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Sample records for curaremimetic neurotoxin loop

  1. Adaptive Simulated Annealing Based Protein Loop Modeling of Neurotoxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杰; 黄丽娜; 彭志红

    2003-01-01

    A loop modeling method, adaptive simulated annealing, for ab initio prediction of protein loop structures, as an optimization problem of searching the global minimum of a given energy function, is proposed. An interface-friendly toolbox-LoopModeller in Windows and Linux systems, VC++ and OpenGL environments is developed for analysis and visualization. Simulation results of three short-chain neurotoxins modeled by LoopModeller show that the method proposed is fast and efficient.

  2. Identification of a Unique Ganglioside Binding Loop within Botulinum Neurotoxins C and D-SA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karalewitz, Andrew P.-A.; Kroken, Abby R.; Fu, Zhuji; Baldwin, Michael R.; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Barbieri, Joseph T. (MCW); (Missouri)

    2010-09-22

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent protein toxins for humans. There are seven serotypes of BoNTs (A-G) based on a lack of cross antiserum neutralization. BoNTs utilize gangliosides as components of the host receptors for binding and entry into neurons. Members of BoNT/C and BoNT/D serotypes include mosaic toxins that are organized in D/C and C/D toxins. One D/C mosaic toxin, BoNT/D-South Africa (BoNT/D-SA), was not fully neutralized by immunization with BoNT serotype C or D, which stimulated this study. Here the crystal structures of the receptor binding domains of BoNT/C, BoNT/D, and BoNT/D-SA are presented. Biochemical and cell binding studies show that BoNT/C and BoNT/D-SA possess unique mechanisms for ganglioside binding. These studies provide new information about how the BoNTs can enter host cells as well as a basis for understanding the immunological diversity of these neurotoxins.

  3. α-Elapitoxin-Aa2a, a long-chain snake α-neurotoxin with potent actions on muscle (α1)(2)βγδ nicotinic receptors, lacks the classical high affinity for neuronal α7 nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklow, Benjamin; Kornhauser, Rachelle; Hains, Peter G; Loiacono, Richard; Escoubas, Pierre; Graudins, Andis; Nicholson, Graham M

    2011-01-15

    In contrast to all classical long-chain α-neurotoxins possessing the critical fifth disulfide bond, α-elapitoxin-Aa2a (α-EPTX-Aa2a), a novel long-chain α-neurotoxin from the common death adder Acanthophis antarcticus, lacks affinity for neuronal α7-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). α-EPTX-Aa2a (8850Da; 0.1-1μM) caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of indirect twitches, and blocked contractures to cholinergic agonists in the isolated chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation, consistent with a postsynaptic curaremimetic mode of action. α-EPTX-Aa2a (1-10nM) produced a potent pseudo-irreversible antagonism of chick muscle nAChRs, with an estimated pA(2) value of 8.311±0.031, which was not reversed by monovalent death adder antivenom. This is only 2.5-fold less potent than the prototypical long-chain α-neurotoxin, α-bungarotoxin. In contrast, α-EPTX-Aa2a produced complete, but weak, inhibition of (125)I-α-bungarotoxin binding to rat hippocampal α7 nAChRs (pK(I)=3.670), despite high sequence homology and similar mass to a wide range of long-chain α-neurotoxins. The mostly likely cause for the loss of α7 binding affinity is a leucine substitution, in loop II of α-EPTX-Aa2a, for the highly conserved Arg(33) in long-chain α-neurotoxins. Arg(33) has been shown to be critical for both neuronal and muscle activity. Despite this substitution, α-EPTX-Aa2a retains high affinity for muscle (α1)(2)βγδ nAChRs. This is probably as a result of an Arg(29) residue, previously shown to be critical for muscle (α1)(2)βγδ nAChR affinity, and highly conserved across all short-chain, but not long-chain, α-neurotoxins. α-EPTX-Aa2a therefore represents a novel atypical long-chain α-neurotoxin that includes a fifth disulfide but exhibits differential affinity for nAChR subtypes.

  4. Comparison of sea snake (Hydrophiidae) neurotoxin to cobra (Naja) neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Yumiko; Nagamizu, Masaya; Uchiya, Kei-Ichi; Nikai, Toshiaki; Tu, Anthony T

    2009-12-01

    Both sea snakes and cobras have venoms containing postsynaptic neurotoxins. Comparison of the primary structures indicates many similarities, especially the positions of the four disulfide bonds. However, detailed examination reveals differences in several amino acid residues. Amino acid sequences of sea snake neurotoxins were determined, and then compared to cobra neurotoxins by computer modeling. This allowed for easy comparison of the similarities and differences between the two types of postsynaptic neurotoxins. Comparison of computer models for the toxins of sea snakes and cobra will reveal the three dimensional difference of the toxins much clearer than the amino acid sequence alone.

  5. BOTDB: A Database for the Clostridial Neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    alpha-test phase of development and will become a publicly available web site. INTRODUCTION The neurotoxins from Clostridium botulinum and related...tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) from C. tetani , in contrast, causes spastic paralysis due to its net disinhibitory effect within the central nervous system... Clostridium botulinum and its neurotoxins: a metabolic and cellular perspective. Toxicon 2001;39:1703-1722. 6. Rossetto O, Seveso M, Caccin P, Schiavo G

  6. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins

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    Kamalakar Chatla

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins.

  7. Molecular Methods for Identification of Clostridium tetani by Targeting Neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoba, Basavraj; Dharne, Mahesh; Gohil, Kushal N

    2017-01-01

    Tetanus is a potentially fatal muscle spasm disease. It is an important public health problem, especially in rural/tribal areas of developing countries. Tetanus toxin, a neurotoxin (tetanospasmin ), is the most important virulence factor that plays a key role in the pathogenicity of tetanus . Confirmation of virulence by confirming the production of tetanospasmin by infecting species forms the most important part in the diagnosis of tetanus . Various molecular methods have been devised for confirmation of diagnosis by targeting different genes. The most common molecular methods are tetanospasmin producing (TetX) gene-targeted methods using TetX-specific primers. Here, we describe various molecular methods targeting TetX gene such as polymerase chain reaction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting, loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay, etc. to confirm the virulence of Cl. tetani.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L R; Wüthrich, K

    1992-10-20

    The three-dimensional structure in solution of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A high quality structure for this 60-residue protein was obtained from 656 NOE distance constraints and 143 dihedral angle constraints, using the distance geometry program DIANA for the structure calculation and AMBER for restrained energy minimization. For a group of 20 conformers used to represent the solution structure, the average root-mean-square deviation value calculated for the polypeptide backbone heavy atoms relative to the mean structure was 0.45 A. The protein consists of a core region from which three finger-like loops extend outwards. It includes a short, two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet of residues 1-5 and 13-17, a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet involving residues 23-31, 34-42 and 51-55, and four disulfide bridges in the core region. There is also extensive non-regular hydrogen bonding between the carboxy-terminal tail of the polypeptide chain and the rest of the core region. Comparison with the crystal structure of erabutoxin-b indicates that the structure of alpha-neurotoxin is quite similar to other neurotoxin structures, but that local structural differences are seen in regions thought to be important for binding of neurotoxins to the acetylcholine receptor. For two regions of the alpha-neurotoxin structure there is evidence for an equilibrium between multiple conformations, which might be related to conformational rearrangements upon binding to the receptor. Overall, the alpha-neurotoxin presents itself as a protein with a stable core and flexible surface areas that interact with the acetylcholine receptor in such a way that high affinity binding is achieved by conformational rearrangements of the deformable regions of the neurotoxin structure.

  9. Ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning mimicking burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heir, Gary M

    2005-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a condition in which the patient perceives a sensation of intraoral burning, typically of the anterior tongue. This article presents a case report of a patient presenting for orofacial pain evaluation in whom ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning is diagnosed. The clinician should be aware of neurotoxin poisoning as a possible cause of symptoms of burning mouth, especially among patients who have recently traveled to a tropical area. Recognition of this condition in this case highlights the need for a detailed and accurate patient history.

  10. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Clostridium tetani (Welloner, 1982). They differ in that whereas BoNT acts at the nerve periphery, TeTx blocks the release of inhibitory amino acids...AD-A27 2 939 GRANT NO: DAMDl7-90-Z-0033 TITLE: PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN GENES PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nigel P...Characterization of Clostridium Grant No. Botulinum. Neurotoxin Genes DAMD 17-90- Z-0033 6. AUTHOR(S) Nigel P. Minton, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S

  11. Substrate Binding Mode and its Implication on Drug Design for Botulinum Neurotoxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, D.; Rawat, R; Ahmed, A; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, the causative agents of botulism, block the neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has declared them as Category A biowarfare agents. The most potent among them, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), cleaves its substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). An efficient drug for botulism can be developed only with the knowledge of interactions between the substrate and enzyme at the active site. Here, we report the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of BoNT/A with its uncleavable SNAP-25 peptide 197QRATKM202 and its variant 197RRATKM202 to 1.5 A and 1.6 A, respectively. This is the first time the structure of an uncleavable substrate bound to an active botulinum neurotoxin is reported and it has helped in unequivocally defining S1 to S5? sites. These substrate peptides make interactions with the enzyme predominantly by the residues from 160, 200, 250 and 370 loops. Most notably, the amino nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of P1 residue (Gln197) chelate the zinc ion and replace the nucleophilic water. The P1?-Arg198, occupies the S1? site formed by Arg363, Thr220, Asp370, Thr215, Ile161, Phe163 and Phe194. The S2? subsite is formed by Arg363, Asn368 and Asp370, while S3? subsite is formed by Tyr251, Leu256, Val258, Tyr366, Phe369 and Asn388. P4?-Lys201 makes hydrogen bond with Gln162. P5?-Met202 binds in the hydrophobic pocket formed by the residues from the 250 and 200 loop. Knowledge of interactions between the enzyme and substrate peptide from these complex structures should form the basis for design of potent inhibitors for this neurotoxin.

  12. Substrate binding mode and its implication on drug design for botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desigan Kumaran

    Full Text Available The seven antigenically distinct serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, the causative agents of botulism, block the neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has declared them as Category A biowarfare agents. The most potent among them, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A, cleaves its substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25. An efficient drug for botulism can be developed only with the knowledge of interactions between the substrate and enzyme at the active site. Here, we report the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of BoNT/A with its uncleavable SNAP-25 peptide (197QRATKM(202 and its variant (197RRATKM(202 to 1.5 A and 1.6 A, respectively. This is the first time the structure of an uncleavable substrate bound to an active botulinum neurotoxin is reported and it has helped in unequivocally defining S1 to S5' sites. These substrate peptides make interactions with the enzyme predominantly by the residues from 160, 200, 250 and 370 loops. Most notably, the amino nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of P1 residue (Gln197 chelate the zinc ion and replace the nucleophilic water. The P1'-Arg198, occupies the S1' site formed by Arg363, Thr220, Asp370, Thr215, Ile161, Phe163 and Phe194. The S2' subsite is formed by Arg363, Asn368 and Asp370, while S3' subsite is formed by Tyr251, Leu256, Val258, Tyr366, Phe369 and Asn388. P4'-Lys201 makes hydrogen bond with Gln162. P5'-Met202 binds in the hydrophobic pocket formed by the residues from the 250 and 200 loop. Knowledge of interactions between the enzyme and substrate peptide from these complex structures should form the basis for design of potent inhibitors for this neurotoxin.

  13. Fetal exposure to environmental neurotoxins in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuen-Bin Jiang

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg, lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd, and arsenic (As are recognized neurotoxins in children that particularly affect neurodevelopment and intellectual performance. Based on the hypothesis that the fetal basis of adult disease is fetal toxic exposure that results in adverse outcomes in adulthood, we explored the concentrations of key neurotoxins (i.e., Hg, Pb, Cd, and As in meconium to identify the risk factors associated with these concentrations. From January 2007 to December 2009, 545 mother-infant pairs were recruited. The geometric mean concentrations of Pb and As in the meconium of babies of foreign-born mothers (22.9 and 38.1 µg/kg dry weight, respectively were significantly greater than those of babies of Taiwan-born mothers (17.5 and 33.0 µg/kg dry weight, respectively. Maternal age (≥30 y, maternal education, use of traditional Chinese herbs during pregnancy, and fish cutlet consumption (≥3 meals/wk were risk factors associated with concentrations of key prenatal neurotoxins. The Taiwan government should focus more attention on providing intervention programs for immigrant mothers to help protect the health of unborn babies. Further investigation on how multiple neurotoxins influence prenatal neurodevelopment is warranted.

  14. Neurotoxin Binding Site on the Acetylcholine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    Neurotoxins fron snakes belonging to the families Elapidae (cobras, kraits, mambas , and others) and Hydrophidae (sea snakes) are polypep- tides of 60-74... black mice were used as immunizing anrmals and as a soirce of feeder spleen cells. Mice were injected subcutaneously with j2-mer (50 nmol) emulsified in

  15. The neurotoxin BMAA in aquatic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication is a major water quality issue and in many aquatic systems, it leads to the proliferation of toxic phytoplankton species. The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is one of the compounds that can be present in phytoplankton. BMAA has been suggested to play a role in the ne

  16. Historical Perspectives and Guidelines for Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype Nomenclature

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    Michael W. Peck

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins are diverse proteins. They are currently represented by at least seven serotypes and more than 40 subtypes. New clostridial strains that produce novel neurotoxin variants are being identified with increasing frequency, which presents challenges when organizing the nomenclature surrounding these neurotoxins. Worldwide, researchers are faced with the possibility that toxins having identical sequences may be given different designations or novel toxins having unique sequences may be given the same designations on publication. In order to minimize these problems, an ad hoc committee consisting of over 20 researchers in the field of botulinum neurotoxin research was convened to discuss the clarification of the issues involved in botulinum neurotoxin nomenclature. This publication presents a historical overview of the issues and provides guidelines for botulinum neurotoxin subtype nomenclature in the future.

  17. Historical Perspectives and Guidelines for Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype Nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Michael W.; Smith, Theresa J.; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Austin, John W.; Bano, Luca; Bradshaw, Marite; Cuervo, Paula; Cheng, Luisa W.; Derman, Yagmur; Dorner, Brigitte G.; Fisher, Audrey; Hill, Karen K.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia; Lista, Florigio; Lúquez, Carolina; Mazuet, Christelle; Pirazzini, Marco; Popoff, Michel R.; Rossetto, Ornella; Rummel, Andreas; Sesardic, Dorothea; Singh, Bal Ram; Stringer, Sandra C.

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are diverse proteins. They are currently represented by at least seven serotypes and more than 40 subtypes. New clostridial strains that produce novel neurotoxin variants are being identified with increasing frequency, which presents challenges when organizing the nomenclature surrounding these neurotoxins. Worldwide, researchers are faced with the possibility that toxins having identical sequences may be given different designations or novel toxins having unique sequences may be given the same designations on publication. In order to minimize these problems, an ad hoc committee consisting of over 20 researchers in the field of botulinum neurotoxin research was convened to discuss the clarification of the issues involved in botulinum neurotoxin nomenclature. This publication presents a historical overview of the issues and provides guidelines for botulinum neurotoxin subtype nomenclature in the future. PMID:28106761

  18. Mechanism of Action of Presynaptic Neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    cell system in order to directly assess the physiological relevance of the tetanus toxin receptor in the intoxication process and to study the events...the interactions of the Clostridlal neurotoxins with their physiological target tissues. The NI1-RE-105 cell line has receptors that are analogous to...L. A., and Tischler, A. S. (1982) PC12 Pheochromocytoma Cultures in Neurobiological Research. Adv. Cell. Neurobiol. •, 373-415. 18 Gundersen, C. B

  19. Unique Ganglioside Recognition Strategies for Clostridial Neurotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Marc A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R. (MCW); (UMC)

    2012-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin are the causative agents of the paralytic diseases botulism and tetanus, respectively. The potency of the clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) relies primarily on their highly specific binding to nerve terminals and cleavage of SNARE proteins. Although individual CNTs utilize distinct proteins for entry, they share common ganglioside co-receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of the BoNT/F receptor-binding domain in complex with the sugar moiety of ganglioside GD1a. GD1a binds in a shallow groove formed by the conserved peptide motif E ... H ... SXWY ... G, with additional stabilizing interactions provided by two arginine residues. Comparative analysis of BoNT/F with other CNTs revealed several differences in the interactions of each toxin with ganglioside. Notably, exchange of BoNT/F His-1241 with the corresponding lysine residue of BoNT/E resulted in increased affinity for GD1a and conferred the ability to bind ganglioside GM1a. Conversely, BoNT/E was not able to bind GM1a, demonstrating a discrete mechanism of ganglioside recognition. These findings provide a structural basis for ganglioside binding among the CNTs and show that individual toxins utilize unique ganglioside recognition strategies.

  20. Substrate Recognition of VAMP-2 by Botulinum Neurotoxin B and Tetanus Neurotoxin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Hall, Cherisse; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2008-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT; serotypes A-G) and tetanus neurotoxin elicit flaccid and spastic paralysis, respectively. These neurotoxins are zinc proteases that cleave SNARE proteins to inhibit synaptic vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane. Although BoNT/B and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) cleave VAMP-2 at the same scissile bond, their mechanism(s) of VAMP-2 recognition is not clear. Mapping experiments showed that residues 60-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient cleavage by BoNT/B and that residues 40-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient TeNT cleavage. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis and kinetic analysis identified three regions within VAMP-2 that were recognized by BoNT/B and TeNT: residues adjacent to the site of scissile bond cleavage (cleavage region) and residues located within N-terminal and C-terminal regions relative to the cleavage region. Analysis of residues within the cleavage region showed that mutations at the P7, P4, P2, and P1′ residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/B cleavage (≥32- fold), whereas mutations at P7, P4, P1′, and P2′ residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/TeNT cleavage (≥64-fold). Residues within the cleavage region influenced catalysis, whereas residues N-terminal and C-terminal to the cleavage region influenced binding affinity. Thus, BoNT/B and TeNT possess similar organization but have unique residues to recognize and cleave VAMP-2. These studies provide new insights into how the clostridial neurotoxins recognize their substrates. PMID:18511417

  1. Substrate recognition of VAMP-2 by botulinum neurotoxin B and tetanus neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Hall, Cherisse; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2008-07-25

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT; serotypes A-G) and tetanus neurotoxin elicit flaccid and spastic paralysis, respectively. These neurotoxins are zinc proteases that cleave SNARE proteins to inhibit synaptic vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane. Although BoNT/B and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) cleave VAMP-2 at the same scissile bond, their mechanism(s) of VAMP-2 recognition is not clear. Mapping experiments showed that residues 60-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient cleavage by BoNT/B and that residues 40-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient TeNT cleavage. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis and kinetic analysis identified three regions within VAMP-2 that were recognized by BoNT/B and TeNT: residues adjacent to the site of scissile bond cleavage (cleavage region) and residues located within N-terminal and C-terminal regions relative to the cleavage region. Analysis of residues within the cleavage region showed that mutations at the P7, P4, P2, and P1' residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/B cleavage (> or =32-fold), whereas mutations at P7, P4, P1', and P2' residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/TeNT cleavage (> or =64-fold). Residues within the cleavage region influenced catalysis, whereas residues N-terminal and C-terminal to the cleavage region influenced binding affinity. Thus, BoNT/B and TeNT possess similar organization but have unique residues to recognize and cleave VAMP-2. These studies provide new insights into how the clostridial neurotoxins recognize their substrates.

  2. Insights into the evolutionary origins of clostridial neurotoxins from analysis of the Clostridium botulinum strain A neurotoxin gene cluster

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    Meiering Elizabeth M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs are the most deadly toxins known and causal agents of botulism and tetanus neuroparalytic diseases. Despite considerable progress in understanding CNT structure and function, the evolutionary origins of CNTs remain a mystery as they are unique to Clostridium and possess a sequence and structural architecture distinct from other protein families. Uncovering the origins of CNTs would be a significant contribution to our understanding of how pathogens evolve and generate novel toxin families. Results The C. botulinum strain A genome was examined for potential homologues of CNTs. A key link was identified between the neurotoxin and the flagellin gene (CBO0798 located immediately upstream of the BoNT/A neurotoxin gene cluster. This flagellin sequence displayed the strongest sequence similarity to the neurotoxin and NTNH homologue out of all proteins encoded within C. botulinum strain A. The CBO0798 gene contains a unique hypervariable region, which in closely related flagellins encodes a collagenase-like domain. Remarkably, these collagenase-containing flagellins were found to possess the characteristic HEXXH zinc-protease motif responsible for the neurotoxin's endopeptidase activity. Additional links to collagenase-related sequences and functions were detected by further analysis of CNTs and surrounding genes, including sequence similarities to collagen-adhesion domains and collagenases. Furthermore, the neurotoxin's HCRn domain was found to exhibit both structural and sequence similarity to eukaryotic collagen jelly-roll domains. Conclusion Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the neurotoxin and adjacent genes evolved from an ancestral collagenase-like gene cluster, linking CNTs to another major family of clostridial proteolytic toxins. Duplication, reshuffling and assembly of neighboring genes within the BoNT/A neurotoxin gene cluster may have lead to the neurotoxin's unique architecture. This

  3. Neurotoxins from Marine Dinoflagellates: A Brief Review

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    Da-Zhi Wang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are not only important marine primary producers and grazers, but also the major causative agents of harmful algal blooms. It has been reported that many dinoflagellate species can produce various natural toxins. These toxins can be extremely toxic and many of them are effective at far lower dosages than conventional chemical agents. Consumption of seafood contaminated by algal toxins results in various seafood poisoning syndromes: paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP, neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP, amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP, diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP, ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP and azaspiracid shellfish poisoning (ASP. Most of these poisonings are caused by neurotoxins which present themselves with highly specific effects on the nervous system of animals, including humans, by interfering with nerve impulse transmission. Neurotoxins are a varied group of compounds, both chemically and pharmacologically. They vary in both chemical structure and mechanism of action, and produce very distinct biological effects, which provides a potential application of these toxins in pharmacology and toxicology. This review summarizes the origin, structure and clinical symptoms of PSP, NSP, CFP, AZP, yessotoxin and palytoxin produced by marine dinoflagellates, as well as their molecular mechanisms of action on voltage-gated ion channels.

  4. Neurotoxins from marine dinoflagellates: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Zhi

    2008-06-11

    Dinoflagellates are not only important marine primary producers and grazers, but also the major causative agents of harmful algal blooms. It has been reported that many dinoflagellate species can produce various natural toxins. These toxins can be extremely toxic and many of them are effective at far lower dosages than conventional chemical agents. Consumption of seafood contaminated by algal toxins results in various seafood poisoning syndromes: paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP), amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP), diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP), ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and azaspiracid shellfish poisoning (ASP). Most of these poisonings are caused by neurotoxins which present themselves with highly specific effects on the nervous system of animals, including humans, by interfering with nerve impulse transmission. Neurotoxins are a varied group of compounds, both chemically and pharmacologically. They vary in both chemical structure and mechanism of action, and produce very distinct biological effects, which provides a potential application of these toxins in pharmacology and toxicology. This review summarizes the origin, structure and clinical symptoms of PSP, NSP, CFP, AZP, yessotoxin and palytoxin produced by marine dinoflagellates, as well as their molecular mechanisms of action on voltage-gated ion channels.

  5. Novel Ganglioside-mediated Entry of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D into Neurons

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    Kroken, Abby R.; Karalewitz, Andrew P.-A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Barbieri, Joseph T. (MCW)

    2012-02-07

    Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs) are organized into seven serotypes, A-G. Although several BoNT serotypes enter neurons through synaptic vesicle cycling utilizing dual receptors (a ganglioside and a synaptic vesicle-associated protein), the entry pathway of BoNT/D is less well understood. Although BoNT/D entry is ganglioside-dependent, alignment and structural studies show that BoNT/D lacks key residues within a conserved ganglioside binding pocket that are present in BoNT serotypes A, B, E, F, and G, which indicate that BoNT/D-ganglioside interactions may be unique. In this study BoNT/D is shown to have a unique association with ganglioside relative to the other BoNT serotypes, utilizing a ganglioside binding loop (GBL, residues Tyr-1235-Ala-1245) within the receptor binding domain of BoNT/D (HCR/D) via b-series gangliosides, including GT1b, GD1b, and GD2. HCR/D bound gangliosides and entered neurons dependent upon the aromatic ring of Phe-1240 within the GBL. This is the first BoNT-ganglioside interaction that is mediated by a phenylalanine. In contrast, Trp-1238, located near the N terminus of the ganglioside binding loop, was mostly solvent-inaccessible and appeared to contribute to maintaining the loop structure. BoNT/D entry and intoxication were enhanced by membrane depolarization via synaptic vesicle cycling, where HCR/D colocalized with synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle marker, but immunoprecipitation experiments did not detect direct association with synaptic vesicle protein 2. Thus, BoNT/D utilizes unique associations with gangliosides and synaptic vesicles to enter neurons, which may facilitate new neurotoxin therapies.

  6. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN SEROTYPE B.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWAMINATHAN,S.; ESWARAMOORTHY,S.

    2001-11-19

    The toxigenic strains of Clostridium botulinum produce seven serologically distinct types of neurotoxins labeled A - G (EC 3.4.24.69), while Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin (EC 3.4.24.68). Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins (BoNTs and TeNT) are produced as single inactive chains of molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Most of these neurotoxins are released after being cleaved into two chains, a heavy chain (HI) of 100 kDa and a light chain (L) of 50 kDa held together by an interchain disulfide bond, by tissue proteinases. BoNT/E is released as a single chain but cleaved by host proteinases [1]. Clostvidium botulinum neurotoxins are extremely poisonous proteins with their LD{sub 50} for humans in the range of 0.1 - 1 ng kg{sup -1} [2]. Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for neuroparalytic syndromes of botulism characterized by serious neurological disorders and flaccid paralysis. BoNTs block the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction causing flaccid paralysis while TeNT blocks the release of neurotransmitters like glycine and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord resulting in spastic paralysis. In spite of different clinical symptoms, their aetiological agents intoxicate neuronal cells in the same way and these toxins have similar structural organization [3].

  7. Botulinum neurotoxin: a marvel of protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montal, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of botulism, is acknowledged to be the most poisonous protein known. BoNT proteases disable synaptic vesicle exocytosis by cleaving their cytosolic SNARE (soluble NSF attachment protein receptor) substrates. BoNT is a modular nanomachine: an N-terminal Zn(2+)-metalloprotease, which cleaves the SNAREs; a central helical protein-conducting channel, which chaperones the protease across endosomes; and a C-terminal receptor-binding module, consisting of two subdomains that determine target specificity by binding to a ganglioside and a protein receptor on the cell surface and triggering endocytosis. For BoNT, functional complexity emerges from its modular design and the tight interplay between its component modules--a partnership with consequences that surpass the simple sum of the individual component's action. BoNTs exploit this design at each step of the intoxication process, thereby achieving an exquisite toxicity. This review summarizes current knowledge on the structure of individual modules and presents mechanistic insights into how this protein machine evolved to this level of sophistication. Understanding the design principles underpinning the function of such a dynamic modular protein remains a challenging task.

  8. Use of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Başar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT is the first biological toxin used in the treatment of ophthalmic diseases and to decrease skin wrinkles as an aesthetic agent. When used appropriately, it weakens the force of muscular contraction and/or inhibits glandular secretion. The most common areas for botulinum toxin treatment are the upper face, including the glabella, forehead, brows, and lateral canthal lines or crow’s feet. By relaxing the muscles causing wrinkles, non-permanent results may be achieved with its use. BoNT has gained widespread use in a variety of ophthalmic diseases. The effect of BoNT is temporary, but the therapeutic benefit is usually maintained even after repeated injections. Treatment is usually well tolerated. Complications and side effects associated with the treatment are rare and temporary. Complications occur due to weakness (chemodenervation of adjacent muscle groups, immunological mechanisms and injection technique. Current therapeutic indications, doses, complications and contraindications of BoNT use in the following disorders related to ophthalmology were investigated: aesthetic use, strabismus, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, eyelid retraction, entropion, lacrimal hypersecretion syndrome, and facial paralysis.

  9. Use of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, Emel; Arıcı, Ceyhun

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the first biological toxin used in the treatment of ophthalmic diseases and to decrease skin wrinkles as an aesthetic agent. When used appropriately, it weakens the force of muscular contraction and/or inhibits glandular secretion. The most common areas for botulinum toxin treatment are the upper face, including the glabella, forehead, brows, and lateral canthal lines, or crow’s feet. By relaxing the muscles causing wrinkles, non-permanent results may be achieved with its use. BoNT has gained widespread use in a variety of ophthalmic diseases. The effect of BoNT is temporary, but the therapeutic benefit is usually maintained even after repeated injections. Treatment is usually well tolerated. Complications and side effects associated with the treatment are rare and temporary. Complications occur due to weakness (chemodenervation) of adjacent muscle groups, immunological mechanisms and injection technique. Current therapeutic indications, doses, complications and contraindications of BoNT use in the following disorders related to ophthalmology were investigated: aesthetic use, strabismus, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, eyelid retraction, entropion, lacrimal hypersecretion syndrome, and facial paralysis. PMID:28050326

  10. Positive regulation of botulinum neurotoxin gene expression by CodY in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Dahlsten, Elias; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia

    2014-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin, produced mainly by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum, is the most poisonous biological substance known. Here, we show that CodY, a global regulator conserved in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria, positively regulates the botulinum neurotoxin gene expression. Inactivation of codY resulted in decreased expression of botA, encoding the neurotoxin, as well as in reduced neurotoxin synthesis. Complementation of the codY mutation in trans rescued neurotoxin synthesis, and overexpression of codY in trans caused elevated neurotoxin production. Recombinant CodY was found to bind to a 30-bp region containing the botA transcription start site, suggesting regulation of the neurotoxin gene transcription through direct interaction. GTP enhanced the binding affinity of CodY to the botA promoter, suggesting that CodY-dependent neurotoxin regulation is associated with nutritional status.

  11. Structural Studies on Intact Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    structure1. Introduction Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani and the seven antigenically distinct botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G...2-0011 TITLE: Structural Studies on Intact Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug...DATES COVERED (From - To) 28 Jan 2005 – 27 Jan 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Structural Studies on Intact Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed

  12. A Novel Neurotoxin from Venom of the Spider, Brachypelma albopilosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mingwei; Li, Hongli; Wang, Ping; Yuan, Minglong; Lu, Qiumin

    2014-01-01

    Spiders have evolved highly selective toxins for insects. There are many insecticidal neurotoxins in spider venoms. Although a large amount of work has been done to focus on neurotoxicity of spider components, little information, which is related with effects of spider toxins on tumor cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, is available for Brachypelma albopilosum venom. In this work, a novel spider neurotoxin (brachyin) was identified and characterized from venoms of the spider, Brachypelma albopilosum. Brachyin is composed of 41 amino acid residues with the sequence of CLGENVPCDKDRPNCCSRYECLEPTGYGWWYASYYCYKKRS. There are six cysteines in this sequence, which form three disulfided bridges. The serine residue at the C-terminus is amidated. Brachyin showed strong lethal effects on American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) and Tenebrio molitor (common mealbeetle). This neurotoxin also showed significant analgesic effects in mice models including abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid and formalin-induced paw licking tests. It was interesting that brachyin exerted marked inhibition on tumor cell proliferation. PMID:25329070

  13. A novel neurotoxin from venom of the spider, Brachypelma albopilosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yunhua; Song, Bo; Mo, Guoxiang; Yuan, Mingwei; Li, Hongli; Wang, Ping; Yuan, Minglong; Lu, Qiumin

    2014-01-01

    Spiders have evolved highly selective toxins for insects. There are many insecticidal neurotoxins in spider venoms. Although a large amount of work has been done to focus on neurotoxicity of spider components, little information, which is related with effects of spider toxins on tumor cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, is available for Brachypelma albopilosum venom. In this work, a novel spider neurotoxin (brachyin) was identified and characterized from venoms of the spider, Brachypelma albopilosum. Brachyin is composed of 41 amino acid residues with the sequence of CLGENVPCDKDRPNCCSRYECLEPTGYGWWYASYYCYKKRS. There are six cysteines in this sequence, which form three disulfided bridges. The serine residue at the C-terminus is amidated. Brachyin showed strong lethal effects on American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) and Tenebrio molitor (common mealbeetle). This neurotoxin also showed significant analgesic effects in mice models including abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid and formalin-induced paw licking tests. It was interesting that brachyin exerted marked inhibition on tumor cell proliferation.

  14. A novel neurotoxin from venom of the spider, Brachypelma albopilosum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhua Zhong

    Full Text Available Spiders have evolved highly selective toxins for insects. There are many insecticidal neurotoxins in spider venoms. Although a large amount of work has been done to focus on neurotoxicity of spider components, little information, which is related with effects of spider toxins on tumor cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, is available for Brachypelma albopilosum venom. In this work, a novel spider neurotoxin (brachyin was identified and characterized from venoms of the spider, Brachypelma albopilosum. Brachyin is composed of 41 amino acid residues with the sequence of CLGENVPCDKDRPNCCSRYECLEPTGYGWWYASYYCYKKRS. There are six cysteines in this sequence, which form three disulfided bridges. The serine residue at the C-terminus is amidated. Brachyin showed strong lethal effects on American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana and Tenebrio molitor (common mealbeetle. This neurotoxin also showed significant analgesic effects in mice models including abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid and formalin-induced paw licking tests. It was interesting that brachyin exerted marked inhibition on tumor cell proliferation.

  15. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew T; Peck, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised.

  16. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  17. Historical Perspectives and Guidelines for Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype Nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay for detecting type B Clostridium botulinum toxin produced in pure culture and an inoculated model cured meat system...Characterization of botulinum neurotoxin A subtypes 1 through 5 by investigation of activities in mice, in neuronal cell cultures , and in vitro, Infect

  18. Use of Botulinum Neurotoxin for the Treatment of Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carefully reviewed all available scientific studies on the effect of BoNT for treating movement disorders. What is botulinum neurotoxin and how does it work? BoNT is a drug made by bacteria that causes some forms of food poisoning. Neurologists inject small and safe doses of ...

  19. Prediction of antigenic epitopes and MHC binders of neurotoxin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Hydrophobicity plot of neurotoxin alpha-KTx 3.8 by Hopp TP, Woods KR (1981). tion methods are ... protein is hydrophobic in nature and contains segments of low complexity ..... Hydrophobicity indices at ph 3.4 determined by ...

  20. Rattlesnake Neurotoxin Structure, Mechanism of Action, Immunology and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-10

    phospholipase A2 presynaptic neurotoxin from ViDera ammodvtes ammodytes venom. Hydropathy profiles of B. asoer phospholipase and the ammodytoxins also show great...from 8, a•pe and V8 phospholipase A2 from Vipera russellii (provided by John Middlebrook, USAMRIID). In neither case was an enhancement in toxin

  1. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotypes Detected by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Alison C.; Buckley, Nicholas; Halliwell, Jennifer; Gwenin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is one of the deadliest biological toxins known to mankind and is able to cause the debilitating disease botulism. The rapid detection of the different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin is essential for both diagnosis of botulism and identifying the presence of toxin in potential cases of terrorism and food contamination. The modes of action of botulinum neurotoxins are well-established in literature and differ for each serotype. The toxins are known to specifically cleave portions of the SNARE proteins SNAP-25 or VAMP; an interaction that can be monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This study presents a SNAP-25 and a VAMP biosensors for detecting the activity of five botulinum neurotoxin serotypes (A–E) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors are able to detect concentrations of toxins as low as 25 fg/mL, in a short time-frame compared with the current standard methods of detection. Both biosensors show greater specificity for their compatible serotypes compared with incompatible serotypes and denatured toxins. PMID:25954998

  2. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotypes Detected by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C. Savage

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin is one of the deadliest biological toxins known to mankind and is able to cause the debilitating disease botulism. The rapid detection of the different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin is essential for both diagnosis of botulism and identifying the presence of toxin in potential cases of terrorism and food contamination. The modes of action of botulinum neurotoxins are well-established in literature and differ for each serotype. The toxins are known to specifically cleave portions of the SNARE proteins SNAP-25 or VAMP; an interaction that can be monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This study presents a SNAP-25 and a VAMP biosensors for detecting the activity of five botulinum neurotoxin serotypes (A–E using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors are able to detect concentrations of toxins as low as 25 fg/mL, in a short time-frame compared with the current standard methods of detection. Both biosensors show greater specificity for their compatible serotypes compared with incompatible serotypes and denatured toxins.

  3. Conjugative botulinum neurotoxin-encoding plasmids in Clostridium botulinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Marshall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium botulinum produces seven distinct serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs. The genes encoding different subtype neurotoxins of serotypes A, B, F and several dual neurotoxin-producing strains have been shown to reside on plasmids, suggesting that intra- and interspecies transfer of BoNT-encoding plasmids may occur. The objective of the present study was to determine whether these C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids are conjugative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids pBotCDC-A3 (strain CDC-A3, pCLJ (strain 657Ba and pCLL (strain Eklund 17B were tagged with the erythromycin resistance marker (Erm using the ClosTron mutagenesis system by inserting a group II intron into the neurotoxin genes carried on these plasmids. Transfer of the tagged plasmids from the donor strains CDC-A3, 657Ba and Eklund 17B to tetracycline-resistant recipient C. botulinum strains was evaluated in mating experiments. Erythromycin and tetracycline resistant transconjugants were isolated from donor:recipient mating pairs tested. Transfer of the plasmids to the transconjugants was confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and Southern hybridizations. Transfer required cell-to-cell contact and was DNase resistant. This indicates that transfer of these plasmids occurs via a conjugation mechanism. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first evidence supporting conjugal transfer of native botulinum neurotoxin-encoding plasmids in C. botulinum, and provides a probable mechanism for the lateral distribution of BoNT-encoding plasmids to other C. botulinum strains. The potential transfer of C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids to other bacterial hosts in the environment or within the human intestine is of great concern for human pathogenicity and necessitates further characterization of these plasmids.

  4. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of neurotoxin gene from an environmental isolate of Clostridium sp.: comparison with other clostridial neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Aparna; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Singh, Lokendra

    2006-07-01

    A Clostridium sp. isolated from intestine of decaying fish exhibited 99% sequence identity with C. tetani at 16S rRNA level. It produced a neurotoxin that was neutralized by botulinum antitoxin (A+B+E) as well as tetanus antitoxin. The gene fragments for light chain, C-terminal and N-terminal regions of the heavy chain of the toxin were amplified using three reported primer sets for tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). The neurotoxin gene fragments were cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. The sequences obtained exhibited approximately 98, 99 and 98% sequence identity with reported gene sequences of TeNT/LC, TeNT/HC and TeNT/HN, respectively. The phylogenetic interrelationship between the neurotoxin gene of Clostridium sp. with previously reported gene sequences of Clostridium botulinum A to G and C. tetani was examined by analysis of differences in the nucleotide sequences. Six amino acids were substituted at four different positions in the light chain of neurotoxin from the isolate when compared with the reported closest sequence of TeNT. Of these, four were located in the beta15 motif at a solvent inaccessible, buried region of the protein molecule. One of these substitutions were on the solvent accessible surface residue of alpha1 motif, previously shown to have strong sequence conservation. A substitution of two amino acids observed in N-terminal region of heavy chain were buried residues, located in the beta21 and beta37 motifs showing variability in other related sequences. The C-terminal region responsible for binding to receptor was conserved, showing no changes in the amino acid sequence.

  5. Botulinum neurotoxin homologs in non-Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Michael J; Adams, Jeremy B; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-01-30

    Clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) are the deadliest toxins known and the causative agents of botulism and tetanus. Despite their structural and functional complexity, no CNT homologs are currently known outside Clostridium. Here, we report the first homologs of Clostridium CNTs within the genome of the rice fermentation organism Weissella oryzae SG25. One gene in W. oryzae S25 encodes a protein with a four-domain architecture and HExxH protease motif common to botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). An adjacent gene with partial similarity to CNTs is also present, and both genes seem to have been laterally transferred into the W. oryzae genome from an unknown source. Identification of mobile, CNT-related genes outside of Clostridium has implications for our understanding of the evolution of this important toxin family. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. What is the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Aluminium is neurotoxic. Its free ion, Al(3+) (aq), is highly biologically reactive and uniquely equipped to do damage to essential cellular (neuronal) biochemistry. This unequivocal fact must be the starting point in examining the risk posed by aluminium as a neurotoxin in humans. Aluminium is present in the human brain and it accumulates with age. The most recent research demonstrates that a significant proportion of individuals older than 70 years of age have a potentially pathological accumulation of aluminium somewhere in their brain. What are the symptoms of chronic aluminium intoxication in humans? What if neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are the manifestation of the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin? How might such an (outrageous) hypothesis be tested?

  7. Characterization of Clostridium sp. RKD producing botulinum-like neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Aparna; Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Singh, Lokendra

    2005-07-01

    A Gram positive, motile, rod-shaped, strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from intestine of decaying fish was identified as Clostridium sp. RKD and produced a botulinum type B-like neurotoxin as suggested by mouse bioassay and protection with anti botulinum antibodies. The neurotoxicity was functionally characterized by the phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm assay. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence, placed it at a different position from the reported strains of Clostridium botulinum. The strain exhibited differences from both Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani with respect to morphological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics. Botulinum group specific and serotype specific primers amplified the DNA fragments of 260 and 727 bp, respectively, indicating presence of botulinum type 'B' toxin gene. Sequence of nearly 700 bp amplified using primers specific for botulinum neurotoxin type B gene, did not show any significant match in the database when subjected to BLAST search.

  8. An Overview on the Marine Neurotoxin, Saxitoxin: Genetics, Molecular Targets, Methods of Detection and Ecological Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Sayler, Gary S.; Cusick, Kathleen D.

    2013-01-01

    Marine neurotoxins are natural products produced by phytoplankton and select species of invertebrates and fish. These compounds interact with voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels and modulate the flux of these ions into various cell types. This review provides a summary of marine neurotoxins, including their structures, molecular targets and pharmacologies. Saxitoxin and its derivatives, collectively referred to as paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are unique among neurotoxin...

  9. Mass spectrometry-based methods for detection and differentiation of botulinum neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jurgen G.; Boyer, Anne E.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Moura, Hercules; Barr, John R.; Woolfitt, Adrian R.

    2009-11-03

    The present invention is directed to a method for detecting the presence of clostridial neurotoxins in a sample by mixing a sample with a peptide that can serve as a substrate for proteolytic activity of a clostridial neurotoxin; and measuring for proteolytic activity of a clostridial neurotoxin by a mass spectroscopy technique. In one embodiment, the peptide can have an affinity tag attached at two or more sites.

  10. Substrate recognition mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin-cleaving clostridial neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2008-07-25

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) inhibit neurotransmitter release by proteolyzing a single peptide bond in one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors SNAP-25, syntaxin, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT and BoNT/B, D, F, and G of the seven known BoNTs cleave the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP/synaptobrevin. Except for BoNT/B and TeNT, they cleave unique peptide bonds, and prior work suggested that different substrate segments are required for the interaction of each toxin. Although the mode of SNAP-25 cleavage by BoNT/A and E has recently been studied in detail, the mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin proteolysis is fragmentary. Here, we report the determination of all substrate residues that are involved in the interaction with BoNT/B, D, and F and TeNT by means of systematic mutagenesis of VAMP/synaptobrevin. For each of the toxins, three or more residues clustered at an N-terminal site remote from the respective scissile bond are identified that affect solely substrate binding. These exosites exhibit different sizes and distances to the scissile peptide bonds for each neurotoxin. Substrate segments C-terminal of the cleavage site (P4-P4') do not play a role in the catalytic process. Mutation of residues in the proximity of the scissile bond exclusively affects the turnover number; however, the importance of individual positions at the cleavage sites varied for each toxin. The data show that, similar to the SNAP-25 proteolyzing BoNT/A and E, VAMP/synaptobrevin-specific clostridial neurotoxins also initiate substrate interaction, employing an exosite located N-terminal of the scissile peptide bond.

  11. Central Nervous System Toxicity After Botulinum Neurotoxin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilkhchoui, Yashar; Ghaly, Ramsis F.; Knezevic, N. Nick; Candido, Kenneth D

    2013-01-01

    Since Its first description of botulism toxicity in 1820s, specific formulations of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) have been introduced with different clinical benefits. However, there is increasing number of adverse events reported to Food and Drug Administration. This report presents the case of 62-year-old woman with Parkinson’s disease who received BoNT injections to treat painful spasticity in her hands. She developed severe generalized dystonia shortly after BoNT injections. PMID:24223367

  12. Sensing the Deadliest Toxin: Technologies for Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Čapek, Petr; Dickerson, Tobin J.

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and rapid detection of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most poisonous substances known to date, is essential for studies of medical applications of BoNTs and detection of poisoned food, as well as for response to potential bioterrorist threats. Currently, the most common method of BoNT detection is the mouse bioassay. While this assay is sensitive, it is slow, quite expensive, has limited throughput and requires sacrificing animals. Herein, we discuss and compare recently develop...

  13. Rational Design of Therapeutic and Diagnostic Against Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Gram-positive bacilli bacterium, Clostridium botulinum, which can be found worldwide in soil. Clostridium tetani is a similar bacterium to C...B: Biological Sciences, 354, 259-268. 6. Nantel, A.J. (1999). Clostridium Botulinum. WHO international programme on chemical safety poisons...of Clostridium botulinum C1 neurotoxin. Nucleic Acids Research, 18, 4924. 20. Binz, T., Kurazono, H., Popoff, M.R., Eklund, M.W., Sakaguchi, G

  14. Presynaptic Neurotoxins: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Immunology and Other Exploratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    residues are conserved in PLA2s that exist as aggregates (e.g. crotoxin, Mojave toxin, vipoxin from Vipera ammodytes , the complex from Pseudocerastes...success of others in using the site-directed polyclonal antibody approach to localize the toxic site in the ammodytoxins from the venom of Vipera ... ammodytes (Curin-Serbec et al, 1991). Molecular Biology. Descriptions of the organization of genomic presynaptic neurotoxin genes is presently in its

  15. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy biosensor for detection of active botulinum neurotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Halliwell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The standard method for the detection of botulinum neurotoxin is currently the mouse bioassay which is considered to be the most reliable method for the detection of the active form of this toxin. Despite this it is a time-consuming and expensive assay to run and as such many alternative assays have recently been proposed. Herein we report the development of two electrochemical assays for the detection of active botulinum neurotoxin in a pharmaceutical sample. Gold electrodes were modified with self-assembled monolayers of the SNARE protein SNAP-25 which is selectively cleaved by active botulinum neurotoxin A. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed on the modified working electrodes to observe changes to the layer on addition of the toxin. Both methods were able to distinguish the difference between the presence of the active toxin and a placebo containing the excipients of the pharmaceutical product. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy assay also allowed for detection of the active toxin at concentrations as low as 25 fg/ml, with results being obtained in under an hour outperforming the mouse bioassay.

  16. The effect of neurotoxin on rabies virus binding to mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, D J; Phillips, R M

    1991-08-01

    Mouse neuroblastoma cells were exposed to alpha bungarotoxin, a neurotoxin known to inhibit rabies virus binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor located at the neuromuscular junction in muscle tissue. The total amount of 3H-CVS virus that bound to neurotoxin treated cells was separated into specific and non-specific binding using a cold competition assay. Comparison of untreated and neurotoxin treated cells demonstrated that the majority of cell-associated virus in untreated cells was of a specific nature whereas the majority of the cell-associated virus in neurotoxin treated cells was due to non-specific binding.

  17. Solution structure of robustoxin, the lethal neurotoxin from the funnel-web spider Atrax robustus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallaghy, P K; Alewood, D; Alewood, P F; Norton, R S

    1997-12-15

    The solution structure of robustoxin, the lethal neurotoxin from the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus, has been determined from 2D 1H NMR data. Robustoxin is a polypeptide of 42 residues cross-linked by four disulphide bonds, the connectivities of which were determined from NMR data and trial structure calculations to be 1-15, 8-20, 14-31 and 16-42 (a 1-4/2-6/3-7/5-8 pattern). The structure consists of a small three-stranded, anti-parallel beta-sheet and a series of interlocking gamma-turns at the C-terminus. It also contains a cystine knot, thus placing it in the inhibitor cystine knot motif family of structures, which includes the omega-conotoxins and a number of plant and animal toxins and protease inhibitors. Robustoxin contains three distinct charged patches on its surface, and an extended loop that includes several aromatic and non-polar residues. Both of these structural features may play a role in its binding to the voltage-gated sodium channel.

  18. Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type B is heat-stable in milk and not inactivated by pasteurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foodborne botulism is caused by the ingestion of foods containing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). Currently, the only accepted assay to detect active C. botulinum neurotoxin is an in vivo mouse bioassay, which raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. Therefore, there is...

  19. Coupling the Torpedo microplate-receptor binding assay with mass spectrometry to detect cyclic imine neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-12-04

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the surface of microplate wells and the use of biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin as tracer. Cyclic imine neurotoxins competitively inhibit biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The microplate-receptor binding assay allowed rapid detection of nanomolar concentrations of cyclic imine neurotoxins directly in shellfish samples. Although highly sensitive and specific for the detection of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a class, the receptor binding assay cannot identify a given analyte. To address the low selectivity of the microplate-receptor binding assay, the cyclic imine neurotoxins tightly bound to the coated Torpedo nicotinic receptor were eluted with methanol, and the chemical nature of the eluted ligands was identified by mass spectrometry. The immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes on the surface of microplate wells proved to be a high-throughput format for the survey of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors directly in shellfish matrixes with high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  20. Molecular Structures and Functional Relationships in Clostridial Neurotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan S.

    2011-12-01

    The seven serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (A-G) are the deadliest poison known to humans. They share significant sequence homology and hence possess similar structure-function relationships. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) act via a four-step mechanism, viz., binding and internalization to neuronal cells, translocation of the catalytic domain into the cytosol and finally cleavage of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) causing blockage of neurotransmitter release leading to flaccid paralysis. Crystal structures of three holotoxins, BoNT/A, B and E, are available to date. Although the individual domains are remarkably similar, their domain organization is different. These structures have helped in correlating the structural and functional domains. This has led to the determination of structures of individual domains and combinations of them. Crystal structures of catalytic domains of all serotypes and several binding domains are now available. The catalytic domains are zinc endopeptidases and share significant sequence and structural homology. The active site architecture and the catalytic mechanism are similar although the binding mode of individual substrates may be different, dictating substrate specificity and peptide cleavage selectivity. Crystal structures of catalytic domains with substrate peptides provide clues to specificity and selectivity unique to BoNTs. Crystal structures of the receptor domain in complex with ganglioside or the protein receptor have provided information about the binding of botulinum neurotoxin to the neuronal cell. An overview of the structure-function relationship correlating the 3D structures with biochemical and biophysical data and how they can be used for structure-based drug discovery is presented here.

  1. Sensing the deadliest toxin: technologies for botulinum neurotoxin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Petr; Dickerson, Tobin J

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and rapid detection of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most poisonous substances known to date, is essential for studies of medical applications of BoNTs and detection of poisoned food, as well as for response to potential bioterrorist threats. Currently, the most common method of BoNT detection is the mouse bioassay. While this assay is sensitive, it is slow, quite expensive, has limited throughput and requires sacrificing animals. Herein, we discuss and compare recently developed alternative in vitro detection methods and assess their ability to supplement or replace the mouse bioassay in the analysis of complex matrix samples.

  2. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  3. Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon as neurotoxins producers in some Russian freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernova, Ekaterina; Sidelev, Sergey; Russkikh, Iana; Voyakina, Ekaterina; Babanazarova, Olga; Romanov, Roman; Kotovshchikov, Anton; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna

    2017-05-01

    Last decades, cyanobacterial blooms have been commonly reported in Russia. Among the boom-forming species, potential toxin producers have been identified. The aim of this paper was to study the presence of neurotoxic compounds - saxitoxins and anatoxin-a - in water bodies from different regions of Russia. We also made attempts to identify the neurotoxin-producing genera. The good convergence of the results obtained by light microscopy, PCR and LC-MS/MS analyses indicated the presence of active neurotoxin producing species in all investigated water bodies. Saxitoxin was detected in phytoplankton from 4 water bodies in Central European Russia and West Siberia, including lake and reservoirs used as a source for potable water. The water bodies differed with the respect of saxitoxin producers which belonged to Aphanizomenon and/or Dolichospermum genera. For the first time, we obtained quantitative data on the intracellular saxitoxin concentration in Russian freshwaters using LC-MS/MS. Anatoxin-a was detected only in lakes of Northwestern Russia. In the eutrophic shallow Lower Suzdal Lake, Aphanizomenon was the stated anatoxin-a-producing genus. In the large shallow artificial hypertrophic Sestroretskij Razliv Lake, it was very likely that both dominant species - Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Dolichospermum planctonicum - were anatoxin-a producers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Labile neurotoxin in serum of calves with "nervous" coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isler, C M; Bellamy, J E; Wobeser, G A

    1987-01-01

    Mouse inoculation was used to test for the presence of a toxin in the serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and intestinal contents collected from cases of bovine enteric coccidiosis, with and without neurological signs, and from control calves. Intravenous inoculation of mice with 10 mL/kg of serum from calves showing nervous signs caused effects significantly different from those caused by the inoculation of serum from calves not showing nervous signs and from control calves. The effect was particularly evident in female mice. At this dosage severe neurological signs such as loss of righting reflex, seizures and death occurred only with serum from calves with "nervous coccidiosis". The results suggest that serum from the calves with neurological signs contains a neurotoxin. This toxin appears to be highly labile. It was not present in the cerebrospinal fluid at levels comparable to those in the serum. The significance of this labile neurotoxin with respect to the pathogenesis of the neurological signs associated with bovine enteric coccidiosis is unknown. PMID:2955865

  5. Botulinum neurotoxin type A in the masseter muscle: Effects on incisor eruption in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Alfonso L.; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Liu, Zi Jun; Ye, Wenmin; Greenlee, Geoffrey M.; Herring, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for the paralytic food poisoning, botulism. Commercial formulations such as botulinum neurotoxin type A are increasingly used for various conditions, including cosmetic recontouring of the lower face by injection of the large masseter muscles. The paralysis of a major muscle of mastication lowers occlusal force and thus might affect tooth eruption. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of unilateral masseter muscle injection of botulinum neurotoxin type A on the rate of eruption of incisors in a rabbit model. We hypothesized that the teeth would overerupt in an underloaded environment. Methods Forty rabbits were injected with either botulinum neurotoxin type A or saline solution in 1 masseter muscle. Mastication and muscle force production were monitored, and incisor eruption rate was assessed by caliper measurement of grooved teeth. Results The injection of saline solution had no effect. The masseter muscle injected with botulinum neurotoxin type A showed a dramatic loss of force 3 weeks after injection despite apparently normal mastication. Incisor eruption rate was significantly decreased for the botulinum neurotoxin type A group, an effect attributed to decreased attrition. Conclusions This study has implications for orthodontics. Although findings from ever-growing rabbit incisors cannot be extrapolated to human teeth, it is clear that botulinum neurotoxin type A caused a decrease in bite force that could influence dental eruption. PMID:23561411

  6. Computational Insights of the Interaction among Sea Anemones Neurotoxins and Kv1.3 Channel

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Sea anemone neurotoxins are peptides that interact with Na+ and K+ channels, resulting in specific alterations on their functions. Some of these neurotoxins (1ROO, 1BGK, 2K9E, 1BEI) are important for the treatment of about 80 autoimmune disorders because of their specificity for Kv1.3 channel. The aim of this study was to identify the common residues among these neurotoxins by computational methods, and establish whether there is a pattern useful for the future generation of a treatment for a...

  7. Universal and specific quantitative detection of botulinum neurotoxin genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnon Stephen S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium botulinum, an obligate anaerobic spore-forming bacterium, produces seven antigenic variants of botulinum toxin that are distinguished serologically and termed "serotypes". Botulinum toxin blocks the release of acetylcholine at neuromuscular junctions resulting in flaccid paralysis. The potential lethality of the disease warrants a fast and accurate means of diagnosing suspected instances of food contamination or human intoxication. Currently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA-accepted assay to detect and type botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs is the mouse protection bioassay. While specific and sensitive, this assay requires the use of laboratory animals, may take up to four days to achieve a diagnosis, and is unsuitable for high-throughput analysis. We report here a two-step PCR assay that identifies all toxin types, that achieves the specificity of the mouse bioassay while surpassing it in equivalent sensitivity, that has capability for high-throughput analysis, and that provides quantitative results within hours. The first step of our assay consists of a conventional PCR that detects the presence of C. botulinum regardless of the neurotoxin type. The second step uses quantitative PCR (qPCR technology to determine the specific serotype of the neurotoxin. Results We assayed purified C. botulinum DNA and crude toxin preparations, as well as food and stool from healthy individuals spiked with purified BoNT DNA, and one stool sample from a case of infant botulism for the presence of the NTNH gene, which is part of the BoNT gene cluster, and for the presence of serotype-specific BoNT genes. The PCR surpassed the mouse bioassay both in specificity and sensitivity, detecting positive signals in BoNT preparations containing well below the 1 LD50 required for detection via the mouse bioassay. These results were type-specific and we were reliably able to quantify as few as 10 genomic copies. Conclusions While other studies

  8. Structural and mutational analyses of the receptor binding domain of botulinum D/C mosaic neurotoxin: Insight into the ganglioside binding mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuemket, Nipawan [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Yoshikazu [Creative Research Institution ' Sousei,' Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takao [Department of Microbiology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192 (Japan); Nakamura, Keiji; Kozaki, Shunji [Department of Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka 598-8531 (Japan); Yao, Min [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao, E-mail: tanaka@castor.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT in complex with 3'-sialyllactose. {yields} An electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. {yields} Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed that GBS and GBL are important for ganglioside binding. {yields} A cell binding mechanism, which involves cooperative contribution of two sites, was proposed. -- Abstract: Clostridium botulinum type D strain OFD05, which produces the D/C mosaic neurotoxin, was isolated from cattle killed by the recent botulism outbreak in Japan. The D/C mosaic neurotoxin is the most toxic of the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) characterized to date. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT from strain OFD05 in complex with 3'-sialyllactose at a resolution of 3.0 A. In the structure, an electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed the significant contribution of the residues surrounding the cleft to ganglioside recognition. In addition, a loop adjoining the cleft also plays an important role in ganglioside recognition. In contrast, little effect was observed when the residues located around the surface previously identified as the protein receptor binding site in other BoNTs were substituted. The results of cell binding analysis of the mutants were significantly correlated with the ganglioside binding properties. Based on these observations, a cell binding mechanism of BoNT from strain OFD05 is proposed, which involves cooperative contribution of two ganglioside binding sites.

  9. Botulinum Neurotoxin Is Shielded by NTNHA in an Interlocked Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Shenyan; Rumpel, Sophie; Zhou, Jie; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Bigalke, Hans; Perry, Kay; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng (Cornell); (Tufts); (Hannover-MED); (Sanford-Burnham)

    2012-03-28

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly poisonous substances that are also effective medicines. Accidental BoNT poisoning often occurs through ingestion of Clostridium botulinum-contaminated food. Here, we present the crystal structure of a BoNT in complex with a clostridial nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA) protein at 2.7 angstroms. Biochemical and functional studies show that NTNHA provides large and multivalent binding interfaces to protect BoNT from gastrointestinal degradation. Moreover, the structure highlights key residues in BoNT that regulate complex assembly in a pH-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings define the molecular mechanisms by which NTNHA shields BoNT in the hostile gastrointestinal environment and releases it upon entry into the circulation. These results will assist in the design of small molecules for inhibiting oral BoNT intoxication and of delivery vehicles for oral administration of biologics.

  10. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.; Mushrush, Darren J.; Pruitt, Rory N.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt); (MCW)

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  11. Botulinum Neurotoxin for Pain Management: Insights from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siro Luvisetto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The action of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs at the neuromuscular junction has been extensively investigated and knowledge gained in this field laid the foundation for the use of BoNTs in human pathologies characterized by excessive muscle contractions. Although much more is known about the action of BoNTs on the peripheral system, growing evidence has demonstrated several effects also at the central level. Pain conditions, with special regard to neuropathic and intractable pain, are some of the pathological states that have been recently treated with BoNTs with beneficial effects. The knowledge of the action and potentiality of BoNTs utilization against pain, with emphasis for its possible use in modulation and alleviation of chronic pain, still represents an outstanding challenge for experimental research. This review highlights recent findings on the effects of BoNTs in animal pain models.

  12. Botulinum neurotoxin for pain management: insights from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Flaminia; Luvisetto, Siro

    2010-12-01

    The action of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) at the neuromuscular junction has been extensively investigated and knowledge gained in this field laid the foundation for the use of BoNTs in human pathologies characterized by excessive muscle contractions. Although much more is known about the action of BoNTs on the peripheral system, growing evidence has demonstrated several effects also at the central level. Pain conditions, with special regard to neuropathic and intractable pain, are some of the pathological states that have been recently treated with BoNTs with beneficial effects. The knowledge of the action and potentiality of BoNTs utilization against pain, with emphasis for its possible use in modulation and alleviation of chronic pain, still represents an outstanding challenge for experimental research. This review highlights recent findings on the effects of BoNTs in animal pain models.

  13. Salsolinol, a catechol neurotoxin, induces oxidative modification of cytochrome c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hoon Kang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Methyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (salsolinol,an endogenous neurotoxin, is known to perform a role in thepathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. In this study, weevaluated oxidative modification of cytochrome c occurring afterincubation with salsolinol. When cytochrome c was incubatedwith salsolinol, protein aggregation increased in a dosedependentmanner. The formation of carbonyl compounds andthe release of iron were obtained in salsolinol- treated cytochromec. Salsolinol also led to the release of iron fromcytochrome c. Reactive oxygen species (ROS scavengers andiron specific chelator inhibited the salsolinol-mediated cytochromec modification and carbonyl compound formation. It issuggested that oxidative damage of cytochrome c by salsolinolmight induce the increase of iron content in cells, subsequentlyleading to the deleterious condition which was observed. Thismechanism may, in part, provide an explanation for thedeterioration of organs under neurodegenerative disorders suchas PD. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(2: 119-123

  14. The finite Bruck Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Baumeister, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    We continue the work by Aschbacher, Kinyon and Phillips [AKP] as well as of Glauberman [Glaub1,2] by describing the structure of the finite Bruck loops. We show essentially that a finite Bruck loop $X$ is the direct product of a Bruck loop of odd order with either a soluble Bruck loop of 2-power order or a product of loops related to the groups $PSL_2(q)$, $q= 9$ or $q \\geq 5$ a Fermat prime. The latter possibillity does occur as is shown in [Nag1, BS]. As corollaries we obtain versions of Sylow's, Lagrange's and Hall's Theorems for loops.

  15. Genetic Diversity Among Botulinum Neurotoxin Producing Clostridial Strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, K K; Smith, T J; Helma, C H; Ticknor, L O; Foley, B T; Svennson, R T; Brown, J L; Johnson, E A; Smith, L A; Okinaka, R T; Jackson, P J; Marks, J D

    2006-07-06

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation for many diverse anaerobic spore forming rod-shaped bacteria which have the common property of producing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). The BoNTs are exoneurotoxins that can cause severe paralysis and even death in humans and various other animal species. A collection of 174 C. botulinum strains were examined by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and BoNT genes to examine genetic diversity within this species. This collection contained representatives of each of the seven different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT A-G). Analysis of the16S rRNA sequences confirmed earlier reports of at least four distinct genomic backgrounds (Groups I-IV) each of which has independently acquired one or more BoNT serotypes through horizontal gene transfer. AFLP analysis provided higher resolution, and can be used to further subdivide the four groups into sub-groups. Sequencing of the BoNT genes from serotypes A, B and E in multiple strains confirmed significant sequence variation within each serotype. Four distinct lineages within each of the BoNT A and B serotypes, and five distinct lineages of serotype E strains were identified. The nucleotide sequences of the seven serotypes of BoNT were compared and show varying degrees of interrelatedness and recombination as has been previously noted for the NTNH gene which is linked to BoNT. These analyses contribute to the understanding of the evolution and phylogeny within this species and assist in the development of improved diagnostics and therapeutics for treatment of botulism.

  16. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Selby, Katja; Miethe, Sebastian; Frenzel, André; Liu, Yvonne; Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Pelat, Thibaut; Urbain, Remi; Fontayne, Alexandre; Thullier, Philippe; Sesardic, Dorothea; Lindström, Miia; Hust, Michael; Korkeala, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis)-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18) by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E). In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD) in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans. PMID:27626446

  17. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yağmur Derman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18 by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E. In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans.

  18. The primary structure of a short neurotoxin homologue from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (Black mamba venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Joubert

    1984-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxin CM-7 was purified from black mamba venom by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 followed by ion exchange chromotography on CM-cellulose. It contains 60 amino acids, including eight half-cystines. The complete amino acid sequence of toxin CM-7 has been elucidated. In toxin CM-7 the eleven structurally invariant amino acids of the neurotoxins and cardiotoxins are conserved, but it has only one of the five functionally invariant amino acids of the neurotoxins. The eight cysteine residues of toxin CM-7 are in the same locations as those in short neurotoxins of known structures and are presumed to be similarly cross-linked. The sequence of CM-7 is structurally homologous with the short neurotoxins, but it is less toxic.

  19. Characterization of the Ptychodiscus brevis Polyether Neurotoxin Binding Component in Excitable Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-31

    Centruroides suffusus suffusus toxin II to neurotoxin receptoi Site 4 by the brevetoxins. Catterall and Gainer (16) suggested that the brevetoxins bind at a...binding of 1251 Centruroides suffusus suffusus toxin 11 on neurotoxin receptor site 4. Purification of both alpha- and beta-scorpion toxins is...guinguestraitus venom (site 3), or Centruroides sculpturatus venom (site 4) (Fig 13 ). Tritiated brevetoxin binding is slightly enhanced (5-10%) in the presence

  20. Structural Studies on Intact Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Subramanyam Swaminathan...Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02-2-0011 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Subramanyam Swaminathan, Ph.D. 5d...on Intact Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design Annual Report for the Period ending January 2008

  1. Pseudonoise code tracking loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflame, D. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A delay-locked loop is presented for tracking a pseudonoise (PN) reference code in an incoming communication signal. The loop is less sensitive to gain imbalances, which can otherwise introduce timing errors in the PN reference code formed by the loop.

  2. Pentavalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins and tetanus toxin using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxin (CNT) family includes botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), serotypes A, B, E, and F of which can cause human botulism, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT), which is the causative agent of tetanus. This suggests that the greatest need is for a multivalent or multiagent vaccine that provides protection against all 5 agents. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several pentavalent replicon vaccines that protected mice against BoNTs and TeNT. First, we evaluat...

  3. Supersymmetric Wilson loops at two loops

    CERN Document Server

    Bassetto, Antonio; Pucci, Fabrizio; Seminara, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    We study the quantum properties of certain BPS Wilson loops in ${\\cal N}=4$ supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. They belong to a general family, introduced recently, in which the addition of particular scalar couplings endows generic loops on $S^3$ with a fraction of supersymmetry. When restricted to $S^2$, their quantum average has been further conjectured to be exactly computed by the matrix model governing the zero-instanton sector of YM$_2$ on the sphere. We perform a complete two-loop analysis on a class of cusped Wilson loops lying on a two-dimensional sphere, finding perfect agreement with the conjecture. The perturbative computation reproduces the matrix-model expectation through a highly non-trivial interplay between ladder diagrams and self-energies/vertex contributions, suggesting the existence of a localization procedure.

  4. Identification of the amino acid residues rendering TI-VAMP insensitive toward botulinum neurotoxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2006-03-24

    Botulinum neurotoxins types B, D, F, and G, and tetanus neurotoxin inhibit vesicular fusion via proteolytic cleavage of VAMP/Synaptobrevin, a core component of the membrane fusion machinery. Thus, these neurotoxins became widely used tools for investigating vesicular trafficking routes. Except for VAMP-1, VAMP-2, and Cellubrevin, no other member of the VAMP family represents a substrate for these neurotoxins. The molecular basis for this discrepancy is not known. A 34 amino acid residue segment of VAMP-2 was previously suggested to mediate the interaction with botulinum neurotoxin B, but the validity of the data was later questioned. To check whether this segment alone controls the susceptibility toward botulinum neurotoxin B, it was used to replace the corresponding segment in TI-VAMP. The resulting VAMP hybrid and VAMP-2 were hydrolysed at virtually identical rates. Resetting the VAMP-2 portion in the hybrid from either end to TI-VAMP residues gradually reduced the cleavability. A hybrid encompassing merely the VAMP-2 segment 71-80 around the Gln76/Phe77 scissile bond was still hydrolysed, albeit at a approximately tenfold lower cleavage rate. The contribution of each non-conserved amino acid of the whole 34-mer segment to the interaction was investigated employing VAMP-2. We find that the eight non-conserved residues of the 71-80 segment are all necessary for efficient cleavage. Mutation of an additional six residues located upstream and downstream of this segment affects substrate hydrolysis as well. Vice versa, a readily cleavable TI-VAMP molecule requires at the least the replacement of Ile158, Thr161, and the section 165-174 by Asp64, Ala67, and the 71-80 segment of VAMP-2, respectively. However, the insensitivity of TI-VAMP to botulinum neurotoxin B relies on at least 12 amino acid changes versus VAMP-2. These are scattered along an interface of 22 amino acid residues in length.

  5. Neurotoxins from snake venoms and α-conotoxin ImI inhibit functionally active ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Shelukhina, Irina V; Son, Lina V; Ojomoko, Lucy O; Kryukova, Elena V; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Zhmak, Maxim N; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Ivanov, Igor A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Starkov, Vladislav G; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2015-09-11

    Ionotropic receptors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR) regulate neuronal inhibition and are targeted by benzodiazepines and general anesthetics. We show that a fluorescent derivative of α-cobratoxin (α-Ctx), belonging to the family of three-finger toxins from snake venoms, specifically stained the α1β3γ2 receptor; and at 10 μm α-Ctx completely blocked GABA-induced currents in this receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes (IC50 = 236 nm) and less potently inhibited α1β2γ2 ≈ α2β2γ2 > α5β2γ2 > α2β3γ2 and α1β3δ GABAARs. The α1β3γ2 receptor was also inhibited by some other three-finger toxins, long α-neurotoxin Ls III and nonconventional toxin WTX. α-Conotoxin ImI displayed inhibitory activity as well. Electrophysiology experiments showed mixed competitive and noncompetitive α-Ctx action. Fluorescent α-Ctx, however, could be displaced by muscimol indicating that most of the α-Ctx-binding sites overlap with the orthosteric sites at the β/α subunit interface. Modeling and molecular dynamic studies indicated that α-Ctx or α-bungarotoxin seem to interact with GABAAR in a way similar to their interaction with the acetylcholine-binding protein or the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. This was supported by mutagenesis studies and experiments with α-conotoxin ImI and a chimeric Naja oxiana α-neurotoxin indicating that the major role in α-Ctx binding to GABAAR is played by the tip of its central loop II accommodating under loop C of the receptors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Neurotoxins from Snake Venoms and α-Conotoxin ImI Inhibit Functionally Active Ionotropic γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Denis S.; Shelukhina, Irina V.; Son, Lina V.; Ojomoko, Lucy O.; Kryukova, Elena V.; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N.; Zhmak, Maxim N.; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Ivanov, Igor A.; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Starkov, Vladislav G.; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Utkin, Yuri N.

    2015-01-01

    Ionotropic receptors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR) regulate neuronal inhibition and are targeted by benzodiazepines and general anesthetics. We show that a fluorescent derivative of α-cobratoxin (α-Ctx), belonging to the family of three-finger toxins from snake venoms, specifically stained the α1β3γ2 receptor; and at 10 μm α-Ctx completely blocked GABA-induced currents in this receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes (IC50 = 236 nm) and less potently inhibited α1β2γ2 ≈ α2β2γ2 > α5β2γ2 > α2β3γ2 and α1β3δ GABAARs. The α1β3γ2 receptor was also inhibited by some other three-finger toxins, long α-neurotoxin Ls III and nonconventional toxin WTX. α-Conotoxin ImI displayed inhibitory activity as well. Electrophysiology experiments showed mixed competitive and noncompetitive α-Ctx action. Fluorescent α-Ctx, however, could be displaced by muscimol indicating that most of the α-Ctx-binding sites overlap with the orthosteric sites at the β/α subunit interface. Modeling and molecular dynamic studies indicated that α-Ctx or α-bungarotoxin seem to interact with GABAAR in a way similar to their interaction with the acetylcholine-binding protein or the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. This was supported by mutagenesis studies and experiments with α-conotoxin ImI and a chimeric Naja oxiana α-neurotoxin indicating that the major role in α-Ctx binding to GABAAR is played by the tip of its central loop II accommodating under loop C of the receptors. PMID:26221036

  7. Tetanus neurotoxin-induced epilepsy in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Marco; Pietrasanta, Marta; Vannini, Eleonora; Rossetto, Ornella; Caleo, Matteo

    2012-07-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) is a metalloprotease that cleaves the synaptic protein VAMP/synaptobrevin, leading to focal epilepsy. Although this model is widely used in rats, the time course and spatial specificity of TeNT proteolytic action have not been precisely defined. Here we have studied the biochemical, electrographic, and anatomic characteristics of TeNT-induced epilepsy in mouse visual cortex (V1). We found that VAMP cleavage peaked at 10 days, was reduced at 21 days, and completely extinguished 45 days following TeNT delivery. VAMP proteolysis was restricted to the injected V1 and ipsilateral thalamus, whereas it was undetectable in other cortical areas. Electrographic epileptiform activity was evident both during and after the time window of TeNT effects, indicating development of chronic epilepsy. Anatomic analyses found no evidence for long-term tissue damage, such as neuronal loss or microglia activation. These data show that TeNT reliably induces nonlesional epilepsy in mouse cortex. Due to the excellent physiologic knowledge of the visual cortex and the availability of mouse transgenic strains, this model will be useful for examining the network and cellular alterations underlying hyperexcitability within an epileptic focus.

  8. Using llama derived single domain antibodies to target botulinum neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Marla D.; Anderson, George P.; Bernstein, Rachael D.; Liu, Jinny L.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2010-04-01

    Llama serum contains both conventional IgG as well as unique forms of antibody that contain only heavy chains where antigen binding is mediated through a single variable domain. These variable domains can be expressed recombinantly and are referred to as single domain antibodies (sdAb). SdAb are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments, possess good solubility, thermal stability, and can refold after heat and chemical denaturation. Llamas were immunized with either BoNT A or B toxoid and phage display libraries prepared. Single domain antibodies (sdAb) that were able to detect botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B were selected from their respective libraries. Here, the binders obtained by panning the BoNT B library on either BoNT B toxoid or BoNT B complex toxoid coated plates or BoNT B toxin coupled microspheres are described. Using these panning methods, we selected for binders that showed specificity for BoNT B. Phage displayed binders were screened, moved to a protein expression vector and soluble sdAb was produced. Using a Luminex flow cytometer binders were evaluated in direct binding assays. We have exploited the unique properties of sdAb and used them as biological recognition elements in immuno-based sensors that can detect BoNT B.

  9. Cosmic string loop shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the shapes of cosmic string loops found in large-scale simulations of an expanding-universe string network. The simulation does not include gravitational back reaction, but we model that process by smoothing the loop using Lorentzian convolution. We find that loops at formation consist of generally straight segments separated by kinks. We do not see cusps or any cusp-like structure at the scale of the entire loop, although we do see very small regions of string that move with large Lorentz boosts. However, smoothing of the string almost always introduces two cusps on each loop. The smoothing process does not lead to any significant fragmentation of loops that were in non-self-intersecting trajectories before smoothing.

  10. Coxeter-Chein Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Blok, Rieuwert J

    2011-01-01

    In 1974 Orin Chein discovered a new family of Moufang loops which are now called Chein loops. Such a loop can be created from any group $W$ together with $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ by a variation on a semi-direct product. We study these loops in the case where $W$ is a Coxeter group and show that it has what we call a Chein-Coxeter system, a small set of generators of order 2, together with a set of relations closely related to the Coxeter relations and Chein relations. As a result we are able to give amalgam presentations for Coxeter-Chein loops. This is to our knowledge the first such presentation for a Moufang loop.

  11. Coxeter-Chein Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Blok, Rieuwert J.; Gagola III, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In 1974 Orin Chein discovered a new family of Moufang loops which are now called Chein loops. Such a loop can be created from any group $W$ together with $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ by a variation on a semi-direct product. We study these loops in the case where $W$ is a Coxeter group and show that it has what we call a Chein-Coxeter system, a small set of generators of order 2, together with a set of relations closely related to the Coxeter relations and Chein relations. As a result we are able to give am...

  12. Observational Evidence for Loop-Loop Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiping, W.; Guangli, H.; Yuhua, T.; Aoao, X.

    2004-01-01

    Through analysis of the data including the hard x-ray(BASTE) microwave(NoRP) and magnetogram(MDI from SOHO) as well as the images of soft x-ray(YHKOH) and EIT(SOHO) on Apr. 151998 solar flare in the active region 8203(N30W12) we found: (1) there are similar quasi period oscillation in the profile of hard x-ray flux (25-5050-100keV) and microwave flux(1GHz) with duration of 85+/-25s every peak includes two sub-peak structures; (2) in the preheat phase of the flare active magnetic field changes apparently and a s-pole spot emerges ; (3) several EIT and soft x-ray loops exist and turn into bright . All of these may suggest that loop-loop interaction indeed exist. Through reconnection the electrons may be accelerated and the hard x-ray and microwave emission take place.

  13. PEG precipitation coupled with chromatography is a new and sufficient method for the purification of botulinum neurotoxin type B [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhao

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are used to treat a variety of neuro-muscular disorders, as well as in cosmetology. The increased demand requires efficient methods for the production and purification of these toxins. In this study, a new purification process was developed for purifying type B neurotoxin. The kinetics of C.botulinum strain growth and neurotoxin production were determined for maximum yield of toxin. The neurotoxin was purified by polyethylene glycol (PEG precipitation and chromatography. Based on design of full factorial experiment, 20% (w/v PEG-6000, 4 °C, pH 5.0 and 0.3 M NaCl were optimal conditions to obtain a high recovery rate of 87% for the type B neurotoxin complex, as indicated by a purification factor of 61.5 fold. Furthermore, residual bacterial cells, impurity proteins and some nucleic acids were removed by PEG precipitation. The following purification of neurotoxin was accomplished by two chromatography techniques using Sephacryl™ S-100 and phenyl HP columns. The neurotoxin was recovered with an overall yield of 21.5% and the purification factor increased to 216.7 fold. In addition, a mouse bioassay determined the purified neurotoxin complex possessed a specific toxicity (LD(50 of 4.095 ng/kg.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  15. Calpains participate in nerve terminal degeneration induced by spider and snake presynaptic neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duregotti, Elisa; Tedesco, Erik; Montecucco, Cesare; Rigoni, Michela

    2013-03-15

    α-latrotoxin and snake presynaptic phospholipases A2 neurotoxins target the presynaptic membrane of axon terminals of the neuromuscular junction causing paralysis. These neurotoxins display different biochemical activities, but similarly alter the presynaptic membrane permeability causing Ca(2+) overload within the nerve terminals, which in turn induces nerve degeneration. Using different methods, here we show that the calcium-activated proteases calpains are involved in the cytoskeletal rearrangements that we have previously documented in neurons exposed to α-latrotoxin or to snake presynaptic phospholipases A2 neurotoxins. These results indicate that calpains, activated by the massive calcium influx from the extracellular medium, target fundamental components of neuronal cytoskeleton such as spectrin and neurofilaments, whose cleavage is functional to the ensuing nerve terminal fragmentation.

  16. Purification and characterization of neurotoxin complex from a dual toxin gene containing Clostridium Botulinum Strain PS-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Sachdeva, Amita; Degrasse, Jeffrey A; Croley, Timothy R; Stanker, Larry H; Hodge, David; Sharma, Shashi K

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are produced as a toxin complex (TC) which consists of neurotoxin (NT) and neurotoxin associated proteins. The characterization of NT in its native state is an essential step for developing diagnostics and therapeutic countermeasures against botulism. The presence of NT genes was validated by PCR amplification of toxin specific fragments from genomic DNA of Clostridium botulinum strain PS-5 which indicated the presence of both serotype A and B genes on PS-5 genome. Further, TC was purified and characterized by Western blotting, Digoxin-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, endopeptidase activity assay, and Liquid chromatography-Mass spectrometry. The data showed the presence of serotype A specific neurotoxin. Based on the analysis of neurotoxin genes and characterization of TC, PS-5 strain appears as a serotype A (B) strain of C. botulinum which produces only serotype A specific TC in the cell culture medium.

  17. Antibody protection against botulinum neurotoxin intoxication in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Luisa W; Stanker, Larry H; Henderson, Thomas D; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D

    2009-10-01

    Adulteration of food or feed with any of the seven serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a potential bioterrorism concern. Currently, there is strong interest in the development of detection reagents, vaccines, therapeutics, and other countermeasures. A sensitive immunoassay for detecting BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A), based on monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) F1-2 and F1-40, has been developed and used in complex matrices. The epitope for F1-2 has been mapped to the heavy chain of BoNT/A, and the epitope of F1-40 has been mapped to the light chain. The ability of these MAbs to provide therapeutic protection against BoNT/A intoxication in mouse intravenous and oral intoxication models was tested. High dosages of individual MAbs protected mice well both pre- and postexposure to BoNT/A holotoxin. A combination therapy consisting of antibodies against both the light and heavy chains of the toxin, however, significantly increased protection, even at a lower MAb dosage. An in vitro peptide assay for measuring toxin activity showed that pretreatment of toxin with these MAbs did not block catalytic activity but instead blocked toxin entry into primary and cultured neuronal cells. The timing of antibody rescue in the mouse intoxication models revealed windows of opportunity for antibody therapeutic treatment that correlated well with the biologic half-life of the toxin in the serum. Knowledge of BoNT intoxication and antibody clearance in these mouse models and understanding of the pharmacokinetics of BoNT are invaluable for future development of antibodies and therapeutics against intoxication by BoNT.

  18. Proconvulsant actions of intrahippocampal botulinum neurotoxin B in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröer, S; Zolkowska, D; Gernert, M; Rogawski, M A

    2013-11-12

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) may affect the excitability of brain circuits by inhibiting neurotransmitter release at central synapses. There is evidence that local delivery of BoNT serotypes A and E, which target SNAP-25, a component of the release machinery specific to excitatory synapses, can inhibit seizure generation. BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B) targets VAMP2, which is expressed in both excitatory and inhibitory terminals. Here we assessed the effects of unilateral intrahippocampal infusion of BoNT/B in the rat on intravenous pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure thresholds, and on the expression of spontaneous behavioral and electrographic seizures. Infusion of BoNT/B (500 and 1,000 unit) by convection-enhanced delivery caused a reduction in myoclonic twitch and clonic seizure thresholds in response to intravenous PTZ beginning about 6 days after the infusion. Handling-evoked and spontaneous convulsive seizures were observed in many BoNT/B-treated animals but not in vehicle-treated controls. Spontaneous electrographic seizure discharges were recorded in the dentate gyrus of animals that received local BoNT/B infusion. In addition, there was an increased frequency of interictal epileptiform spikes and sharp waves at the same recording site. BoNT/B-treated animals also exhibited tactile hyperresponsivity in comparison with vehicle-treated controls. This is the first demonstration that BoNT/B causes a delayed proconvulsant action when infused into the hippocampus. Local infusion of BoNT/B could be useful as a focal epilepsy model.

  19. What Controls DNA Looping?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J. Perez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The looping of DNA provides a means of communication between sequentially distant genomic sites that operate in tandem to express, copy, and repair the information encoded in the DNA base sequence. The short loops implicated in the expression of bacterial genes suggest that molecular factors other than the naturally stiff double helix are involved in bringing the interacting sites into close spatial proximity. New computational techniques that take direct account of the three-dimensional structures and fluctuations of protein and DNA allow us to examine the likely means of enhancing such communication. Here, we describe the application of these approaches to the looping of a 92 base-pair DNA segment between the headpieces of the tetrameric Escherichia coli Lac repressor protein. The distortions of the double helix induced by a second protein—the nonspecific nucleoid protein HU—increase the computed likelihood of looping by several orders of magnitude over that of DNA alone. Large-scale deformations of the repressor, sequence-dependent features in the DNA loop, and deformability of the DNA operators also enhance looping, although to lesser degrees. The correspondence between the predicted looping propensities and the ease of looping derived from gene-expression and single-molecule measurements lends credence to the derived structural picture.

  20. Testing loop quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2017-03-01

    Loop quantum cosmology predicts that quantum gravity effects resolve the big-bang singularity and replace it by a cosmic bounce. Furthermore, loop quantum cosmology can also modify the form of primordial cosmological perturbations, for example by reducing power at large scales in inflationary models or by suppressing the tensor-to-scalar ratio in the matter bounce scenario; these two effects are potential observational tests for loop quantum cosmology. In this article, I review these predictions and others, and also briefly discuss three open problems in loop quantum cosmology: its relation to loop quantum gravity, the trans-Planckian problem, and a possible transition from a Lorentzian to a Euclidean space-time around the bounce point.

  1. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Schlessinger

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested

  2. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-07-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  3. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  4. Therapeutic attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in neurotoxin models of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stack, Edward C.; Ferro, Joellyn L.; Kim, Jinho; Del Signore, Steven J.; Goodrich, Sarah; Matson, Samantha; Hunt, Bonnie B.; Cormier, Kerry; Smith, Karen; Matson, Wayne R.; Ryu, Hoon; Ferrante, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in neurotoxin models of Parkinson?s disease correspondence: Corresponding author. GRECC Unit 182B, Bedford VA Medical Center, 200 Springs Road, Bedford, MA 01730, USA. Tel.: +1 781 687 2908; fax: +1 781 687 3515. (Ferrante, Robert J.) (Ferrante, Robert J.) Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine - Boston--> , MA 02118--> ...

  5. Substrate Binding Mode and Its Implication on Drug Design for Botulinum Neurotoxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-26

    1000165 Editor: C. Erec Stebbins , The Rockefeller University, United States of America Received May 30, 2008; Accepted August 28, 2008; Published...dash lines while zinc co-ordination is shown in solid line . doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1000165.g003 Neurotoxin-Substrate Complex PLoS Pathogens

  6. Neuronal targeting, internalization, and biological activity of a recombinant atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) have the unique capacity to cross epithelial barriers, target neuromuscular junctions, and translocate active metalloprotease component to the cytosol of motor neurons. We have taken advantage of the molecular carriers responsible for this trafficking to create a family ...

  7. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) bioassay for visceral toxicosis of catfish and botulinum neurotoxin serotype E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visceral toxicosis of catfish (VTC), a sporadic disease of cultured channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) often with high mortality, is caused by botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (BoNT/E). Presumptive diagnosis of VTC is based on characteristic clinical signs and lesions, and the production of these ...

  8. [A crustacean-specific neurotoxin from the venom of the black widow spider Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperov, V G; Shamotienko, O G; Grishin, E V

    1990-11-01

    A method of the isolation of a crustacea-specific neurotoxin from the venom of the Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus spider by means of ion exchange chromatography on Mono Q and Mono S columns and hydrophobic chromatography on Phenyl-Superose column has been developed. LD50 of the toxin has been elucidated.

  9. [Isolation and properties of insect-specific neurotoxins from venoms of the spider Lactodectus mactans tredecimguttatus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperov, V G; Shamotienko, O G; Grishin, E V

    1990-08-01

    A method has been developed for isolating five insect-specific neurotoxins and alpha-latrotoxin from venom of the Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus spider by means of ion exchange chromatography on Mono Q and Mono S columns and chromatography on hydroxylapatite column. LD 50 of all the toxins are determined.

  10. Structural basis for recognition of synaptic vesicle protein 2C by botulinum neurotoxin A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benoit, Roger M.; Frey, Daniel; Hilbert, Manuel; Kevenaar, Josta T.; Wieser, Mara M.; Stirnimann, Christian U.; McMillan, David; Ceska, Tom; Lebon, Florence; Jaussi, Rolf; Steinmetz, Michel O.; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Capitani, Guido; Kammerer, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) belongs to the most dangerous class of bioweapons. Despite this, BoNT/A is used to treat a wide range of common medical conditions such as migraines and a variety of ocular motility and movement disorders. BoNT/A is probably best known for its use as an antiwrinkle ag

  11. A comparative study on three analytical methods for the determination of the neurotoxin BMAA in cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, E.J.; Gillissen, F.; Lürling, M.

    2012-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been considered a serious health threat because of its putative role in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. First reports on BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria were alarming: nearly all cyanobacteria were assumed to contain high B

  12. A comparative study on three analytical methods for the determination of the neurotoxin BMAA in cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, E.J.; Gillissen, F.; Lurling, M.

    2012-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin ß-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been considered a serious health threat because of its putative role in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. First reports on BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria were alarming: nearly all cyanobacteria were assumed to contain high B

  13. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    sodium inhibitory effect of ethanol on channel - mediated sodium influx channels ...Exprnmantal Trherpeutics Ped in I.SA. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels : Effects on Neurotoxin Binding1 MICHAEL J. MULLIN 2 and... sodium channels . This indirect allosteric mechanism for inhibition of [H]BTX-B binding. effect orethanol was concentration-dependent and was

  14. Innovative mode of action based in vitro assays for detection of marine neurotoxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolas, J.A.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Innovative mode of action based in vitro assays for detection of marine neurotoxins J. Nicolas, P.J.M. Hendriksen, T.F.H. Bovee, I.M.C.M. Rietjens Marine biotoxins are naturally occurring compounds produced by particular phytoplankton species. These toxins often accumulate in seafood and thereby

  15. Organization and regulation of the neurotoxin genes in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffestin, Stéphanie; Marvaud, Jean Christophe; Cerrato, Rosario; Dupuy, Bruno; Popoff, Michel R

    2004-04-01

    Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins are structurally and functionally related 150 kDa proteins that are potent inhibitors of neuroexocytosis. Botulinum neurotoxin associates with non-toxic proteins to form complexes of various sizes. The botulinum neurotoxin and non-toxic protein genes are clustered in a DNA segment called the botulinum locus. This locus is probably located on a mobile or degenerate mobile element, which accounts for the various genomic localizations (chromosome, plasmid, phage) in different Clostridium botulinum types. The botulinum neurotoxin and non-toxic protein genes are organized in two polycistronic operons (ntnh-bont and ha operons) transcribed in opposite orientations. The gene that separates the two operons of the botulinum locus in C. botulinum A encodes a 21 kDa protein BotR/A, which is a positive regulator of the expression of the botulinum locus genes. Similarly, in Clostridium tetani, the gene located immediately upstream of the tetanus toxin gene, encodes a positive regulatory protein, TetR. BotR and TetR are possibly alternative sigma factors related to TxeR and UviA, which regulate C. difficile toxin and C. perfringens bacteriocin production, respectively. TxeR and UviA define a new sub-group of the sigma(70) family of RNA polymerase initiation factors. In addition, the C. botulinum genome contains predicted two-component system genes, some of which are possibly involved in regulation of toxinogenesis.

  16. Trans generational effects of the neurotoxin BMAA on the aquatic grazer Daphnia magna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, Elisabeth J.; García-Altares, María; Mendes e Mello, Mariana; Lürling, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin that is suspected to play a role in the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson’s disease. BMAA has been detected in phytoplankton and globally, the main exposure routes for humans to BMAA are

  17. Trans generational effects of the neurotoxin BMAA on the aquatic grazer Daphnia magna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, E.J.; Garcia-Altares, M.; Mendes e Mello, M.; Lurling, M.F.L.L.W.

    2015-01-01

    ß-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin that is suspected to play a role in the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson’s disease. BMAA has been detected in phytoplankton and globally, the main exposure routes for humans to BMAA are through

  18. A loop quantum multiverse?

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Inhomogeneous space-times in loop quantum cosmology have come under better control with recent advances in effective methods. Even highly inhomogeneous situations, for which multiverse scenarios provide extreme examples, can now be considered at least qualitatively.

  19. Blind loop syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the stomach) and operations for extreme obesity As a complication of inflammatory bowel disease Diseases such as diabetes or scleroderma may slow down movement in a segment of the intestine, leading to blind loop syndrome.

  20. Diffusion of Wilson Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Brzoska, A M; Negele, J W; Thies, M

    2004-01-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the distribution of Wilson loops in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory is presented in which Wilson loop distributions are described as the result of a diffusion process on the group manifold. It is shown that, in the absence of forces, diffusion implies Casimir scaling and, conversely, exact Casimir scaling implies free diffusion. Screening processes occur if diffusion takes place in a potential. The crucial distinction between screening of fundamental and adjoint loops is formulated as a symmetry property related to the center symmetry of the underlying gauge theory. The results are expressed in terms of an effective Wilson loop action and compared with various limits of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory.

  1. Presynaptic snake beta-neurotoxins produce tetanic fade and endplate potential run-down during neuromuscular blockade in mouse diaphragm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, H I; Nicholson, G M

    1997-11-01

    The present study investigated the ability of a number of presynaptic snake neurotoxins (snake beta-neurotoxins) to produce nerve-evoked train-of-four fade, tetanic fade and endplate potential run-down during the development of neuromuscular blockade in the isolated mouse phrenic-hemidiaphragm nerve-muscle preparation. All the snake beta-neurotoxins tested, with the exception of notexin, produced train-of-four and tetanic fade of nerve-evoked isometric muscle contractions. Train-of-four fade was not present during the initial depressant or facilitatory phases of muscle tension produced by the snake beta-neurotoxins but developed progressively during the final depressant phase that precedes complete neuromuscular blockade. The 'non-neurotoxic' bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 and the 'low-toxicity' phospholipase A2 from Naja naja atra venom failed to elicit train-of-four fade, indicating that the phospholipase activity of the snake beta-neurotoxins is not responsible for the development of fade. Intracellular recording of endplate potentials (EPPs) elicited by nerve-evoked trains of stimuli showed a progressive run-down in EPP amplitude during the train following incubation with all snake beta-neurotoxins except notexin. Again this run-down in EPP amplitude was confined to the final depressant phase of snake beta-neurotoxin action. However when EPP amplitude fell to near uniquantal levels (fade was reduced. Unlike postjunctional snake alpha-neurotoxins, prejunctional snake beta-neurotoxins interfere with acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction during the development of neuromuscular blockade. This study provides further support for the hypothesis that fade in twitch and tetanic muscle tension is due to an underlying rundown in EPP amplitude resulting from a prejunctional alteration of transmitter release rather than a use-dependent block of postjunctional nicotinic receptors.

  2. From Loops to Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, H

    2010-01-01

    The generating function for all antisymmetric characters of a Wilson loop matrix in SU(N) Yang Mills theory is the partition function of a fermion living on the curve describing the loop. This generalizes to fermion subsystems living on higher dimensional submanifolds, for example, surfaces. This write-up also contains some extra background, in response to some questions raised during the oral presentation.

  3. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Recognizes Its Protein Receptor SV2 by a Different Mechanism than Botulinum Neurotoxin B Synaptotagmin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Weisemann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs exhibit extraordinary potency due to their exquisite neurospecificity, which is achieved by dual binding to complex polysialo-gangliosides and synaptic vesicle proteins. The luminal domain 4 (LD4 of the three synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 isoforms, SV2A‐C, identified as protein receptors for the most relevant serotype BoNT/A, binds within the 50 kDa cell binding domain HC of BoNT/A. Here, we deciphered the BoNT/A‐SV2 interactions in more detail. In pull down assays, the binding of HCA to SV2-LD4 isoforms decreases from SV2C >> SV2A > SV2B. A binding constant of 200 nM was determined for BoNT/A to rat SV2C-LD4 in GST pull down assay. A similar binding constant was determined by surface plasmon resonance for HCA to rat SV2C and to human SV2C, the latter being slightly lower due to the substitution L563F in LD4. At pH 5, as measured in acidic synaptic vesicles, the binding constant of HCA to hSV2C is increased more than 10-fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that the quadrilateral helix of SV2C-LD4 already exists in solution prior to BoNT/A binding. Hence, the BoNT/A‐SV2C interaction is of different nature compared to BoNT/B‐Syt-II. In particular, the preexistence of the quadrilateral β-sheet helix of SV2 and its pH-dependent binding to BoNT/A via backbone–backbone interactions constitute major differences. Knowledge of the molecular details of BoNT/A‐SV2 interactions drives the development of high affinity peptides to counteract BoNT/A intoxications or to capture functional BoNT/A variants in innovative detection systems for botulism diagnostic.

  4. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Recognizes Its Protein Receptor SV2 by a Different Mechanism than Botulinum Neurotoxin B Synaptotagmin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisemann, Jasmin; Stern, Daniel; Mahrhold, Stefan; Dorner, Brigitte G.; Rummel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) exhibit extraordinary potency due to their exquisite neurospecificity, which is achieved by dual binding to complex polysialo-gangliosides and synaptic vesicle proteins. The luminal domain 4 (LD4) of the three synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 isoforms, SV2A‐C, identified as protein receptors for the most relevant serotype BoNT/A, binds within the 50 kDa cell binding domain HC of BoNT/A. Here, we deciphered the BoNT/A‐SV2 interactions in more detail. In pull down assays, the binding of HCA to SV2-LD4 isoforms decreases from SV2C >> SV2A > SV2B. A binding constant of 200 nM was determined for BoNT/A to rat SV2C-LD4 in GST pull down assay. A similar binding constant was determined by surface plasmon resonance for HCA to rat SV2C and to human SV2C, the latter being slightly lower due to the substitution L563F in LD4. At pH 5, as measured in acidic synaptic vesicles, the binding constant of HCA to hSV2C is increased more than 10-fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that the quadrilateral helix of SV2C-LD4 already exists in solution prior to BoNT/A binding. Hence, the BoNT/A‐SV2C interaction is of different nature compared to BoNT/B‐Syt-II. In particular, the preexistence of the quadrilateral β-sheet helix of SV2 and its pH-dependent binding to BoNT/A via backbone–backbone interactions constitute major differences. Knowledge of the molecular details of BoNT/A‐SV2 interactions drives the development of high affinity peptides to counteract BoNT/A intoxications or to capture functional BoNT/A variants in innovative detection systems for botulism diagnostic. PMID:27196927

  5. Structure- and Substrate- Based Inhibitor Design for Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran,D.; Rawat, R.; Ludivico, M.; Ahmed, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins cleave specific soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex proteins and block the release of neurotransmitters that cause flaccid paralysis and are considered potential bioweapons. Botulinum neurotoxin type A is the most potent among the clostridial neurotoxins, and to date there is no post-exposure therapeutic intervention available. To develop inhibitors leading to drug design, it is imperative that critical interactions between the enzyme and the substrate near the active site are known. Although enzyme-substrate interactions at exosites away from the active site are mapped in detail for botulinum neurotoxin type A, information about the active site interactions is lacking. Here, we present the crystal structures of botulinum neurotoxin type A catalytic domain in complex with four inhibitory substrate analog tetrapeptides, viz. RRGC, RRGL, RRGI, and RRGM at resolutions of 1.6-1.8 Angstroms . These structures show for the first time the interactions between the substrate and enzyme at the active site and delineate residues important for substrate stabilization and catalytic activity. We show that OH of Tyr366 and NH2 of Arg363 are hydrogen-bonded to carbonyl oxygens of P1 and P1' of the substrate analog and position it for catalytic activity. Most importantly, the nucleophilic water is replaced by the amino group of the N-terminal residue of the tetrapeptide. Furthermore, the S1' site is formed by Phe194, Thr215, Thr220, Asp370, and Arg363. The Ki of the best inhibitory tetrapeptide is 157 nm.

  6. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twine Susan M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Results Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes, and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI. These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5 has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Conclusion Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism

  7. Allosteric modulation of neurotoxin binding to voltage-sensitive sodium channels by Ptychodiscus brevis toxin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, R G; Jover, E; Couraud, F; Baden, D G; Catterall, W A

    1987-03-01

    The effects of Ptychodiscus brevis toxin 2 (PbTx-2) on the binding of neurotoxins at four different neurotoxin receptor sites on voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes were examined. Binding of saxitoxin at neurotoxin receptor site 1 and Leiurus quinquestriatus alpha-scorpion toxin (LqTx) at neurotoxin receptor site 3 was unaffected. PbTx-2 enhanced binding of batrachotoxinin A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B) to neurotoxin receptor site 2 and Centruroides suffusus suffusus beta-scorpion toxin (CsTx II) to site 4 on sodium channels. These results support the proposal that PbTx-2 and related toxins act at a new receptor site (site 5) that has not been previously analyzed in binding experiments. Half-maximal effects of PbTx-2 were observed in the range of 20-50 nM PbTx-2. The enhancement of BTX-B binding was reduced by depolarization. Saturating concentrations of PbTx-2 reduced KD values for binding of BTX-B and CsTx-II 2.9-fold and 2.6-fold, respectively. The effects of PbTx-2 and LqTx in enhancing BTX-B binding were synergistic. A model involving both preferential binding of BTX-B, PbTx-2, LqTx, and CsTx II to active states of sodium channels and allosteric interactions among the four receptor sites at which these toxins act accommodates these and previous results.

  8. Genetic Programming with Simple Loops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Yuesheng; WANG Baozhong; KANG Lishan

    1999-01-01

    A kind of loop function LoopN inGenetic Programming (GP) is proposed.Different from other forms of loopfunction, such as While-Do and Repeat-Until, LoopNtakes only oneargument as its loop body and makes its loop body simply run N times,soinfinite loops will never happen. The problem of how to avoid too manylayers ofloops in Genetic Programming is also solved. The advantage ofLoopN in GP is shown bythe computational results in solving the mowerproblem.

  9. Two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 represses transcription from botulinum neurotoxin promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Korkeala, Hannu; Dahlsten, Elias; Sahala, Elina; Heap, John T; Minton, Nigel P; Lindström, Miia

    2013-03-01

    Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved -10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike.

  10. Loop electrosurgical excisional procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, E J; Harper, M B

    1993-02-01

    Loop electrosurgical excisional procedure, or LEEP, also known as loop diathermy treatment, loop excision of the transformation zone (LETZ), and large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ), is a new technique for outpatient diagnosis and treatment of dysplastic cervical lesions. This procedure produces good specimens for cytologic evaluation, carries a low risk of affecting childbearing ability, and is likely to replace cryotherapy or laser treatment for cervical neoplasias. LEEP uses low-current, high-frequency electrical generators and thin stainless steel or tungsten loops to excise either lesions or the entire transformation zone. Complication rates are comparable to cryotherapy or laser treatment methods and include bleeding, incomplete removal of the lesion, and cervical stenosis. Compared with other methods, the advantages of LEEP include: removal of abnormal tissue in a manner permitting cytologic study, low cost, ease of acquiring necessary skills, and the ability to treat lesions with fewer visits. Patient acceptance of the procedure is high. Widespread use of LEEP by family physicians can be expected.

  11. Differentiating Botulinum Neurotoxin-Producing Clostridia with a Simple, Multiplex PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Charles H D; Vazquez, Adam J; Hill, Karen; Smith, Theresa J; Nottingham, Roxanne; Stone, Nathan E; Sobek, Colin J; Cocking, Jill H; Fernández, Rafael A; Caballero, Patricia A; Leiser, Owen P; Keim, Paul; Sahl, Jason W

    2017-09-15

    Diverse members of the genus Clostridium produce botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), which cause a flaccid paralysis known as botulism. While multiple species of clostridia produce BoNTs, the majority of human botulism cases have been attributed to Clostridium botulinum groups I and II. Recent comparative genomic studies have demonstrated the genomic diversity within these BoNT-producing species. This report introduces a multiplex PCR assay for differentiating members of C. botulinum group I, C. sporogenes, and two major subgroups within C. botulinum group II. Coding region sequences unique to each of the four species/subgroups were identified by in silico analyses of thousands of genome assemblies, and PCR primers were designed to amplify each marker. The resulting multiplex PCR assay correctly assigned 41 tested isolates to the appropriate species or subgroup. A separate PCR assay to determine the presence of the ntnh gene (a gene associated with the botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster) was developed and validated. The ntnh gene PCR assay provides information about the presence or absence of the botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster and the type of gene cluster present (ha positive [ha(+)] or orfX(+)). The increased availability of whole-genome sequence data and comparative genomic tools enabled the design of these assays, which provide valuable information for characterizing BoNT-producing clostridia. The PCR assays are rapid, inexpensive tests that can be applied to a variety of sample types to assign isolates to species/subgroups and to detect clostridia with botulinum neurotoxin gene (bont) clusters.IMPORTANCE Diverse clostridia produce the botulinum neurotoxin, one of the most potent known neurotoxins. In this study, a multiplex PCR assay was developed to differentiate clostridia that are most commonly isolated in connection with human botulism cases: C. botulinum group I, C. sporogenes, and two major subgroups within C. botulinum group II. Since BoNT-producing and

  12. Cobra ( Naja spp. ) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor exhibits resistance to Erabu sea snake ( Laticauda semifasciata) short-chain alpha-neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Zoltan; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C; Sorota, Steve

    2004-05-01

    Snake alpha-neutotoxins of Elapidae venoms are grouped into two structural classes, short-chain and long-chain alpha-neutotoxins. While these two classes share many chemical and biological characteristics, there are also distinct dissimilarities between them, including their binding site on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), specificity among species of Chordata, and the associated pharmacological effects. In the present study we test the hypothesis that structural motifs that evolved to confer natural resistance against conspecific long-chain alpha-neurotoxins in Elapidae snakes also interfere with the biological action of short-chain alpha-neurotoxins. We expressed functional nAChRs that contains segments or single residues of the Elapidae nAChR ligand binding domain and tested the effect of short-chain alpha-neurotoxin erabutoxin-a (ETX-a) from the Erabu sea snake Laticauda semifasciata on the acetylcholine-induced currents as measured by two-microelectrode voltage clamp. Our results show that the Elapidae nAChR alpha subunit segment T(154)-L(208) ligand binding domain has an inhibitory effect on the pharmacological action of ETX-a. This effect is primarily attributed to the presence of glycosylation at position N(189). If the glycosylation is removed from the T(154)-L(208) segment, the nAChR will be inhibited, however, to a lesser extent than seen in the mouse. This effect correlates with the variations in alpha-neurotoxin sensitivity of different species and, importantly, reflects the evolutionary conservation of the binding site on the nAChR polypeptide backbone per se. Phylogenetic analysis of alpha-neurotoxin resistance suggests that alpha-neurotoxin-resistant nAChR evolved first, which permitted the evolution of snake venom alpha-neurotoxins. A model describing alpha-neurotoxin resistance in Elapidae snakes is presented.

  13. Biochemistry of snake venom neurotoxins and their application to the study of synapse. [Neurotoxins isolated from venom of the Formosan banded krait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanley, M.R.

    1978-11-01

    The crude venom of the Formosan banded krait, Bungarus multicinctus, was separated into eleven lethal protein fractions. Nine fractions were purified to final homogeneous toxins, designated ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, ..beta..-bungarotoxin, and toxins 7, 8, 9A, 11, 12, 13, and 14. Three of the toxins, ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, 7, and 8, were identified as post-synaptic curarimimetic neurotoxins. The remaining toxins were identified as pre-synaptic neurotoxins. ..cap alpha..-Bungarotoxin, toxin 7, and toxin 8 are all highly stable basic polypeptides of approx. 8000 daltons molecular weight. The pre-synaptic toxins fell into two structural groups: toxin 9A and 14 which were single basic chains of approx. 14,000 daltons, and ..beta..-bungarotoxin, and toxins 11 thru 13 which were composed of two chains of approx. 8000 and approx. 13,000 daltons covalently linked by disulfides. All the pre-synaptic neurotoxins were shown to have intrinsic calcium-dependent phospholipase A activities. Under certain conditions, intact synaptic membranes were hydrolyzed more rapidly than protein-free extracted synaptic-lipid liposomes which, in turn, were hydrolyzed more rapidly than any other tested liposomes. It was speculated that cell-surface arrays of phosphatidyl serine/glycolipids created high affinity target sites for ..beta..-bungarotoxin. Single-chain toxins were found to be qualitatively different from the two-chain toxins in their ability to block the functioning of acetylcholine receptors, and were quantitatively different in their enzymatic and membrane disruptive activities. ..beta..-Bungarotoxin was shown to be an extremely potent neuronal lesioning agent. There was no apparent selectivity for cholinergic over non-cholinergic neurons, nor for nerve terminals over cell bodies. It was suggested that ..beta..-bungarotoxin can be considered a useful new histological tool, which may exhibit some regional selectivity.

  14. Loops in Twistor Space

    CERN Document Server

    Bena, I; Kosower, D A; Roiban, R; Bena, Iosif; Bern, Zvi; Kosower, David A.; Roiban, Radu

    2004-01-01

    We elucidate the one-loop twistor-space structure corresponding to momentum-space MHV diagrams. We also discuss the infrared divergences, and argue that only a limited set of MHV diagrams contain them. We show how to introduce a twistor-space regulator corresponding to dimensional regularization for the infrared-divergent diagrams. We also evaluate explicitly the `holomorphic anomaly' pointed out by Cachazo, Svrcek, and Witten, and use the result to define modified differential operators which can be used to probe the twistor-space structure of one-loop amplitudes.

  15. Closed Loop Subspace Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir W. Nilsen

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A new three step closed loop subspace identifications algorithm based on an already existing algorithm and the Kalman filter properties is presented. The Kalman filter contains noise free states which implies that the states and innovation are uneorre lated. The idea is that a Kalman filter found by a good subspace identification algorithm will give an output which is sufficiently uncorrelated with the noise on the output of the actual process. Using feedback from the output of the estimated Kalman filter in the closed loop system a subspace identification algorithm can be used to estimate an unbiased model.

  16. Loop Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) -- a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the article, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  17. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  18. Reversible hysteresis loop tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A.; Binek, Ch.; Margulies, D. T.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2006-02-01

    We utilize antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer structures to magnetically tune hysteresis loop properties. Key element of this approach is the non-overlapping switching field distribution of the two magnetic layers that make up the system: a hard magnetic CoPtCrB layer (HL) and a soft magnetic CoCr layer (SL). Both layers are coupled antiferromagnetically through an only 0.6-nm-thick Ru interlayer. The non-overlapping switching field distribution allows the measurement of magnetization reversal in the SL at low fields while keeping the magnetization state of the HL unperturbed. Applying an appropriate high field or high field sequence changes the magnetic state of the HL, which then influences the SL magnetization reversal due to the interlayer coupling. In this way, the position and shape of the SL hysteresis loop can be changed or tuned in a fully reversible and highly effective manner. Here, we study specifically how the SL hysteresis loop characteristics change as we move the HL through an entire high field hysteresis loop sequence.

  19. VAMP/synaptobrevin cleavage by tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins is strongly enhanced by acidic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccin, Paola; Rossetto, Ornella; Rigoni, Michela; Johnson, Eric; Schiavo, Giampietro; Montecucco, Cesare

    2003-05-01

    Tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins (TeNT and BoNTs) block neuroexocytosis via specific cleavage and inactivation of SNARE proteins. Such activity is exerted by the N-terminal 50 kDa light chain (L) domain, which is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. TeNT, BoNT/B, /D, /F and /G cleave vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP), a protein of the neurotransmitter-containing small synaptic vesicles, at different single peptide bonds. Since the proteolytic activity of these metalloproteases is higher on native VAMP inserted in synaptic vesicles than on recombinant VAMP, we have investigated the influence of liposomes of different lipid composition on this activity. We found that the rate of VAMP cleavage with all neurotoxins tested here is strongly enhanced by negatively charged lipid mixtures. This effect is at least partially due to the binding of the metalloprotease to the lipid membranes, with electrostatic interactions playing an important role.

  20. [Analysis of Phytoplankton in Tsimlyansk Reservoir (RUSSIA) for the Presence of Cyanobacterial Hepato- and Neurotoxins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidelev, S I; Golokolenova, T B; Chernova, E N; Russkikh, I V

    2015-01-01

    Although the water bodies of southern Russia experience the most extreme effects of cyanobacterial blooms, molecular genetic data on the composition of toxigenic cyanobacteria in this region have been absent. Screening for the genes responsible for the synthesis of hepatotoxins (microcystins and cylindrospermopsin) and neurotoxins (anatoxin-a and saxitoxins) in cyanobacteria from the Tsimlyansk reservoir on the Don River was carried out. The presence of microcystin-producing Microcystis and Planktothrix populations, as well as of cyanobacteria capable of synthesis of a neurotoxin anatoxin-a was revealed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A hypothesis of the presence of anatoxin-a-producing Planktothrix rubescens population in the phytoplankton of the Tsimlyansk reservoir is proposed. The obtained PCR data were confirmed by the results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and liquid chromatography/mass-spectrometry (LC/MS). Anatoxin-a and five microcystin variants were identified in the phytoplankton biomass.

  1. [The chromosomal genes for black widow spider neurotoxins do not contain introns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilevich, V N; Grishin, E V

    2000-12-01

    The overlapping fragments of the chromosomal DNA from black widow spider Latrodectus mactans carrying genes for high-molecular-mass protein neurotoxins, alpha- and delta-latroinsectotoxins (alpha-LIT and delta-LIT) and alpha-latrotoxin (alpha-LTX), were PCR-amplified and cloned. Restriction analysis of the PCR products showed that the distribution and sizes of the restriction fragments coincided with those deduced from the earlier sequencing of cDNAs of the corresponding genes. It thus followed that the alpha-LIT and delta-LIT genes are intronless. Along with our data on the structure of the alpha-latrocrustotoxin (alpha-LCT), this implies that the lack of introns is a common feature of the black widow spider genes encoding high molecular mass neurotoxins.

  2. The Structure of the Neurotoxin- Associated Protein HA33/A from Clostridium botulinum Suggests a Reoccurring Beta-Trefoil Fold in the Progenitor Toxin Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    sequence similarity to the b-trefoil- containing binding domains of BoNT/A and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) from Clostridium tetani with sequence...doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2004.12.039 J. Mol. Biol. (2005) 346, 1083–1093The Structure of the Neurotoxin-associated Protein HA33/A from Clostridium botulinum...correspond stevens@scripps.eduThe hemagglutinating protein HA33 from Clostridium botulinum is associated with the large botulinum neurotoxin secreted

  3. Substrate Recognition Mechanism of VAMP/Synaptobrevin-cleaving Clostridial Neurotoxins*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) inhibit neurotransmitter release by proteolyzing a single peptide bond in one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors SNAP-25, syntaxin, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT and BoNT/B, D, F, and G of the seven known BoNTs cleave the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP/synaptobrevin. Except for BoNT/B and TeNT, they cleave unique peptide bonds, and prior work suggested that different substrate segments are required for the interaction of each toxin. Although the mode of SNAP-25 cleavage by BoNT/A and E has recently been studied in detail, the mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin proteolysis is fragmentary. Here, we report the determination of all substrate residues that are involved in the interaction with BoNT/B, D, and F and TeNT by means of systematic mutagenesis of VAMP/synaptobrevin. For each of the toxins, three or more residues clustered at an N-terminal site remote from the respective scissile bond are identified that affect solely substrate binding. These exosites exhibit different sizes and distances to the scissile peptide bonds for each neurotoxin. Substrate segments C-terminal of the cleavage site (P4-P4′) do not play a role in the catalytic process. Mutation of residues in the proximity of the scissile bond exclusively affects the turnover number; however, the importance of individual positions at the cleavage sites varied for each toxin. The data show that, similar to the SNAP-25 proteolyzing BoNT/A and E, VAMP/synaptobrevin-specific clostridial neurotoxins also initiate substrate interaction, employing an exosite located N-terminal of the scissile peptide bond. PMID:18511418

  4. Discovery of Nuclear-Encoded Genes for the Neurotoxin Saxitoxin in Dinoflagellates

    OpenAIRE

    Anke Stüken; Orr, Russell J. S.; Ralf Kellmann; Murray, Shauna A.; Neilan, Brett A.; Kjetill S Jakobsen

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin that occurs in aquatic environments worldwide. Ingestion of vector species can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning, a severe human illness that may lead to paralysis and death. In freshwaters, the toxin is produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria; in marine waters, it is associated with eukaryotic dinoflagellates. However, several studies suggest that saxitoxin is not produced by dinoflagellates themselves, but by co-cultured bacteria. Here, we show that genes ...

  5. Scorpion Potassium Channel-blocking Defensin Highlights a Functional Link with Neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lanxia; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Qian; Li, Yang; Yang, Fan; Chen, Zongyun; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-03-25

    The structural similarity between defensins and scorpion neurotoxins suggests that they might have evolved from a common ancestor. However, there is no direct experimental evidence demonstrating a functional link between scorpion neurotoxins and defensins. The scorpion defensin BmKDfsin4 from Mesobuthus martensiiKarsch contains 37 amino acid residues and a conserved cystine-stabilized α/β structural fold. The recombinant BmKDfsin4, a classical defensin, has been found to have inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Micrococcus luteusas well as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Interestingly, electrophysiological experiments showed that BmKDfsin4,like scorpion potassium channel neurotoxins, could effectively inhibit Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channel currents, and its IC50value for the Kv1.3 channel was 510.2 nm Similar to the structure-function relationships of classical scorpion potassium channel-blocking toxins, basic residues (Lys-13 and Arg-19) of BmKDfsin4 play critical roles in peptide-Kv1.3 channel interactions. Furthermore, mutagenesis and electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the channel extracellular pore region is the binding site of BmKDfsin4, indicating that BmKDfsin4 adopts the same mechanism for blocking potassium channel currents as classical scorpion toxins. Taken together, our work identifies scorpion BmKDfsin4 as the first invertebrate defensin to block potassium channels. These findings not only demonstrate that defensins from invertebrate animals are a novel type of potassium channel blockers but also provide evidence of a functional link between defensins and neurotoxins.

  6. Cycad neurotoxins, consumption of flying foxes, and ALS-PDC disease in Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Paul Alan; Sacks, Oliver W

    2002-03-26

    The Chamorro people of Guam have been afflicted with a complex of neurodegenerative diseases (now known as ALS-PDC) with similarities to ALS, AD, and PD at a far higher rate than other populations throughout the world. Chamorro consumption of flying foxes may have generated sufficiently high cumulative doses of plant neurotoxins to result in ALS-PDC neuropathologies, since the flying foxes forage on neurotoxic cycad seeds.

  7. Biomagnification of cycad neurotoxins in flying foxes: implications for ALS-PDC in Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Cox, Paul Alan

    2003-08-12

    Beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) occurs in higher levels in museum specimens of the Guamanian flying fox than in the cycad seeds the flying foxes feed on, confirming the hypothesis that cycad neurotoxins are biomagnified within the Guam ecosystem. Consumption of a single flying fox may have resulted in an equivalent BMAA dose obtained from eating 174 to 1,014 kg of processed cycad flour. Traditional feasting on flying foxes may be related to the prevalence of neuropathologic disease in Guam.

  8. A Review of the Disruptive Potential of Botulinum Neurotoxins as Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    dangerous chemical weapon (persistence in vivo, exceedingly high potency, ease of distribution and ease of production) also make it highly...caused by ingestion of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) was first described as “ sausage poisoning” in 1820 and attributed to a bacterium in 1897 [1]. We...intoxication of susceptible hosts invariably results in neuromuscular paralysis. The same characteristics that make the BoNTs the most lethal substances

  9. Evaluation of Lateral-Flow Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Detection Kits for Food Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-08

    samples for each food type (n 3). No mixed results were observed. 3938 SHARMA ET AL. APPL. ENVIRON. MICROBIOL. histolyticum, Clostridium tetani ...of Lateral-Flow Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Detection Kits for Food Analysis Shashi K. Sharma,1* Brian S. Eblen,1 Robert L. Bull,2 Donald H. Burr...detecting Clostridium botulinum neuro- toxins (BoNTs) in an assortment of foods were evaluated. Toxin extraction and preparation methods for various liquid

  10. Neurotoxins and their binding areas on voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke eStevens

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Sodium Channels (VGSCs are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Genetic defects in sodium channel genes therefore can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called ‘channelopathies’.The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. Until now, these concepts still form the basis for understanding the functioning of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and will generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start inactivating and currents decrease. In the inactivated state channels stay refractory for any new stimulus and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to any new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX and saxitoxin (STX also contributed largely to our today’s understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and specifically of VGSCs. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable tools in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt®, Elan. The original peptide, -MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMEA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in neurons.This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the

  11. Occurrence of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin in chronic disease of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyboldt, Christian; Discher, Sabrina; Jordan, Eva; Neubauer, Heinrich; Jensen, Katharina Charlotte; Campe, Amely; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Scheu, Theresa; Wichern, Anika; Gundling, Frieder; DoDuc, Phuong; Fohler, Svenja; Abdulmawjood, Amir; Klein, Günter; Hoedemaker, Martina

    2015-06-12

    Botulism caused by neurotoxins of Clostridium (C.) botulinum is a rare, but serious life-threatening disease in humans and animals. Botulism in livestock is usually caused by the oral uptake of C. botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) via contaminated feed and is characterized by flaccid paralysis. In the recent past a new syndrome caused by BoNT in dairy cattle was postulated. It was supposed that C. botulinum is able to colonize the lower intestine and may subsequently produce neurotoxin. The continuous resorption of small amounts of these BoNT may then provoke the so called syndrome of "chronic" or "visceral" botulism involving unspecific clinical symptoms, reduced performance of dairy cows and massive animal losses in the affected herd. To test this hypothesis a case-control study was conducted involving 92 affected farms and 47 control farms located in Northern Germany. Fecal samples of 1388 animals were investigated for the presence of BoNT to verify the key requirement of the hypothesis of chronic botulism. BoNT was not detected in any of the fecal samples using the most sensitive standard method for BoNT detection, the mouse bioassay. Therefore, the existence of "chronic" or "visceral" botulism could not be proven.

  12. Weak neurotoxin from Naja kaouthia cobra venom affects haemodynamic regulation by acting on acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogay, Alexey Ya; Rzhevsky, Dmitry I; Murashev, Arkady N; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2005-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies of weak neurotoxins from snake venoms have demonstrated their ability to interact with both muscle-type and neuronal alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). However, the biological activity in vivo of weak neurotoxins remains largely unknown. We have studied the influence of weak neurotoxin (WTX) from the venom of cobra Naja kaouthia on arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in rats and mice. It was found that intravenous injection of WTX induced a dose-dependent decrease in BP and an increase in HR in both species, the rats being more sensitive to WTX. Application of WTX following blockade of nAChRs or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) by hexamethonium or atropine, respectively, showed that both nAChRs and mAChRs are involved in the haemodynamic effects of WTX. Blockade of either nAChRs or mAChRs affected WTX action differently in rats and mice, thus reflecting interspecies differences in haemodynamic regulation.

  13. An Overview on the Marine Neurotoxin, Saxitoxin: Genetics, Molecular Targets, Methods of Detection and Ecological Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Kathleen D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Marine neurotoxins are natural products produced by phytoplankton and select species of invertebrates and fish. These compounds interact with voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels and modulate the flux of these ions into various cell types. This review provides a summary of marine neurotoxins, including their structures, molecular targets and pharmacologies. Saxitoxin and its derivatives, collectively referred to as paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are unique among neurotoxins in that they are found in both marine and freshwater environments by organisms inhabiting two kingdoms of life. Prokaryotic cyanobacteria are responsible for PST production in freshwater systems, while eukaryotic dinoflagellates are the main producers in marine waters. Bioaccumulation by filter-feeding bivalves and fish and subsequent transfer through the food web results in the potentially fatal human illnesses, paralytic shellfish poisoning and saxitoxin pufferfish poisoning. These illnesses are a result of saxitoxin’s ability to bind to the voltage-gated sodium channel, blocking the passage of nerve impulses and leading to death via respiratory paralysis. Recent advances in saxitoxin research are discussed, including the molecular biology of toxin synthesis, new protein targets, association with metal-binding motifs and methods of detection. The eco-evolutionary role(s) PSTs may serve for phytoplankton species that produce them are also discussed. PMID:23535394

  14. An Overview on the Marine Neurotoxin, Saxitoxin: Genetics, Molecular Targets, Methods of Detection and Ecological Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. Sayler

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine neurotoxins are natural products produced by phytoplankton and select species of invertebrates and fish. These compounds interact with voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels and modulate the flux of these ions into various cell types. This review provides a summary of marine neurotoxins, including their structures, molecular targets and pharmacologies. Saxitoxin and its derivatives, collectively referred to as paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs, are unique among neurotoxins in that they are found in both marine and freshwater environments by organisms inhabiting two kingdoms of life. Prokaryotic cyanobacteria are responsible for PST production in freshwater systems, while eukaryotic dinoflagellates are the main producers in marine waters. Bioaccumulation by filter-feeding bivalves and fish and subsequent transfer through the food web results in the potentially fatal human illnesses, paralytic shellfish poisoning and saxitoxin pufferfish poisoning. These illnesses are a result of saxitoxin’s ability to bind to the voltage-gated sodium channel, blocking the passage of nerve impulses and leading to death via respiratory paralysis. Recent advances in saxitoxin research are discussed, including the molecular biology of toxin synthesis, new protein targets, association with metal-binding motifs and methods of detection. The eco-evolutionary role(s PSTs may serve for phytoplankton species that produce them are also discussed.

  15. Droplet microfluidics for characterizing the neurotoxin-induced responses in individual Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weiwei; Wen, Hui; Lu, Yao; Shi, Yang; Lin, Bingcheng; Qin, Jianhua

    2010-11-07

    A droplet-based microfluidic device integrated with a novel floatage-based trap array and a tapered immobilization channel array was presented for characterizing the neurotoxin-induced multiple responses in individual Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) continuously. The established device enabled the evaluations of movement and fluorescence imaging analysis of individual C. elegans simultaneously. The utility of this device was demonstrated by the pharmacological evaluation of neurotoxin (6-hydroxydopamine, 6-OHDA) triggered mobility defects, neuron degeneration and oxidative stress in individual worms. Exposure of living worms to 6-OHDA could cause obvious mobility defects, selective degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons, and increased oxidative stress in a dose dependent manner. These results are important towards the understanding of mechanisms leading to DAergic toxicity by neurotoxin and will be of benefit for the screening of new therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. This device was simple, stable and easy to operate, with the potential to facilitate whole-animal assays and drug screening in a high throughput manner at single animal resolution.

  16. Tetrodotoxin, an Extremely Potent Marine Neurotoxin: Distribution, Toxicity, Origin and Therapeutical Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lago

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a potent neurotoxin responsible for many human intoxications and fatalities each year. The origin of TTX is unknown, but in the pufferfish, it seems to be produced by endosymbiotic bacteria that often seem to be passed down the food chain. The ingestion of contaminated pufferfish, considered the most delicious fish in Japan, is the usual route of toxicity. This neurotoxin, reported as a threat to human health in Asian countries, has spread to the Pacific and Mediterranean, due to the increase of temperature waters worldwide. TTX, for which there is no known antidote, inhibits sodium channel producing heart failure in many cases and consequently death. In Japan, a regulatory limit of 2 mg eq TTX/kg was established, although the restaurant preparation of “fugu” is strictly controlled by law and only chefs qualified are allowed to prepare the fish. Due to its paralysis effect, this neurotoxin could be used in the medical field as an analgesic to treat some cancer pains.

  17. Two-loop and n-loop eikonal vertex corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Kidonakis, Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    I present calculations of two-loop vertex corrections with massive and massless partons in the eikonal approximation. I show that the $n$-loop result for the UV poles can be given in terms of the one-loop calculation.

  18. Local loop near-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Franetič, Damir

    2015-01-01

    We study loop near-rings, a generalization of near-rings, where the additive structure is not necessarily associative. We introduce local loop near-rings and prove a useful detection principle for localness.

  19. Isolation and functional characterization of the novel Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin A8 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, Skadi; Schulz, K Melanie; Weisemann, Jasmin; Kirchner, Sebastian; Schreiber, Tanja; Bollenbach, Alexander; Dabrowski, P Wojtek; Nitsche, Andreas; Kalb, Suzanne R; Dorner, Martin B; Barr, John R; Rummel, Andreas; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2015-01-01

    Botulism is a severe neurological disease caused by the complex family of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT). Based on the different serotypes known today, a classification of serotype variants termed subtypes has been proposed according to sequence diversity and immunological properties. However, the relevance of BoNT subtypes is currently not well understood. Here we describe the isolation of a novel Clostridium botulinum strain from a food-borne botulism outbreak near Chemnitz, Germany. Comparison of its botulinum neurotoxin gene sequence with published sequences identified it to be a novel subtype within the BoNT/A serotype designated BoNT/A8. The neurotoxin gene is located within an ha-orfX+ cluster and showed highest homology to BoNT/A1, A2, A5, and A6. Unexpectedly, we found an arginine insertion located in the HC domain of the heavy chain, which is unique compared to all other BoNT/A subtypes known so far. Functional characterization revealed that the binding characteristics to its main neuronal protein receptor SV2C seemed unaffected, whereas binding to membrane-incorporated gangliosides was reduced in comparison to BoNT/A1. Moreover, we found significantly lower enzymatic activity of the natural, full-length neurotoxin and the recombinant light chain of BoNT/A8 compared to BoNT/A1 in different endopeptidase assays. Both reduced ganglioside binding and enzymatic activity may contribute to the considerably lower biological activity of BoNT/A8 as measured in a mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm assay. Despite its reduced activity the novel BoNT/A8 subtype caused severe botulism in a 63-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the first description and a comprehensive characterization of a novel BoNT/A subtype which combines genetic information on the neurotoxin gene cluster with an in-depth functional analysis using different technical approaches. Our results show that subtyping of BoNT is highly relevant and that understanding of the detailed toxin function might

  20. Isolation and functional characterization of the novel Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin A8 subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skadi Kull

    Full Text Available Botulism is a severe neurological disease caused by the complex family of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT. Based on the different serotypes known today, a classification of serotype variants termed subtypes has been proposed according to sequence diversity and immunological properties. However, the relevance of BoNT subtypes is currently not well understood. Here we describe the isolation of a novel Clostridium botulinum strain from a food-borne botulism outbreak near Chemnitz, Germany. Comparison of its botulinum neurotoxin gene sequence with published sequences identified it to be a novel subtype within the BoNT/A serotype designated BoNT/A8. The neurotoxin gene is located within an ha-orfX+ cluster and showed highest homology to BoNT/A1, A2, A5, and A6. Unexpectedly, we found an arginine insertion located in the HC domain of the heavy chain, which is unique compared to all other BoNT/A subtypes known so far. Functional characterization revealed that the binding characteristics to its main neuronal protein receptor SV2C seemed unaffected, whereas binding to membrane-incorporated gangliosides was reduced in comparison to BoNT/A1. Moreover, we found significantly lower enzymatic activity of the natural, full-length neurotoxin and the recombinant light chain of BoNT/A8 compared to BoNT/A1 in different endopeptidase assays. Both reduced ganglioside binding and enzymatic activity may contribute to the considerably lower biological activity of BoNT/A8 as measured in a mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm assay. Despite its reduced activity the novel BoNT/A8 subtype caused severe botulism in a 63-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the first description and a comprehensive characterization of a novel BoNT/A subtype which combines genetic information on the neurotoxin gene cluster with an in-depth functional analysis using different technical approaches. Our results show that subtyping of BoNT is highly relevant and that understanding of the detailed

  1. Three classes of plasmid (47-63 kb) carry the type B neurotoxin gene cluster of group II Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew T; Austin, John W; Weedmark, Kelly A; Corbett, Cindi; Peck, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis of 26 strains of Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B4 showed that 23 strains carried their neurotoxin gene cluster on a 47-63 kb plasmid (three strains lacked any hybridization signal for the neurotoxin gene, presumably having lost their plasmid). Unexpectedly, no neurotoxin genes were found on the chromosome. This apparent constraint on neurotoxin gene transfer to the chromosome stands in marked contrast to Group I C. botulinum, in which neurotoxin gene clusters are routinely found in both locations. The three main classes of type B4 plasmid identified in this study shared different regions of homology, but were unrelated to any Group I or Group III plasmid. An important evolutionary aspect firmly links plasmid class to geographical origin, with one class apparently dominant in marine environments, whereas a second class is dominant in European terrestrial environments. A third class of plasmid is a hybrid between the other two other classes, providing evidence for contact between these seemingly geographically separated populations. Mobility via conjugation has been previously demonstrated for the type B4 plasmid of strain Eklund 17B, and similar genes associated with conjugation are present in all type B4 plasmids now described. A plasmid toxin-antitoxin system pemI gene located close to the neurotoxin gene cluster and conserved in each type B4 plasmid class may be important in understanding the mechanism which regulates this unique and unexpected bias toward plasmid-borne neurotoxin genes in Group II C. botulinum type B4.

  2. On the extended loop calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Griego, J R

    1995-01-01

    Some features of extended loops are considered. In particular, the behaviour under diffeomorphism transformations of the wavefunctions with support on the extended loop space are studied. The basis of a method to obtain analytical expressions of diffeomorphism invariants via extended loops are settled. Applications to knot theory and quantum gravity are considered.

  3. Closing global material loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosman, Ernst-Jan; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Liotta, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Replacing virgin materials with waste materials, a practice known as Industrial Symbiosis (IS), has been identified as a key strategy for closing material loops. This article adopts a critical view on geographic proximity and external coordinators – two key enablers of IS. By ‘uncovering’ a case...... where both enablers are absent, this study seeks to explore firm-level challenges of IS. We adopt an exploratory case study approach at a cement manufacturer who engages in cross-border IS without the support of external coordinators. Our research presents insights into two key areas of IS: 1) setting...... for geographic proximity and external coordinators. In doing so, our insights into firm-level challenges of long-distance IS exchanges contribute to closing global material loops by increasing the number of potential circular pathways....

  4. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time.

  5. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations where classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical space-time inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding space-time is then modified. One particular realization is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. Main effects are introduced into effective classical equations which allow to avoid interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function which allows to extend space-time beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of space-time arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds new light on more general issues such as time.

  6. PAR Loop Schedule Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, Jr.; W.F.

    1958-04-30

    The schedule for the installation of the PAR slurry loop experiment in the South Facility of the ORR has been reviewed and revised. The design, fabrications and Installation is approximately two weeks behind schedule at this time due to many factors; however, indications are that this time can be made up. Design is estimated to be 75% complete, fabrication 32% complete and installation 12% complete.

  7. Verification of Loop Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, A.; Lionello, R.; Mok, Y.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Many different techniques have been used to characterize the plasma in the solar corona: density-sensitive spectral line ratios are used to infer the density, the evolution of coronal structures in different passbands is used to infer the temperature evolution, and the simultaneous intensities measured in multiple passbands are used to determine the emission measure. All these analysis techniques assume that the intensity of the structures can be isolated through background subtraction. In this paper, we use simulated observations from a 3D hydrodynamic simulation of a coronal active region to verify these diagnostics. The density and temperature from the simulation are used to generate images in several passbands and spectral lines. We identify loop structures in the simulated images and calculate the loop background. We then determine the density, temperature and emission measure distribution as a function of time from the observations and compare with the true temperature and density of the loop. We find that the overall characteristics of the temperature, density, and emission measure are recovered by the analysis methods, but the details of the true temperature and density are not. For instance, the emission measure curves calculated from the simulated observations are much broader than the true emission measure distribution, though the average temperature evolution is similar. These differences are due, in part, to inadequate background subtraction, but also indicate a limitation of the analysis methods.

  8. Cosmic string loop microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Chernoff, David F.

    2014-06-01

    Cosmic superstring loops within the galaxy microlens background point sources lying close to the observer-string line of sight. For suitable alignments, multiple paths coexist and the (achromatic) flux enhancement is a factor of two. We explore this unique type of lensing by numerically solving for geodesics that extend from source to observer as they pass near an oscillating string. We characterize the duration of the flux doubling and the scale of the image splitting. We probe and confirm the existence of a variety of fundamental effects predicted from previous analyses of the static infinite straight string: the deficit angle, the Kaiser-Stebbins effect, and the scale of the impact parameter required to produce microlensing. Our quantitative results for dynamical loops vary by O(1) factors with respect to estimates based on infinite straight strings for a given impact parameter. A number of new features are identified in the computed microlensing solutions. Our results suggest that optical microlensing can offer a new and potentially powerful methodology for searches for superstring loop relics of the inflationary era.

  9. LoopIng: a template-based tool for predicting the structure of protein loops.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2015-08-06

    Predicting the structure of protein loops is very challenging, mainly because they are not necessarily subject to strong evolutionary pressure. This implies that, unlike the rest of the protein, standard homology modeling techniques are not very effective in modeling their structure. However, loops are often involved in protein function, hence inferring their structure is important for predicting protein structure as well as function.We describe a method, LoopIng, based on the Random Forest automated learning technique, which, given a target loop, selects a structural template for it from a database of loop candidates. Compared to the most recently available methods, LoopIng is able to achieve similar accuracy for short loops (4-10 residues) and significant enhancements for long loops (11-20 residues). The quality of the predictions is robust to errors that unavoidably affect the stem regions when these are modeled. The method returns a confidence score for the predicted template loops and has the advantage of being very fast (on average: 1 min/loop).www.biocomputing.it/loopinganna.tramontano@uniroma1.itSupplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Identification of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a protein receptor for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte P S Jacky

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A causes transient muscle paralysis by entering motor nerve terminals (MNTs where it cleaves the SNARE protein Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25206 to yield SNAP25197. Cleavage of SNAP25 results in blockage of synaptic vesicle fusion and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine. The specific uptake of BoNT/A into pre-synaptic nerve terminals is a tightly controlled multistep process, involving a combination of high and low affinity receptors. Interestingly, the C-terminal binding domain region of BoNT/A, HC/A, is homologous to fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, making it a possible ligand for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs. Here we present data supporting the identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a high affinity receptor for BoNT/A in neuronal cells. HC/A binds with high affinity to the two extra-cellular loops of FGFR3 and acts similar to an agonist ligand for FGFR3, resulting in phosphorylation of the receptor. Native ligands for FGFR3; FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 compete for binding to FGFR3 and block BoNT/A cellular uptake. These findings show that FGFR3 plays a pivotal role in the specific uptake of BoNT/A across the cell membrane being part of a larger receptor complex involving ganglioside- and protein-protein interactions.

  11. Identification of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a protein receptor for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte P S Jacky

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A causes transient muscle paralysis by entering motor nerve terminals (MNTs where it cleaves the SNARE protein Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25206 to yield SNAP25197. Cleavage of SNAP25 results in blockage of synaptic vesicle fusion and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine. The specific uptake of BoNT/A into pre-synaptic nerve terminals is a tightly controlled multistep process, involving a combination of high and low affinity receptors. Interestingly, the C-terminal binding domain region of BoNT/A, HC/A, is homologous to fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, making it a possible ligand for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs. Here we present data supporting the identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a high affinity receptor for BoNT/A in neuronal cells. HC/A binds with high affinity to the two extra-cellular loops of FGFR3 and acts similar to an agonist ligand for FGFR3, resulting in phosphorylation of the receptor. Native ligands for FGFR3; FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 compete for binding to FGFR3 and block BoNT/A cellular uptake. These findings show that FGFR3 plays a pivotal role in the specific uptake of BoNT/A across the cell membrane being part of a larger receptor complex involving ganglioside- and protein-protein interactions.

  12. Three-dimensional structure of the neurotoxin ATX Ia from Anemonia sulcata in aqueous solution determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, H; Billeter, M; Wüthrich, K

    1989-01-01

    With the aid of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the three-dimensional structure in aqueous solution was determined for ATX Ia, which is a 46 residue polypeptide neurotoxin of the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata. The input for the structure calculations consisted of 263 distance constraints from nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) and 76 vicinal coupling constants. For the structure calculation several new or ammended programs were used in a revised strategy consisting of five successive computational steps. First, the program HABAS was used for a complete search of all backbone and chi 1 conformations that are compatible with the intraresidual and sequential NMR constraints. Second, using the program DISMAN, we extended this approach to pentapeptides by extensive sampling of all conformations that are consistent with the local and medium-range NMR constraints. Both steps resulted in the definition of additional dihedral angle constraints and in stereospecific assignments for a number of beta-methylene groups. In the next two steps DISMAN was used to obtain a group of eight conformers that contain no significant residual violations of the NMR constraints or van der Waals contacts. Finally, these structures were subjected to restrained energy refinement with a modified version of the molecular mechanics module of AMBER, which in addition to the energy force field includes potentials for the NOE distance constraints and the dihedral angle constraints. The average of the pairwise minimal RMS distances between the resulting refined conformers calculated for the well defined molecular core, which contains the backbone atoms of 35 residues and 20 interior side chains, is 1.5 +/- 0.3 A. This core is formed by a four-stranded beta-sheet connected by two well-defined loops, and there is an additional flexible loop consisting of the eleven residues 8-18. The core of the protein is stabilized by three disulfide bridges, which are surrounded by hydrophobic residues

  13. Improving Loop Dependence Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nicklas Bo; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Programmers can no longer depend on new processors to have significantly improved single-thread performance. Instead, gains have to come from other sources such as the compiler and its optimization passes. Advanced passes make use of information on the dependencies related to loops. We improve...... the quality of that information by reusing the information given by the programmer for parallelization. We have implemented a prototype based on GCC into which we also add a new optimization pass. Our approach improves the amount of correctly classified dependencies resulting in 46% average improvement...

  14. Closing the loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2011-02-01

    Closed-loop algorithms can be found in every aspect of everyday modern life. Automation and control are used constantly to provide safety and to improve quality of life. Closed-loop systems and algorithms can be found in home appliances, automobiles, aviation and more. Can one imagine nowadays driving a car without ABS, cruise control or even anti-sliding control? Similar principles of automation and control can be used in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM). The idea of an algorithmic/technological way to control glycaemia is not new and has been researched for more than four decades. However, recent improvements in both glucose-sensing technology and insulin delivery together with advanced control and systems engineering made this dream of an artificial pancreas possible. The artificial pancreas may be the next big step in the treatment of DM since the use of insulin analogues. An artificial pancreas can be described as internal or external devices that use continuous glucose measurements to automatically manage exogenous insulin delivery with or without other hormones in an attempt to restore glucose regulation in individuals with DM using a control algorithm. This device as described can be internal or external; can use different types of control algorithms with bi-hormonal or uni-hormonal design; and can utilise different ways to administer them. The different designs and implementations have transitioned recently from in silico simulations to clinical evaluation stage with practical applications in mind. This may mark the beginning of a new era in diabetes management with the introduction of semi-closed-loop systems that can prevent or minimise nocturnal hypoglycaemia, to hybrid systems that will manage blood glucose (BG) levels with minimal user intervention to finally fully automated systems that will take the user out of the loop. More and more clinical trials will be needed for the artificial pancreas to become a reality but initial encouraging

  15. Loop expansion and the bosonic representation of loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, E.; Guglielmon, J.; Hackl, L.; Yokomizo, N.

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new loop expansion that provides a resolution of the identity in the Hilbert space of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. We work in the bosonic representation obtained by the canonical quantization of the spinorial formalism. The resolution of the identity gives a tool for implementing the projection of states in the full bosonic representation onto the space of solutions to the Gauss and area matching constraints of loop quantum gravity. This procedure is particularly efficient in the semiclassical regime, leading to explicit expressions for the loop expansions of coherent, heat kernel and squeezed states.

  16. Loop expansion and the bosonic representation of loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Hackl, Lucas; Yokomizo, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new loop expansion that provides a resolution of the identity in the Hilbert space of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. We work in the bosonic representation obtained by the canonical quantization of the spinorial formalism. The resolution of the identity gives a tool for implementing the projection of states in the full bosonic representation onto the space of solutions to the Gauss and area matching constraints of loop quantum gravity. This procedure is particularly efficient in the semiclassical regime, leading to explicit expressions for the loop expansions of coherent, heat kernel and squeezed states.

  17. Geochemical legacies and the future health of cities: A tale of two neurotoxins in urban soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel M. Filippelli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The past and future of cities are inextricably linked, a linkage that can be seen clearly in the long-term impacts of urban geochemical legacies. As loci of population as well as the means of employment and industry to support these populations, cities have a long history of co-locating contaminating practices and people, sometimes with negative implications for human health. Working at the intersection between environmental processes, communities, and human health is critical to grapple with environmental legacies and to support healthy, sustainable, and growing urban populations. An emerging area of environmental health research is to understand the impacts of chronic exposures and exposure mixtures—these impacts are poorly studied, yet may pose a significant threat to population health. Acute exposure to lead (Pb, a powerful neurotoxin to which children are particularly susceptible, has largely been eliminated in the U.S. and other countries through policy-based restrictions on leaded gasoline and lead-based paints. But the legacy of these sources remains in the form of surface soil Pb contamination, a common problem in cities and one that has only recently emerged as a widespread chronic exposure mechanism in cities. Some urban soils are also contaminated with another neurotoxin, mercury (Hg. The greatest human exposure to Hg is through fish consumption, so eating fish caught in urban areas presents risks for toxic Hg exposure. The potential double impact of chronic exposure to these two neurotoxins is pronounced in cities. Overall, there is a paradigmatic shift from reaction to and remediation of acute exposures towards a more nuanced understanding of the dynamic cycling of persistent environmental contaminants with resultant widespread and chronic exposure of inner-city dwellers, leading to chronic toxic illness and disability at substantial human and social cost.

  18. Geochemical Legacies and the Future Health of Cities: An Analysis of two Neurotoxins in Urban Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippelli, G. M.; Risch, M.

    2015-12-01

    The past and future of cities are inextricably linked, a linkage that can be seen clearly in the long-term impacts of urban geochemical legacies. As loci of population as well as the means of employment and industry to support these populations, cities have a long history of co-locating contaminating practices and people, sometimes with negative implications for human health. Working at the intersection between geochemical processes, communities, and human health is critical to grapple with environmental legacies and to support healthy, sustainable, and growing urban populations. An emerging area of environmental health research is to understand the impacts of chronic exposures and exposure mixtures—these impacts are very poorly studied, yet have materialized as perhaps the greatest threat to large-scale population health. Acute exposure to lead (Pb), a powerful neurotoxin to which children are particularly susceptible, has largely been eliminated in the U.S. and other countries through policy-based restrictions on leaded gasoline and lead-based paints. But these legacy Pb sources are still around in the form of surface soil Pb contamination, a common problem in cities and one that has only recently emerged as a pernicious and widespread chronic exposure mechanism in cities. Some urban soils are also contaminated with another neurotoxin, mercury (Hg), although very little work has been done to understand human exposures to low levels of this element in soils. The most documented human exposure to Hg is through fish consumption, so eating fish caught in urban areas presents risks for above average dietary Hg exposure. The potential double impact of chronic exposure to these two neurotoxins is pronounced in cities. Many aspects of the dose-response curves for individual elements and mixtures are poorly understood, especially at lower levels, leaving unanswered several interesting and provocative questions about environmental impacts on neurological and

  19. Interactions of the Neurotoxin Vipoxin in Solution Studied by Dynamic Light Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Dessislava Nikolova; Genov, Nicolay; Hristov, Krassimir; Dierks, Karsten; Betzel, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The neurotoxin vipoxin is the lethal component of the venom of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis. It is a heterodimer of a basic toxic His-48 phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and an acidic nontoxic Gln-48 PLA2. The shape of the neurotoxin and its separated components in solution as well as their interactions with calcium, the brain phospholipid phosphatidylcholine, and two inhibitors, elaidoylamide and vitamin E, were investigated by dynamic light scattering. Calcium binding is connected with a conformational change in vipoxin observed as a change of the hydrodynamic shape from oblate ellipsoid to a shape closer to a sphere. The Ca2+-bound form of vipoxin, which is catalytically active, is more compact and symmetric than the calcium-free heterodimer. Similar changes were observed as a result of the Ca2+-binding to the two separated subunits. In the presence of aggregated phosphatidylcholine, the neurotoxic complex dissociates to subunits. It is supposed that only the toxic component binds to the substrate, and the other subunit, which plays a chaperone function, remains in solution. The inhibition of vipoxin with the synthetic inhibitor elaidoylamide and the natural compound vitamin E changes the shape of the toxin from oblate to prolate ellipsoid. The inhibited toxin is more asymmetric in comparison to the native one. Similar, but not so pronounced, effects were observed after the inhibition of the monomeric and homodimeric forms of the toxic His-48 PLA2. Circular dichroism measurements in the presence of urea, methylurea, and ethylurea indicate a strong hydrophobic stabilization of the neurotoxin. Hydrophobic interactions stabilize not only the folded regions but also the regions of intersubunit contacts. PMID:14695289

  20. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  1. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  2. Bacterial Toxins and the Nervous System: Neurotoxins and Multipotential Toxins Interacting with Neuronal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Michel R.; Poulain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Toxins are potent molecules used by various bacteria to interact with a host organism. Some of them specifically act on neuronal cells (clostridial neurotoxins) leading to characteristics neurological affections. But many other toxins are multifunctional and recognize a wider range of cell types including neuronal cells. Various enterotoxins interact with the enteric nervous system, for example by stimulating afferent neurons or inducing neurotransmitter release from enterochromaffin cells which result either in vomiting, in amplification of the diarrhea, or in intestinal inflammation process. Other toxins can pass the blood brain barrier and directly act on specific neurons. PMID:22069606

  3. Bacterial toxins and the nervous system: neurotoxins and multipotential toxins interacting with neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Michel R; Poulain, Bernard

    2010-04-01

    Toxins are potent molecules used by various bacteria to interact with a host organism. Some of them specifically act on neuronal cells (clostridial neurotoxins) leading to characteristics neurological affections. But many other toxins are multifunctional and recognize a wider range of cell types including neuronal cells. Various enterotoxins interact with the enteric nervous system, for example by stimulating afferent neurons or inducing neurotransmitter release from enterochromaffin cells which result either in vomiting, in amplification of the diarrhea, or in intestinal inflammation process. Other toxins can pass the blood brain barrier and directly act on specific neurons.

  4. Molecular size of different neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhanin, J; Schmid, A; Lombet, A; Wheeler, K P; Lazdunski, M; Ellory, J C

    1983-01-25

    Measurements were made of the molecular sizes of two distinct receptors on the Na+ channel in rat brain synaptosomes that are specific for different neurotoxins. Radiation inactivation of the binding of radiolabeled derivatives of the toxins was consistent with Mr = 260,000 for the tetrodotoxin receptor and Mr = 266,000 for the receptor specific for two scorpion toxins, toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus and toxin gamma from Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. Covalent cross-linking of the latter to its receptor similarly indicated Mr = 270,000. It seems most likely that these two distinct receptors reside on the same molecule.

  5. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    post- exposure therapeutics. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this study, we report on five novel small-molecule BoNT/A inhibitors that have been...cellular and tissue-based assays intended to mimic BoNT exposure . These five compounds (at 15 mM) protected N2a cells from BoNT/A-mediated cleavage of SNAP...neurotoxin (rELC; residues 1 to 423) and truncated type A LC ( tALC ; residues 1 to 425) will be described elsewhere. Briefly, rELC with a C-terminal His6

  6. Two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 represses transcription from botulinum neurotoxin promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved -10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike.

  7. Detection of Clostridium tetani in human clinical samples using tetX specific primers targeting the neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Madhu; Sheikh, Nasira K; Shah, Pooja; Mehetre, Gajanan; Dharne, Mahesh S; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus resulting from ear injury remains an important health problem, particularly in the developing world. We report the successful detection of Clostridium tetani using tetX specific primers targeting the Cl. tetani neurotoxin. The sample was obtained from an ear discharge of a case of otogenic tetanus in a 2-year-old male child. Based on the culture results of the ear discharge, Gram staining and virulence testing by genotyping, a diagnosis of tetanus was confirmed. This is the first report from India on the successful detection of Cl. tetani in a human clinical sample using tetX specific primers targeting the Cl. tetani neurotoxin.

  8. Condition Monitoring of Control Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Horch, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    The main concern of this work is the development of methodsfor automatic condition monitoring of control loops withapplication to the process industry. By condition monitoringboth detection and diagnosis of malfunctioning control loops isunderstood, using normal operating data and a minimum amount ofprocess knowledge. The use of indices for quantifying loop performance is dealtwith in the first part of the thesis. The starting point is anindex proposed by Harris (1989). This index has been mo...

  9. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  10. Dynamic PID loop control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  11. Inductance loop and partial

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Clayton R

    2010-01-01

    "Inductance is an unprecedented text, thoroughly discussing "loop" inductance as well as the increasingly important "partial" inductance. These concepts and their proper calculation are crucial in designing modern high-speed digital systems. World-renowned leader in electromagnetics Clayton Paul provides the knowledge and tools necessary to understand and calculate inductance." "With the present and increasing emphasis on high-speed digital systems and high-frequency analog systems, it is imperative that system designers develop an intimate understanding of the concepts and methods in this book. Inductance is a much-needed textbook designed for senior and graduate-level engineering students, as well as a hands-on guide for working engineers and professionals engaged in the design of high-speed digital and high-frequency analog systems."--Jacket.

  12. Dynamic PID loop control

    CERN Document Server

    Pei, L; Theilacker, J; Soyars, W; Martinez, A; Bossert, R; DeGraff, B; Darve, C

    2012-01-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters' oscillation.

  13. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesi, Stefano [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); CEMS, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Jaffe, Arthur [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Loss, Daniel [CEMS, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Pedrocchi, Fabio L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  14. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler’s “spacetime foam” intuition. (iii Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv A derivation of the Bekenstein–Hawking black-hole entropy. (v Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  15. Suppression of oocyte release in rats by local administration of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, J M; Stoker, T E; Cooper, R L; McElroy, W K; Parrish, M B

    1996-03-01

    The presence of noradrenergic neuronal innervation in the ovaries and cyclic alterations in ovarian noradrenaline suggest a role for such innervation in oocyte release. The current experiments evaluated the relationship between ovulation and alterations in ovarian concentrations of noradrenaline induced by unilateral, intrabursal administration of the specific noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP4. Intrabursal injections of DSP4 (0-10 mumoles per ovary) given at 19:00 h at pro-oestrus induced a prompt, dose-related reduction in ovarian noradrenaline on the injected and non-injected sides. Although this result suggests that injected material was reaching the contralateral ovary, ovulation was suppressed only on the injected side. This suppression was persistent, and lasted through at least the next two cycles following either unilateral or bilateral treatment. The reductions in noradrenaline could be mostly, if not entirely, attenuated by prior administration of desipramine which blocks re-uptake of noradrenaline, while the ipsilateral ovulatory effects remained unchanged. Although it has been reported that DSP4 binds the opiate receptor, intrabursal co-administration of the antagonist naloxone was ineffective in altering ovulatory suppression. These results suggest that while decreases in ovarian noradrenaline in response to local exposure to a noradrenergic neurotoxin may accompany a reduction in oocyte release or a block in ovulation, the anti-ovulatory effect of DSP4 is independent of the changes in noradrenaline concentrations and may be due to some other ovarian response.

  16. Effect of neurotoxin DSP4 on EEG power spectra in the rat acute model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culić, M; Saponjić, J; Janković, B; Udović, S; Popović, S; Rakić, L

    1995-08-18

    The effect of the adrenergic neurotoxin N-(chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was studied in the model of epilepsy induced by systemic application of penicillin (1,000,000 IU/kg, i.p). DSP4 (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was administrated to male Wistar rats, while the control animals were rats from the same litters. EEG activity was recorded in acute and chronic experiments 3 or 4 weeks after DSP4 treatment, before and after penicillin administration. Occasional locus coeruleus (LC) stimulation served as an electrophysiological test of DSP4 toxic effect. EEG power spectra in DSP4 treated animals showed a tendency to be greater in lower frequency bands than in controls before penicillin administration; there was almost no effect of electrical LC stimulation, regardless on penicillin treatment. In the model of epilepsy, the mean total EEG power spectra were greater in the period of 135-330 min after penicillin administration, as well as during 345-540 min, in DSP4 treated animals as compared to the controls. It seems that neurotoxin DSP4 is an optimal tool for studying the removal of LC influence in the acute model of epilepsy. It is also suggested that norepinephrine (NE) may have a modulatory role in the systemic penicillin epilepsy.

  17. Domain Organization in Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Type E is Unique: Its Implication in Faster Translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, D.; Eswaramoorthy, S; Furey, W; Navaza, J; Sax, M; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces seven antigenically distinct neurotoxins [C. botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) A-G] sharing a significant sequence homology. Based on sequence and functional similarity, it was believed that their three-dimensional structures will also be similar. Indeed, the crystal structures of BoNTs A and B exhibit similar fold and domain association where the translocation domain is flanked on either side by binding and catalytic domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of BoNT E holotoxin and show that the domain association is different and unique, although the individual domains are similar to those of BoNTs A and B. In BoNT E, both the binding domain and the catalytic domain are on the same side of the translocation domain, and all three have mutual interfaces. This unique association may have an effect on the rate of translocation, with the molecule strategically positioned in the vesicle for quick entry into cytosol. Botulism, the disease caused by BoNT E, sets in faster than any other serotype because of its speedy internalization and translocation, and the present structure offers a credible explanation. We propose that the translocation domain in other BoNTs follows a two-step process to attain translocation-competent conformation as in BoNT E. We also suggest that this translocation-competent conformation in BoNT E is a probable reason for its faster toxic rate compared to BoNT A. However, this needs further experimental elucidation.

  18. Neurotoxin-induced selective ubiquitination and regulation of MEF2A isoform in neuronal stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Hua; Yang, Qian; Mao, Zixu

    2012-09-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A-D (MEF2) proteins are members of the MCM1-agamous-deficiens-serum response factor family of transcription factors. Various MEF2 isoform proteins are enriched in neurons and exhibit distinct patterns of expression in different regions of the brain. In neurons, MEF2 functions as a converging factor to regulate many neuronal functions including survival. MEF2 activities are tightly controlled in neurons in response to stress. Whether stress signal may differentially regulate MEF2s remains largely unknown. In this work, we showed that MEF2A, but not MEF2C or MEF2D, was modified by ubiquitination in dopaminergic neuronal cell line SN4741 cells. MEF2A was ubiquitinated at its N'-terminus, and the ubiquitination of MEF2A was first detectable in the nuclear compartment and later in the cytoplasm. Ubiquitination of MEF2A correlated with reduced DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity. More importantly, disturbing the degradation of ubiquitinated MEF2A through proteasome pathway by neurotoxins known to induce Parkinson's disease features in model animals caused accumulation of ubiquitinated MEF2A, reduced MEF2 activity, and impaired cellular viability. Our work thus provides the first evidence to demonstrate an isoforms-specific regulation of MEF2s by ubiquitination-proteasome pathway in dopaminergic neuronal cell by neurotoxins, suggesting that stress signal and cellular context-dependent dysregulation of MEF2s may underlie the loss of neuronal viability.

  19. Algal chloroplast produced camelid VH H antitoxins are capable of neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Daniel J; Rosenberg, Julian N; Chiu, Joanna G; Chang, Yung-Nien; Debatis, Michelle; Ngoi, Soo-Mun; Chang, John T; Shoemaker, Charles B; Oyler, George A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    We have produced three antitoxins consisting of the variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VH H) by expressing the genes in the chloroplast of green algae. These antitoxins accumulate as soluble proteins capable of binding and neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin. Furthermore, they accumulate at up to 5% total soluble protein, sufficient expression to easily produce these antitoxins at scale from algae. The genes for the three different antitoxins were transformed into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts and their products purified from algae lysates and assayed for in vitro biological activity using toxin protection assays. The produced antibody domains bind to botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) with similar affinities as camelid antibodies produced in Escherichia coli, and they are similarly able to protect primary rat neurons from intoxication by BoNT/A. Furthermore, the camelid antibodies were produced in algae without the use of solubilization tags commonly employed in E. coli. These camelid antibody domains are potent antigen-binding proteins and the heterodimer fusion protein containing two VH H domains was capable of neutralizing BoNT/A at near equimolar concentrations with the toxin. Intact antibody domains were detected in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mice treated orally with antitoxin-producing microalgae. These findings support the use of orally delivered antitoxins produced in green algae as a novel treatment for botulism.

  20. Neutralizing antibodies to botulinum neurotoxin type A in aesthetic medicine: five case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Torres,1 Mark Hamilton,2 Elena Sanches,4 Polina Starovatova,3 Elena Gubanova,3 Tatiana Reshetnikova51Di Stefano Velona Clinic, Catania, Italy; 2Hamilton Face Clinic, Dublin, Ireland; 3Preventive Medicine Clinic "Vallex M", Moscow, Russia; 4EKLAN Co Ltd Medical Center for Aesthetic Correction, Moscow, Russia; 5Department of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, State Medical University, Novosibirsk, RussiaAbstract: Botulinum neurotoxin injections are a valuable treatment modality for many therapeutic indications as well as in the aesthetic field for facial rejuvenation. As successful treatment requires repeated injections over a long period of time, secondary resistance to botulinum toxin preparations after repeated injections is an ongoing concern. We report five case studies in which neutralizing antibodies to botulinum toxin type A developed after injection for aesthetic use and resulted in secondary treatment failure. These results add to the growing number of reports in the literature for secondary treatment failure associated with high titers of neutralizing antibodies in the aesthetic field. Clinicians should be aware of this risk and implement injection protocols that minimize resistance development.Keywords: aesthetic medicine, botulinum neurotoxin type A, neutralizing antibody, secondary treatment failure

  1. Expression of functional recombinant scorpion beta-neurotoxin Css II in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T M; Quick, M W; Sakai, T T; Krishna, N R

    2000-06-01

    The gene for a beta-neurotoxin [Centruroides suffusus suffusus toxin II (Css II)] from the scorpion C. suffusus suffusus was synthesized by recursive PCR and cloned into the expression vector, pET15b. This recombinant vector was transformed into a thioredoxin mutant host bacterial cell, AD 494(DE3)pLysS, and expression was induced with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Although the level of expression was low, the recombinant toxin was found only in the soluble fraction with no evidence for the formation of inclusion bodies as had been observed previously with other scorpion toxins. The recombinant Css II was purified by successive ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectral measurements indicate that the protein has a native structure with no indication of denatured species. The recombinant neurotoxin inhibits the uptake of [(3)H]GABA [gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)] in neuronal cells as effectively as natural beta-toxins.

  2. Functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, K J; Nutter, T J; Elmer, L W; Kempner, E S

    1985-03-25

    Radiation inactivation was used in situ to determine the functional unit sizes of the neurotoxin receptors of the voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain. Frozen or lyophilized synaptosomes were irradiated with high energy electrons generated by a linear accelerator and assayed for [3H]saxitoxin, 125I-Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (alpha-scorpion toxin), 125I-Centruroides suffusus suffusus (beta-scorpion toxin), and batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-[3H]benzoate binding activity. The functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors determined in situ by target analysis are 220,000 for saxitoxin, 263,000 for alpha-scorpion toxin, and 45,000 for beta-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the inactivation curve for batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-benzoate binding to the channel yields two target sizes of Mr approximately 287,000 (50%) and approximately 51,000 (50%). The results are independent of the purity of the membrane preparation. Comparison of the radiation inactivation data with the protein composition of the rat brain sodium channel indicates that there are at least two functional components.

  3. [Botulism: the agent, mode of action of the botulinum neurotoxins, forms of acquisition, treatment and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvaud, Jean-Christophe; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Popoff, Michel R

    2002-08-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins are produced by anaerobic, spore-forming bacteria belonging to the Clostridium genus. They are synthesised as a single chain protein (150 kDa), which is not or weakly active. The active form results from a proteolysis cleaving the precursor in a light chain (about 50 kDa) and a heavy chain (about 100 kDa), which are linked by a disulfide bridge. The heavy chain is involved in the recognition of a specific neuronal surface receptor and mediates the internalization of the light chain into the cytosol. The light chain is responsible for the intracellular activity. It catalyses the proteolysis of SNARE proteins, which are involved in the exocytosis of synaptic vesicles containing acetylcholine. Hence, the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction is blocked, leading to a flaccid paralysis. Human botulism, usually type A, B or E, is associated with intoxination, ingestion of preformed toxin in food, with digestive toxi-infection, mainly in newborns (infant botulism), or with wound contamination (wound botulism). The treatment of botulism is usually symptomatic. The specific treatment is based on the serotherapy or on the use of purified specific antibodies. The vaccination against botulism is efficient. However, since the botulinum neurotoxins are widely used for the treatment of numerous dystonias, a generalised vaccination is not conceivable.

  4. Noradrenergic-Dopaminergic Interactions Due to DSP-4-MPTP Neurotoxin Treatments: Iron Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Trevor

    The investigations of noradrenergic lesions and dopaminergic lesions have established particular profiles of functional deficits and accompanying alterations of biomarkers in brain regions and circuits. In the present account, the focus of these lesions is directed toward the effects upon dopaminergic neurotransmission and expression that are associated with the movement disorders and psychosis-like behavior. In this context, it was established that noradrenergic denervation, through administration of the selective noradrenaline (NA) neurotoxin, DSP-4, should be performed prior to the depletion of dopamine (DA) with the selective neurotoxin, MPTP. Employing this regime, it was shown that (i) following DSP-4 (50 mg/kg) pretreatment of C57/Bl6 mice, both the functional and neurochemical (DA loss) effects of MPTP (2 × 20 and 2 × 40 mg/kg) were markedly exacerbated, and (ii) following postnatal iron (Fe(2+), 7.5 mg/kg, on postnatal days 19-12), pretreatment with DSP-4 followed by the lower 2 × 20 mg/kg MPTP dose induced even greater losses of motor behavior and striatal DA. As yet, the combination of NA-DA depletions, and even more so Fe(2+)-NA-DA depletion, has been considered to present a movement disorder aspect although studies exploring cognitive domains are lacking. With intrusion of iron overload into this formula, the likelihood of neuropsychiatric disorder, as well, unfolds.

  5. New Elements To Consider When Modeling the Hazards Associated with Botulinum Neurotoxin in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihekwaba, Adaoha E C; Mura, Ivan; Malakar, Pradeep K; Walshaw, John; Peck, Michael W; Barker, G C

    2015-09-08

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the most potent biological substances known to mankind. BoNTs are the agents responsible for botulism, a rare condition affecting the neuromuscular junction and causing a spectrum of diseases ranging from mild cranial nerve palsies to acute respiratory failure and death. BoNTs are a potential biowarfare threat and a public health hazard, since outbreaks of foodborne botulism are caused by the ingestion of preformed BoNTs in food. Currently, mathematical models relating to the hazards associated with C. botulinum, which are largely empirical, make major contributions to botulinum risk assessment. Evaluated using statistical techniques, these models simulate the response of the bacterium to environmental conditions. Though empirical models have been successfully incorporated into risk assessments to support food safety decision making, this process includes significant uncertainties so that relevant decision making is frequently conservative and inflexible. Progression involves encoding into the models cellular processes at a molecular level, especially the details of the genetic and molecular machinery. This addition drives the connection between biological mechanisms and botulism risk assessment and hazard management strategies. This review brings together elements currently described in the literature that will be useful in building quantitative models of C. botulinum neurotoxin production. Subsequently, it outlines how the established form of modeling could be extended to include these new elements. Ultimately, this can offer further contributions to risk assessments to support food safety decision making.

  6. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  7. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A specific cell-based potency assay to replace the mouse bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Salas, Ester; Wang, Joanne; Molina, Yanira; Nelson, Jeremy B; Jacky, Birgitte P S; Aoki, K Roger

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A), a potent therapeutic used to treat various disorders, inhibits vesicular neurotransmitter exocytosis by cleaving SNAP25. Development of cell-based potency assays (CBPAs) to assess the biological function of BoNT/A have been challenging because of its potency. CBPAs can evaluate the key steps of BoNT action: receptor binding, internalization-translocation, and catalytic activity; and therefore could replace the current mouse bioassay. Primary neurons possess appropriate sensitivity to develop potential replacement assays but those potency assays are difficult to perform and validate. This report describes a CBPA utilizing differentiated human neuroblastoma SiMa cells and a sandwich ELISA that measures BoNT/A-dependent intracellular increase of cleaved SNAP25. Assay sensitivity is similar to the mouse bioassay and measures neurotoxin biological activity in bulk drug substance and BOTOX® product (onabotulinumtoxinA). Validation of a version of this CBPA in a Quality Control laboratory has led to FDA, Health Canada, and European Union approval for potency testing of BOTOX®, BOTOX® Cosmetic, and Vistabel®. Moreover, we also developed and optimized a BoNT/A CBPA screening assay that can be used for the discovery of novel BoNT/A inhibitors to treat human disease.

  8. Cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in shark fins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A; Mash, Deborah C

    2012-02-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA.

  9. Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome : Radiation Neurotoxins, Mechanisms of Toxicity, Neuroimmune Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (CvARS) is an extremely severe in-jury of Central Nervous System (CNS) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). CvARS can be induced by the high doses of neutron, heavy ions, or gamma radiation. The Syndrome clinical picture depends on a type, timing, and the doses of radiation. Four grades of the CvARS were defined: mild, moderate, severe, and extremely severe. Also, four stages of CvARS were developed: prodromal, latent, manifest, outcome -death. Duration of stages depends on the types, doses, and time of radiation. The CvARS clinical symptoms are: respiratory distress, hypotension, cerebral edema, severe disorder of cerebral blood microcirculation, and acute motor weakness. The radiation toxins, Cerebro-Vascular Radiation Neurotoxins (SvARSn), determine development of the acute radiation syndrome. Mechanism of action of the toxins: Though pathogenesis of radiation injury of CNS remains unknown, our concept describes the Cv ARS as a result of Neurotoxicity and Excitotoxicity, cell death through apoptotic necrosis. Neurotoxicity occurs after the high doses radiation exposure, formation of radiation neuro-toxins, possible bioradicals, or group of specific enzymes. Intracerebral hemorrhage can be a consequence of the damage of endothelial cells caused by radiation and the radiation tox-ins. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB)and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCFB)is possibly the most significant effect of microcirculation disorder and metabolic insufficiency. NMDA-receptors excitotoxic injury mediated by cerebral ischemia and cerebral hypoxia. Dam-age of the pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5 and Purkinje cell layer the cerebral cortex , damage of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus occur as a result of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral bleeding. Methods: Radiation Toxins of CV ARS are defined as glycoproteins with the molec-ular weight of RT toxins ranges from 200-250 kDa and with high enzymatic activity

  10. Phenomenology of loop quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2010-01-01

    After introducing the basic ingredients of Loop Quantum Cosmology, I will briefly discuss some of its phenomenological aspects. Those can give some useful insight about the full Loop Quantum Gravity theory and provide an answer to some long-standing questions in early universe cosmology.

  11. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-08

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Improved code-tracking loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflame, D. T.

    1980-01-01

    Delay-locked loop tracks pseudonoise codes without introducing dc timing errors, because it is not sensitive to gain imbalance between signal processing arms. "Early" and "late" reference codes pass in combined form through both arms, and each arm acts on both codes. Circuit accomodates 1 dB weaker input signals with tracking ability equal to that of tau-dither loops.

  13. Loop groups and noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Carpi, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    We describe the representation theory of loop groups in terms of K-theory and noncommutative geometry. This is done by constructing suitable spectral triples associated with the level l projective unitary positive-energy representations of any given loop group LG. The construction is based on certain supersymmetric conformal field theory models associated with LG.

  14. Brane Couplings from Bulk Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Georgi, Howard; Grant, Aaron K.; Hailu, Girma

    2000-01-01

    We compute loop corrections to the effective action of a field theory on a five-dimensional $S_1/Z_2$ orbifold. We find that the quantum loop effects of interactions in the bulk produce infinite contributions that require renormalization by four-dimensional couplings on the orbifold fixed planes. Thus bulk couplings give rise to renormalization group running of brane couplings.

  15. Epitope characterization and variable region sequence of f1-40, a high-affinity monoclonal antibody to botulinum neurotoxin type a (Hall strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles C Scotcher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Botulism, an often fatal neuroparalytic disease, is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT which consist of a family of seven serotypes (A-H produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. BoNT, considered the most potent biological toxin known, is a 150 kDa protein consisting of a 100 kDa heavy-chain (Hc and a 50 kDa light-chain (Lc. F1-40 is a mouse-derived, IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds the light chain of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A and is used in a sensitive immunoassay for toxin detection. We report the fine epitope mapping of F1-40 and the deduced amino acid sequence of the variable regions of the heavy and light chains of the antibody. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To characterize the binding epitope of F1-40, three complementary experimental approaches were selected. Firstly, recombinant peptide fragments of BoNT/A light-chain were used in Western blots to identify the epitope domains. Secondly, a peptide phage-display library was used to identify the specific amino acid sequences. Thirdly, the three-dimensional structure of BoNT/A was examined in silico, and the amino acid sequences determined from the phage-display studies were mapped onto the three-dimensional structure in order to visualize the epitope. F1-40 was found to bind a peptide fragment of BoNT/A, designated L1-3, which spans from T125 to L200. The motif QPDRS was identified by phage-display, and was mapped to a region within L1-3. When the three amino acids Q138, P139 and D140 were all mutated to glycine, binding of F1-40 to the recombinant BoNT/A light chain peptide was abolished. Q-138, P-139 and D-140 form a loop on the external surface of BoNT/A, exposed to solvent and accessible to F1-40 binding. CONCLUSIONS: The epitope of F1-40 was localized to a single exposed loop (ss4, ss5 on the Lc of BoNT. Furthermore amino acids Q138, P139 and D140 forming the tip of the loop appear critical for binding.

  16. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n+1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n+1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n+1 dimensional model and the 3+1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology.

  17. Effects of carbon dioxide on growth of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, its ability to produce neurotoxin, and its transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artin, Ingrid; Mason, David R; Pin, Carmen; Schelin, Jenny; Peck, Michael W; Holst, Elisabet; Rådström, Peter; Carter, Andrew T

    2010-02-01

    The antimicrobial gas carbon dioxide is frequently used in modified atmosphere packaging. In the present study, the effects of CO2 (10 to 70%, vol/vol) on gene expression (measured using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and a whole-genome DNA microarray) and neurotoxin formation (measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) by proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 3502 were studied during the growth cycle. Interestingly, in marked contrast to the situation with nonproteolytic C. botulinum types B and E, CO2 had little effect on any of these parameters. At all CO2 concentrations, relative expression of neurotoxin cluster genes peaked in the transition between exponential and stationary phases, with evidence of a second rise in expression in late stationary phase. Microarray analysis enabled identification of coding sequences whose expression profiles matched those of the neurotoxin cluster. Further research is needed to determine whether these are connected to neurotoxin formation or are merely growth phase associated.

  18. Role of tetanus neurotoxin insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) in vesicular transport mediating neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Arca, S; Alberts, P; Zahraoui, A; Louvard, D; Galli, T

    2000-05-15

    How vesicular transport participates in neurite outgrowth is still poorly understood. Neurite outgrowth is not sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin thus does not involve synaptobrevin-mediated vesicular transport to the plasma membrane of neurons. Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) is a vesicle-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein [SNAP] receptor), involved in transport to the apical plasma membrane in epithelial cells, a tetanus neurotoxin-resistant pathway. Here we show that TI-VAMP is essential for vesicular transport-mediating neurite outgrowth in staurosporine-differentiated PC12 cells. The NH(2)-terminal domain, which precedes the SNARE motif of TI-VAMP, inhibits the association of TI-VAMP with synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP25). Expression of this domain inhibits neurite outgrowth as potently as Botulinum neurotoxin E, which cleaves SNAP25. In contrast, expression of the NH(2)-terminal deletion mutant of TI-VAMP increases SNARE complex formation and strongly stimulates neurite outgrowth. These results provide the first functional evidence for the role of TI-VAMP in neurite outgrowth and point to its NH(2)-terminal domain as a key regulator in this process.

  19. MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY OF CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS - EXPRESSION OF MESSENGER-RNAS ENCODING TETANUS AND BOTULINUM NEUROTOXINS IN APLYSIA NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOCHIDA, S; POULAIN, B; EISEL, U; BINZ, T; KURAZONO, H; NIEMANN, H; TAUC, L

    1990-01-01

    mRNAs encoding the light chain of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins were transcribed, in vitro, from the cloned and specifically truncated genes of Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum, respectively, and injected into presynaptic identified cholinergic neurons of the buccal ganglia of

  20. MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY OF CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS - EXPRESSION OF MESSENGER-RNAS ENCODING TETANUS AND BOTULINUM NEUROTOXINS IN APLYSIA NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOCHIDA, S; POULAIN, B; EISEL, U; BINZ, T; KURAZONO, H; NIEMANN, H; TAUC, L

    1990-01-01

    mRNAs encoding the light chain of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins were transcribed, in vitro, from the cloned and specifically truncated genes of Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum, respectively, and injected into presynaptic identified cholinergic neurons of the buccal ganglia of Aplysi

  1. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion

  2. Destabilization of survival factor MEF2D mRNA by neurotoxin in models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Cai, Zhibiao; Lu, Fangfang; Li, Chen; Zhu, Xiaofei; Su, Linna; Gao, Guodong; Yang, Qian

    2014-09-01

    Progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta (SNc) is an important pathological feature in Parkinson's disease (PD). Loss of transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), a key neuronal survival factor, has been shown to underlie the loss of DA neurons in SNc and the pathogenic process of PD. It is known that PD-associated neurotoxins reduce the level of MEF2D protein to trigger neuronal death. Although neurotoxins clearly destabilize MEF2D by post-translational mechanisms, it is not known whether regulation of MEF2D mRNA contributes to neurotoxin-induced decrease in MEF2D protein. In this work, we showed that MPP(+), the toxic metabolite of MPTP, caused a significant decrease in the half-life and total level of MEF2D mRNA in a DA neuronal cell line, SN4741 cells. Quantitative PCR analysis of the SNc DA neurons captured by immune-laser capture microdissection showed that exposure to MPTP led to a marked reduction in the level of MEF2D mRNA in SNc DA neurons compared to controls. Down-regulation of MEF2D mRNA alone reduced the viability of SN4741 cells and sensitized the cells to MPP(+)-induced toxicity. These results suggest that destabilization and reduction in MEF2D mRNA is in part responsible for neurotoxin-induced decrease in MEF2D protein and neuronal viability. Myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) plays an important role in neuronal survival. How MEF2D mRNA is deregulated under toxic stress is unclear. We found that PD-associated neurotoxins destabilize MEF2D mRNA and reduce its level in vitro and in vivo. Reduction in MEF2D mRNA is sufficient to sensitize model cells to neurotoxin-induced toxicity, suggesting that destabilization of MEF2D mRNA is part of the mechanism by which neurotoxins trigger deregulation of neuronal survival.

  3. Modeling loop entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold from a highly disordered state into a highly ordered one. Traditionally, the folding problem has been stated as one of predicting "the" tertiary structure from sequential information. However, new evidence suggests that the ensemble of unfolded forms may not be as disordered as once believed, and that the native form of many proteins may not be described by a single conformation, but rather an ensemble of its own. Quantifying the relative disorder in the folded and unfolded ensembles as an entropy difference may therefore shed light on the folding process. One issue that clouds discussions of "entropy" is that many different kinds of entropy can be defined: entropy associated with overall translational and rotational Brownian motion, configurational entropy, vibrational entropy, conformational entropy computed in internal or Cartesian coordinates (which can even be different from each other), conformational entropy computed on a lattice, each of the above with different solvation and solvent models, thermodynamic entropy measured experimentally, etc. The focus of this work is the conformational entropy of coil/loop regions in proteins. New mathematical modeling tools for the approximation of changes in conformational entropy during transition from unfolded to folded ensembles are introduced. In particular, models for computing lower and upper bounds on entropy for polymer models of polypeptide coils both with and without end constraints are presented. The methods reviewed here include kinematics (the mathematics of rigid-body motions), classical statistical mechanics, and information theory.

  4. The loop gravity string

    CERN Document Server

    Freidel, Laurent; Pranzetti, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study canonical gravity in finite regions for which we introduce a generalisation of the Gibbons-Hawking boundary term including the Immirzi parameter. We study the canonical formulation on a spacelike hypersuface with a boundary sphere and show how the presence of this term leads to an unprecedented type of degrees of freedom coming from the restoration of the gauge and diffeomorphism symmetry at the boundary. In the presence of a loop quantum gravity state, these boundary degrees of freedom localize along a set of punctures on the boundary sphere. We demonstrate that these degrees of freedom are effectively described by auxiliary strings with a 3-dimensional internal target space attached to each puncture. We show that the string currents represent the local frame field, that the string angular momenta represent the area flux and that the string stress tensor represents the two dimensional metric on the boundary of the region of interest. Finally, we show that the commutators of these broken...

  5. Botulinum neurotoxins A and E undergo retrograde axonal transport in primary motor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Restani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The striking differences between the clinical symptoms of tetanus and botulism have been ascribed to the different fate of the parental neurotoxins once internalised in motor neurons. Tetanus toxin (TeNT is known to undergo transcytosis into inhibitory interneurons and block the release of inhibitory neurotransmitters in the spinal cord, causing a spastic paralysis. In contrast, botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs block acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction, therefore inducing a flaccid paralysis. Whilst overt experimental evidence supports the sorting of TeNT to the axonal retrograde transport pathway, recent findings challenge the established view that BoNT trafficking is restricted to the neuromuscular junction by highlighting central effects caused by these neurotoxins. These results suggest a more complex scenario whereby BoNTs also engage long-range trafficking mechanisms. However, the intracellular pathways underlying this process remain unclear. We sought to fill this gap by using primary motor neurons either in mass culture or differentiated in microfluidic devices to directly monitor the endocytosis and axonal transport of full length BoNT/A and BoNT/E and their recombinant binding fragments. We show that BoNT/A and BoNT/E are internalised by spinal cord motor neurons and undergo fast axonal retrograde transport. BoNT/A and BoNT/E are internalised in non-acidic axonal carriers that partially overlap with those containing TeNT, following a process that is largely independent of stimulated synaptic vesicle endo-exocytosis. Following intramuscular injection in vivo, BoNT/A and TeNT displayed central effects with a similar time course. Central actions paralleled the peripheral spastic paralysis for TeNT, but lagged behind the onset of flaccid paralysis for BoNT/A. These results suggest that the fast axonal retrograde transport compartment is composed of multifunctional trafficking organelles orchestrating the simultaneous transfer

  6. A long-form α-neurotoxin from cobra venom produces potent opioidindependent analgesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-xin CHEN; Hui-ling ZHANG; Zhen-lun GU; Bo-wen CHEN; Rong HAN; Paul F REID; Laurence N RAYMOND; Zheng-hong QIN

    2006-01-01

    Aim:In light of the antinociceptive activity of the short-chain neurotoxin,cobrotoxin,and other acetylcholine antagonists,the antinociceptive activity and mechanisms of cobratoxin (CTX) ,a long-chain postsynaptic α-neurotoxin,was investigated in rodent pain models.Methods:CTX was administered intraperitoneally (30,45,68μg/kg) ,intra-cerebral ventricularly (4.5 μg/kg) or microinjected into periaqueductal gray (PAG;4.5 μg/kg).The antinociceptive action was tested using the hot.plate and acetic acid writhing tests in mice and rats.The involvement of the cholinergic system and opioid system in CTX-induced analgesia was examined by pretreatment of animals with atropine (0.5 mg/kg,im;or 10 mg/kg,ip) or naloxone (1 and 5 mg/kg,ip).The effect of CTX on motor activity was tested using the Animex test.Results:CTX exhibited a dose-dependent analgesic action in mice as determined by both the hot-plate and acetic acid writhing tests.The Deak effect of analgesia was seen 3 h after administration.In the mouse acetic acid writhing test,the intra-cerebral ventricular administration of CTX at 4.5μg/kg (1/12th of a systemic dose) produced marked analgesic effects.Microinjection of CTX (4.5μg/kg) into the PAG region did not elicit an analgesic action in rats in the hot-plate test.Atropine at 0.5 mg/kg (im) and naloxone at l and 5 mg/kg (ip) both failed to block the analgesic effects of CTX,but atropine at 1 0 mg/kg (ip) did antagonize the analgesia mediated bv CTX in the mouse acetic acid writhing test.Acetylsalicylic acid (300 mg/kg) did not enhance the analgesic effects of CTX.At the highest effective dose of 68μg/kg the neurotoxin did not change the spontaneous mobility of mice.Conclusion:CTX has analgesic effects.which are mediated in the central nervous system though not through the PAG.The central cholinergic system but not opioid system appears to be involved in the antinociceptive action of CTX.

  7. A historical and proteomic analysis of botulinum neurotoxin type/G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rees Jon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium botulinum is the taxonomic designation for at least six diverse species that produce botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs. There are seven known serotypes of BoNTs (/A through/G, all of which are potent toxins classified as category A bioterrorism agents. BoNT/G is the least studied of the seven serotypes. In an effort to further characterize the holotoxin and neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs, we conducted an in silico and proteomic analysis of commercial BoNT/G complex. We describe the relative quantification of the proteins present in the/G complex and confirm our ability to detect the toxin activity in vitro. In addition, we review previous literature to provide a complete description of the BoNT/G complex. Results An in-depth comparison of protein sequences indicated that BoNT/G shares the most sequence similarity with the/B serotype. A temperature-modified Endopep-MS activity assay was successful in the detection of BoNT/G activity. Gel electrophoresis and in gel digestions, followed by MS/MS analysis of/G complex, revealed the presence of four proteins in the complexes: neurotoxin (BoNT and three NAPs--nontoxic-nonhemagglutinin (NTNH and two hemagglutinins (HA70 and HA17. Rapid high-temperature in-solution tryptic digestions, coupled with MS/MS analysis, generated higher than previously reported sequence coverages for all proteins associated with the complex: BoNT 66%, NTNH 57%, HA70 91%, and HA17 99%. Label-free relative quantification determined that the complex contains 30% BoNT, 38% NTNH, 28% HA70, and 4% HA17 by weight comparison and 17% BoNT, 23% NTNH, 42% HA70, and 17% HA17 by molecular comparison. Conclusions The in silico protein sequence comparisons established that the/G complex is phenetically related to the other six serotypes of C. botulinum. Proteomic analyses and Endopep-MS confirmed the presence of BoNT and NAPs, along with the activity of the commercial/G complex. The use of data

  8. Hard Loops, Soft Loops, and High Density Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, T

    2003-01-01

    We study several issues related to the use of effective field theories in QCD at large baryon density. We show that the power counting is complicated by the appearance of two scales inside loop integrals. Hard dense loops involve the large scale $mu^2$ and lead to phenomena such as screening and damping at the scale $gmu$. Soft loops only involve small scales and lead to superfluidity and non-Fermi liquid behavior at exponentially small scales. Four-fermion operators in the effective theory are suppressed by powers of $1/mu$, but they get enhanced by hard loops. As a consequence their contribution to the pairing gap is only suppressed by powers of the coupling constant, and not powers of $1/mu$. We determine the coefficients of four-fermion operators in the effective theory by matching quark-quark scattering amplitudes. Finally, we introduce a perturbative scheme for computing corrections to the gap parameter in the superfluid phase

  9. Radial propagators and Wilson loops

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, S; Leupold, Stefan; Weigert, Heribert

    1996-01-01

    We present a relation which connects the propagator in the radial (Fock-Schwinger) gauge with a gauge invariant Wilson loop. It is closely related to the well-known field strength formula and can be used to calculate the radial gauge propagator. The result is shown to diverge in four-dimensional space even for free fields, its singular nature is however naturally explained using the renormalization properties of Wilson loops with cusps and self-intersections. Using this observation we provide a consistent regularization scheme to facilitate loop calculations. Finally we compare our results with previous approaches to derive a propagator in Fock-Schwinger gauge.

  10. Botulinum Neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    and VI (Sobel, 2005) and include ocular disorders such as blurred vision, diplopia , ptosis and photophobia (Terranova et al., 1979). This is generally...Dysphagia 96 97 82 Dry mouth 83 100 93 Diplopia 90 92 39 Dysarthia 100 69 50 Upper extremity weakness 86 64 NA Lower

  11. Neurotoxin Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    methylglyoxal involved in ligand binding and esterase activity. J Biol Chem 280:5724-5732. Benschop HP and Keijer JH (1966) On the mechanism of ageing of...identiWes hotspot site of modiWcation in human serum albumin by methylglyoxal involved in ligand binding and esterase activity, J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005

  12. Effects of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP4 on spatial memory in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontag, T A; Hauser, J; Kaunzinger, I; Gerlach, M; Tucha, O; Lange, K W

    2008-01-01

    Patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show various cognitive impairments such as deficits in attention or working memory. Most symptoms of ADHD are thought to be associated with a dysbalance between the neurotransmitters noradrenaline and dopamine in the brain. In order to investigate the role of noradrenaline in this context we have produced a central depletion of noradrenaline in rats by administering different doses (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg body weight) of the neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) and assessing the behavioral consequences with a modified hole board task. The administration of DSP4 affected the working memory error, while reference memory and motor functions were not affected. The use of different doses of DSP4 to influence prefrontal functions and to understand the dysbalance of dopamine and noradrenaline in ADHD appears to be a promising approach.

  13. First evidence of antimicrobial activity of neurotoxin 2 from Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Trapani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the antibacterial activity of Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria, Anthozoa tentacle and body acidic extracts. Biochemical purification consisted of first step on solid phase Sep-Pak C8 column followed by several HPLC runs on C18 column using different conditions. Anti-Micrococcus lysodeikticus activity has been detected in 40 % acetonitrile fractions. The resulting purified molecule from tentacles had a molecular mass determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrum of 4946,299 Da and has been completely sequenced. Its aa sequence revealed identity with the Neurotoxin 2 (ATX-II, a Na+ channel blocking toxins. Consequently, ATX-II appeared to display a dual role as toxin and as antibacterial.

  14. Botulinum neurotoxin type-A when utilized in animals with trigeminal sensitization induced a antinociceptive effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio J Piovesan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose of the study was evaluate the possible antinociceptive effect of botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT/A in an experimental model of trigeminal neuralgia. Method Neuropathic pain was induced by surgical constriction of the infraorbital nerve in rats. A control group underwent a sham procedure consisting of surgical exposure of the nerve. Subgroups of each group received either BoNT/A or isotonic saline solution. The clinical response was assessed with the -20°C test. Animals that underwent nerve constriction developed sensitization; the sham group did not. Results The sensitization was reversed by BoNT/A treatment evident 24 hours following application. Pronociceptive effect was observed in the sham group following BoNT/A. Conclusion BoNT/A has an antinociceptive effect in sensitized animals and a pronociceptive effect in non-sensitized animals.

  15. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin by Measuring its Activity in Serum and Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Pirkle, James L.; Barr, John R.

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are bacterial protein toxins which are considered likely agents for bioterrorism due to their extreme toxicity and high availability. A new mass spectrometry based assay called Endopep MS detects and defines the toxin serotype in clinical and food matrices via toxin activity upon a peptide substrate which mimics the toxin's natural target. Furthermore, the subtype of the toxin is differentiated by employing mass spectrometry based proteomic techniques on the same sample. The Endopep-MS assay selectively detects active BoNT and defines the serotype faster and with sensitivity greater than the mouse bioassay. One 96-well plate can be analyzed in under 7 h. On higher level or "hot" samples, the subtype can then be differentiated in less than 2 h with no need for DNA.

  16. Excitatory amino acid b-N-methylamino-L-alanine is a putative environmental neurotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR NEDELJKOV

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid b-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA has been associated with the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex in three distinct western Pacific populations. The putative neurotoxin is produced by cyanobacteria, which live symbiotically in the roots of cycad trees. L-BMAA was thought to be a threat only to those few populations whose diet and medicines rely heavily on cycad seeds. However, the recent discovery that cyanobacteria from diverse terrestrial, freshwater, and saltwater ecosystems around the world produce the toxin requires a reassessment of whether it poses a larger health threat. Therefore, it is proposed that monitoring L-BMAA levels in cyanobacteria-contaminated water supplies might be prudent.

  17. Product Integrals and Wilson loops

    CERN Document Server

    Karp, R L

    2001-01-01

    Using product integrals we review the unambiguous mathematical representation of Wilson line and Wilson loop operators, including their behavior under gauge transformations and the non-abelian Stokes theorem. Interesting consistency conditions among Wilson lines are also presented.

  18. Thermal fluctuations in loop cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Magueijo, Joao; Singh, Parampreet

    2007-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects in loop quantum cosmology lead to a resolution of the initial singularity and have the potential to solve the horizon problem and generate a quasi scale-invariant spectrum of density fluctuations. We consider loop modifications to the behavior of the inverse scale factor below a critical scale in closed models and assume a purely thermal origin for the fluctuations. We show that the no-go results for scale invariance in classical thermal models can be evaded even if we just consider modifications to the background (zeroth order) gravitational dynamics. Since a complete and systematic treatment of the perturbed Einstein equations in loop cosmology is still lacking, we simply parameterize their expected modifications. These change quantitatively, but not qualitatively, our conclusions. We thus urge the community to more fully work out this complex aspect of loop cosmology, since the full picture would not only fix the free parameters of the theory, but also provide a model for a no...

  19. Loop Quantum Cosmology Gravitational Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Odintsov, S D

    2016-01-01

    Loop Quantum Cosmology is an appealing quantum completion of classical cosmology, which brings along various theoretical features which in many cases offer remedy or modify various classical cosmology aspects. In this paper we address the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism in the context of Loop Quantum Cosmology. As we demonstrate, when Loop Quantum Cosmology effects are taken into account in the resulting Friedmann equations for a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe, then even for a radiation dominated Universe, the predicted baryon-to-entropy ratio from the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism is non-zero, in contrast to the Einstein-Hilbert case, in which case the baryon-to-entropy ratio is zero. We also discuss various other cases apart from the radiation domination case, and we discuss how the baryon-to-entropy ratio is affected from the parameters of the quantum theory. In addition, we use illustrative exact solutions of Loop Quantum Cosmology and we investigate under which circumstances the bar...

  20. Interference of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP4 with neuronal and nonneuronal monoamine transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenge, Birger; Bönisch, Heinz

    2009-12-01

    The haloalkylamine DSP4 (N[-2-chloroethyl]-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine) is a noradrenergic neurotoxin, which is used for the chemical denervation of noradrenergic neurons, and it has been proposed to be a selective substrate for the neuronal, Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent noradrenaline transporter (NAT). In the present study, we investigated whether DSP4 not only interacts with the human NAT (hNAT) but also with other neuronal monoamine transporters such as the transporters for dopamine (hDAT) and serotonin (hSERT) or with nonneuronal (Na(+)-independent) monoamine transporters also known as organic cation transporters (OCTs), such as hOCT(1), hOCT(2), and hOCT(3). Using human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells heterologously expressing the corresponding transporter, we show that DSP4 irreversibly inhibits the hNAT, hDAT, hSERT, and hOCT(3). However, this inhibition includes a reversible component at the hDAT, hSERT, and hOCT(3) but not at the hNAT. The inhibitory potency of DSP4 at the neuronal transporters was highest at the hNAT (IC(50) about 5 microM), and it was about five and 40 times lower at the hSERT and hDAT, respectively. DSP4 inhibited all three hOCTs with high potency (IC(50) about 1 microM) but in a completely reversible manner at hOCT(1) and hOCT(2). Cytotoxicity by 24-h exposure of hNAT- or hOCT-expressing cells to low DSP4 concentrations (DSP4's high-affinity uptake through the NAT together with its completely irreversible mode of interaction with the NAT may contribute to its selectivity as noradrenergic neurotoxin.

  1. Genetic diversity within Clostridium botulinum serotypes, botulinum neurotoxin gene clusters and toxin subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Karen K; Smith, Theresa J

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a species of spore-forming anaerobic bacteria defined by the expression of any one or two of seven serologically distinct botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) designated BoNT/A-G. This Gram-positive bacterium was first identified in 1897 and since then the paralyzing and lethal effects of its toxin have resulted in the recognition of different forms of the intoxication known as food-borne, infant, or wound botulism. Early microbiological and biochemical characterization of C. botulinum isolates revealed that the bacteria within the species had different characteristics and expressed different toxin types. To organize the variable bacterial traits within the species, Group I-IV designations were created. Interestingly, it was observed that isolates within different Groups could express the same toxin type and conversely a single Group could express different toxin types. This discordant phylogeny between the toxin and the host bacteria indicated that horizontal gene transfer of the toxin was responsible for the variation observed within the species. The recent availability of multiple C. botulinum genomic sequences has offered the ability to bioinformatically analyze the locations of the bont genes, the composition of their toxin gene clusters, and the genes flanking these regions to understand their variation. Comparison of the genomic sequences representing multiple serotypes indicates that the bont genes are not in random locations. Instead the analyses revealed specific regions where the toxin genes occur within the genomes representing serotype A, B, C, E, and F C. botulinum strains and C. butyricum type E strains. The genomic analyses have provided evidence of horizontal gene transfer, site-specific insertion, and recombination events. These events have contributed to the variation observed among the neurotoxins, the toxin gene clusters and the bacteria that contain them, and has supported the historical microbiological, and biochemical

  2. Environmental neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and mercury in shark cartilage dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondo, Kiyo; Broc Glover, W; Murch, Susan J; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C

    2014-08-01

    Shark cartilage products are marketed as dietary supplements with claimed health benefits for animal and human use. Shark fin and cartilage products sold as extracts, dry powders and in capsules are marketed based on traditional Chinese medicine claims that it nourishes the blood, enhances appetite, and energizes multiple internal organs. Shark cartilage contains a mixture of chondroitin and glucosamine, a popular nutritional supplement ingested to improve cartilage function. Sharks are long-lived apex predators, that bioaccumulate environmental marine toxins and methylmercury from dietary exposures. We recently reported detection of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in the fins of seven different species of sharks from South Florida coastal waters. Since BMAA has been linked to degenerative brain diseases, the consumption of shark products may pose a human risk for BMAA exposures. In this report, we tested sixteen commercial shark cartilage supplements for BMAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-FD) with fluorescence detection and ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Total mercury (Hg) levels were measured in the same shark cartilage products by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). We report here that BMAA was detected in fifteen out of sixteen products with concentrations ranging from 86 to 265μg/g (dry weight). All of the shark fin products contained low concentrations of Hg. While Hg contamination is a known risk, the results of the present study demonstrate that shark cartilage products also may contain the neurotoxin BMAA. Although the neurotoxic potential of dietary exposure to BMAA is currently unknown, the results demonstrate that shark cartilage products may contain two environmental neurotoxins that have synergistic toxicities.

  3. Production and characterisation of a neutralising chimeric antibody against botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Prigent

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins, produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria, are the causative agent of botulism. This disease only affects a few hundred people each year, thus ranking it among the orphan diseases. However, botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A is the most potent toxin known to man. Due to their potency and ease of production, these toxins were classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as Category A biothreat agents. For several biothreat agents, like BoNT/A, passive immunotherapy remains the only possible effective treatment allowing in vivo neutralization, despite possible major side effects. Recently, several mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against a recombinant fragment of BoNT/A were produced in our laboratory and most efficiently neutralised the neurotoxin. In the present work, the most powerful one, TA12, was selected for chimerisation. The variable regions of this antibody were thus cloned and fused with the constant counterparts of human IgG1 (kappa light and gamma 1 heavy chains. Chimeric antibody production was evaluated in mammalian myeloma cells (SP2/0-Ag14 and insect cells (Sf9. After purifying the recombinant antibody by affinity chromatography, the biochemical properties of chimeric and mouse antibody were compared. Both have the same very low affinity constant (close to 10 pM and the chimeric antibody exhibited a similar capacity to its parent counterpart in neutralising the toxin in vivo. Its strong affinity and high neutralising potency make this chimeric antibody interesting for immunotherapy treatment in humans in cases of poisoning, particularly as there is a probable limitation of the immunological side effects observed with classical polyclonal antisera from heterologous species.

  4. Presence of presynaptic neurotoxin complexes in the venoms of Australo-Papuan death adders (Acanthophis spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklow, Benjamin; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; Hodgson, Wayne C; Nicholson, Graham M

    2010-06-01

    Australo-papuan death adders (Acanthophis spp.) are a cause of serious envenomations in Papua New Guinea and northern Australia often resulting in neurotoxic paralysis. Furthermore, victims occasionally present with delayed-onset neurotoxicity that sometimes responds poorly to antivenom or anticholinesterase treatment. This clinical outcome could be explained by the presence of potent snake presynaptic phospholipase A(2) neurotoxin (SPAN) complexes and monomers, in addition to long- and short-chain postsynaptic alpha-neurotoxins, that bind irreversibly, block neurotransmitter release and result in degeneration of the nerve terminal. The present study therefore aimed to determine within-genus variations in expression of high molecular mass SPAN complexes in the venoms of six major species of Acanthophis, four geographic variants of Acanthophis antarcticus. Venoms were separated by size-exclusion liquid chromatography under non-denaturing conditions and fractions corresponding to proteins in the range of 22 to >60 kDa were subjected to pharmacological characterization using the isolated chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle (CBCNM) preparation. All venoms, except Acanthophis wellsi and Acanthophis pyrrhus, contained high mass fractions with phospholipase A(2) activity that inhibited twitch contractions of the CBCNM preparation. This inhibition was of slow onset, and responses to exogenous nicotinic agonists were not blocked, consistent with the presence of SPAN complexes. The results of the present study indicate that clinicians may need to be aware of possible prejunctional neurotoxicity following envenomations from A. antarcticus (all geographic variants except perhaps South Australia), Acanthophis praelongus, Acanthophis rugosus and Acanthophis. laevis species, and that early antivenom intervention is important in preventing further development of toxicity.

  5. High-resolution crystal structure of HA33 of botulinum neurotoxin type B progenitor toxin complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced as progenitor toxin complexes (PTCs) by Clostridium botulinum. The PTCs are composed of BoNT and non-toxic neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs), which serve to protect and deliver BoNT through the gastrointestinal tract in food borne botulism. HA33 is a key NAP component that specifically recognizes host carbohydrates and helps enrich PTC on the intestinal lumen preceding its transport across the epithelial barriers. Here, we report the crystal structure of HA33 of type B PTC (HA33/B) in complex with lactose at 1.46 Å resolution. The structural comparisons among HA33 of serotypes A–D reveal two different HA33–glycan interaction modes. The glycan-binding pockets on HA33/A and B are more suitable to recognize galactose-containing glycans in comparison to the equivalent sites on HA33/C and D. On the contrary, HA33/C and D could potentially recognize Neu5Ac as an independent receptor, whereas HA33/A and B do not. These findings indicate that the different oral toxicity and host susceptibility observed among different BoNT serotypes could be partly determined by the serotype-specific interaction between HA33 and host carbohydrate receptors. Furthermore, we have identified a key structural water molecule that mediates the HA33/B–lactose interactions. It provides the structural basis for development of new receptor-mimicking compounds, which have enhanced binding affinity with HA33 through their water-displacing moiety. PMID:24631690

  6. Continuous smearing of Wilson Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Lohmayer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Continuum smearing was introduced in section 4.1 of JHEP03, 064 (2006) as a meaningful continuum analogue of the well known set of lattice techniques by the same name. Here we apply continuous smearing in continuous space-time to Wilson loops in order to clarify what it does in the context of field theory and also in the context of the loop calculus of the Makeenko-Migdal equation.

  7. The Projectile inside the Loop

    OpenAIRE

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe an alternative use of the loop-the-loop apparatus, which can be used to study an interesting case of projectile motion. We also present an effective way to perform and analyze these experiments, by using video capture software together with a digital video camera. These experiments can be integrated into classroom demonstrations for general physics courses, or become part of laboratory activities.

  8. Introduction to Loop Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Mercuri, Simone

    2010-01-01

    The questions I have been asked during the 5th International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, have compelled me to give an account of the premises that I consider important for a beginner's approach to Loop Quantum Gravity. After a description of some general arguments and an introduction to the canonical theory of gravity, I review the background independent approach to quantum gravity, giving only a brief survey of Loop Quantum Gravity.

  9. Bifurcations of nontwisted heteroclinic loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田清平; 朱德明

    2000-01-01

    Bifurcations of nontwisted and fine heteroclinic loops are studied for higher dimensional systems. The existence and its associated existing regions are given for the 1-hom orbit and the 1-per orbit, respectively, and bifurcation surfaces of the two-fold periodic orbit are also obtained. At last, these bifurcation results are applied to the fine heteroclinic loop for the planar system, which leads to some new and interesting results.

  10. Snake venom toxins. The amino-acid sequence of a short-neurotoxin homologue from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydom, D J

    1977-06-01

    The third most abundant component of black mamba venom, named FS2, was sequenced with the aid of sequenator studies and peptides derived by tryptic and chymotryptic digestion. Cyanogen bromide digests provided extra information to support the proposed structure. This protein is a homologue of the short neurotoxins of snake venom, but is much less toxic. Its structure is quite different from both neurotoxins and the other mamba proteins, called angusticeps types (neurotoxin homologues). Comparison of the known angusticeps-type toxins from mamba venom with mamba neurotoxins and each other leads to proposals that these proteins of low toxicity are inventions of the group of mambas and that three different, as yet unknown, functions will be associated with the three subgroups that are discernable.

  11. Reinterpretation of luminiscence properties of neurotoxins from the venom of Middle-Asian corba Naja oxiana eichw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukolova-Orlova, T G; Permyakov, E A; Burstein, E A; Yukelson, L Y

    1976-08-09

    A new interpretation of previous work (Bukolova-Orlova, T. G., Burstein, E.A. and Yukelson, L. Ya (1974) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 342, 272-280) and some new data on the luminescence of neurotoxins I and II from Naja oxiana venom is given, based on the newer data on their complete amino acid sequences. Very effective excitation energy exchange exists between Trp-27 and Trp-33 in neurotoxin I and between Trp-27 and Trp-28 in neurotoxin II, Which results in the tryptophanyl fluorescence spectra of each of the proteins seeming to be monocomponent ones. The lowered fluorescence quantium yield value, the shortened phosphorescence lifetime (80% of the emission has tau p less than 0.5 s, 20% has tau p = 4.8 s, comparing with usual tau p = 5.5-5.9 s) and decreased phosphorescence to fluorescence ratio (0.042, as compared to the usual 0.4-0.7) for neurotoxin I suggest that the indole chromophore of Trp-27 and/or Trp-33 are in contact with heavy sulfur atoms of disulfide, most probably of Cys(28)-Cys(32). Tryptophanyls in neurotoxin II are exposed to the solvent, however their accessibility in relation to that of the free tryptophan to the negatively charged quencher I- (0.455) is much higher than that for the positively charged Cs+ (0.08), which is probably due to the proximity of cationic Lys-25, Lys-26 and His-31. The difference of accessibility to the negative and positive quenchers is even more pronounced in the case of the neurotoxin I (1.04 and 0 +/- 0.02, respectively), though in its chromophore vicinity along the primary structure there is only one cationic group, Lys-25. This fact together with the analysis of the amino acid sequence, suggest that the space folding of this polypeptide results in the close proximity of Trp-27 and/or Trp-33 with the C-terminal peptide segment 67-73, which contains four cationic groups (His-67, Lys-69, Lys-71 and Arg-72).

  12. The type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster locus of group II clostridium botulinum has evolved by successive disruption of two different ancestral precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew T; Stringer, Sandra C; Webb, Martin D; Peck, Michael W

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequences of five different Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type F6 strains were compared at a 50-kb locus containing the neurotoxin gene cluster. A clonal origin for these strains is indicated by the fact that sequences were identical except for strain Eklund 202F, with 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and a 15-bp deletion. The essential topB gene encoding topoisomerase III was found to have been split by the apparent insertion of 34.4 kb of foreign DNA (in a similar manner to that in Group II C. botulinum type E where the rarA gene has been disrupted by a neurotoxin gene cluster). The foreign DNA, which includes the intact 13.6-kb type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster, bears not only a newly introduced topB gene but also two nonfunctional botulinum neurotoxin gene remnants, a type B and a type E. This observation combined with the discovery of bacteriophage integrase genes and IS4 elements suggest that several rounds of recombination/horizontal gene transfer have occurred at this locus. The simplest explanation for the current genotype is that the ancestral bacterium, a Group II C. botulinum type B strain, received DNA firstly from a strain containing a type E neurotoxin gene cluster, then from a strain containing a type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster. Each event disrupted the previously functional neurotoxin gene. This degree of successive recombination at one hot spot is without precedent in C. botulinum, and it is also the first description of a Group II C. botulinum genome containing more than one neurotoxin gene sequence.

  13. Neurotoxins from Clostridium botulinum (serotype A) isolated from the soil of Mendoza (Argentina) differ from the A-Hall archetype and from that causing infant botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, P; Troncoso, M; Patterson, S I; López Gómez, C; Fernandez, R; Sosa, M A

    2016-10-01

    The type A of neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum is the prevalent serotype in strains of Mendoza. The soil is the main reservoir for C.botulinum and is possibly one of the infection sources in infant botulism. In this study, we characterized and compared autochthonous C. botulinum strains and their neurotoxins. Bacterial samples were obtained from the soil and from fecal samples collected from children with infant botulism. We first observed differences in the appearance of the colonies between strains from each source and with the A Hall control strain. In addition, purified neurotoxins of both strains were found to be enriched in a band of 300 kDa, whereas the A-Hall strain was mainly made up of a band of ∼600 kDa. This finding is in line with the lack of hemagglutinating activity of the neurotoxins under study. Moreover, the proteolytic activity of C. botulinum neurotoxins was evaluated against SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptor) proteins from rat brain. It was observed that both, SNAP 25 (synaptosomal-associated protein 25) and VAMP 2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein) were cleaved by the neurotoxins isolated from the soil strains, whereas the neurotoxins from infant botulism strains only induced a partial cleavage of VAMP 2. On the other hand, the neurotoxin from the A-Hall strain was able to cleave both proteins, though at a lesser extent. Our data indicate that the C.botulinum strain isolated from the soil, and its BoNT, exhibit different properties compared to the strain obtained from infant botulism patients, and from the A-Hall archetype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Binding of long-chain α-neurotoxin would stabilize the resting state of nAChR: A comparative study with α-conotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naderi-Manesh Hossein

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The details of interaction in a complex between potent antagonists such as long chain α-neurotoxins and α-conotoxins with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, and conformational changes induced by these antagonists, are not yet clear. Modeling In order to uncover some of these critical structural features, we conducted a docking simulation and a molecular dynamics simulation (MD of a model of the ligand binding domain of nAChR in complex with a long-chain α-neurotoxin and an α-conotoxin. Results Our docking results confirm the claim that T.nAChR is in the basal or resting state, which favors binding to the alpha-neurotoxins. Moreover, more correct "hits" for the α/γ interface upon docking for conotoxin-nAChR confirm the preference of conotoxin GI for the α/γ interface. More importantly, upon binding of α-neurotoxin, ligand-bonded nAChR is less dynamic in certain domains than the apo form of the conotoxin-AChR complex. Some critical interactions in the binding site such as the salt bridge formed between K145/D200 in the neurotoxin-nAChR complex is further stabilized during the MD simulation, while it is obviously more labile in the apo form. Conclusion These observations could support the claim that alpha neurotoxins stabilize the nAChR resting state.

  15. Bol loops of odd prime exponent

    CERN Document Server

    Foguel, Tuval

    2009-01-01

    Although any finite Bol loop of odd prime exponent is solvable, we show there exist such Bol loops with trivial center. We also construct finitely generated, infinite, simple Bruck loops of odd prime exponent for sufficiently large primes. This shows that the Burnside problem for Bruck loops has a negative answer.

  16. Classifying Finitely Generated Indecomposable RA Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Cornelissen, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    In 1995, E. Jespers, G. Leal and C. Polcino Milies classified all finite ring alternative loops (RA loops for short) which are not direct products of proper subloops. In this paper we extend this result to finitely generated RA loops and provide an explicit description of all such loops.

  17. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  18. Study of the Open Loop and Closed Loop Oscillator Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imel, George R. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Baker, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riley, Tony [Knolls Atomic Power Lab. (KAPL), Schenectady, NY (United States); Langbehn, Adam [Puget Sound Naval Base, Bremerton, WA (United States); Aryal, Harishchandra [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Benzerga, M. Lamine [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2015-04-11

    This report presents the progress and completion of a five-year study undertaken at Idaho State University of the measurement of very small worth reactivity samples comparing open and closed loop oscillator techniques.The study conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of the two techniques with regard to uncertainties in reactivity values, i.e., limited by reactor noise. As those results are thoroughly documented in recent publications, in this report we will concentrate on the support work that was necessary. For example, we describe in some detail the construction and calibration of a pilot rod for the closed loop system. We discuss the campaign to measure the required reactor parameters necessary for inverse-kinetics. Finally, we briefly discuss the transfer of the open loop technique to other reactor systems.

  19. BPS Wilson Loops on S^2 at Higher Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Donovan

    2008-01-01

    We consider supersymmetric Wilson loops of the variety constructed by Drukker, Giombi, Ricci, and Trancanelli, whose spatial contours lie on a two-sphere. Working to second order in the 't Hooft coupling in planar N=4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory (SYM), we compute the vacuum expectation value of a wavy-latitude and of a loop composed of two longitudes. We evaluate the resulting integrals numerically and find that the results are consistent with the zero-instanton sector calculation of Wilson loops in 2-d Yang-Mills on S^2 performed by Bassetto and Griguolo. We also consider the connected correlator of two distinct latitudes to third order in the 't Hooft coupling in planar N=4 SYM. We compare the result in the limit where the latitudes become coincident to a perturbative calculation in 2-d Yang-Mills on S^2 using a light-cone Wu-Mandelstam-Leibbrandt prescription. The two calculations produce differing results.

  20. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing: Sequential assignment of resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Krishna, N.R. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (USA))

    1989-02-21

    The authors report the sequential assignment of resonances to specific residues in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the variant-3 neurotoxin from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing (range southwestern U.S.A.). A combination of two-dimensional NMR experiments such as 2D-COSY, 2D-NOESY, and single- and double-RELAY coherence transfer spectroscopy has been employed on samples of the protein dissolved in D{sub 2}O and in H{sub 2}O for assignment purposes. These studies provide a basis for the determination of the solution-phase conformation of this protein and for undertaking detailed structure-function studies of these neurotoxins that modulate the flow of sodium current by binding to the sodium channels of excitable membranes.

  1. Generalized loop space and TMDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertens Tom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Standard Model describes the three (of four basic interactions known in Nature in terms of the quantum fields which are constituted by representations of special unitary gauge groups of symmetry. However, the physical observables do not always coincide with the fundamental degrees of freedom of the Standard Model. Therefore it can be useful to switch to the loop space representation of the gauge theory, where the variables are inherently gauge invariant but the degrees of freedom are absorbed in the path/loop dependence. Over-completeness of this space requires the introduction of an equivalence relation which is provided by Wilson loop functionals operating on piecewise regular paths. It is well known that certain Wilson loops show the same singularity structure as some Transverse Momentum Dependent PDFs (TMDs, which are not renormalizable by the common methods due to exactly this singularity structure. By introducing geometrical operators, like the area-derivative, we were able to derive an evolution equation for these Wilson loops and we hope to apply this method in the future to find some renormalization schemes for TMDs.

  2. Loop coupled resonator optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Junfeng; Luo, Lian-Wee; Luo, Xianshu; Zhou, Haifeng; Tu, Xiaoguang; Jia, Lianxi; Fang, Qing; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2014-10-06

    We propose a novel coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure that is made up of a waveguide loop. We theoretically investigate the forbidden band and conduction band conditions in an infinite periodic lattice. We also discuss the reflection- and transmission- spectra, group delay in finite periodic structures. Light has a larger group delay at the band edge in a periodic structure. The flat band pass filter and flat-top group delay can be realized in a non-periodic structure. Scattering matrix method is used to calculate the effects of waveguide loss on the optical characteristics of these structures. We also introduce a tunable coupling loop waveguide to compensate for the fabrication variations since the coupling coefficient of the directional coupler in the loop waveguide is a critical factor in determining the characteristics of a loop CROW. The loop CROW structure is suitable for a wide range of applications such as band pass filters, high Q microcavity, and optical buffers and so on.

  3. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop AntennaPrinted Slot Loop Antenna (invited)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren Helstrup; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel verticall A novel vertically polarized dpolarize , omnidirection omnidirectional l , printed slot loop antenna h sprinted slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated, and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform...

  4. Molecular composition and extinction coefficient of native botulinum neurotoxin complex produced by Clostridium botulinum hall A strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Anne-Marie; Davis, Jenny; Cai, Shuowei; Singh, Bal Ram

    2013-02-01

    Seven distinct strains of Clostridium botulinum (type A to G) each produce a stable complex of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) along with neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs). Type A botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/A) is produced with a group of NAPs and is commercially available for the treatment of numerous neuromuscular disorders and cosmetic purposes. Previous studies have indicated that BoNT/A complex composition is specific to the strain, the method of growth and the method of purification; consequently, any variation in composition of NAPs could have significant implications to the effectiveness of BoNT based therapeutics. In this study, a standard analytical technique using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and densitometry analysis was developed to accurately analyze BoNT/A complex from C. botulinum type A Hall strain. Using 3 batches of BoNT/A complex the molar ratio was determined as neurotoxin binding protein (NBP, 124 kDa), heavy chain (HC, 90 kDa), light chain (LC, 53 kDa), NAP-53 (50 kDa), NAP-33 (36 kDa), NAP-22 (24 kDa), NAP-17 (17 kDa) 1:1:1:2:3:2:2. With Bradford, Lowry, bicinchoninic acid (BCA) and spectroscopic protein estimation methods, the extinction coefficient of BoNT/A complex was determined as 1.54 ± 0.26 (mg/mL)(-1)cm(-1). These findings of a reproducible BoNT/A complex composition will aid in understanding the molecular structure and function of BoNT/A and NAPs.

  5. Structural And Biochemical Studies of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype C1 Light Chain Protease: Implications for Dual Substrate Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, R.; Sikorra, S.; Stegmann, C.M.; Pich, A.; Binz, T.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-06-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic disease botulism and tetanus. They block neurotransmitter release through specific proteolysis of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) SNAP-25, syntaxin, and synaptobrevin, which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The catalytic component of the clostridial neurotoxins is their light chain (LC), a Zn2+ endopeptidase. There are seven structurally and functionally related botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), termed serotype A to G, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). Each of them exhibits unique specificity for their target SNAREs and peptide bond(s) they cleave. The mechanisms of action for substrate recognition and target cleavage are largely unknown. Here, we report structural and biochemical studies of BoNT/C1-LC, which is unique among BoNTs in that it exhibits dual specificity toward both syntaxin and SNAP-25. A distinct pocket (S1') near the active site likely achieves the correct register for the cleavage site by only allowing Ala as the P1' residue for both SNAP-25 and syntaxin. Mutations of this SNAP-25 residue dramatically reduce enzymatic activity. The remote a-exosite that was previously identified in the complex of BoNT/A-LC and SNAP-25 is structurally conserved in BoNT/C1. However, mutagenesis experiments show that the a-exosite of BoNT/C1 plays a less stringent role in substrate discrimination in comparison to that of BoNT/A, which could account for its dual substrate specificity.

  6. Development and Testing of an In Vitro Assay for Screening of Potential Therapeutic Agents against Na Channel Neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-03

    organizations and trade names in this report do not constitute an official Department of the Army endorsement or approval of the products or services of... BTX -B binding in frozen synaptoneurosomes. 26 Figure 5. Stability of sodium channel neurotoxins to storage at -70C. 27 Figure 6. Inhibition of...voltage-sensitive sodium channel producing a block of ion flux. The lipid-soluble toxins, of which BTX is the most potent, bind at site 2 causing a shift

  7. Effects of algal-produced neurotoxins on metabolic activity in telencephalon, optic tectum and cerebellum of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, Marit Jorgensen [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Horsberg, Tor Einar [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: tor.e.horsberg@veths.no

    2007-11-30

    Neurotoxins from algal blooms have been reported to cause mortality in a variety of species, including sea birds, sea mammals and fish. Farmed fish cannot escape harmful algal blooms and their potential toxins, thus they are more vulnerable for exposure than wild stocks. Sublethal doses of the toxins are likely to affect fish behaviour and may impair cognitive abilities. In the present study, changes in the metabolic activity in different parts of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) brain involved in central integration and cognition were investigated after exposure to sublethal doses of three algal-produced neurotoxins; saxitoxin (STX), brevetoxin (BTX) and domoic acid (DA). Fish were randomly selected to four groups for i.p. injection of saline (control) or one of the neurotoxins STX (10 {mu}g STX/kg bw), BTX (68 {mu}g BTX/kg bw) or DA (6 mg DA/kg bw). In addition, {sup 14}C-2-deoxyglucose was i.m. injected to measure brain metabolic activity by autoradiography. The three regions investigated were telencephalon (Tel), optic tectum (OT) and cerebellum (Ce). There were no differences in the metabolic activity after STX and BTX exposure compared to the control in these regions. However, a clear increase was observed after DA exposure. When the subregions with the highest metabolic rate were pseudocoloured in the three brain regions, the three toxins caused distinct differences in the respective patterns of metabolic activation. Fish exposed to STX displayed similar patterns as the control fish, whereas fish exposed to BTX and DA showed highest metabolic activity in subregions different from the control group. All three neurotoxins affected subregions that are believed to be involved in cognitive abilities in fish.

  8. Preparation and properties of a neurotoxin purified from the venom of black widow spider (Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, A

    1976-08-09

    A neurotoxin of the venom of the spider Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, has been prepared in a homogeneous form and examined by a variety of techniques. The protein has a molecular weight of 130 000 and its toxicity in mice is about 49 000 LD50 mg pure protein/g body weight. The toxin releases norepinephrine from synaptosomes prepared from rat brain and shows most of the toxic effects of the crude venom preparation.

  9. Botulinum and Tetanus Neurotoxin Induced Blockage of Synaptic Transmission in Networked Cultures of Human and Rodent Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-28

    spontaneous postsynaptic currents The clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) are a family of closely related bacterial protein toxins that include tetanus...and cleavage of cognate SNARE proteins (Fig. 3D–F). Concentration-response curves were used to estimate toxin concentrations that caused proteolysis...Each BOTOX vial contains stabilizing excipients with 100 or 200 U of “complex” toxin , consisting of BoNT/A associated with naturally associated proteins

  10. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels. Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in Synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    concentration in the nonaqueuus (membrane) phase (Lyon et aL, 1981). Concentration- effect summarized in table 1 . When sodium channels were activated curves were...Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels : Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in DT (7 Synaptosomes E L C MICHAEL J. MULLIN’ and WALTER A. HUNT...1984). At the present time, the 8 1 structural and functional properties of the voltage-sensitive sodium channels are understood most completely

  11. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype F: Identification of Substrate Recognition Requirements and Development of Inhibitors with Low Nanomolar Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    toxin, secreted by Clostridium tetani , and the seven serologically distinct botulinum toxins, designated types A-G, produced by various strains of... Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium baratii, and Clostridium butyricum (1-3). They are the most toxic substances known (4). Each neurotoxin is synthesized as...The latter characteristic distinguishes BoNT F from other zinc metalloendoproteases, including BoNTs A and B. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Clostridium botulinuim

  12. Effects of Megaplasmid Loss on Growth of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Strains and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Concetta eScalfaro; Angelo eIacobino; Laura eGrande; Stefano eMorabito; Giovanna eFranciosa

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum strains that atypically produce the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) possess a megaplasmid of unknown functions in their genome. In this study, we cured two botulinum neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains of their megaplasmids, and compared the obtained megaplasmid-cured strains to their respective wild-type parental strains. Our results showed that the megaplasmids do not confer beta-lactam resistance on the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, although ...

  13. NMR analysis of interaction of LqhalphaIT scorpion toxin with a peptide corresponding to the D4/S3-S4 loop of insect para voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, Einat; Turkov, Michael; Kahn, Roy; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Anglister, Jacob

    2008-01-22

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) are large transmembrane proteins that initiate action potential in electrically excitable cells. This central role in the nervous system has made them a primary target for a large number of neurotoxins. Scorpion alpha-neurotoxins bind to Navs with high affinity and slow their inactivation, causing a prolonged action potential. Despite the similarity in their mode of action and three-dimensional structure, alpha-toxins exhibit great variations in selectivity toward insect and mammalian Navs, suggesting differences in the binding surfaces of the toxins and the channels. The scorpion alpha-toxin binding site, termed neurotoxin receptor site 3, has been shown to involve the extracellular S3-S4 loop in domain 4 of the alpha-subunit of voltage-gated sodium channels (D4/S3-S4). In this study, the binding site for peptides corresponding to the D4/S3-S4 loop of the para insect Nav was mapped on the highly insecticidal alpha-neurotoxin, LqhalphaIT, from the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus, by following changes in the toxin amide 1H and 15N chemical shifts upon binding. This analysis suggests that the five-residue turn (residues LqK8-LqC12) of LqhalphaIT and those residues in its vicinity interact with the D4/S3-S4 loop of Nav. Residues LqR18, LqW38, and LqA39 could also form a patch contributing to the interaction with D4/S3-S4. Moreover, a new bioactive residue, LqV13, was identified as being important for Nav binding and specifically for the interaction with the D4/S3-S4 loop. The contribution of LqV13 to NaV binding was further verified by mutagenesis. Future studies involving other extracellular regions of Navs are required for further characterization of the structure of the LqhalphaIT-Navs binding site.

  14. In vitro detection of cardiotoxins or neurotoxins affecting ion channels or pumps using beating cardiomyocytes as alternative for animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Peter J M; de Haan, Laura H J; Koning, Rosella; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Bovee, Toine F H

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated if and to what extent murine stem cell-derived beating cardiomyocytes within embryoid bodies can be used as a broad screening in vitro assay for neurotoxicity testing, replacing for example in vivo tests for marine neurotoxins. Effect of nine model compounds, acting on either the Na(+), K(+), or Ca(2+) channels or the Na(+)/K(+) ATP-ase pump, on the beating was assessed. Diphenhydramine, veratridine, isradipine, verapamil and ouabain induced specific beating arrests that were reversible and none of the concentrations tested induced cytotoxicity. Three K(+) channel blockers, amiodarone, clofilium and sematilide, and the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase pump inhibitor digoxin had no specific effect on the beating. In addition, two marine neurotoxins i.e. saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin elicited specific beating arrests in cardiomyocytes. Comparison of the results obtained with cardiomyocytes to those obtained with the neuroblastoma neuro-2a assay revealed that the cardiomyocytes were generally somewhat more sensitive for the model compounds affecting Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, but less sensitive for the compounds affecting K(+) channels. The stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were not as sensitive as the neuroblastoma neuro-2a assay for saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin. It is concluded that the murine stem cell-derived beating cardiomyocytes provide a sensitive model for detection of specific neurotoxins and that the neuroblastoma neuro-2a assay may be a more promising cell-based assay for the screening of marine biotoxins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New Typical Vector of Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-l-Alanine (BMAA in the Marine Benthic Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aifeng Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA has been identified as an environmental factor triggering neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We investigated the possible vectors of BMAA and its isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB and N-2(aminoethylglycine (AEG in marine mollusks collected from the Chinese coast. Sixty-eight samples of marine mollusks were collected along the Chinese coast in 2016, and were analyzed by an HILIC-MS/MS (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer method without derivatization. BMAA was detected in a total of five samples from three species: Neverita didyma, Solen strictus, and Mytilus coruscus. The top three concentrations of free-form BMAA (0.99~3.97 μg·g−1 wet weight were detected in N. didyma. DAB was universally detected in most of the mollusk samples (53/68 with no species-specific or regional differences (0.051~2.65 μg·g−1 wet weight. No AEG was detected in any mollusk samples tested here. The results indicate that the gastropod N. didyma might be an important vector of the neurotoxin BMAA in the Chinese marine ecosystem. The neurotoxin DAB was universally present in marine bivalve and gastropod mollusks. Since N. didyma is consumed by humans, we suggest that the origin and risk of BMAA and DAB toxins in the marine ecosystem should be further investigated in the future.

  16. Iptakalim hydrochloride protects cells against neurotoxin-induced glutamate transporter dysfunction in in vitro and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-Ling; Meng, Chang-Hong; Ding, Jian-Hua; He, Hai-Rong; Ellsworth, Kevin; Wu, Jie; Hu, Gang

    2005-07-01

    Iptakalim hydrochloride (Ipt), a novel antihypertensive drug, exhibits K(ATP) channel activation. Here, we report that Ipt remarkably protects cells against neurotoxin-induced glutamate transporter dysfunction in in vitro and in vivo models. Chronic exposure of cultured PC12 cells to neurotoxins, such as 6-OHDA, MPP+, or rotenone, decreased overall [3H]-glutamate uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Pre-treatment using 10 microM Ipt significantly protected cells against neurotoxin-induced glutamate uptake diminishment, and this protection was abolished by the K(ATP) channel blocker glibenclamide (20 microM), suggesting that the protective mechanisms may involve the opening of K(ATP) channels. In 6-OHDA-treated rats (as an in vivo Parkinson's disease model), [3H]-glutamate uptake was significantly lower in synaptosomes isolated from the striatum and cerebral cortex, but not the hippocampus. Pre-conditioning using 10, 50, and 100 microM Ipt significantly restored glutamate uptake impairment and these protections were abolished by blockade of K(ATP) channels. It is concluded that Ipt exhibits substantial protection of cells against neurotoxicity in in vitro and in vivo models. The cellular mechanisms of this protective effect may involve the opening of K(ATP) channels. Collectively, Ipt may serve as a novel and effective drug for PD therapy.

  17. New Typical Vector of Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-l-Alanine (BMAA) in the Marine Benthic Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aifeng; Song, Jialiang; Hu, Yang; Deng, Longji; Ding, Ling; Li, Meihui

    2016-11-04

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been identified as an environmental factor triggering neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the possible vectors of BMAA and its isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-2(aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) in marine mollusks collected from the Chinese coast. Sixty-eight samples of marine mollusks were collected along the Chinese coast in 2016, and were analyzed by an HILIC-MS/MS (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer) method without derivatization. BMAA was detected in a total of five samples from three species: Neverita didyma, Solen strictus, and Mytilus coruscus. The top three concentrations of free-form BMAA (0.99~3.97 μg·g(-1) wet weight) were detected in N. didyma. DAB was universally detected in most of the mollusk samples (53/68) with no species-specific or regional differences (0.051~2.65 μg·g(-1) wet weight). No AEG was detected in any mollusk samples tested here. The results indicate that the gastropod N. didyma might be an important vector of the neurotoxin BMAA in the Chinese marine ecosystem. The neurotoxin DAB was universally present in marine bivalve and gastropod mollusks. Since N. didyma is consumed by humans, we suggest that the origin and risk of BMAA and DAB toxins in the marine ecosystem should be further investigated in the future.

  18. All digital pulsewidth control loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong-Yi; Jan, Shiun-Dian; Pu, Ruei-Iun

    2013-03-01

    This work presents an all-digital pulsewidth control loop (ADPWCL). The proposed system accepts a wide range of input duty cycles and performs a fast correction to the target output pulsewidth. An all-digital delay-locked loop (DLL) with fast locking time using a simplified time to digital converter and a new differential two-step delay element is proposed. The area of the delay element is much smaller than that in conventional designs, while having the same delay range. A test chip is verified in a 0.18-µm CMOS process. The measured duty cycle ranges from 4% to 98% with 7-bit resolution.

  19. Loop quantum cosmology: Recent progress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Martin Bojowald

    2004-10-01

    Aspects of the full theory of loop quantum gravity can be studied in a simpler context by reducing to symmetric models like cosmological ones. This leads to several applications where loop effects play a significant role when one is sensitive to the quantum regime. As a consequence, the structure of and the approach to classical singularities are very different from general relativity. The quantum theory is free of singularities, and there are new phenomenological scenarios for the evolution of the very early universe such as inflation. We give an overview of the main effects, focussing on recent results obtained by different groups.

  20. Loop quantum geometry: a primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corichi, Alejandro [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. Postal 70-543, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2005-01-15

    This is the written version of a lecture given at the 'VI Mexican School of Gravitation and Mathematical Physics' (Nov 21-27, 2004, Playa del Carmen, Mexico), introducing the basics of Loop Quantum Geometry. The purpose of the written contribution is to provide a Primer version, that is, a first entry into Loop Quantum Gravity and to present at the same time a friendly guide to the existing pedagogical literature on the subject. This account is geared towards graduate students and non-experts interested in learning the basics of the subject.

  1. LISA Pathfinder: OPD loop characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Michael; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The optical metrology system (OMS) of the LISA Pathfinder mission is measuring the distance between two free-floating test masses with unprecedented precision. One of the four OMS heterodyne interferometers reads out the phase difference between the reference and the measurement laser beam. This phase from the reference interferometer is common to all other longitudinal interferometer read outs and therefore subtracted. In addition, the phase is fed back via the digital optical pathlength difference (OPD) control loop to keep it close to zero. Here, we analyse the loop parameters and compare them to on-ground measurement results.

  2. Loop Quantum Geometry: A primer

    OpenAIRE

    Corichi, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    This is the written version of a lecture given at the ``VI Mexican School of Gravitation and Mathematical Physics" (Nov 21-27, 2004, Playa del Carmen, Mexico), introducing the basics of Loop Quantum Geometry. The purpose of the written contribution is to provide a Primer version, that is, a first entry into Loop Quantum Gravity and to present at the same time a friendly guide to the existing pedagogical literature on the subject. This account is geared towards graduate students and non-expert...

  3. Immunoprecipitation of native botulinum neurotoxin complexes from Clostridium botulinum subtype A strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guangyun; Tepp, William H; Bradshaw, Marite; Fredrick, Chase M; Johnson, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) naturally exist as components of protein complexes containing nontoxic proteins. The nontoxic proteins impart stability of BoNTs in the gastrointestinal tract and during purification and handling. The two primary neurotoxin complexes (TCs) are (i) TC1, consisting of BoNT, nontoxin-nonhemagglutinin (NTNH), and hemagglutinins (HAs), and (ii) TC2, consisting of BoNT and NTNH (and possibly OrfX proteins). In this study, BoNT/A subtypes A1, A2, A3, and A5 were examined for the compositions of their TCs in culture extracts using immunoprecipitation (IP). IP analyses showed that BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A5 form TC1s, while BoNT/A2 and BoNT/A3 form TC2s. A Clostridium botulinum host strain expressing recombinant BoNT/A4 (normally present as a TC2) from an extrachromosomal plasmid formed a TC1 with complexing proteins from the host strain, indicating that the HAs and NTNH encoded on the chromosome associated with the plasmid-encoded BoNT/A4. Strain NCTC 2916 (A1/silent B1), which carries both an ha silent bont/b cluster and an orfX bont/a1 cluster, was also examined. IP analysis revealed that NCTC 2916 formed only a TC2 containing BoNT/A1 and its associated NTNH. No association between BoNT/A1 and the nontoxic proteins from the silent bont/b cluster was detected, although the HAs were expressed as determined by Western blotting analysis. Additionally, NTNH and HAs from the silent bont/b cluster did not form a complex in NCTC 2916. The stabilities of the two types of TC differed at various pHs and with addition of KCl and NaCl. TC1 complexes were more stable than TC2 complexes. Mouse serum stabilized TC2, while TC1 was unaffected.

  4. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Laming, J. M.; Taylor, B. D.; Obenschain, K.

    2016-11-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  5. Dirac Induction for loop groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma, H.

    2011-01-01

    Using a coset version of the cubic Dirac operators for affine Lie algebras, we give an algebraic construction of the Dirac induction homomorphism for loop group representations. With this, we prove a homogeneous generalization of the Weyl-Kac character formula and show compatibility with Dirac induc

  6. Five-loop massive tadpoles

    CERN Document Server

    Luthe, T

    2016-01-01

    We provide an update on a long-term project that aims at evaluating massive vacuum integrals at the five-loop frontier, with high precision and in various space-time dimensions. A number of applications are sketched, mainly concerning the determination of anomalous dimensions, for quantum field theories in four, three and two dimensions.

  7. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Barrau, A

    2014-01-01

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  8. Neurotoxin-induced DNA damage is persistentin SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Musich, Phillip R.; Cui, Kui; Zou, Yue; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the noradrenergic neurons has been reported in the brain of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. However, their pathologic characteristics during the neurodegenerative course and underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we used the neurotoxincamptothecin (CPT)to induce the DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, normal fibroblast cells, and primarily cultured LC and raphe neurons to examine cellular responses and repair capabilities after neurotoxin exposure. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and deficientin DNA repair, as compared to fibroblast cells. Furthermore, similar to SH-SY5Y cells, primarily cultured LC neurons are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and show a deficiency in repairing this damage. Moreover, while N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) exposure also results in DNA damage in cultured LC neurons, neither CPT nor DSP4 induce DNA damage in neuronal cultures from the raphe nuclei. Taken together, noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons are sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and exhibit a repair deficiency, providing a mechanistic explanation for the pathologic characteristics of LC degeneration when facing endogenous and environmental DNA-damaging insultsin vivo. PMID:25724887

  9. Implementing the Bruker MALDI Biotyper in the Public Health Laboratory for C. botulinum Neurotoxin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Perry

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the gold standard method for active botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT detection is the mouse bioassay (MBA. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-developed mass spectrometry (MS-based assay that detects active BoNT was successfully validated and implemented in a public health laboratory in clinical matrices using the Bruker MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry Biotyper. For the first time, a direct comparison with the MBA was performed to determine MS-based assay sensitivity using the Bruker MALDI Biotyper. Mice were injected with BoNT/A, /B, /E, and /F at concentrations surrounding the established MS assay limit of detection (LOD and analyzed simultaneously. For BoNT/B, /E, and /F, MS assay sensitivity was equivalent or better than the MBA at 25, 0.3, and 8.8 mLD50, respectively. BoNT/A was detected by the MBA between 1.8 and 18 mLD50, somewhat more sensitive than the MS method of 18 mLD50. Studies were performed to compare assay performance in clinical specimens. For all tested specimens, the MS method rapidly detected BoNT activity and serotype in agreement with, or in the absence of, results from the MBA. We demonstrate that the MS assay can generate reliable, rapid results while eliminating the need for animal testing.

  10. Disulfide bond reduction corresponds to dimerization and hydrophobicity changes of Clostridium botulinum type A neurotoxin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiunn-jye WEY; Shiao-shek TANG; Tzong-yuan WU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine the structure factors that mediate the intoxication process of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). Methods: Triton X-114 phase separation experiments and 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate binding assay were used to study the structural factor that corresponds to the hydrophobicity change of BoNT/A. In addition, sucrose density gradient centrifugation and a chemical crosslinking study were employed to determine the quaternary structure of BoNT/A. Results: Our results demonstrated that in other than acidic conditions, the disulfide reduction is the structural factor that corresponds to the hydrophobicity change of BoNT/A. The quaternary structure of BoNT/A exists as a dimmer in acidic solution (pH 4.5), although the monomeric structure of BoNT/A was reported based on X-ray crystallography. Conclusion: Disulfide bond reduction is critical for BoNT/A's channel formation and ability to cross endosome membranes. This result implies that compounds that block this disulfide bond reduction may serve as potential therapeutic agents for botulism.

  11. Camelid-derived heavy-chain nanobody against Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin E in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghban, Roghayyeh; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Nazarian, Shahram; Bakherad, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) result in severe and often fatal disease, botulism. Common remedial measures such as equine antitoxin and human botulism immunoglobulin in turn are problematic and time-consuming. Therefore, diagnosis and therapy of BoNTs are vital. The variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH) has unique features, such as the ability to identify and bind specifically to target epitopes and ease of production in bacteria and yeast. The Pichia pastoris is suitable for expression of recombinant antibody fragments. Disulfide bond formation and correct folds of protein with a high yield are some of the advantages of this eukaryotic host. In this study, we have expressed and purified the camelid VHH against BoNT/E in P. pastoris. The final yield of P. pastoris-expressed antibody was estimated to be 16 mg/l, which is higher than that expressed by Escherichia coli. The nanobody expressed in P. pastoris neutralized 4LD50 of the BoNT/E upon i.p. injection in 25% of mice. The nanobody expressed in E. coli extended the mice's survival to 1.5-fold compared to the control. This experiment indicated that the quality of expressed protein in the yeast is superior to that of the bacterial expression. Favorable protein folding by P. pastoris seems to play a role in its better toxin-binding property.

  12. Structure of a bimodular botulinum neurotoxin complex provides insights into its oral toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangkook Lee

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs are produced by Clostridium botulinum and cause the fatal disease botulism, a flaccid paralysis of the muscle. BoNTs are released together with several auxiliary proteins as progenitor toxin complexes (PTCs to become highly potent oral poisons. Here, we report the structure of a ∼760 kDa 14-subunit large PTC of serotype A (L-PTC/A and reveal insight into its absorption mechanism. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and functional studies, we found that L-PTC/A consists of two structurally and functionally independent sub-complexes. A hetero-dimeric 290 kDa complex protects BoNT, while a hetero-dodecameric 470 kDa complex facilitates its absorption in the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. BoNT absorption is mediated by nine glycan-binding sites on the dodecameric sub-complex that forms multivalent interactions with carbohydrate receptors on intestinal epithelial cells. We identified monosaccharides that blocked oral BoNT intoxication in mice, which suggests a new strategy for the development of preventive countermeasures for BoNTs based on carbohydrate receptor mimicry.

  13. A Monoclonal Antibody Based Capture ELISA for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B: Toxin Detection in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry H. Stanker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalytic disease, caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A–H have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We report here a group of serotype B specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs capable of binding toxin under physiological conditions. Thus, they serve as capture antibodies for a sandwich (capture ELISA. The antibodies were generated using recombinant peptide fragments corresponding to the receptor-binding domain of the toxin heavy chain as immunogen. Their binding properties suggest that they bind a complex epitope with dissociation constants (KD’s for individual antibodies ranging from 10 to 48 × 10−11 M. Assay performance for all possible combinations of capture-detector antibody pairs was evaluated and the antibody pair resulting in the lowest level of detection (L.O.D., ~20 pg/mL was determined. Toxin was detected in spiked dairy samples with good recoveries at concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL and in ground beef samples at levels as low as 2 ng/g. Thus, the sandwich ELISA described here uses mAb for both the capture and detector antibodies (binding different epitopes on the toxin molecule and readily detects toxin in those food samples tested.

  14. Mode of VAMP Substrate Recognition and Inhibition of Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, R.; Schmidt, J; Stafford, R; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cleave neuronal proteins responsible for neurotransmitter release, causing the neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNT serotypes B, D, F and G cleave and inactivate vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), each at a unique peptide bond. The specificity of BoNTs depends on the mode of substrate recognition. We have investigated the mechanism of substrate recognition of BoNT F by determining the crystal structures of its complex with two substrate-based inhibitors, VAMP 22-58/Gln58D-cysteine and 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. The inhibitors bind to BoNT F in the canonical direction (as seen for BoNTs A and E substrates) but are positioned specifically via three major exosites away from the active site. The cysteine sulfur of the inhibitors interacts with the zinc and exists as sulfinic acid in the inhibitor VAMP 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. Arg133 and Arg171, which form part of two separate exosites, are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis.

  15. Neurotoxin-Induced Catecholaminergic Loss in the Colonic Myenteric Plexus of Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Jeanette M; Resnikoff, Henry; Bondarenko, Viktorya; Joers, Valerie; Mejia, Andres; Simmons, Heather; Emborg, Marina E

    2017-01-01

    Objective Constipation is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although pathology of the enteric nervous system (ENS) has been associated with constipation in PD, the contribution of catecholaminergic neurodegeneration to this symptom is currently debated. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on the colonic myenteric plexus and shed light on the role of catecholaminergic innervation in gastrointestinal (GI) function. Methods Proximal colon tissue from 6-OHDA-treated (n=5) and age-matched control (n=5) rhesus monkeys was immunostained and quantified using ImageJ software. All animals underwent routine daily feces monitoring to assess for constipation or other GI dysfunction. Results Quantification of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC)-immunoreactivity (-ir) revealed significant reduction in myenteric ganglia of 6-OHDA-treated animals compared to controls (TH-ir: 87.8%, P30% days) soft stool or diarrhea in 2 of the 5 6-OHDA-treated animals and 0 of the 5 control animals during the 2 months prior to necropsy, with no animals exhibiting signs of constipation. Conclusion Systemic administration of 6-OHDA to rhesus monkeys significantly reduced catecholaminergic expression in the colonic myenteric plexus without inducing constipation. These findings support the concept that ENS catecholaminergic loss is not responsible for constipation in PD. PMID:28090391

  16. In vitro detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxin type E activity in avian blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Timothy M.; Blehert, David S.; Dunning, F. Mark; Berlowski-Zier, Brenda M.; Zeytin, Fusun N.; Samuel, Michael D.; Tucker, Ward C.

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (BoNT/E) outbreaks in the Great Lakes region cause large annual avian mortality events, with an estimated 17,000 bird deaths reported in 2007 alone. During an outbreak investigation, blood collected from bird carcasses is tested for the presence of BoNT/E using the mouse lethality assay. While sensitive, this method is labor-intensive and low throughput and can take up to 7 days to complete. We developed a rapid and sensitive in vitro assay, the BoTest Matrix E assay, that combines immunoprecipitation with high-affinity endopeptidase activity detection by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to rapidly quantify BoNT/E activity in avian blood with detection limits comparable to those of the mouse lethality assay. On the basis of the analysis of archived blood samples (n = 87) collected from bird carcasses during avian mortality investigations, BoTest Matrix E detected picomolar quantities of BoNT/E following a 2-h incubation and femtomolar quantities of BoNT/E following extended incubation (24 h) with 100% diagnostic specificity and 91% diagnostic sensitivity.

  17. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.

  18. Mode of VAMP substrate recognition and inhibition of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rakhi; Schmidt, James J; Stafford, Robert G; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2009-07-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cleave neuronal proteins responsible for neurotransmitter release, causing the neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNT serotypes B, D, F and G cleave and inactivate vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), each at a unique peptide bond. The specificity of BoNTs depends on the mode of substrate recognition. We have investigated the mechanism of substrate recognition of BoNT F by determining the crystal structures of its complex with two substrate-based inhibitors, VAMP 22-58/Gln58D-cysteine and 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. The inhibitors bind to BoNT F in the canonical direction (as seen for BoNTs A and E substrates) but are positioned specifically via three major exosites away from the active site. The cysteine sulfur of the inhibitors interacts with the zinc and exists as sulfinic acid in the inhibitor VAMP 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. Arg133 and Arg171, which form part of two separate exosites, are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis.

  19. Probiotic Microorganisms Inhibit Epithelial Cell Internalization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina I. Lam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs are some of the most poisonous natural toxins known to man and are threats to public health and safety. Previous work from our laboratory showed that both BoNT serotype A complex and holotoxin can bind and transit through the intestinal epithelia to disseminate in the blood. The timing of BoNT/A toxin internalization was shown to be comparable in both the Caco-2 in vitro cell culture and in the oral mouse intoxication models. Probiotic microorganisms have been extensively studied for their beneficial effects in not only maintaining the normal gut mucosa but also protection from allergens, pathogens, and toxins. In this study, we evaluate whether probiotic microorganisms will block BoNT/A uptake in the in vitro cell culture system using Caco-2 cells. Several probiotics tested (Saccharomyces boulardii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG, and Lactobacillus reuteri blocked BoNT/A uptake in a dose-dependent manner whereas a non-probiotic strain of Escherichia coli did not. We also showed that inhibition of BoNT/A uptake was not due to the degradation of BoNT/A nor by sequestration of toxin via binding to probiotics. These results show for the first time that probiotic treatment can inhibit BoNT/A binding and internalization in vitro and may lead to the development of new therapies.

  20. Clinical Uses of Botulinum Neurotoxins: Current Indications, Limitations and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs cause flaccid paralysis by interfering with vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release in the neuronal cells. BoNTs are the most widely used therapeutic proteins. BoNT/A was approved by the U.S. FDA to treat strabismus, blepharospam, and hemificial spasm as early as 1989 and then for treatment of cervical dystonia, glabellar facial lines, axillary hyperhidrosis, chronic migraine and for cosmetic use. Due to its high efficacy, longevity of action and satisfactory safety profile, it has been used empirically in a variety of ophthalmological, gastrointestinal, urological, orthopedic, dermatological, secretory, and painful disorders. Currently available BoNT therapies are limited to neuronal indications with the requirement of periodic injections resulting in immune-resistance for some indications. Recent understanding of the structure-function relationship of BoNTs prompted the engineering of novel BoNTs to extend therapeutic interventions in non-neuronal systems and to overcome the immune-resistance issue. Much research still needs to be done to improve and extend the medical uses of BoNTs.

  1. Eosinophil-Derived Neurotoxin Is Elevated in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Ting Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons in the brainstem, motor cortex, and spinal cord. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ALS. Members of the family of damage-associated molecular patterns, including reactive oxygen species, high-mobility group box 1, and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN, may participate in pathological conditions. In this study, we aim to discover new biomarker for detecting ALS. Materials and Methods. We examined 44 patients with ALS, 41 patients with Alzheimer’s disease, 41 patients with Parkinson’s disease, and 44 healthy controls. The concentration of serum EDN was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. EDN levels were significantly increased 2.17-fold in the serum of patients with ALS as compared with healthy controls (P<0.05. No correlation between the levels of serum EDN and various clinical parameters of ALS was found. Moreover, the levels of serum EDN in patients with Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease and healthy controls were similar. Conclusion. A higher level of serum EDN was found specifically in patients with ALS, indicating that EDN may participate in the pathophysiology of ALS.

  2. Biodistribution and Lymphatic Tracking of the Main Neurotoxin of Micrurus fulvius Venom by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Vergara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The venom of the Eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius can cause respiratory paralysis in the bitten patient, which is attributable to β-neurotoxins (β-NTx. The aim of this work was to study the biodistribution and lymphatic tracking by molecular imaging of the main β-NTx of M. fulvius venom. β-NTx was bioconjugated with the chelator diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA and radiolabeled with the radionuclide Gallium-67. Radiolabeling efficiency was 60%–78%; radiochemical purity ≥92%; and stability at 48 h ≥ 85%. The median lethal dose (LD50 and PLA2 activity of bioconjugated β-NTx decreased 3 and 2.5 times, respectively, in comparison with native β-NTx. The immune recognition by polyclonal antibodies decreased 10 times. Biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga in rats showed increased uptake in popliteal, lumbar nodes and kidneys that was not observed with 67Ga-free. Accumulation in organs at 24 h was less than 1%, except for kidneys, where the average was 3.7%. The inoculation site works as a depot, since 10% of the initial dose of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga remains there for up to 48 h. This work clearly demonstrates the lymphatic system participation in the biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga. Our approach could be applied to analyze the role of the lymphatic system in snakebite for a better understanding of envenoming.

  3. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or adding an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.

  4. Iterative structure-based peptide-like inhibitor design against the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Zuniga

    Full Text Available The botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoNT/A LC protease is the catalytic component responsible for the neuroparalysis that is characteristic of the disease state botulism. Three related peptide-like molecules (PLMs were designed using previous information from co-crystal structures, synthesized, and assayed for in vitro inhibition against BoNT/A LC. Our results indicate these PLMS are competitive inhibitors of the BoNT/A LC protease and their K(i values are in the nM-range. A co-crystal structure for one of these inhibitors was determined and reveals that the PLM, in accord with the goals of our design strategy, simultaneously involves both ionic interactions via its P1 residue and hydrophobic contacts by means of an aromatic group in the P2' position. The PLM adopts a helical conformation similar to previously determined co-crystal structures of PLMs, although there are also major differences to these other structures such as contacts with specific BoNT/A LC residues. Our structure further demonstrates the remarkable plasticity of the substrate binding cleft of the BoNT/A LC protease and provides a paradigm for iterative structure-based design and development of BoNT/A LC inhibitors.

  5. Potent tetravalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Guo, Jin-Peng; An, Huai-Jie; Zhang, Shu-Ming; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-05-07

    Human botulism is commonly associated with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B, E and F. This suggests that the greatest need is for a tetravalent vaccine that provides protection against all four of these serotypes. In current study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several tetravalent vaccines that protected mice against the four serotypes. Firstly, monovalent replicon vaccine against BoNT induced better antibody response and protection than that of corresponding conventional DNA vaccine. Secondly, dual-expression DNA replicon pSCARSE/FHc or replicon particle VRP-E/FHc vaccine was well resistant to the challenge of BoNT/E and BoNT/F mixture as a combination vaccine composed of two monovalent replicon vaccines. Finally, the dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle tetravalent vaccine could simultaneously and effectively neutralize and protect the four BoNT serotypes. Protection correlated directly with serum ELISA titers and neutralization antibody levels to BoNTs. Therefore, replicon-based DNA or particle might be effective vector to develop BoNT vaccines, which might be more desirable for use in clinical application than the conventional DNA vaccines. Our studies demonstrate the utility of combining dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle vaccines into multi-agent formulations as potent tetravalent vaccines for eliciting protective responses to four serotypes of BoNTs.

  6. Rapid Microfluidic Assay for the Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Animal Sera

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    Lmar Babrak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potent Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs represent a threat to public health and safety. Botulism is a disease caused by BoNT intoxication that results in muscle paralysis that can be fatal. Sensitive assays capable of detecting BoNTs from different substrates and settings are essential to limit foodborne contamination and morbidity. In this report, we describe a rapid 96-well microfluidic double sandwich immunoassay for the sensitive detection of BoNT-A from animal sera. This BoNT microfluidic assay requires only 5 μL of serum, provides results in 75 min using a standard fluorescence microplate reader and generates minimal hazardous waste. The assay has a <30 pg·mL−1 limit of detection (LOD of BoNT-A from spiked human serum. This sensitive microfluidic BoNT-A assay offers a fast and simplified workflow suitable for the detection of BoNT-A from serum samples of limited volume in most laboratory settings.

  7. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A complex by carbohydrate receptor mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna-Magdalena; Mahrhold, Stefan; Perry, Kay; Cheng, Luisa W; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes for botulism. BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and is subsequently transported through the intestinal epithelium into the general circulation. Several hemagglutinin proteins form a multi-protein complex (HA complex) that recognizes host glycans on the intestinal epithelial cell surface to facilitate BoNT absorption. Blocking carbohydrate binding to the HA complex could significantly inhibit the oral toxicity of BoNT. Here, we identify lactulose, a galactose-containing non-digestible sugar commonly used to treat constipation, as a prototype inhibitor against oral BoNT/A intoxication. As revealed by a crystal structure, lactulose binds to the HA complex at the same site where the host galactose-containing carbohydrate receptors bind. In vitro assays using intestinal Caco-2 cells demonstrated that lactulose inhibits HA from compromising the integrity of the epithelial cell monolayers and blocks the internalization of HA. Furthermore, co-administration of lactulose significantly protected mice against BoNT/A oral intoxication in vivo. Taken together, these data encourage the development of carbohydrate receptor mimics as a therapeutic intervention to prevent BoNT oral intoxication.

  8. Intraprostatic Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Injection for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia—A Spotlight in Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chao Hsu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It inhibits the release of acetylcholine and other neurotransmitters from the nerve terminal. Botulinum toxin, specifically toxin type A (BoNT-A has been used since the 1970s to reduce the muscular hypercontraction disorders. The application of BoNT-A in urology field started from intra-bladder injection for overactive bladder, which has been recognized as third line therapy in many countries. Since prostate gland as well as bladder is under the influence of autonomic innervation, theorectically, injection of BoNT-A into the prostate induces chemo-denervation and modulation of prostate function, and reduces lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. This article reviews the application of BoNT-A in patients with LUTS/ benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH from mechanisms of action to clinical results. BoNT-A has been shown to induce prostate apoptosis, downregulation of alpha 1A receptors, and reduce contractile function of prostate in animal studies. Open studies of intraprostate BoNT-A injection have demonstrated promising results of reducing LUTS and improvement of voiding function in human LUTS/BPH, however, intraprostatic BoNT-A injection did not perform better than the placebo group in recent publications of placebo controlled studies. We suggested that BoNT-A prostate injection might benefit selected population of BPH/LUTS, but it is unlikely to be an effective therapy for general population of male LUTS/BPH.

  9. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Sensitive Detection and Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa W. Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT are some of nature’s most potent toxins. Due to potential food contamination, and bioterrorism concerns, the development of detection reagents, therapeutics and countermeasures are of urgent interest. Recently, we have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL immunoassay for BoNT/B, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs MCS6-27 and anti-BoNT/B rabbit polyclonal antibodies as the capture and detector. The ECL assay detected as little as 1 pg/mL BoNT/B in the buffer matrix, surpassing the detection sensitivities of the gold standard mouse bioassays. The ECL assay also allowed detection of BoNT/B in sera matrices of up to 100% sera with negligible matrix effects. This highly-sensitive assay allowed the determination of the biological half-lives of BoNT/B holotoxin in vivo. We further tested the toxin neutralization potential of our monoclonal antibodies using the mouse systemic and oral intoxication models. A combination of mAbs protected mice in both pre- and post-exposure models to lethal doses of BoNT/B. MAbs were capable of increasing survival of animals when administered even 10 h post-intoxication in an oral model, suggesting a likely time for BoNT/B complexes to reach the blood stream. More sensitive detection assays and treatments against BoNT intoxication will greatly enhance efforts to combat botulism.

  10. Botulinum neurotoxin and chronic migraine: muscle fiber chemodenervation or nociceptic system modulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Artemenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of controlled investigations suggest that botulinumtoxin type A (BTA leads to decrease headache intensity and prevent migraine attacks. The antinociceptive mechanisms of BTA action remain unclear. Modern and previous hypothesis of antinociceptive action BTA in chronic migraine (CM are discussed in details. Recent experimental and clinical evidence strongly suggest that BTA has aspecific antinociceptive effect realized through inhibition of proinflammatory neurotransmitters release not only from the sensory terminals but from muscle nociceptors. The mechanism of the action of BTA in CM has more than one target and is considered to involve different pathophysiological levels CM: neurogenic inflammation, peripheral and central sensitization. The administration of BTA on the PREEMPT principle (paradigm ensures optimal neurotoxin distribution in the anatomic areas in accordance with their sensory innervation by cervical segments and sensory fibers in the trigeminal system, the terminal branches which are the major target of BTA in the treatment of CM.

  11. Recommended Mass Spectrometry-Based Strategies to Identify Botulinum Neurotoxin-Containing Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs cause the disease called botulism, which can be lethal. BoNTs are proteins secreted by some species of clostridia and are known to cause paralysis by interfering with nerve impulse transmission. Although the human lethal dose of BoNT is not accurately known, it is estimated to be between 0.1 μg to 70 μg, so it is important to enable detection of small amounts of these toxins. Our laboratory previously reported on the development of Endopep-MS, a mass-spectrometric‑based endopeptidase method to detect, differentiate, and quantify BoNT immunoaffinity purified from complex matrices. In this work, we describe the application of Endopep-MS for the analysis of thirteen blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. This method successfully identified the presence or absence of BoNT in all thirteen samples and was able to successfully differentiate the serotype of BoNT present in the samples, which included matrices such as buffer, milk, meat extract, and serum. Furthermore, the method yielded quantitative results which had z-scores in the range of −3 to +3 for quantification of BoNT/A containing samples. These results indicate that Endopep-MS is an excellent technique for detection, differentiation, and quantification of BoNT in complex matrices.

  12. Neutralization of botulinum neurotoxin by a human monoclonal antibody specific for the catalytic light chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P Adekar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT are a family of category A select bioterror agents and the most potent biological toxins known. Cloned antibody therapeutics hold considerable promise as BoNT therapeutics, but the therapeutic utility of antibodies that bind the BoNT light chain domain (LC, a metalloprotease that functions in the cytosol of cholinergic neurons, has not been thoroughly explored. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used an optimized hybridoma method to clone a fully human antibody specific for the LC of serotype A BoNT (BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody demonstrated potent in vivo neutralization when administered alone and collaborated with an antibody specific for the HC. In Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, the 4LCA antibody prevented the cleavage of the BoNT/A proteolytic target, SNAP-25. Unlike an antibody specific for the HC, the 4LCA antibody did not block entry of BoNT/A into cultured cells. Instead, it was taken up into synaptic vesicles along with BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody also directly inhibited BoNT/A catalytic activity in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: An antibody specific for the BoNT/A LC can potently inhibit BoNT/A in vivo and in vitro, using mechanisms not previously associated with BoNT-neutralizing antibodies. Antibodies specific for BoNT LC may be valuable components of an antibody antidote for BoNT exposure.

  13. Construction of an insecticidal baculovirus expressing insect-specific neurotoxin AaIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚斌; 庞义; 范云六; 赵荣敏; 杨应昌; 王天原

    1996-01-01

    Considering the factors which affect gene transcription, translation and the stability of mRNA, without changing the amino acid composition of the encoded polypeptide, AaIT gene encoding insect-specific neurotoxin was designed and synthesized according to bias in codon choice, overall G+C content and G + C content of bases at the third position in codons of polyhedrin genes of baculovirus and of plant genes as well. AaIT gene was fused behind a synthetic gp67 signal sequence and then recombined into the genome of Trichoplusia ni nuclear polyhedrosis virus (TnNPV) by transfer vector pSXIV VI+X3. The recombinant virus TnNPV-AalT (occ+-gal-) was screened. The results of Southern blotting and SDS-PAGE demonstrated that AaIT gene had integrated into the genome of virus and expressed. Bioassays on the 3rd-instar Trichoplusia ni larvae showed that recombinant viruses TnNPV-AalT could shorten the time of killing insect and improve the efficiency of killing agronomically important insects.

  14. Cannabidiol Exposure During Neuronal Differentiation Sensitizes Cells Against Redox-Active Neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhofen, Patrícia; de Medeiros, Liana M; Bristot, Ivi Juliana; Lopes, Fernanda M; De Bastiani, Marco A; Kapczinski, Flávio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Castro, Mauro Antônio A; Parsons, Richard B; Klamt, Fábio

    2015-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), one of the most abundant Cannabis sativa-derived compounds, has been implicated with neuroprotective effect in several human pathologies. Until now, no undesired side effects have been associated with CBD. In this study, we evaluated CBD's neuroprotective effect in terminal differentiation (mature) and during neuronal differentiation (neuronal developmental toxicity model) of the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. A dose-response curve was performed to establish a sublethal dose of CBD with antioxidant activity (2.5 μM). In terminally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, incubation with 2.5 μM CBD was unable to protect cells against the neurotoxic effect of glycolaldehyde, methylglyoxal, 6-hydroxydopamine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Moreover, no difference in antioxidant potential and neurite density was observed. When SH-SY5Y cells undergoing neuronal differentiation were exposed to CBD, no differences in antioxidant potential and neurite density were observed. However, CBD potentiated the neurotoxicity induced by all redox-active drugs tested. Our data indicate that 2.5 μM of CBD, the higher dose tolerated by differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, does not provide neuroprotection for terminally differentiated cells and shows, for the first time, that exposure of CBD during neuronal differentiation could sensitize immature cells to future challenges with neurotoxins.

  15. Botulinum neurotoxin D uses synaptic vesicle protein SV2 and gangliosides as receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisheng Peng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs include seven bacterial toxins (BoNT/A-G that target presynaptic terminals and act as proteases cleaving proteins required for synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Here we identified synaptic vesicle protein SV2 as the protein receptor for BoNT/D. BoNT/D enters cultured hippocampal neurons via synaptic vesicle recycling and can bind SV2 in brain detergent extracts. BoNT/D failed to bind and enter neurons lacking SV2, which can be rescued by expressing one of the three SV2 isoforms (SV2A/B/C. Localization of SV2 on plasma membranes mediated BoNT/D binding in both neurons and HEK293 cells. Furthermore, chimeric receptors containing the binding sites for BoNT/A and E, two other BoNTs that use SV2 as receptors, failed to mediate the entry of BoNT/D suggesting that BoNT/D binds SV2 via a mechanism distinct from BoNT/A and E. Finally, we demonstrated that gangliosides are essential for the binding and entry of BoNT/D into neurons and for its toxicity in vivo, supporting a double-receptor model for this toxin.

  16. Enhancing the Pharmacokinetic Properties of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Protease Inhibitors Through Rational Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Petr; Zhang, Yan; Barlow, Deborah J; Houseknecht, Karen L; Smith, Garry R; Dickerson, Tobin J

    2011-06-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the etiological agent that causes the neuroparalytic disease botulism, has become a highly studied drug target in light of the potential abuse of this toxin as a weapon of bioterrorism. In particular, small molecule inhibitors of the light chain metalloprotease of BoNT serotype A have received significant attention and a number of small molecule and biologic inhibitors have been reported. However, all small molecules reported have been identified from either primary screens or medicinal chemistry follow-up studies, and the pharmacokinetic profiles of these compounds have not been addressed. In this study, we have removed the pharmacologic liabilities of one of the best compounds reported to date, 2,4-dichlorocinnamate hydroxamic acid, and in the process, uncovered a related class of benzothiophene hydroxamic acids that are significantly more potent inhibitors of the BoNT/A light chain, while also possessing greatly improved ADME properties, with the best compound showing the most potent inhibition of BoNT/A light chain reported (K(i) = 77 nM). Using a strategy of incorporating traditional drug development filters early into the discovery process, potential liabilities in BoNT/A lead compounds have been illuminated and removed, clearing the path for advancement into further pharmacologic optimization and in vivo efficacy testing.

  17. Molecular Evolution of Antibody Cross-Reactivity for Two Subtypes of Type a Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rodriguez, C.; Levy, R.; Arndt, J.W.; Forsyth, C.M.; Razai, A.; Lou, J.; Geren, I.; Stevens, R.C.; Marks, J.D.; /UC, San Francisco /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-09

    Broadening antibody specificity without compromising affinity should facilitate detection and neutralization of toxin and viral subtypes. We used yeast display and a co-selection strategy to increase cross-reactivity of a single chain (sc) Fv antibody to botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). Starting with a scFv that binds the BoNT/A1 subtype with high affinity (136 pM) and the BoNT/A2 subtype with low affinity (109 nM), we increased its affinity for BoNT/A2 1,250-fold, to 87 pM, while maintaining high-affinity binding to BoNT/A1 (115 pM). To find the molecular basis for improved cross-reactivity, we determined the X-ray co-crystal structures of wild-type and cross-reactive antibodies complexed to BoNT/A1 at resolutions up to 2.6 A, and measured the thermodynamic contribution of BoNT/A1 and A2 amino acids to wild-type and cross-reactive antibody binding. The results show how an antibody can be engineered to bind two different antigens despite structural differences in the antigen-antibody interface and may provide a general strategy for tuning antibody specificity and cross-reactivity.

  18. Plastic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA)-on-a-chip biosensor for botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung-Mok; Cho, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Il-Hoon; Paek, Eui-Hwan; Oh, Hee-Bok; Kim, Bong-Su; Ryu, Chunsun; Lee, Kyunghee; Kim, Young-Kee; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2007-03-21

    A plastic ELISA-on-a-chip (EOC) employing the concept of cross-flow immuno-chromatographic analysis was applied to the measurement of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) as agent for bio-terrorism. Two monoclonal antibodies specific to the heavy chain of the toxin were raised and identified to form sandwich binding complexes as the pair with the analyte. For the construction of an immuno-strip, one was utilized as the capture antibody immobilized onto nitrocellulose membrane and the other as the detection coupled to an enzyme, horseradish peroxidase. The two plates of EOC used in this study were fabricated by injection molding of polycarbonate to improve the reproducibility of manufacture and, after inclusion of the immuno-strip, bonded using a UV-sensitive adhesive. Under optimal conditions of analysis, the chip produced a color signal in proportion to the analyte dose and the signal was quantified using a detector equipped with a digital camera. From the dose-response curve, the detection limit of BoNT/A was 2.0 ng mL(-1), approximately five times more sensitive than a commercial-version detection kit employing colloidal gold tracer.

  19. Botulinum neurotoxin: unique folding of enzyme domain of the most-poisonous poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Kukreja, Roshan V; Li, Li; Zhmurov, Artem; Kononova, Olga; Cai, Shuowei; Ahmed, Syed A; Barsegov, Valeri; Singh, Bal Ram

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most toxic substance known to mankind, is the first example of the fully active molten globule state. To understand its folding mechanism, we performed urea denaturation experiments and theoretical modeling using BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A). We found that the extent of BoNT/A denaturation from the native state (N) shows a nonmonotonic dependence on urea concentration indicating a unique multistep denaturation process, N → I1 [Formula: see text] I2 [Formula: see text] U, with two intermediate states I1 and I2. BoNT/A loses almost all its secondary structure in 3.75 M urea (I1), yet it displays a native-like secondary structure in 5 M urea (I2). This agrees with the results of theoretical modeling, which helped to determine the molecular basis of unique behavior of BoNT/A in solution. Except for I2, all the states revert back to full enzymatic activity for SNAP-25 including the unfolded state U stable in 7 M urea. Our results stress the importance of structural flexibility in the toxin's mechanism of survival and action, an unmatched evolutionary trait from billion-year-old bacteria, which also correlates with the long-lasting enzymatic activity of BoNT inside neuronal cells. BoNT/A provides a rich model to explore protein folding in relation to functional activity.

  20. 1H NMR study of robustoxin, the lethal neurotoxin from the funnel web spider Atrax robustus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, M D; Hinds, M G; Sheumack, D D; Howden, M E; Norton, R S

    1999-03-01

    Robustoxin, the lethal neurotoxin from the Sydney funnel web spider Atrax robustus, is a polypeptide of 42 residues cross-linked by four disulfide bonds. This paper describes the sequence-specific assignment of resonances in the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of robustoxin in aqueous solution. Several broad backbone amide resonances were encountered in spectra recorded at 27 degrees C, making the assignments at that temperature incomplete. In spectra recorded at lower temperatures these amide resonances became sharper, but others that were sharp at 27 degrees C became broad, indicative of conformational averaging on the millisecond timescale for certain regions of the structure. Nevertheless, it was possible to establish that robustoxin contains a small, triple-stranded, antiparallel beta-sheet and several reverse turns, but no alpha-helix. These observations indicate that this toxin may adopt the inhibitor cystine knot structure found in polypeptides from a diverse range of species, including a number of spiders. Analysis of the pH dependence of the spectrum yielded pKa values for Tyr22 and Tyr25, one of the three carboxyl groups, and the Lys residues.

  1. Botulinum neurotoxin type A for the treatment of pain: not just in migraine and trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrini, Giorgio; De Icco, Roberto; Tassorelli, Cristina; Smania, Nicola; Tamburin, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    Despite their huge epidemiological impact, primary headaches, trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic pain conditions still receive suboptimal medical approach, even in developed countries. The limited efficacy of current pain-killers and prophylactic treatments stands among the main reasons for this phenomenon. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) represents a well-established and licensed treatment for chronic migraine, but also an emerging treatment for other types of primary headache, trigeminal neuralgia, neuropathic pain, and an increasing number of pain conditions. We searched and critically reviewed evidence for the efficacy of BoNT for the treatment of chronic pain. Meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that BoNT potentially represents a multi-purpose drug for the treatment of pain in several disorders due to a favorable safety profile and a long-lasting relief after a single injection. BoNT is an emerging treatment in different pain conditions. Future RCTs should explore the use of BoNT injection therapy combined with systemic drugs and/or physical therapies as new pain treatment strategies.

  2. Effects on craniofacial growth and development of unilateral botulinum neurotoxin injection into the masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Yang; Chiu, Wan Chi; Liao, Yi-Hsuan; Tsai, Chih-Mong

    2009-02-01

    The effects of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) on masseter muscles, when injected for cosmetic purposes (volumetric reduction) or treatment of excessive muscle activity (bruxism), have been investigated. However, the full anatomic effects of treatment are not known, particularly with respect to the mandible and relevant anthropometric measurements. The intent of this study was to use unilaterial BoNT/A injections to induce localized masseter atrophy and paresis and then to measure the effects of muscle influence on craniofacial growth and development. Growing male Wistar rats, 30 days old, were studied. The experimental group consisted of 8 rats. One side of the masseter muscle was injected with BoNT/A and the other side of the masseter muscle was injected with saline. The side with BoNT/A belonged to 1 group and the side with saline was the sham group. Three rats without injections was the control. After 45 days, the masseter muscles were dissected and weighed. Dry skulls were prepared, and anthropometric measurements determined. One-way ANOVA showed that the animals maintained their weight in both groups; however, the muscles injected with BoNT/A were smaller than the sham or control muscles. Anthropometric measurements of the bony structures attached to the masseter muscle showed a significant treatment effect. After localized masseter muscle atrophy induced by BoNT/A injection, alterations of craniofacial bone growth and development were seen. The results agree with the functional matrix theory that soft tissues regulate bone growth.

  3. Ouabain exacerbates botulinum neurotoxin-induced muscle paralysis via progression of muscle atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Ryu; Muroi, Yoshikage; Unno, Toshihiro; Ishii, Toshiaki

    2010-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) inhibits acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction in isolated muscles, and ouabain can partially block its effect. However, it is not clear whether ouabain attenuates BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis in vivo. In this work, we investigated the effects of ouabain on BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis in mice. Ouabain was administered to mice intraperitoneally immediately after a single injection of BoNT/A into skeletal muscle. The effects of ouabain on BoNT/A-induced muscle paralysis were assessed by quantitative monitoring of muscle tension and digit abduction via the digit abduction scoring (DAS) assay. A single administration of ouabain significantly prolonged BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis. Moreover, consecutive daily injection of ouabain exacerbated BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis, and led to a significant decrease in both twitch and tetanic forces as assayed in isolated BoNT/A-injected muscles. We next looked at the effects of ouabain on BoNT/A-induced muscle atrophy. Administration of ouabain led to a decrease in the myofibrillar cross-sectional area (CSAs) by 14 post-BoNT/A injection. In addition, repeated administration of ouabain increased mRNA expression levels of ubiquitin ligases, which are markers of muscle atrophy, in BoNT/A-injected muscle. These results suggest that ouabain exacerbates BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis via a marked progression of BoNT/A-induced muscle atrophy.

  4. High Tc superconducting small loop antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Z.; Mehler, M.J.; Maclean, T.S.M.; Lancaster, M.J.; Gough, C.E. (Univ. of Birmingham (UK)); Alford, N. (I.C.I. Advanced Materials Div., Runcorn (UK))

    1989-12-01

    The improvement in the radiation efficiency of an electrically small loop antenna is analysed when it is fabricated from a superconductor, and experimental results for a liquid nitrogen cooled, ceramic superconducting loop at 450MHz are presented. (orig.).

  5. Crystal packing effects on protein loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Chaya S; Pollack, Rena M

    2005-07-01

    The effects of crystal packing on protein loop structures are examined by (1) a comparison of loops in proteins that have been crystallized in alternate packing arrangements, and (2) theoretical prediction of loops both with and without the inclusion of the crystal environment. Results show that in a minority of cases, loop geometries are dependent on crystal packing effects. Explicit representation of the crystal environment in a loop prediction algorithm can be used to model these effects and to reconstruct the structures, and relative energies, of a loop in alternative packing environments. By comparing prediction results with and without the inclusion of the crystal environment, the loop prediction algorithm can further be used to identify cases in which a crystal structure does not represent the most stable state of a loop in solution. We anticipate that this capability has implications for structural biology.

  6. Modified Continuous Loop Technique for microvascular anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified method of continuous loop technique for microvascular anastomosis is described. The handling of loop is easier & even last suture is placed under vision. This makes the microvascular anastomosis easier and simpler.

  7. Resumming the POPE at One Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Ho Tat

    2016-01-01

    The Pentagon Operator Product Expansion represents polygonal Wilson loops in planar $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills in terms of a series of flux tube excitations for finite coupling. We demonstrate how to re-sum this series at the one loop level for the hexagonal Wilson loop dual to the six-point MHV amplitude. By summing over a series of effective excitations we find expressions which integrate to logarithms and polylogarithms, reproducing the known one-loop result.

  8. Loop Equations in Abelian Gauge Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bartolo, C; Pe~na, F; Bartolo, Cayetano Di; Leal, Lorenzo; Peña, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The equations obeyed by the vacuum expectation value of the Wilson loop of Abelian gauge theories are considered from the point of view of the loop-space. An approximative scheme for studying these loop-equations for lattice Maxwell theory is presented. The approximation leads to a partial difference equation in the area and length variables of the loop, and certain physically motivated ansatz is seen to reproduce the mean field results from a geometrical perspective.

  9. Estimation of complex permittivity using loop antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A method for estimating the complex permittivity of materials in the vicinity of a loop antenna is proposed. The method is based on comparing measured and numerically calculated input admittances for the loop antenna.......A method for estimating the complex permittivity of materials in the vicinity of a loop antenna is proposed. The method is based on comparing measured and numerically calculated input admittances for the loop antenna....

  10. Estimation of complex permittivity using loop antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A method for estimating the complex permittivity of materials in the vicinity of a loop antenna is proposed. The method is based on comparing measured and numerically calculated input admittances for the loop antenna.......A method for estimating the complex permittivity of materials in the vicinity of a loop antenna is proposed. The method is based on comparing measured and numerically calculated input admittances for the loop antenna....

  11. Polyhedra in loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Speziale, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Interwiners are the building blocks of spin-network states. The space of intertwiners is the quantization of a classical symplectic manifold introduced by Kapovich and Millson. Here we show that a theorem by Minkowski allows us to interpret generic configurations in this space as bounded convex polyhedra in Euclidean space: a polyhedron is uniquely described by the areas and normals to its faces. We provide a reconstruction of the geometry of the polyhedron: we give formulas for the edge lengths, the volume and the adjacency of its faces. At the quantum level, this correspondence allows us to identify an intertwiner with the state of a quantum polyhedron, thus generalizing the notion of quantum tetrahedron familiar in the loop quantum gravity literature. Moreover, coherent intertwiners result to be peaked on the classical geometry of a polyhedron. We discuss the relevance of this result for loop quantum gravity. In particular, coherent spin-network states with nodes of arbitrary valence represent a collection...

  12. Nucleosome repositioning via loop formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kulic, M L

    2002-01-01

    Active (catalysed) and passive (intrinsic) nucleosome repositioning is known to be a crucial event during the transcriptional activation of certain eucaryotic genes. Here we consider theoretically the intrinsic mechanism and study in detail the energetics and dynamics of DNA-loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning, as previously proposed by Schiessel et al. (H. Schiessel, J. Widom, R. F. Bruinsma, and W. M. Gelbart. 2001. {\\it Phys. Rev. Lett.} 86:4414-4417). The surprising outcome of the present study is the inherent nonlocality of nucleosome motion within this model -- being a direct physical consequence of the loop mechanism. On long enough DNA templates the longer jumps dominate over the previously predicted local motion, a fact that contrasts simple diffusive mechanisms considered before. The possible experimental outcome resulting from the considered mechanism is predicted, discussed and compared to existing experimental findings.

  13. The Statistical Loop Analyzer (SLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    The statistical loop analyzer (SLA) is designed to automatically measure the acquisition, tracking and frequency stability performance characteristics of symbol synchronizers, code synchronizers, carrier tracking loops, and coherent transponders. Automated phase lock and system level tests can also be made using the SLA. Standard baseband, carrier and spread spectrum modulation techniques can be accomodated. Through the SLA's phase error jitter and cycle slip measurements the acquisition and tracking thresholds of the unit under test are determined; any false phase and frequency lock events are statistically analyzed and reported in the SLA output in probabilistic terms. Automated signal drop out tests can be performed in order to trouble shoot algorithms and evaluate the reacquisition statistics of the unit under test. Cycle slip rates and cycle slip probabilities can be measured using the SLA. These measurements, combined with bit error probability measurements, are all that are needed to fully characterize the acquisition and tracking performance of a digital communication system.

  14. Loop Diuretics in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Won; Han, Sang Youb

    2015-06-01

    Diuretics are commonly used to control edema across various clinical fields. Diuretics inhibit sodium reabsorption in specific renal tubules, resulting in increased urinary sodium and water excretion. Loop diuretics are the most potent diuretics. In this article, we review five important aspects of loop diuretics, in particular furosemide, which must be considered when prescribing this medicine: (1) oral versus intravenous treatment, (2) dosage, (3) continuous versus bolus infusion, (4) application in chronic kidney disease patients, and (5) side effects. The bioavailability of furosemide differs between oral and intravenous therapy. Additionally, the threshold and ceiling doses of furosemide differ according to the particular clinical condition of the patient, for example in patients with severe edema or chronic kidney disease. To maximize the efficiency of furosemide, a clear understanding of how the mode of delivery will impact bioavailability and the required dosage is necessary.

  15. Deconfinement and virtual quark loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, T.; Engels, J.; Satz, H.

    1983-12-01

    We calculate paer Monte Carlo evaluation on an 83 × 3 lattice the energy density ɛG of the gluon sector of QCD, including virtual quark loops up to the fourth power in the hopping parameter expansion. For light quarks of one flavour, we observe at T/ΛL 95 +/- 10 a rapid variation of ɛG in T, accompanied by strong fluctuations from iteration to iteration. as clear signal of the deconfinement transition.

  16. Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity and the foundation of Loop Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Alesci, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity is a promising framework for linking Loop Quantum Gravity and the effective semiclassical dynamics of Loop Quantum Cosmology. We review its basic achievements and its main perspectives, outlining how it provides a quantum description of the Universe in terms of a cuboidal graph which constitutes the proper framework for applying loop techniques in a cosmological setting.

  17. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Taylor, B D; Obenschain, K

    2016-01-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect, the by now well known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a "byproduct" of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of a coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 Teslas to 0.02 Teslas and lengths from 25000 km to 75000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets...

  18. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  19. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  20. Production and evaluation of a recombinant subunit vaccine against botulinum neurotoxin serotype B using a 293E expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, YunZhou; Shi, DanYang; Liu, Si; Gong, Zheng-Wei; Wang, Shuang; Sun, ZhiWei

    2015-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli and yeast were commonly used to express recombinant Hc of botulinum neurotoxins, as an alternative, in current study, a 293E expression system was used to express the Hc of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BHc) as soluble recombinant protein for experimental vaccine evaluation. Our results demonstrated that the 293E expression system could produce high level of recombinant secreted BHc protein, which was immunorecognized specifically by anti-botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BoNT/B) sera and showed ganglioside binding activities. The serological response and efficacy of recombinant BHc formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant were evaluated in mice. Immunization with Alhydrogel-formulated BHc subunit vaccine afforded the effective protection against BoNT/B challenge. A frequency- and dose-dependent effect to immunization with BHc subunit vaccine was observed and the ELISA antibody titers correlated well with neutralizing antibody titers and protection. And a solid-phase assay showed that the neutralizing antibodies from the BHc-immunized mice inhibited the binding of BHc to the ganglioside GT1b. Our results also show that the plasmid pABE293SBHc derived of the 293E expression system as DNA vaccine is capable of inducing stronger humoral response and protective efficacy against BoNT/B than the pVAX1SBHc. In summary, immunization with the 293E-expressed BHc protein generates effective immune protection against BoNT/B as E. coli or yeast-expressed BHc, so the efficient expression of botulinum Hc protein for experimental vaccine can be prepared using the 293E expression system.

  1. Modeling Phase-Locked Loops Using Verilog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    a charge pump, the phase detector has a tri-state output that can drive a opamp loop filter directly. This signal is conditioned by the charge pump...then it can directly drive an opamp based loop filter. Most loop filters are based upon an integrator loop. The integrator loop filter is advantageous...replaced with an accumulator. The opamp circuit can be replaced by a digital filter using Z-transform theory z=exp(jwT), where T is the sampling

  2. Recovery of central noradrenergic neurons one year after the administration of the neurotoxin DSP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfman, C; Abó, V; Calvo, D; Medina, J; Dajas, F; Silveira, R

    1994-10-01

    The long-term effects of the systemic administration of DSP4 (N-(2-chloroethyl)N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride), a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin, on the endogenous levels of monoamines and their metabolites and on alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors in selected brain regions of the rat were examined. After 7 days, DSP4 caused a marked reduction (about 80%) of endogenous noradrenaline levels in locus coeruleus-innervated regions. At 90, 240 and 300 days after DSP4 injection, a partial and gradual recovery (50%, 41% and 25% of control values, respectively) of the noradrenaline cortical levels was evident. One year after DSP4 administration, brain regional noradrenaline stores were almost completely recovered. No changes in 5-hydroxytryptamine levels were observed in the three time intervals, but a mild decrease in cortical and hippocampal 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid levels was found 7 days after DSP4 injection. Following the profound noradrenaline depletion seen at 7 days, the cerebral cortical density of alpha 1-, alpha 2- and beta-adrenoceptors was significantly increased. Assessment of adrenergic receptors in cerebral cortex at 365 days after DSP4 injection, indicated that alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor densities did not differ from control values; however, the density of beta-adrenoceptors remained increased. No changes were observed in the affinities of the three types of adrenoceptors studied. These results indicate that after a selective noradrenergic denervation induced by DSP4, there is a slow and gradual recovery of noradrenaline stores and of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor populations, suggesting a possible regrowth and/or collateral sprouting of noradrenergic terminals.

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit the Proteolytic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Fan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Existing antibodies (Abs used to treat botulism cannot enter the cytosol of neurons and bind to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT at its site of action, and thus cannot reverse paralysis. However, Abs targeting the proteolytic domain of the toxin could inhibit the proteolytic activity of the toxin intracellularly and potentially reverse intoxication, if they could be delivered intracellularly. As such, antibodies that neutralize toxin activity could serve as potent inhibitory cargos for therapeutic antitoxins against botulism. BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B contains a zinc endopeptidase light chain (LC domain that cleaves synaoptobrevin-2, a SNARE protein responsible for vesicle fusion and acetylcholine vesicle release. To generate monoclonal Abs (mAbs that could reverse paralysis, we targeted the protease domain for Ab generation. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv libraries from immunized mice or humans were displayed on yeast, and 19 unique BoNT/B LC-specific mAbs isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. The equilibrium dissociation constants (KD of these mAbs for BoNT/B LC ranged from 0.24 nM to 14.3 nM (mean KD 3.27 nM. Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/B LC proteolytic activity. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were identified by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that inhibitory mAbs bound near the active site, substrate-binding site or the extended substrate-binding site. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis and identify epitopes that could be targeted by small molecules inhibitors.

  4. Botulinum Neurotoxin Type-A for the Treatment of Atypical Odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, María-Luz; García-Moreno, Héctor; Arias, José-Antonio; Pareja, Juan A

    2016-09-01

    Atypical odontalgia (AO), a subform of persistent idiopathic facial pain, is defined as a continuous toothache in which a thorough examination reveals no dental pathology. AO is believed to be a neuropathic condition, given that some cases are preceded by dental procedures. Different topical and systemic medications have been used for the treatment of AO, but their effect is often unsatisfactory. The authors aimed to assess the effect and safety of botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNTA) in a series of patients with AO. Four patients with refractory AO (2 males and 2 females, aged 31-72) were treated with local injections of BoNTA to the painful area. BoNTA was injected at various sites into the gums, and two patients had additional injections in the hard palate or the upper lip. The total dose of BoNTA for each procedure was 15-30 U, and the total number of injection points was 6-12. The follow-up ranged from 6 to 20 months. Two patients received two cycles of BoNTA, while the remaining patients received three and five cycles each, respectively. All patients obtained significant relief with complete or almost complete reduction of pain. The analgesic effect was apparent after a latency period of 3-14 days, and the effect persisted for 2-6 months. There were no adverse events reported from any of the interventions. The responses to BoNTA injections in this series agree with those previously observed in neuropathic pain. BoNTA injections may be a safe and effective option for the treatment of AO. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Inhibitory effects of recombinant neurotoxin BmK IM on seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何小华; 彭方; 章军建; 李文鑫; 曾宪春; 刘辉

    2003-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the inhibitory effects of recombinant Chinese scorpion neurotoxin BmK IM on seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) and the possible mechanism.Methods After purifying recombinant BmK IM from an E. coli cell line, its toxicity (both LD50 and minimum lethal dose) on rats was determined. BmK IM was then microinjected into the CA3 region of the right hippocampus and its ability to inhibit the effects of an intraperitoneal injection of PTZ was assessed. The effects of BmK IM on the electrophysiological properties of isolated CA3 pyramidal neurons were then studied using whole-cell patch clamp techniques.Results BmK IM can significantly prolong the latent period of epileptic seizures, decrease the degree of seizures, and decrease the frequency of epileptiform discharges induced by PTZ. At the same time, 24h after injection of BmK IM into the hippocampal tissue, BmK IM significantly reduces the concentration of the neurotransmitter glutamate and alleviates PTZ-induced lesions in the hippocampus. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings indicate that BmK IM inhibits INa of rat hippocampal neurons in a dose-dependent manner. BmK IM significantly shifts the activation curve of INa in a positive direction, indicating that BmK IM enhances the threshold potential of INa.Conclusions BmK IM has significant anti-epileptic properties, and may prove useful as a drug in the therapy of epilepsy. The inhibitory effects of BmK IM on seizures caused by pentylenetetrazol might depend on reductions in the release of presynaptic glutamate via the blocking of Na+ channels.

  6. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-11

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  7. Production and evaluation of a recombinant chimeric vaccine against clostridium botulinum neurotoxin types C and D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Luciana A F; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P; Moreira, Gustavo M S G; Salvarani, Felipe M; Assis, Ronnie A; Lobato, Francisco Carlos F; Mendonça, Marcelo; Dellagostin, Odir A; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2013-01-01

    Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC) are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB), a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH)3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL) and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL), as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH)3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle.

  8. Production and evaluation of a recombinant chimeric vaccine against clostridium botulinum neurotoxin types C and D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana A F Gil

    Full Text Available Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB, a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH3 developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL, as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle.

  9. Neuroprotection effects of retained acupuncture in neurotoxin-induced Parkinson's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jen-Lin; Chen, Jay S C; Yang, Yi-Fei; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Lin, Ching-Huang; Chang, Rong-Seng; Tsao, Po-Jui; Chen, Fang-Pey; Chern, Chang-Ming; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of retained acupuncture (RA) in neurotoxin-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were injected with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to induce the PD model. The mice were divided into four groups, namely, (1) normal; (2) MPTP+retained acupuncture (RA); (3) MPTP+electroacupuncture (EA); (4) MPTP+sham acupuncture (SA). After mice being manipulated with/without acupuncture at acupoints (Daling, PC 7), groups 2-4 were injected with MPTP (15 mg/kg/d). The mice were evaluated for behavioral changes, in terms of time of landing, after acupuncture treatment. The animals were sacrificed and their brains assayed for dopamine and its metabolites and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression by using HPLC and immunohistochemistry/Western blotting, respectively. [(123)I] IBZM-SPECT imaging between SA and RA groups were compared. The results showed that the time of landing of the three groups with treatment was significant longer than group 1 (normal) (4.33±0.15 s). Nonetheless, group 2 (RA) (7.13±0.20 s) had a shorter time of landing than group 4 (SA) (7.89±0.46 s). The number of TH (+) neurons and the expression of TH proteins were significantly higher in the RA group than in the SA/EA groups. RA also increased the uptake of [(123)I] IBZM into the triatum compared to the SA group. We conclude that RA possibly attenuates neuronal damage in MPTP-induced PD mice, which suggests RA may be useful as a complementary strategy when treating human PD.

  10. Pre-Clinical Study of a Novel Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxin Derivative Engineered for Improved Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin; Tenezaca, Luis; Angeles, Christopher; Syngkon, Aurelia; Liublinska, Victoria; Ichtchenko, Konstantin; Band, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Cyto-012 is a recombinant derivative of Botulinum neurotoxin Type A (BoNT/A). It primarily differs from wild type (wt) BoNT/A1 in that it incorporates two amino acid substitutions in the catalytic domain of the light chain (LC) metalloprotease (E224 > A and Y366 > A), designed to provide a safer clinical profile. Cyto-012 is specifically internalized into rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and cleaves Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25 (SNAP-25), the substrate of wt BoNT/A, but exhibits slower cleavage kinetics and therefore requires a higher absolute dose to exhibit pharmacologic activity. The pharmacodynamics of Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A have similar onset and duration of action using the Digital Abduction Assay (DAS). Intramuscular LD50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A respectively, were 0.63 ug (95% CI = 0.61, 0.66) and 6.22 pg (95% CI = 5.42, 7.02). ED50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A were respectively, 0.030 ug (95% CI = 0.026, 0.034) and 0.592 pg (95% CI = 0.488, 0.696). The safety margin (intramuscular LD50/ED50 ratio) for Cyto-012 was found to be improved 2-fold relative to wt BoNT/A (p < 0.001). The DAS response to Cyto-012 was diminished when a second injection was administered 32 days after the first. These data suggest that the safety margin of BoNT/A can be improved by modulating their activity towards SNAP-25.

  11. A three monoclonal antibody combination potently neutralizes multiple botulinum neurotoxin serotype F subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yongfeng; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Zhai, Wenwu; Smith, Theresa J.; Smith, Leonard A.

    2017-01-01

    Human botulism is primarily caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B and E, with around 1% caused by serotype F (BoNT/F). BoNT/F comprises at least seven different subtypes with the amino acid sequence difference between subtypes as high as 36%. The sequence differences present a significant challenge for generating monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that can bind, detect and neutralize all BoNT/F subtypes. We used repertoire cloning of immune mouse antibody variable (V) regions and yeast display to generate a panel of 33 lead single chain Fv (scFv) mAbs that bound one or more BoNT/F subtypes with a median equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 4.06 × 10−9 M. By diversifying the V-regions of the lead mAbs and selecting for cross reactivity we generated five mAbs that bound each of the seven subtypes. Three scFv binding non-overlapping epitopes were converted to IgG that had KD for the different BoNT/F subtypes ranging from 2.2×10−8 M to 1.47×10−12 pM. An equimolar combination of the mAbs was able to potently neutralize BoNT/F1, F2, F4 and F7 in the mouse neutralization assay. The mAbs have potential utility as diagnostics capable of recognizing the known BoNT/F subtypes and could be developed as antitoxins to prevent and treat type F botulism. PMID:28323873

  12. Expression and biochemical characterization of light chains of Botulinum neurotoxin subtypes F5 and F7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiubiao; Chen, Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most potent protein toxins known to human. To date, seven subtypes of the BoNT/F serotype (BoNT/F1 to BoNT/F7) have been identified, among which BoNT/F5 and BoNT/F7 are the most divergent. However, little structural and functional information is available for these two subtypes due to a lack of suitable recombinant proteins for biochemical characterization, except that they appear to possess unique substrate recognition mechanisms, thereby impeding development of vaccine or inhibitors against these proteins. In the present study, we utilized a combinatorial approach which involved examining the effects of different affinity tags, mapping C-terminal truncation mutants and optimization of expression and purification conditions, that allowed us to successfully express and purify soluble and highly active recombinant LC/F5 and LC/F7 proteins. GST-LC/F5(1-450) and 6× His-LC/F5(1-405) were the formats which exhibit the highest level of solubility and activity, whereas GST-LC/F7(1-405) was the most active form of LC/F7. In comparison, GST-LC/F5(1-450) was more active than GST-LC/F7(1-405), which was in turn more active than the LC/F1 control. Our data suggest that solubility of these proteins strongly correlated with their catalytic activity. Successful expression and purification of LC/F5 and LC/F7 in this work will, for the first time, provide materials for further characterization of these two subtypes of BoNT/F, which is essential for future development of protective vaccine or other therapeutic strategies, as well as BoNT/F protein engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel paradigm for assessing efficacies of potential antidotes against neurotoxins in mice.

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    Crankshaw, Daune L; Goon, David J W; Briggs, Jacquie E; DeLong, David; Kuskowski, Michael; Patterson, Steven E; Nagasawa, Herbert T

    2007-12-10

    Historically, antidotal potencies of cyanide antagonists were measured as increases in the experimental LD(50) for cyanide elicited by the antidotes. This required the use of high doses of cyanide following pre-treatment with the putative antidote. Since IACUC guidelines at our institutions strongly discourage LD(50) determinations: we developed a new test paradigm that allowed for maximal survival of cyanide-treated animals with greatly reduced numbers of animals. Symptoms of cyanide toxicity include disruption of neuromuscular coordination, i.e., the righting reflex. Therefore, to establish a dose-response curve, the times required for recovery of this righting reflex with increasing doses of cyanide were measured. A cyanide dose that disrupted this righting reflex for approximately 1h with minimal deaths was then selected. Using this paradigm, the current cyanide antidotes, viz., nitrite plus thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin, as well as some potential cyanide antidotes that we developed, were evaluated pre- and post-cyanide. This allowed, for the first time, the assessment of the post-cyanide effectiveness of the current antidotes against cyanide poisoning in a live animal. In addition, some prototype compounds were found to exhibit antidotal efficacy not only when injected i.p. following cyanide, but also when administered orally 30 min before cyanide. Pre-cyanide oral efficacy suggests that such compounds have the potential of being administered prophylactically before exposure to cyanide. This new test paradigm was found to be a powerful tool for assessing the efficacies of some novel antidotes against cyanide and should be equally applicable for evaluating putative antidotes for other neurotoxins.

  14. Accelerated neuronal cell recovery from Botulinum neurotoxin intoxication by targeted ubiquitination.

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    Chueh-Ling Kuo

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, a Category A biodefense agent, delivers a protease to motor neuron cytosol that cleaves one or more soluble NSF attachment protein receptors (SNARE proteins involved in neurotransmission to cause a flaccid paralysis. No antidotes exist to reverse symptoms of BoNT intoxication so severely affected patients require artificial respiration with prolonged intensive care. Time to recovery depends on toxin serotype because the intraneuronal persistence of the seven known BoNT serotypes varies widely from days to many months. Our therapeutic antidote strategy is to develop 'targeted F-box' (TFB agents that target the different intraneuronal BoNT proteases for accelerated degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS, thus promoting rapid recovery from all serotypes. These agents consist of a camelid heavy chain-only V(H (VHH domain specific for a BoNT protease fused to an F-box domain recognized by an intraneuronal E3-ligase. A fusion protein containing the 14 kDa anti-BoNT/A protease VHH, ALcB8, joined to a 15 kDa F-box domain region of TrCP (D5 was sufficient to cause increased ubiquitination and accelerate turnover of the targeted BoNT/A protease within neurons. Neuronal cells expressing this TFB, called D5-B8, were also substantially resistant to BoNT/A intoxication and recovered from intoxication at least 2.5 fold quicker than control neurons. Fusion of D5 to a VHH specific for BoNT/B protease (BLcB10 led to accelerated turnover of the targeted protease within neurons, thus demonstrating the modular nature of these therapeutic agents and suggesting that development of similar therapeutic agents specific to all botulinum serotypes should be readily achievable.

  15. Widespread sequence variations in VAMP1 across vertebrates suggest a potential selective pressure from botulinum neurotoxins.

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    Peng, Lisheng; Adler, Michael; Demogines, Ann; Borrell, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Tao, Liang; Tepp, William H; Zhang, Su-Chun; Johnson, Eric A; Sawyer, Sara L; Dong, Min

    2014-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G), the most potent toxins known, act by cleaving three SNARE proteins required for synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Previous studies on BoNTs have generally utilized the major SNARE homologues expressed in brain (VAMP2, syntaxin 1, and SNAP-25). However, BoNTs target peripheral motor neurons and cause death by paralyzing respiratory muscles such as the diaphragm. Here we report that VAMP1, but not VAMP2, is the SNARE homologue predominantly expressed in adult rodent diaphragm motor nerve terminals and in differentiated human motor neurons. In contrast to the highly conserved VAMP2, BoNT-resistant variations in VAMP1 are widespread across vertebrates. In particular, we identified a polymorphism at position 48 of VAMP1 in rats, which renders VAMP1 either resistant (I48) or sensitive (M48) to BoNT/D. Taking advantage of this finding, we showed that rat diaphragms with I48 in VAMP1 are insensitive to BoNT/D compared to rat diaphragms with M48 in VAMP1. This unique intra-species comparison establishes VAMP1 as a physiological toxin target in diaphragm motor nerve terminals, and demonstrates that the resistance of VAMP1 to BoNTs can underlie the insensitivity of a species to members of BoNTs. Consistently, human VAMP1 contains I48, which may explain why humans are insensitive to BoNT/D. Finally, we report that residue 48 of VAMP1 varies frequently between M and I across seventeen closely related primate species, suggesting a potential selective pressure from members of BoNTs for resistance in vertebrates.

  16. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, elastase, and cytokine profile in effusion from eosinophilic otitis media.

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    Uchimizu, Hirotaka; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Kato, Masahiko; Otori, Nobuyosi; Kojima, Hiromi

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is an intractable disease characterized by a remarkably viscous effusion and accumulation of numerous eosinophils in both the middle ear effusion and the mucosa. The key factors in EOM pathogenesis remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to identify the important factors involved in EOM pathogenesis. Middle ear effusion samples were collected from 12 patients with EOM and 9 patients with secretory otitis media (SOM), as controls. Multiple cytokines in the effusion were measured using a Bio-Plex™ Human Cytokine 27-Plex panel. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) and elastase were measured by ELISA. The concentrations of EDN, elastase, and each cytokine were compared between the EOM and SOM groups. Furthermore, in the EOM group, each cytokine was examined for correlation with EDN and elastase. EDN and elastase concentrations were significantly higher in the EOM group than in the SOM group (p < 0.05). IL-5, IL-1β, MIP-1α, G-CSF, IL-1ra, IL-4, IFN-γ, MIP-1β, IL-10, TNF-α, VEGF, and IL-2 concentration was significantly higher in the EOM group than in the SOM group (p < 0.05). Significant positive correlations were found between EDN and IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, eotaxin, MIP-1α, PDGF-BB, and RANTES in the EOM group (p < 0.05). Our study showed that IL-5, IL-2, MIP-1α, and IL-1ra are the important factors involved in EOM pathogenesis. Furthermore, not only eosinophil, but also neutrophil are involved in middle ear inflammation of EOM. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Alpha-Exosite of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/A Inhibit Catalytic Activity.

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    Yongfeng Fan

    Full Text Available The paralytic disease botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, multi-domain proteins containing a zinc endopeptidase that cleaves the cognate SNARE protein, thereby blocking acetylcholine neurotransmitter release. Antitoxins currently used to treat botulism neutralize circulating BoNT but cannot enter, bind to or neutralize BoNT that has already entered the neuron. The light chain endopeptidase domain (LC of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A was targeted for generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that could reverse paralysis resulting from intoxication by BoNT/A. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv libraries from immunized humans and mice were displayed on the surface of yeast, and 19 BoNT/A LC-specific mAbs were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Affinities of the mAbs for BoNT/A LC ranged from a KD value of 9.0×10-11 M to 3.53×10-8 M (mean KD 5.38×10-9 M and median KD 1.53×10-9 M, as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/A LC catalytic activity with IC50 values ranging from 8.3 ~73×10-9 M. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were also mapped by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that the inhibitory mAbs bound the α-exosite region remote from the BoNT/A LC catalytic center. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis post-intoxication and further define epitopes that could be targeted by small molecule inhibitors.

  18. Botulinum neurotoxin type A versus punctal plug insertion in the management of dry eye disease

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    Amal A Bukhari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the efficacies of punctal plug insertion and Botulinum toxin injection in dry eye disease not responding to topical medications. Materials and Methods: A non-controlled randomized clinical trial of two parallel groups of 60 dry eye patients seen in the clinic not responding to topical medications were divided into two groups. One group received punctal plugs and the other group received Botulinum toxin injections to prevent lacrimal tear drainage. Results: Of a total of 36 patients with a mean age of 44.5 years who received punctal plugs, 50% of them experienced improvements in the clinical manifestations of their disease. 12/36 (33.3% developed plug extrusion, and 6/36 (16.7% patients developed conjunctival erosions with irritation that necessitated plug removal within one week of insertion. A total of 24 patients with a mean age of 47.5 years received injections of Botulinum toxin. Of these, 83.3% had improvement in all of the clinical manifestations of dry eye. 4/24 (16.7% had no improvement in the degrees to which they experienced foreign body sensations, 33.3% reported shampoo entering the eye while showering. All of the patients who received Botulinum toxin injections were satisfied with the results of their treatment, whereas only 72.3% of the patients who received punctal plugs were satisfied with their results. Conclusion: Botulinum neurotoxin A injections can be a very good alternative to punctal plugs in improving the clinical manifestations of dry eye disease They are associated with the development of fewer and milder complications and with higher levels of patient satisfaction.

  19. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) bioassay for visceral toxicosis of catfish and botulinum neurotoxin serotype E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Hohn, Claudia; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Visceral toxicosis of catfish (VTC), a sporadic disease of cultured channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) often with high mortality, is caused by botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (BoNT/E). Presumptive diagnosis of VTC is based on characteristic clinical signs and lesions, and the production of these signs and mortality after sera from affected fish is administered to sentinel catfish. The diagnosis is confirmed if the toxicity is neutralized with BoNT/E antitoxin. Because small catfish are often unavailable, the utility of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) was evaluated in BoNT/E and VTC bioassays. Channel catfish and zebrafish susceptibilities were compared using trypsin-activated BoNT/E in a 96-hr trial by intracoelomically administering 0, 1.87, 3.7, 7.5, 15, or 30 pg of toxin per gram of body weight (g-bw) of fish. All of the zebrafish died at the 7.5 pg/g-bw and higher, while the catfish died at the 15 pg/g-bw dose and higher. To test the bioassay, sera from VTC-affected fish or control sera were intracoelomically injected at a dose of 10 µl per zebrafish and 20 µl/g-bw for channel catfish. At 96 hr post-injection, 78% of the zebrafish and 50% of the catfish receiving VTC sera died, while no control fish died. When the VTC sera were preincubated with BoNT/E antitoxin, they became nontoxic to zebrafish. Histology of zebrafish injected with either VTC serum or BoNT/E demonstrated renal necrosis. Normal catfish serum was toxic to larval zebrafish in immersion exposures, abrogating their utility in VTC bioassays. The results demonstrate bioassays using adult zebrafish for detecting BoNT/E and VTC are sensitive and practical.

  20. A comparative study on three analytical methods for the determination of the neurotoxin BMAA in cyanobacteria.

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    Elisabeth J Faassen

    Full Text Available The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA has been considered a serious health threat because of its putative role in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. First reports on BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria were alarming: nearly all cyanobacteria were assumed to contain high BMAA concentrations, implying ubiquitous exposure. Recent studies however question this presence of high BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria. To assess the real risk of BMAA to human health, this discrepancy must be resolved. We therefore tested whether the differences found could be caused by the analytical methods used in different studies. Eight cyanobacterial samples and two control samples were analyzed by three commonly used methods: HPLC-FLD analysis and LC-MS/MS analysis of both derivatized and underivatized samples. In line with published results, HPLC-FLD detected relatively high BMAA concentrations in some cyanobacterial samples, while both LC-MS/MS methods only detected BMAA in the positive control (cycad seed sarcotesta. Because we could eliminate the use of different samples and treatments as causal factors, we demonstrate that the observed differences were caused by the analytical methods. We conclude that HPLC-FLD overestimated BMAA concentrations in some cyanobacterial samples due to its low selectivity and propose that BMAA might be present in (some cyanobacteria, but in the low µg/g or ng/g range instead of the high µg/g range as sometimes reported before. We therefore recommend to use only selective and sensitive analytical methods like LC-MS/MS for BMAA analysis. Although possibly present in low concentrations in cyanobacteria, BMAA can still form a health risk. Recent evidence on BMAA accumulation in aquatic food chains suggests human exposure through consumption of fish and shellfish which expectedly exceeds exposure through cyanobacteria.

  1. Synergistic capture of Clostridium botulinum Type A neurotoxin by scFv antibodies to novel epitopes

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    Gray, Sean A.; Barr, John R.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Marks, James D.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Miller, Keith D.; Feldhaus, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    A non-immune library of human single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies displayed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was screened for binding to the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain [BoNT/A (Hc)] with the goal of identifying scFv to novel epitopes. To do this, an antibody-mediated labeling strategy was used in which antigen-binding yeast clones were selected after labeling with previously characterized monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the Hc. Twenty unique scFv clones were isolated that bound Hc. Of these, three also bound to full-length BoNT/A toxin complex with affinities ranging from 5 nM to 170 nM. Epitope binning showed that the three unique clones recognized at least two epitopes that were distinct from one another and from the detection MAbs. After production in E. coli, the scFv were coupled to magnetic particles and tested for their ability to capture BoNT/A holotoxin using an Endopep-MS assay. In this assay, toxin captured by scFv coated magnetic particles was detected by incubation of the complex with a peptide containing a BoNT/A-specific cleavage sequence. Mass spectrometry was used to detect the ratio of intact peptide to cleavage products as evidence for toxin capture. When tested individually, each of the scFv showed a weak positive Endopep-MS result. However, when the particles were coated with all three scFv simultaneously, they exhibited significantly higher Endopep-MS activity, consistent with synergistic binding. These results demonstrate novel approaches toward the isolation and characterization of scFv antibodies specific to unlabeled antigen. They also provide evidence that distinct scFv antibodies can work synergistically to increase the efficiency of antigen capture onto a solid support.

  2. Botulinum neurotoxin type A induces TLR2-mediated inflammatory responses in macrophages.

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    Yun Jeong Kim

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A is the most potent protein toxin and causes fatal flaccid muscle paralysis by blocking neurotransmission. Application of BoNT/A has been extended to the fields of therapeutics and biodefense. Nevertheless, the global response of host immune cells to authentic BoNT/A has not been reported. Employing microarray analysis, we performed global transcriptional profiling of RAW264.7 cells, a murine alveolar macrophage cell line. We identified 70 genes that were modulated following 1 nM BoNT/A treatment. The altered genes were mainly involved in signal transduction, immunity and defense, protein metabolism and modification, neuronal activities, intracellular protein trafficking, and muscle contraction. Microarray data were validated with real-time RT-PCR for seven selected genes including tlr2, tnf, inos, ccl4, slpi, stx11, and irg1. Proinflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα were induced in a dose-dependent manner in BoNT/A-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Increased expression of these factors was inhibited by monoclonal anti-Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 and inhibitors specific to intracellular proteins such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK. BoNT/A also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced NO and TNFα production from RAW264.7 macrophages at the transcription level by blocking activation of JNK, ERK, and p38 MAPK. As confirmed by TLR2-/- knock out experiments, these results suggest that BoNT/A induces global gene expression changes in host immune cells and that host responses to BoNT/A proceed through a TLR2-dependent pathway, which is modulated by JNK, ERK, and p38 MAPK.

  3. Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein

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    Inui, Ken [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Sagane, Yoshimasa [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Miyata, Keita [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Suzuki, Tomonori [Department of Bacteriology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Shikamori, Yasuyuki [Agilent Technologies International Japan, Ltd. Takaura-cho 9-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0033 (Japan); Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Watanabe, Toshihiro, E-mail: t-watana@bioindustry.nodai.ac.jp [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X{sub 35}-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

  4. Enhanced neutralization potency of botulinum neurotoxin antibodies using a red blood cell-targeting fusion protein.

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    Sharad P Adekar

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT potently inhibits cholinergic signaling at the neuromuscular junction. The ideal countermeasures for BoNT exposure are monoclonal antibodies or BoNT antisera, which form BoNT-containing immune complexes that are rapidly cleared from the general circulation. Clearance of opsonized toxins may involve complement receptor-mediated immunoadherence to red blood cells (RBC in primates or to platelets in rodents. Methods of enhancing immunoadherence of BoNT-specific antibodies may increase their potency in vivo. We designed a novel fusion protein (FP to link biotinylated molecules to glycophorin A (GPA on the RBC surface. The FP consists of an scFv specific for murine GPA fused to streptavidin. FP:mAb:BoNT complexes bound specifically to the RBC surface in vitro. In a mouse model of BoNT neutralization, the FP increased the potency of single and double antibody combinations in BoNT neutralization. A combination of two antibodies with the FP gave complete neutralization of 5,000 LD50 BoNT in mice. Neutralization in vivo was dependent on biotinylation of both antibodies and correlated with a reduction of plasma BoNT levels. In a post-exposure model of intoxication, FP:mAb complexes gave complete protection from a lethal BoNT/A1 dose when administered within 2 hours of toxin exposure. In a pre-exposure prophylaxis model, mice were fully protected for 72 hours following administration of the FP:mAb complex. These results demonstrate that RBC-targeted immunoadherence through the FP is a potent enhancer of BoNT neutralization by antibodies in vivo.

  5. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

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    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective. PMID:27626445

  6. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

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    Han Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  7. Discovery of nuclear-encoded genes for the neurotoxin saxitoxin in dinoflagellates.

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    Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J S; Kellmann, Ralf; Murray, Shauna A; Neilan, Brett A; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin that occurs in aquatic environments worldwide. Ingestion of vector species can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning, a severe human illness that may lead to paralysis and death. In freshwaters, the toxin is produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria; in marine waters, it is associated with eukaryotic dinoflagellates. However, several studies suggest that saxitoxin is not produced by dinoflagellates themselves, but by co-cultured bacteria. Here, we show that genes required for saxitoxin synthesis are encoded in the nuclear genomes of dinoflagellates. We sequenced >1.2×10(6) mRNA transcripts from the two saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellate strains Alexandrium fundyense CCMP1719 and A. minutum CCMP113 using high-throughput sequencing technology. In addition, we used in silico transcriptome analyses, RACE, qPCR and conventional PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing. These approaches successfully identified genes required for saxitoxin-synthesis in the two transcriptomes. We focused on sxtA, the unique starting gene of saxitoxin synthesis, and show that the dinoflagellate transcripts of sxtA have the same domain structure as the cyanobacterial sxtA genes. But, in contrast to the bacterial homologs, the dinoflagellate transcripts are monocistronic, have a higher GC content, occur in multiple copies, contain typical dinoflagellate spliced-leader sequences and eukaryotic polyA-tails. Further, we investigated 28 saxitoxin-producing and non-producing dinoflagellate strains from six different genera for the presence of genomic sxtA homologs. Our results show very good agreement between the presence of sxtA and saxitoxin-synthesis, except in three strains of A. tamarense, for which we amplified sxtA, but did not detect the toxin. Our work opens for possibilities to develop molecular tools to detect saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellates in the environment.

  8. Structure-function relationships in the neurotoxin Vipoxin from the venom of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Dessislava Nikolova; Genov, Nicolay; Nikolov, Peter; Aleksiev, Boris; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Voelter, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2003-02-01

    The neurotoxic complex Vipoxin is the lethal component of the venom of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis, the most toxic snake in Europe. It is a complex between a toxic phospholipase A 2 (PLA 2) and a non-toxic and catalytically inactive protein, stabilizing the enzyme and reducing the activity and toxicity. Structure-function relationships in this complex were studied by spectroscopic methods. A good correlation between the ionization behaviour and accessible surface area (ASA) of the tyrosyl residues was observed. In the toxic PLA 2 subunit phenolic groups participate in H-bonding network that stabilizes the catalytically and pharmacologically active conformation. The tryptophan fluorescence decay of Vipoxin is well fitted by two exponentials with lifetimes of 0.1 (54%) and 2.5 (46%) ns. W20P, W31P and W31I are located in the interface between the two subunits and participate in hydrophobic interactions stabilizing the complex. Dissociation of the complex leads to a transition of the tryptophans from hydrophobic to hydrophilic environment, which influences mainly τ2. The longer lifetime is more sensitive to the polarity of the environment. Circular dichroism measurements demonstrate that the two components of the neurotoxin preserve their secondary structure after dissociation of the complex. The results of the spectroscopic studies are in accordance with a mechanism of blockade of transmission across the neuromuscular junctions of the breathing muscles by interaction of a dissociated toxic PLA 2 with a membrane. The loss of toxicity is connected with slight changes in the secondary structure of PLA 2. CD studies also show a substantial contribution of disulfide bonds to the stability of the neurotoxic complex and its components.

  9. A camelid single-domain antibody neutralizes botulinum neurotoxin A by blocking host receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Guorui; Lam, Kwok-ho; Weisemann, Jasmin; Peng, Lisheng; Krez, Nadja; Perry, Kay; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Dong, Min; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng (BCH); (Cornell); (Tufts CTSI); (UCI); (MHH)

    2017-08-07

    Antibody treatment is currently the only available countermeasure for botulism, a fatal illness caused by flaccid paralysis of muscles due to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) intoxication. Among the seven major serotypes of BoNT/A-G, BoNT/A poses the most serious threat to humans because of its high potency and long duration of action. Prior to entering neurons and blocking neurotransmitter release, BoNT/A recognizes motoneurons via a dual-receptor binding process in which it engages both the neuron surface polysialoganglioside (PSG) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2). Previously, we identified a potent neutralizing antitoxin against BoNT/A1 termed ciA-C2, derived from a camelid heavy-chain-only antibody (VHH). In this study, we demonstrate that ciA-C2 prevents BoNT/A1 intoxication by inhibiting its binding to neuronal receptor SV2. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structure of ciA-C2 in complex with the receptor-binding domain of BoNT/A1 (HCA1) at 1.68 Å resolution. The structure revealed that ciA-C2 partially occupies the SV2-binding site on HCA1, causing direct interference of HCA1 interaction with both the N-glycan and peptide-moiety of SV2. Interestingly, this neutralization mechanism is similar to that of a monoclonal antibody in clinical trials, despite that ciA-C2 is more than 10-times smaller. Taken together, these results enlighten our understanding of BoNT/A1 interactions with its neuronal receptor, and further demonstrate that inhibiting toxin binding to the host receptor is an efficient countermeasure strategy.

  10. The space of states of quantum gravity in terms of loops and extended loops some remarks

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bartolo, C; Griego, J R; Pullin, J; Di Bartolo, Cayetano; Gambini, Rodolfo; Griego, Jorge; Pullin, Jorge

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews the status of several solutions to all the constraints of quantum gravity that have been proposed in terms of loops and extended loops. We discuss pitfalls of several of the results and in particular discuss the issues of covariance and regularization of the constraints in terms of extended loops. We also propose a formalism for ``thickened out loops'' which does not face the covariance problems of extended loops and may allow to regularize expressions in a consistent manner.

  11. Epitopic Profiling of Antibody Response against Neurotoxins from the Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Martin Closter; Engmark, Mikael; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    The black mamba (Dendroaspis Polylepis) is among the most dangerous snakes in the world, with a venom dominated by three-finger toxins and dendrotoxins. Among the three-finger toxins, the α-neurotoxins (α-NT) are the most important, and these are conserved between snake species. Cross......-reactivity between threefinger toxins is known to occur, and understanding this phenomenon in depth may help guide future design of antivenoms to obtain optimal specificity against medically important toxins from different snake species. Using a bioinformatic approach, we investigated the cross-reactivity be- tween...

  12. Amino acid sequence of versutoxin, a lethal neurotoxin from the venom of the funnel-web spider Atrax versutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M R; Sheumack, D D; Tyler, M I; Howden, M E

    1988-03-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of versutoxin, a lethal neurotoxic polypeptide isolated from the venom of male and female funnel-web spiders of the species Atrax versutus, was determined. Sequencing was performed in a gas-phase protein sequencer by automated Edman degradation of the S-carboxymethylated toxin and fragments of it produced by reaction with CNBr. Versutoxin consisted of a single chain of 42 amino acid residues. It was found to have a high proportion of basic residues and of cystine. The primary structure showed marked homology with that of robustoxin, a novel neurotoxin recently isolated from the venom of another funnel-web-spider species, Atrax robustus.

  13. Toxicity evolution of Vipera aspis aspis venom: identification and molecular modeling of a novel phospholipase A(2) heterodimer neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Virginie; Maroun, R C; Robbe-Vincent, Annie; De Haro, Luc; Choumet, Valérie

    2002-09-11

    We report the simultaneous presence of two phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) neurotoxins in the venom of Vipera aspis aspis, the first such observation. One is monomeric and identical to ammodytoxin B of Vipera ammodytes ammodytes. Its presence may result from gene flux after interbreeding between V. aspis aspis and V. ammodytes ammodytes. The second, a novel heterodimer named vaspin, is very similar to vipoxin of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis and to PLA(2)-I of Vipera aspis zinnikeri. It may result from expression of preexisting genes, the acidic subunit evolving from an ancestor common to ammodytin I2 from V. ammodytes ammodytes, which we also found in V. aspis aspis.

  14. Researchers unmask secret to long-lasting effects of botulinum neurotoxin A in motor neurons | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A team of scientists led by the Center for Cancer Research's Allan M. Weissman, M.D., and Yien Che Tsai, Ph.D., has discovered a molecular mechanism that explains the extreme toxicity of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), the most potent BoNT strain. The discovery, published June 5 in PNAS, also identifies a molecular target that the researchers hope will eventually lead to improved therapies to treat exposure and severely undermine the potential use of BoNTs as bioweapons.  Read more...  

  15. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  16. The extended loop representation of quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bartolo, C; Griego, J R

    1995-01-01

    A new representation of Quantum Gravity is developed. This formulation is based on an extension of the group of loops. The enlarged group, that we call the Extended Loop Group, behaves locally as an infinite dimensional Lie group. Quantum Gravity can be realized on the state space of extended loop dependent wavefunctions. The extended representation generalizes the loop representation and contains this representation as a particular case. The resulting diffeomorphism and hamiltonian constraints take a very simple form and allow to apply functional methods and simplify the loop calculus. In particular we show that the constraints are linear in the momenta. The nondegenerate solutions known in the loop representation are also solutions of the constraints in the new representation. The practical calculation advantages allows to find a new solution to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. Moreover, the extended representation puts in a precise framework some of the regularization problems of the loop representation. We sh...

  17. Clostridium botulinum strain Af84 contains three neurotoxin gene clusters: bont/A2, bont/F4 and bont/F5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Dover

    Full Text Available Sanger and shotgun sequencing of Clostridium botulinum strain Af84 type Af and its botulinum neurotoxin gene (bont clusters identified the presence of three bont gene clusters rather than the expected two. The three toxin gene clusters consisted of bont subtypes A2, F4 and F5. The bont/A2 and bont/F4 gene clusters were located within the chromosome (the latter in a novel location, while the bont/F5 toxin gene cluster was located within a large 246 kb plasmid. These findings are the first identification of a C. botulinum strain that contains three botulinum neurotoxin gene clusters.

  18. Singularities in loop quantum cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailleteau, Thomas; Cardoso, Antonio; Vandersloot, Kevin; Wands, David

    2008-12-19

    We show that simple scalar field models can give rise to curvature singularities in the effective Friedmann dynamics of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We find singular solutions for spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies with a canonical scalar field and a negative exponential potential, or with a phantom scalar field and a positive potential. While LQC avoids big bang or big rip type singularities, we find sudden singularities where the Hubble rate is bounded, but the Ricci curvature scalar diverges. We conclude that the effective equations of LQC are not in themselves sufficient to avoid the occurrence of curvature singularities.

  19. Loop equations from differential systems

    CERN Document Server

    Eynard, Bertrand; Marchal, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    To any differential system $d\\Psi=\\Phi\\Psi$ where $\\Psi$ belongs to a Lie group (a fiber of a principal bundle) and $\\Phi$ is a Lie algebra $\\mathfrak g$ valued 1-form on a Riemann surface $\\Sigma$, is associated an infinite sequence of "correlators" $W_n$ that are symmetric $n$-forms on $\\Sigma^n$. The goal of this article is to prove that these correlators always satisfy "loop equations", the same equations satisfied by correlation functions in random matrix models, or the same equations as Virasoro or W-algebra constraints in CFT.

  20. Cygnus Loop: A double bubble?

    CERN Document Server

    West, J; Reichardt, I; Stil, J; Kothes, R; Jaffe, T

    2016-01-01

    The Cygnus Loop is a well-studied supernova remnant (SNR) that has been observed across the electromagnetic spectrum. Although widely believed to be an SNR shell with a blow- out region in the south, we consider the possibility that this object is two SNRs projected along the same line-of-sight by using multi-wavelength images and modelling. Our results show that a model of two objects including some overlap region/interaction between the two objects has the best match to the observed data.

  1. Closed-loop neuromorphic benchmarks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stewart

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarks   Terrence C. Stewart 1* , Travis DeWolf 1 , Ashley Kleinhans 2 , Chris Eliasmith 1   1 University of Waterloo, Canada, 2 Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa   Submitted to Journal:   Frontiers in Neuroscience   Specialty... the study was exempt from ethical approval procedures.) Did the study presented in the manuscript involve human or animal subjects: No I v i w 1Closed-loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks Terrence C. Stewart 1,∗, Travis DeWolf 1, Ashley Kleinhans 2 and Chris...

  2. Loop Virasoro Lie conformal algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Henan, E-mail: wuhenanby@163.com; Chen, Qiufan; Yue, Xiaoqing [Department of Mathematics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-01-15

    The Lie conformal algebra of loop Virasoro algebra, denoted by CW, is introduced in this paper. Explicitly, CW is a Lie conformal algebra with C[∂]-basis (L{sub i} | i∈Z) and λ-brackets [L{sub i} {sub λ} L{sub j}] = (−∂−2λ)L{sub i+j}. Then conformal derivations of CW are determined. Finally, rank one conformal modules and Z-graded free intermediate series modules over CW are classified.

  3. Using the Meeting Graph Framework to Minimise Kernel Loop Unrolling for Scheduled Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Mounira; Gregg, David; Touati, Sid-Ahmed-Ali

    This paper improves our previous research effort [1] by providing an efficient method for kernel loop unrolling minimisation in the case of already scheduled loops, where circular lifetime intervals are known. When loops are software pipelined, the number of values simultaneously alive becomes exactly known giving better opportunities for kernel loop unrolling. Furthermore, fixing circular lifetime intervals allows us to reduce the algorithmic complexity of our method compared to [1] by computing a new research space for minimal kernel loop unrolling. The meeting graph (MG) is one of the [3] frameworks proposed in the literature which models loop unrolling and register allocation together in a common formal framework for software pipelined loops. Although MG significantly improves loop register allocation, the computed loop unrolling may lead to unpractical code growth.

  4. Are Coronal Loops Isothermal or Multithermal? Yes!

    CERN Document Server

    Schmelz, J T; Rightmire, L A; Kimble, J A; Del Zanna, G; Cirtain, J W; DeLuca, E E; Mason, H E

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly few solar coronal loops have been observed simultaneously with TRACE and SOHO/CDS, and even fewer analyses of these loops have been conducted and published. The SOHO Joint Observing Program 146 was designed in part to provide the simultaneous observations required for in-depth temperature analysis of active region loops and determine whether these loops are isothermal or multithermal. The data analyzed in this paper were taken on 2003 January 17 of AR 10250. We used TRACE filter ratios, emission measure loci, and two methods of differential emission measure analysis to examine the temperature structure of three different loops. TRACE and CDS observations agree that Loop 1 is isothermal with Log T $=$ 5.85, both along the line of sight as well as along the length of the loop leg that is visible in the CDS field of view. Loop 2 is hotter than Loop 1. It is multithermal along the line of sight, with significant emission between 6.2 $<$ Log T $<$ 6.4, but the loop apex region is out of the CDS ...

  5. Gauge theory loop operators and Liouville theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukker, Nadav [Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Gomis, Jaume; Okuda, Takuda [Perimeter Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Teschner, Joerg [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    We propose a correspondence between loop operators in a family of four dimensional N=2 gauge theories on S{sup 4} - including Wilson, 't Hooft and dyonic operators - and Liouville theory loop operators on a Riemann surface. This extends the beautiful relation between the partition function of these N=2 gauge theories and Liouville correlators found by Alday, Gaiotto and Tachikawa. We show that the computation of these Liouville correlators with the insertion of a Liouville loop operator reproduces Pestun's formula capturing the expectation value of a Wilson loop operator in the corresponding gauge theory. We prove that our definition of Liouville loop operators is invariant under modular transformations, which given our correspondence, implies the conjectured action of S-duality on the gauge theory loop operators. Our computations in Liouville theory make an explicit prediction for the exact expectation value of 't Hooft and dyonic loop operators in these N=2 gauge theories. The Liouville loop operators are also found to admit a simple geometric interpretation within quantum Teichmueller theory as the quantum operators representing the length of geodesics. We study the algebra of Liouville loop operators and show that it gives evidence for our proposal as well as providing definite predictions for the operator product expansion of loop operators in gauge theory. (orig.)

  6. Efficient Loop Navigation for Symbolic Execution

    CERN Document Server

    Obdrzalek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Symbolic execution is a successful and very popular technique used in software verification and testing. A key limitation of symbolic execution is in dealing with code containing loops. The problem is that even a single loop can generate a huge number of different symbolic execution paths, corresponding to different number of loop iterations and taking various paths through the loop. We introduce a technique which, given a start location above some loops and a target location anywhere below these loops, returns a feasible path between these two locations, if such a path exists. The technique infers a collection of constraint systems from the program and uses them to steer the symbolic execution towards the target. On reaching a loop it iteratively solves the appropriate constraint system to find out which path through this loop to take, or, alternatively, whether to continue below the loop. To construct the constraint systems we express the values of variables modified in a loop as functions of the number of ...

  7. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A: design, inhibition, cocrystal structures, structure-activity relationship and pharmacophore modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar G.; Swaminathan S.; Kumaran, D.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The seven serotypes (A-G) of the botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of the disease botulism, block neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. Using a structure-based drug-design approach, a number of peptide inhibitors were designed and their inhibitory activity against botulinum serotype A (BoNT/A) protease was determined. The most potent peptide, RRGF, inhibited BoNT/A protease with an IC{sub 50} of 0.9 {micro}M and a K{sub i} of 358 nM. High-resolution crystal structures of various peptide inhibitors in complex with the BoNT/A protease domain were also determined. Based on the inhibitory activities and the atomic interactions deduced from the cocrystal structures, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed and a pharmacophore model was developed. Unlike the currently available models, this pharmacophore model is based on a number of enzyme-inhibitor peptide cocrystal structures and improved the existing models significantly, incorporating new features.

  8. Structural analysis of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type D as a platform for the development of targeted secretion inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyer, Geoffrey; Davies, Jonathan R; Moore, Kevin; Chaddock, John A; Ravi Acharya, K

    2015-09-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin type D is one of seven highly potent toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum which inhibit neurotransmission at cholinergic nerve terminals. A functional fragment derived from the toxin, LHn, consisting of the catalytic and translocation domains, has been heralded as a platform for the development of targeted secretion inhibitors. These secretion inhibitors are aimed at retargeting the toxin towards a specific cell type to inhibit vesicular secretion. Here we report crystal structures of LHn from serotype D at 2.3 Å, and that of SXN101959 at 3.1 Å resolution. SXN101959, a derivative that combines LHn from serotype D with a fragment of the growth hormone releasing hormone, has previously revealed promising results in inhibiting growth hormone release in pituitary somatotrophs. These structures offer for the first time insights into the translocation domain interaction with the catalytic domain in serotype D. Furthermore, structural information from small-angle X-ray scattering of LHn/D is compared among serotypes A, B, and D. Taken together, these results demonstrate the robustness of the 'LHn fold' across serotypes and its use in engineering additional polypeptide components with added functionality. Our study demonstrates the suitability of botulinum neurotoxin, and serotype D in particular, as a basis for engineering novel secretion inhibitors.

  9. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  10. A Label Free Colorimetric Assay for the Detection of Active Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A by SNAP-25 Conjugated Colloidal Gold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Gwenin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins are one of the most potent toxins known to man. Current methods of detection involve the quantification of the toxin but do not take into account the percentage of the toxin that is active. At present the assay used for monitoring the activity of the toxin is the mouse bioassay, which is lengthy and has ethical issues due to the use of live animals. This report demonstrates a novel assay that utilises the endopeptidase activity of the toxin to detect Botulinum neurotoxin in a pharmaceutical sample. The cleaving of SNAP-25 is monitored via UV-Visible spectroscopy with a limit of detection of 373 fg/mL and has been further developed into a high throughput method using a microplate reader detecting down to 600 fg/mL of active toxin. The results show clear differences between the toxin product and the placebo, which contains the pharmaceutical excipients human serum albumin and lactose, showing that the assay detects the active form of the toxin.

  11. Development of a Highly Sensitive Cell-Based Assay for Detecting Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A through Neural Culture Media Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Won S; Pezzi, Hannah M; Schuster, Andrea R; Berry, Scott M; Sung, Kyung E; Beebe, David J

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the most lethal naturally produced neurotoxin. Due to the extreme toxicity, BoNTs are implicated in bioterrorism, while the specific mechanism of action and long-lasting effect was found to be medically applicable in treating various neurological disorders. Therefore, for both public and patient safety, a highly sensitive, physiologic, and specific assay is needed. In this paper, we show a method for achieving a highly sensitive cell-based assay for BoNT/A detection using the motor neuron-like continuous cell line NG108-15. To achieve high sensitivity, we performed a media optimization study evaluating three commercially available neural supplements in combination with retinoic acid, purmorphamine, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and ganglioside GT1b. We found nonlinear combinatorial effects on BoNT/A detection sensitivity, achieving an EC50 of 7.4 U ± 1.5 SD (or ~7.9 pM). The achieved detection sensitivity is comparable to that of assays that used primary and stem cell-derived neurons as well as the mouse lethality assay.

  12. Molecular Characteristics of Four New Depressant Insect Neurotoxins Purified From Venom of Buthus martensi Karsch by HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吉永华; H.Hattori; 徐科; S.Terakawa

    1994-01-01

    Suitable pattern and high yield were obtained when the reverse-phase performance liquidchromatography (RP-HPLC) was used to separate neurotoxins from venom of Chinese scorpion Buthusmartensi Karsch.Using this technique,the venom was first separated to two main regions.The toxicitytests show that the insect-selective neurotoxical components are concentrated in the latter region,from whichfive insect-selective neurotoxins designated by BmK IT1-IT5 were obtained.According to the results of thetoxicity test as well as the amino acid composition and N-terminal analyses,BmK IT1 is the excitatory insectneurotoxin as reported in a previous paper,and the others are the newly found depressant insect-selectiveneurotoxins.The molecules of all the four toxins are single-chain minipeptides of about 60 amino acids.Their isoelectric points (pI) are between 8.3 and 8.5.The fact that BmK IT2 loses completely its insect tox-icity after being modified by fluorochrome shows that the positive charges on the molecular surface of thiskind of toxins are important to maintaining the bioactivity of the molecules.

  13. Three-dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) composite for electrochemical study on acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by endogenous neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yingqiao; Fu, Ying; Xu, Lili; Lin, Bin; Wang, Zhongchuan; Xu, Zhiai; Jin, Litong; Zhang, Wen

    2012-09-13

    In this paper, an electrochemical acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition assay based on three-dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) composite was conducted. The 3DOM composite was first fabricated on the glassy carbon electrode by electropolymerization of aniline in the presence of ionic liquid (IL) on a sacrificial silica nanospheres template. After the silica nanospheres were etched, an IL-doped polyaniline (IL-PANI) film with 3DOM morphology was formed. Then, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were decorated on the IL-PANI film by electrodeposition. The immobilized AChE on the 3DOM composite displayed favorable affinity to substrate acetylthiocholine chloride (ATCh), and the 3DOM composite showed excellent electrocatalytic effect on thiocholine, the hydrolysis product of ATCh. The presence of IL and AuNPs could improve the sensitivity by accelerating the electron transfer. The designed AChE biosensor was successfully applied to evaluate the AChE inhibition induced by endogenous neurotoxin 1(R),2N-dimethyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline [(R)-NMSal]. The results demonstrate that (R)-NMSal exerts a considerable effect on AChE activity, and the inhibition is reversible. The developed method offers a new approach for AChE inhibition assay, which is of great benefit in understanding the mechanism behind neurotoxin-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. A structural and mutagenic blueprint for molecular recognition of strychnine and d-tubocurarine by different cys-loop receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke Brams

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cys-loop receptors (CLR are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast excitatory or inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Strychnine and d-tubocurarine (d-TC are neurotoxins that have been highly instrumental in decades of research on glycine receptors (GlyR and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR, respectively. In this study we addressed the question how the molecular recognition of strychnine and d-TC occurs with high affinity and yet low specificity towards diverse CLR family members. X-ray crystal structures of the complexes with AChBP, a well-described structural homolog of the extracellular domain of the nAChRs, revealed that strychnine and d-TC adopt multiple occupancies and different ligand orientations, stabilizing the homopentameric protein in an asymmetric state. This introduces a new level of structural diversity in CLRs. Unlike protein and peptide neurotoxins, strychnine and d-TC form a limited number of contacts in the binding pocket of AChBP, offering an explanation for their low selectivity. Based on the ligand interactions observed in strychnine- and d-TC-AChBP complexes we performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis in the binding pocket of the human α1 GlyR and α7 nAChR and showed the functional relevance of these residues in conferring high potency of strychnine and d-TC, respectively. Our results demonstrate that a limited number of ligand interactions in the binding pocket together with an energetic stabilization of the extracellular domain are key to the poor selective recognition of strychnine and d-TC by CLRs as diverse as the GlyR, nAChR, and 5-HT(3R.

  15. A structural and mutagenic blueprint for molecular recognition of strychnine and d-tubocurarine by different cys-loop receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brams, Marijke; Pandya, Anshul; Kuzmin, Dmitry; van Elk, René; Krijnen, Liz; Yakel, Jerrel L; Tsetlin, Victor; Smit, August B; Ulens, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Cys-loop receptors (CLR) are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast excitatory or inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Strychnine and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) are neurotoxins that have been highly instrumental in decades of research on glycine receptors (GlyR) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), respectively. In this study we addressed the question how the molecular recognition of strychnine and d-TC occurs with high affinity and yet low specificity towards diverse CLR family members. X-ray crystal structures of the complexes with AChBP, a well-described structural homolog of the extracellular domain of the nAChRs, revealed that strychnine and d-TC adopt multiple occupancies and different ligand orientations, stabilizing the homopentameric protein in an asymmetric state. This introduces a new level of structural diversity in CLRs. Unlike protein and peptide neurotoxins, strychnine and d-TC form a limited number of contacts in the binding pocket of AChBP, offering an explanation for their low selectivity. Based on the ligand interactions observed in strychnine- and d-TC-AChBP complexes we performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis in the binding pocket of the human α1 GlyR and α7 nAChR and showed the functional relevance of these residues in conferring high potency of strychnine and d-TC, respectively. Our results demonstrate that a limited number of ligand interactions in the binding pocket together with an energetic stabilization of the extracellular domain are key to the poor selective recognition of strychnine and d-TC by CLRs as diverse as the GlyR, nAChR, and 5-HT(3)R.

  16. Holotoxin Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype A4 Originating from a Nontoxigenic Clostridium botulinum Expression System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Marite; Tepp, William H; Whitemarsh, Regina C M; Pellett, Sabine; Johnson, Eric A

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum subtype A4 neurotoxin (BoNT/A4) is naturally expressed in the dual-toxin-producing C. botulinum strain 657Ba at 100× lower titers than BoNT/B. In this study, we describe purification of recombinant BoNT/A4 (rBoNT/A4) expressed in a nonsporulating and nontoxigenic C. botulinum expression host strain. The rBoNT/A4 copurified with nontoxic toxin complex components provided in trans by the expression host and was proteolytically cleaved to the active dichain form. Activity of the recombinant BoNT/A4 in mice and in human neuronal cells was about 1,000-fold lower than that of BoNT/A1, and the recombinant BoNT/A4 was effectively neutralized by botulism heptavalent antitoxin. A previous report using recombinant truncated BoNT/A4 light chain (LC) expressed in Escherichia coli has indicated reduced stability and activity of BoNT/A4 LC compared to BoNT/A1 LC, which was surmounted by introduction of a single-amino-acid substitution, I264R. In order to determine whether this mutation would also affect the holotoxin activity of BoNT/A4, a recombinant full-length BoNT/A4 carrying this mutation as well as a second mutation predicted to increase solubility (L260F) was produced in the clostridial expression system. Comparative analyses of the in vitro, cellular, and in vivo activities of rBoNT/A4 and rBoNT/A4-L260F I264R showed 1,000-fold-lower activity than BoNT/A1 in both the mutated and nonmutated BoNT/A4. This indicates that these mutations do not alter the activity of BoNT/A4 holotoxin. In summary, a recombinant BoNT from a dual-toxin-producing strain was expressed and purified in an endogenous clostridial expression system, allowing analysis of this toxin.

  17. NO DECREASE IN MUSCLE STRENGTH AFTER BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN-A INJECTION IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meta Nyström Eek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity and muscle weakness is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Spasticity can be treated with Botulinum Neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A, but this drug has also been reported to induce muscle weakness. Our purpose was to describe the effect on muscle strength in the lower extremities after BoNT-A injections in children with cerebral palsy. A secondary aim was to relate the effect of BoNT-A to gait pattern and range of motion.Twenty children with spastic cerebral palsy were included in the study, eight girls and 12 boys (mean age 7.7 years. All were able to walk without support, but with increased muscle tone interfering with motor function and gait pattern. Sixteen children had unilateral spastic CP and four bilateral spastic CP. Twenty-four legs received injections with BoNT-A in the plantar flexor muscles. The children were tested before treatment, around six weeks after at the peak effect of BoNT-A, and at six months after treatment, with measurement of muscle strength, gait analysis and range of motion.There were no differences in muscle strength in plantar flexors of treated legs at peak effect compared to baseline. Six months after treatment, there was still no change in untreated plantar flexor muscles, but an increasing trend in plantar flexor strength in legs treated with BoNT-A. Parents reported positive effects in all children, graded as: small in three children, moderate in eight, and large in nine children. The gait analysis showed a small improvement in knee extension at initial contact, and there was a small increase in passive range of motion for ankle dorsiflexion. Two children had a period with transient weakness and pain.We found that voluntary force production in plantar flexor muscles did not decrease after BoNT-A, instead there was a trend to increased muscle strength at follow-up. The increase may be explained as an effect of the blocking of involuntary nerve impulses, leading to an opportunity to using and training the

  18. No Decrease in Muscle Strength after Botulinum Neurotoxin-A Injection in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eek, Meta N.; Himmelmann, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity and muscle weakness is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Spasticity can be treated with botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A), but this drug has also been reported to induce muscle weakness. Our purpose was to describe the effect on muscle strength in the lower extremities after BoNT-A injections in children with CP. A secondary aim was to relate the effect of BoNT-A to gait pattern and range of motion. Twenty children with spastic CP were included in the study, 8 girls and 12 boys (mean age 7.7 years). All were able to walk without support, but with increased muscle tone interfering with motor function and gait pattern. Sixteen children had unilateral spastic CP and four bilateral spastic CP. Twenty-four legs received injections with BoNT-A in the plantar flexor muscles. The children were tested before treatment, around 6 weeks after at the peak effect of BoNT-A, and at 6 months after treatment, with measurement of muscle strength, gait analysis, and range of motion. There were no differences in muscle strength in plantar flexors of treated legs at peak effect compared to baseline. Six months after treatment, there was still no change in untreated plantar flexor muscles, but an increasing trend in plantar flexor strength in legs treated with BoNT-A. Parents reported positive effects in all children, graded as: small in three children, moderate in eight, and large in nine children. The gait analysis showed a small improvement in knee extension at initial contact, and there was a small increase in passive range of motion for ankle dorsiflexion. Two children had a period with transient weakness and pain. We found that voluntary force production in plantar flexor muscles did not decrease after BoNT-A, instead there was a trend to increased muscle strength at follow-up. The increase may be explained as an effect of the blocking of involuntary nerve impulses, leading to an opportunity to using and training the muscles with voluntary control. Adequate

  19. No Decrease in Muscle Strength after Botulinum Neurotoxin-A Injection in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eek, Meta N; Himmelmann, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity and muscle weakness is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Spasticity can be treated with botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A), but this drug has also been reported to induce muscle weakness. Our purpose was to describe the effect on muscle strength in the lower extremities after BoNT-A injections in children with CP. A secondary aim was to relate the effect of BoNT-A to gait pattern and range of motion. Twenty children with spastic CP were included in the study, 8 girls and 12 boys (mean age 7.7 years). All were able to walk without support, but with increased muscle tone interfering with motor function and gait pattern. Sixteen children had unilateral spastic CP and four bilateral spastic CP. Twenty-four legs received injections with BoNT-A in the plantar flexor muscles. The children were tested before treatment, around 6 weeks after at the peak effect of BoNT-A, and at 6 months after treatment, with measurement of muscle strength, gait analysis, and range of motion. There were no differences in muscle strength in plantar flexors of treated legs at peak effect compared to baseline. Six months after treatment, there was still no change in untreated plantar flexor muscles, but an increasing trend in plantar flexor strength in legs treated with BoNT-A. Parents reported positive effects in all children, graded as: small in three children, moderate in eight, and large in nine children. The gait analysis showed a small improvement in knee extension at initial contact, and there was a small increase in passive range of motion for ankle dorsiflexion. Two children had a period with transient weakness and pain. We found that voluntary force production in plantar flexor muscles did not decrease after BoNT-A, instead there was a trend to increased muscle strength at follow-up. The increase may be explained as an effect of the blocking of involuntary nerve impulses, leading to an opportunity to using and training the muscles with voluntary control. Adequate

  20. Glycosylated SV2 and Gangliosides as Dual Receptors for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Zhuji; Chen, Chen; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R.; (MCW)

    2010-02-22

    Botulinum neurotoxin causes rapid flaccid paralysis through the inhibition of acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction. The seven BoNT serotypes (A-G) have been proposed to bind motor neurons via ganglioside-protein dual receptors. To date, the structure-function properties of BoNT/F host receptor interactions have not been resolved. Here, we report the crystal structures of the receptor binding domains (HCR) of BoNT/A and BoNT/F and the characterization of the dual receptors for BoNT/F. The overall polypeptide fold of HCR/A is essentially identical to the receptor binding domain of the BoNT/A holotoxin, and the structure of HCR/F is very similar to that of HCR/A, except for two regions implicated in neuronal binding. Solid phase array analysis identified two HCR/F binding glycans: ganglioside GD1a and oligosaccharides containing an N-acetyllactosamine core. Using affinity chromatography, HCR/F bound native synaptic vesicle glycoproteins as part of a protein complex. Deglycosylation of glycoproteins using {alpha}(1-3,4)-fucosidase, endo-{beta}-galactosidase, and PNGase F disrupted the interaction with HCR/F, while the binding of HCR/B to its cognate receptor, synaptotagmin I, was unaffected. These data indicate that the HCR/F binds synaptic vesicle glycoproteins through the keratan sulfate moiety of SV2. The interaction of HCR/F with gangliosides was also investigated. HCR/F bound specifically to gangliosides that contain {alpha}2,3-linked sialic acid on the terminal galactose of a neutral saccharide core (binding order GT1b = GD1a GM3; no binding to GD1b and GM1a). Mutations within the putative ganglioside binding pocket of HCR/F decreased binding to gangliosides, synaptic vesicle protein complexes, and primary rat hippocampal neurons. Thus, BoNT/F neuronal discrimination involves the recognition of ganglioside and protein (glycosylated SV2) carbohydrate moieties, providing a structural basis for the high affinity and specificity of BoNT/F for neurons.

  1. Grey Matter Microstructural Integrity Alterations in Blepharospasm Are Partially Reversed by Botulinum Neurotoxin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirumamilla, Venkata Chaitanya; Koirala, Nabin; Paktas, Burcu; Deuschl, Günther; Zeuner, Kirsten E.; Groppa, Sergiu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Benign Essential Blepharospasm (BEB) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) are the most common hyperkinetic movement disorders of facial muscles. Although similar in clinical presentation different pathophysiological mechanisms are assumed. Botulinum Neurotoxin (BoNT) is a standard evidence-based treatment for both conditions. In this study we aimed to assess grey matter microstructural differences between these two groups of patients and compared them with healthy controls. In patients we furthermore tracked the longitudinal morphometric changes associated with BoNT therapy. We hypothesized microstructural differences between the groups at the time point of maximum symptoms representation and distinct longitudinal grey matter dynamics with symptom improvement. Methods Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of 3T 3D-T1 MRI images from BEB, HFS patients prior to and one month after BoNT therapy and from a group of age and sex matched healthy controls. Cortical thickness as extracted from Freesurfer was assessed as parameter of microstructural integrity. Results BoNT therapy markedly improved motor symptoms in patients with BEB and HFS. Significant differences of grey matter integrity have been found between the two patients groups. The BEB group showed lower cortical thickness at baseline in the frontal-rostral, supramarginal and temporal regions compared to patients with HFS. In this group BoNT treatment was associated with a cortical thinning in the primary motor cortex and the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA). Contrary patients with HFS showed no longitudinal CT changes. A decreased cortical thickness was attested bilaterally in the temporal poles and in the right superior frontal region in BEB patients in comparison to HC. Patients in the HFS group presented a decreased CT in the left lingual gyrus and temporal pole. Conclusions Although patients with BEB and HFS present clinically with involuntary movements of facial muscles, they exhibited differences

  2. Higher Loop Nonplanar Anomalous Dimensions from Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Robert de Mello; Messamah, Ilies

    2013-01-01

    In this article we study the action of the one loop dilatation operator on operators with a classical dimension of order N. These operators belong to the su(2) sector and are constructed using two complex fields Y and Z. For these operators non-planar diagrams contribute already at the leading order in N and the planar and large N limits are distinct. The action of the one loop and the two loop dilatation operator reduces to a set of decoupled oscillators and factorizes into an action on the Z fields and an action on the Y fields. Direct computation has shown that the action on the Y fields is the same at one and two loops. In this article, using the su(2) symmetry algebra as well as structural features of field theory, we give compelling evidence that the factor in the dilatation operator that acts on the Ys is given by the one loop expression, at any loop order.

  3. Abstract Acceleration of General Linear Loops

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    International audience; We present abstract acceleration techniques for computing loop invariants for numerical programs with linear assignments and conditionals. Whereas abstract interpretation techniques typically over-approximate the set of reachable states iteratively, abstract acceleration captures the effect of the loop with a single, non-iterative transfer function applied to the initial states at the loop head. In contrast to previous acceleration techniques, our approach applies to a...

  4. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  5. Wilson Loops in Open String Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    Wilson loop elements on torus are introduced into the partition function of open strings as Polyakov’s path integral at one-loop level. Mass spectra from compactification and expected symmetry breaking are illustrated by choosing the correct weight for the contributions from annulus and Möbius strip. We show that Jacobi’s imaginary transformation connects the mass spectra with the Wilson loops. The application to thermopartition function and cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  6. Wilson Loops in Open String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Wilson loop elements on torus are introduced into the partition function of open strings as Polyakov's path integral at one-loop level. Mass spectra from compactification and expected symmetry breaking are illustrated by choosing the correct weight for the contributions from annulus and M\\"obius strip. We show that Jacobi's imaginary transformation connects the mass spectra with the Wilson loops. The application to thermopartition function and cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  7. All Digital Phase-Locked Loop

    OpenAIRE

    Marijan Jurgo

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews working principles of phase-locked loop and drawbacks of classical PLL structure in nanometric technologies. It is proposed to replace the classical structure by all-digital phase-locked loop structure. Authors described the main blocks of all-digital phase-locked loop (time to digital converter and digitally controlled oscillator) and overviewed the quantization noise arising in these blocks as well as its minimization strategies. The calculated inverter delay in 65 nm CMOS...

  8. Magnetic Monopole in the Loop Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Leal, L; Leal, Lorenzo; Lopez, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    We quantize the electromagnetic field in the presence of a static magnetic monopole, within the loop-representation formalism. We find that the loop-dependent wave functional becomes multivalued, in the sense that it acquires a dependence on the surfaces bounded by the loop. This generalizes what occurs in quantum mechanics in multiply connected spaces. When Dirac's quantization condition holds, this surface-dependence disappears, together with the effect of the monopole on the electromagnetic field.

  9. A Note on Loop Amplitudes in QED

    CERN Document Server

    Brandhuber, Andreas; Vincon, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    We consider the two-loop four-point amplitude in N=2 super QED, and show that there exists an approximate recursive structure similar to that captured by the ABDK/BDS ansatz for MHV amplitudes in N=4 super Yang-Mills. Furthermore, we present a simple relation between the box coefficients of one-loop photon MHV amplitudes in (super) QED, and sums of box coefficients of one-loop MHV amplitudes in (super) Yang-Mills.

  10. Safety and administration of treatment with botulinum neurotoxin for sialorrhoea in ALS patients: Review of the litterature and a proposal for tailored treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Morten; Bisgård, Carsten; Vilholm, Ole Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a second-line treatment of sialorrhoea in ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) patients. This article is a review of the published literature concerning safety and administration of this treatment to ALS patients. A PubMed search was performed. All original...

  11. Explaining human recreational use of 'pesticides': The neurotoxin regulation model of substance use vs. the hijack model and implications for age and sex differences in drug consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward H Hagen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Most globally popular drugs are plant neurotoxins or their close chemical analogs. These compounds evolved to deter, not reward or reinforce, consumption. Moreover, they reliably activate virtually all toxin defense mechanisms, and are thus correctly identified by human neurophysiology as toxins. Acute drug toxicity must therefore play a more central role in drug use theory. We accordingly challenge the popular idea that the rewarding and reinforcing properties of drugs "hijack" the brain, and propose instead that the brain evolved to carefully regulate neurotoxin consumption to minimize fitness costs and maximize fitness benefits. This perspective provides a compelling explanation for the dramatic changes in substance use that occur during the transition from childhood to adulthood, and for pervasive sex differences in substance use: because nicotine and many other plant neurotoxins are teratogenic, children, and to a lesser extent women of childbearing age, evolved to avoid ingesting them. However, during the course of human evolution many adolescents and adults reaped net benefits from regulated intake of plant neurotoxins.

  12. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  13. Recombinant botulinum neurotoxin Hc subunit (BoNT Hc) and catalytically inactive Clostridium botulinum holoproteins (ciBoNT HPs) as vaccine candidates for the prevention of botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-03

    nontoxic accessory proteins were purchased from 502 Metabiologics (Madison, Wisconsin) and WAKO (Kyoto, Japan ), or produced at USAMRIID. 503...J.; Marks, J.D.; Nakagawa, T.; Montal, 631 M. Molecular architecture of botulinum neurotoxin E revealed by single particle electron 632 microscopy

  14. Human-in-the-loop simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rothrock, Ling

    2011-01-01

    ""Human-in-the-Loop Simulations"" is a compilation of articles from experts in the design, development, and use of human-in-the-loop simulations. The first section of the handbook consists of papers on fundamental concepts in human-in-the-loop simulations, such as object-oriented simulation development, interface design and development, and performance measurement. The second section includes papers from researchers who utilized HITL simulations to inform models of cognitive processes to include decision making and metacognition. The last section describes human-in-the-loop processes for compl

  15. High Temperature Sodium Thermal Convection Test Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A project for the evaluation of compatibility characteristic of structural materials used in China experimental fast reactor(CEFR) has been in operation. The conditions which these structural materials contact with liquid sodium in reactor can be simulated by the tests in high temperature sodium thermal convection test loop. The main aims of designing and constructing the thermal convection test loop is for the corrosion test of CEFR materials, and the objective is to obtain the corrosion data of domestic materials.The main features of the test loop are shown in Fig.1. The primary components of the loop

  16. The emergy analysis of loop circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kai; Feng, Xiao

    2008-12-01

    Emergy analysis can analyze the resource utilization and environmental performance of a system. Loop circuit is a common structure in the process industry, but when emergy analysis is carried out to such structure, mistakes such as emergy double counting often occur. To avoid emergy double counting, two types of loop circuit-direct loop circuit and indirect loop circuit-are theoretically distinguished, and the methods to avoid such mistake are proposed. Finally, PVC production and vinyl acetate production are adopted to demonstrate the methods.

  17. Pseudoautomorphisms of Bruck loops and their generalizations

    CERN Document Server

    Greer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We show that in a weak commutative inverse property loop, such as a Bruck loop, if $\\alpha$ is a right [left] pseudoautomorphism with companion $c$, then $c$ [$c^2$] must lie in the left nucleus. In particular, for any such loop with trivial left nucleus, every right pseudoautomorphism is an automorphism and if the squaring map is a permutation, then every left pseudoautomorphism is an automorphism as well. We also show that every pseudoautomorphism of a commutative inverse property loop is an automorphism, generalizing a well-known result of Bruck.

  18. On Bruck Loops of 2-power Exponent

    CERN Document Server

    Baumeister, Barbara; Stroth, Gernot

    2009-01-01

    We classify "nice" loop envelopes to Bruck loops of 2-power exponent under the assumption that every nonabelian simple section of $G$ is either passive or isomorphic to $\\PSL_2(q)$, $q-1 \\ge 4$ a 2-power. The hypothesis is verified in a separate paper. This paper is a continuation of the work by Aschbacher, Kinyon and Phillips on finite Bruck loops [AKP]. In [BS3] we applied these results and get a neat description of the structure of the finite Bruck loops.

  19. Loops with exponent three in all isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kinyon, Michael

    2011-01-01

    It was shown by van Rees \\cite{vR} that a latin square of order $n$ cannot have more than $n^2(n-1)/18$ latin subsquares of order 3. He conjectured that this bound is only achieved if $n$ is a power of 3. We show that it can only be achieved if $n\\equiv3\\bmod6$. We also state several conditions that are equivalent to achieving the van Rees bound. One of these is that the Cayley table of a loop achieves the van Rees bound if and only if every loop isotope has exponent 3. We call such loops \\emph{van Rees loops} and show that they form an equationally defined variety. We also show that (1) In a van Rees loop, any subloop of index 3 is normal, (2) There are exactly 6 nonassociative van Rees loops of order 27 with a non-trivial nucleus, (3) There is a Steiner quasigroup associated with every van Rees loop and (4) Every Bol loop of exponent 3 is a van Rees loop.

  20. Polyakov loop modeling for hot QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Skokov, Vladimir

    2017-09-01

    We review theoretical aspects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) at finite temperature. The most important physical variable to characterize hot QCD is the Polyakov loop, which is an approximate order parameter for quark deconfinement in a hot gluonic medium. Additionally to its role as an order parameter, the Polyakov loop has rich physical contents in both perturbative and non-perturbative sectors. This review covers a wide range of subjects associated with the Polyakov loop from topological defects in hot QCD to model building with coupling to the Polyakov loop.

  1. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren H.; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel vertically polarized omnidirectional printed slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform and in-phase fields in the slot in order to obtain an omnidirectional radiation...... pattern. The antenna is designed for the 2.45 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band. Applications of the antenna are many. One is for on-body applications since it is ideal for launching a creeping waves due to the polarization....

  2. R-loopDB: a database for R-loop forming sequences (RLFS) and R-loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Wongsurawat, Thidathip; Sutheeworapong, Sawannee; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2017-01-01

    R-loopDB (http://rloop.bii.a-star.edu.sg) was originally constructed as a collection of computationally predicted R-loop forming sequences (RLFSs) in the human genic regions. The renewed R-loopDB provides updates, improvements and new options, including access to recent experimental data. It includes genome-scale prediction of RLFSs for humans, six other animals and yeast. Using the extended quantitative model of RLFSs (QmRLFS), we significantly increased the number of RLFSs predicted in the human genes and identified RLFSs in other organism genomes. R-loopDB allows searching of RLFSs in the genes and in the 2 kb upstream and downstream flanking sequences of any gene. R-loopDB exploits the Ensembl gene annotation system, providing users with chromosome coordinates, sequences, gene and genomic data of the 1 565 795 RLFSs distributed in 121 056 genic or proximal gene regions of the covered organisms. It provides a comprehensive annotation of Ensembl RLFS-positive genes including 93 454 protein coding genes, 12 480 long non-coding RNA and 7 568 small non-coding RNA genes and 7 554 pseudogenes. Using new interface and genome viewers of R-loopDB, users can search the gene(s) in multiple species with keywords in a single query. R-loopDB provides tools to carry out comparative evolution and genome-scale analyses in R-loop biology. PMID:27899586

  3. UWB communication receiver feedback loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiridon, Alex; Benzel, Dave; Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2007-12-04

    A novel technique and structure that maximizes the extraction of information from reference pulses for UWB-TR receivers is introduced. The scheme efficiently processes an incoming signal to suppress different types of UWB as well as non-UWB interference prior to signal detection. Such a method and system adds a feedback loop mechanism to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of reference pulses in a conventional TR receiver. Moreover, sampling the second order statistical function such as, for example, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the received signal and matching it to the ACF samples of the original pulses for each transmitted bit provides a more robust UWB communications method and system in the presence of channel distortions.

  4. Delay locked loop integrated circuit.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) integrated circuit (IC). The DLL was developed and tested as a stand-alone IC test chip to be integrated into a larger application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), the Quadrature Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QDWS). The purpose of the DLL is to provide a digitally programmable delay to enable synchronization between an internal system clock and external peripherals with unknown clock skew. The DLL was designed and fabricated in the IBM 8RF process, a 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process. It was designed to operate with a 300MHz clock and has been tested up to 500MHz.

  5. Wilson loops with arbitrary charges

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, Piotr; Wosiek, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    We discuss how to implement, in lattice gauge theories, external charges which are not commensurate with an elementary gauge coupling. It is shown that an arbitrary, real power of a standard Wilson loop (or Polyakov line) can be defined and consistently computed in lattice formulation of non-abelian, two dimensional gauge theories. However, such an observable can excite quantum states with integer fluxes only. Since the non-integer fluxes are not in the spectrum of the theory they cannot be created, no matter which observable is chosen. Also the continuum limit of above averages does not exist unless the powers in question are in fact integer. On the other hand, a new continuum limit exists, which is rather intuitive, and where above observables make perfect sense and lead to the string tension proportional to the square of arbitrary (non necessary commensurate with gauge coupling) charge.

  6. A Loop-philic Pseudoscalar

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Gang; Tang, Yi-Lei; Zhang, Chen; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2015-01-01

    We construct a weakly-coupled renormalizable model to explain the 750 $\\mbox{GeV}$ diphoton excess. The 750 $\\mbox{GeV}$ resonance (denoted as $X(750)$) is interpreted as a pseudoscalar which comes from a complex singlet. The model also naturally provides a dark matter candidate. One most attractive feature of our model is that decays of $X(750)$ are all loop-induced so the diphoton rate is not diluted by unwanted tree level branching fractions. Relevant Yukawa interactions need not to be tuned to nearly non-perturbative region to explain the rate. The model is highly predictive, including the pseudoscalar nature of the new resonance, and two nearly mass-degenerate quarks carrying electric charge $5/3$ and $2/3$. In our model, rich phenomenology is expected with respect to collider searches, flavor physics and dark matter searches in various manners, if $X(750)$ can be pinned down by future LHC experiments.

  7. Inflation and Loop Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Barrau, Aurelien

    2010-01-01

    On the one hand, inflation is an extremely convincing scenario: it solves most cosmological paradoxes and generates fluctuations that became the seeds for the growth of structures. It, however, suffers from a "naturalness" problem: generating initial conditions for inflation is far from easy. On the other hand, loop quantum cosmology is very successful: it solves the Big Bang singularity through a non-perturbative and background-independent quantization of general relativity. It, however, suffers from a key drawback: it is extremely difficult to test. Recent results can let us hope that inflation and LQC could mutually cure those pathologies: LQC seems to naturally generate inflation and inflation could allow us to test LQC.

  8. Lectures on Loop Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Thiemann, T

    2003-01-01

    Quantum General Relativity (QGR), sometimes called Loop Quantum Gravity, has matured over the past fifteen years to a mathematically rigorous candidate quantum field theory of the gravitational field. The features that distinguish it from other quantum gravity theories are 1) background independence and 2) minimality of structures. Background independence means that this is a non-perturbative approach in which one does not perturb around a given, distinguished, classical background metric, rather arbitrary fluctuations are allowed, thus precisely encoding the quantum version of Einstein's radical perception that gravity is geometry. Minimality here means that one explores the logical consequences of bringing together the two fundamental principles of modern physics, namely general covariance and quantum theory, without adding any experimentally unverified additional structures. The approach is purposely conservative in order to systematically derive which basic principles of physics have to be given up and mu...

  9. Lose Your Loops with Numpy

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Developing in python is fast. Computation, however, can often be another story. Or at least that is how it may seem. When working with arrays and numerical datasets one can subvert many of python’s computational limitations by utilizing numpy. Numpy is python’s standard matrix computation library. Many python users only use numpy to store and generate arrays, failing to utilize one of python’s most powerful computational tools. By leveraging numpy’s ufuncs, aggregation, broadcasting and slicing/masking/indexing functionality one can cut back on slow python loops and increase the speed of their programs by as much as 100x. This talk aims at teaching attendees how to use these tools through toy examples.

  10. Reconstitution of high-affinity binding of a beta-scorpion toxin to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on purified sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, W; Martin-Eauclaire, M F; Rochat, H; Catterall, W A

    1995-09-01

    Reconstitution of purified sodium channels into phospholipid vesicles restores many aspects of sodium channel function including high-affinity neurotoxin binding and action at neurotoxin receptor sites 1-3 and 5, but neurotoxin binding and action at receptor site 4 has not previously been demonstrated in purified and reconstituted preparations. Toxin IV from the venom of the American scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css IV), a beta-scorpion toxin, shifts the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by binding with high affinity to neurotoxin receptor site 4. Sodium channels were purified from rat brain and reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine (65:35). 125I-Css IV, purified by reversed-phase HPLC, bound rapidly and specifically to reconstituted sodium channels. Dissociation of the bound toxin was biphasic with half-times of 0.22 min-1 and 0.015 min-1. At equilibrium, the toxin bound to two classes of specific high-affinity sites, a variable minor class with KD of approximately 0.1 nM and a major class with a KD of approximately 5 nM. Approximately 0.8 mol 125I-Css IV was bound per mole of reconstituted, right-side-out sodium channels, as assessed from comparison of binding of saxitoxin and Css IV. Binding of Css IV was unaffected by membrane potential or by neurotoxins that bind at sites 1-3 or 5, consistent with the characteristics of binding of beta-scorpion toxins to sodium channels in cells and membrane preparations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis reveals stable and prolonged neurotoxin cluster gene activity in a Clostridium botulinum type E strain at refrigeration temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindén, Jere; Lindström, Miia

    2008-10-01

    The relative expression levels of six botulinum neurotoxin cluster genes in a group II Clostridium botulinum type E strain grown at 10 or 30 degrees C were investigated using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to confirm neurotoxin expression. Distinct mRNA and toxin production patterns were observed at the two temperatures. The average relative mRNA levels at 10 degrees C were higher than (ntnh and p47), similar to (botE), or lower than (orfx1, orfx2, orfx3) those at 30 degrees C. The maximum botE expression levels and average neurotoxin levels at 10 degrees C were 45 to 65% of those at 30 degrees C. The relative mRNA levels at 10 degrees C declined generally slowly within 8 days, as opposed to the rapid decline observed at 30 degrees C within 24 h. Distinct expression patterns of the six genes at the two temperatures suggest that the type E neurotoxin cluster genes are transcribed as two tricistronic operons at 30 degrees C, whereas at 10 degrees C monocistronic (botE or orfx1 alone) and bicistronic (ntnh-p47 and orfx2-orfx3) transcription may dominate. Thus, type E botulinum neurotoxin production may be involved with various temperature-dependent regulatory events. In light of group II C. botulinum type E being a dangerous food-borne pathogen, these findings may be important in terms of the safety of refrigerated packaged foods of extended durability.

  12. On the Properties of Cosmic String Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Paul Henry

    1996-01-01

    When coupled with the prevailing ideas of cosmology, the standard model of particle physics implies that the early universe underwent a sequence of phase transitions. Such phase transitions can lead to topological defects such as magnetic monopoles, domain walls and cosmic strings. The formation and subsequent evolution of a network of cosmic strings may have played a key role in the development of the early universe. One of the most crucial elements in the evolution of the cosmic string network is the formation and decay of closed loops of cosmic string. After formation, the loops lose their energy by emitting gravitational radiation. This provides the primary energy loss mechanism for the cosmic string network. In addition, the cosmic string loops may display a number of observable features through which the cosmic string model may be constrained. In this dissertation a number of the key properties of cosmic string loops are investigated. A general method for determining the rates at which cosmic string loops radiate both energy and linear momentum is developed and implemented. Exact solutions for the radiation rates of a several new classes of loops are derived and used to test the validity of using the piecewise linear method on smooth loop trajectories. A large set of representative loop trajectories is produced using the method of loop fragmentation. These trajectories are analyzed to provide useful information on the properties of realistic cosmic string loops. The fraction of cosmic string loops which would collapse to form black holes is determined and used to place a new observational limit on the mass per unit length of cosmic strings.

  13. Cross-Neutralisation of In Vitro Neurotoxicity of Asian and Australian Snake Neurotoxins and Venoms by Different Antivenoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anjana; Hodgson, Wayne C.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information on the cross-neutralisation of neurotoxic venoms with antivenoms. Cross-neutralisation of the in vitro neurotoxicity of four Asian and four Australian snake venoms, four post-synaptic neurotoxins (α-bungarotoxin, α-elapitoxin-Nk2a, α-elapitoxin-Ppr1 and α-scutoxin; 100 nM) and one pre-synaptic neurotoxin (taipoxin; 100 nM) was studied with five antivenoms: Thai cobra antivenom (TCAV), death adder antivenom (DAAV), Thai neuro polyvalent antivenom (TNPAV), Indian Polyvalent antivenom (IPAV) and Australian polyvalent antivenom (APAV). The chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation was used for this study. Antivenom was added to the organ bath 20 min prior to venom. Pre- and post-synaptic neurotoxicity of Bungarus caeruleus and Bungarus fasciatus venoms was neutralised by all antivenoms except TCAV, which did not neutralise pre-synaptic activity. Post-synaptic neurotoxicity of Ophiophagus hannah was neutralised by all antivenoms, and Naja kaouthia by all antivenoms except IPAV. Pre- and post-synaptic neurotoxicity of Notechis scutatus was neutralised by all antivenoms, except TCAV, which only partially neutralised pre-synaptic activity. Pre- and post-synaptic neurotoxicity of Oxyuranus scutellatus was neutralised by TNPAV and APAV, but TCAV and IPAV only neutralised post-synaptic neurotoxicity. Post-synaptic neurotoxicity of Acanthophis antarcticus was neutralised by all antivenoms except IPAV. Pseudonaja textillis post-synaptic neurotoxicity was only neutralised by APAV. The α-neurotoxins were neutralised by TNPAV and APAV, and taipoxin by all antivenoms except IPAV. Antivenoms raised against venoms with post-synaptic neurotoxic activity (TCAV) cross-neutralised the post-synaptic activity of multiple snake venoms. Antivenoms raised against pre- and post-synaptic neurotoxic venoms (TNPAV, IPAV, APAV) cross-neutralised both activities of Asian and Australian venoms. While acknowledging the limitations of adding antivenom prior to

  14. Geometric Structures on Loop and Path Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vicente Muñoz; Francisco Presas

    2010-09-01

    The loop space associated to a Riemannian manifold admits a quasi-symplectic structure (that is, a closed 2-form which is non-degenerate up to a finite-dimensional kernel). We show how to construct a compatible almost-complex structure. Finally conditions to have contact structures on loop spaces are studied.

  15. Holonomy loops, spectral triples and quantum gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Aastrup; Grimstrup, Jesper Møller; Nest, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    We review the motivation, construction and physical interpretation of a semi-finite spectral triple obtained through a rearrangement of central elements of loop quantum gravity. The triple is based on a countable set of oriented graphs and the algebra consists of generalized holonomy loops...

  16. Newtonian gravity in loop quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Smolin, Lee

    2010-01-01

    We apply a recent argument of Verlinde to loop quantum gravity, to conclude that Newton's law of gravity emerges in an appropriate limit and setting. This is possible because the relationship between area and entropy is realized in loop quantum gravity when boundaries are imposed on a quantum spacetime.

  17. Formation of Chromosomal Domains by Loop Extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Fudenberg

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Topologically associating domains (TADs are fundamental structural and functional building blocks of human interphase chromosomes, yet the mechanisms of TAD formation remain unclear. Here, we propose that loop extrusion underlies TAD formation. In this process, cis-acting loop-extruding factors, likely cohesins, form progressively larger loops but stall at TAD boundaries due to interactions with boundary proteins, including CTCF. Using polymer simulations, we show that this model produces TADs and finer-scale features of Hi-C data. Each TAD emerges from multiple loops dynamically formed through extrusion, contrary to typical illustrations of single static loops. Loop extrusion both explains diverse experimental observations—including the preferential orientation of CTCF motifs, enrichments of architectural proteins at TAD boundaries, and boundary deletion experiments—and makes specific predictions for the depletion of CTCF versus cohesin. Finally, loop extrusion has potentially far-ranging consequences for processes such as enhancer-promoter interactions, orientation-specific chromosomal looping, and compaction of mitotic chromosomes.

  18. Vacuum Energy Sequestering and Graviton Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2016-01-01

    We recently formulated a local mechanism of vacuum energy sequester. This mechanism automatically removes all matter loop contributions to vacuum energy from the stress energy tensor which sources the curvature. Here we adapt the local vacuum energy sequestering mechanism to also cancel all the vacuum energy loops involving virtual gravitons, in addition to the vacuum energy generated by matter fields alone.

  19. High-Order Frequency-Locked Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Guerrero, Josep M.; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2017-01-01

    In very recent years, some attempts for designing high-order frequency-locked loops (FLLs) have been made. Nevertheless, the advantages and disadvantages of these structures, particularly in comparison with a standard FLL and high-order phase-locked loops (PLLs), are rather unclear. This lack......) as well as a unification between FLLs and PLLs is presented....

  20. Conformal anomaly of super Wilson loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belitsky, A.V., E-mail: andrei.belitsky@asu.edu [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2012-09-11

    Classically supersymmetric Wilson loop on a null polygonal contour possesses all symmetries required to match it onto non-MHV amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. However, to define it quantum mechanically, one is forced to regularize it since perturbative loop diagrams are not well defined due to presence of ultraviolet divergences stemming from integration in the vicinity of the cusps. A regularization that is adopted by practitioners by allowing one to use spinor helicity formalism, on the one hand, and systematically go to higher orders of perturbation theory is based on a version of dimensional regularization, known as Four-Dimensional Helicity scheme. Recently it was demonstrated that its use for the super Wilson loop at one loop breaks both conformal symmetry and Poincare supersymmetry. Presently, we exhibit the origin for these effects and demonstrate how one can undo this breaking. The phenomenon is alike the one emerging in renormalization group mixing of conformal operators in conformal theories when one uses dimensional regularization. The rotation matrix to the diagonal basis is found by means of computing the anomaly in the Ward identity for the conformal boost. Presently, we apply this ideology to the super Wilson loop. We compute the one-loop conformal anomaly for the super Wilson loop and find that the anomaly depends on its Grassmann coordinates. By subtracting this anomalous contribution from the super Wilson loop we restore its interpretation as a dual description for reduced non-MHV amplitudes which are expressed in terms of superconformal invariants.

  1. Design Principles for Closed Loop Supply Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Krikke (Harold); C.P. Pappis (Costas); G.T. Tsoulfas; J.M. Bloemhof-Ruwaard (Jacqueline)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we study design principles for closed loop supply chains. Closed loop supply chains aim at closing material flows thereby limiting emission and residual waste, but also providing customer service at low cost. We study 'traditional' and 'new' design principles known in the l

  2. Loop approaches to gauge field theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loll, R.

    1992-01-01

    Basic mathematical and physical concepts in loop- and path-dependent formulations of Yang-MiIls theory are reviewed and set into correspondence. We point out some problems peculiar to these non-local approaches, in particular those associated with defining structure on various kinds of loop

  3. External Tank CIL Closed Loop Verification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Eugene A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Lockheed Martin was requested to develop a closed loop CIL system following the Challenger accident. The system that was developed has proven to be very robust with minimal problems since implementation, having zero escapes in the last 7 years (27 External Tanks). We are currently investigating expansion of the CIL Closed Loop system to include "MI" CILs.

  4. Vacuum Energy Sequestering and Graviton Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We recently formulated a local mechanism of vacuum energy sequester. This mechanism automatically removes all matter loop contributions to vacuum energy from the stress energy tensor which sources the curvature. Here we adapt the local vacuum energy sequestering mechanism to also cancel all the vacuum energy loops involving virtual gravitons, in addition to the vacuum energy generated by matter fields alone.

  5. New Matrix Loop Algebra and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Huan-He; XU Yue-Cai

    2008-01-01

    A new matrix Lie algebra and its corresponding Loop algebra are constructed firstly, as its appfication, the multi-component TC equation hierarchy is obtained, then by use of trace identity the Hamiltonian structure of the above system is presented. Finally, the integrable couplings of the obtained system is worked out by the expanding matrix Loop algebra.

  6. Complete renormalization of QCD at five loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthe, Thomas; Maier, Andreas; Marquard, Peter; Schröder, York

    2017-03-01

    We present new analytical five-loop Feynman-gauge results for the anomalous dimensions of ghost field and -vertex, generalizing the known values for SU(3) to a general gauge group. Together with previously published results on the quark mass and -field anomalous dimensions and the Beta function, this completes the 5-loop renormalization program of gauge theories in that gauge.

  7. Newtonian gravity in loop quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Smolin, Lee

    2010-01-01

    We apply a recent argument of Verlinde to loop quantum gravity, to conclude that Newton's law of gravity emerges in an appropriate limit and setting. This is possible because the relationship between area and entropy is realized in loop quantum gravity when boundaries are imposed on a quantum spacetime.

  8. Design Principles for Closed Loop Supply Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Krikke (Harold); C.P. Pappis (Costas); G.T. Tsoulfas; J.M. Bloemhof-Ruwaard (Jacqueline)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we study design principles for closed loop supply chains. Closed loop supply chains aim at closing material flows thereby limiting emission and residual waste, but also providing customer service at low cost. We study 'traditional' and 'new' design principles known in the

  9. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  10. Damped transverse oscillations of interacting coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Damped transverse oscillations of magnetic loops are routinely observed in the solar corona. This phenomenon is interpreted as standing kink magnetohydrodynamic waves, which are damped by resonant absorption owing to plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field. The periods and damping times of these oscillations can be used to probe the physical conditions of the coronal medium. Some observations suggest that interaction between neighboring oscillating loops in an active region may be important and can modify the properties of the oscillations compared to those of an isolated loop. Here we theoretically investigate resonantly damped transverse oscillations of interacting non-uniform coronal loops. We provide a semi-analytic method, based on the T-matrix theory of scattering, to compute the frequencies and damping rates of collective oscillations of an arbitrary configuration of parallel cylindrical loops. The effect of resonant damping is included in the T-matrix scheme in the thin boundary approximation. ...

  11. Botulinum neurotoxins for the treatment of focal dystonias: Review of rating tools used in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, Francesca; Albanese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are used to achieve therapeutic benefit in focal dystonia. An expert panel recently reviewed published evidence on the efficacy of BoNTs for the treatment of focal dystonias and produced recommendations for clinical practice. Another panel reviewed the clinimetric properties of rating scales for dystonia and produced recommendations for current usage and future directions. Considering that the strength of evidence derives not only from the quality of the study design, but also from usage of validated outcome measures, we combined the information provided by these two recent reviews and assessed the appropriateness of the rating instruments used in clinical trials on BoNT treatment in focal dystonia. Data sources included all the publications on BoNT treatment for focal dystonias reviewed by the recent evidence-based analysis. We reviewed all rating instruments used to assess primary and secondary outcome following BoNT treatment. The publications were allocated into five topics according to the focal dystonia type reviewed in the meta-analysis: blepharospasm, oromandibular dystonia, cervical dystonia, upper limb dystonia, and laryngeal dystonia. For each topic, papers were divided, according to the terminology used in the meta-analysis, into placebo-controlled, active comparator and methodological or uncontrolled. For each topic we identified the rating tools used in each study class and annotated which were the mostly used in each focal dystonia type. Outcome measures included tools related to motor and non-motor features, such as pain and depression, and functional as well as health-related quality of life features. Patient- and investigator-reported outcomes were also included. Rating instruments were classified as recommended, suggested, listed or not included, based on recommendations produced by the rating scale task force. Both primary and secondary outcome measures were assessed. As a final step we compared current practice, as

  12. Dynamic Model of Gap Loop for HCW Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-ming; YANG Qiu-xia; CHE Hai-jun; CHANG Ling-fang

    2004-01-01

    The hydraulic automatic gauge control system using gap loop for cold mill was designed. The stiffness of HCW cold mill was defined for gap loop, and the dynamic model of gauge control system for gap loop was built with mechanism analysis. The stiffness for gap loop and the cylinder displacement loop were measured.

  13. Direct loop gain and bandwidth measurement of phase-locked loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, P.; Ren, R.; Kou, Y.; Sun, F.; Hu, J.; Chen, S.; Hou, D.

    2017-08-01

    A simple and robust technique for directly measuring the loop gain and bandwidth of a phase-locked loop (PLL) is proposed. This technique can be used for the real-time measurement of the real loop gain in a closed PLL without breaking its locking state. The agreement of the measured loop gain and theoretical calculations proves the validity of the proposed measurement technique. This technique with a simple configuration can be easily expanded to other phase-locking systems whose loop gain and bandwidth should be measured precisely.

  14. Functional analysis of the alpha-neurotoxin, BmalphaTX14, derived from the Chinese scorpion, Buthus martensii Karsch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Yin, Shi-Jin; Lu, Meng; Yi, Hong; Dai, Chao; Xu, Xiu-Jing; Cao, Zhi-Jian; Wu, Ying-Liang; Li, Wen-Xin

    2006-11-01

    The gene encoding the BmalphaTX14 (alpha-neurotoxin TX14) protein, derived from the cDNA library of the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch, was expressed in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant protein was purified by metal chelate affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Using patch-clamp technique, electrophysiological activity of rBmalphaTX14 was identified. In the neurons isolated from mice trigeminal root ganglion, the Na+ current amplitude was reduced by 80% under whole cell patch-clamp recording. There were no apparent modifications to the gating mechanism in the presence of rBmalphaTX14. Although BmalphaTX14 shared a high amino acid sequence similarity with other typical alpha-toxins, it has different effects on neurons. Further electrophysiological analysis suggested that rBmalphaTX14 selectively blocked Na+ channels and is a member of a new group of scorpion toxins.

  15. Structure-function relationships in scorpion neurotoxins. Identification of the supperreactive lysine residue in toxin I of Androctonus australis Hector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, F; Habersetzer-Rochat, C

    1978-07-21

    In a previous article (Habersetzer-Rochat, C. and Sampieri, R. (1976) Biochemistry 15, 2254--2261) it was demonstrated that the toxin I of the North African Scorpion Androctonus australis Hector was inactivated after reaction with iodoacetate; the toxicity loss in mice was correlated with the carboxymethylation of one superreactive residue. In the present work, alkylation of toxin I was performed with iodo[14C]-acetate. Hence, it was possible, after reduction, S-methylation and chymotryptic hydrolysis of this toxin, to isolate the peptide containing the labelled lysine residue. By automatic Edman degradation, this residue was identified as being the penultimate lysine at position 56 in the primary sequence. Comparison of three primary structures of scorpion neurotoxins and comparison in different kinds of activity seem to indicate that this lysine residue is mainly important for toxicity in mice.

  16. Comparative sequence analyses of the neurotoxin complex genes in Clostridium botulinum serotypes A, B, E, and F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay K. Singh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurotoxin complex (NTC genes are arranged in two known hemagglutinin (HA and open reading frame X (ORFX clusters. NTC genes have been analyzed in four serotypes A, B, E and F of Clostridium botulinum causing human botulism. Analysis of amino acid sequences of NT genes demonstrated significant differences among subtypes and four serotypes. Phylogram tree of NT genes reveals that serotypes A1 and B1 are much closer compared to serotype E1 and F1. However, non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH gene is highly conserved among four serotypes. Analysis of phylogram tree of NTNH gene reveals that serotypes A and F are more closely related compared to serotype B and E. Additionally, sequences of HAs and ORFX genes are very divergent but these genes are specific in subtypes and serotypes of Clostridium botulinum. Information derived from sequence analyses of NTC has direct implication in development of detection tools and therapeutic countermeasures for botulism.

  17. Individual and bivalent vaccines against botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and B using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yunzhou; Yu, Jiyu; Li, Na; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Weiyuan; Sun, Zhiwei

    2009-10-19

    We evaluated individual and bivalent replicon vaccines against Clostridiumbotulinum neurotoxin serotypes A (BoNT/A) or B (BoNT/B). The DNA replicon vaccine (pSCARSBHc) encoding the Hc domain of BoNT/B (BHc) induced better responses and protection against BoNT/B mouse challenge than conventional DNA vaccine. The dual-expressing DNA vaccine (pSCARSA/BHc) protected similarly to a DNA replicon vaccine mixture (pSCARSAHc+pSCARSBHc). Additionally, recombinant SFV particles, VRP-AHc or VRP-BHc, protected mice from high-dose BoNT/A or BoNT/B challenge, respectively. Mice given either dual-expressing VRP-A/BHc or mixture of VRP-AHc and VRP-BHc were protected from challenge with serotype A/B mixtures. These data justify further testing in other animals or humans.

  18. Cygnus Loop Supernova Blast Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This is an image of a small portion of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, which marks the edge of a bubble-like, expanding blast wave from a colossal stellar explosion, occurring about 15,000 years ago. The HST image shows the structure behind the shock waves, allowing astronomers for the first time to directly compare the actual structure of the shock with theoretical model calculations. Besides supernova remnants, these shock models are important in understanding a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from winds in newly-formed stars to cataclysmic stellar outbursts. The supernova blast is slamming into tenuous clouds of insterstellar gas. This collision heats and compresses the gas, causing it to glow. The shock thus acts as a searchlight revealing the structure of the interstellar medium. The detailed HST image shows the blast wave overrunning dense clumps of gas, which despite HST's high resolution, cannot be resolved. This means that the clumps of gas must be small enough to fit inside our solar system, making them relatively small structures by interstellar standards. A bluish ribbon of light stretching left to right across the picture might be a knot of gas ejected by the supernova; this interstellar 'bullet' traveling over three million miles per hour (5 million kilometres) is just catching up with the shock front, which has slowed down by ploughing into interstellar material. The Cygnus Loop appears as a faint ring of glowing gases about three degrees across (six times the diameter of the full Moon), located in the northern constellation, Cygnus the Swan. The supernova remnant is within the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and is 2,600 light-years away. The photo is a combination of separate images taken in three colors, oxygen atoms (blue) emit light at temperatures of 30,000 to 60,000 degrees Celsius (50,000 to 100,000 degrees Farenheit). Hydrogen atoms (green) arise throughout the region of shocked gas. Sulfur atoms (red) form when the gas cools to

  19. Loop Staggering,Loop Compacting:Restructuring Techniques for Thrashing Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金国华; 杨学军; 等

    1993-01-01

    Parallel loops account for the greatest amount of parallelism in numerical programs.Executing nested loops in parallel wit low run-time overhead is thus very important for achieving high performance in paralleo processing systems.However,in parallel processing systems with caches of local memories in memory hierarchies,“thrashing problemmay” may arise when data move back and forth frequently between the caches or local memories in different processors.The techniques associated with parallel compiler to solve the problem are not completely developed.In this paper,we present two restructuring techniques called loopg staggering,loop staggering and compacting,with which we can not only eliminate the cache or local memory thrashing phemomena significantly,but also exploit the potential parallelism existing in outer serial loop.Loop staggering benefits the dynamic loop scheduling strategies,whereas loop staggering and compacting is good for static loop scheduling strategies,Our method especially benefits parallel programs,in which a parallel loop is enclosed by a serial loop and array elements are repeatedly used in the different iterations of the parallel loop.

  20. Evidence that plasmid-borne botulinum neurotoxin type B genes are widespread among Clostridium botulinum serotype B strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Franciosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmids that encode certain subtypes of the botulinum neurotoxin type B have recently been detected in some Clostridium botulinum strains. The objective of the present study was to investigate the frequency with which plasmid carriage of the botulinum neurotoxin type B gene (bont/B occurs in strains of C. botulinum type B, Ab, and A(B, and whether plasmid carriage is bont/B subtype-related. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PCR-Restriction fragment length polymorphism was employed to identify subtypes of the bont/B gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot hybridization with specific probes were performed to analyze the genomic location of the bont/B subtype genes. All five known bont/B subtype genes were detected among the strains; the most frequently detected subtype genes were bont/B1 and /B2. Surprisingly, the bont/B subtype gene was shown to be plasmid-borne in >50% of the total strains. The same bont/B subtype gene was associated with the chromosome in some strains, whereas it was associated with a plasmid in others. All five known bont/B subtype genes were in some cases found to reside on plasmids, though with varying frequency (e.g., most of the bont/B1 subtype genes were located on plasmids, whereas all but one of the bont/B2 subtypes were chromosomally-located. Three bivalent isolates carried both bont/A and /B genes on the same plasmid. The plasmids carrying the bont gene were five different sizes, ranging from approximately 55 kb to approximately 245 kb. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The unexpected finding of the widespread distribution of plasmids harboring the bont/B gene among C. botulinum serotype B strains provides a chance to examine their contribution to the dissemination of the bont genes among heterogeneous clostridia, with potential implications on issues related to pathogenesis and food safety.

  1. Botulinum neurotoxin type A counteracts neuropathic pain and facilitates functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, S; Luvisetto, S; Cobianchi, S; Makuch, W; Obara, I; Mezzaroma, E; Caruso, M; Straface, E; Przewlocka, B; Pavone, F

    2010-11-24

    A growing interest was recently focused on the use of Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) for fighting pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of BoNT/A on neuropathic pain. It was observed that BoNT/A is able to counteract neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve both in mice and in rats. This effect is already present after a single intraplantar (i.pl.) or intrathecal (i.t.) neurotoxin administration that significantly reduces the sciatic nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia in mice and rats and thermal hyperalgesia in rats. This effect was evident starting 24 h after the administration of BoNT/A and it was long-lasting, being present 81 or 25 days after i.pl. injection of the higher dose in mice (15 pg/paw) and rats (75 pg/paw), respectively, and 35 days after i.t. injection in rats (75 pg/rat). Moreover, BoNT/A-injected mice showed a quicker recovery of the walking pattern and weight bearing compared to control groups. The behavioral improvement was accompanied by structural modifications, as revealed by the expression of cell division cycle 2 (Cdc2) and growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43) regeneration associated proteins, investigated by immunofluorescence and Western blotting in the sciatic nerve, and by the immunofluorescence expression of S100β and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) Schwann cells proteins. In conclusion, the present research demonstrate long-lasting anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of BoNT/A in animal models of neuropathic pain together with an acceleration of regenerative processes in the injured nerve, as evidenced by both behavioral and immunohistochemistry/blotting analysis. These results may have important implications in the therapy of neuropathic pain.

  2. A scorpion venom neurotoxin paralytic to insects that affects sodium current inactivation: Purification, primary structure, and mode of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eitan, M.; Fowler, E.; Herrmann, R.; Duval, A.; Pelhate, M.; Zlotkin, E. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-06-26

    A new toxin, Lqh alpha IT, which caused a unique mode of paralysis of blowfly larvae, was purified from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus, and its structural and pharmacological properties were compared to those of three other groups of neurotoxins found in Buthinae scorpion venoms. Like the excitatory and depressant insect-selective neurotoxins, Lqh alpha IT was highly toxic to insects, but it differed from these toxins in two important characteristics: (a) Lqh alpha IT lacked strict selectivity for insects; it was highly toxic to crustaceans and had a measurable but low toxicity to mice. (b) It did not displace an excitatory insect toxin, 125I-AaIT, from its binding sites in the insect neuronal membrane; this indicates that the binding sites for Lqh alpha IT are different from those shared by the excitatory and depressant toxins. However, in its primary structure and its effect on excitable tissues, Lqh alpha IT strongly resembled the well-characterized alpha scorpion toxins, which affect mammals. The amino acid sequence was identical with alpha toxin sequences in 55%-75% of positions. This degree of similarity is comparable to that seen among the alpha toxins themselves. Voltage- and current-clamp studies showed that Lqh alpha IT caused an extreme prolongation of the action potential in both cockroach giant axon and rat skeletal muscle preparations as a result of the slowing and incomplete inactivation of the sodium currents. These observations indicate that Lqh alpha IT is an alpha toxin which acts on insect sodium channels.

  3. Detection, differentiation, and identification of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes C, CD, D, and DC by highly specific immunoassays and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansbauer, Eva-Maria; Skiba, Martin; Endermann, Tanja; Weisemann, Jasmin; Stern, Daniel; Dorner, Martin B; Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Wolf, Jessica; Luginbühl, Werner; Messelhäußer, Ute; Bellanger, Laurent; Woudstra, Cédric; Rummel, Andreas; Fach, Patrick; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2016-09-21

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes C and D and their mosaic variants CD and DC cause severe cases of botulism in animal husbandry and wildlife. Epidemiological data on the exact serotype or toxin variant causing outbreaks are rarely available, mainly because of their high sequence identity and the lack of fast and specific screening tools to detect and differentiate the four similar toxins. To fill this gap, we developed four highly specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) able to detect and differentiate botulinum neurotoxins type BoNT/C, D, CD, and DC based on four distinct combinations of specific monoclonal antibodies targeting both conserved and divergent subdomains of the four toxins. Here, highly sensitive detection with detection limits between 2 and 24 pg mL(-1) was achieved. The ELISAs were extensively validated and results were compared with data obtained by quantitative real-time PCR using a panel of Clostridium botulinum strains, real sample materials from veterinary botulism outbreaks, and non-BoNT-producing Clostridia. Additionally, in order to verify the results obtained by ELISA screening, the new monoclonal antibodies were used for BoNT enrichment and subsequent detection (i) on a functional level by endopeptidase mass spectrometry (Endopep-MS) assays and (ii) on a protein sequence level by LC-MS/MS spectrometry. Based on all technical information gathered in the validation study, the four differentiating ELISAs turned out to be highly reliable screening tools for the rapid analysis of veterinary botulism cases and should aid future field investigations of botulism outbreaks and the acquisition of epidemiological data.

  4. Increased levels of SV2A botulinum neurotoxin receptor in clinical sensory disorders and functional effects of botulinum toxins A and E in cultured human sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiangou Y

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Yiangos Yiangou1 Uma Anand1,2, William R. Otto2, Marco Sinisi3, Michael Fox3, Rolfe Birch3 Keith A. Foster4, Gaurav Mukerji1,5, Ayesha Akbar1,6, Sanjiv K. Agarwal5, Praveen Anand11Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London; 2Histopathology Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, London; 3Peripheral Nerve Injury Unit, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore; 4Syntaxin Ltd, Oxford; 5Department of Urology; 6Department of Gastroenterology, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom Background: There is increasing evidence that botulinum neurotoxin A may affect sensory nociceptor fibers, but the expression of its receptors in clinical pain states, and its effects in human sensory neurons, are largely unknown.Methods: We studied synaptic vesicle protein subtype SV2A, a receptor for botulinum neurotoxin A, by immunostaining in a range of clinical tissues, including human dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, peripheral nerves, the urinary bladder, and the colon. We also determined the effects of botulinum neurotoxins A and E on localization of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, and functional sensitivity to capsaicin stimuli in cultured human dorsal root ganglion neurons.Results: Image analysis showed that SV2A immunoreactive nerve fibers were increased in injured nerves proximal to the injury (P = 0.002, and in painful neuromas (P = 0.0027; the ratio of percentage area SV2A to neurofilaments (a structural marker was increased proximal to injury (P = 0.0022 and in neuromas (P = 0.0001, indicating increased SV2A levels in injured nerve fibers. In the urinary bladder, SV2A nerve fibers were found in detrusor muscle and associated with blood vessels, with a significant increase in idiopathic detrusor overactivity (P = 0.002 and painful bladder syndrome (P = 0.0087. Colon biopsies showed numerous SV2A-positive nerve fibers, which were increased in quiescent

  5. Loops in exceptional field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossard, Guillaume [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay,91128 Palaiseau cedex (France); Kleinschmidt, Axel [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut),Am Mühlenberg 1, DE-14476 Potsdam (Germany); International Solvay Institutes,ULB-Campus Plaine CP231, BE-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-01-27

    We study certain four-graviton amplitudes in exceptional field theory in dimensions D≥4 up to two loops. As the formulation is manifestly invariant under the U-duality group E{sub 11−D}(ℤ), our resulting expressions can be expressed in terms of automorphic forms. In the low energy expansion, we find terms in the M-theory effective action of type R{sup 4}, ∇{sup 4}R{sup 4} and ∇{sup 6}R{sup 4} with automorphic coefficient functions in agreement with independent derivations from string theory. This provides in particular an explicit integral formula for the exact string theory ∇{sup 6}R{sup 4} threshold function. We exhibit moreover that the usual supergravity logarithmic divergences cancel out in the full exceptional field theory amplitude, within an appropriately defined dimensional regularisation scheme. We also comment on terms of higher derivative order and the role of the section constraint for possible counterterms.

  6. Analysis and improvement of missile three-loop autopilots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Defu; Fan Junfang; Qi Zaikang; Mou Yu

    2009-01-01

    characteristics from a two-loop autopilot with PI compensator.Both the two-loop and three-loop topologies can stabilize a static unstable missile.However,the finite actuator resource is the crucial factor dominating autopilot function.

  7. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  8. Remarks on correlators of Polyakov Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Polyakov loop eigenvalues and their N-dependence are studied in 2 and 4 dimensional SU(N) YM theory. The connected correlation function of the single eigenvalue distributions of two separated Polyakov loops in 2D YM is calculated and is found to have a structure differing from the one of corresponding hermitian random matrix ensembles. No large $N$ non-analyticities are found for two point functions in the confining regime. Suggestions are made for situations in which large-N phase transitions involving Polyakov loops might occur.

  9. Wilson Loop Form Factors: A New Duality

    OpenAIRE

    Chicherin, Dmitry; Heslop, Paul; Korchemsky, Gregory P.; Sokatchev, Emery

    2016-01-01

    We find a new duality for form factors of lightlike Wilson loops in planar $\\mathcal N=4$ super-Yang-Mills theory. The duality maps a form factor involving an $n$-sided lightlike polygonal super-Wilson loop together with $m$ external on-shell states, to the same type of object but with the edges of the Wilson loop and the external states swapping roles. This relation can essentially be seen graphically in Lorentz harmonic chiral (LHC) superspace where it is equivalent to planar graph duality....

  10. Construction of the blowdown and condensation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choon Kyung; Song, Chul Kyung; Cho, Seok; Chun, S. Y.; Chung, Moon Ki

    1997-12-01

    The blowdown and condensation loop (B and C loop) has been constructed to get experimental data for designing the safety depressurization system (SDS) and steam sparger which are considered to implement in the Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). In this report, system description on the B and C loop is given in detail, which includes the drawings and technical specification of each component, instrumentation and control system, and the operational procedures and the results of the performance testing. (author). 7 refs., 11 tabs., 48 figs.

  11. Parallel Digital Phase-Locked Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Ramin; Shah, Biren N.; Hinedi, Sami M.

    1995-01-01

    Wide-band microwave receivers of proposed type include digital phase-locked loops in which band-pass filtering and down-conversion of input signals implemented by banks of multirate digital filters operating in parallel. Called "parallel digital phase-locked loops" to distinguish them from other digital phase-locked loops. Systems conceived as cost-effective solution to problem of filtering signals at high sampling rates needed to accommodate wide input frequency bands. Each of M filters process 1/M of spectrum of signal.

  12. Loop-deformed Poincar\\'e algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Mielczarek, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    In this essay we present evidence suggesting that loop quantum gravity leads to deformation of the local Poincar\\'e algebra within the limit of high energies. This deformation is a consequence of quantum modification of effective off-shell hypersurface deformation algebra. Surprisingly, the form of deformation suggests that the signature of space-time changes from Lorentzian to Euclidean at large curvatures. We construct particular realization of the loop-deformed Poincar\\'e algebra and find that it can be related to curved momentum space, which indicates the relationship with recently introduced notion of relative locality. The presented findings open a new way of testing loop quantum gravity effects.

  13. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genomic Deletion of the Beta-1, 4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 Gene in Murine P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells Results in Low Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxin Type C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Tsukamoto

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum cause flaccid paralysis by inhibiting neurotransmitter release at peripheral nerve terminals. Previously, we found that neurons derived from the murine P19 embryonal carcinoma cell line exhibited high sensitivity to botulinum neurotoxin type C. In order to prove the utility of P19 cells for the study of the intracellular mechanism of botulinum neurotoxins, ganglioside-knockout neurons were generated by deletion of the gene encoding beta-1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 in P19 cells using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats combined with Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9 system. By using this system, knockout cells could be generated more easily than with previous methods. The sensitivity of the generated beta-1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1-depleted P19 neurons to botulinum neurotoxin type C was decreased considerably, and the exogenous addition of the gangliosides GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b restored the susceptibility of P19 cells to botulinum neurotoxin type C. In particular, addition of a mixture of these three ganglioside more effectively recovered the sensitivity of knockout cells compared to independent addition of GD1a, GD1b, or GT1b. Consequently, the genome-edited P19 cells generated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system were useful for identifying and defining the intracellular molecules involved in the toxic action of botulinum neurotoxins.

  14. Eigenvalue distributions of Wilson loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmayer, Robert

    2010-07-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we focus on the distribution of the eigenvalues of the unitary Wilson loop matrix in the two-dimensional case at arbitrary finite N. To characterize the distribution of the eigenvalues, we introduce three density functions (the ''symmetric'', the ''antisymmetric'', and the ''true'' eigenvalue density) which differ at finite N but possess the same infinite-N limit, exhibiting the Durhuus-Olesen phase transition. Using expansions of determinants and inverse determinants in characters of totally symmetric or totally antisymmetric representations of SU(N), the densities at finite N can be expressed in terms of simple sums involving only dimensions and quadratic Casimir invariants of certain irreducible representations of SU(N), allowing for a numerical computation of the densities at arbitrary N to any desired accuracy. We find that the true eigenvalue density, adding N oscillations to the monotonic symmetric density, is in some sense intermediate between the symmetric and the antisymmetric density, which in turn is given by a sum of N delta peaks located at the zeros of the average of the characteristic polynomial. Furthermore, we show that the dependence on N can be made explicit by deriving integral representations for the resolvents associated to the three eigenvalue densities. Using saddle-point approximations, we confirm that all three densities reduce to the Durhuus-Olesen result in the infinite-N limit. In the second part, we study an exponential form of the multiplicative random complex matrix model introduced by Gudowska-Nowak et al. Varying a parameter which can be identified with the area of the Wilson loop in the unitary case, the region of non-vanishing eigenvalue density of the N-dimensional complex product matrix undergoes a topological change at a transition point in the infinite-N limit. We study the transition by a detailed analysis of the average of the

  15. Integrand reduction beyond one-loop calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Ossola, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation, we review the general features of integrand-reduction techniques, with a particular focus on their generalization beyond one loop. We start with a brief discussion of the one-loop scenario, a case in which integrand-reduction algorithms are well established and played over the past decade an important role in the development of automated tools for the theoretical evaluation of physical observables. The generalization of integrand-reduction techniques to all loops has been the subject of several efforts in the recent past, thus providing a better understanding of the universal properties of scattering amplitudes. The ultimate goal of these studies is the development of efficient alternative computational techniques for the evaluation of Feynman integrals beyond one loop.

  16. Analytic three-loop static potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roman N.; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Smirnov, Vladimir A.; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We present analytic results for the three-loop static potential of two heavy quarks. The analytic calculation of the missing ingredients is outlined, and results for the singlet and octet potential are provided.

  17. Force distribution in a semiflexible loop

    CERN Document Server

    Waters, James T

    2016-01-01

    Loops undergoing thermal fluctuations are prevalent in nature. Ring-like or cross-linked polymers, cyclic macromolecules, and protein-mediated DNA loops all belong to this category. Stability of these molecules are generally described in terms of free energy, an average quantity, but it may also be impacted by local fluctuating forces acting within these systems. The full distribution of these forces can thus give us insights into mechanochemistry beyond the predictive capability of thermodynamics. In this paper, we study the force exerted by an inextensible semiflexible polymer constrained in a looped state. By using a novel simulation method termed "phase-space sampling", we generate the equilibrium distribution of chain conformations in both position and momentum space. We compute the constraint forces between the two ends of the loop in this chain ensemble using Lagrangian mechanics, and show that the mean of these forces is equal to the thermodynamic force. By analyzing kinetic and potential contribution...

  18. Quantum Loops in Non-Local Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Talaganis, Spyridon

    2015-01-01

    In this proceedings, I will consider quantum aspects of a non-local, infinite-derivative scalar field theory - a ${\\it toy \\, model}$ depiction of a covariant infinite-derivative, non-local extension of Einstein's general relativity which has previously been shown to be free from ghosts around the Minkowski background. The graviton propagator in this theory gets an exponential suppression making it ${\\it asymptotically \\, free}$, thus providing strong prospects of resolving various classical and quantum divergences. In particular, I will find that at $1$-loop, the $2$-point function is still divergent, but once this amplitude is renormalized by adding appropriate counter terms, the ultraviolet (UV) behavior of all other $1$-loop diagrams as well as the $2$-loop, $2$-point function remains well under control. I will go on to discuss how one may be able to generalize our computations and arguments to arbitrary loops.

  19. Numerical multi-loop integrals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Freitas, Ayres

    2016-01-01

    Higher-order radiative corrections play an important role in precision studies of the electroweak and Higgs sector, as well as for the detailed understanding of large backgrounds to new physics searches. For corrections beyond the one-loop level and involving many independent mass and momentum scales, it is in general not possible to find analytic results, so that one needs to resort to numerical methods instead. This article presents an overview over a variety of numerical loop integration techniques, highlighting their range of applicability, suitability for automatization, and numerical precision and stability. In a second part of this article, the application of numerical loop integration methods in the area of electroweak precision tests is illustrated. Numerical methods were essential for obtaining full two-loop predictions for the most important precision observables within the Standard Model. The theoretical foundations for these corrections will be described in some detail, including aspects of the r...

  20. Conformal anomaly of super Wilson loop

    CERN Document Server

    Belitsky, A V

    2012-01-01

    Classically supersymmetric Wilson loop on a null polygonal contour possesses all symmetries required to match it onto non-MHV amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. However, to define it quantum mechanically, one is forced to regularize it since perturbative loop diagrams are not well-defined due to presence of ultraviolet divergences stemming from integration in the vicinity of the cusps. A regularization that is adopted by practitioners by allowing one to use spinor helicity formalism, on the one hand, and systematically go to higher orders of perturbation theory is based on a version of dimensional regularization, known as Four-Dimensional Helicity scheme. Recently it was demonstrated that its use for the super Wilson loop at one loop breaks both conformal symmetry and Poincare supersymmetry. Presently, we exhibit the origin for these effects and demonstrate how one can undo this breaking. The phenomenon is alike the one emerging in renormalization group mixing of conformal operators in ...

  1. Introductory lectures to loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Doná, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    We give a standard introduction to loop quantum gravity, from the ADM variables to spin network states. We include a discussion on quantum geometry on a fixed graph and its relation to a discrete approximation of general relativity.

  2. The Universal One-Loop Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Drozd, Aleksandra; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong

    2016-01-01

    We present the universal one-loop effective action for all operators of dimension up to six obtained by integrating out massive, non-degenerate multiplets. Our general expression may be applied to loops of heavy fermions or bosons, and has been checked against partial results available in the literature. The broad applicability of this approach simplifies one-loop matching from an ultraviolet model to a lower-energy effective field theory (EFT), a procedure which is now reduced to the evaluation of a combination of matrices in our universal expression, without any loop integrals to evaluate. We illustrate the relationship of our results to the Standard Model (SM) EFT, using as an example the supersymmetric stop and sbottom squark Lagrangian and extracting from our universal expression the Wilson coefficients of dimension-six operators composed of SM fields.

  3. Dimensionally continued multi-loop gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Broadhurst, D J

    1999-01-01

    A dimensionally continued background-field method makes the rationality of the 4-loop quenched QED beta function far more reasonable than had previously appeared. After 33 years of quest, dating from Rosner's discovery of 3-loop rationality, one finally sees cancellation of zeta values by the trace structure of individual diagrams. At 4-loops, diagram-by-diagram cancellation of $\\zeta(5)$ does not even rely on the values of integrals at d=4. Rather, it is a property of the rational functions of $d$ that multiply elements of the full d-dimensional basis. We prove a lemma: the basis consists of slices of wheels. We explain the previously mysterious suppression of $\\pi^4$ in massless gauge theory. The 4-loop QED result $\\beta_4=-46$ is obtained by setting d=4 in a precisely defined rational polynomial of d, with degree 11. The other 5 rational functions vanish at d=4.

  4. Energy release in driven twisted coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Bareford, M R; Browning, P K; Hood, A W

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we investigate magnetic reconnection in twisted magnetic fluxtubes with different initial configurations. In all considered cases, energy release is triggered by the ideal kink instability, which is itself the result of applying footpoint rotation to an initially potential field. The main goal of this work is to establish the influence of the field topology and various thermodynamic effects on the energy release process. Specifically, we investigate convergence of the magnetic field at the loop footpoints, atmospheric stratification, as well as thermal conduction. In all cases, the application of vortical driving at the footpoints of an initally potential field leads to an internal kink instability. With the exception of the curved loop with high footpoint convergence, the global geometry of the loop change little during the simulation. Footpoint convergence, curvature and atmospheric structure clearly influences the rapidity with which a loop achieves instability as well as the size of t...

  5. Loop Diuretics in the Treatment of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malha, Line; Mann, Samuel J

    2016-04-01

    Loop diuretics are not recommended in current hypertension guidelines largely due to the lack of outcome data. Nevertheless, they have been shown to lower blood pressure and to offer potential advantages over thiazide-type diuretics. Torsemide offers advantages of longer duration of action and once daily dosing (vs. furosemide and bumetanide) and more reliable bioavailability (vs. furosemide). Studies show that the previously employed high doses of thiazide-type diuretics lower BP more than furosemide. Loop diuretics appear to have a preferable side effect profile (less hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and possibly less glucose intolerance). Studies comparing efficacy and side effect profiles of loop diuretics with the lower, currently widely prescribed, thiazide doses are needed. Research is needed to fill gaps in knowledge and common misconceptions about loop diuretic use in hypertension and to determine their rightful place in the antihypertensive arsenal.

  6. A theory of desynchronisable closed loop system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Beohar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The task of implementing a supervisory controller is non-trivial, even though different theories exist that allow automatic synthesis of these controllers in the form of automata. One of the reasons for this discord is due to the asynchronous interaction between a plant and its controller in implementations, whereas the existing supervisory control theories assume synchronous interaction. As a consequence the implementation suffer from the so-called inexact synchronisation problem. In this paper we address the issue of inexact synchronisation in a process algebraic setting, by solving a more general problem of refinement. We construct an asynchronous closed loop system by introducing a communication medium in a given synchronous closed loop system. Our goal is to find sufficient conditions under which a synchronous closed loop system is branching bisimilar to its corresponding asynchronous closed loop system.

  7. A magnetohydrodynamic theory of coronal loop transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T.

    1982-01-01

    The physical and geometrical characteristics of solar coronal loop transients are described in an MHD model based on Archimedes' MHD buoyancy force. The theory was developed from interpretation of coronagraphic data, particularly from Skylab. The brightness of a loop is taken to indicate the electron density, and successive pictures reveal the electron enhancement in different columns. The forces which lift the loop off the sun surface are analyzed as an MHD buoyancy force affecting every mass element by imparting an inertial force necessary for heliocentrifugal motion. Thermal forces are responsible for transferring the ambient stress to the interior of the loop to begin the process. The kinematic and hydrostatic buoyancy overcome the gravitational force, and a flux rope can then curve upward, spiralling like a corkscrew with varying cross section around the unwinding solar magnetic field lines.

  8. Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTC has a suite of Hardware-in-the Loop facilities that include three operational facilities that provide performance assessment and production acceptance testing of...

  9. Off-shell two loop QCD vertices

    CERN Document Server

    Gracey, J A

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the triple gluon, ghost-gluon and quark-gluon vertex functions at two loops in the MSbar scheme in the chiral limit for an arbitrary linear covariant gauge when the external legs are all off-shell.

  10. Capillary fluid loop developments in Astrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figus, C.; Ounougha, L.; Bonzom, P. [Astrium SAS, Toulouse (France); Supper, W. [ESA/ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Puillet, C. [CNES, Toulouse (France)

    2003-06-01

    Over the past decade, Astrium has been involved in the development of capillary pumped fluid loops. In the frame of the French technological demonstrator spacecraft called STENTOR, Astrium has gained experience on capillary fluid loop design and manufacturing. After the STENTOR cylindrical evaporator type was successfully tested and qualified, Astrium has developed miniaturised fluid loops for thermal dissipation of electronic devices. For such applications, the use of a flat shape evaporator is very promising, limiting the volume and the mass of the thermal hardware. Both technologies have been submitted to a comprehensive one-g test program and will be flight-tested in the near future. Through a comparative of the reached performances, some main advantages and drawbacks of each design are listed and a definition of what should be the next generation of Astrium fluid loops is given. (author)

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of a new type of lethal neurotoxin from the venom of the funnel-web spider Atrax robustus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheumack, D D; Claassens, R; Whiteley, N M; Howden, M E

    1985-02-11

    Robustoxin, the lethal neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the male Sydney funnel-web spider, Atrax robustus, is of unique structural type and physiological mode of action. The primary structure of this 42-residue peptide was determined to be H2N-Cys-Ala-Lys-Lys-Arg-Asn-Trp-Cys-Gly-Lys-Asn-Glu-Asp-Cys-Cys-Cys-Pro- Met-Lys-Cys-Ile-Tyr-Ala-Trp-Tyr-Asn-Gln-Gln-Gly-Ser-Cys-Gln-Thr-Thr-Ile- Thr-Gly-Leu-Phe-Lys-Lys-Cys-H. The disposition of disulphide-bridged cysteine residues at both the amino- and carboxy-termini and as a triplet at residues 14-16 appears to have no precedent amongst neurotoxins.

  12. Modulation of DNA loop lifetimes by the free energy of loop formation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Mulligan, Peter; Spakowitz, Andrew J; Phillips, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Storage and retrieval of the genetic information in cells is a dynamic process that requires the DNA to undergo dramatic structural rearrangements. DNA looping is a prominent example of such a structural rearrangement that is essential for transcriptional regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and the speed of such regulations affects the fitness of individuals. Here, we examine the in vitro looping dynamics of the classic Lac repressor gene-regulatory motif. We show that both loop association and loop dissociation at the DNA-repressor junctions depend on the elastic deformation of the DNA and protein, and that both looping and unlooping rates approximately scale with the looping J factor, which reflects the system's deformation free energy. We explain this observation by transition state theory and model the DNA-protein complex as an effective worm-like chain with twist. We introduce a finite protein-DNA binding interaction length, in competition with the characteristic DNA deformation length scale, ...

  13. A multiple-pass ring oscillator based dual-loop phase-locked loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Danfeng; Ren Junyan; Deng Jingjing; Li Wei; Li Ning

    2009-01-01

    A dual-loop phase-locked loop (PLL) for wideband operation is proposed. The dual-loop architecture combines a coarse-tuning loop with a fine-tuning one, enabling a wide tuning range and low voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) gain without poisoning phase noise and reference spur suppression performance. An analysis of the phase noise and reference spur of the dual-loop PLL is emphasized. A novel multiple-pass ring VCO is designed for the dual-loop application. It utilizes both voltage-control and current-control simultaneously in the delay cell. The PLL is fabricated in Jazz 0.18-μm RF CMOS technology. The measured tuning range is from 4.2 to 5.9 GHz. It achieves a low phase noise of-99 dBc/Hz @ 1 MHz offset from a 5.5 GHz carrier.

  14. A multiple-pass ring oscillator based dual-loop phase-locked loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Danfeng; Ren Junyan; Deng Jingjing; Li Wei; Li Ning, E-mail: dfchen@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2009-10-15

    A dual-loop phase-locked loop (PLL) for wideband operation is proposed. The dual-loop architecture combines a coarse-tuning loop with a fine-tuning one, enabling a wide tuning range and low voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) gain without poisoning phase noise and reference spur suppression performance. An analysis of the phase noise and reference spur of the dual-loop PLL is emphasized. A novel multiple-pass ring VCO is designed for the dual-loop application. It utilizes both voltage-control and current-control simultaneously in the delay cell. The PLL is fabricated in Jazz 0.18-{mu}m RF CMOS technology. The measured tuning range is from 4.2 to 5.9 GHz. It achieves a low phase noise of -99 dBc/Hz - 1 MHz offset from a 5.5 GHz carrier.

  15. Exponential Decay of Loop Lengths in the Loop O( n) Model with Large n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duminil-Copin, Hugo; Peled, Ron; Samotij, Wojciech; Spinka, Yinon

    2017-02-01

    The loop O( n) model is a model for a random collection of non-intersecting loops on the hexagonal lattice, which is believed to be in the same universality class as the spin O( n) model. It has been conjectured that both the spin and the loop O( n) models exhibit exponential decay of correlations when n > 2. We verify this for the loop O( n) model with large parameter n, showing that long loops are exponentially unlikely to occur, uniformly in the edge weight x. Our proof provides further detail on the structure of typical configurations in this regime. Putting appropriate boundary conditions, when nx 6 is sufficiently small, the model is in a dilute, disordered phase in which each vertex is unlikely to be surrounded by any loops, whereas when nx 6 is sufficiently large, the model is in a dense, ordered phase which is a small perturbation of one of the three ground states.

  16. Rectangular Wilson Loops at Large N

    CERN Document Server

    Lohmayer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This work is about pure Yang Mills theory in four Euclidean dimensions with gauge group SU(N). We study rectangular smeared Wilson loops on the lattice at large N and relatively close to the large-N transition point in their eigenvalue density. We show that the string tension can be extracted from these loops but obtain a shape dependence different from the prediction of effective string theory.

  17. Laser welding closed-loop power control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    A closed-loop control system is developed to maintain an even seam width on the root side of a laser weld by continually controlling the output laser power of a 1500 W CO2 laser.......A closed-loop control system is developed to maintain an even seam width on the root side of a laser weld by continually controlling the output laser power of a 1500 W CO2 laser....

  18. Loop residues and catalysis in OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Gary P.; Hansen, Michael Riis; Grubmeyer, Charles

    2012-01-01

    (preceding paper in this issue, DOI 10.1021/bi300083p)]. The full expression of KIEs by H105A and E107A may result from a less secure closure of the catalytic loop. The lower level of expression of the KIE by K103A suggests that in these mutant proteins the major barrier to catalysis is successful closure...... of the catalytic loop, which when closed, produces rapid and reversible catalysis....

  19. Simple system for locating ground loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, P M

    2007-06-01

    A simple low-cost system for rapid identification of the cables causing ground loops in complex instrumentation configurations is described. The system consists of an exciter module that generates a 100 kHz ground loop current and a detector module that determines which cable conducts this test current. Both the exciter and detector are magnetically coupled to the ground circuit so there is no physical contact to the instrumentation system under test.

  20. Deployable radiator with flexible line loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Bryan V. (Inventor); Lehtinen, Arthur Mathias (Inventor); McGee, Billy W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Radiator assembly (10) for use on a spacecraft (12) is provided including at least one radiator panel assembly (26) repeatably movable between a panel stowed position (28) and a panel deployed position (36), at least two flexible lines (40) in fluid communication with the at least one radiator panel assembly (26) and repeatably movable between a stowage loop (42) and a flattened deployed loop (44).