WorldWideScience

Sample records for cuprous oxide first-principles

  1. Magnetoexcitons in cuprous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiner, Frank; Main, Jörg; Wunner, Günter; Freitag, Marcel; Heckötter, Julian; Uihlein, Christoph; Aßmann, Marc; Fröhlich, Dietmar; Bayer, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Two of the most striking experimental findings when investigating exciton spectra in cuprous oxide using high-resolution spectroscopy are the observability and the fine structure splitting of F excitons reported by J. Thewes et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 027402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.027402]. These findings show that it is indispensable to account for the complex valence band structure and the cubic symmetry of the solid in the theory of excitons. This is all the more important for magnetoexcitons, where the external magnetic field reduces the symmetry of the system even further. We present the theory of excitons in Cu2O in an external magnetic field and especially discuss the dependence of the spectra on the direction of the external magnetic field, which cannot be understood from a simple hydrogenlike model. Using high-resolution spectroscopy, we also present the corresponding experimental spectra for cuprous oxide in Faraday configuration. The theoretical results and experimental spectra are in excellent agreement as regards not only the energies but also the relative oscillator strengths. Furthermore, this comparison allows for the determination of the fourth Luttinger parameter κ of this semiconductor.

  2. Radiation annealing in cuprous oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajda, P.

    1966-01-01

    Experimental results from high-intensity gamma-irradiation of cuprous oxide are used to investigate the annealing of defects with increasing radiation dose. The results are analysed on the basis of the Balarin and Hauser (1965) statistical model of radiation annealing, giving a square-root relati......-root relationship between the rate of change of resistivity and the resistivity change. The saturation defect density at room temperature is estimated on the basis of a model for defect creation in cuprous oxide....

  3. Resistance switching of electrodeposited cuprous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanparast, Sanaz

    In this work, the resistance switching behavior of electrodeposited cuprous oxide (Cu2O) thin films in Au/Cu2O/top electrode (Pt, Au-Pd, Al) cells was studied. After an initial FORMING process, the fabricated cells show reversible switching between a low resistance state (16.6 O) and a high resistance state (0.4 x 106 O). Changing the resistance states in cuprous oxide films depends on the magnitude of the applied voltage which corresponds to unipolar resistance switching behavior of this material. The endurance and retention tests indicate a potential application of the fabricated cells for nonvolatile resistance switching random access memory (RRAM). The results suggest formation and rupture of one or several nanoscale copper filaments as the resistance switching mechanism in the cuprous oxide films. At high electric voltage in the as-deposited state of Au/Cu 2O/Au-Pd cell structure, the conduction behavior follows Poole-Frenkel emission. Various parameters, such as the compliance current, the cuprous oxide microstructure, the cuprous oxide thickness, top electrode area, and top electrode material, affect the resistance switching characteristics. The required FORMING voltage is higher for Au/Cu2O/Al cell compared with the Au/Cu2O/Pt which is related to the Schottky behavior of Al contact with Cu2O. Cu2O nanowires in Au-Pt/ Cu 2O/Au-Pt cell also show resistance switching behavior, indicating scalable potential of this cell for usage as RRAM. After an initial FORMING process under an electric field of 3 x 106 V/m, the Cu2O nanowire is switched to the LRS. During the FORMING process physical damages are observed in the cell, which may be caused by Joule heating and gas evolution.

  4. Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO, A2O3, and AO2 (A=U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations, using the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation. Emphasis is put on the degree of f-electron localization, which...... in the actinide dioxides is discussed, and it is found that the dioxide is the most stable oxide for the actinides from Np onward. Our study reveals a strong link between preferred oxidation number and degree of localization which is confirmed by comparing to the ground-state configurations of the corresponding...

  5. Evaluation of defects in cuprous oxide through exciton luminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Laszlo, E-mail: jl@laszlofrazer.com [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Lenferink, Erik J. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chang, Kelvin B. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stern, Nathaniel P. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Ketterson, John B. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The various decay mechanisms of excitons in cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) are highly sensitive to defects which can relax selection rules. Here we report cryogenic hyperspectral imaging of exciton luminescence from cuprous oxide crystals grown via the floating zone method showing that the samples have few defects. Some locations, however, show strain splitting of the 1s orthoexciton triplet polariton luminescence. Strain is reduced by annealing. In addition, annealing causes annihilation of oxygen and copper vacancies, which leads to a negative correlation between luminescence of unlike vacancies. - Highlights: • We use luminescence to observe defects in high quality cuprous oxide crystals. • Strain is reduced by annealing. • Annealing causes annihilation of oxygen and copper vacancies.

  6. Potentiostatic Deposition and Characterization of Cuprous Oxide Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electrodeposition technique was employed to deposit cuprous oxide Cu2O thin films. In this work, Cu2O thin films have been grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) transparent conducting glass as a substrate by potentiostatic deposition of cupric acetate. The effect of deposition time on the morphologies, crystalline, and optical quality of Cu2O thin films was investigated.

  7. The Absorption of Benzotriazole on Copper and Cuprous Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    Cornell University, Ithaca INY, 14853 Copper surfaces are commonly treated with benzotriazole ( BTA ), 1. to inhibit cor- rosion. H1+ is thought to be...00 00 SIOFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Contract N00014-82-K-0576 Technical Report No. 38 THE ADSORPTION OF BENZOTRIAZOLE ON COPPER AND CUPROUS OXIDE by M... Benzotriazole on Copper and Cuprous Oxide 12 7- `SONAL AUTHOR(S) M. C. Zonnevylle and R. Hoffmann 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT (Year

  8. First Principles Design of Non-Centrosymmetric Metal Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joshua Aaron

    The lack of an inversion center in a material's crystal structure can result in many useful material properties, such as ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity and non-linear optical behavior. Recently, the desire for low power, high efficiency electronic devices has spurred increased interest in these phenomena, especially ferroelectricity, as well as their coupling to other material properties. By studying and understanding the fundamental structure-property relationships present in non-centrosymmetric materials, it is possible to purposefully engineer new compounds with the desired "acentric" qualities through crystal engineering. The families of ABO3 perovskite and ABO2.5 perovskite-derived brownmillerite oxides are ideal for such studies due to their wide range of possible chemistries, as well as ground states that are highly tunable owing to strong electron-lattice coupling. Furthermore, control over the B-O-B bond angles through epitaxial strain or chemical substitution allows for the rapid development of new emergent properties. In this dissertation, I formulate the crystal-chemistry criteria necessary to design functional non-centrosymmetric oxides using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Recently, chemically ordered (AA')B2O 6 oxides have been shown to display a new form of rotation-induced ferroelectric polarizations. I now extend this property-design methodology to alternative compositions and crystal classes and show it is possible to induce a host of new phenomena. This dissertation will address: 1) the formulation of predictive models allowing for a priori design of polar oxides, 2) the optimization of properties exhibited by these materials through chemical substitution and cation ordering, and 3) the use of strain to control the stability of new phases. Completion of this work has led to a deeper understanding of how atomic structural features determine the physical properties of oxides, as well as the successful elucidation of

  9. Remarkable Hydrogen Storage on Beryllium Oxide Clusters: First Principles Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Since the current transportation sector is the largest consumer of oil, and subsequently responsible for major air pollutants, it is inevitable to use alternative renewable sources of energies for vehicular applications. The hydrogen energy seems to be a promising candidate. To explore the possibility of achieving a solid-state high-capacity storage of hydrogen for onboard applications, we have performed first principles density functional theoretical calculations of hydrogen storage properties of beryllium oxide clusters (BeO)$_{n}$ (n=2 -- 8). We observed that polar BeO bond is responsible for H$_{2}$ adsorption. The problem of cohesion of beryllium atoms does not arise, as they are an integral part of BeO clusters. The (BeO)$_{n}$ (n=2 -- 8) adsorbs 8--12 H$_{2}$ molecules with an adsorption energy in the desirable range of reversible hydrogen storage. The gravimetric density of H$_{2}$ adsorbed on BeO clusters meets the ultimate 7.5 wt% limit, recommended for onboard practical applications. In conclusion,...

  10. Green chemistry synthesis of nano-cuprous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceja-Romero, L R; Ortega-Arroyo, L; Ortega Rueda de León, J M; López-Andrade, X; Narayanan, J; Aguilar-Méndez, M A; Castaño, V M

    2016-04-01

    Green chemistry and a central composite design, to evaluate the effect of reducing agent, temperature and pH of the reaction, were employed to produce controlled cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles. Response surface method of the ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy is allowed to determine the most relevant factors for the size distribution of the nanoCu2O. X-ray diffraction reflections correspond to a cubic structure, with sizes from 31.9 to 104.3 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the different shapes depend strongly on the conditions of the green synthesis.

  11. First-principles prediction of disordering tendencies in complex oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Chao [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanek, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The disordering tendencies of a series of zirconate (A{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) , hafnate (A{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}), titanate (A{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), and stannate (A{sub 2} Sn{sub 2}O{sub 7}) pyrochlores are predicted in this study using first-principles total energy calculations. To model the disordered (A{sub 1/2}B{sub 1/2})(O{sub 7/8}/V{sub 1/8}){sub 2} fluorite structure, we have developed an 88-atom two-sublattice special quasirandom structure (SQS) that closely reproduces the most important near-neighbor intra-sublattice and inter-sublattice pair correlation functions of the random alloy. From the calculated disordering energies, the order-disorder transition temperatures of those pyrochlores are further predicted and our results agree well with the existing experimental phase diagrams. It is clearly demonstrated that both size and electronic effects play an important role in determining the disordering tendencies of pyrochlore compounds.

  12. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (~0.2 wt% 235U) to high enriched (>20 wt% 235U); compositions consisting of U3O8, UO2, UF6, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since 235U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the 235U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the "known standard" method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U3O8 samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact 235U sample masses.

  13. Prediction of solid oxide fuel cell cathode activity with first-principles descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Yueh-Lin; Kleis, Jesper; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the experimentally measured area specific resistance and oxygen surface exchange of solid oxide fuel cell cathode perovskites are strongly correlated with the first-principles calculated oxygen p-band center and vacancy formation energy. These quantities...... are therefore descriptors of catalytic activity that can be used in the first-principles design of new SOFC cathodes....

  14. First principles materials design of novel functional oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Valentino R.; Voas, Brian K.; Bridges, Craig A.; Morris, James R.; Beckman, Scott P.

    2016-05-01

    We review our efforts to develop and implement robust computational approaches for exploring phase stability to facilitate the prediction-to-synthesis process of novel functional oxides. These efforts focus on a synergy between (i) electronic structure calculations for properties predictions, (ii) phenomenological/empirical methods for examining phase stability as related to both phase segregation and temperature-dependent transitions and (iii) experimental validation through synthesis and characterization. We illustrate this philosophy by examining an inaugural study that seeks to discover novel functional oxides with high piezoelectric responses. Our results show progress towards developing a framework through which solid solutions can be studied to predict materials with enhanced properties that can be synthesized and remain active under device relevant conditions.

  15. First principles investigation of heterogeneous catalysis on metal oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoussoub, Mireille

    Metal oxides possess unique electronic and structural properties that render them highly favourable for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. In this study, computational atomistic modelling based on Density Functional Theory was used to investigate the reduction of carbon dioxide over hydroxylated indium oxide nanoparticles, as well at the activation of methane over oxygen-covered bimetallic surfaces. The first study employed metadynamics-biased ab initio molecular dynamics to obtain the free energy surface of the various reaction steps at finite temperature. In the second study, the nudged elastic band method was used to probe the C-H activation mechanisms for different surface configurations. In both cases, activation energies, reaction energies, transition state structures, and charge analysis results are used to explain the underlying mechanistic pathways.

  16. Electronic phenomena at complex oxide interfaces: insights from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentcheva, Rossitza [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Munich, Theresienstrasse 41, D-80333 Munich (Germany); Pickett, Warren E [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-02-03

    Oxide interfaces have attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the emerging novel behavior which does not exist in the corresponding bulk parent compounds. This opens possibilities for future applications in oxide-based electronics and spintronics devices. Among the different materials combinations, heterostructures containing the two simple band insulators LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} have advanced to a model system exhibiting unanticipated properties ranging from conductivity, to magnetism, even to superconductivity. Electronic structure calculations have contributed significantly towards understanding these phenomena and we review here the progress achieved in the past few years, also showing some future directions and perspectives. A central issue in understanding the novel behavior in these oxide heterostructures is to discover the way (or ways) that these heterostructures deal with the polar discontinuity at the interface. Despite analogies to polar semiconductor interfaces, transition metal oxides offer much richer possibilities to compensate the valence mismatch, including, for example, an electronic reconstruction. Moreover, electronic correlations can lead to additional complex behavior like charge disproportionation and order, magnetism and orbital order. We discuss in some detail the role of finite size effects in ultrathin polar films on a nonpolar substrate leading to another intriguing feature-the thickness-dependent insulator-to-metal transition in thin LaAlO{sub 3} films on a SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate, driven by the impending polar catastrophe. The strong and uniform lattice polarization that emerges as a response to the potential build-up enables the system to remain insulating up to a few layers. However, beyond a critical thickness there is a crossover from an ionic relaxation to an electronic reconstruction. At this point two bands of electron and hole character, separated both in real and in reciprocal space, have been

  17. Microwave-assisted synthesis and optical properties of cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Dandan [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan 250353 (China); Du, Yi, E-mail: duyi234@126.com [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan 250353 (China); Tian, Xiuying, E-mail: xiuyingt@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hunan Institute of Humanities Science and Technology, Loudi 417000 (China); Li, Zhongfu; Chen, Zhongtao; Zhu, Chaofeng [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan 250353 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals were fabricated by a facile and green microwave-assisted method using soluble starch as reductant and dispersant. Spheres with the diameter of about 100 and 600 nm, octahedron and truncated octahedron with the edge length of about 0.8–3 μm cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals were successfully obtained. Microwave heating was proved to be a efficient method and was advantageous to the homogeneous nucleation. Growth mechanism of the prepared Cu{sub 2}O microcrystals were investigated carefully. Furthermore, the optical properties of the prepared cuprous oxide microcrystals were investigated by UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, demonstrating that their band gaps of obtained samples were 1.96–2.07 eV, assigned to their different sizes and morphologies. - Abstract: Cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals were fabricated by a facile and green microwave-assisted method using soluble starch as reductant and dispersant. It was observed that the addition amounts of NaOH had a prominent effect on the morphologies and size of cuprous oxide products, and microwave heating was proved to be a efficient method and was advantageous to the homogeneous nucleation. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results indicated that the samples were pure cuprous oxide. Spheres with the diameter of about 100 and 600 nm, octahedron and truncated octahedron with the edge length of about 0.8–3 μm cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals were successfully obtained. Furthermore, the UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy was used to investigate the optical properties of the prepared cuprous oxide microcrystals, demonstrating that their band gaps of obtained samples were 1.96–2.07 eV, assigned to their different sizes and morphologies.

  18. Oxidation of cuprous stellacyanin by aminopolycarboxylatocobaltate(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, G S; Mitchel, G L; Blackmer, G L; Holwerda, R A

    1978-01-01

    Rate parameters are reported for the oxidation of cuprous stellacyanin by Co(PDTA)-(k(25.0 degrees) = 17.9 M(-1)sec(-1), deltaH not equal to = 8.5 kcal/mol, deltaH not equal to = 8.5 kcal/mol, deltaS not equal to = -24 cal/mol-deg; pH 7.0, Mu 0.5 M) and Co(CyDTA)-(k(25.1 degrees) = 17.0 M(-1)sec(-1), deltaH not equal to = 8.7 kcal/mol, deltaS not equal to = -24 cal/mol-deg; pH 7.0 mu 0.5 M). The first order Co(PDTA)- and Co(CyDTA)- dependences observed over wide concentration ranges contrast with the saturation behavior reported previously for Co(EDTA)- as the oxidant. It is concluded that the- CH3 and -(CH2)4-substituents of PDTA and CyDTA, respectively, prevent the alkylated derivatives of Co(EDTA)- from hydrogen bonding with the reduced blue protein, causing precursor complex formation constants to fall far below that of 149M(-1) (25.1 degrees) observed for the EDTA complex. The similarity between deltaH not equal to and deltaS not equal to values for the oxidation of stellacyanin by Co(PDTA)- and Co(CyDTA)- indicates that the size of alkyl substituents linked to the carbon atoms of the EDTA ethylenediamine backbone has little influence on activation requirements for Cu(I) to Co(III) electron transfer. The electron transfer reactivity of aminopolycarboxylatocobalt(III) complexes with cuprous stellacyanin therefore appears to be linked to the accessibility of one or more of the ligated acetate groups to outer-sphere contact with the type 1 Cu(I) center. Saturation in kobsd vs. [oxidant] plots found for the reactions of Co(PDTA)- and Co(CyDTA)- with stellacyanin at pH 6 and at pH 7 in the presence of EDTA is attributed to the formation of "dead-end" oxidant-protein complexes.

  19. A first principles investigation of the electronic structure of actinide oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Zdzislawa

    2010-01-01

    The ground state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO, A2O3 and AO2 (A=U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations using the selfinteraction corrected local spin-density approximation. Our study reveals a strong link between preferred oxidation number...

  20. Microwave Synthesis of Cuprous Oxide Micro-/Nanocrystals with Different Morphologies and Photocatalytic Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingwei Zhu; Yihe Zhang; Jiajun Wang; Fengshan Zhou; Paul K. Chu

    2011-01-01

    Cuprous oxide micro-/nanocrystals were synthesized by using a simple liquid phase reduction process under microwave irradiation. Copper sulfate was used as the starting materials and macromolecule surfactants served as the templates.The morphologies phase and optical properties of them are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflection absorptive spectra (UV-vis/DRS), respectively. The crystals had four different shapes, namely spheres, strips, octahedrons, and dandelions. The photocatalytic behavior of the cuprous oxide particles were investigated by monitoring the degradation of rhodamine B. In spite of the different morphologies, all of the cuprous oxide micro-/nanocrystals exhibited photocatalytic activities under visible light irradiation in the following order: dandelions, strips, spheres, and octahedral crystals. The photocatalytic degradation rates of rhodamine B are 56.37%, 55.68%, 51.83% and 46.16%, respectively. The morphology affects significantly the photocatalytic performance.

  1. Enhancement of convective heat transfer coefficient of ethylene glycol base cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ali; Ramzan, Naveed; Umer, Asim; Ahmad, Ayyaz; Muryam, Hina

    2017-08-01

    The enhancement in the convective heat transfer coefficient of the ethylene glycol (EG) base cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanofluids were investigated. The nanofluids of different volume concentrations i-e 1%, 2.5% and 4.5% were prepared by the two step method. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles were ultrasonically stirred for four hours in the ethylene glycol (EG). The experimental study has been performed through circular tube geometry in laminar flow regime at average Reynolds numbers 36, 71 and 116. The constant heat flux Q = 4000 (W/m2) was maintained during this work. Substantial enhancement was observed in the convective heat transfer coefficient of ethylene glycol (EG) base cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanofluids than the base fluid. The maximum 74% enhancement was observed in convective heat transfer coefficient at 4.5 vol% concentration and Re = 116.

  2. First-principles investigations for the catalytic dissociation and oxidation of methane on the Cu surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Mahadevan, Jagan; Wang, Sanwu

    2010-03-01

    The catalytic reactions of dissociation and oxidation of methane on the copper surfaces play a key role in, for example, the development of high-performance solid oxide fuel cells. We used first-principles quantum theory and large-scale parallel calculations to investigate the atomic-scale mechanism of the catalytic chemical reactions. We report the calculated results, which provide fundamental information and understanding about the atomic-scale dynamics and electronic structures pertinent to the reactions and specifically the catalytic role of the Cu(100) and Cu(111) surfaces. We also report comparison of our results with available experimental data and previous theoretical investigations.

  3. Towards printed perovskite solar cells with cuprous oxide hole transporting layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yan; Xia, Zhonggao; Liang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Solution-processed p-type metal oxide materials have shown great promise in improving the stability of perovskite-based solar cells and offering the feasibility for a low cost printing fabrication process. Herein, we performed a device modeling study on planar perovskite solar cells with cuprous ...

  4. Optical characterization of gold-cuprous oxide interfaces for terahertz emission applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanandan, G.K.P.; Adam, A.J.L.; Ramakrishnan, G.; Petrik, P.; Hendrikx, R.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the interface between gold and thermally formed cuprous oxide, which emits terahertz radiation when illuminated with ultrafast femtosecond lasers, is in fact an AuCu/Cu2O interface due to the formation of the thermal diffusion alloy AuCu. The alloy enables the formation of a Schottky-ba

  5. First-principles study on initial stage of oxidation on Si(110) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, Takahiro; Shiba, Seiji; Sueoka, Koji [Department of System Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    There is a great deal of engineering interest in Si (110) wafers as the substrates of large scale integrations (LSIs) in the next generation. However, few studies on Si (110) surface have been reported in comparison with those on other low-index surfaces, still less the mechanism of surface oxidation. We analyzed the surface structure and the initial stage of oxidation on the Si (110)-(16 x 2) clean surface with first-principles calculation. The results of our calculations showed that first, the stable structure of the Si (110) clean surface was the adatom-tetramer-interstitial (ATI) reconstruction. Second, pairs of pentagon (PPs) were preferentially oxidized in the initial stage of the oxidation. Third, the oxidation growth should progress with the clustering of O atoms. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Cobalt (hydro)oxide electrodes under electrochemical conditions: a first principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Selloni, Annabella

    2013-03-01

    There is currently much interest in photoelectrochemical water splitting as a promising pathway towards sustainable energy production. A major issue of such photoelectrochemical devices is the limited efficiency of the anode, where the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) takes place. Cobalt (hydro)oxides, particularly Co3O4 and Co(OH)2, have emerged as promising candidates for use as OER anode materials. Interestingly, recent in-situ Raman spectroscopy studies have shown that Co3O4 electrodes undergo progressive oxidation and transform into oxyhydroxide, CoO(OH), under electrochemical working conditions. (Journal of the American Chemical Society 133, 5587 (2011))Using first principle electronic structure calculations, we provide insight into these findings by presenting results on the structural, thermodynamic, and electronic properties of cobalt oxide, hydroxide and oxydroxide CoO(OH), and on their relative stabilities when in contact with water under external voltage.

  7. First-principles search for n -type oxide, nitride, and sulfide thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, Kevin F.

    2016-07-01

    Oxides have many potentially desirable characteristics for thermoelectric applications, including low cost and stability at high temperatures, but thus far there are few known high z T n -type oxide thermoelectrics. In this work, we use high-throughput first-principles calculations to screen transition metal oxides, nitrides, and sulfides for candidate materials with high power factors and low thermal conductivity. We find a variety of promising materials, and we investigate these materials in detail in order to understand the mechanisms that cause them to have high power factors. These materials all combine a high density of states near the Fermi level with dispersive bands, reducing the trade-off between the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity, but they do so for several different reasons. In addition, our calculations indicate that many of our candidate materials have low thermal conductivity.

  8. First-principles analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism for transition metal complex oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, Hidekazu

    2016-10-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) is widely used for the characterization of magnetism of materials. However, information from XMCD related to the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structures is not fully utilized due to the lack of reliable theoretical tools for spectral analysis. In this work, the first-principles configuration interaction (CI) calculations for X-ray absorption spectra developed by the author were extended for the calculation of XMCD, where the Zeeman energy was taken into the Hamiltonian of the CI to mimic magnetic polarization in the solid state. This technique was applied to interpret the L2,3 XMCD from 3d transition metal complex oxides, such as NiFe2O4 and FeTiO3. The experimental XMCD spectra were quantitatively reproduced using this method. The oxidation states as well as the magnetic ordering between transition metal ions on crystallographically different sites in NiFe2O4 can be unambiguously determined. A first-principles analysis of XMCD in FeTiO3 revealed the presence of Fe3+ and Ti3+ ions, which indicates that the charge transfer from Fe to Ti ions occurs. The origin of magnetic polarization of Ti ions in FeTiO3 was also discussed.

  9. First-principles analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism for transition metal complex oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeno, Hidekazu, E-mail: h-ikeno@21c.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Organization for the 21st Century, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan)

    2016-10-14

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) is widely used for the characterization of magnetism of materials. However, information from XMCD related to the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structures is not fully utilized due to the lack of reliable theoretical tools for spectral analysis. In this work, the first-principles configuration interaction (CI) calculations for X-ray absorption spectra developed by the author were extended for the calculation of XMCD, where the Zeeman energy was taken into the Hamiltonian of the CI to mimic magnetic polarization in the solid state. This technique was applied to interpret the L{sub 2,3} XMCD from 3d transition metal complex oxides, such as NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and FeTiO{sub 3}. The experimental XMCD spectra were quantitatively reproduced using this method. The oxidation states as well as the magnetic ordering between transition metal ions on crystallographically different sites in NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} can be unambiguously determined. A first-principles analysis of XMCD in FeTiO{sub 3} revealed the presence of Fe{sup 3+} and Ti{sup 3+} ions, which indicates that the charge transfer from Fe to Ti ions occurs. The origin of magnetic polarization of Ti ions in FeTiO{sub 3} was also discussed.

  10. Epitaxially aligned cuprous oxide nanowires for all-oxide, single-wire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittman, Sarah; Yoo, Youngdong; Dasgupta, Neil P; Kim, Si-in; Kim, Bongsoo; Yang, Peidong

    2014-08-13

    As a p-type semiconducting oxide that can absorb visible light, cuprous oxide (Cu2O) is an attractive material for solar energy conversion. This work introduces a high-temperature, vapor-phase synthesis that produces faceted Cu2O nanowires that grow epitaxially along the surface of a lattice-matched, single-crystal MgO substrate. Individual wires were then fabricated into single-wire, all-oxide diodes and solar cells using low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2 and ZnO films to form the heterojunction. The performance of devices made from pristine Cu2O wires and chlorine-exposed Cu2O wires was investigated under one-sun and laser illumination. These faceted wires allow the fabrication of well-controlled heterojunctions that can be used to investigate the interfacial properties of all-oxide solar cells.

  11. First-Principles Study of Photochemical Activation of CO2 by Ti-based Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haiying; Zapol, Peter; Curtiss, Larry

    2013-03-01

    The photochemical conversion of CO2 and H2O into energy-bearing hydrocarbon fuels provides an attractive way of mitigating the green-house gas CO2 and utilizing solar energy as a sustainable energy source. However, due to the high reduction potential and chemical inertness of CO2 molecules, the conversion rate of CO2 is impractically low. The activation of CO2 is critical in facilitating further reactions. By carrying out first-principles calculations of reaction pathways from CO2 to CO2-anions on Ti-based oxides including zeolites in the presence of photoexcited electrons, we have studied the initial step of CO2 activation via 1e transfer. It is shown that the CO2 reactivity of these surfaces strongly depends on the crystal structure, surface orientation, and presence of defects. This opens a new dimension in surface structure modification to enhance the CO2 adsorption and reduction on semiconductor surfaces.

  12. First-principles data-driven discovery of transition metal oxides for artificial photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qimin

    We develop a first-principles data-driven approach for rapid identification of transition metal oxide (TMO) light absorbers and photocatalysts for artificial photosynthesis using the Materials Project. Initially focusing on Cr, V, and Mn-based ternary TMOs in the database, we design a broadly-applicable multiple-layer screening workflow automating density functional theory (DFT) and hybrid functional calculations of bulk and surface electronic and magnetic structures. We further assess the electrochemical stability of TMOs in aqueous environments from computed Pourbaix diagrams. Several promising earth-abundant low band-gap TMO compounds with desirable band edge energies and electrochemical stability are identified by our computational efforts and then synergistically evaluated using high-throughput synthesis and photoelectrochemical screening techniques by our experimental collaborators at Caltech. Our joint theory-experiment effort has successfully identified new earth-abundant copper and manganese vanadate complex oxides that meet highly demanding requirements for photoanodes, substantially expanding the known space of such materials. By integrating theory and experiment, we validate our approach and develop important new insights into structure-property relationships for TMOs for oxygen evolution photocatalysts, paving the way for use of first-principles data-driven techniques in future applications. This work is supported by the Materials Project Predictive Modeling Center and the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis through the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources also provided by the Department of Energy through the National Energy Supercomputing Center.

  13. Picosecond nonlinear optical properties of cuprous oxide with different nano-morphologies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Harshavardhan Reddy; H Sekhar; D Narayana Rao

    2014-02-01

    Cuprous oxide nanoclusters, microcubes and microparticles were successfully synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method. Phase purity and crystallinity of the samples were studied by using X-ray powder diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show different morphologies like nanoclusters, microcubes and microparticles. For linear and nonlinear optical measurements, the as-synthesized Cu2O with different morphologies were dispersed in isopropanol solution. The absorption spectrum recorded in the visible regions shows peaks that depend on the morphology of the particles and the peak shifts towards red region as one goes from nanoclusters to microparticles. Simple open-aperture Z-scan technique is used to measure nonlinear optical properties of cuprous oxide at 532 nm, 30 ps excitation at 10 Hz repetition rate. Cuprous oxide nanoclusters show reverse saturable absorption (RSA) behaviour, the microcubes and microparticles at a similar concentration exhibit saturable absorption (SA) type of behaviour at lower peak intensities and exhibit RSA within SA at higher peak intensities. The results show that the transition from SA to RSA can be ascribed to the two-photon absorption (TPA) process.

  14. CO oxidation catalyzed by Pt-embedded graphene: A first-principles investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We addressed the potential catalytic role of Pt-embedded graphene in CO oxidation by first-principles-based calculations. We showed that the combination of highly reactive Pt atoms and defects over graphene makes the Pt-embedded graphene a superior mono-dispersed atomic catalyst for CO oxidation. The binding energy of a single Pt atom onto monovacancy defects is up to -7.10 eV, which not only ensures the high stability of the embedded Pt atom, but also vigorously excludes the possibility of diffusion and aggregation of embedded Pt atoms. This strong interfacial interaction also tunes the energy level of Pt-d states for the activation of O2, and promotes the formation and dissociation of the peroxide-like intermediate. The catalytic cycle of CO oxidation is initiated through the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, with the formation of a peroxide-like intermediate by the coadsorbed CO and O2, by the dissociation of which the CO2 molecule and an adsorbed O atom are formed. Then, another gaseous CO will react with the remnant O atom and make the embedded Pt atom available for the subsequent reaction. The calculated energy barriers for the formation and dissociation of the peroxide-like intermediate are as low as 0.33 and 0.15 eV, respectively, while that for the regeneration of the embedded Pt atom is 0.46 eV, indicating the potential high catalytic performance of Pt-embedded graphene for low temperature CO oxidation.

  15. Giant piezoelectric resistance effect of nanoscale zinc oxide tunnel junctions: first principles simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Genghong; Luo, Xin; Zheng, Yue; Wang, Biao

    2012-05-21

    Based on first principles simulations and quantum transport calculations, we have investigated in the present work the effect of the mechanical load on transport characteristics and the relative physical properties of nanoscale zinc oxide (ZnO) tunnel junctions, and verified an intrinsic giant piezoelectric resistance (GPR) effect. Our results show that the transport-relevant properties, e.g., the piezoelectric potential (piezopotential), built-in electric field, conduction band offset and electron transmission probability of the junction etc., can obviously be tuned by the applied strain. Accordingly, it is inspiring to find that the current-voltage characteristics and tunneling electro-resistance of the ZnO tunnel junction can significantly be adjusted with the strain. When the applied strain switches from -5% to 5%, an increase of more than 14 times in the tunneling current at a bias voltage of 1.1 V can be obtained. Meanwhile, an increase of up to 2000% of the electro-resistance ratio with respect to the zero strain state can be reached at the same bias voltage and with a 5% compression. According to our investigations, the giant piezoelectric resistance effect of nanoscale ZnO tunnel junctions exhibits great potential in exploiting tunable electronic devices. Furthermore, the methodology of strain engineering revealed in this work may shed light on the mechanical manipulations of electronic devices.

  16. Piezoelectric properties of graphene oxide: A first-principles computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhenyue; Yan, Wenyi; Shang, Jin; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2014-07-01

    Some highly ordered compounds of graphene oxide (GO), e.g., the so-called clamped and unzipped GO, are shown to have piezoelectric responses via first-principles density functional calculations. By applying an electric field perpendicular to the GO basal plane, the largest value of in-plane strain and strain piezoelectric coefficient, d31 are found to be 0.12% and 0.24 pm/V, respectively, which are comparable with those of some advanced piezoelectric materials. An in-depth molecular structural analysis reveals that the deformation of the oxygen doping regions in the clamped GO dominates its overall strain output, whereas the deformation of the regions without oxygen dopant in the unzipped GO determines its overall piezoelectric strain. This understanding explains the observed dependence of d31 on oxygen doping rate, i.e., higher oxygen concentration giving rise to a larger d31 in the clamped GO whereas leading to a reduced d31 in the unzipped GO. As the thinnest two-dimensional piezoelectric materials, GO has a great potential for a wide range of micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) actuators and sensors.

  17. Transition metal decorated graphene-like zinc oxide monolayer: A first-principles investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Jie [School of Physics and National Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); School of Science, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan, Shandong 250353 (China); Xu, Ming-Chun; Hu, Shu-Jun, E-mail: hushujun@sdu.edu.cn [School of Physics and National Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China)

    2015-09-14

    Transition metal (TM) atoms have been extensively employed to decorate the two-dimensional materials, endowing them with promising physical properties. Here, we have studied the adsorption of TM atoms (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co) on graphene-like zinc oxide monolayer (g-ZnO) and the substitution of Zn by TM using first-principles calculations to search for the most likely configurations when TM atoms are deposited on g-ZnO. We found that when a V atom is initially placed on the top of Zn atom, V will squeeze out Zn from the two-dimensional plane then substitute it, which is a no barrier substitution process. For heavier elements (Cr to Co), although the substitution configurations are more stable than the adsorption ones, there is an energy barrier for the adsorption-substitution transition with the height of tens to hundreds meV. Therefore, Cr to Co prefers to be adsorbed on the hollow site or the top of oxygen, which is further verified by the molecular dynamics simulations. The decoration of TM is revealed to be a promising approach in terms of tuning the work function of g-ZnO in a large energy range.

  18. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.

    2016-06-03

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work.

  19. Attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy of simultaneous processes: Corrosion inhibition of cuprous oxide by benzotriazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Allred, Daniel B.; Saito, Nagahiro; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Takai, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy was used to perform in situ studies of the corrosion inhibition of cuprous oxide (Cu 2O) by benzotriazole (BTA) in aqueous solution at concentrations from 1 to 20 μM. Because two separate processes occur simultaneously, that of Cu 2O corrosion and corrosion inhibition by BTA adsorption, the spectral information was subjected to deconvolution by a conjugate gradient minimization algorithm. Under these conditions, a solution phase concentration of 7-10 μM BTA nearly completely inhibited the corrosion of Cu 2O in deionized water. Using a Langmuir adsorption model, this represented only 25% of the maximally covered surface area.

  20. A photoemission study of benzotriazole on clean copper and cuprous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bo-Shung; Olson, Clifford G.; Lynch, David W.

    1986-11-01

    Photoemission spectra of benzotriazole (BTA) chemisorbed on clean Cu and on cuprous oxide were compared with the spectra of condensed- and gas-phase BTA. Chemisorbed BTA bonds to both Cu and Cu 2O via lone-pair orbitais on the nitrogen ring. The lack of a chemical shift for the π- orbitais indicates that BTA does not lie flat on the surface. We propose a model for the geometry and bonding of chemisorbed BTA which accounts for its corrosion inhibition on Cu, and for the corrosion inhibition, or lack of inhibition, by molecules similar to BTA.

  1. Numerical simulation of exciton dynamics in cuprous oxide at ultra low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Som, Sunipa

    2015-06-29

    This thesis is a theoretical investigation of the relaxation behaviour of excitons in Cuprous Oxide at ultra low temperatures when the excitons are confined within a potential trap and also in a homogeneous system. Under the action of deformation potential phonon scattering only, Bose Einstein Condensation (BEC) occurs for all temperatures in the investigated range. In the case of Auger decay, we do not find at any temperature a BEC due to the heating of the exciton gas. In the case of elastic and phonon-scattering together BEC occurs in this case of 0.1 K.

  2. First Principles Evaluation of Nickel Oxide and Other Materials for Solar Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidoust, Nima

    Global climate change and pollution caused by fossil fuels necessitate the search for inexpensive, clean, renewable energy sources. Photocatalytic and photovoltaic solar energy conversion to fuels and electricity, respectively, are among the possible solutions to this challenge. Engineering devices that can efficiently achieve these tasks requires fundamental understanding of the materials involved, identification of ways to improve these materials, and discovery of new materials that could help achieve higher efficiencies and lower costs. The work presented in this dissertation contributes to these fronts via first-principles quantum mechanical calculations. In particular, we extensively study nickel oxide (NiO), an inexpensive semiconductor, with the desired potentially carrier-lifetime-extending charge-transfer property. We identify and devise various theoretical models that accurately describe NiO's electronic structure. We use these models to show that alloying NiO with Li2O could decrease NiO's band gap from ˜4 eV to ˜2 eV, making it an appropriate light absorber for use in various solar energy conversion devices. We study hole transport in NiO and NiO alloys. We show that hole conductivity in NiO can be enhanced by forming homogeneous LixNi1-xO alloys with high enough Li concentration, making LixNi1-x O alloys suitable for use as p-type hole conductors. We further find that hole transport in NiO is confined to two dimensions. We predict that forming MgxNi1-xO and ZnxNi 1-xO (which we find to be transparent to visible light) disrupts this confinement and leads to three-dimensional hole transport, thereby increasing conductivity. This makes MgxNi1-xO and ZnxNi 1-xO alloys suitable for use as transparent conducting oxides. We introduce CoO and Co0.25Ni0.75O alloy as new intermediate band semiconductors (IBSCs), capable of absorbing light across multiple band gaps and enhancing light absorption in IBSC-based solar cells. Finally, we investigate the spatial

  3. A First Principles Investigation of Proton Chemistry in Perovskite-Type Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauer, Tania Allison

    Certain acceptor-doped perovskite-type oxides show significant promise for deployment into a number of electrochemical device applications, including fuel cells, batteries, and electrolyzers, owing to their rapid proton conductivities at high temperatures. However, limitations in bulk material hydration and slow grain boundary conductivities have reduced the viability of these materials in intermediate temperatures applications. This thesis work uses density functional theory to gain a fundamental understanding of proton and defect chemistry within various perovskite environments in order to identify strategies to increase proton concentration and improve overall proton conductivity. First, material hydration was probed within yttrium-doped barium cerate (BCY) to examine how the thermodynamics of material hydration are influenced by dopant concentration. A model was derived from solely first principle techniques to describe hydration within BCY as a function of dopant concentration, temperature, and partial pressure of water. The resulting model can be used to screen for favorable perovskite-dopant combinations with enhanced hydration capabilities. Next, defect segregation was investigated in the more complex interfacial environment to probe the origin of low proton conductivity across perovskite grain boundaries (GB). The results of this study suggest that screening for perovskite-dopant combinations with strong dopant-oxygen bond strengths may reduce the segregation of dopant ions and oxygen vacancies to the GB interface, mitigating the development of a positive GB core and enhancing proton conduction across the GB. Finally, proton stability was assessed at various interfacial regions within the perovskite material. An examination of proton adsorption at the BaZrO3-vacuum interface reveals a destabilization of protons in the first subsurface layer of the perovskite, yielding a potential barrier for proton diffusion into and out of the perovskite membrane. An

  4. Stability and morphology of cerium oxide surfaces in an oxidizing environment: A first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronzi, Marco; Soon, Aloysius; Delley, Bernard; Traversa, Enrico; Stampfl, Catherine

    2009-09-01

    We present density functional theory investigations of the bulk properties of cerium oxides (CeO2 and Ce2O3) and the three low index surfaces of CeO2, namely, (100), (110), and (111). For the surfaces, we consider various terminations including surface defects. Using the approach of "ab initio atomistic thermodynamics," we find that the most stable surface structure considered is the stoichiometric (111) surface under "oxygen-rich" conditions, while for a more reducing environment, the same (111) surface, but with subsurface oxygen vacancies, is found to be the most stable one, and for a highly reducing environment, the (111) Ce-terminated surface becomes energetically favored. Interestingly, this latter surface exhibits a significant reconstruction in that it becomes oxygen terminated and the upper layers resemble the Ce2O3(0001) surface. This structure could represent a precursor to the phase transition of CeO2 to Ce2O3.

  5. Cuprous Oxide Scale up: Gram Production via Bulk Synthesis using Classic Solvents at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Han, T. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Cuprous oxide is a p-type semiconducting material that has been highly researched for its interesting properties. Many small-scale syntheses have exhibited excellent control over size and morphology. As the demand for cuprous oxide grows, the synthesis method need to evolve to facilitate large-scale production. This paper supplies a facile bulk synthesis method for Cu₂O on average, 1-liter reaction volume can produce 1 gram of particles. In order to study the shape and size control mechanisms on such a scale, the reaction volume was diminished to 250 mL producing on average 0.3 grams of nanoparticles per batch. Well-shaped nanoparticles have been synthesized using an aqueous solution of CuCl₂, NaOH, SDS surfactant, and NH₂OH-HCl at mild temperatures. The time allotted between the addition of NaOH and NH₂OH-HCl was determined to be critical for Cu(OH)2 production, an important precursor to the final produce The effects of stirring rates on a large scale was also analyzed during reagent addition and post reagent addition. A morphological change from rhombic dodecahedra to spheres occurred as the stirring speed was increased. The effects of NH₂OH-HCl concentration were also studied to control the etching effects of the final product.

  6. A Facile One Step Solution Route to Synthesize Cuprous Oxide Nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy U. Sandhya

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A cuprous oxide nanofluid stabilized by sodium lauryl sulfate, synthesized by using the one step method, has been reported. Nanofluids were synthesized by using a well‐ controlled surfactant‐assisted solution phase synthesis. The method involved reduction of copper acetate by glucose in a mixture of water and ethylene glycol serving as the base fluid. The synthesized fluid was characterized by X‐ray and electron diffraction techniques, in addition, transmission and field emission microscopic techniques and Fourier transform infra red spectroscopic analysis was undertaken. The rheological property, as well as the thermal conductivity of the fluid, were measured. The variation of reaction parameters considerably affected the size of the particles as well as the reaction rate. The uniform dispersion of the particles in the base fluid led to a stability period of three months under stationary state, augmenting the thermal conductivity of the nanofluid. The method is found to be simple, reliable and fast for the synthesis of Newtonian nanofluids containing cuprous oxide nanoparticles.

  7. First Principles Studies of Perovskites for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Salawu, Omotayo Akande

    2017-05-15

    Fundamental advances in cathode materials are key to lowering the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Detailed understanding of the structural, electronic and defect formation characteristics are essential for rational design of cathode materials. In this thesis we employ first principles methods to study La(Mn/Co)O3 and LnBaCo2O5+δ (Ln = Pr, Gd; δ = 0.5, 1) as cathode for SOFCs. Specifically, factors affecting the O vacancy formation and migration are investigated. We demonstrate that for LaMnO3 the anisotropy effects often neglected at high operating temperatures become relevant when the temperature is lowered. We show that this fact has consequences for the material properties and can be further enhanced by strain and Sr doping. Tensile strain promotes both the O vacancy formation and migration in pristine and Sr doped LaMnO3, while Sr doping enhances the O vacancy formation but not the migration. The effect of A-site hole doping (Mg2+, Ca2+ or Ba2+) on the electronic and magnetic properties as well as the O vacancy formation and migration in LaCoO3 are studied. All three dopants are found to facilitate O vacancy formation. Substitution of La3+ with Ba2+/Mg2+ yields the lowest O vacancy formation energy for low/intermediate spin Co, implying that not only the structure, but also the spin state of Co is a key parameter. Only for low spin Co the ionic radius is correlated with the O migration barrier. Enhanced migration for intermediate spin Co is ascribed to the availability of additional space at the transition state. For LnBaCo2O5+δ we compare the O vacancy formation in GdBaCo2O5.5 (Pmmm symmetry) and GdBaCo2O6 (P4/mmm symmetry), and the influence of Sr doping. The O vacancy formation energy is demonstrated to be smaller in the already O deficient compound. This relation is maintained under Sr doping. It turns out that Sr doping can be utilized to significantly enhance the O vacancy formation in both compounds. The observed trends are

  8. Elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of new oxide perovskite BaVO3: a first-principles study

    OpenAIRE

    Bannikov, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structural, elastic, magnetic properties, as well as electronic structure and chemical bonding picture of new oxide 3d1-perovskite BaVO3, recently synthesized, were systematically investigated involving the first-principles FLAPW-GGA calculations. The obtained results are discussed in comparison with available experimental data, as well as with those obtained before for isostructural and isoelectronic SrVO3 perovskite.

  9. Cuprous Sulfide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials: Solvothermal Synthesis and Enhanced Electrochemical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhanjun; Zhu, Yabo; Xing, Zheng; Wang, Zhengyuan

    2016-01-01

    The cuprous sulfide nanoparticles (CuS NPs)-decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposites have been successfully prepared via a facile and efficient solvothermal synthesis method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that CuS micronspheres composed of nanosheets and distributed on the rGO layer in well-monodispersed form. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that graphene oxide (GO) had been reduced to rGO. The electrochemical performances of CuS/rGO nanocomposites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and charge/discharge techniques, which showed that the specific capacitance of CuS/rGO nanocomposites was enhanced because of the introduction of rGO.

  10. Electrochemical potentials of layered oxide and olivine phosphate with aluminum substitution: A first principles study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Kumar Varanasi; Phani Kanth Sanagavarapu; Arghya Bhowmik; Mridula Dixit Bharadwaj; Balasubramanian Narayana; Umesh V Waghmare; Dipti Deodhare; Alind Sharma

    2013-12-01

    First-principles prediction of enhancement in the electrochemical potential of LiCoO2 with aluminum substitution has been realized through earlier experiments. For safer and less expensive Li-ion batteries, it is desirable to have a similar enhancement for alternative cathode materials, LiFePO4 and LiCoPO4. Here, we present first-principles density functional theory based analysis of the effects of aluminum substitution on electrochemical potential of LiCoO2, LiFePO4 and LiCoPO4. While Al substitution for transition metal results in increase in electrochemical potential of LiCoO2, it leads to reduction in LiFePO4 and LiCoPO4. Through comparative topological analysis of charge density of these materials, we identify a ratio of Bader charges that correlates with electrochemical potential and determine the chemical origin of these contrasting effects: while electronic charge from lithium is transferred largely to oxygen in LiCoO2, it gets shared by the oxygen and Co/Fe in olivine phosphates due to strong covalency between O and Co/Fe. Our work shows that covalency of transition metal–oxygen bond plays a key role in determining battery potential.

  11. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. These results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  12. First-principles Study on Neutral Nitrogen Impurities in Zinc Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Li; Sheng-hua Deng; Yi-bao Li; Li Zhang; Guo-hong Liu; Jing Huang

    2012-01-01

    The atomic geometries,electronic structures,and formation energies of neutral nitrogen impurities in ZnO have been investigated by first-principles calculations.The nitrogen impurities are always deep acceptors,thus having no contributions to p-type conductivity.Among all the neutral nitrogen impurities,nitrogen substituting on an oxygen site has the lowest formation energy and the shallowest acceptor level,while nitrogen substituting on a zinc site has the second-lowest formation energy in oxygen-rich conditions.Nitrogen interstitials are unstable at the tetrahedral site and spontaneously relax into a kick-out configuration.Though nitrogen may occupy the octahedral site,the concentrations will be low for the high formation energy.The charge density distributions in various doping cases are discussed,and self-consistent results are obtained.

  13. Intrinsic Defect Engineering of Cuprous Oxide to Enhance Electrical Transport Properties for Photovoltaic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Michael A.; Siah, Sin-Cheng; Brandt, Riley E.; Serdy, James; Johnston, Steve W.; Lee, Yun Seog; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2014-06-08

    Intrinsic point-defect species in cuprous oxide films are manipulated based on their thermodynamic properties via the implementation of a controlled annealing process. A wide range of electrical properties is demonstrated, with a window suitable for high-quality solar cell devices. A variation of carrier concentration over two orders of magnitude is demonstrated. Minority carrier lifetime is investigated by means of microwave photoconductance decay measurements, demonstrating a strong correlation with carrier concentration. Spectrally resolved photoluminescence yields are analyzed to provide insight into lifetime limiting mechanisms as a function of Cu2O processing parameters. Hall measurements of carrier mobility and concentration are taken at room temperature to provide insight into the effect of these processing conditions on net ionized defect concentration.

  14. Investigations of the interaction between cuprous oxide nanoparticles and Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN ChengLing; LI YuanFang; QI WenJing; HUANG ChengZhi

    2009-01-01

    Cuprous oxide nanoparticles of 30-50 nm in size were prepared in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB).By taking Staphylococcus aureus (S.a),which always causes a variety of suppurative infections and toxinoses in humans,as a model bioparticle,the negative bioeffect of nano-Cu2O on S.a cells was evaluated,and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by imitating the MIC of antibiotics.Cellularity and bactericidal effect were measured by flow cytometry (FCM),dark field light scattering imaging and SEM photography.The results showed that nano-Cu2O particles may,by absorbing on the cell surface,impair the cell wall,damage the cell membrane,and finally increase permeability of the cell membrane,thus leading to a decrease in the viability of bacteria in the nano-Cu2O solution.

  15. Investigations of the interaction between cuprous oxide nanoparticles and Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Cuprous oxide nanoparticles of 30-50 nm in size were prepared in the presence of cetyltrimethylam-monium bromide (CTAB). By taking Staphylococcus aureus (S.a), which always causes a variety of suppurative infections and toxinoses in humans, as a model bioparticle, the negative bioeffect of nano-Cu2O on S.a cells was evaluated, and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by imitating the MIC of antibiotics. Cellularity and bactericidal effect were measured by flow cytometry (FCM), dark field light scattering imaging and SEM photography. The results showed that nano-Cu2O particles may, by absorbing on the cell surface, impair the cell wall, damage the cell membrane, and finally increase permeability of the cell membrane, thus leading to a decrease in the viability of bacteria in the nano-Cu2O solution.

  16. Defect-induced selective oxidation of graphene: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yu-heng; Lu, Peng-fei; Wang, Jian; Yang, Jin-peng; Chen, Yong-ping

    2017-02-01

    Controlled oxidation of graphene is extremely important for nanopatterning and chemical functionalization. It is generally assumed in experiments that the oxidizing agent in the liquid-phase oxidation first attacks the defective sites in carbon lattices. To explore how the oxidation in the graphene sheet first begins, we have investigated the oxidization process with the structural defect using the density functional theory. Ten reaction pathways in the frame of the transition state theory are considered. We find that the most preferential reaction locus is located at the center of defect. It has also been observed that the preexistence of hydroxyl functional group on the graphene surface substantially decrease energy barrier for oxidization. Such facilitation of oxidation due to hydroxyl can explain how the oxidation process continues after its first oxidation around defects. The uneven redistributions of electron density caused both by defect and by the hydroxyl functional group account for the mechanism of the oxidization process on graphene sheet. Our calculation fully verifies the experimental assumption and is consistent with the recent experimental observations.

  17. On the transparent conducting oxide Al doped ZnO: First Principles and Boltzmann equations study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slassi, A. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohammed V-Agdal, Rabat (Morocco); Naji, S. [LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohammed V-Agdal, Rabat (Morocco); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ibb University, Ibb (Yemen); Benyoussef, A. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohammed V-Agdal, Rabat (Morocco); Hamedoun, M., E-mail: hamedoun@hotmail.com [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); El Kenz, A. [LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohammed V-Agdal, Rabat (Morocco)

    2014-08-25

    Highlights: • The incorporation of Al in ZnO increases the optical band edge absorption. • Incorporated Al creates shallow donor states of Al-3s around Fermi level. • Transmittance decreases in the visible and IR regions, while it increases in the UV region. • Electrical conductivity increases and reaches almost the saturation for high concentration of Al. - Abstract: We report, in this work, a theoretical study on the electronic, optical and electrical properties of pure and Al doped ZnO with different concentrations. In fact, we investigate these properties using both First Principles calculations within TB-mBJ approximation and Boltzmann equations under the constant relaxation time approximation for charge carriers. It is found out that, the calculated lattice parameters and the optical band gap of pure ZnO are close to the experimental values and in a good agreement with the other theoretical studies. It is also observed that, the incorporations of Al in ZnO increase the optical band edge absorption which leads to a blue shift and no deep impurities levels are induced in the band gap as well. More precisely, these incorporations create shallow donor states around Fermi level in the conduction band minimum from mainly Al-3s orbital. Beside this, it is found that, the transmittance is decreased in the visible and IR regions, while it is significantly improved in UV region. Finally, our calculations show that the electrical conductivity is enhanced as a result of Al doping and it reaches almost the saturation for high concentration of Al. These features make Al doped ZnO a transparent conducting electrode for optoelectronic device applications.

  18. Cuprous oxide photovoltaic cells. Final report, September 1, 1978-November 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivich, D.

    1979-01-01

    The research described represents the beginning of a second phase of research on cuprous oxide photovoltaic cells. The first phase was concerned with the development of procedures of making Schottky barriers on isolated films of Cu/sub 2/O, including single crystals. It was found that properties of these Schottky barrier cells, in particular the barrier heights, were limited by chemical changes at the junction especially with metals of low work function which tend to be more active chemically, e.g., Al. The motivation of the present phase of the research was to construct junctions that would avoid this chemical degradation while maintaining electrical contact between the Cu/sub 2/O and a low work function material in order to attain larger barrier heights. Essentially the approach involved placing the Cu/sub 2/O in contact with a stable oxide. When this oxide is used as a thin layer between the Cu/sub 2/O and a top metal contact this gives an MIS structure. As another approach the other oxide can be an n-type semiconductor in thicker layers to form a heterojunction. Results are reported. (WHK)

  19. Facile fabrication of electrolyte-gated single-crystalline cuprous oxide nanowire field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesser, Anna; von Seggern, Falk; Purohit, Suneeti; Nasr, Babak; Kruk, Robert; Dehm, Simone; Wang, Di; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2016-10-01

    Oxide semiconductors are considered to be one of the forefront candidates for the new generation, high-performance electronics. However, one of the major limitations for oxide electronics is the scarcity of an equally good hole-conducting semiconductor, which can provide identical performance for the p-type metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors as compared to their electron conducting counterparts. In this quest, here we present a bulk synthesis method for single crystalline cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanowires, their chemical and morphological characterization and suitability as active channel material in electrolyte-gated, low-power, field-effect transistors (FETs) for portable and flexible logic circuits. The bulk synthesis method used in the present study includes two steps: namely hydrothermal synthesis of the nanowires and the removal of the surface organic contaminants. The surface treated nanowires are then dispersed on a receiver substrate where the passive electrodes are structured, followed by printing of a composite solid polymer electrolyte (CSPE), chosen as the gate insulator. The characteristic electrical properties of individual nanowire FETs are found to be quite interesting including accumulation-mode operation and field-effect mobility of 0.15 cm2 V-1 s-1.

  20. First principle identification of SiC monolayer as an efficient catalyst for CO oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinthika, S., E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: sinthika90@gmail.com; Thapa, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: sinthika90@gmail.com [SRM Research Institute, SRM University, Kattankulathur 603203, Tamil Nadu (India); Reddy, C. Prakash [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur 603203, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-06-24

    Using density functional theory, we investigated the electronic properties of SiC monolayer and tested its catalytic activity toward CO oxidation. The planar nature of a SiC monolayer is found to stable and is a high band gap semiconductor. CO interacts physically with SiC surface, whereas O{sub 2} is adsorbed with moderate binding. CO oxidation on SiC monolayer prefers the Eley Rideal mechanism over the Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism, with an easily surmountable activation barrier during CO{sub 2} formation. Overall metal free SiC monolayer can be used as efficient catalyst for CO oxidation.

  1. Electrical conductivity in oxygen-deficient phases of transition metal oxides from first-principles calculations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondi, Robert James; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Marinella, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    Density-functional theory calculations, ab-initio molecular dynamics, and the Kubo-Greenwood formula are applied to predict electrical conductivity in Ta2Ox (0 x 5) as a function of composition, phase, and temperature, where additional focus is given to various oxidation states of the O monovacancy (VOn; n=0,1+,2+). Our calculations of DC conductivity at 300K agree well with experimental measurements taken on Ta2Ox thin films and bulk Ta2O5 powder-sintered pellets, although simulation accuracy can be improved for the most insulating, stoichiometric compositions. Our conductivity calculations and further interrogation of the O-deficient Ta2O5 electronic structure provide further theoretical basis to substantiate VO0 as a donor dopant in Ta2O5 and other metal oxides. Furthermore, this dopant-like behavior appears specific to neutral VO cases in both Ta2O5 and TiO2 and was not observed in other oxidation states. This suggests that reduction and oxidation reactions may effectively act as donor activation and deactivation mechanisms, respectively, for VO0 in transition metal oxides.

  2. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and dynamical properties of graphene oxides: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabhi, Shweta D.; Gupta, Sanjay D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-05-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study on the structural, electronic, mechanical, and vibrational properties of some graphene oxide models (GDO, a-GMO, z-GMO, ep-GMO and mix-GMO) at ambient pressure. The calculations are based on the ab-initio plane-wave pseudo potential density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximations for the exchange and correlation functional. The calculated values of lattice parameters, bulk modulus, and its first order pressure derivative are in good agreement with other reports. A linear response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive the phonon frequencies. We discuss the contribution of the phonons in the dynamical stability of graphene oxides and detailed analysis of zone centre phonon modes in all the above mentioned models. Our study demonstrates a wide range of energy gap available in the considered models of graphene oxide and hence the possibility of their use in nanodevices.

  3. High throughput first-principles calculations of bixbyite oxides for TCO applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmadian, Nasrin; Saniz, Rolando; Partoens, Bart; Lamoen, Dirk; Volety, Kalpana; Huyberechts, Guido; Paul, Johan

    2014-09-07

    We present a high-throughput computing scheme based on density functional theory (DFT) to generate a class of oxides and screen them with the aim of identifying those that might be electronically appropriate for transparent conducting oxide (TCO) applications. The screening criteria used are a minimum band gap to ensure sufficient transparency, a band edge alignment consistent with easy n- or p-type dopability, and a minimum thermodynamic phase stability to be experimentally synthesizable. Following this scheme we screened 23 binary and 1518 ternary bixbyite oxides in order to identify promising candidates, which can then be a subject of an in-depth study. The results for the known TCOs are in good agreement with the reported data in the literature. We suggest a list of several new potential TCOs, including both n- and p-type compounds.

  4. Which Oxide for Low-Emissivity Glasses? First-Principles Modeling of Silver Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornil, David; Wiame, Hugues; Lecomte, Benoit; Cornil, Jérôme; Beljonne, David

    2017-05-31

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to assess the work of adhesion of silver layers deposited on metal oxide surfaces differing by their chemical nature (ZnO, TiO2, SnO2, and ZrO2) and their crystallographic face. The calculated work of adhesion values range from ∼0 to 3 J m(-2) and are shown to originate from the interplay between ionic (associated with charge transfer at the interface) and covalent (as probed by atomic bond orders between silver and the metal oxide atoms) interactions. The results are discussed in the context of the design of silver/metal oxide interfaces for low-emissivity glasses.

  5. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and dynamical properties of graphene oxides: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabhi, Shweta D. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Krishnakumarsinhji Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar 364001 (India); Gupta, Sanjay D. [V. B. Institute of Science, Department of Physics, C. U. Shah University, Wadhwan City - 363030, Surendranagar (India); Jha, Prafulla K., E-mail: prafullaj@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India)

    2014-05-28

    We report the results of a theoretical study on the structural, electronic, mechanical, and vibrational properties of some graphene oxide models (GDO, a-GMO, z-GMO, ep-GMO and mix-GMO) at ambient pressure. The calculations are based on the ab-initio plane-wave pseudo potential density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximations for the exchange and correlation functional. The calculated values of lattice parameters, bulk modulus, and its first order pressure derivative are in good agreement with other reports. A linear response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive the phonon frequencies. We discuss the contribution of the phonons in the dynamical stability of graphene oxides and detailed analysis of zone centre phonon modes in all the above mentioned models. Our study demonstrates a wide range of energy gap available in the considered models of graphene oxide and hence the possibility of their use in nanodevices.

  6. Electro-oxidation of water on hematite: Effects of surface termination and oxygen vacancies investigated by first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Iandolo, Beniamino; Wickman, Bjorn

    2015-01-01

    oxidation measurements conducted on thin-film hematite anodes, resulted in a measured onset potential of 1.66 V vs. RHE. Furthermore, the threshold potential between the hydroxyl- and oxygen-terminated hematite was determined as a function of pH. The results indicate that electrochemical water oxidation......The oxygen evolution reaction on hydroxyl- and oxygen-terminated hematite was investigated using first-principle calculations within a theoretical electrochemical framework. Both pristine hematite and hematite containing oxygen vacancies were considered. The onset potential was determined to be 1.......79 V and 2.09 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) for the pristine hydroxyl- and oxygen-terminated hematite, respectively. The presence of oxygen vacancies in the hematite surface resulted in pronounced shifts of the onset potential to 3.09 V and 1.83 V. respectively. Electrochemical...

  7. Acetone gas sensing mechanism on zinc oxide surfaces: A first principles calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian Lemraski, M.; Nadimi, E.

    2017-03-01

    Semiconducting metal oxide gas sensors have attracted growing interest as a result of their outstanding performance in the bio and industrial applications. Nevertheless, the sensing mechanism is yet not totally understood. In this study, we extensively investigate the adsorption mechanism of acetone molecule on ZnO-based thin film sensors by performing ab initio density functional theory calculations and employing quantum molecular dynamic simulations. Since the sensitivity of a metal oxide sensor is exceedingly depends on molecular oxygen exposure and operating temperature, we explore the competitive adsorption of acetone and oxygen molecule on the most stable orientation of ZnO surface (10 1 ̅ 0) at different temperatures. Results indicate that at elevated temperatures acetone gains required thermal energy to remove preadsorbed oxygen molecule from the surface in a competitive process. We will show that this competition is responsible for the resistive switching behavior in the ZnO-based gas sensors.

  8. Cuprous oxide nanoparticle-inhibited melanoma progress by targeting melanoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Wang, Ye; Yu, Xinlu; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhu, Ji; Wang, Chen; Chen, Fei; Liu, Changcheng; Wang, Jingqiang; Zhu, Haiying

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that metal and metal oxide have a potential function in antitumor therapy. Our previous studies demonstrated that cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) not only selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro but also inhibit the growth and metastasis of melanoma by targeting mitochondria with little hepatic and renal toxicities in mice. As a further study, our current research revealed that CONPs induced apoptosis of human melanoma stem cells (CD271(+/high) cells) in A375 and WM266-4 melanoma cell lines and could significantly suppress the expression of MITF, SOX10 and CD271 involved in the stemness maintenance and tumorigenesis of melanoma stem cells. CD271(+/high) cells could accumulate more CONPs than CD271(-/low) through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In addition, lower dosage of CONPs exhibited good anti-melanoma effect by decreasing the cell viability, stemness and tumorigenesis of A375 and WM266-4 cells through reducing the expression of SOX10, MITF, CD271 and genes in MAPK pathway involved in tumor progression. Finally, CONPs obviously suppressed the growth of human melanoma in tumor-bearing nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD-SCID) mice, accompanied with tumors structural necrosis and fibrosis remarkably and decreased expression of CD271, SOX10 and MITF. These results above proved the effectiveness of CONPs in inhibiting melanoma progress through multiple pathways, especially through targeting melanoma stem cells.

  9. Towards printed perovskite solar cells with cuprous oxide hole transporting layers: a theoretical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Xia, Zhonggao; Liang, Jun; Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Yiming; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Shengdong; Zhou, Hang

    2015-05-01

    Solution-processed p-type metal oxide materials have shown great promise in improving the stability of perovskite-based solar cells and offering the feasibility for a low cost printing fabrication process. Herein, we performed a device modeling study on planar perovskite solar cells with cuprous oxide (Cu2O) hole transporting layers (HTLs) by using a solar cell simulation program, wxAMPS. The performance of a Cu2O/perovskite solar cell was correlated to the material properties of the Cu2O HTL, such as thickness, carrier mobility, mid-gap defect, and doping concentrations. The effect of interfacial defect densities on the solar cell performance was also investigated. Our simulation indicates that, with an optimized Cu2O HTL, high performance perovskite solar cells with efficiencies above 13% could be achieved, which shows the potential of using Cu2O as an alternative HTL over other inorganic materials, such as NiOx and MoOx. This study provides theoretical guidance for developing perovskite solar cells with inorganic hole transporting materials via a printing process.

  10. A first-principles investigation of the optical spectra of oxidized graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra

    2013-01-14

    The electronic and optical properties of mono, di, tri, and tetravacancies in graphene are studied in comparison to each other, using density functional theory. In addition, oxidized monovacancies are considered for different oxygen concentrations. Pristine graphene is found to be more absorptive than any defect configuration at low energy. We demonstrate characteristic differences in the optical spectra of the various defects for energies up to 3 eV. This makes it possible to quantify by optical spectroscopy the ratios of the defect species present in a sample.

  11. Effect of surface phosphorus on the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane: A first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Amitesh; Govind, Niranjan; Kung, Paul; King-Smith, Dominic; Miller, James E.; Zhang, Conrad; Whitwell, George

    2002-11-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of small-chain alkanes has the potential to displace thermal cracking as the preferred method of light olefin production. Many heterogeneous catalysts for the ODH reaction have been discussed in the literature, including oxides, vanadates, and phosphates of rare earth and transition metals. Our experiments and the literature indicate that for most of these catalysts, including silica gel and alumina, a phosphorus-enriched surface enhances the ODH yield of ethane to ethylene. To understand the role of P, the ODH reactions were simulated on a silica surface, with and without P, using the density functional theory code DMol3 in a periodic supercell. Optimized structures for all intermediates as well as transition states were obtained for full catalytic cycles. The simulations reveal that activation barriers for the rate-limiting steps are lowered by ˜10 kcal/mol in the presence of P. The decrease results from a transition state in which the P atom remains quasi-5-valent and fourfold coordinated.

  12. Investigating the Electronic Structure of Fluorite Oxides: Comparsion of EELS and First Principles Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, J; Asta, M; Gronbech-Jensen, N; Perlov, A; Milman, V; Gao, S; Pickard, C; Browning, N

    2009-06-05

    Energy loss spectra from a variety of cubic oxides are compared with ab-initio calculations based on the density functional plane wave method (CASTEP). In order to obtain agreement between experimental and theoretical spectra, unique material specific considerations were taken into account. The spectra were calculated using various approximations to describe core-hole effects and electronic correlations. All the calculations are based on the local spin density approximation to show qualitative agreement with the sensitive oxygen K-edge spectra in ceria, zirconia, and urania. Comparison of experimental and theoretical results let us characterize the main electronic interactions responsible for both the electronic structure and the resulting EEL spectra of the compounds in question.

  13. First-Principles Study of Structure Property Relationships of Monolayer (Hydroxy)Oxide-Metal Bifunctional Electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Kubal, Joseph; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, on the basis of detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and using Ni hydroxy(oxide) films on Pt(111) and Au(111) electrodes as model systems, we describe a detailed structural and electrocatalytic analysis of hydrogen evolution (HER) at three-phase boundaries...... of information that is inaccessible by purely experimental means, and these structures, in turn, strongly suggest that a bifunctional reaction mechanism for alkaline HER will be operative at the interface between the films, the metal substrates, and the surrounding aqueous medium. This bifunctionality produces...... important changes in the calculated barriers of key elementary reaction steps, including water activation and dissociation, as compared to traditional monofunctional Pt surfaces. The successful identification of the structures of thin metal films and three-phase boundary catalysts is not only an important...

  14. Schottky barrier at graphene/metal oxide interfaces: insight from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai; Han, Nannan; Su, Yan; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhao, Jijun

    2017-02-01

    Anode materials play an important role in determining the performance of lithium ion batteries. In experiment, graphene (GR)/metal oxide (MO) composites possess excellent electrochemical properties and are promising anode materials. Here we perform density functional theory calculations to explore the interfacial interaction between GR and MO. Our result reveals generally weak physical interactions between GR and several MOs (including Cu2O, NiO). The Schottky barrier height (SBH) in these metal/semiconductor heterostructures are computed using the macroscopically averaged electrostatic potential method, and the role of interfacial dipole is discussed. The calculated SBHs below 1 eV suggest low contact resistance; thus these GR/MO composites are favorable anode materials for better lithium ion batteries.

  15. Schottky barrier at graphene/metal oxide interfaces: insight from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai; Han, Nannan; Su, Yan; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhao, Jijun

    2017-01-01

    Anode materials play an important role in determining the performance of lithium ion batteries. In experiment, graphene (GR)/metal oxide (MO) composites possess excellent electrochemical properties and are promising anode materials. Here we perform density functional theory calculations to explore the interfacial interaction between GR and MO. Our result reveals generally weak physical interactions between GR and several MOs (including Cu2O, NiO). The Schottky barrier height (SBH) in these metal/semiconductor heterostructures are computed using the macroscopically averaged electrostatic potential method, and the role of interfacial dipole is discussed. The calculated SBHs below 1 eV suggest low contact resistance; thus these GR/MO composites are favorable anode materials for better lithium ion batteries. PMID:28165485

  16. One-pot synthesis of cuprous oxide-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite with enhanced photocatalytic and electrocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fugui; Li, Heping; Yang, Jun; Cai, Xiaodong; Fu, Li

    2016-03-01

    We report on the facile one-step synthesis of porous cuprous oxide nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (Cu2O-RGO) by synchronously reducing Cu2+ ions and GO with ethylene glycol. The basic chemical components, crystal structure and surface morphology of prepared nanocomposite was carefully characterized. The photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared nanocomposite was investigated by photodegrading methylene blue (MB) under visible light. The electrocatalytic property of the nanocomposite was investigated by electrocatalytic determination of acetaminophen. The results indicate that the corporation of RGO with Cu2O nanoparticles could high enhance the both photocatalytic and electrocatalytic properties. Moreover, we found that the content of RGO introduced into nanocomposite could highly affect the product properties.

  17. First-principle simulations of the electronic structure of copper-based oxide superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Yutoh, Y

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between the transition temperature (T sub c) of an oxide superconductor and strain has been studied by means of experiments, with a focus an specimens that include an interface between a superconductor and a substrate. In the current study, we performed calculations on the bulk and the surface in order to investigate the electronic structures of the above systems. We calculated the electronic structure of La sub 2 CuO sub 4 bulk by employment of three-dimensional boundary conditions and that of a La sub 2 CuO sub 4 surface by employment of two-dimensional boundary conditions. The results for the bulk indicate that a relationship exists between the lattice parameters and T sub c of La sub 2 CuO sub 4. We discuss the calculated results for the bulk and surface on the basis of the results of investigation of the differences in electronic structures. The results indicate that the surface retained the electronic structures of the bulk. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Revealing a room temperature ferromagnetism in cadmium oxide nanoparticles: An experimental and first-principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Bououdina, Mohamed

    2015-03-26

    We obtain a single cadmium oxide phase from powder synthesized by a thermal decomposition method of cadmium acetate dehydrate. The yielded powder is annealed in air, vacuum, and H2 gas in order to create point defects. Magnetization-field curves reveal the appearance of diamagnetic behavior with a ferromagnetic component for all the powders. Powder annealing under vacuum and H2 atmosphere leads to a saturation magnetization 1.15 memu g-1 and 1.2 memu g-1 respectively with an increase by 45% and 16% compared to the one annealed in air. We show that annealing in vacuum produces mainly oxygen vacancies while annealing in H2 gas creates mainly Cd vacancy leading to room temperature ferromagnetic (RTFM) component together with known diamagnetic properties. Ab initio calculations performed on the CdO nanoparticles show that the magnetism is governed by polarized hybrid states of the Cd d and O p orbitals together with the vacancy. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  19. Giant piezoelectric size effects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride nanowires. A first principles investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ravi; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2011-02-09

    Nanowires made of materials with noncentrosymmetric crystal structure are under investigation for their piezoelectric properties and suitability as building blocks for next-generation self-powered nanodevices. In this work, we investigate the size dependence of piezoelectric coefficients in nanowires of two such materials - zinc oxide and gallium nitride. Nanowires, oriented along their polar axis, ranging from 0.6 to 2.4 nm in diameter were modeled quantum mechanically. A giant piezoelectric size effect is identified for both GaN and ZnO nanowires. However, GaN exhibits a larger and more extended size dependence than ZnO. The observed size effect is discussed in the context of charge redistribution near the free surfaces leading to changes in local polarization. The study reveals that local changes in polarization and reduction of unit cell volume with respect to bulk values lead to the observed size effect. These results have strong implication in the field of energy harvesting, as piezoelectric voltage output scales with the piezoelectric coefficient.

  20. Rational design of novel cathode materials in solid oxide fuel cells using first-principles simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YongMan; Liu, Meilin [Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, N.W., Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Lin, M.C. [Department of Chemistry, Emory University, 1515 Dickey Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Center for Interdisciplinary Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010 (China)

    2010-03-01

    The search for clean and renewable sources of energy represents one of the most vital challenges facing us today. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are among the most promising technologies for a clean and secure energy future due to their high energy efficiency and excellent fuel flexibility (e.g., direct utilization of hydrocarbons or renewable fuels). To make SOFCs economically competitive, however, development of new materials for low-temperature operation is essential. Here we report our results on a computational study to achieve rational design of SOFC cathodes with fast oxygen reduction kinetics and rapid ionic transport. Results suggest that surface catalytic properties are strongly correlated with the bulk transport properties in several material systems with the formula of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}BO{sub 2.75} (where B = Cr, Mn, Fe, or Co). The predictions seem to agree qualitatively with available experimental results on these materials. This computational screening technique may guide us to search for high-efficiency cathode materials for a new generation of SOFCs. (author)

  1. BN and BN oxide nanosheets based nanosensor for paracetamol adsorption: a first principles simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Castro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects that the adsorption of the paracetamol molecule produce on the structural and electronic properties of boron nitride (hBNNs; B27N27H18 and boron nitride oxide (hBNONs; B27N27H17 + O + (OH3 + COOH hexagonal symmetry nanosheets were studied by means of Density Functional Theory. The generalized gradient approximation proposed by Heyd—Scuseria—Ernzerhof ((HSEh1PBE―GGA was used in concert with 6-31G(d basis sets. Several candidate structures, 9 and 13 for the hBNNs―Paracetamol and BNONs―Paracetamol interactions, respectively, were used for the geometry optimization procedure. The results show that in the lowest energy absorption site the paracetamol molecule reaches a parallel orientation to the surface of the nanosheets, producing physisorption for hBNNs―Paracetamol and chemisorption for BNONs―Paracetamol. Besides, the adsorption process yields an increase of the polarity opening the possibility for the solubility and dispersion of these compounds. The paracetamol molecule promotes also a decrease of the reactivity parameter, which is crucial for biological applications of these systems. Referred to pristine hBNNs and BNONs, the work functions of hBNNs-Paracetamol and BNONs―Paracetamol are diminished. That is, these functionalized 2D systems yields appropriate conditions for field emission and they may be used as sensors of such pharmaceutical compound.

  2. Elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of new oxide perovskite BaVO{sub 3}: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannikov, V.V., E-mail: bannikov@ihim.uran.ru

    2016-03-01

    The structural, elastic, magnetic properties, as well as electronic structure and chemical bonding picture of new oxide 3d{sup 1}-perovskite BaVO{sub 3}, recently synthesized, were systematically investigated involving the first-principles FLAPW-GGA calculations. The obtained results are discussed in comparison with available experimental data, as well as with those obtained before for isostructural and isoelectronic SrVO{sub 3} perovskite. - Highlights: • BaVO{sub 3} is more compressible, but stiffer with respect to shear than SrVO{sub 3}. • Maximal Young's modulus for BaVO{sub 3} is ∼303 GPa - in [111] direction. • BaVO{sub 3} is characterized with negative Cauchy pressure. • BaVO{sub 3} is so-called “exchange-enhanced” Pauli paramagnet.

  3. Improvement in structural and electrical properties of cuprous oxide-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shivani Dhall; Neena Jaggi

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles are coated on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using Fehling’s reaction. The coating of Cu2O nanoparticles on the nanotubes was confirmed by SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra. The calculated D/G ratio of Cu2O (using 3% CuSO4 by wt)-coated MWCNTs by Raman spectra is found to decrease to 0.94 as compared to 1.14 for pristine MWCNTs. It shows that the presence of Cu2O nanoparticles on nanotubes decreases the inherent defects present in the form of some pentagons/heptagons in the honeycomb hexagonal carbon atoms in the structure of graphene sheets of MWCNTs and increases the crystalline nature of MWCNTs, which is also confirmed by the XRD peaks. Whereas the value of D/G ratio increases to 1.39 for sample 2 (using 5% CuSO4 by wt), which represents the structural deformation. Moreover, the electrical conductivity of MWCNTs was increased by 3 times after coating the nanotubes with Cu2O (using 3% CuSO4 by wt).

  4. Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of Nanocrystalline Cuprous Oxide Thin Film Deposited By Chemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Bansilal Ahirrao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cuprous oxide (Cu2O is an interesting p-type semiconductor material used in solar cell applications.  The Modified Chemical Bath Deposition (M-CBD method is suitable for growing thin multilayer structure due to low deposition temperature. This method does not require any sophisticated instrument and substrate need not to be conductive. The nanocrystalline Cu2O thin films were deposited on glass substrates by M-CBD method. The deposited films were characterized by different characterization techniques to study structural, surface morphological, optical and electrical properties. The structural studies show that, the formation of Cu2O thin films with an average crystallite size of 14 nm. Optical studies show a direct band gap 2.48 eV. The room temperature electrical resistivity is of the order of 1.3 kW-cm and activation energy 0.33 eV. The films exhibit p-type electrical conductivity as seen by thermo-emf measurements.

  5. Parameters controlling microstructures and resistance switching of electrodeposited cuprous oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanparast, Sanaz

    2016-12-01

    Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) thin films were electrodeposited cathodically from a highly alkaline bath using tartrate as complexing agent. Different microstructures for Cu2O thin films were achieved by varying the applied potential from -0.285 to -0.395 V versus a reference electrode of Ag/AgCl at 50 °C in potentiostatic mode, and separately by changing the bath temperature from 25 to 50 °C in galvanostatic mode. Characterization experiments showed that both grain size and orientation of Cu2O can be controlled by changing the applied potential. Applying a high negative potential of -0.395 V resulted in smaller grain size of Cu2O thin films with a preferred orientation in [111] direction. An increase in the bath temperature in galvanostatic electrodeposition increased the grain size of Cu2O thin films. All the films in Au/Cu2O/Au-Pd cell showed unipolar resistance switching behavior after an initial FORMING process. Increasing the grain size of Cu2O thin films and decreasing the top electrode area increased the FORMING voltage and decreased the current level of high resistance state (HRS). The current in low resistance state (LRS) was independent of the top electrode area and the grain size of deposited films, suggesting a filamentary conduction mechanism in unipolar resistance switching of Cu2O.

  6. Monodisperse Pt atoms anchored on N-doped graphene as efficient catalysts for CO oxidation: A first-principles investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    We performed first-principles based calculations to investigate the electronic structure and the potential catalytic performance of Pt atoms monodispersed on N-doped graphene in CO oxidation. We showed that N-doping can introduce localized defect states in the vicinity of the Fermi level of graphene which will effectively stabilize the deposited Pt atoms. The binding energy of a single Pt atom onto a stable cluster of 3 pyridinic N (PtN3) is up to -4.47 eV, making the diffusion and aggregation of anchored Pt atoms difficult. Both the reaction thermodynamics and kinetics suggest that CO oxidation over PtN3 would proceed through the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The reaction barriers for the formation and dissociation of the peroxide-like intermediate are determined to be as low as 0.01 and 0.08 eV, respectively, while that for the regeneration is only 0.15 eV, proving the potential high catalytic performance of PtN3 in CO oxidation, especially at low temperatures. The Pt-d states that are up-shifted by the Pt-N interaction account for the enhanced activation of O2 and the efficient formation and dissociation of the peroxide-like intermediate.

  7. Copper atoms embedded in hexagonal boron nitride as potential catalysts for CO oxidation: A first-principles investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We addressed the electronic structure of Cu atoms embedded in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and their catalytic role in CO oxidation by first-principles-based calculations. We showed that Cu atoms prefer to bind directly with the localized defects on h-BN, which act as strong trapping sites for Cu atoms and inhibit their clustering. The strong binding of Cu atoms at boron vacancy also up-shifts the energy level of Cu-d states to the Fermi level and promotes the formation of peroxide-like intermediate. CO oxidation over Cu atoms embedded in h-BN would proceed through the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the formation of a peroxide-like complex by reaction of coadsorbed CO and O2, with the dissociation of which the a CO2 molecule and an adsorbed O atom are formed. Then, the embedded Cu atom is regenerated by the reaction of another gaseous CO with the remnant O atom. The calculated energy barriers for the formation and dissociation of peroxide complex and regeneration of embedded Cu atoms are as low as 0.26, 0.11 and 0.03 eV, respectively, indicating the potential high catalytic performance of Cu atoms embedded in h-BN for low temperature CO oxidation. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  8. Tilts, dopants, vacancies and non-stoichiometry: Understanding and designing the properties of complex solid oxide perovskites from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joseph W.

    Perovskite oxides of formula ABO3 have a wide range of structural, electrical and mechanical properties, making them vital materials for many applications, such as catalysis, ultrasound machines and communication devices. Perovskite solid solutions with high piezoelectric response, such as ferroelectrics, are of particular interest as they can be employed as sensors in SONAR devices. Ferroelectric materials are unique in that their chemical and electrical properties can be non-invasively and reversibly changed, by switching the bulk polarization. This makes ferroelectrics useful for applications in non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM) devices. Perovskite solid solutions with a lower piezoelectric response than ferroelectrics are important for communication technology, as they function well as electroceramic capacitors. Also of interest is how these materials act as a component in a solid oxide fuel cell, as they can function as an efficient source of energy. Altering the chemical composition of these solid oxide materials offers an opportunity to change the desired properties of the final ceramic, adding a degree of flexibility that is advantageous for a variety of applications. These solid oxides are complex, sometimes disordered systems that are a challenge to study experimentally. However, as it is their complexity which produces favorable properties, highly accurate modeling which captures the essential features of the disordered structure is necessary to explain the behavior of current materials and predict favorable compositions for new materials. Methodological improvements and faster computer speeds have made first-principles and atomistic calculations a viable tool for understanding these complex systems. Offering a combination of accuracy and computational speed, the density functional theory (DFT) approach can reveal details about the microscopic structure and interactions of complex systems. Using DFT and a combination of principles from both

  9. First principle study of the surface reactivity of layered lithium oxides LiMO2 (M = Ni, Mn, Co)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallverdu, Germain; Minvielle, Marie; Andreu, Nathalie; Gonbeau, Danielle; Baraille, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    LiNixMnyCo1 - x - yO2 compounds (NMC) are layered oxides widely used in commercial lithium-ion batteries at the positive electrode. Nevertheless surface reactivity of this material is still not well known. As a first step, based on first principle calculations, this study deals with the electronic properties and the surface reactivity of LiMO2 (M = Co, Ni, Mn) compounds, considering the behavior of each transition metal separately in the same R 3 ̅ mα-NaFeO2-type structure, the one of LiCoO2 and NMC. For each compound, after a brief description of the bare slab electronic properties, we explored the acido-basic and redox properties of the (110) and (104) surfaces by considering the adsorption of a gaseous probe. The chemisorption of SO2 produces both sulfite or sulfate species associated respectively to an acido-basic or a reduction process. These processes are localized on the transition metals of the first two layers of the surface. Although sulfate species are globally favored, a different behavior is obtained depending on both the surface and the transition metal considered. We conclude with a simple scheme which describes the reduction processes on the both surfaces in terms of formal oxidation degrees of transition metals.

  10. Carbon-layer-protected cuprous oxide nanowire arrays for efficient water reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhonghai

    2013-02-26

    In this work, we propose a solution-based carbon precursor coating and subsequent carbonization strategy to form a thin protective carbon layer on unstable semiconductor nanostructures as a solution to the commonly occurring photocorrosion problem of many semiconductors. A proof-of-concept is provided by using glucose as the carbon precursor to form a protective carbon coating onto cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanowire arrays which were synthesized from copper mesh. The carbon-layer-protected Cu2O nanowire arrays exhibited remarkably improved photostability as well as considerably enhanced photocurrent density. The Cu2O nanowire arrays coated with a carbon layer of 20 nm thickness were found to give an optimal water splitting performance, producing a photocurrent density of -3.95 mA cm-2 and an optimal photocathode efficiency of 0.56% under illumination of AM 1.5G (100 mW cm-2). This is the highest value ever reported for a Cu 2O-based electrode coated with a metal/co-catalyst-free protective layer. The photostability, measured as the percentage of the photocurrent density at the end of 20 min measurement period relative to that at the beginning of the measurement, improved from 12.6% on the bare, nonprotected Cu2O nanowire arrays to 80.7% on the continuous carbon coating protected ones, more than a 6-fold increase. We believe that the facile strategy presented in this work is a general approach that can address the stability issue of many nonstable photoelectrodes and thus has the potential to make a meaningful contribution in the general field of energy conversion. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. Cytotoxicity of cuprous oxide nanoparticles to fish blood cells: hemolysis and internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Liqiang, E-mail: chenlq@ynu.edu.cn; Kang Bin [Yunnan University, Asian International Rivers Center, Yunnan Key Laboratory of International Rivers and Trans-boundary Eco-security (China); Ling Jian [Yunnan University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2013-03-15

    Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu{sub 2}O NPs) possess unique physical and chemical properties which are employed in a broad variety of applications. However, little is known about the adverse effects of Cu{sub 2}O NPs on organisms. In the current study, in vitro cytotoxicity of Cu{sub 2}O NPs (ca. 60 nm in diameter) to the blood cells of freshwater fish Carassius auratus was evaluated. A concentration-dependent hemolytic activity of Cu{sub 2}O NPs to red blood cells (RBCs) and the phagocytosis of Cu{sub 2}O NPs by leukocytes were revealed. The results showed that dosages of Cu{sub 2}O NPs greater than 40 {mu}g/mL were toxic to blood cells, and could cause serious membrane damage to RBCs. The EC{sub 50} value of Cu{sub 2}O NPs as obtained from RBCs and whole blood exposure was 26 and 63 {mu}g/mL, respectively. The generation of reactive oxygen species and the direct interaction between Cu{sub 2}O NPs and the cell membrane were suggested as the possible mechanism for cytotoxicity, and the intrinsic hemolytic active of Cu{sub 2}O NPs was the main contributor to the toxicity rather than solubilized copper ions. The adsorption of plasma proteins on the surfaces of Cu{sub 2}O NPs led to their aggregation in whole blood, and aggregate formation can significantly alleviate the hemolytic effect and subsequently mediate the phagocytosis of Cu{sub 2}O NPs by leukocytes.

  12. Reduced graphene oxide–cuprous oxide composite via facial deposition for photocatalytic dye-degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, MingYan, E-mail: mingyanlyg@hotmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang 222005 (China); Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Australian Institute of Innovative Materials, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Huang, JunRao; Tong, ZhiWei [Department of Chemical Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang 222005 (China); Li, WeiHua [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Chen, Jun, E-mail: junc@uow.edu.au [Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Australian Institute of Innovative Materials, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •Cubic Cu{sub 2}O were effectively loaded on n-propylamine (PA) intercalated graphene oxide. •The addition of PA on the carbon sheets supports the stable structure of the composites. •Cu{sub 2}O/PA/rGO showed superior adsorption capacity and photocatalytic activity. -- Abstract: Cubic Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized on n-propylamine (PA) intercalated graphene oxide (GO) with uniform distribution followed with a subsequent hydrazine hydrate reduction process to generate Cu{sub 2}O/PA/rGO composite. For comparison, Cu{sub 2}O conjugated reduced graphene oxide (Cu{sub 2}O/rGO) composite was also synthesized using the same method. The as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O/PA/rGO and Cu{sub 2}O/rGO nanocomposites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area analysis, and Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) measurements. UV/vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy was employed to estimate band gap energies of cuprous oxide composites. The results show that the intercalation of PA into the layered GO increases the surface area of the composites and provides an efficient strategy to load Cu{sub 2}O due to the large and uniform distribution of active sites for anchoring copper ions. The surface area of the Cu{sub 2}O/PA/rGO (123 m{sup 2}/g) nanocomposite was found to be almost 2.5 times higher than that of Cu{sub 2}O/rGO (55.7 m{sup 2}/g). The as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O/PA/rGO show significant improvement on both adsorption capacity and photocatalytic activity towards organic pigment pollution compared with Cu{sub 2}O/rGO under identical performance conditions.

  13. First-principles model potentials for lattice-dynamical studies: general methodology and example of application to ferroic perovskite oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdeł, Jacek C; Hermet, Patrick; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ghosez, Philippe; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2013-07-31

    We present a scheme to construct model potentials, with parameters computed from first principles, for large-scale lattice-dynamical simulations of materials. We mimic the traditional solid-state approach to the investigation of vibrational spectra, i.e., we start from a suitably chosen reference configuration of the compound and describe its energy as a function of arbitrary atomic distortions by means of a Taylor series. Such a form of the potential-energy surface is general, trivial to formulate for any material, and physically transparent. Further, such models involve clear-cut approximations, their precision can be improved in a systematic fashion, and their simplicity allows for convenient and practical strategies to compute/fit the potential parameters. We illustrate our scheme with two challenging cases in which the model potential is strongly anharmonic, namely, the ferroic perovskite oxides PbTiO3 and SrTiO3. Studying these compounds allows us to better describe the connection between the so-called effective-Hamiltonian method and ours (which may be seen as an extension of the former), and to show the physical insight and predictive power provided by our approach-e.g., we present new results regarding the factors controlling phase-transition temperatures, novel phase transitions under elastic constraints, an improved treatment of thermal expansion, etc.

  14. First-principles local density approximation (LDA)+ U and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) + U studies of plutonium oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Bo; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    The electronic structures and properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 have been studied according to the first principles by using the all-electron projector-augmented-wave (PAW) method. The local density approximation (LDA)+U and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)+U formalisms have been used to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion among the localized Pu 5f electrons. We discuss how the properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 are affected by choosing the values of U and exchange-correlation potential. Also, the oxidation reaction of Pu2O3, leading to the formation of PuO2, and its dependence on U and exchange-correlation potential have been studied. Our results show that by choosing an appropriate U it is possible to consistently describe structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3, which enable the modelling of the redox process involving Pu-based materials.

  15. Lattice and transport properties of the misfit-layered oxide thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebola, Alejandro; Klie, Robert; Zapol, Peter; Ogut, Serdar

    2013-03-01

    The misfit-layered oxide Ca3Co4O9 (CCO) has recently been the subject of many experimental and some theoretical investigations due to its remarkable thermoelectric properties. CCO is composed of two incommensurate subsystems, a distorted rocksalt-type Ca2CoO3 layer sandwiched between hexagonal CoO2 layers. Taking into account that the composition ratio between these subsystems is very close to the golden mean, which is the limit of the sequence of the ratios of consecutive Fibonacci numbers F (n) , we model CCO from first principles[1] by using rational approximants of composition [Ca2CoO3]2 F (n)[CoO2]2 F (n + 1). In the present study, we use 3/2 and 5/3 rational approximants and PBE+U computations to calculate the ab initio phonon dispersion curves, related thermal properties, as well as ab initio electronic transport properties such as DC conductivity and thermopower within the relaxation time approximation by applying the Boltzmann transport theory. Results are compared with available experimental data and potential routes for increasing the thermopower of CCO are discussed.

  16. Hydrogen oxidation reaction at the Ni/YSZ anode of solid oxide fuel cells from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S; Bernasconi, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-11-11

    By means of ab initio simulations we here provide a comprehensive scenario for hydrogen oxidation reactions at the Ni/zirconia anode of solid oxide fuel cells. The simulations have also revealed that in the presence of water chemisorbed at the oxide surface, the active region for H oxidation actually extends beyond the metal/zirconia interface unraveling the role of water partial pressure in the decrease of the polarization resistance observed experimentally.

  17. Literature review on the properties of cuprous oxide Cu{sub 2}O and the process of copper oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhavyi, P. A.; Johansson, B. (Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of the present review is to provide a reference guide to the most recent data on the properties of copper(I) oxide as well as on the atomic processes involved in the initial stages of oxidation of copper. The data on the structure of surfaces, as obtained from atomic-resolution microscopy studies (for example, STM) or from first-principles calculations, are reviewed. Information of this kind may be useful for understanding the atomic mechanisms of corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking of copper

  18. Hydrometallurgical process for the recycling of copper using anodic oxidation of cuprous ammine complexes and flow-through electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, T.; Yaguchi, M.; Koyama, K.; Tanaka, M. [Metals Recycling Group, Research Institute for Environmental Management Technology, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Lee, J.-C. [Minerals and Materials Processing Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 30 Gajeong-dong, Yuseong-ku, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea)

    2008-01-01

    Flow-through electrolysis for copper electrowinning from cuprous ammine complex was studied in order to develop a hydrometallurgical copper recycling process using an ammoniacal chloride solution, focusing on the anodic oxidation of cuprous to cupric ammine complexes. The current efficiency of this anodic oxidation was 96% at a current density of 200 A m{sup -2} under a batch condition. In a flow-through electrolysis using a sub-liter cell and a carbon felt anode, the anodic current efficiency increased with the flow rate and was typically higher than 97%. This tendency was explained by the backward flow of the cupric ammine complex, which was formed on the anode, through the diaphragm. The anodic overpotential was lower than 0.3 V even at an apparent current density of 1500 A m{sup -2}. A similar current efficiency and overpotential were also achieved in a liter scale cell, which indicates the scale flexibility of this electrolysis. The power consumption requirements for copper electrowinning in this cell were 460 and 770 kWh t{sup -1} at the current densities of 250 and 500 A m{sup -2}, respectively, which were much lower than that of the conventional copper electrowinning despite the longer interpolar distance. (author)

  19. Plasmon-induced selective carbon dioxide conversion on earth-abundant aluminum-cuprous oxide antenna-reactor nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robatjazi, Hossein; Zhao, Hangqi; Swearer, Dayne F; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Zhou, Linan; Alabastri, Alessandro; McClain, Michael J; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2017-06-21

    The rational combination of plasmonic nanoantennas with active transition metal-based catalysts, known as 'antenna-reactor' nanostructures, holds promise to expand the scope of chemical reactions possible with plasmonic photocatalysis. Here, we report earth-abundant embedded aluminum in cuprous oxide antenna-reactor heterostructures that operate more effectively and selectively for the reverse water-gas shift reaction under milder illumination than in conventional thermal conditions. Through rigorous comparison of the spatial temperature profile, optical absorption, and integrated electric field enhancement of the catalyst, we have been able to distinguish between competing photothermal and hot-carrier driven mechanistic pathways. The antenna-reactor geometry efficiently harnesses the plasmon resonance of aluminum to supply energetic hot-carriers and increases optical absorption in cuprous oxide for selective carbon dioxide conversion to carbon monoxide with visible light. The transition from noble metals to aluminum based antenna-reactor heterostructures in plasmonic photocatalysis provides a sustainable route to high-value chemicals and reaffirms the practical potential of plasmon-mediated chemical transformations.Plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis holds promise for the control of chemical reactions. Here the authors report an Al@Cu2O heterostructure based on earth abundant materials to transform CO2 into CO at significantly milder conditions.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Wurtzite Zinc-Oxide from First-Principles Lattice Dynamics--a Comparative Study with Gallium Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufei; Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Wohlwend, Jennifer L; Roy, Ajit K; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-03-01

    Wurtzite Zinc-Oxide (w-ZnO) is a wide bandgap semiconductor that holds promise in power electronics applications, where heat dissipation is of critical importance. However, large discrepancies exist in the literature on the thermal conductivity of w-ZnO. In this paper, we determine the thermal conductivity of w-ZnO using first-principles lattice dynamics and compare it to that of wurtzite Gallium-Nitride (w-GaN)--another important wide bandgap semiconductor with the same crystal structure and similar atomic masses as w-ZnO. However, the thermal conductivity values show large differences (400 W/mK of w-GaN vs. 50 W/mK of w-ZnO at room temperature). It is found that the much lower thermal conductivity of ZnO originates from the smaller phonon group velocities, larger three-phonon scattering phase space and larger anharmonicity. Compared to w-GaN, w-ZnO has a smaller frequency gap in phonon dispersion, which is responsible for the stronger anharmonic phonon scattering, and the weaker interatomic bonds in w-ZnO leads to smaller phonon group velocities. The thermal conductivity of w-ZnO also shows strong size effect with nano-sized grains or structures. The results from this work help identify the cause of large discrepancies in w-ZnO thermal conductivity and will provide in-depth understanding of phonon dynamics for the design of w-ZnO-based electronics.

  1. Understanding the Atomic-Level Chemistry and Structure of Oxide Deposits on Fuel Rods in Light Water Nuclear Reactors Using First Principles Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Zs.; O'Brien, C. J.; Brenner, D. W.; Andersson, D. A.; Stanek, C. R.

    2016-09-01

    The results of recent studies are discussed in which first principles calculations at the atomic level have been used to expand the thermodynamic database for science-based predictive modeling of the chemistry, composition and structure of unwanted oxides that deposit on the fuel rods in pressurized light water nuclear reactors. Issues discussed include the origin of the particles that make up deposits, the structure and properties of the deposits, and the forms by which boron uptake into the deposits can occur. These first principles approaches have implications for other research areas, such as hydrothermal synthesis and the stability and corrosion resistance of other materials under other extreme conditions.

  2. Preparation of 3D nanoporous copper-supported cuprous oxide for high-performance lithium ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dequan; Yang, Zhibo; Wang, Peng; Li, Fei; Wang, Desheng; He, Deyan

    2013-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanoporous architectures can provide efficient and rapid pathways for Li-ion and electron transport as well as short solid-state diffusion lengths in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). In this work, 3D nanoporous copper-supported cuprous oxide was successfully fabricated by low-cost selective etching of an electron-beam melted Cu(50)Al(50) alloy and subsequent in situ thermal oxidation. The architecture was used as an anode in lithium ion batteries. In the first cycle, the sample delivered an extremely high lithium storage capacity of about 2.35 mA h cm(-2). A high reversible capacity of 1.45 mA h cm(-2) was achieved after 120 cycles. This work develops a promising approach to building reliable 3D nanostructured electrodes for high-performance lithium ion batteries.

  3. Optical Study of Cuprous Oxide and Ferric Oxide Based Materials for Applications in Low Cost Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Thi Cuc; Bui, Bao Thoa; Wegmuller, Benjamin; Nguyen, Minh Hieu; Hoang Ngoc, Lam Huong; Bui, Van Diep; Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Hoang, Chi Hieu; Nguyen-Tran, Thuat

    2016-05-01

    One of the interesting forms of cuprous oxide and ferric oxide based materials is CuFeO2 which can be a delafossite-type compound and is a well known p-type semiconductor. This compound makes up an interesting family of materials for technological applications. CuFeO2 thin films recently gained renewed interest for potential applications in solar cell devices especially as absorption layers. One of the interesting facts is that CuFeO2 is made from cheap materials such as copper and iron. In this study, CuFeO2 thin films are intentionally deposited on corning glass and silicon substrates by the radio-frequency and direct current sputtering method with complicated and well developed co-sputtering recipes. The deposition was performed at room temperature which leads to an amorphous phase with extremely low roughness and high density. The films also were annealed at 500°C in 5% H2 in Ar for the passivation. A detailed optical study was performed on these thin films by spectroscopic ellipsometry and by ultra-violet visible near infrared spectroscopy. Depending on sputtering conditions, the direct band gap was extrapolated to be from 1.96 eV to 2.2 eV and 2.92 eV to 2.96 eV and the indirect band gap is about 1.22 eV to 1.42 eV. A good electrical conduction is also observed which is suitable for solar cell applications. In future more study on the structural properties will be carried out in order to fully understand these materials.

  4. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles inhibit prostate cancer by attenuating the stemness of cancer cells via inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Yang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Tie; Shi, Min-Feng; Sun, Chen-Xia; Gao, Xiu-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Qiong; Cui, Xin-Gang; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2017-01-01

    Disordered copper metabolism plays a critical role in the development of various cancers. As a nanomedicine containing copper, cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) exert ideal antitumor pharmacological effects in vitro and in vivo. Prostate cancer is a frequently diagnosed male malignancy prone to relapse, and castration resistance is the main reason for endocrine therapy failure. However, whether CONPs have the potential to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer is still unknown. Here, using the castration-resistant PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line as a model, we report that CONPs can selectively induce apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. CONPs can also attenuate the stemness of cancer cells and inhibit the Wnt signaling pathway, both of which highlight the great potential of CONPs as a new clinical castration-resistant prostate cancer therapy.

  5. Organics on oxidic metal surfaces: a first-principles DFT study of PMDA and ODA fragments on the pristine and mildly oxidized surfaces of Cu(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hwan; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Metal-organic hybrid materials are ubiquitous and a fundamental understanding of the hybrid-interface is key for the development of these hybrid material systems. In this work, using first-principles density-functional theory (including van der Waals (vdW) corrections), we study the fundamental physico-chemical properties of the molecular fragments of pyromellitic dianhydride oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA) on pristine Cu(111), as well as oxidic p4:O/Cu(111) in order to investigate the effect of mild oxidation of the metal substrate on PMDA-ODA adsorption. Firstly, we report the most favorable adsorption geometries amongst the various surface models and correlate the adsorption behavior with the electronic structure of the molecular fragments and the substrate layer. PMDA adsorbs weakly on both the clean and mildly oxidized copper surface via vdW forces while ODA adsorbs much stronger with a significant charge transfer between the substrates. Here, the oxidic layer is found to reduce the adsorption strength of both fragments and in particular, the ODA molecule interacts with the substrate via additional hydrogen bonding. Finally, our simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images suggest possible orientations of PMDA and ODA on clean and oxidic Cu surfaces to guide future experiments.

  6. Pt atoms stabilized on hexagonal boron nitride as efficient single-atom catalysts for CO oxidation: A first-principles investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Taking CO oxidation as a probe, we investigated the electronic structure and reactivity of Pt atoms stabilized by vacancy defects on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by first-principles-based calculations. As a joint effect of the high reactivity of both a single Pt atom and a boron vacancy defect (PtBV), the Pt-N interaction is -4.40 eV and is already strong enough to prohibit the diffusion and aggregation of the stabilized Pt atom. Facilitated by the upshifted Pt-d states originated from the Pt-N interaction, the barriers for CO oxidation through the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for formation and dissociation of peroxide-like intermediate and the regeneration are as low as 0.38, 0.10 and 0.04 eV, respectively, suggesting the superiority of PtBV as a catalyst for low temperature CO oxidation.

  7. Nonlinear optical properties of bulk cuprous oxide using single beam Z-scan at 790 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, J.; Rueda, E. [Grupo de Óptica y Fotónica, Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia U de A, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); García, H., E-mail: hgarcia@siue.edu [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, Illinois 60026 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficient β and the nonlinear index of refraction n{sub 2} for bulk cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) direct gap semiconductor single crystal have been measured by using a balance-detection Z-scan single beam technique, with an excellent signal to noise ratio. Both coefficients were measured at 790 nm using a 65 fs laser pulse at a repetition rate of 90.9 MHz, generated by a Ti:Sapphire laser oscillator. The experimental values for β were explained by using a model that includes allowed-allowed, forbidden-allowed, and forbidden-forbidden transitions. It was found that the forbidden-forbidden transition is the dominant mechanism, which is consistent with the band structure of Cu{sub 2}O. The low value for β found in bulk, as compared with respect to thin film, is explained in terms of the structural change in thin films that result in opposite parities of the conduction and valence band. The n{sub 2} is also theoretically calculated by using the TPA dispersion curve and the Kramers-Kronig relations for nonlinear optics.

  8. Novel Facile Technique for Synthesis of Stable Cuprous Oxide (Cu2O Nanoparticles – an Ageing Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin S. Sawant

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel facile method to synthesize stable phase of Cuprous Oxide (Cu2O nanoparticles at room temperature is demonstrated. The structural and optical properties of (Cu2O nanoparticles were investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD, UV-VIS Spectroscopy. XRD analysis has indexed nanocrystalline nature of cubical phase Cu2O with an average edge length of about 20 nm. The Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM measurements also ascertain the cubical morphology. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR affirms the presence of characteristic functional group of Cu2O. The absorbance peak at 485 nm in UV-VIS spectra also confirms the Cu2O synthesis. Furthermore, UV-VIS absorbance spectra at different ageing time substantiate the phase stability of Cu2O nanoparticles. The ageing leads to blue shift of absorbance peak mainly due to decrease in Cu2O particle size with no additional absorbance peak in UV-VIS spectra indicating the formation of secondary phase. The reduction in particle size may be attributed to tiny conversion Cu2O to CuO. The energy band gap measurements from Tauc plots for Cu2O nanoparticles shows the increasing trend (2.5 eV to 2.8 eV with ageing time (2 months, owing to quantum confinement effects.

  9. Preparation of cuprous oxides with different sizes and their behaviors of adsorption, visible-light driven photocatalysis and photocorrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Peng, Feng; Yu, Hao; Wang, Hongjuan

    2009-01-01

    Cuprous oxide (Cu 2O) nanoparticles and microparticles have been prepared by liquid phase chemical synthesis. The samples were characterized by means of SEM, XRD, UV/DRS and XPS. It was presented that as-prepared Cu 2O nanoparticles are substantially stable in ambient atmosphere and the Cu + as main state exists on the surface of Cu 2O nanoparticles. As-prepared Cu 2O microparticles can exist stably as a Cu 2O/CuO core/shell structure; and the Cu 2+ as main state exists on the surface of Cu 2O microparticles. The behaviors of adsorption, photocatalysis and photocorrosion of Cu 2O particles with different sizes were investigated in detail. The results show that Cu 2O nanoparticles are very easy to photocorrosion during the photocatalytic reaction, which cannot be used as photocatalyst directly to degrade organic compound, although as-prepared Cu 2O nanoparticles exhibit special property of adsorption. Cu 2O microparticles have a higher photocatalytic activity than Cu 2O nanoparticles because of its slower photocorrosion rate, although Cu 2O microparticles have much lower adsorption capacity than Cu 2O nanoparticles. The mechanisms of photocatalysis and photocorrosion for Cu 2O under visible light were also discussed.

  10. First Principles Fe L2,3-Edge and O K-Edge XANES and XMCD Spectra for Iron Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Michel; Pearce, Carolyn I; Bagus, Paul S; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M

    2017-09-21

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopies are tools in widespread use for providing detailed local atomic structure, oxidation state, and magnetic structure information for materials and organometallic complexes. Analysis of these spectra for transition metal L-edges is routinely performed on the basis of ligand-field multiplet theory because one- and two-particle mean field ab initio methods typically cannot describe the multiplet structure. Here we show that multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations can satisfactorily reproduce measured XANES spectra for a range of complex iron oxide materials including hematite and magnetite. MRCI Fe L2,3-edge XANES and XMCD spectra of Fe(II)O6, Fe(III)O6 and Fe(III)O4 in magnetite are found to be in very good qualitative agreement with experiment and multiplet calculations. Point charge embedding and small distortions of the first shell oxygen ligands have only small effects. Oxygen K-edge XANES/XMCD spectra for magnetite investigated by a real-space Green's function approach completes the very good qualitative agreement with experiment. Material-specific differences in local coordination and site symmetry are well reproduced, making the approach useful for assigning spectral features to specific oxidation states and coordination environments.

  11. The ensemble effect of formic acid oxidation on platinum-gold electrode studied by first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wenhui; Qi, Yuanyuan; Deng, Mingsen

    2015-03-01

    The reaction mechanisms for HCOOH oxidation on a series of PtAu(111) alloy surfaces in the aqueous solution phase are investigated by density functional theory calculations. It is found that the dehydrogenation pathway of HCOOH oxidation occurs through the formation of formate with a barrier of 16.8 kcal mol-1 and requires at least one Pt atom on the surface. In contrast, the CO formation pathway proceeds through the dimerization with a barrier of 5.6 kcal mol-1, for which at least three Pt atoms with a non-equilateral structure are required. The calculated average electrostatic potential, charge density difference, Bader charge and partial density of states all show obvious charge transfer from the alloy surface Pt atoms to HCOOH molecules, indicating that Pt sites are the reaction active center. Different ensemble of Pt sites on PtAu(111) surfaces can have significant impact on the catalysis performance for HCOOH oxidation. The non-equilateral Pt site upon PtAu(111) should be avoided to eliminate CO poisoning effect on Pt-based catalysts.

  12. Dynamic modeling and predictive control in solid oxide fuel cells first principle and data-based approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Biao; Murshed, A K M Monjur

    2012-01-01

    The high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is identified as one of the leading fuel cell technology contenders to capture the energy market in years to come. However, in order to operate as an efficient energy generating system, the SOFC requires an appropriate control system which in turn requires a detailed modelling of process dynamics. Introducting state-of-the-art dynamic modelling, estimation, and control of SOFC systems, this book presents original modelling methods and brand new results as developed by the authors. With comprehensive coverage and bringing together many

  13. Effect of oxygen vacancies on the electronic and optical properties of tungsten oxide from first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Faisal; Pachter, Ruth; Murphy, Neil R.; Johnson, Walter E.; Ramana, Chintalapalle V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we investigated theoretically the role of oxygen vacancies on the electronic and optical properties of cubic, γ-monoclinic, and tetragonal phases of tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films. Following the examination of structural properties and stability of the bulk tungsten oxide polymorphs, we analyzed band structures and optical properties, applying density functional theory (DFT) and GW (Green's (G) function approximation with screened Coulomb interaction (W)) methods. Careful benchmarking of calculated band gaps demonstrated the importance of using a range-separated functional, where results for the pristine room temperature γ-monoclinic structure indicated agreement with experiment. Further, modulation of the band gap for WO3 structures with oxygen vacancies was quantified. Dielectric functions for cubic WO3, calculated at both the single-particle, essentially time-dependent DFT, as well as many-body GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation levels, indicated agreement with experimental data for pristine WO3. Interestingly, we found that introducing oxygen vacancies caused appearance of lower energy absorptions. A smaller refractive index was indicated in the defective WO3 structures. These predictions could lead to further experiments aimed at tuning the optical properties of WO3 by introducing oxygen vacancies, particularly for the lower energy spectral region.

  14. Revisiting Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectra of Nickel Oxide from First Principles: Implications for Solar Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We use two different ab initio quantum mechanics methods, complete active space self-consistent field theory applied to electrostatically embedded clusters and periodic many-body G0W0 calculations, to reanalyze the states formed in nickel(II) oxide upon electron addition and ionization. In agreement with interpretations of earlier measurements, we find that the valence and conduction band edges consist of oxygen and nickel states, respectively. However, contrary to conventional wisdom, we find that the oxygen states of the valence band edge are localized whereas the nickel states at the conduction band edge are delocalized. We argue that these characteristics may lead to low electron–hole recombination and relatively efficient electron transport, which, coupled with band gap engineering, could produce higher solar energy conversion efficiency compared to that of other transition-metal oxides. Both methods find a photoemission/inverse-photoemission gap of 3.6–3.9 eV, in good agreement with the experimental range, lending credence to our analysis of the electronic structure of NiO. PMID:24689856

  15. First principles LDA + U and GGA + U study of protactinium and protactinium oxides: dependence on the effective U parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obodo, K. O.; Chetty, N.

    2013-04-01

    The electronic structure and properties of protactinium and its oxides (PaO and PaO2) have been studied within the framework of the local density approximation (LDA), the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation [GGA(PBE)], LDA + U and GGA(PBE) + U implementations of density functional theory. The dependence of selected observables of these materials on the effective U parameter has been investigated in detail. The examined properties include lattice constants, bulk moduli, the effect of charge density distributions, the hybridization of the 5f orbital and the energy of formation for PaO and PaO2. The LDA gives better agreement with experiment for the bulk modulus than the GGA for Pa but the GGA gives better structural properties. We found that PaO is metallic and PaO2 is a Mott-Hubbard insulator. This is consistent with observations for the other actinide oxides. We discover that GGA and LDA incorrectly give metallic behavior for PaO2. The GGA(PBE) + U calculated indirect band gap of 3.48 eV reported for PaO2 is a prediction and should stimulate further studies of this material.

  16. Hydrogen release at metal-oxide interfaces: A first principle study of hydrogenated Al/SiO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianqiu; Tea, Eric; Li, Guanchen; Hin, Celine

    2017-06-01

    The Anode Hydrogen Release (AHR) mechanism at interfaces is responsible for the generation of defects, that traps charge carriers and can induce dielectric breakdown in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors. The AHR has been extensively studied at Si/SiO2 interfaces but its characteristics at metal-silica interfaces remain unclear. In this study, we performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the hydrogen release mechanism at the typical Al/SiO2 metal-oxide interface. We found that interstitial hydrogen atoms can break interfacial Alsbnd Si bonds, passivating a Si sp3 orbital. Interstitial hydrogen atoms can also break interfacial Alsbnd O bonds, or be adsorbed at the interface on aluminum, forming stable Alsbnd Hsbnd Al bridges. We showed that hydrogenated Osbnd H, Sisbnd H and Alsbnd H bonds at the Al/SiO2 interfaces are polarized. The resulting bond dipole weakens the Osbnd H and Sisbnd H bonds, but strengthens the Alsbnd H bond under the application of a positive bias at the metal gate. Our calculations indicate that Alsbnd H bonds and Osbnd H bonds are more important than Sisbnd H bonds for the hydrogen release process.

  17. Revisiting photoemission and inverse photoemission spectra of nickel oxide from first principles: implications for solar energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidoust, Nima; Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Carter, Emily A

    2014-07-17

    We use two different ab initio quantum mechanics methods, complete active space self-consistent field theory applied to electrostatically embedded clusters and periodic many-body G0W0 calculations, to reanalyze the states formed in nickel(II) oxide upon electron addition and ionization. In agreement with interpretations of earlier measurements, we find that the valence and conduction band edges consist of oxygen and nickel states, respectively. However, contrary to conventional wisdom, we find that the oxygen states of the valence band edge are localized whereas the nickel states at the conduction band edge are delocalized. We argue that these characteristics may lead to low electron-hole recombination and relatively efficient electron transport, which, coupled with band gap engineering, could produce higher solar energy conversion efficiency compared to that of other transition-metal oxides. Both methods find a photoemission/inverse-photoemission gap of 3.6-3.9 eV, in good agreement with the experimental range, lending credence to our analysis of the electronic structure of NiO.

  18. CO oxidation mechanism on the γ-Al2O3 supported single Pt atom: First principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongwei

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the role of metal-support interaction for the supported single-atom catalysts is very important in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, Three different CO oxidation mechanisms on Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst were probed by periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations in detail, namely the reactive O*sbnd Osbnd C*dbnd O intermediate mechanism, the reactive CO3 intermediate mechanism and the Pt-Al3+ double sites mechanism. According to the calculated results analysis, we concluded that the dominant reaction pathway at the low temperatures is the reactive O*sbnd Osbnd C*dbnd O intermediate mechanism. Our results are in very good agreement with the experimental evidence for O*sbnd Osbnd C*dbnd O coverage on Pt/γ-Al2O3 at room temperature by an in situ diffuse reflectance infrared detector.

  19. Optimizing Open Iron Sites in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Ethane Oxidation: A First-Principles Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peilin; Getman, Rachel B; Snurr, Randall Q

    2017-04-10

    Activation of the C-H bonds in ethane to form ethanol is a highly desirable, yet challenging, reaction. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with open Fe sites are promising candidates for catalyzing this reaction. One advantage of MOFs is their modular construction from inorganic nodes and organic linkers, allowing for flexible design and detailed control of properties. In this work, we studied a series of single-metal atom Fe model systems with ligands that are commonly used as MOF linkers and tried to understand how one can design an optimal Fe catalyst. We found linear relationships between the binding enthalpy of oxygen to the Fe sites and common descriptors for catalytic reactions, such as the Fe 3d energy levels in different reaction intermediates. We further analyzed the three highest-barrier steps in the ethane oxidation cycle (including desorption of the product) with the Fe 3d energy levels. Volcano relationships are revealed with peaks toward higher Fe 3d energy and stronger electron-donating group functionalization of linkers. Furthermore, we found that the Fe 3d energy levels positively correlate with the electron-donating strength of functional groups on the linkers. Finally, we validated our hypotheses on larger models of MOF-74 iron sites. Compared with MOF-74, functionalizing the MOF-74 linkers with NH2 groups lowers the enthalpic barrier for the most endothermic step in the reaction cycle. Our findings provide insight for catalyst optimization and point out directions for future experimental efforts.

  20. Semiconductor growth on an oxide using a metallic surfactant and interface studies for potential gate stacks from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes Huamantinco, Andrei

    2008-05-09

    In this work the epitaxial growth of germanium on SrHfO{sub 3}(001), and the La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}/Si(001) and SrTiO{sub 3}/GaAs(001) interfaces were studied theoretically using the Projector-Augmented Wave (PAW) method. The PAW method is based on Density Functional Theory and it is implemented in the Car-Parrinello Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics. The goal of the germanium growth on SrHfO{sub 3}(001) is to form a germanium film with low density of defects and smooth morphology, to be used as channel in a transistor. The feasibility of using a third material to achieve germanium layer-by-layer growth was investigated. The formation of an ordered strontium film on a SrO-terminated oxide substrate, to be used as template for germanium overgrowth, was studied. Deposition of germanium on the strontium 1ML template results in wetting and thus a change of the growth mode to layer-by-layer. The germanium surface is then passivated and a germanium compound is initially formed with strontium at the surface and interface. The interfacial structure and valence band offsets of the La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}/Si(001) crystalline system were studied. The SrTiO{sub 3}/GaAs(001) crystalline interfaces with unpinned Fermi level were investigated. (orig.)

  1. A novel reducing graphene/polyaniline/cuprous oxide composite hydrogel with unexpected photocatalytic activity for the degradation of Congo red

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Jie; Xie, Anjian; Li, Shikuo; Huang, Fangzhi; Cao, Juan; Shen, Yuhua, E-mail: yhshen@ahu.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Excellent photocatalytic activity of the RGO/PANI/Cu{sub 2}O composite hydrogel for CR degradation under UV–vis light irradiation. - Highlights: • The RGO/PANI/Cu{sub 2}O composite hydrogel was first synthesized via a facile method. • Photocatalytic performance was studied under UV–vis light. • The ternary composite hydrogel shows unexpected photocatalytic activity. • A possible photocatalysis mechanism was illustrated. - Abstract: In this work, a novel reducing graphene/polyaniline/cuprous oxide (RGO/PANI/Cu{sub 2}O) composite hydrogel with a 3D porous network has been successfully prepared via a one-pot method in the presence of cubic Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles. The as-synthesized ternary composites hydrogel shows unexpected photocatalytic activity such that Congo red (CR) degradation efficiency can reaches 97.91% in 20 min under UV–vis light irradiation, which is much higher than that of either the single component (Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles), or two component systems (RGO/Cu{sub 2}O composite hydrogel and PANI/Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposites). Furthermore, the ternary composite hydrogel exhibits high stability and do not show any significant loss after five recycles. Such outstanding photocatalytic activity of the RGO/PANI/Cu{sub 2}O composite hydrogel was ascribed to the high absorption ability of the product for CR and the synergic effect among RGO, PANI and Cu{sub 2}O in photocatalytic process. The product of this work would provide a new sight for the construction of UV–vis light responsive photocatalyst with high performance.

  2. Fe atoms trapped on graphene as a potential efficient catalyst for room-temperature complete oxidation of formaldehyde: a first-principles investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Huimin

    2017-03-24

    We investigated the oxidation of formaldehyde, one of the major indoor air pollutants, into CO2 and H2O over Fe atoms trapped in defects on graphene by first-principles based calculations. These trapped Fe atoms are not only stable to withstand interference from the reaction environments but are also efficient in catalyzing the reactions between coadsorbed O-2 and formaldehyde. The oxidation of formaldehyde starts with the formation of a peroxide-like intermediate and continues by its dissociation into. eta(1)-OCHO coadsorbed with an OH radical. Then, the adsorbed OCHO undergoes conformational changes and hydride transfer, leading to the formation of H2O and CO2. Subsequent adsorption of O2 or formaldehyde facilitates desorption of H2O and a new reaction cycle initiates. The calculated barriers for formation and dissociation of the peroxide-like intermediate are 0.43 and 0.40 eV, respectively, and those for conformation changes and hydride transfer are 0.47 and 0.13 eV, respectively. These relatively low barriers along the reaction path suggest the potential high catalytic performance of trapped Fe atoms for formaldehyde oxidation.

  3. Shape and catalytic mechanism of RuO{sub 2} particles at CO oxidation reaction conditions. First-principles based multi-scale modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuter, Karsten [TU Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie

    2016-11-01

    For model catalyst studies on low-index single-crystal surfaces close agreement between detailed measurements and quantitative microkinetic modeling can increasingly be achieved. However, for 'real' catalyst particles, such structure-morphology-activity relationships are only scarcely established. This is prototypically reflected by the situation for RuO{sub 2}, as a most active catalyst for CO oxidation. Here, existing first-principles kinetic modeling is restricted to just one facet, namely the RuO{sub 2}(110) surface, which is not able to fully account for activity data obtained from polycrystalline RuO{sub 2} powder catalysts. The overarching objective of this project was correspondingly to close this gap and demonstrate that similarly close agreement as for individual single-crystal model catalysts can also be achieved for catalyst particles. Specifically, we addressed experiments where an intact RuO{sub 2} bulk structure is conserved, and establish the atomic-scale structure and reactivity of other RuO{sub 2} low-index facets under the gas-phase conditions characteristic for catalytic CO oxidation.

  4. A first principles comparison of the mechanism and site requirements for the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol and formic acid over Pt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurock, Matthew; Janik, Michael; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    First principles density functional theoretical calculations were carried out to examine and compare the reaction paths and ensembles for the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol and formic acid in the presence of solution and applied electrochemical potential. Methanol proceeds via both direct and indirect pathways which are governed by the initial C-H and O-H bond activation, respectively. The primary path requires an ensemble size of between 3-4 Pt atoms, whereas the secondary path is much less structure sensitive, requiring only 1-2 metal atoms. The CO that forms inhibits the surface at potentials below 0.66 V NHE. The addition of Ru results in bifunctional as well as electronic effects that lower the onset potential for CO oxidation. In comparison, formic acid proceeds via direct, indirect and formate pathways. The direct path, which involves the activation of the C-H bond followed by the rapid activation of the O-H bond, was calculated to be the predominant path especially at potentials greater than 0.6 V. The activation of the O-H bond of formic acid has a very low barrier and readily proceeds to form surface formate intermediates as the first step of the indirect formate path. Adsorbed formate, however, was calculated to be very stable, and thus acts as a spectator species. At potentials below 0.6 V NHE, CO, which forms via the non-Faradaic hydrolytic splitting of the C-O bond over stepped or defect sites in the indirect path, can build up and poison the surface. The results indicate that the direct path only requires a single Pt atom whereas the indirect path requires a larger surface ensemble and stepped sites. This suggests that alloys will not have the same influence on formic acid oxidation as they do for methanol oxidation.

  5. Energetic stability, oxidation states, and electronic structure of Bi-doped NaTaO3: a first-principles hybrid functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Paul H; Behtash, Maziar; Yang, Kesong

    2016-01-14

    We studied the defect formation energies, oxidation states of the dopants, and electronic structures of Bi-doped NaTaO3 using first-principles hybrid density functional theory calculations. Three possible structural models, including Bi-doped NaTaO3 with Bi at the Na site (Bi@Na), with Bi at the Ta site (Bi@Ta), and with Bi at both Na and Ta sites [Bi@(Na,Ta)], are constructed. Our results show that the preferred doping sites of Bi are strongly related to the preparation conditions of NaTaO3. It is energetically more favorable to form a Bi@Na structure under Na-poor conditions, to form a Bi@Ta structure under Na-rich conditions, and to form a Bi@(Na,Ta) structure under mildly Na-rich conditions. The Bi@Na doped model shows an n-type conducting character along with an expected blueshift of the optical absorption edge, in which the Bi atoms exist as Bi(3+) (6s(2)6p(0)). The Bi@Ta doped model has empty gap states consisting of Bi 6s states in its band gap, which can lead to visible-light absorption via the electron transition among the valence band, the conduction band, and the gap states. The Bi dopant is present as a Bi(5+) ion in this model, consistent with the experimental results. In contrast, the Bi@(Na,Ta) doped model has occupied gap states consisting of Bi 6s states in its band gap, and thus visible-light absorption is also expected in this system due to electron excitation from these occupied states to the conduction band, in which the Bi dopants exist as Bi(3+) ions. Our first-principles electronic structure calculations revealed the relationship between the Bi doping sites and the material preparation conditions, and clarified the oxidation states of Bi dopants in NaTaO3 as well as the origin of different visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen evolution behaviors in Bi@Ta and Bi@(Na,Ta) doped NaTaO3. This work can provide a useful reference for preparing a Bi-doped NaTaO3 photocatalyst with desired doping sites.

  6. Design of novel magnetic materials based on ZrCuSiAs-like semiconducting pnictide-oxides from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, V. V.; Shein, I. R.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2010-11-01

    We assumed that significant enlargement of the functional properties of the family of quaternary ZrCuSiAs-like pnictide-oxides, often called also 1111 phases, which are known now first of all as parent phases for new FeAs superconductors, may be achieved by replacement of non-magnetic ions by magnetic ions in semiconducting ZrCuSiAs-like phases. We checked this assumption by means of first-principles FLAPW-GGA calculations using a wide-band-gap semiconductor YZnAsO doped with Mn, Fe, and Co as an example. Our main finding is that substitution of Mn, Fe, and Co for Zn leads to drastic transformations of electronic and magnetic properties of the parent material: as distinct from the non-magnetic YZnAsO, the examined doped phases Y Zn 0.89Mn 0.11AsO, Y Zn 0.89Fe 0.11AsO, and Y Zn 0.89Co 0.11AsO behave as a magnetic semiconductor, a magnetic half-metal or as a magnetic gapless semi-metal, respectively.

  7. Conformational and Dynamic Properties of Poly(ethylene oxide) in an Ionic Liquid: Development and Implementation of a First-Principles Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jesse G; Choi, Eunsong; Son, Chang-Yun; Schmidt, J R; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-01-14

    The conformational properties of polymers in ionic liquids are of fundamental interest but not well understood. Atomistic and coarse-grained molecular models predict qualitatively different results for the scaling of chain size with molecular weight, and experiments on dilute solutions are not available. In this work, we develop a first-principles force field for poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in the ionic liquid 1-butyl 3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]) using symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). At temperatures above 400 K, simulations employing both the SAPT and OPLS-AA force fields predict that PEO displays ideal chain behavior, in contrast to previous simulations at lower temperature. We therefore argue that the system shows a transition from extended to more compact configurations as the temperature is increased from room temperature to the experimental lower critical solution temperature. Although polarization is shown to be important, its implicit inclusion in the OPLS-AA force is sufficient to describe the structure and energetics of the mixture. The simulations emphasize the difference between ionic liquids from typical solvents for polymers.

  8. Calibrating transition-metal energy levels and oxygen bands in first-principles calculations: Accurate prediction of redox potentials and charge transfer in lithium transition-metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Hwa; Urban, Alexander; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-09-01

    Transition-metal (TM) oxides play an increasingly important role in technology today, including applications such as catalysis, solar energy harvesting, and energy storage. In many of these applications, the details of their electronic structure near the Fermi level are critically important for their properties. We propose a first-principles-based computational methodology for the accurate prediction of oxygen charge transfer in TM oxides and lithium TM (Li-TM) oxides. To obtain accurate electronic structures, the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06) hybrid functional is adopted, and the amount of exact Hartree-Fock exchange (mixing parameter) is adjusted to reproduce reference band gaps. We show that the HSE06 functional with optimal mixing parameter yields not only improved electronic densities of states, but also better energetics (Li-intercalation voltages) for LiCo O2 and LiNi O2 as compared to the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), Hubbard U corrected GGA (GGA +U ), and standard HSE06. We find that the optimal mixing parameters for TM oxides are system specific and correlate with the covalency (ionicity) of the TM species. The strong covalent (ionic) nature of TM-O bonding leads to lower (higher) optimal mixing parameters. We find that optimized HSE06 functionals predict stronger hybridization of the Co 3 d and O 2 p orbitals as compared to GGA, resulting in a greater contribution from oxygen states to charge compensation upon delithiation in LiCo O2 . We also find that the band gaps of Li-TM oxides increase linearly with the mixing parameter, enabling the straightforward determination of optimal mixing parameters based on GGA (α =0.0 ) and HSE06 (α =0.25 ) calculations. Our results also show that G0W0@GGA +U band gaps of TM oxides (M O ,M =Mn ,Co ,Ni ) and LiCo O2 agree well with experimental references, suggesting that G0W0 calculations can be used as a reference for the calibration of the mixing parameter in cases when no experimental band gap has been

  9. Plasma-produced phase-pure cuprous oxide nanowires for methane gas sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Qijin, E-mail: ijin.cheng@xmu.edu.cn; Zhang, Fengyan [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen City, Fujian Province 361005 (China); Yan, Wei [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience Laboratories, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); Randeniya, Lakshman [Plasma Nanoscience Laboratories, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); Ostrikov, Kostya [Plasma Nanoscience Laboratories, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-03-28

    Phase-selective synthesis of copper oxide nanowires is warranted by several applications, yet it remains challenging because of the narrow windows of the suitable temperature and precursor gas composition in thermal processes. Here, we report on the room-temperature synthesis of small-diameter, large-area, uniform, and phase-pure Cu{sub 2}O nanowires by exposing copper films to a custom-designed low-pressure, thermally non-equilibrium, high-density (typically, the electron number density is in the range of 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}) inductively coupled plasmas. The mechanism of the plasma-enabled phase selectivity is proposed. The gas sensors based on the synthesized Cu{sub 2}O nanowires feature fast response and recovery for the low-temperature (∼140 °C) detection of methane gas in comparison with polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}O thin film-based gas sensors. Specifically, at a methane concentration of 4%, the response and the recovery times of the Cu{sub 2}O nanowire-based gas sensors are 125 and 147 s, respectively. The Cu{sub 2}O nanowire-based gas sensors have a potential for applications in the environmental monitoring, chemical industry, mining industry, and several other emerging areas.

  10. Accuracy of first-principles interatomic interactions and predictions of ferroelectric phase transitions in perovskite oxides: Energy functional and effective Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Arpita; Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Waghmare, Umesh V.

    2017-02-01

    While first-principles density functional theory (DFT)-based models have been effective in capturing the physics of ferroelectric phase transitions in BaTiO3, PbTiO3, and KNbO3, quantitative estimates of the transition temperatures (TC) suffer from errors that are believed to originate from the errors in estimating lattice constants obtained within the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of DFT. The recently developed strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-GGA functional has been shown to be quite accurate in the estimation of lattice constants. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the estimates of ferroelectric ground-state properties of eight perovskite oxides and transition temperatures of BaTiO3, PbTiO3, and KNbO3 obtained with molecular dynamics simulations using an effective Hamiltonian derived from the SCAN meta-GGA-based DFT. Relative to LDA, we find an improvement in the estimates of TC, which arises from the changes in the calculated strain-phonon, anharmonic coupling constants, and strength of ferroelectric instabilities, i.e., frequencies of the soft modes. We also assess the errors in TC originating from approximately integrating out the high-energy phonons during construction of the model Hamiltonian through estimates of the effects of fourth-order couplings between the soft mode and higher-energy modes of BaTiO3, PbTiO3, and KNbO3. We find that inclusion of these anharmonic couplings results in deeper double-well energy functions of ferroelectric distortions and further improvement in the estimates of transition temperatures. Consistently improved estimates of lattice constants and transition temperatures with the SCAN meta-GGA calculations augur well for their use in simulations of superlattices or heterostructures of perovskite oxides, in which the effects of lattice matching are critical.

  11. Characterizations of Cuprous Oxide Thin Films Prepared by Sol-Gel Spin Coating Technique with Different Additives for the Photoelectrochemical Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. C. Halin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cuprous oxide (Cu2O thin films were deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO coated glass substrate by sol-gel spin coating technique using different additives, namely, polyethylene glycol and ethylene glycol. It was found that the organic additives added had a significant influence on the formation of Cu2O films and lead to different microstructures and optical properties. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis. Based on the FESEM micrographs, the grain size of film prepared using polyethylene glycol additive has smaller grains of about 83 nm with irregular shapes. The highest optical absorbance film was obtained by the addition of polyethylene glycol. The Cu2O thin films were used as a working electrode in the application of photoelectrochemical solar cell (PESC.

  12. Cupric and cuprous oxide by reactive ion beam sputter deposition and the photosensing properties of cupric oxide metal–semiconductor–metal Schottky photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Min-Jyun; Lin, Yong-Chen; Chao, Liang-Chiun, E-mail: lcchao@mail.ntust.edu.tw; Lin, Pao-Hung; Huang, Bohr-Ran

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • CuO and Cu{sub 2}O were deposited by reactive ion beam sputter deposition. • Single phase CuO thin film is obtained with Ar:O{sub 2} = 2:1. • CuO MSM PD shows photoresponse from 400 nm to 1.30 μm. • CuO MSM PD is RC limited with a decay time less than 1 μs. - Abstract: Cupric (CuO) and cuprous (Cu{sub 2}O) oxide thin films have been deposited by reactive ion beam sputter deposition at 400 °C with an Ar:O{sub 2} ratio from 2:1 to 12:1. With an Ar:O{sub 2} ratio of 2:1, single phase polycrystalline CuO thin films were obtained. Decreasing oxygen flow rate results in CuO + Cu{sub 2}O and Cu{sub 2}O + Cu mixed thin films. As Ar:O{sub 2} ratio reaches 12:1, Cu{sub 2}O nanorods with diameter of 250 nm and length longer than 1 μm were found across the sample. Single phase CuO thin film exhibits an indirect band gap of 1.3 eV with a smooth surface morphology. CuO metal–semiconductor–metal (MSM) Schottky photodiodes (PD) were fabricated by depositing Cu interdigitated electrodes on CuO thin films. Photosensing properties of the CuO PD were characterized from 350 to 1300 nm and a maximum responsivity of 43 mA/W was found at λ = 700 nm. The MSM PD is RC limited with a decay time constant less than 1 μs.

  13. Constructing heterostructure on highly roughened caterpillar-like gold nanotubes with cuprous oxide grains for ultrasensitive and stable nonenzymatic glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anran; Ding, Yu; Yang, Zhimao; Yang, Shengchun

    2015-12-15

    In this study, a metal-metal oxide heterostructure was designed and constructed by growing cuprous oxide (Cu2O) grains on highly surface roughened caterpillar-like Au nanotubes (CLGNs) for ultrasensitive, selective and stable nonenzymatic glucose biosensors. The Cu2O grains are tightly anchored to the surface of CLGNs by the spines, resulting in a large increase in the contact area between Cu2O grains and the CLGNs, which facilitates the electron transport between metal and metal oxide and improves the sensitivity and stability of the sensors. The electron transfer coefficient (α) and electron transfer rate constant (ks) for redox reaction of Cu2O-CLGNs/GCE are found to be 0.50114 and 3.24±0.1 s(-1), respectively. The biosensor shows a linear response to glucose over a concentration range of 0.1-5mM and a high sensitivity of 1215.7 µA mM(-1) cm(-2) with a detection limit of 1.83 μM. Furthermore, the Cu2O-CLGNs biosensor exhibited strong anti-interference capability against uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium ascorbate (SA), as well as a high stability and repeatability. Our current research indicates that the Cu2O-CLGNs hybrid electrode is a promising choice for constructing nonenzyme based electrochemical biosensors.

  14. Multilayer core-shell structured composite paper electrode consisting of copper, cuprous oxide and graphite assembled on cellulose fibers for asymmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Caichao; Jiao, Yue; Li, Jian

    2017-09-01

    An easily-operated and inexpensive strategy (pencil-drawing-electrodeposition-electro-oxidation) is proposed to synthesize a novel class of multilayer core-shell structured composite paper electrode, which consists of copper, cuprous oxide and graphite assembled on cellulose fibers. This interesting electrode structure plays a pivotal role in providing more active sites for electrochemical reactions, facilitating ion and electron transport and shorting their diffusion pathways. This electrode demonstrates excellent electrochemical properties with a high specific capacitance of 601 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 and retains 83% of this capacitance when operated at an ultrahigh current density of 100 A g-1. In addition, a high energy density of 13.4 W h kg-1 at the power density of 0.40 kW kg-1 and a favorable cycling stability (95.3%, 8000 cycles) were achieved for this electrode. When this electrode was assembled into an asymmetric supercapacitor with carbon paper as negative electrode, the device displays remarkable electrochemical performances with a large areal capacitances (122 mF cm-2 at 1 mA cm-2), high areal energy density (10.8 μW h cm-2 at 402.5 μW cm-2) and outstanding cycling stability (91.5%, 5000 cycles). These results unveil the potential of this composite electrode as a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors.

  15. Physico-chemical studies of cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) nanoparticles coated on amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johan, Mohd Rafie, E-mail: mrafiej@um.edu.my; Meriam Suhaimy, Syazwan Hanani; Yusof, Yusliza, E-mail: yus_liza@siswa.um.edu.my

    2014-01-15

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at a temperature (∼250 °C) in an air furnace. As- synthesized α-CNTs were purified with deionized water and hydrochloric acid. A purified α-CNTs were hybridized with cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu{sub 2}O) through a simple chemical process. Morphology of the samples was analyzed with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra showed the attachment of acidic functional groups onto the surface of α-CNTs and the formation of hybridized α-CNTs-Cu{sub 2}O. Raman spectra reveal the amorphous nature of the carbon. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed the amorphous phase of the carbon and the formation of Cu{sub 2}O crystalline phase. The coating of Cu{sub 2}O was confirmed by FESEM, TEM, and XRD. Optical absorption of the samples has also been investigated and the quantum confinement effect was illustrated in the absorption spectra.

  16. Photocatalytic Degradation of Rhodamine B by Cuprous Oxide%氧化亚铜光催化降解罗丹明 B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄涛; 吕重安; 杨水金

    2014-01-01

    Cuprous oxide ( Cu2 O) was successfully prepared by the method of reduction in aqueous at room temperature.All the powders were characterized by X -rays diffraction ( XRD) and scanning electron microscopy ( SEM) .The effect of different factors on the degradation was investigated .The best reaction conditions were found out.The photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B by Cu 2 O under simulated natural light irradiation was investiga-ted.The results demonstrated that initial concentration of rhodamine B is 10 mg/L, catalyst dosage is 0.38 g/L and the pH is 5.2, the degradation ratio of rhodamine B is as high as 96.5%after 30 minutes simulated natural light ir-radiation .%利用室温液相还原法制备了氧化亚铜,通过XRD、 SEM对其进行了表征,探讨了该催化剂对罗丹明B的光催化降解的活性。在催化剂用量为0.38 g/L,过氧化氢量为1.8 mL,罗丹明B的浓度为10 mg/L, pH为5.2的条件下,光照30 min后罗丹明B的降解率为96.5%。

  17. First principles study of (Cd, Hg, In, Tl, Sn, Pb, As, Sb, Bi, Se) modified Pt(111), Pt(100) and Pt(211) electrodes as CO oxidation catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    CO oxidation is a prototype reaction for studying oxidation of small organic molecules. Certain adatom modified Pt electrodes have a large promotional effect on CO oxidation. However, the effect is often coverage dependent, and has a limited effect due to short lifetimes of the adatoms. The cover...

  18. Surface chemistry of copper metal and copper oxide atomic layer deposition from copper(ii) acetylacetonate: a combined first-principles and reactive molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Schuster, Jörg; Schulz, Stefan E; Gessner, Thomas

    2015-10-28

    Atomistic mechanisms for the atomic layer deposition using the Cu(acac)2 (acac = acetylacetonate) precursor are studied using first-principles calculations and reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Cu(acac)2 chemisorbs on the hollow site of the Cu(110) surface and decomposes easily into a Cu atom and the acac-ligands. A sequential dissociation and reduction of the Cu precursor [Cu(acac)2 → Cu(acac) → Cu] are observed. Further decomposition of the acac-ligand is unfavorable on the Cu surface. Thus additional adsorption of the precursors may be blocked by adsorbed ligands. Molecular hydrogen is found to be nonreactive towards Cu(acac)2 on Cu(110), whereas individual H atoms easily lead to bond breaking in the Cu precursor upon impact, and thus release the surface ligands into the gas-phase. On the other hand, water reacts with Cu(acac)2 on a Cu2O substrate through a ligand-exchange reaction, which produces gaseous H(acac) and surface OH species. Combustion reactions with the main by-products CO2 and H2O are observed during the reaction between Cu(acac)2 and ozone on the CuO surface. The reactivity of different co-reactants toward Cu(acac)2 follows the order H > O3 > H2O.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of copper compounds with oxygen and hydrogen from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhavyi, P.A.; Johansson, B. (Applied Materials Physics, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-02-15

    We employ quantum-mechanical calculations (based on density functional theory and linear response theory) in order to test the mechanical and chemical stability of several solid-state configurations of Cu1+, Cu2+, O2-, H1-, and H1+ ions. We begin our analysis with cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O, cuprite structure), cupric oxide (CuO, tenorite structure), and cuprous hydride (CuH, wurtzite and sphalerite structures) whose thermodynamic properties have been studied experimentally. In our calculations, all these compounds are found to be mechanically stable configurations. Their formation energies calculated at T = 0 K (including the energy of zero-point and thermal motion of the ions) and at room temperature are in good agreement with existing thermodynamic data. A search for other possible solid-state conformations of copper, hydrogen, and oxygen ions is then performed. Several candidate structures for solid phases of cuprous oxy-hydride (Cu{sub 4}H{sub 2}O) and cupric hydride (CuH{sub 2}) have been considered but found to be dynamically unstable. Cuprous oxy-hydride is found to be energetically unstable with respect to decomposition onto cuprous oxide and cuprous hydride. Metastability of cuprous hydroxide (CuOH) is established in our calculations. The free energy of CuOH is calculated to be some 50 kJ/mol higher than the average of the free energies of Cu{sub 2}O and water. Thus, cuprite Cu{sub 2}O is the most stable of the examined Cu(I) compounds

  20. Simulating Linear Sweep Voltammetry from First-Principles: Application to Electrochemical Oxidation of Water on Pt(111) and Pt3Ni(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a fundamental experimental method for characterizing adsorbates on electrochemical surfaces. We present a model for the electrochemical solid–liquid interface, and we simulate the linear sweep voltammogram of the electrochemical oxidation of H2O on Pt(111) and Pt3Ni(111...

  1. Oxidative dehydration reaction of glycerol into acrylic acid: A first-principles prediction of structural and thermodynamic parameters of a bifunctional catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Lívia Clara T.; dos Santos Pires, Maíra; Corrêa, Silviana; Oliveira, Luiz Carlos A.; Ramalho, Teodorico C.

    2016-05-01

    The production of biodiesel generates crude glycerol as a byproduct. The search for glycerol conversion routes has attracted the attention of researchers and thus, this work evaluated the properties of the catalysts T-Nb2O5 and T-Nb2O5/V treated with H2O2 applied to the reaction of oxidative dehydration of glycerol. The peroxo groups from the treatment with H2O2 had a greater oxidation capacity in relation to those in the pure catalyst. Furthermore, the catalyst doped with vanadium presented lower energy costs during the process. Those results might be helpful for designing new catalysts for the production of strategic chemical products from glycerol.

  2. A first-principle calculation of sulfur oxidation on metallic Ni(111) and Pt(111), and bimetallic Ni@Pt(111) and Pt@Ni(111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chen-Hao; Ho, Jia-Jen

    2012-09-17

    Sulfur, a pollutant known to poison fuel-cell electrodes, generally comes from S-containing species such as hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S). The S-containing species become adsorbed on a metal electrode and leave atomic S strongly bound to the metal surface. This surface sulfur is completely removed typically by oxidation with O(2) into gaseous SO(2). According to our DFT calculations, the oxidation of sulfur at 0.25 ML surface sulfur coverage on pure Pt(111) and Ni(111) metal surfaces is exothermic. The barriers to the formation of SO(2) are 0.41 and 1.07 eV, respectively. Various metals combined to form bimetallic surfaces are reported to tune the catalytic capabilities toward some reactions. Our results show that it is more difficult to remove surface sulfur from a Ni@Pt(111) surface with reaction barrier 1.86 eV for SO(2) formation than from a Pt@Ni(111) surface (0.13 eV). This result is in good agreement with the statement that bimetallic surfaces could demonstrate more or less activity than to pure metal surfaces by comparing electronic and structural effects. Furthermore, by calculating the reaction free energies we found that the sulfur oxidation reaction on the Pt@Ni(111) surface exhibits the best spontaneity of SO(2) desorption at either room temperature or high temperatures.

  3. Oxidation and diffusion processes at the Mn-doped Fe(0 0 1) and Fe(1 1 0) surfaces from first-principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.; Giorgi, M.-L.; Guillot, J.-B. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes et Materiaux, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Geneste, G., E-mail: gregory.geneste@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Laboratoire Structures, Proprietes et Modelisation des Solides, CNRS UMR 8580, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2012-09-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of Mn in the Fe surface layer does not favour the O adsorption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The energy barriers for O, Fe or Mn diffusion are lower on Fe(1 1 0) than on Fe(1 0 0). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On the Fe(0 0 1) termination, the Mn and O adatoms are more mobile than Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On the Fe(1 1 0) termination, the Mn adatom is much more mobile than O and Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of MnO (resp. FeO) from adatoms is exothermic (resp. endothermic). - Abstract: Using density-functional calculations, we have studied the adsorption of atomic oxygen on the Fe(0 0 1) and Fe(1 1 0) surfaces with and without Mn substitution at the top layer, as well as the diffusion mechanisms of oxygen and metal adatoms (Fe, Mn) on these two surfaces. The elementary processes studied give microscopic insight into the first stages of selective oxidation of Fe-Mn steels, a phenomenon that leads, in suitable thermodynamic conditions, to the growth of MnO particles at the iron surface. Our calculations provide significant differences between the two terminations, especially in the diffusion barriers of the different atomic chemical species involved in these complex growth processes.

  4. A first principles investigation of electron transfer between Fe(II) and U(VI) on insulating Al- vs. semiconducting Fe-oxide surfaces via the proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. D.; Marcano, M. C.; Becker, U.

    2017-01-01

    (II) to travel through the hematite surface and reach U(VI). The progression and extent of ET occurring on the semiconducting hematite (0 0 1) surface via the proximity effect depends on the electronic properties of the surface. ET between the spatially separated U(VI) and Fe(II) occurs most readily when orbitals between the Fe and U adsorbates overlap with those of neighboring O and Fe ions at the hematite surface, as shown by calculations without the Hubbard U correction. Analyses of the spins densities confirm that the U and Fe adsorbates were reduced and oxidized, respectively, (acquiring 0.33 μB and 0.11-0.20 μB, respectively), while Fe cations at the hematite surface were reduced (losing ⩽0.6 μB). If electrons are highly localized, the amount of orbital mixing and electronic coupling through the hematite surface decreases and in turn leads to a lower degree of spin transfer, as predicted by calculations with the Hubbard U correction. Thus, the proximity effect is a potential mechanism on semiconducting surfaces facilitating surface-mediated redox reactions, although its significance varies depending on the electronic properties and subsequent charge-carrying ability of the surface. These results provide insight into ET pathways and mechanisms on insulating Al- and semiconducting Fe oxide surfaces influencing the reduction U(VI) by Fe(II) that may subsequently limit uranium's transport in the subsurface.

  5. Oxygen reduction activity on perovskite oxide surfaces: a comparative first-principle study of LaMnO$_3$, LaFeO$_3$ and LaCrO$_3$

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity on perovskite oxide surfaces is essential for promising future fuel cell applications. We report a comparative study of ORR mechanisms on La$B$O$_3$ ($B$=Mn, Fe, Cr) surfaces by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). Results obtained from varied DFT methods such as generalized gradient approximation(GGA), GGA+$U$ and the hybrid Hartree-Fock density functional method are reported for comparative purposes. We find that the results calculated from hybrid-functional method suggest that the order of ORR activity is LaMnO$_3$ $>$ LaCrO$_3$ $>$ LaFeO$_3$, which is in better agreement with recent experimental results (Suntivich \\textit{et al.}, Nature Chemistry 3, 546 (2011)) than those using the GGA or GGA+$U$ method.

  6. First principles studies on anatase surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Sencer

    TiO2 is one of the most widely studied metal oxides from both the fundamental and the technological points of view. A variety of applications have already been developed in the fields of energy production, environmental remediation, and electronics. Still, it is considered to have a high potential for further improvement and continues to be of great interest. This thesis describes our theoretical studies on the structural and electronic properties of anatase surfaces, and their (photo)chemical behavior. Recently much attention has been focused on anatase crystals synthesized by hydrofluoric acid assisted methods. These crystals exhibit a high percentage of {001} facets, generally considered to be highly reactive. We used first principles methods to investigate the structure of these facets, which is not yet well understood. Our results suggest that (001) surfaces exhibit the bulk-terminated structure when in contact with concentrated HF solutions. However, 1x4-reconstructed surfaces, as observed in UHV, become always more stable at the typical temperatures used to clean the as-prepared crystals in experiments. Since the reconstructed surfaces are only weakly reactive, we predict that synthetic anatase crystals with dominant {001} facets should not exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity. Understanding how defects in solids interact with external electric fields is important for technological applications such as memristor devices. We studied the influence of an external electric field on the formation energies and diffusion barriers of the surface and the subsurface oxygen vacancies at the anatase (101) surface from first principles. Our results show that the applied field can have a significant influence on the relative stabilities of these defects, whereas the effect on the subsurface-to-surface defect migration is found to be relatively minor. Charge carriers play a key role in the transport properties and the surface chemistry of TiO2. Understanding their

  7. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with potassium iodide under slightly acidic conditions. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cuprous iodide. 184.1265 Section 184.1265 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1265 Cuprous iodide. (a) Cuprous iodide (copper (I) iodide, CuI, CAS...

  8. Nanometer-Thick Gold on Silicon as a Proxy for Single-Crystal Gold for the Electrodeposition of Epitaxial Cuprous Oxide Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Jay A; Hill, James C; Mahenderkar, Naveen K; Liu, Ying-Chau

    2016-06-22

    Single-crystal Au is an excellent substrate for electrochemical epitaxial growth due to its chemical inertness, but the high cost of bulk Au single crystals prohibits their use in practical applications. Here, we show that ultrathin epitaxial films of Au electrodeposited onto Si(111), Si(100), and Si(110) wafers can serve as an inexpensive proxy for bulk single-crystal Au for the deposition of epitaxial films of cuprous oxide (Cu2O). The Au films range in thickness from 7.7 nm for a film deposited for 5 min to 28.3 nm for a film deposited for 30 min. The film thicknesses are measured by low-angle X-ray reflectivity and X-ray Laue oscillations. High-resolution TEM shows that there is not an interfacial SiOx layer between the Si and Au. The Au films deposited on the Si(111) substrates are smoother and have lower mosaic spread than those deposited onto Si(100) and Si(110). The mosaic spread of the Au(111) layer on Si(111) is only 0.15° for a 28.3 nm thick film. Au films deposited onto degenerate Si(111) exhibit ohmic behavior, whereas Au films deposited onto n-type Si(111) with a resistivity of 1.15 Ω·cm are rectifying with a barrier height of 0.85 eV. The Au and the Cu2O follow the out-of-plane and in-plane orientations of the Si substrates, as determined by X-ray pole figures. The Au and Cu2O films deposited on Si(100) and Si(110) are both twinned. The films grown on Si(100) have twins with a [221] orientation, and the films grown on Si(110) have twins with a [411] orientation. An interface model is proposed for all Si orientations, in which the -24.9% mismatch for the Au/Si system is reduced to only +0.13% by a coincident site lattice in which 4 unit meshes of Au coincide with 3 unit meshes of Si. Although this study only considers the deposition of epitaxial Cu2O films on electrodeposited Au/Si, the thin Au films should serve as high-quality substrates for the deposition of a wide variety of epitaxial materials.

  9. Preparation and Instability of Nanocrystalline Cuprous Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Malinda D; White, Miles A; Thompson, Michelle J; Miller, Gordon J; Vela, Javier

    2015-07-06

    Low-dimensional cuprous nitride (Cu3N) was synthesized by nitridation (ammonolysis) of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanocrystals using either ammonia (NH3) or urea (H2NCONH2) as the nitrogen source. The resulting nanocrystalline Cu3N spontaneously decomposes to nanocrystalline CuO in the presence of both water and oxygen from air at room temperature. Ammonia was produced in 60% chemical yield during Cu3N decomposition, as measured using the colorimetric indophenol method. Because Cu3N decomposition requires H2O and produces substoichiometric amounts of NH3, we conclude that this reaction proceeds through a complex stoichiometry that involves the concomitant release of both N2 and NH3. This is a thermodynamically unfavorable outcome, strongly indicating that H2O (and thus NH3 production) facilitate the kinetics of the reaction by lowering the energy barrier for Cu3N decomposition. The three different Cu2O, Cu3N, and CuO nanocrystalline phases were characterized by a combination of optical absorption, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electronic density of states obtained from electronic structure calculations on the bulk solids. The relative ease of interconversion between these interesting and inexpensive materials bears possible implications for catalytic and optoelectronic applications.

  10. Structural characterization combined with the first principles simulations of barium/strontium cobaltite/ferrite as promising material for solid oxide fuel cells cathodes and high-temperature oxygen permeation membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhayay, Shruba; Inerbaev, Talgat; Masunov, Artëm E; Altilio, Deanna; Orlovskaya, Nina

    2009-07-01

    Mixed ionic-electronic conducting perovskite type oxides with a general formula ABO(3) (where A = Ba, Sr, Ca and B = Co, Fe, Mn) often have high mobility of the oxygen vacancies and exhibit strong ionic conductivity. They are key materials that find use in several energy related applications, including solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), sensors, oxygen separation membranes, and catalysts. Barium/strontium cobaltite/ferrite (BSCF) Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-delta) was recently identified as a promising candidate for cathode material in intermediate temperature SOFCs. In this work, we perform experimental and theoretical study of the local atomic structure of BSFC. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was performed to characterize the vibrational properties of BSCF. The Jahn-Teller distortion of octahedral coordination around Co(4+) cations was observed experimentally and explained theoretically. Different cations and oxygen vacancies ordering are examined using plane wave pseudopotential density functional theory. We find that cations are completely disordered, whereas oxygen vacancies exhibit a strong trend for aggregation in L-shaped trimer and square tetramer structure. On the basis of our results, we suggest a new explanation for BSCF phase stability. Instead of linear vacancy ordering, which must take place before the phase transition into brownmillerite structure, the oxygen vacancies in BSCF prefer to form the finite clusters and preserve the disordered cubic structure. This structural feature could be found only in the first-principles simulations and can not be explained by the effect of the ionic radii alone.

  11. First-principles calculations of novel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jifeng

    Computational material simulation is becoming more and more important as a branch of material science. Depending on the scale of the systems, there are many simulation methods, i.e. first-principles calculation (or ab-initio), molecular dynamics, mesoscale methods and continuum methods. Among them, first-principles calculation, which involves density functional theory (DFT) and based on quantum mechanics, has become to be a reliable tool in condensed matter physics. DFT is a single-electron approximation in solving the many-body problems. Intrinsically speaking, both DFT and ab-initio belong to the first-principles calculation since the theoretical background of ab-initio is Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation and both are aimed at solving the Schrodinger equation of the many-body system using the self-consistent field (SCF) method and calculating the ground state properties. The difference is that DFT introduces parameters either from experiments or from other molecular dynamic (MD) calculations to approximate the expressions of the exchange-correlation terms. The exchange term is accurately calculated but the correlation term is neglected in HF. In this dissertation, DFT based first-principles calculations were performed for all the novel materials and interesting materials introduced. Specifically, the DFT theory together with the rationale behind related properties (e.g. electronic, optical, defect, thermoelectric, magnetic) are introduced in Chapter 2. Starting from Chapter 3 to Chapter 5, several representative materials were studied. In particular, a new semiconducting oxytelluride, Ba2TeO is studied in Chapter 3. Our calculations indicate a direct semiconducting character with a band gap value of 2.43 eV, which agrees well with the optical experiment (˜ 2.93 eV). Moreover, the optical and defects properties of Ba2TeO are also systematically investigated with a view to understanding its potential as an optoelectronic or transparent conducting material. We find

  12. A facile one-pot oxidation-assisted dealloying protocol to massively synthesize monolithic core-shell architectured nanoporous copper@cuprous oxide nanonetworks for photodegradation of methyl orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenbo; Chen, Long; Dong, Xin; Yan, Jiazhen; Li, Ning; Shi, Sanqiang; Zhang, Shichao

    2016-11-01

    In this report, a facile and effective one-pot oxidation-assisted dealloying protocol has been developed to massively synthesize monolithic core-shell architectured nanoporous copper@cuprous oxide nanonetworks (C-S NPC@Cu2O NNs) by chemical dealloying of melt-spun Al 37 at.% Cu alloy in an oxygen-rich alkaline solution at room temperature, which possesses superior photocatalytic activity towards photodegradation of methyl orange (MO). The experimental results show that the as-prepared nanocomposite exhibits an open, bicontinuous interpenetrating ligament-pore structure with length scales of 20 ± 5 nm, in which the ligaments comprising Cu and Cu2O are typical of core-shell architecture with uniform shell thickness of ca. 3.5 nm. The photodegradation experiments of C-S NPC@Cu2O NNs show their superior photocatalytic activities for the MO degradation under visible light irradiation with degradation rate as high as 6.67 mg min-1 gcat-1, which is a diffusion-controlled kinetic process in essence in light of the good linear correlation between photodegradation ratio and square root of irradiation time. The excellent photocatalytic activity can be ascribed to the synergistic effects between unique core-shell architecture and 3D nanoporous network with high specific surface area and fast mass transfer channel, indicating that the C-S NPC@Cu2O NNs will be a promising candidate for photocatalysts of MO degradation.

  13. Corrosion protection properties and interfacial adhesion mechanism of an epoxy/polyamide coating applied on the steel surface decorated with cerium oxide nanofilm: Complementary experimental, molecular dynamics (MD) and first principle quantum mechanics (QM) simulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlakeh, Ghasem; Ramezanzadeh, Bahram; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Terryn, Herman; Ghaffari, Mehdi

    2017-10-01

    The effect of cerium oxide treatment on the corrosion protection properties and interfacial interaction of steel/epoxy was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, (EIS) classical molecular dynamics (MD) and first principle quantum mechanics (QM) simulation methods X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to verify the chemical composition of the Ce film deposited on the steel. To probe the role of the curing agent in epoxy adsorption, computations were compared for an epoxy, aminoamide and aminoamide modified epoxy. Moreover, to study the influence of water on interfacial interactions the MD simulations were executed for poly (aminoamide)-cured epoxy resin in contact with the different crystallographic cerium dioxide (ceria, CeO2) surfaces including (100), (110), and (111) in the presence of water molecules. It was found that aminoamide-cured epoxy material was strongly adhered to all types of CeO2 substrates, so that binding to ceria surfaces followed the decreasing order CeO2 (111) > CeO2 (100) > CeO2 (110) in both dry and wet environments. Calculation of interaction energies noticed an enhanced adhesion to metal surface due to aminoamide curing of epoxy resin; where facets (100) and (111) revealed electrostatic and Lewis acid-base interactions, while an additional hydrogen bonding interaction was identified for CeO2 (110). Overall, MD simulations suggested decrement of adhesion to CeO2 in wet environment compared to dry conditions. Additionally, contact angle, pull-off test, cathodic delamination and salt spray analyses were used to confirm the simulation results. The experimental results in line with modeling results revealed that Ce layer deposited on steel enhanced substrate surface free energy, work of adhesion, and interfacial adhesion strength of the epoxy coating. Furthermore, decrement of adhesion of epoxy to CeO2 in presence of water was affirmed by experimental results. EIS results revealed remarkable enhancement of the corrosion

  14. Aqueous solvation of methane from first principles

    CERN Document Server

    Rossato, Lorenzo; Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Structural, dynamical, bonding, and electronic properties of water molecules around a soluted methane molecule are studied from first principles. The results are compatible with experiments and qualitatively support the conclusions of recent classical Molecular Dynamics simulations concerning the controversial issue on the presence of "immobilized" water molecules around hydrophobic groups: the hydrophobic solute slightly reduces (by a less than 2 factor) the mobility of many surrounding water molecules rather than immobilizing just the few ones which are closest to methane, similarly to what obtained by previous first-principles simulations of soluted methanol. Moreover, the rotational slowing down is compatible with that one predicted on the basis of the excluded volume fraction, which leads to a slower Hydrogen bond-exchange rate. The analysis of simulations performed at different temperatures suggests that the target temperature of the soluted system must be carefully chosen, in order to avoid artificial ...

  15. First-principles theory of flexoelectricity

    OpenAIRE

    Stengel, Massimiliano; Vanderbilt, David

    2015-01-01

    In this Chapter we provide an overview of the current first-principles perspective on flexoelectric effects in crystalline solids. We base our theoretical formalism on the long-wave expansion of the electrical response of a crystal to an acoustic phonon perturbation. In particular, we recover the known expression for the piezoelectric tensor from the response at first order in wavevector ${\\bf q}$, and then obtain the flexoelectric tensor by extending the formalism to second order in $\\bf q$....

  16. Electron-phonon interactions from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustino, Feliciano

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the theory of electron-phonon interactions in solids from the point of view of ab initio calculations. While the electron-phonon interaction has been studied for almost a century, predictive nonempirical calculations have become feasible only during the past two decades. Today it is possible to calculate from first principles many materials properties related to the electron-phonon interaction, including the critical temperature of conventional superconductors, the carrier mobility in semiconductors, the temperature dependence of optical spectra in direct and indirect-gap semiconductors, the relaxation rates of photoexcited carriers, the electron mass renormalization in angle-resolved photoelectron spectra, and the nonadiabatic corrections to phonon dispersion relations. In this article a review of the theoretical and computational framework underlying modern electron-phonon calculations from first principles as well as landmark investigations of the electron-phonon interaction in real materials is given. The first part of the article summarizes the elementary theory of electron-phonon interactions and their calculations based on density-functional theory. The second part discusses a general field-theoretic formulation of the electron-phonon problem and establishes the connection with practical first-principles calculations. The third part reviews a number of recent investigations of electron-phonon interactions in the areas of vibrational spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, transport, and superconductivity.

  17. 氧化锌/氧化亚铜异质结太阳能电池的研究进展∗%Research Progress in Zinc Oxide/Cuprous Oxide Heterojunction Solar Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯云珠; 董磊; 于良民

    2015-01-01

    Much attention recently has been paid on p-n heterojunction solar cells fabricated with cuprous oxide combined with zinc oxide owing to the advantage of favorable alignment of conductive band edges and lattice matching. The formation of heterojunctions can enhance the seperation of photoinduced electrons and holes,as well as the absor-bance of the light.This review compiles the main milestones reached during the last decades in the development of ZnO/Cu2 O heterojunction solar cells comprehensively.Different junction structures of these cells as planar and ZnO nanoarray based ones related to deposition sequences and synthesis methods are introduced separately,while photovol-taic property influence factors as well as improving methods are discussed.Considering the accomplishments achieved in a relatively short period of time,it can be said that this kind of solar cell can be promisingly applied in clean energy exploitation in the future,in spite of improvement of cell performance still in need.%因氧化亚铜(Cu2 O)、氧化锌(ZnO)能级和晶格匹配较好,近年来较多的研究者将两者复合制备异质结太阳能电池。异质结的形成可提高光生电子-空穴对的分离效率,同时拓展复合结构的光响应范围,从而有效提高太阳能电池性能。介绍了3类主流的 ZnO/Cu2 O 异质结结构,分别阐述主要的进展,综述了异质结结构中 Cu2 O、ZnO的制备方法以及制备条件对电池效率的影响,讨论了电池性能的改进措施,并对 ZnO/Cu2 O 异质结太阳能电池未来的发展前景进行展望。

  18. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  19. First principles approach to ionicity of fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam, E-mail: gpilania@lanl.gov; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Valone, Steven M.

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • A novel first principles approach towards the fragment ionicity. • Constrained DFT and valance charge density decomposition were employed. • Correct dissociation limit achieved for diatomics. • Ionicity is an input parameter for a new class of atomistic potentials. - Abstract: We develop a first principles approach towards the ionicity of fragments. In contrast to the bond ionicity, the fragment ionicity refers to an electronic property of the constituents of a larger system, which may vary from a single atom to a functional group or a unit cell to a crystal. The fragment ionicity is quantitatively defined in terms of the coefficients of contributing charge states in a superposition of valence configurations of the system. Utilizing the constrained density functional theory-based computations, a practical method to compute the fragment ionicity from valence electron charge densities, suitably decomposed according to the Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model prescription for those electron densities, is presented for the first time. The adopted approach is illustrated using BeO, MgO and CaO diatomic molecules as simple examples. The results are compared and discussed with respect to the bond ionicity scales of Phillips and Pauling.

  20. Iron diffusion from first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wann, E.; Ammann, M. W.; Vocadlo, L.; Wood, I. G.; Lord, O. T.; Brodholt, J. P.; Dobson, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The cores of Earth and other terrestrial planets are made up largely of iron1 and it is therefore very important to understand iron's physical properties. Chemical diffusion is one such property and is central to many processes, such as crystal growth, and viscosity. Debate still surrounds the explanation for the seismologically observed anisotropy of the inner core2, and hypotheses include convection3, anisotropic growth4 and dendritic growth5, all of which depend on diffusion. In addition to this, the main deformation mechanism at the inner-outer core boundary is believed to be diffusion creep6. It is clear, therefore, that to gain a comprehensive understanding of the core, a thorough understanding of diffusion is necessary. The extremely high pressures and temperatures of the Earth's core make experiments at these conditions a challenge. Low-temperature and low-pressure experimental data must be extrapolated across a very wide gap to reach the relevant conditions, resulting in very poorly constrained values for diffusivity and viscosity. In addition to these dangers of extrapolation, preliminary results show that magnetisation plays a major role in the activation energies for diffusion at low pressures therefore creating a break down in homologous scaling to high pressures. First principles calculations provide a means of investigating diffusivity at core conditions, have already been shown to be in very good agreement with experiments7, and will certainly provide a better estimate for diffusivity than extrapolation. Here, we present first principles simulations of self-diffusion in solid iron for the FCC, BCC and HCP structures at core conditions in addition to low-temperature and low-pressure calculations relevant to experimental data. 1. Birch, F. Density and composition of mantle and core. Journal of Geophysical Research 69, 4377-4388 (1964). 2. Irving, J. C. E. & Deuss, A. Hemispherical structure in inner core velocity anisotropy. Journal of Geophysical

  1. Numerical inductance calculations based on first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatz, Lisa F; Christensen, Craig W

    2014-01-01

    A method of calculating inductances based on first principles is presented, which has the advantage over the more popular simulators in that fundamental formulas are explicitly used so that a deeper understanding of the inductance calculation is obtained with no need for explicit discretization of the inductor. It also has the advantage over the traditional method of formulas or table lookups in that it can be used for a wider range of configurations. It relies on the use of fast computers with a sophisticated mathematical computing language such as Mathematica to perform the required integration numerically so that the researcher can focus on the physics of the inductance calculation and not on the numerical integration.

  2. First principles approach to ionicity of fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Valone, Steven M.

    2015-02-01

    We develop a first principles approach towards the ionicity of fragments. In contrast to the bond ionicity, the fragment ionicity refers to an electronic property of the constituents of a larger system, which may vary from a single atom to a functional group or a unit cell to a crystal. The fragment ionicity is quantitatively defined in terms of the coefficients of contributing charge states in a superposition of valence configurations of the system. Utilizing the constrained density functional theory-based computations, a practical method to compute the fragment ionicity from valence electron charge densities, suitably decomposed according to the Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model prescription for those electron densities, is presented for the first time. The adopted approach is illustrated using BeO, MgO and CaO diatomic molecules as simple examples. The results are compared and discussed with respect to the bond ionicity scales of Phillips and Pauling.

  3. Primordial Black Holes from First Principles (Overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Casey; Bloomfield, Jolyon; Moss, Zander; Russell, Megan; Face, Stephen; Guth, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Given a power spectrum from inflation, our goal is to calculate, from first principles, the number density and mass spectrum of primordial black holes that form in the early universe. Previously, these have been calculated using the Press- Schechter formalism and some demonstrably dubious rules of thumb regarding predictions of black hole collapse. Instead, we use Monte Carlo integration methods to sample field configurations from a power spectrum combined with numerical relativity simulations to obtain a more accurate picture of primordial black hole formation. We demonstrate how this can be applied for both Gaussian perturbations and the more interesting (for primordial black holes) theory of hybrid inflation. One of the tools that we employ is a variant of the BBKS formalism for computing the statistics of density peaks in the early universe. We discuss the issue of overcounting due to subpeaks that can arise from this approach (the ``cloud-in-cloud'' problem). MIT UROP Office- Paul E. Gray (1954) Endowed Fund.

  4. Electrophysiology of living organs from first principles

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, Günter

    2010-01-01

    Based on the derivation of the macroscopic Maxwell's equations by spatial averaging of the microscopic equations, we discuss the electrophysiology of living organs. Other methods of averaging (or homogenization) like the bidomain model are not compatible with Maxwell's theory. We also point out that modeling the active cells by source currents is not a suitable description of the situation from first principles. Instead, it turns out that the main source of the measured electrical potentials is the polarization charge density which exists at the membranes of the active cells and adds up to a macroscopic polarization. The latter is the source term in the Laplace equation, the solution of which gives the measured far-field potential. As a consequence it is the polarization or dipole density which is best suited for localization of cardiac arrhythmia.

  5. First-principles determination of magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Ruqian; Yang Zongxian; Hong Jisang [Department of Physics, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-02-12

    First-principles density functional theory calculations have achieved great success in the exciting field of low-dimension magnetism, in explaining new phenomena observed in experiments as well as in predicting novel properties and materials. As known, spin-orbit coupling (SOC) plays an extremely important role in various magnetic properties such as magnetic anisotropy, magnetostriction, magneto-optical effects and spin-dynamics. Using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave approach, we have carried out extensive investigations for the effects of SOC in various materials. Results of selected examples, such as structure and magnetic properties of Ni/Cu(001), magnetism and magnetic anisotropy in magnetic Co/Cu(001) thin films, wires and clusters, magnetostriction in FeGa alloys and magneto-optical effects in Fe/Cr superlattices, are discussed.

  6. First principles study of magnetism in nanographenes

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, De-en; Dai, Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Magnetism in nanographenes (also know as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs) are studied with first principles density functional calculations. We find that an antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase appears as the PAH reaches a certain size. This AFM phase in PAHs has the same origin as the one in infinitely long zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons, namely, from the localized electronic state at the zigzag edge. The smallest PAH still having an AFM ground state is identified. With increased length of the zigzag edge, PAHs approach an infinitely long ribbon in terms of (1) the energetic ordering and difference among the AFM, ferromagnetic (FM), and nonmagnetic (NM) phases and (2) the average local magnetic moment at the zigzag edges. These PAHs serve as ideal targets for chemical synthesis of nanographenes that possess magnetic properties. Moreover, our calculations support the interpretation that experimentally observed magnetism in activated carbon fibers originates from the zigzag edges of the nanographenes.

  7. Intrinsic ferroelectric switching from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2016-06-01

    The existence of domain walls, which separate regions of different polarization, can influence the dielectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric and electronic properties of ferroelectric materials. In particular, domain-wall motion is crucial for polarization switching, which is characterized by the hysteresis loop that is a signature feature of ferroelectric materials. Experimentally, the observed dynamics of polarization switching and domain-wall motion are usually explained as the behaviour of an elastic interface pinned by a random potential that is generated by defects, which appear to be strongly sample-dependent and affected by various elastic, microstructural and other extrinsic effects. Theoretically, connecting the zero-kelvin, first-principles-based, microscopic quantities of a sample with finite-temperature, macroscopic properties such as the coercive field is critical for material design and device performance; and the lack of such a connection has prevented the use of techniques based on ab initio calculations for high-throughput computational materials discovery. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations of 90° domain walls (separating domains with orthogonal polarization directions) in the ferroelectric material PbTiO3 to provide microscopic insights that enable the construction of a simple, universal, nucleation-and-growth-based analytical model that quantifies the dynamics of many types of domain walls in various ferroelectrics. We then predict the temperature and frequency dependence of hysteresis loops and coercive fields at finite temperatures from first principles. We find that, even in the absence of defects, the intrinsic temperature and field dependence of the domain-wall velocity can be described with a nonlinear creep-like region and a depinning-like region. Our model enables quantitative estimation of coercive fields, which agree well with experimental results for ceramics and thin films. This agreement between model and experiment suggests

  8. High Pressure Hydrogen from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Typical approximations employed in first-principles simulations of high-pressure hydrogen involve the neglect of nuclear quantum effects (NQE) and the approximate treatment of electronic exchange and correlation, typically through a density functional theory (DFT) formulation. In this talk I'll present a detailed analysis of the influence of these approximations on the phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen, with the goal of identifying the predictive capabilities of current methods and, at the same time, making accurate predictions in this important regime. We use a path integral formulation combined with density functional theory, which allows us to incorporate NQEs in a direct and controllable way. In addition, we use state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo calculations to benchmark the accuracy of more approximate mean-field electronic structure calculations based on DFT, and we use GW and hybrid DFT to calculate the optical properties of the solid and liquid phases near metallization. We present accurate predictions of the metal-insulator transition on the solid, including structural and optical properties of the molecular phase. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by LDRD Grant No. 13-LW-004.

  9. Safeguards First Principle Initiative (SFPI) Cost Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Alice Price

    2010-07-11

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) began operating Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) under the Safeguards First Principle Initiative (SFPI), a risk-based and cost-effective program, in December 2006. The NTS SFPI Comprehensive Assessment of Safeguards Systems (COMPASS) Model is made up of specific elements (MC&A plan, graded safeguards, accounting systems, measurements, containment, surveillance, physical inventories, shipper/receiver differences, assessments/performance tests) and various sub-elements, which are each assigned effectiveness and contribution factors that when weighted and rated reflect the health of the MC&A program. The MC&A Cost Model, using an Excel workbook, calculates budget and/or actual costs using these same elements/sub-elements resulting in total costs and effectiveness costs per element/sub-element. These calculations allow management to identify how costs are distributed for each element/sub-element. The Cost Model, as part of the SFPI program review process, enables management to determine if spending is appropriate for each element/sub-element.

  10. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING AND FIRST-PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, P; Abrikosov, I; Burton, B; Fries, S; Grimvall, G; Kaufman, L; Korzhavyi, P; Manga, R; Ohno, M; Pisch, A; Scott, A; Zhang, W

    2005-12-15

    The increased application of quantum mechanical-based methodologies to the study of alloy stability has required a re-assessment of the field. The focus is mainly on inorganic materials in the solid state. In a first part, after a brief overview of the so-called ab initio methods with their approximations, constraints, and limitations, recommendations are made for a good usage of first-principles codes with a set of qualifiers. Examples are given to illustrate the power and the limitations of ab initio codes. However, despite the ''success'' of these methodologies, thermodynamics of complex multi-component alloys, as used in engineering applications, requires a more versatile approach presently afforded within CALPHAD. Hence, in a second part, the links that presently exist between ab initio methodologies, experiments, and CALPHAD approach are examined with illustrations. Finally, the issues of dynamical instability and of the role of lattice vibrations that still constitute the subject of ample discussions within the CALPHAD community are revisited in the light of the current knowledge with a set of recommendations.

  11. First principles model of carbonate compaction creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    Rocks under compressional stress conditions are subject to long-term creep deformation. From first principles we develop a simple micromechanical model of creep in rocks under compressional stress that combines microscopic fracturing and pressure solution. This model was then upscaled by a statistical mechanical approach to predict strain rate at core and reservoir scale. The model uses no fitting parameter and has few input parameters: effective stress, temperature, water saturation porosity, and material parameters. Material parameters are porosity, pore size distribution, Young's modulus, interfacial energy of wet calcite, the dissolution, and precipitation rates of calcite, and the diffusion rate of calcium carbonate, all of which are independently measurable without performing any type of deformation or creep test. Existing long-term creep experiments were used to test the model which successfully predicts the magnitude of the resulting strain rate under very different effective stress, temperature, and water saturation conditions. The model was used to predict the observed compaction of a producing chalk reservoir.

  12. Preparation of poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglyceldimethacrylate) monolithic column modified with β-cyclodextrin and nano-cuprous oxide and its application in polymer monolithic microextraction of polychlorinated biphenyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haijiao; Liu, Qingwen; Jia, Qiong

    2014-05-23

    A poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglyceldimethacrylate) (poly(BMA-EDMA)) monolithic column was prepared with in situ polymerization method and modified with allylamine-β-cyclodextrin (ALA-β-CD) and nano-cuprous oxide (Cu2O). A polymer monolith microextraction method was developed with the modified monolithic column for the preconcentration of polychlorinated biphenyls combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detector. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, we obtained acceptable linearities, low limits of detection, and good intra-day/inter-day relative standard deviations. Because of the hydrophobic properties of β-CD and the porous nano structure of Cu2O, the enrichment capacity of the poly(BMA-EDMA) monolithic column was significantly improved. The extraction efficiency followed the order: poly(BMA-EDMA-ALA-β-CD-Cu2O)>poly(BMA-EDMA-ALA-β-CD)>poly(BMA-EDMA)>direct GC analysis. When applied to the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in wine samples, low limits of detection (0.09ngmL(-1)) were obtained under the preoptimized conditions (sample volume 1.0mL, sample flow rate 0.1mLmin(-1), eluent volume 0.1mL, and eluent flow rate 0.05mLmin(-1)). In addition, the present method was employed to determine polychlorinated biphenyls in red wine samples and the accuracy was assessed through recovery experiments. The obtained recovery values were in the range of 78.8-104.1% with relative standard deviations less than 9.0%.

  13. Transversity from First Principles in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2012-02-16

    Transversity observables, such as the T-odd Sivers single-spin asymmetry measured in deep inelastic lepton scattering on polarized protons and the distributions which are measured in deeply virtual Compton scattering, provide important constraints on the fundamental quark and gluon structure of the proton. In this talk I discuss the challenge of computing these observables from first principles; i.e.; quantum chromodynamics, itself. A key step is the determination of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions (LFWFs) of hadrons - the QCD eigensolutions which are analogs of the Schroedinger wavefunctions of atomic physics. The lensing effects of initial-state and final-state interactions, acting on LFWFs with different orbital angular momentum, lead to T-odd transversity observables such as the Sivers, Collins, and Boer-Mulders distributions. The lensing effect also leads to leading-twist phenomena which break leading-twist factorization such as the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions. A similar rescattering mechanism also leads to diffractive deep inelastic scattering, as well as nuclear shadowing and non-universal antishadowing. It is thus important to distinguish 'static' structure functions, the probability distributions computed the target hadron's light-front wavefunctions, versus 'dynamical' structure functions which include the effects of initial- and final-state rescattering. I also discuss related effects such as the J = 0 fixed pole contribution which appears in the real part of the virtual Compton amplitude. AdS/QCD, together with 'Light-Front Holography', provides a simple Lorentz-invariant color-confining approximation to QCD which is successful in accounting for light-quark meson and baryon spectroscopy as well as hadronic LFWFs.

  14. First principles investigation of substituted strontium hexaferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vivek

    This dissertation investigates how the magnetic properties of strontium hexaferrite change upon the substitution of foreign atoms at the Fe sites. Strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12O19, is a commonly used hard magnetic material and is produced in large quantities (around 500,000 tons per year). For different applications of strontium hexaferrite, its magnetic properties can be tuned by a proper substitution of the foreign atoms. Experimental screening for a proper substitution is a cost-intensive and time-consuming process, whereas computationally it can be done more efficiently. We used the 'density functional theory' a first principles based method to study substituted strontium hexaferrite. The site occupancies of the substituted atoms were estimated by calculating the substitution energies of different configurations. The formation probabilities of configurations were used to calculate the magnetic properties of substituted strontium hexaferrite. In the first study, Al-substituted strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-x AlxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. It was found that at the annealing temperature the non-magnetic Al +3 ions preferentially replace Fe+3 ions from the 12 k and 2a sites. We found that the magnetization decreases and the magnetic anisotropy field increases as the fraction, x of the Al atoms increases. In the second study, SrFe12-xGaxO19 and SrFe12-xInxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. In the case of SrFe12-xGaxO19, the sites where Ga+3 ions prefer to enter are: 12 k, 2a, and 4f1. For SrFe12-xInxO19, In+3 ions most likely to occupy the 12k, 4f1 , and 4f2 sites. In both cases the magnetization was found to decrease slightly as the fraction of substituted atom increases. The magnetic anisotropy field increased for SrFe12-xGaxO 19, and decreased for SrFe12-xInxO19 as the concentration of substituted atoms increased. In the third study, 23 elements (M) were screened for their possible substitution in strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-xMxO 19

  15. First-Principles Informed Thermodynamics of CRUD Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Christopher John

    The recent emphasis in the United States on developing abundant domestic sources of energy, together with an increasing awareness of the environmental hazards of fossil fuels, has led to a fresh look at the challenges of nuclear energy within the science and engineering community. One of these challenges is controlling the precipitation of porous oxide deposits onto the nuclear fuel rod cladding from the primary coolant during operation of pressurized light-water reactors (PWRs). These deposits, called CRUD (an acronym for Chalk River Unidentified Deposits), are a major concern to reactor operation because they reduce fuel lifetime and efficiency by reducing heat transfer to the coolant, promote corrosion, and depress neutron flux. This dissertation provides fundamental insights into the process by which CRUD is formed in PWRs by providing a framework linking the results of first-principles calculations to experimental data. The technique developed to facilitate the investigation is referred to as Density Functional Theory (DFT) referenced semi-empirical thermodynamics; It links 0K first-principles calculations with high temperature thermodynamics by redefining the reference chemical potentials of the constituent elements. The technique permits aqueous chemistry to be incorporated into thermodynamic calculations and allows for the prediction of temperature and pressure dependent free energies of materials that are experimentally inaccessible or have not yet been measured. The ability to extend accurate first-principles calculations to high temperatures and aqueous environments allows the stability of crystal surfaces, calculated with DFT techniques, to be predicted at conditions representative of an operating PWR. Accurate values of surface energies are used in fulfilling the principal goal of this dissertation, which is to investigate the aqueous thermodynamics of formation of nickel oxide (NiO) and nickel ferrite (NiFe 2O4) crystallites as representative CRUD

  16. First Principles Hartree-Fock Description of Lithium Insertion in Oxides. I. The End Members TiO 2and LiTiO 2of the System Li xTiO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackrodt, W. C.

    1999-02-01

    First principles periodic Hartree-Fock calculations are reported for the P4 2/ mnm(rutile), I4 1/ amd(anatase), Pbca(brookite), Pnma(ramsdellite), Pcbn(colombite), Fdoverline3m(spinel), and Imma(orthorhombic) polymorphs of TiO 2, from which the predicted order of stability is The calculated difference in energy between the rutile and anatase structures is 0.02-0.06 eV, in good agreement with a recent local density approximation (LDA) estimate of 0.033 eV and an experiment enthalpy difference of 0.05 eV. The corresponding Hartree-Fock and LDA differences for the brookite structure are 0.06 and 0.058 eV, respectively. The calculated volumes, which are based on isotropic volume-optimized Hartree-Fock energies, are also in good agreement with recent LDA calculations and with experiment. Spin-unrestricted calculations are reported for the Fmoverline3m, Imma, Pnma, and P4 2/ mmmof LiTiO 2, where the stability is in the order The only reported phase for LiTiO 2is Fmoverline3m, for which the calculated volume is in good agreement with experiment. From the relative stabilities of TiO 2and LiTiO 2, the relative lithium insertion potentials corresponding to TiO 2 → LiTiO 2are deduced, with a maximum variation of 1.6 eV for the different polymorphic routes. The maximum voltage predicted is that for the Immaroute which is ˜1 eV larger than that for Pnma. Direct comparisons with the calculated energy for C2/ mLi 0.5MnO 2 → LiMnO 2lead to an estimate of the voltage for ImmaTiO 2 → LiTiO 2of ˜1.3 eV, which is ˜2.5 eV anodicto the Mn system. The corresponding values for the Pnmapolymorphic route are ˜3 and ˜3.5 eV, respectively. Mulliken population analyses indicate that lithium is completely ionized in LiTiO 2and that the charge transfer is predominantly to the oxygen sublattice. There is a rehybridization of the titanium valence orbitals leading to a slight increase in the 3 dpopulation and strong localization of spin density at the titanium sites with local moments of

  17. First-principles study of fission product (Xe, Cs, Sr) incorporation and segregation in alkaline earth metal oxides, HfO2, and MgO-HfO2 interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In order to close the nuclear fuel cycle, advanced concepts for separating out fission products are necessary. One approach is to use a dispersion fuel form in which a fissile core is surrounded by an inert matrix that captures and immobilizes the fission products from the core. If this inert matrix can be easily separated from the fuel, via e.g. solution chemistry, the fission products can be separated from the fissile material. We examine a surrogate dispersion fuel composition, in which hafnia (HfO{sub 2}) is a surrogate for the fissile core and alkaline earth metal oxides are used as the inert matrix. The questions of fission product incorporation in these oxides and possible segregation behavior at interfaces are considered. Density functional theory based calculations for fission product elements (Xe, Sr, and Cs) in these oxides are carried out. We find smaller incorporation energy in hafnia than in MgO for Cs and Sr, and Xe if variation of charge state is allowed. We also find that this trend is reversed or reduced for alkaline earth metal oxides with large cation sizes. Model interfacial calculations show a strong tendency of segregation from bulk MgO to MgO-HfO{sub 2} interfaces.

  18. Effects of lithium (Li) on lithium-cuprous-oxide (Li-Cu2O) composite films grown by using electrochemical deposition for a PEC photoelectrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Gyoum; Ryu, Hyukhyun; Lee, Won-Jae

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Li-Cu2O composite films were grown on fluorine-doped tin-oxide (FTO) substrates by using the electrochemical deposition method. Various amounts of lithium (Li) were added to grow the Li-Cu2O composite films. We analyzed the morphology, structure, photocurrent density and photo-stability of the Li-Cu2O composite films by using various measurements such as field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and potentiostat/galvanostat measurements, respectively. As a result, the highest XRD Cu2O (111)/ LiO (011) peak intensity ratio was obtained for the 10-wt% sample, which also had the highest photocurrent density value of -5.00 mA/cm2. The highest photocurrent density value for the 10-wt% sample was approximately 5 times greater than that of the 0-wt% sample. As shown by this result, we found that adding Li could improve the photocurrent values of Li-Cu2O composite films.

  19. First-principles dynamics of electrons and phonons

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    First-principles calculations combining density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory can provide microscopic insight into the dynamics of electrons and phonons in materials. We review this theoretical and computational framework, focusing on perturbative treatments of scattering, dynamics and transport of coupled electrons and phonons. We discuss application of these first-principles calculations to electronics, lighting, spectroscopy and renewable energy.

  20. A first-principles theoretical approach to heterogeneous nanocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreiros, Fabio R; Aprà, Edoardo; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Vajda, Stefan; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2012-02-21

    A theoretical approach to heterogeneous catalysis by sub-nanometre supported metal clusters and alloys is presented and discussed. Its goal is to perform a computational sampling of the reaction paths in nanocatalysis via a global search in the phase space of structures and stoichiometry combined with filtering which takes into account the given experimental conditions (catalytically relevant temperature and reactant pressure), and corresponds to an incremental exploration of the disconnectivity diagram of the system. The approach is implemented and applied to the study of propylene partial oxidation by Ag(3) supported on MgO(100). First-principles density-functional theory calculations coupled with a Reactive Global Optimization algorithm are performed, finding that: (1) the presence of an oxide support drastically changes the potential energy landscape of the system with respect to the gas phase, favoring configurations which interact positively with the electrostatic field generated by the surface; (2) the reaction energy barriers for the various mechanisms are crucial in the competition between thermodynamically and kinetically favored reaction products; (3) a topological database of structures and saddle points is produced which has general validity and can serve for future studies or for deriving general trends; (4) the MgO(100) surface captures some major features of the effect of an oxide support and appears to be a good model of a simple oxide substrate; (5) strong cooperative effects are found in the co-adsorption of O(2) and other ligands on small metal clusters. The proposed approach appears as a viable route to advance the role of predictive computational science in the field of heterogeneous nanocatalysis. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  1. A first-principles theoretical approach to heterogeneous nanocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreiros, Fabio R.; Aprà, Edoardo; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Vajda, Stefan; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    A theoretical approach to heterogeneous catalysis by sub-nanometre supported metal clusters and alloys is presented and discussed. Its goal is to perform a computational sampling of the reaction paths in nanocatalysis via a global search in the phase space of structures and stoichiometry combined with filtering which takes into account the given experimental conditions (catalytically relevant temperature and reactant pressure), and corresponds to an incremental exploration of the disconnectivity diagram of the system. The approach is implemented and applied to the study of propylene partial oxidation by Ag3 supported on MgO(100). First-principles density-functional theory calculations coupled with a Reactive Global Optimization algorithm are performed, finding that: (1) the presence of an oxide support drastically changes the potential energy landscape of the system with respect to the gas phase, favoring configurations which interact positively with the electrostatic field generated by the surface; (2) the reaction energy barriers for the various mechanisms are crucial in the competition between thermodynamically and kinetically favored reaction products; (3) a topological database of structures and saddle points is produced which has general validity and can serve for future studies or for deriving general trends; (4) the MgO(100) surface captures some major features of the effect of an oxide support and appears to be a good model of a simple oxide substrate; (5) strong cooperative effects are found in the co-adsorption of O2 and other ligands on small metal clusters. The proposed approach appears as a viable route to advance the role of predictive computational science in the field of heterogeneous nanocatalysis.

  2. First Principles Studies of ABO3 Perovskite Surfaces and Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam

    Perovskite-type complex oxides, with general formula ABO 3, constitute one of the most prominent classes of metal oxides which finds key applications in diverse technological fields. In recent years, properties of perovskites at reduced dimensions have aroused considerable interest. However, a complete atomic-level understanding of various phenomena is yet to emerge. To fully exploit the materials opportunities provided by nano-structured perovskites, it is important to characterize and understand their bulk and near-surface electronic structure along with the electric, magnetic, elastic and chemical properties of these materials in the nano-regime, where surface and interface effects naturally play a dominant role. In this thesis, state-of-the-art first principles computations are employed to systematically study properties of one- and two-dimensional perovskite systems which are of direct technological significance. Specifically, our bifocal study targets (1) polarization behavior and dielectric response of ABO3 ferroelectric nanowires, and (2) oxygen chemistry relevant for catalytic properties of ABO3 surfaces. In the first strand, we identify presence of novel closure or vortex-like polarization domains in PbTIO3 and BaTiO3 ferroelectric nanowires and explore ways to control the polarization configurations by means of strain and surface chemistry in these prototypical model systems. The intrinsic tendency towards vortex polarization at reduced dimensions and the underlying driving forces are discussed and previously unknown strain induced phase transitions are identified. Furthermore, to compute the dielectric permittivity of nanostructures, a new multiscale model is developed and applied to the PbTiO3 nanowires with conventional and vortex-like polarization configurations. The second part of the work undertaken in this thesis is comprised of a number of ab initio surface studies, targeted to investigate the effects of surface terminations, prevailing chemical

  3. Origin of the performances degradation of two-dimensional-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors in the sub-10 nm regime: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Anh Khoa Augustin [Semiconductor Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); IMEC, 75 Kapeldreef, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Pourtois, Geoffrey [IMEC, 75 Kapeldreef, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Chemistry, Plasmant Research Group, University of Antwerp, B-2610 Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Agarwal, Tarun [IMEC, 75 Kapeldreef, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Afzalian, Aryan [TSMC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Radu, Iuliana P. [IMEC, 75 Kapeldreef, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Houssa, Michel [Semiconductor Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-01-25

    The impact of the scaling of the channel length on the performances of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors, based on two-dimensional (2D) channel materials, is theoretically investigated, using density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the scaling of the channel length below 10 nm leads to strong device performance degradations. Our simulations reveal that this degradation is essentially due to the tunneling current flowing between the source and the drain in these aggressively scaled devices. It is shown that this electron tunneling process is modulated by the effective mass of the 2D channel material, and sets the limit of the scaling in future transistor designs.

  4. The high pressure structure and equation of state of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) up to 20 GPa: X-ray diffraction measurements and first principles molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavrou, Elissaios, E-mail: stavrou1@llnl.gov; Riad Manaa, M., E-mail: manaa1@llnl.gov; Zaug, Joseph M.; Kuo, I-Feng W.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Armstrong, Michael R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, P.O. Box 808 L-350, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kalkan, Bora [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics Engineering, Hacettepe University 06800, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-14

    Recent theoretical studies of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 6}O{sub 5} Lawrence Livermore Molecule No. 105, LLM-105) report unreacted high pressure equations of state that include several structural phase transitions, between 8 and 50 GPa, while one published experimental study reports equation of state (EOS) data up to a pressure of 6 GPa with no observed transition. Here we report the results of a synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction study and also ambient temperature isobaric-isothermal atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of LLM-105 up to 20 GPa. We find that the ambient pressure phase remains stable up to 20 GPa; there is no indication of a pressure induced phase transition. We do find a prominent decrease in b-axis compressibility starting at approximately 13 GPa and attribute the stiffening to a critical length where inter-sheet distance becomes similar to the intermolecular distance within individual sheets. The ambient temperature isothermal equation of state was determined through refinements of measured X-ray diffraction patterns. The pressure-volume data were fit using various EOS models to yield bulk moduli with corresponding pressure derivatives. We find very good agreement between the experimental and theoretically derived EOS.

  5. The high pressure structure and equation of state of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) up to 20 GPa: X-ray diffraction measurements and first principles molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Riad Manaa, M; Zaug, Joseph M; Kuo, I-Feng W; Pagoria, Philip F; Kalkan, Bora; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Armstrong, Michael R

    2015-10-14

    Recent theoretical studies of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (C4H4N6O5 Lawrence Livermore Molecule No. 105, LLM-105) report unreacted high pressure equations of state that include several structural phase transitions, between 8 and 50 GPa, while one published experimental study reports equation of state (EOS) data up to a pressure of 6 GPa with no observed transition. Here we report the results of a synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction study and also ambient temperature isobaric-isothermal atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of LLM-105 up to 20 GPa. We find that the ambient pressure phase remains stable up to 20 GPa; there is no indication of a pressure induced phase transition. We do find a prominent decrease in b-axis compressibility starting at approximately 13 GPa and attribute the stiffening to a critical length where inter-sheet distance becomes similar to the intermolecular distance within individual sheets. The ambient temperature isothermal equation of state was determined through refinements of measured X-ray diffraction patterns. The pressure-volume data were fit using various EOS models to yield bulk moduli with corresponding pressure derivatives. We find very good agreement between the experimental and theoretically derived EOS.

  6. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-09

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni{sub 3}Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  7. Memristive Properties of Thin Film Cuprous Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Banerjee and D Chakravorty, "Optical absorption by nanoparticles of Cu2O," Europhysics Letters , vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 468-473, November 2000. [20] Gunter...Kotsugi, "Inhomogeneous chemical states in resistance-switching devices with a planar-type Pt/CuO/Pt structure," Applied Physics Letters , vol. 95, p...11] R Dong et al., "Reproducible hysteresis and resistive switching in metal-CuxO- metal," Applied Physics Letters , vol. 90, p. 042107, 2007. [12

  8. First-principles modelling of materials: From polythiophene to phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziletti, Angelo

    As a result of the computing power provided by the current technology, computational methods now play an important role in modeling and designing materials at the nanoscale. The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: first, new computational methods to model nanoscale transport are introduced, then state-of-the-art tools based on density functional theory are employed to explore the properties of phosphorene, a novel low dimensional material with great potential for applications in nanotechnology. A Wannier function description of the electron density is combined with a generalized Slater-Koster interpolation technique, enabling the introduction of a new computational method for constructing first-principles model Hamiltonians for electron and hole transport that maintain the density functional theory accuracy at a fraction of the computational cost. As a proof of concept, this new approach is applied to model polythiophene, a polymer ubiquitous in organic photovoltaic devices. A new low dimensional material, phosphorene - a single layer of black phosphorous - the phosphorous analogue of graphene was first isolated in early 2014 and has attracted considerable attention. It is a semiconductor with a sizable band gap, which makes it a perfect candidate for ultrathin transistors. Multi-layer phosphorene transistors have already achieved the highest hole mobility of any two-dimensional material apart from graphene. Phosphorene is prone to oxidation, which can lead to degradation of electrical properties, and eventually structural breakdown. The calculations reported here are some of the first to explore this oxidation and reveal that different types of oxygen defects are readily introduced in the phosphorene lattice, creating electron traps in some situations. These traps are responsible for the non-ambipolar behavior observed by experimental collaborators in air-exposed few-layer black phosphorus devices. Calculation results predict that air exposure of phosphorene

  9. The fictile coordination chemistry of cuprous-thiolate sites in copper chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushie, M Jake; Zhang, Limei; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N

    2012-06-01

    Copper plays vital roles in the active sites of cytochrome oxidase and in several other enzymes essential for human health. Copper is also highly toxic when dysregulated; because of this an elaborate array of accessory proteins have evolved which act as intracellular carriers or chaperones for the copper ions. In most cases chaperones transport cuprous copper. This review discusses some of the chemistry of these copper sites, with a view to some of the structural factors in copper coordination which are important in the biological function of these chaperones. The coordination chemistry and accessible geometries of the cuprous oxidation state are remarkably plastic and we discuss how this may relate to biological function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  10. First Principle simulations of electrochemical interfaces - a DFT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Rizwan

    for the whole system to qualify as a proper electrochemical interface. I have also contributed to the model, which accounts for pH in the first principle electrode-electrolyte interface simulations. This is an important step forward, since electrochemical reaction rate and barrier for charge transfer can......In this thesis, I have looked beyond the computational hydrogen electrode (CHE) model, and focused on the first principle simulations which treats the electrode-electrolyte interfaces explicitly. Since obtaining a realistic electrode-electrolyte interface was difficult, I aimed to address various...... challenges regarding first principle electrochemical interface modeling in order to bridge the gap between the model interface used in simulations and real catalyst at operating conditions. Atomic scale insight for the processes and reactions that occur at the electrochemical interface presents a challenge...

  11. First-principles models of equilibrium tellurium isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghnegahdar, M. A.; Schauble, E. A.; Fornadel, A. P.; Spry, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, equilibrium mass-dependent isotopic fractionation among representative Te-bearing species is estimated with first-principles thermodynamic calculations. Tellurium is a group 16 element (along with O, S, and Se) with eight stable isotopes ranging in mass from 120Te to 130Te, and six commonly-occurring oxidation states: -II, -I, 0, +II, +IV, and +VI. In its reduced form, Te(-II), tellurium has a unique crystal-chemical role as a bond partner for gold and silver in epithermal and orogenic gold deposits, which likely form when oxidized Te species (e.g., H2TeO3, TeO32-) or perhaps polytellurides (e.g., Te22-) interact with precious metals in hydrothermal solution. Te(IV) is the most common oxidation state at the Earth's surface, including surface outcrops of telluride ore deposits, where tellurite and tellurate minerals form by oxidation. In the ocean, dissolved tellurium tends to be scavenged by particulate matter. Te(VI) is more abundant than Te(IV) in the ocean water (1), even though it is thought to be less stable thermodynamically. This variety of valence states in natural systems and range of isotopic masses suggest that tellurium could exhibit geochemically useful isotope abundance variations. Tellurium isotope fractionations were determined for representative molecules and crystals of varying complexity and chemistry. Gas-phase calculations are combined with supermolecular cluster models of aqueous and solid species. These in turn are compared with plane-wave density functional theory calculations with periodic boundary conditions. In general, heavyTe/lightTe is predicted to be higher for more oxidized species, and lower for reduced species, with 130Te/125Te fractionations as large as 4‰ at 100οC between coexisting Te(IV) and Te(-II) or Te(0) compounds. This is a much larger fractionation than has been observed in naturally occurring redox pairs (i.e., Te (0) vs. Te(IV) species) so far, suggesting that disequilibrium processes may control

  12. First principles modeling of magnetic random access memory devices (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, W.H.; Zhang, X.; Schulthess, T.C.; Nicholson, D.M.; Oparin, A.B. [Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); MacLaren, J.M. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70018 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and spin-dependent tunneling may be used to make magnetic random access memory devices. We have applied first-principles based electronic structure techniques to understand these effects and in the case of GMR to model the transport properties of the devices. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Predictions of the properties of water from first principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukowski, R.; Szalewicz, K.; Groenenboom, G.C.; Avoird, A. van der

    2007-01-01

    A force field for water has been developed entirely from first principles, without any fitting to experimental data. It contains both pairwise and many-body interactions. This force field predicts the properties of the water dimer and of liquid water in excellent agreement with experiments, a previo

  14. Molecular Electronics: Insight from First-Principles Transport Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Conduction properties of nanoscale contacts can be studied using first-principles simulations. Such calculations give insight into details behind the conductance that is not readily available in experiments. For example, we may learn how the bonding conditions of a molecule to the electrodes affect...

  15. Towards first principles modeling of electrochemical electrode-electrolyte interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malte; Björketun, Mårten; Hansen, Martin Hangaard;

    2015-01-01

    We present a mini-perspective on the development of first principles modeling of electrochemical interfaces. We show that none of the existing methods deal with all the thermodynamic constraints that the electrochemical environment imposes on the structure of the interface. We present two directi...... directions forward to make the description more realistic and correct. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  16. Insights into the ammonia synthesis from first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, A.; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Remediakis, Ioannis

    2006-01-01

    A new set of measurements is used to further test a recently published first-principles model for the ammonia (NH3) synthesis on an unpromoted Ru-based catalyst. A direct comparison shows an overall good agreement in NH3 productivity between the model and the experiment. In addition, macro...

  17. Diffusion in thorium carbide: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, 1650, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, 1025, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, 1650, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, 1025, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, 1650, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM–CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, 1650, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    The prediction of the behavior of Th compounds under irradiation is an important issue for the upcoming Generation-IV nuclear reactors. The study of self-diffusion and hetero-diffusion is a central key to fulfill this goal. As a first approach, we obtained, by means of first-principles methods, migration and activation energies of Th and C atoms self-diffusion and diffusion of He atoms in ThC. We also calculate diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature. - Highlights: • Diffusion in thorium carbide by means of first-principles calculations is studied. • The most favorable migration event is a C atom moving through a C-vacancy aided path. • Calculated C atoms diffusion coefficients agree very well with the experimental data. • For He, the energetically most favorable migration path is through Th-vacancies.

  18. First-principles quantum chemistry in the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Tanja

    2004-12-15

    The area of computational quantum chemistry, which applies the principles of quantum mechanics to molecular and condensed systems, has developed drastically over the last decades, due to both increased computer power and the efficient implementation of quantum chemical methods in readily available computer programs. Because of this, accurate computational techniques can now be applied to much larger systems than before, bringing the area of biochemistry within the scope of electronic-structure quantum chemical methods. The rapid pace of progress of quantum chemistry makes it a very exciting research field; calculations that are too computationally expensive today may be feasible in a few months' time! This article reviews the current application of 'first-principles' quantum chemistry in biochemical and life sciences research, and discusses its future potential. The current capability of first-principles quantum chemistry is illustrated in a brief examination of computational studies on neurotransmitters, helical peptides, and DNA complexes.

  19. First-principles insights into f magnetism: A case study on some magnetic pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deilynazar, Najmeh; Khorasani, Elham; Alaei, Mojtaba; Javad Hashemifar, S.

    2015-11-01

    First-principles calculations are performed to investigate f magnetism in A2Ti2O7 (A=Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) magnetic pyrochlore oxides. The Hubbard U parameter and the relativistic spin orbit correction are applied for a more accurate description of the electronic structure of the systems. It is argued that the main obstacle for the first-principles study of these systems is the multi-minima solutions of their electronic configuration. Among the studied pyrochlores, Gd2Ti2O7 shows the least multi-minima problem. The crystal electric field theory is applied for phenomenological comparison of the calculated spin and orbital moments with the experimental data.

  20. First-Principles Modeling of Multiferroic RMn2O5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kun; Guo, Guang-Can; Vanderbilt, David; He, Lixin

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the phase diagrams of RMn2O5 via a first-principles effective-Hamiltonian method. We are able to reproduce the most important features of the complicated magnetic and ferroelectric phase transitions. The calculated polarization as a function of temperature agrees very well with experiments. The dielectric-constant step at the commensurate-to-incommensurate magnetic phase transition is well reproduced. The microscopic mechanisms for the phase transitions are discussed.

  1. Novel natural convection heat sink design concepts from first principles

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, Derek E.

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This was a two-part numerical study using ANSYS Fluent to develop novel heat sink concepts from first principles. The objective of this research was to highlight geometric structures that incorporate the principles of the stack effect to improve the heat transfer capability of a heat sink under natural convection. The first part investigated the heat transfer/fluid flow characteristics of vertically aligned tubes. The gaps between tube...

  2. Hafnium binary alloys from experiments and first principles

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Ohad; Hart, Gus L. W.; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of hafnium in numerous technological applications, experimental and computational data on its binary alloys is sparse. In particular, data is scant on those binary systems believed to be phase separating. We performed a comprehensive study of 44 hafnium binary systems with alkali metals, alkaline earths, transition metals and metals, using high-throughput first principles calculations. These computations predict novel unsuspected compounds in six binary syste...

  3. A Simple First-Principles Homogenization Theory for Chiral Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Rizza

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a simple first-principles homogenization theory for describing, in the long-wavelength limit, the effective bianisotropic response of a periodic metamaterial composite without intrinsic chiral and magnetic inclusions. In the case where the dielectric contrast is low, we obtain a full analytical description which can be considered the extension of Landau-Lifshitz-Looyenga effective-medium formulation in the context of periodic metamaterials.

  4. Adherence of Model Molecules to Silica Surfaces: First Principle Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Matías; Prado, Miguel Oscar

    The adherence of "model molecules" methylene blue and eosine Y ("positive" and "negatively" charged respectively) to crystal SiO2 surfaces is studied from first principle calculations at the DFT level. Adsorption energies are calculated which follow the experimental threads obtained elsewhere (Rivera et al., 2013). We study the quantum nature of the electronic charge transfer between the surface and the molecules, showing the localized and delocalized patterns associated to the repulsive and attractive case respectively.

  5. Vectors and Operators For Spin 1 Derived From First Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Mweene, H V

    1999-01-01

    In previous papers, we demonstrated how the matrix treatment of spin may be obtained from an approach that starts with probability amplitudes for spin-projection measurements. We explicitly showed this for spin 1/2. We now extend the treatment to spin 1. We thereby not only derive from first principles the standard results, but we obtain new generalized results as well. This proves the general validity of our method, and we outline its application to any value of spin J.

  6. First Principles Modeling of Nonlinear Incidence Rates in Seasonal Epidemics

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we used a general stochastic processes framework to derive from first principles the incidence rate function that characterizes epidemic models. We investigate a particular case, the Liu-Hethcote-van den Driessche's (LHD) incidence rate function, which results from modeling the number of successful transmission encounters as a pure birth process. This derivation also takes into account heterogeneity in the population with regard to the per individual transmission probability. We...

  7. First-principles modeling of hard and soft matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Car, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Electronic and atomistic processes are key to bio-inspired functional materials and nanocatalysts for energy applications. This talk will review recent simulation studies and discuss the challenges that first-principles quantum mechanical approaches face when addressing these issues. Supported by DOE-DE-FG02-06ER-46344, DOE-DE-SC0008626, DOE-DE-SC0005180, and NSF-CHE-0956500.

  8. Evolutionary approach for determining first-principles hamiltonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Gus L W; Blum, Volker; Walorski, Michael J; Zunger, Alex

    2005-05-01

    Modern condensed-matter theory from first principles is highly successful when applied to materials of given structure-type or restricted unit-cell size. But this approach is limited where large cells or searches over millions of structure types become necessary. To treat these with first-principles accuracy, one 'coarse-grains' the many-particle Schrodinger equation into 'model hamiltonians' whose variables are configurational order parameters (atomic positions, spin and so on), connected by a few 'interaction parameters' obtained from a microscopic theory. But to construct a truly quantitative model hamiltonian, one must know just which types of interaction parameters to use, from possibly 10(6)-10(8) alternative selections. Here we show how genetic algorithms, mimicking biological evolution ('survival of the fittest'), can be used to distil reliable model hamiltonian parameters from a database of first-principles calculations. We demonstrate this for a classic dilemma in solid-state physics, structural inorganic chemistry and metallurgy: how to predict the stable crystal structure of a compound given only its composition. The selection of leading parameters based on a genetic algorithm is general and easily applied to construct any other type of complex model hamiltonian from direct quantum-mechanical results.

  9. Engineering drawing from first principles using AutoCAD

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, Dennis E

    1998-01-01

    Engineering Drawing From First Principles is a guide to good draughting for students of engineering who need to learn how to produce technically accurate and detailed designs to British and International Standards. Written by Dennis Maguire, an experienced author and City and Guilds chief examiner, this text is designed for use on Further Education and University courses where a basic understanding of draughtsmanship and CAD is necessary. Although not written as an AutoCAD tutor, the book will be a useful introduction to good CAD practice.Part of the Revision and Self-Assessmen

  10. Derivation of instanton rate theory from first principles

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Jeremy O

    2015-01-01

    Instanton rate theory is used to study tunneling events in a wide range of systems including low-temperature chemical reactions. Despite many successful applications, the method has never been obtained from first principles, relying instead on the "ImF" premise. In this paper, the same expression for the rate of barrier penetration at finite temperature is rederived from quantum scattering theory [W. H. Miller, S. D. Schwartz, and J. W. Tromp, J. Chem. Phys. 79, 4889 (1983)] using a semiclassical Green's function formalism. This justifies the instanton approach and provides a route to deriving the rate of other processes.

  11. Diffusion in thorium carbide: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    The prediction of the behavior of Th compounds under irradiation is an important issue for the upcoming Generation-IV nuclear reactors. The study of self-diffusion and hetero-diffusion is a central key to fulfill this goal. As a first approach, we obtained, by means of first-principles methods, migration and activation energies of Th and C atoms self-diffusion and diffusion of He atoms in ThC. We also calculate diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature.

  12. First-principles study of transition metal carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connétable, Damien

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the physical properties of transition metal carbides compounds associated with the Nb-C, Ti-C, Mo-C and W-C alloys systems using first-principles calculations. The ground-state properties (lattice parameters, cohesive energies and magnetism) were analyzed and compared to the experimental and theoretical literature. The simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental findings concerning atomic positions and structures. Elastic properties, computed using a finite-differences approach, are then discussed in detail. To complete the work, their lattice dynamics properties (phonon spectra) were investigated. These results serve to establish that some structures, which are mechanically stable, are dynamically unstable.

  13. Comparative study of Ti and Ni clusters from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B; Lee, G W

    2007-08-20

    Icosahedral clusters in Ti and Ni are studied with first-principles density functional calculations. We find significant distortion on the Ti icosahedron caused by the strong interaction between surface atoms on the icosahedron but not between the center atom and surface atoms, whereas no such distortion is observed on Ni clusters. In addition, distortion becomes more severe when atoms are added to the Ti13 cluster resulting in short bonds. Such distorted icosahedra having short bonds are essentially to explain the structure factor of Ti liquid obtained in experiment.

  14. Thermopower switching by magnetic field: first-principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Achilles, Steven; Sandratskii, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    of the thermopower on the angle between the magnetizations of the electrodes. This complex behavior is explained by the resonant properties of the electron transmission. Consequently, the nanocontacts can be utilized for local heating or cooling controlled by the external magnetic field.......We present first-principles studies of the thermopower of the organometallic V4Bz5 molecule attached between Co electrodes with noncollinear magnetization directions. Different regimes in the formation of the noncollinear magnetic state of the molecule lead to a remarkable nonmonotonous dependence...

  15. First principles pharmacokinetic modeling: A quantitative study on Cyclosporin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mošat', Andrej; Lueshen, Eric; Heitzig, Martina

    2013-01-01

    renal and hepatic clearances, elimination half-life, and mass transfer coefficients, to establish drug biodistribution dynamics in all organs and tissues. This multi-scale model satisfies first principles and conservation of mass, species and momentum.Prediction of organ drug bioaccumulation...... as a function of cardiac output, physiology, pathology or administration route may be possible with the proposed PBPK framework. Successful application of our model-based drug development method may lead to more efficient preclinical trials, accelerated knowledge gain from animal experiments, and shortened time-to-market...

  16. Transition metal doped arsenene: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minglei; Wang, Sake; Du, Yanhui; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2016-12-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atoms substitutional doping of an arsenene monolayer. Based on the binding energy, the TM-substituted arsenene systems were found to be robust. Magnetic states were obtained for Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Fe doping. More importantly, a half-metallic state resulted from Ti and Mn doping, while the spin-polarized semiconducting state occurred with V, Cr and Fe doping. Our studies demonstrated the potential applications of TM-substituted arsenene for spintronics and magnetic storage devices.

  17. Electromagnetic response of 12C: a first-principles calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Lovato, A; Carlson, J; Pieper, Steven C; Schiavilla, R

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal and transverse electromagnetic response functions of $^{12}$C are computed in a "first-principles" Green's function Monte Carlo calculation, based on realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions and associated one- and two-body currents. We find excellent agreement between theory and experiment and, in particular, no evidence for the quenching of measured versus calculated longitudinal response. This is further corroborated by a re-analysis of the Coulomb sum rule, in which the contributions from the low-lying $J^\\pi\\,$=$\\, 2^+$, $0^+_2$ (Hoyle), and $4^+$ states in $^{12}$C are accounted for explicitly in evaluating the total inelastic strength.

  18. Derivation of instanton rate theory from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jeremy O.

    2016-03-01

    Instanton rate theory is used to study tunneling events in a wide range of systems including low-temperature chemical reactions. Despite many successful applications, the method has never been obtained from first principles, relying instead on the "Im F" premise. In this paper, the same expression for the rate of barrier penetration at finite temperature is rederived from quantum scattering theory [W. H. Miller, S. D. Schwartz, and J. W. Tromp, J. Chem. Phys. 79, 4889 (1983)] using a semiclassical Green's function formalism. This justifies the instanton approach and provides a route to deriving the rate of other processes.

  19. First-principles Study on Electronic Structures and Oxygen Vacancy Energies of Perovskite-type Oxides BaBO3-δ ( B =Fe、 Co、Nb)%钙钛矿型氧化物BaBO3-δ(B=Fe、Co、Nb)电子结构和氧空位形成能的第一性原理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于立安; 金璐; 韩敏芳

    2012-01-01

    Based on the density functional theory (DFT) of first-principles, the characters of perovskite-type oxides BaFeO3, BaCoO3 and BaNbO3, such as crystal lattices, electronic structures and the formation energies of oxygen vacancies, were investigated with theoretical chemistry calculations. The equilibrium lattice constants of optimized structures agree well with the experimental literature values. According to the lattice energies and oxygen-vacancy formation energies from DFT calculations, the trend of crystal stability is BaCoO3 < BaFeO3 < BaNbO3. For the system containing many kinds of elements in position B, experimentally the pure phase material was obtained after 10 h sintering in 1130 ℃ and analyzed the equilibrium lattice constant. Theoretically based on the structure of BaCoO3 the perovskite-type structure of BaCo0.5Fe0.25Nb0.25O3 was constructed and optimized with first-principles calculations, the calculated equilibrium lattice constant 0.307 run agree well with the experimental date 0.407 nm; by analyzing the crystal density of states ( DOS) confirmed that it is electronic conductor; the formation energies of oxygen-vacancy between two position B ions were also analyzed, the calculated data indicated that the formation energies next to the Co ions are relatively low, about 0.5-0.6 eV.%基于第一性原理的密度泛函理论,分别对钙钛矿型氧化物BaFeO3、BaCoO3和BaNbO3的电子结构和氧空位形成能进行了理论模拟,经优化后得到的晶胞参数与实验文献值吻合良好.通过比较密度泛函理论计算得到的晶格能和氧空位形成能,发现体系稳定性表现为BaCoO3< BaFeO3< BaNbO3.对于B位含有多种元素的体系,在实验研究中通过1130℃煅烧10 h的条件下得到了BaCo0.5 Fe0.25 Nb0.25O3-(δ)纯相并分析了其晶胞参数.理论研究中以BaCoO3为基构造了钙钛矿型复合氧化物BaCo0.5Fe0.25Nb0.25O3,并通过第一性原理计算优化了其结构,理

  20. Oxygen in the Earth's core a first principles study

    CERN Document Server

    Alfè, D; Gillan, M J; Alfe`, Dario; Gillan, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    First principles electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory have been used to study the thermodynamic, structural and transport properties of solid solutions and liquid alloys of iron and oxygen at Earth's core conditions. Aims of the work are to determine the oxygen concentration needed to account for the inferred density in the outer core, to probe the stability of the liquid against phase separation, to interpret the bonding in the liquid, and to find out whether the viscosity differs significantly from that of pure liquid iron at the same conditions. It is shown that the required concentration of oxygen is in the region 25-30 mol percent, and evidence is presented for phase stability at these conditions. The Fe-O bonding is partly ionic, but with a strong covalent component. The viscosity is lower than that of pure liquid iron at Earth's core conditions. It is shown that earlier first-principles calculations indicating very large enthalpies of formation of solid solutions may nee...

  1. First-principles approach to heat and mass transfer effects in model catalyst studies

    OpenAIRE

    Matera, S.; Reuter, K.

    2009-01-01

    We assess heat and mass transfer limitations in in situ studies of model catalysts with a first-principles based multiscale modeling approach that integrates a detailed description of the surface reaction chemistry and the macro-scale flow structures. Using the CO oxidation at RuO2(110) as a prototypical example we demonstrate that factors like a suppressed heat conduction at the backside of the thin single-crystal, and the build-up of a product boundary layer above the flat-faced surface pla...

  2. First Principles Calculations of Oxygen Adsorption on the UN(001) Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukovskii, Yuri F.; Bocharov, Dmitry; Kotomin, Eugene Alexej; Evarestov, Robert; Bandura, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication, handling and disposal of nuclear fuel materials require comprehensive knowledge of their surface morphology and reactivity. Due to unavoidable contact with air components (even at low partial pressures), UN samples contain considerable amount of oxygen impurities affecting fuel properties. In this study we focus on reactivity of the energetically most stable (001) substrate of uranium nitride towards the atomic oxygen as one of initial stages for further UN oxidation. The basic properties of O atoms adsorbed on the UN(001) surface are simulated here combining the two first principles calculation methods based on the plane wave basis set and that of the localized orbitals.

  3. New class of planar ferroelectric Mott insulators via first-principles design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chanul; Park, Hyowon; Marianetti, Chris A.

    2015-12-11

    which is not common in known materials. Here we use first-principles calculations to design layered double perovskite oxides AABBO6 which achieve the aforementioned properties in the context of Mott insulators. In our design rules, the gap is dictated by B/B electronegativity difference in a Mott state, while the polarization is obtained via nominal d0 filling on the B-site, A-type cations bearing lone-pair electrons, and A = A size mismatch. Successful execution is demonstrated in BaBiCuVO6, BaBiNiVO6, BaLaCuVO6, and PbLaCuVO6.

  4. First-Principles Calculations for Thermodynamic Properties of Perovskite-Type Superconductor MgCNi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; LI Zhe; CHEN Xiang-Rong; CAI Ling-Cang; JING Fu-Qian

    2008-01-01

    The ground state properties and equation of state of the non-oxide perovskite-type superconductor MgCNi,3 are investigated by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave basis set with the local density approximation (LDA) as well as the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation, which agree well with both theoretical calculations and experiments. Some thermodynamic properties including the heat capacity, the thermal expansion coefficient and the Gruneisen parameter for perovskite structure MgCNi,3 are obtained.

  5. Pressure induced novel compounds in the Hf-O system from first-principles calculations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles evolutionary simulations, we have systematically investigated phase stability in the Hf-O system at pressure up to 120 GPa. New compounds Hf5O2, Hf3O2, HfO and HfO3 are discovered to be thermodynamically stable at certain pressure ranges and a new stable high-pressure phase is found for Hf2O with space group Pnnm and anti-CaCl2-type structure. Both P62m-HfO and P4m2-Hf2O3 show semimetallic character. Pnnm-HfO3 shows interesting structure, simultaneously containing oxide...

  6. First-principles modeling of magnetic misfit interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Grytsyuk, Sergiy

    2013-08-16

    We investigate the structural and magnetic properties of interfaces with large lattice mismatch, choosing Pt/Co and Au/Co as prototypes. For our first-principles calculations, we reduce the lattice mismatch to 0.2% by constructing Moiré supercells. Our results show that the roughness and atomic density, and thus the magnetic properties, depend strongly on the substrate and thickness of the Co slab. An increasing thickness leads to the formation of a Co transition layer at the interface, especially for Pt/Co due to strong Pt-Co interaction. A Moiré supercell with a transition layer is found to reproduce the main experimental findings and thus turns out to be the appropriate model for simulating magnetic misfit interfaces.

  7. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2014-11-01

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  8. Optimized Materials From First Principles Simulations: Are We There Yet?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galli, G; Gygi, F

    2005-07-26

    In the past thirty years, the use of scientific computing has become pervasive in all disciplines: collection and interpretation of most experimental data is carried out using computers, and physical models in computable form, with various degrees of complexity and sophistication, are utilized in all fields of science. However, full prediction of physical and chemical phenomena based on the basic laws of Nature, using computer simulations, is a revolution still in the making, and it involves some formidable theoretical and computational challenges. We illustrate the progress and successes obtained in recent years in predicting fundamental properties of materials in condensed phases and at the nanoscale, using ab-initio, quantum simulations. We also discuss open issues related to the validation of the approximate, first principles theories used in large scale simulations, and the resulting complex interplay between computation and experiment. Finally, we describe some applications, with focus on nanostructures and liquids, both at ambient and under extreme conditions.

  9. First-principles simulations of electrostatic interactions between dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Itou, Hotaka; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the electrostatic interaction between two identical dust grains of an infinite mass immersed in homogeneous plasma by employing first-principles N-body simulations combined with the Ewald method. We specifically tested the possibility of an attractive force due to overlapping Debye spheres (ODSs), as was suggested by Resendes et al. (1998). Our simulation results demonstrate that the electrostatic interaction is repulsive and even stronger than the standard Yukawa potential. We showed that the measured electric field acting on the grain is highly consistent with a model electrostatic potential around a single isolated grain that takes into account a correction due to the orbital motion limited theory. Our result is qualitatively consistent with the counterargument suggested by Markes and Williams (2000), indicating the absence of the ODS attractive force.

  10. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jaroszewicz, S. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-11-15

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  11. A metallic superhard boron carbide: first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mengdong; Yang, Bingchao; Li, Zihe; Hu, Meng; Wang, Qianqian; Cui, Lin; Yu, Dongli; He, Julong

    2015-04-21

    A monoclinic BC3 phase (denoted M-BC3) has been predicted using first principles calculations. The M-BC3 structure is formed by alternately stacking sequences of metallic BC-layers and insulating C atom layers, thus, the structure exhibits two-dimensional conductivity. Its stability has been confirmed by our calculations of the total energy, elastic constants, and phonon frequencies. The pressure of phase transition from graphite-like BC3 to M-BC3 is calculated to be 9.3 GPa, and the theoretical Vickers hardness of M-BC3 is 43.8 GPa, this value indicates that the compound is a potentially superhard material. By comparing Raman spectral calculations of M-BC3 and previously proposed structures with the experimental data, we speculate that the experimentally synthesized BC3 crystal may simultaneously contain M-BC3 and Pmma-b phases.

  12. Hadron phenomenology from first-principle QCD studies

    CERN Document Server

    Papavassiliou, J

    2016-01-01

    The form of the kernel that controls the dynamics of the Bethe-Salpeter equations is essential for obtaining quantitatively accurate predictions for the observable properties of hadrons. In the present work we briefly review the basic physical concepts and field-theoretic techniques employed in a first-principle derivation of a universal (process-independent) component of this kernel. This "top-down" approach combines nonperturbative ingredients obtained from lattice simulations and Dyson-Schwinger equations, and furnishes a renormalization-group invariant quark-gluon interaction strength, which is in excellent agreement with the corresponding quantity obtained from a systematic "bottom-up" treatment, where bound-state data are fitted within a well-defined truncation scheme.

  13. Quantum theory from first principles an informational approach

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Quantum theory is the soul of theoretical physics. It is not just a theory of specific physical systems, but rather a new framework with universal applicability. This book shows how we can reconstruct the theory from six information-theoretical principles, by rebuilding the quantum rules from the bottom up. Step by step, the reader will learn how to master the counterintuitive aspects of the quantum world, and how to efficiently reconstruct quantum information protocols from first principles. Using intuitive graphical notation to represent equations, and with shorter and more efficient derivations, the theory can be understood and assimilated with exceptional ease. Offering a radically new perspective on the field, the book contains an efficient course of quantum theory and quantum information for undergraduates. The book is aimed at researchers, professionals, and students in physics, computer science and philosophy, as well as the curious outsider seeking a deeper understanding of the theory.

  14. Photoelectron Spectra of Aqueous Solutions from First Principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiduk, Alex P.; Govoni, Marco; Seidel, Robert; Skone, Jonathan H.; Winter, Bernd; Galli, Giulia

    2016-06-08

    We present a combined computational and experimental study of the photoelectron spectrum of a simple aqueous solution of NaCl. Measurements were conducted on microjets, and first-principles calculations were performed using hybrid functionals and many-body perturbation theory at the G0W0 level, starting with wave functions computed in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show excellent agreement between theory and experiments for the positions of both the solute and solvent excitation energies on an absolute energy scale and for peak intensities. The best comparison was obtained using wave functions obtained with dielectric-dependent self-consistent and range-separated hybrid functionals. Our computational protocol opens the way to accurate, predictive calculations of the electronic properties of electrolytes, of interest to a variety of energy problems.

  15. First-principles modeling hydrogenation of bilayered boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wang; Peng, Zhang; Xiang-Mei, Duan

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the structural and electronic characteristics of hydrogenated boron-nitride bilayer (H-BNBN-H) using first-principles calculations. The results show that hydrogenation can significantly reduce the energy gap of the BN-BN into the visible-light region. Interestingly, the electric field induced by the interface dipoles helps to promote the formation of well-separated electron-hole pairs, as demonstrated by the charge distribution of the VBM and CBM. Moreover, the applied bias voltage on the vertical direction of the bilayer could modulate the band gap, resulting in transition from semiconductor to metal. We conclude that H-BNBN-H could improve the solar energy conversion efficiency, which may provide a new way for tuning the electronic devices to meet different environments and demands. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574167).

  16. Electronic stopping power in LiF from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruneda, J M; Sánchez-Portal, D; Arnau, A; Juaristi, J I; Artacho, Emilio

    2007-12-07

    Using time-dependent density-functional theory we calculate from first principles the rate of energy transfer from a moving proton or antiproton to the electrons of an insulating material, LiF. The behavior of the electronic stopping power versus projectile velocity displays an effective threshold velocity of approximately 0.2 a.u. for the proton, consistent with recent experimental observations, and also for the antiproton. The calculated proton/antiproton stopping-power ratio is approximately 2.4 at velocities slightly above the threshold (v approximately 0.4 a.u.), as compared to the experimental value of 2.1. The projectile energy loss mechanism is observed to be extremely local.

  17. Predicting catalysis: Understanding ammonia synthesis from first-principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, A.; Baerends, E.J.; Biczysko, M.

    2006-01-01

    . Furthermore, our studies provide new insight into several related fields, for instance, gas-phase and electrochemical ammonia synthesis. The success of predicting the outcome of a catalytic reaction from first-principles calculations supports our point of view that, in the future, theory will be a fully......Here, we give a full account of a large collaborative effort toward an atomic-scale understanding of modern industrial ammonia production over ruthenium catalysts. We show that overall rates of ammonia production can be determined by applying various levels of theory (including transition state...... for any given point along an industrial reactor, and the kinetic results can be integrated over the catalyst bed to determine the industrial reactor yield. We find that, given the present uncertainties, the rate of ammonia production is well-determined directly from our atomic-scale calculations...

  18. Electronic Structures of Silicene Doped with Galium: First Principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamungkas Mauludi Ariesto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the success of graphene which possesses unique and superior properties, 2D material other than graphene become centre of interest of material scientists.Silicene, which has the same crystal structure as graphene but consist of silicon atoms rather than carbon become intriguing material due to domination of silicon as main material of electronic component. It is common to enhance electronic properties of semiconductor by adding dopant atoms. The electronic properties of Silicene doped with Gallium are investigated using first principle calculation based on density functional theory (DFT.Ga doping changes character of silicene from semimetal to conductor except silicene with Ga doping on S-site (Ga atom substitutes one Si atom which lead to semiconductor.

  19. First principles simulation technique for characterizing single event effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ke-Ying; Guo Hong-Xia; Luo Yin-Hong; Fan Ru-Yu; Chen Wei; Lin Dong-Sheng; Guo Gang; Yan Yi-Hua

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a new simulation technique to characterize single event effects on semiconductor devices. The technique used to calculate the single event effects is developed according to the physical interaction mechanism of a single event effect. An application of the first principles simulation technique is performed to predict the ground-test single event upset effect on field-programmable gate arrays based on 0.25 μm advanced complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor technology. The agreement between the single event upset cross section accessed from a broad-beam heavy ion experiment and simulation shows that the simulation technique could be used to characterize the single event effects induced by heavy ions on a semiconductor device.

  20. Vibrational and thermophysical properties of PETN from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Joseph M.; Landerville, Aaron C.; Oleynik, Ivan I.

    2017-01-01

    Thermophysical properties are urgently sought as input for meso- and continuum-scale modeling of energetic materials (EMs). However, experimental data are often limited as they cover a narrow region of specific pressures and temperatures. Such modeling of EMs can be greatly improved by inclusion of thermophysical properties over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, provided such data could be reliably obtained from theory. We demonstrate such a capability by calculating the PVT equation of state, heat capacities, and coefficients of thermal expansion for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) using first-principles density functional theory, which includes proper description of van der Waals interactions, zero-point energy and thermal contributions to free energy calculated using the quasi-harmonic approximation. Further, we investigate the evolution of the vibration spectrum of PETN as a function of pressure.

  1. First-principles methodology for quantum transport in multiterminal junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kamal K; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, J; Meunier, Vincent

    2009-10-28

    We present a generalized approach for computing electron conductance and I-V characteristics in multiterminal junctions from first-principles. Within the framework of Keldysh theory, electron transmission is evaluated employing an O(N) method for electronic-structure calculations. The nonequilibrium Green function for the nonequilibrium electron density of the multiterminal junction is computed self-consistently by solving Poisson equation after applying a realistic bias. We illustrate the suitability of the method on two examples of four-terminal systems, a radialene molecule connected to carbon chains and two crossed-carbon chains brought together closer and closer. We describe charge density, potential profile, and transmission of electrons between any two terminals. Finally, we discuss the applicability of this technique to study complex electronic devices.

  2. Hydrogen storage in LiH: A first principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banger, Suman; Nayak, Vikas; Verma, U. P.

    2014-04-01

    First principles calculations have been performed on the Lithium hydride (LiH) using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the framework of density functional theory. We have extended our calculations for LiH+2H and LiH+6H in NaCl structure. The structural stability of three compounds have been studied. It is found that LiH with 6 added Hydrogen atoms is most stable. The obtained results for LiH are in good agreement with reported experimental data. Electronic structures of three compounds are also studied. Out of three the energy band gap in LiH is ˜3.0 eV and LiH+2H and LiH+6H are metallic.

  3. First Principles Modelling of Shape Memory Alloys Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Materials sciences relate the macroscopic properties of materials to their microscopic structure and postulate the need for holistic multiscale research. The investigation of shape memory alloys is a prime example in this regard. This particular class of materials exhibits strong coupling of temperature, strain and stress, determined by solid state phase transformations of their metallic lattices. The present book presents a collection of simulation studies of this behaviour. Employing conceptually simple but comprehensive models, the fundamental material properties of shape memory alloys are qualitatively explained from first principles. Using contemporary methods of molecular dynamics simulation experiments, it is shown how microscale dynamics may produce characteristic macroscopic material properties. The work is rooted in the materials sciences of shape memory alloys and  covers  thermodynamical, micro-mechanical  and crystallographical aspects. It addresses scientists in these research fields and thei...

  4. Liquid-state paramagnetic relaxation from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantaharju, Jyrki; Vaara, Juha

    2016-10-01

    We simulate nuclear and electron spin relaxation rates in a paramagnetic system from first principles. Sampling a molecular dynamics trajectory with quantum-chemical calculations produces a time series of the instantaneous parameters of the relevant spin Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonians are, in turn, used to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by studying the aqueous solution of the Ni2 + ion. Taking advantage of Kubo's theory, the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation rates are extracted from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available experimental data is obtained by the method.

  5. First-principle band calculation of ruthenium for various phases

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, S; Kai, T; Shiiki, K

    2000-01-01

    The total energies and the magnetic moments of Ru for HCP, BCC, FCC, BCT structures were calculated by using a first-principle full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW) method based on the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). HCP has the lowest energy among the structures calculated, which agrees with the experimental result that HCP is the equilibrium phase of Ru. The total energy of BCT Ru has the local minimum at c/a=sq root 2 (FCC) with a=5.13 au, c=7.25 au and c/a=0.83 with a=6.15 au, c=5.11 au. It is pointed out that these phases are possibly metastable. The BCC structure, which corresponds to BCT with a=c=5.78 au, is unstable because it is at a saddle point of the total energy. BCT Ru of c/a<1 has a magnetic moment at the stable volume.

  6. Derivation of Spin Vectors and Operators From First Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Mweene, H V

    1999-01-01

    The interpretation of quantum mechanics due to Lande' is applied to the connection between wave mechanics and matrix mechanics. The connection between the differential and the matrix eigenvalue equation for an operator is elucidated. In particular, we show that the elements of a matrix vector state are probability amplitudes rather than just constants. We obtain the most general forms of the probability amplitudes for the description of spin-1/2 measurements. As a result, we derive spin-1/2 operators and vectors from first principles. The procedure used is analogous to that by which orbital angular momentum wave functions and operators are transformed to matrix mechanic vectors and matrices. The most generalized forms of the spin operators and their eigenvectors for spin 1/2 are derived and shown to reduce to the Pauli matrices and vectors in an appropriate limit.

  7. Point defects in thorium nitride: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2016-11-01

    Thorium and its compounds (carbides and nitrides) are being investigated as possible materials to be used as nuclear fuels for Generation-IV reactors. As a first step in the research of these materials under irradiation, we study the formation energies and stability of point defects in thorium nitride by means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory. We focus on vacancies, interstitials, Frenkel pairs and Schottky defects. We found that N and Th vacancies have almost the same formation energy and that the most energetically favorable defects of all studied in this work are N interstitials. These kind of results for ThN, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically.

  8. Multiphysics modeling using COMSOL a first principles approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pryor, Roger W

    2011-01-01

    Multiphysics Modeling Using COMSOL rapidly introduces the senior level undergraduate, graduate or professional scientist or engineer to the art and science of computerized modeling for physical systems and devices. It offers a step-by-step modeling methodology through examples that are linked to the Fundamental Laws of Physics through a First Principles Analysis approach. The text explores a breadth of multiphysics models in coordinate systems that range from 1D to 3D and introduces the readers to the numerical analysis modeling techniques employed in the COMSOL Multiphysics software. After readers have built and run the examples, they will have a much firmer understanding of the concepts, skills, and benefits acquired from the use of computerized modeling techniques to solve their current technological problems and to explore new areas of application for their particular technological areas of interest.

  9. First-principles GW calculations for DNA and RNA nucleobases

    CERN Document Server

    Faber, Carina; Olevano, Valerio; Runge, Erich; Blase, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of first-principles GW calculations, we study the quasiparticle properties of the guanine, adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil DNA and RNA nucleobases. Beyond standard G0W0 calculations, starting from Kohn-Sham eigenstates obtained with (semi)local functionals, a simple self-consistency on the eigenvalues allows to obtain vertical ionization energies and electron affinities within an average 0.11 eV and 0.18 eV error respectively as compared to state-of-the-art coupled-cluster and multi-configurational perturbative quantum chemistry approaches. Further, GW calculations predict the correct \\pi -character of the highest occupied state, thanks to several level crossings between density functional and GW calculations. Our study is based on a recent gaussian-basis implementation of GW with explicit treatment of dynamical screening through contour deformation techniques.

  10. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Souvatzis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible ex- tended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) costruction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dy- namics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents an ideal starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents ...

  11. Hydrogen storage in LiH: A first principle study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banger, Suman, E-mail: sumanphy28@gmail.com; Nayak, Vikas, E-mail: sumanphy28@gmail.com; Verma, U. P., E-mail: sumanphy28@gmail.com [School of Studies in Physics, Jiwaji University, Gwalior-474011 (India)

    2014-04-24

    First principles calculations have been performed on the Lithium hydride (LiH) using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the framework of density functional theory. We have extended our calculations for LiH+2H and LiH+6H in NaCl structure. The structural stability of three compounds have been studied. It is found that LiH with 6 added Hydrogen atoms is most stable. The obtained results for LiH are in good agreement with reported experimental data. Electronic structures of three compounds are also studied. Out of three the energy band gap in LiH is ∼3.0 eV and LiH+2H and LiH+6H are metallic.

  12. Infrared Spectroscopy of Functionalized Graphene Sheets from First Principle Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui; Dabbs, Daniel; Aksay, Ilhan; Car, Roberto; Selloni, Annabella

    2014-03-01

    Detailed characterization of the structure of functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) is an important and challenging task which could help to improve the performance of FGS materials for technological applications. We present here first principles calculations for the infrared (IR) spectra of different FGS models aimed at identifying the IR signatures of different functional groups and defect sites on FGSs. We found that vacancies and edges have significant effects on the IR frequencies of the functional groups on FGSs. In particular, hydroxyl groups close to vacancies have higher stretching and lower bending frequencies in comparison to hydroxyls in defect free regions of FGSs. More interestingly, the OH vibrations of carboxyl groups at edges exhibit unique features in the high frequency IR bands, which originate from the interactions with neighboring groups and the relative orientation of the carboxyl with respect to the FGS plane. Our results are supported by experimental IR measurements on FGS powders.

  13. First principles calculations of interstitial and lamellar rhenium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, G., E-mail: gerardo@cnyn.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico); Tiznado, H.; Reyes, A.; Cruz, W. de la [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible structures of rhenium nitride as a function of composition are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloying energy is favorable for rhenium nitride in lamellar arrangements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by magnetron sputtering are metastable variations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by high-pressure high-temperature are stable configurations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lamellar structures are a new category of interstitial dissolutions. - Abstract: We report here a systematic first principles study of two classes of variable-composition rhenium nitride: i, interstitial rhenium nitride as a solid solution and ii, rhenium nitride in lamellar structures. The compounds in class i are cubic and hexagonal close-packed rhenium phases, with nitrogen in the octahedral and tetrahedral interstices of the metal, and they are formed without changes to the structure, except for slight distortions of the unit cells. In the compounds in class ii, by contrast, the nitrogen inclusion provokes stacking faults in the parent metal structure. These faults create trigonal-prismatic sites where the nitrogen residence is energetically favored. This second class of compounds produces lamellar structures, where the nitrogen lamellas are inserted among multiple rhenium layers. The Re{sub 3}N and Re{sub 2}N phases produced recently by high-temperature and high-pressure synthesis belong to this class. The ratio of the nitrogen layers to the rhenium layers is given by the composition. While the first principle calculations point to higher stability for the lamellar structures as opposed to the interstitial phases, the experimental evidence presented here demonstrates that the interstitial classes are synthesizable by plasma methods. We conclude that rhenium nitrides possess polymorphism and that the two-dimensional lamellar structures might represent an emerging class of materials

  14. Leptogenesis from first principles in the resonant regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kartavtsev, Alexander [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Hohenegger, Andreas [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    The lepton asymmetry generated by the out-of-equilibrium decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos with a quasi-degenerate mass spectrum is resonantly enhanced. In this work, we study this scenario within a first-principle approach. The quantum field theoretical treatment is applicable for mass splittings of the order of the width of the Majorana neutrinos, for which the enhancement is maximally large. The non-equilibrium evolution of the mixing Majorana neutrino fields is described by a formal analytical solution of the Kadanoff-Baym equations, that is obtained by neglecting the back-reaction. Based on this solution, we derive approximate analytical expressions for the generated asymmetry and compare them to the Boltzmann result. We find that the resonant enhancement obtained from the Kadanoff-Baym approach is smaller compared to the Boltzmann approach, due to additional contributions that describe coherent transitions between the Majorana neutrino species. We also discuss corrections to the masses and widths of the degenerate pair of Majorana neutrinos that are relevant for very small mass splitting, and compare the approximate analytical result for the lepton asymmetry with numerical results. (orig.)

  15. First principles statistical mechanics of alloys and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbach, Markus; Khan, Suffian N.; Li, Ying Wai

    Modern high performance computing resources are enabling the exploration of the statistical physics of phase spaces with increasing size and higher fidelity of the Hamiltonian of the systems. For selected systems, this now allows the combination of Density Functional based first principles calculations with classical Monte Carlo methods for parameter free, predictive thermodynamics of materials. We combine our locally selfconsistent real space multiple scattering method for solving the Kohn-Sham equation with Wang-Landau Monte-Carlo calculations (WL-LSMS). In the past we have applied this method to the calculation of Curie temperatures in magnetic materials. Here we will present direct calculations of the chemical order - disorder transitions in alloys. We present our calculated transition temperature for the chemical ordering in CuZn and the temperature dependence of the short-range order parameter and specific heat. Finally we will present the extension of the WL-LSMS method to magnetic alloys, thus allowing the investigation of the interplay of magnetism, structure and chemical order in ferrous alloys. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division and it used Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility resources at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  16. First-principles studies of atomic dynamics in tetrahedrite thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junchao; Zhu, Mengze; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Ke, Xianglin; Morelli, Donald T.; Lai, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Cu12Sb4S13-based tetrahedrites are high-performance thermoelectrics that contain earth-abundant and environmentally friendly elements. At present, the mechanistic understanding of their low lattice thermal conductivity (applies first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, along with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments, to study the incoherent and coherent atomic dynamics in Cu10.5NiZn0.5Sb4S13, in order to deepen our insight into mechanisms of anomalous dynamic behavior and low lattice thermal conductivity in tetrahedrites. Our study of incoherent dynamics reveals the anomalous "phonon softening upon cooling" behavior commonly observed in inelastic neutron scattering data. By examining the dynamic Cu-Sb distances inside the Sb[CuS3]Sb cage, we ascribe softening to the decreased anharmonic "rattling" of Cu in the cage. On the other hand, our study of coherent dynamics reveals that acoustic modes are confined in a small region of dynamic scattering space, which we hypothesize leads to a minimum phonon mean free path. By assuming a Debye model, we obtain a lattice minimum thermal conductivity value consistent with experiments. We believe this study furthers our understanding of the atomic dynamics of tetrahedrite thermoelectrics and will more generally help shed light on the origin of intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity in these and other structurally similar materials.

  17. NMR quadruopole spectra of PZT from first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Dandan; Walter, Eric J.; Krakauer, Henry

    2006-03-01

    High performance piezoelectric materials are disordered alloys, so it can be difficult to determine the local atomic geometry. Recently, high field NMR measurements have shown great promise as a microscopic probe of ABO3 perovskite-based alloys by their ability to resolve line-splittings due to nuclear quadrupolar coupling with the electric field gradient (EFG) at the nucleus. We report first-principles LDA calculations of the EFG's in monoclinic and tetragonal Pb(Zr0.5Ti0.5)O3 systems using the linear augmented planewave (LAPW) method, and we compute NMR static powder spectra for ^91Zr, ^47Ti, and ^17O atoms as a function of applied strain. With decreasing c/a ratio PZT converts from tetragonal to monoclinic symmetry. We observe that the calculated NMR spectra show dramatic deviations with decreasing c/a from that in tetragonal P4mm well before the electric polarization begins to rotate away from the [001] direction. This indicates that NMR measurements can be a very accurate probe of local structural changes in perovskite piezoelectrics. G. L. Hoatson, D. H. Zhou, F. Fayon, D. Massiot, and R. L. Vold, Phys. Rev. B, 66, 224103 (2002).

  18. High-Pressure Hydrogen from First-Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Miguel A.

    2014-03-01

    The main approximations typically employed in first-principles simulations of high-pressure hydrogen are the neglect of nuclear quantum effects (NQE) and the approximate treatment of electronic exchange and correlation, typically through a density functional theory (DFT) formulation. In this talk I'll present a detailed analysis of the influence of these approximations on the phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen, with the goal of identifying the predictive capabilities of current methods and, at the same time, making accurate predictions in this important regime. We use a path integral formulation combined with density functional theory, which allows us to incorporate NQEs in a direct and controllable way. In addition, we use state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo calculations to benchmark the accuracy of more approximate mean-field electronic structure calculations based on DFT, and we use GW and hybrid DFT to calculate the optical properties of the solid and liquid phases near metallization. We present accurate predictions of the metal-insulator transition on the solid, including structural and optical properties of the molecular phase. MAM was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by LDRD Grant No. 13-LW-004.

  19. First-principles structural design of superhard materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Yanchao; Lv, Jian; Zhu, Chunye; Li, Qian; Zhang, Miao; Li, Quan; Ma, Yanming

    2013-03-21

    We reported a developed methodology to design superhard materials for given chemical systems under external conditions (here, pressure). The new approach is based on the CALYPSO algorithm and requires only the chemical compositions to predict the hardness vs. energy map, from which the energetically preferable superhard structures are readily accessible. In contrast to the traditional ground state structure prediction method where the total energy was solely used as the fitness function, here we adopted hardness as the fitness function in combination with the first-principles calculation to construct the hardness vs. energy map by seeking a proper balance between hardness and energy for a better mechanical description of given chemical systems. To allow a universal calculation on the hardness for the predicted structure, we have improved the earlier hardness model based on bond strength by applying the Laplacian matrix to account for the highly anisotropic and molecular systems. We benchmarked our approach in typical superhard systems, such as elemental carbon, binary B-N, and ternary B-C-N compounds. Nearly all the experimentally known and most of the earlier theoretical superhard structures have been successfully reproduced. The results suggested that our approach is reliable and can be widely applied into design of new superhard materials.

  20. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B5C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B5C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B4C, BC, and BC4, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide.

  1. First-principles Simulations and the Criticality of Calving Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallot, D.; Åström, J. A.; Schäfer, M.; Welty, E.; O'Neel, S.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Liu, Y.; Riikilä, T.; Zwinger, T.; Timonen, J.; Moore, J.

    2014-12-01

    The algoritm of a first principles calving-simulation computer-code is outlined and demonstrated. The code is particle-based and uses Newtonian dynamics to simulate ice-fracture, motion and calving. The code can simulate real-size glacier but is only able to simualte individual calving events within a few tens of minutes in duration. The code couples to the Elmer/Ice ice flow-simulation code: Elmer is employed to produce various glacier geomteries, which are then tested for stability using the particle code. In this way it is possible to pin-point the location of calving fronts. The particle simulation code and field observations are engaged to investigate the criticality of calving glaciers. The calving mass and inter-event waiting times both have power-law distributions with the same critical exponents as found for Abelian sand-pile models. This indicate that calving glaciers share characteristics with Self-Organized Critical systems (SOC). This would explain why many glacier found in nature may become unstable as a result of even minor changes in their environment. An SOC calving glacier at the critical point will display so large fluctuations in calving rate that it will render the concept 'average calving rate' more or less useless. I.e. 'average calving rate' will depend on measurement time and always have fluctuaions in the range of 100% more or less independent of the averaging time.

  2. Safeguards First Principles Initiative at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geneva Johnson

    2007-07-08

    The Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was selected as a test bed for the Safeguards First Principles Initiative (SFPI). The implementation of the SFPI is evaluated using the system effectiveness model and the program is managed under an approved MC&A Plan. The effectiveness model consists of an evaluation of the critical elements necessary to detect, deter, and/or prevent the theft or diversion of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The modeled results indicate that the MC&A program established under this variance is still effective, without creating unacceptable risk. Extensive performance testing is conducted through the duration of the pilot to ensure the protection system is effective and no material is at an unacceptable risk. The pilot was conducted from January 1, 2007, through May 30, 2007. This paper will discuss the following activities in association with SFPI: 1. Development of Timeline 2. Crosswalk of DOE Order and SFPI 3. Peer Review 4. Deviation 5. MC&A Plan and Procedure changes 6. Changes implemented at NTS 7. Training 8. Performance Test

  3. First Principles Investigation of Hydrogen Physical Adsorption on Graphynes' layers

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Giorgi, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Graphynes are 2D porous structures deriving from graphene featuring triangular and regularly distributed subnanometer pores, which may be exploited to host small gaseous species. First principles adsorption energies of molecular hydrogen (H2) on graphene, graphdiyne and graphtriyne molecular prototypes are obtained at the MP2C level of theory. First, a single layer is investigated and it is found that graphynes are more suited than graphene for H2 physical adsorption since they provide larger binding energies at equilibrium distances much closer to the 2D plane. In particular, for graphtriyne a flat minimum located right in the geometric center of the pore is identified. A novel graphite composed of graphtriyne stacked sheets is then proposed and an estimation of its 3D arrangement is obtained at the DFT level of theory. In contrast to pristine graphite this new carbon material allow both H2 intercalation and out-of-plane diffusion by exploiting the larger volume provided by its nanopores. Related H2 binding ...

  4. "Postural first" principle when balance is challenged in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Alexis; Spada, Rosario S; Bosser, Gilles; Gauchard, Gérome C; Anello, Guido; Bosco, Paolo; Calabrese, Santa; Iero, Antonella; Stella, Giuseppe; Elia, Maurizio; Perrin, Philippe P

    2014-08-01

    Human cognitive processing limits can lead to difficulties in performing two tasks simultaneously. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of cognitive load on both simple and complex postural tasks. Postural control was evaluated in 128 noninstitutionalized elderly people (mean age = 73.6 ± 5.6 years) using a force platform on a firm support in control condition (CC) and mental counting condition (MCC) with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC). Then, the same tests were performed on a foam support. Sway path traveled and area covered by the center of foot pressure were recorded, low values indicating efficient balance. On firm support, sway path was higher in MCC than in CC both in EO and EC conditions (p balance control in a simple postural task (i.e. on firm support), which is highlighted by an increase of energetic expenditure (i.e. increase of the sway path covered) to balance. Awareness may not be increased and the attentional demand may be shared between balance and mental task. Conversely, cognitive load does not perturb the realization of a new complex postural task. This result showed that postural control is prioritized ("postural first" principle) when seriously challenged.

  5. First-principle studies on the Li-Te system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youchun; Tian, Fubo; Li, Da; Duan, Defang; Liu, Yunxian; Liu, Bingbing; Zhou, Qiang; Cui, Tian

    2017-01-01

    First-principle evolutionary calculation was performed to search for all probable stable lithium tellurium compounds. In addition to the well-known structures of Fm-3m Li2Te and Pnma Li2Te, several novel structures, including those of P4/nmm Li2Te, Imma Li8Te2, and C2/m Li9Te2, were determined under high pressure. The transformation sequence of Li2Te induced by pressure was presented as follows. The phase transition occurred at 7.5 GPa while transforming from Fm-3m phase to Pnma structure, then transformed to P4/nmm phase at 14 GPa. P4/nmm Li2Te can remain stable at least up to 140 GPa. Li8Te2 and Li9Te2 were stable at 8-120 GPa and 80-120 GPa, respectively. Interestingly, Li8Te2 and Li9Te2 were predicted to be metallic under high pressure, Li2Te would metalize on compression. P4/nmm Li2Te is likely a super ionic conductor due to the special characteristic. Metallic P4/nmm Li2Te may be a candidate mixed conductor material under extreme pressure. Charge transfer was studied using Bader charge analysis. Charge transferred from Li to Te, and the relative debilitated ionicity between Li and Te atoms existed at high pressure.

  6. Solubility of nonelectrolytes: a first-principles computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nicholas E; Chen, Lin X; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-05-15

    Using a combination of classical molecular dynamics and symmetry adapted intermolecular perturbation theory, we develop a high-accuracy computational method for examining the solubility energetics of nonelectrolytes. This approach is used to accurately compute the cohesive energy density and Hildebrand solubility parameters of 26 molecular liquids. The energy decomposition of symmetry adapted perturbation theory is then utilized to develop multicomponent Hansen-like solubility parameters. These parameters are shown to reproduce the solvent categorizations (nonpolar, polar aprotic, or polar protic) of all molecular liquids studied while lending quantitative rigor to these qualitative categorizations via the introduction of simple, easily computable parameters. Notably, we find that by monitoring the first-order exchange energy contribution to the total interaction energy, one can rigorously determine the hydrogen bonding character of a molecular liquid. Finally, this method is applied to compute explicitly the Flory interaction parameter and the free energy of mixing for two different small molecule mixtures, reproducing the known miscibilities. This methodology represents an important step toward the prediction of molecular solubility from first principles.

  7. First-principles studies of atomic dynamics in tetrahedrite thermoelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cu12Sb4S13-based tetrahedrites are high-performance thermoelectrics that contain earth-abundant and environmentally friendly elements. At present, the mechanistic understanding of their low lattice thermal conductivity (<1 W m−1 K−1 at 300 K remains limited. This work applies first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, along with inelastic neutron scattering (INS experiments, to study the incoherent and coherent atomic dynamics in Cu10.5NiZn0.5Sb4S13, in order to deepen our insight into mechanisms of anomalous dynamic behavior and low lattice thermal conductivity in tetrahedrites. Our study of incoherent dynamics reveals the anomalous “phonon softening upon cooling” behavior commonly observed in inelastic neutron scattering data. By examining the dynamic Cu-Sb distances inside the Sb[CuS3]Sb cage, we ascribe softening to the decreased anharmonic “rattling” of Cu in the cage. On the other hand, our study of coherent dynamics reveals that acoustic modes are confined in a small region of dynamic scattering space, which we hypothesize leads to a minimum phonon mean free path. By assuming a Debye model, we obtain a lattice minimum thermal conductivity value consistent with experiments. We believe this study furthers our understanding of the atomic dynamics of tetrahedrite thermoelectrics and will more generally help shed light on the origin of intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity in these and other structurally similar materials.

  8. Predicting catalysis: understanding ammonia synthesis from first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, A; Baerends, E J; Biczysko, M; Bligaard, T; Christensen, C H; Clary, D C; Dahl, S; van Harrevelt, R; Honkala, K; Jonsson, H; Kroes, G J; Luppi, M; Manthe, U; Nørskov, J K; Olsen, R A; Rossmeisl, J; Skúlason, E; Tautermann, C S; Varandas, A J C; Vincent, J K

    2006-09-14

    Here, we give a full account of a large collaborative effort toward an atomic-scale understanding of modern industrial ammonia production over ruthenium catalysts. We show that overall rates of ammonia production can be determined by applying various levels of theory (including transition state theory with or without tunneling corrections, and quantum dynamics) to a range of relevant elementary reaction steps, such as N(2) dissociation, H(2) dissociation, and hydrogenation of the intermediate reactants. A complete kinetic model based on the most relevant elementary steps can be established for any given point along an industrial reactor, and the kinetic results can be integrated over the catalyst bed to determine the industrial reactor yield. We find that, given the present uncertainties, the rate of ammonia production is well-determined directly from our atomic-scale calculations. Furthermore, our studies provide new insight into several related fields, for instance, gas-phase and electrochemical ammonia synthesis. The success of predicting the outcome of a catalytic reaction from first-principles calculations supports our point of view that, in the future, theory will be a fully integrated tool in the search for the next generation of catalysts.

  9. First-Principles Investigation of Ag-Doped Gold Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Yue Fan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoclusters have the tunable optical absorption property, and are promising for cancer cell imaging, photothermal therapy and radiotherapy. First-principle is a very powerful tool for design of novel materials. In the present work, structural properties, band gap engineering and tunable optical properties of Ag-doped gold clusters have been calculated using density functional theory. The electronic structure of a stable Au20 cluster can be modulated by incorporating Ag, and the HOMO–LUMO gap of Au20−nAgn clusters is modulated due to the incorporation of Ag electronic states in the HOMO and LUMO. Furthermore, the results of the imaginary part of the dielectric function indicate that the optical transition of gold clusters is concentration-dependent and the optical transition between HOMO and LUMO shifts to the low energy range as the Ag atom increases. These calculated results are helpful for the design of gold cluster-based biomaterials, and will be of interest in the fields of radiation medicine, biophysics and nanoscience.

  10. Semiconducting Graphene on Silicon from First-Principles Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xuejie; Dong, Huilong; Wang, Lu; Zhao, Yanfei; Guo, Zhenyu; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-08-25

    Graphene is a semimetal with zero band gap, which makes it impossible to turn electric conduction off below a certain limit. Transformation of graphene into a semiconductor has attracted wide attention. Owing to compatibility with Si technology, graphene adsorbed on a Si substrate is particularly attractive for future applications. However, to date there is little theoretical work on band gap engineering in graphene and its integration with Si technology. Employing first-principles calculations, we study the electronic properties of monolayer and bilayer graphene adsorbed on clean and hydrogen (H)-passivated Si (111)/Si (100) surfaces. Our calculation shows that the interaction between monolayer graphene and a H-passivated Si surface is weak, with the band gap remaining negligible. For bilayer graphene adsorbed onto a H-passivated Si surface, the band gap opens up to 108 meV owing to asymmetry introduction. In contrast, the interaction between graphene and a clean Si surface is strong, leading to formation of chemical bonds and a large band gap of 272 meV. Our results provide guidance for device designs based on integrating graphene with Si technology.

  11. First principles study of lithium insertion in bulk silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Wenhui

    2010-09-23

    Si is an important anode material for the next generation of Li ion batteries. Here the energetics and dynamics of Li atoms in bulk Si have been studied at different Li concentrations on the basis of first principles calculations. It is found that Li prefers to occupy an interstitial site as a shallow donor rather than a substitutional site. The most stable position is the tetrahedral (Td) site. The diffusion of a Li atom in the Si lattice is through a Td-Hex-Td trajectory, where the Hex site is the hexagonal transition site with an energy barrier of 0.58 eV. We have also systematically studied the local structural transition of a LixSi alloy with x varying from 0 to 0.25. At low doping concentration (x = 0-0.125), Li atoms prefer to be separated from each other, resulting in a homogeneous doping distribution. Starting from x = 0.125, Li atoms tend to form clusters induced by a lattice distortion with frequent breaking and reforming of Si-Si bonds. When x ≥ 0.1875, Li atoms will break some Si-Si bonds permanently, which results in dangling bonds. These dangling bonds create negatively charged zones, which is the main driving force for Li atom clustering at high doping concentration. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. A First-Principle Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2015-11-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to observe visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo. Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for more accurate quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements. Work supported by NSF Grant 1244842.

  13. Realtime capable first principle based modelling of tokamak turbulent transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, Jonathan; Breton, Sarah; Felici, Federico; Imbeaux, Frederic; Redondo, Juan; Aniel, Thierry; Artaud, Jean-Francois; Baiocchi, Benedetta; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Camenen, Yann; Garcia, Jeronimo

    2015-11-01

    Transport in the tokamak core is dominated by turbulence driven by plasma microinstabilities. When calculating turbulent fluxes, maintaining both a first-principle-based model and computational tractability is a strong constraint. We present a pathway to circumvent this constraint by emulating quasilinear gyrokinetic transport code output through a nonlinear regression using multilayer perceptron neural networks. This recovers the original code output, while accelerating the computing time by five orders of magnitude, allowing realtime applications. A proof-of-principle is presented based on the QuaLiKiz quasilinear transport model, using a training set of five input dimensions, relevant for ITG turbulence. The model is implemented in the RAPTOR real-time capable tokamak simulator, and simulates a 300s ITER discharge in 10s. Progress in generalizing the emulation to include 12 input dimensions is presented. This opens up new possibilities for interpretation of present-day experiments, scenario preparation and open-loop optimization, realtime controller design, realtime discharge supervision, and closed-loop trajectory optimization.

  14. Lattice thermal conductivity of borophene from first principle calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Huaping; Cao, Wei; Ouyang, Tao; Guo, Sumei; He, Chaoyu; Zhong, Jianxin

    2017-04-01

    The phonon transport property is a foundation of understanding a material and predicting the potential application in mirco/nano devices. In this paper, the thermal transport property of borophene is investigated by combining first-principle calculations and phonon Boltzmann transport equation. At room temperature, the lattice thermal conductivity of borophene is found to be about 14.34 W/mK (error is about 3%), which is much smaller than that of graphene (about 3500 W/mK). The contributions from different phonon modes are qualified, and some phonon modes with high frequency abnormally play critical role on the thermal transport of borophene. This is quite different from the traditional understanding that thermal transport is usually largely contributed by the low frequency acoustic phonon modes for most of suspended 2D materials. Detailed analysis further reveals that the scattering between the out-of-plane flexural acoustic mode (FA) and other modes likes FA + FA/TA/LA/OP ↔ TA/LA/OP is the predominant phonon process channel. Finally the vibrational characteristic of some typical phonon modes and mean free path distribution of different phonon modes are also presented in this work. Our results shed light on the fundamental phonon transport properties of borophene, and foreshow the potential application for thermal management community.

  15. A First-principles Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Superionic Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brandon; Marzari, Nicola

    2007-03-01

    Superionic materials---solids with liquid-like transport properties---have found widespread use in a variety of applications in fuel cells, switches, sensors, and batteries. However, reasons for fast-ion conduction in such materials, as well as the specific atomistic mechanisms involved, remain ill understood. Our work uses first-principles molecular dynamics to illuminate the mechanisms, pathways, and motivations for superionic conductivity in two materials representing different classes of ion conductors: α-AgI, an archetypal Type-I superionic; and CsHSO4, an anhydrous solid-state electrolyte candidate for hydrogen fuel cells. For α-AgI, we trace common pathways for silver ion conduction and discuss how a chemical signature in the electronic structure relates to enhanced silver ion mobility. We also characterize the dynamical lattice structure in the superionic phase and present the likely motivations for its existence. For CsHSO4, we isolate the dominant atomistic mechanisms involved in superprotonic conduction and discuss the effect of correlated diffusive events in enhancing proton transport. We also offer a detailed description of the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network topology in the course of proton diffusion and discuss the relevance of atomistic processes with competing timescales in facilitating proton transport.

  16. Accurate line intensities of methane from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, Andrei V.; Rey, Michael; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we report first-principle theoretical predictions of methane spectral line intensities that are competitive with (and complementary to) the best laboratory measurements. A detailed comparison with the most accurate data shows that discrepancies in integrated polyad intensities are in the range of 0.4%-2.3%. This corresponds to estimations of the best available accuracy in laboratory Fourier Transform spectra measurements for this quantity. For relatively isolated strong lines the individual intensity deviations are in the same range. A comparison with the most precise laser measurements of the multiplet intensities in the 2ν3 band gives an agreement within the experimental error margins (about 1%). This is achieved for the first time for five-atomic molecules. In the Supplementary Material we provide the lists of theoretical intensities at 269 K for over 5000 strongest transitions in the range below 6166 cm-1. The advantage of the described method is that this offers a possibility to generate fully assigned exhaustive line lists at various temperature conditions. Extensive calculations up to 12,000 cm-1 including high-T predictions will be made freely available through the TheoReTS information system (http://theorets.univ-reims.fr, http://theorets.tsu.ru) that contains ab initio born line lists and provides a user-friendly graphical interface for a fast simulation of the absorption cross-sections and radiance.

  17. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souvatzis, Petros, E-mail: petros.souvatsiz@fysik.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Materials Theory, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Niklasson, Anders M. N., E-mail: amn@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Electron field emission in nanostructures: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Joseph Andrew

    The objective of this work was to study electron field emission from several nanostructures using a first-principles framework. The systems studied were carbon nanowires, graphene nanoribbons, and nanotubes of varying composition. These particular structures were chosen because they have recently been identified as showing novel physical phenomena, as well as having tremendous industrial applications. We examined the field emission under a variety of conditions, including laser illumination and the presence of adsorbates. The goal was to explore how these conditions affect the field emission performance. In addition to the calculations, this dissertation has presented computational developments by the author that allowed these demanding calculations to be performed. There are many possible choices for basis when performing an electronic structure calculation. Examples are plane waves, atomic orbitals, and real-space grids. The best choice of basis depends on the structure of the system being analyzed and the physical processes involved (e.g., laser illumination). For this reason, it was important to conduct rigorous tests of basis set performance, in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. There are no existing benchmark calculations for field emission, but transport calculations for nanostructures are similar, and so provide a useful reference for evaluating the performance of various basis sets. Based on the results, for the purposes of studying a non-periodic nanostructure under field emission conditions, we decided to use a real-space grid basis which incorporates the Lagrange function approach. Once a basis was chosen, in this case a real-space grid, the issue of boundary conditions arose. The problem is that with a non-periodic system, field emitted electron density can experience non-physical reflections from the boundaries of the calculation volume, leading to inaccuracies. To prevent this issue, we used complex absorbing potentials (CAPs) to absorb

  20. First principles modeling of nonlinear incidence rates in seasonal epidemics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Ponciano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we used a general stochastic processes framework to derive from first principles the incidence rate function that characterizes epidemic models. We investigate a particular case, the Liu-Hethcote-van den Driessche's (LHD incidence rate function, which results from modeling the number of successful transmission encounters as a pure birth process. This derivation also takes into account heterogeneity in the population with regard to the per individual transmission probability. We adjusted a deterministic SIRS model with both the classical and the LHD incidence rate functions to time series of the number of children infected with syncytial respiratory virus in Banjul, Gambia and Turku, Finland. We also adjusted a deterministic SEIR model with both incidence rate functions to the famous measles data sets from the UK cities of London and Birmingham. Two lines of evidence supported our conclusion that the model with the LHD incidence rate may very well be a better description of the seasonal epidemic processes studied here. First, our model was repeatedly selected as best according to two different information criteria and two different likelihood formulations. The second line of evidence is qualitative in nature: contrary to what the SIRS model with classical incidence rate predicts, the solution of the deterministic SIRS model with LHD incidence rate will reach either the disease free equilibrium or the endemic equilibrium depending on the initial conditions. These findings along with computer intensive simulations of the models' Poincaré map with environmental stochasticity contributed to attain a clear separation of the roles of the environmental forcing and the mechanics of the disease transmission in shaping seasonal epidemics dynamics.

  1. First principles modeling of nonlinear incidence rates in seasonal epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponciano, José M; Capistrán, Marcos A

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we used a general stochastic processes framework to derive from first principles the incidence rate function that characterizes epidemic models. We investigate a particular case, the Liu-Hethcote-van den Driessche's (LHD) incidence rate function, which results from modeling the number of successful transmission encounters as a pure birth process. This derivation also takes into account heterogeneity in the population with regard to the per individual transmission probability. We adjusted a deterministic SIRS model with both the classical and the LHD incidence rate functions to time series of the number of children infected with syncytial respiratory virus in Banjul, Gambia and Turku, Finland. We also adjusted a deterministic SEIR model with both incidence rate functions to the famous measles data sets from the UK cities of London and Birmingham. Two lines of evidence supported our conclusion that the model with the LHD incidence rate may very well be a better description of the seasonal epidemic processes studied here. First, our model was repeatedly selected as best according to two different information criteria and two different likelihood formulations. The second line of evidence is qualitative in nature: contrary to what the SIRS model with classical incidence rate predicts, the solution of the deterministic SIRS model with LHD incidence rate will reach either the disease free equilibrium or the endemic equilibrium depending on the initial conditions. These findings along with computer intensive simulations of the models' Poincaré map with environmental stochasticity contributed to attain a clear separation of the roles of the environmental forcing and the mechanics of the disease transmission in shaping seasonal epidemics dynamics.

  2. First principles investigation of copper and silver intercalated molybdenum disulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, D. M.; Onofrio, N.; Strachan, A.

    2017-02-01

    We characterize the energetics and atomic structures involved in the intercalation of copper and silver into the van der Waals gap of molybdenum disulfide as well as the resulting ionic and electronic transport properties using first-principles density functional theory. The intercalation energy of systems with formula (Cu,Ag)xMoS2 decreases with ion concentration and ranges from 1.2 to 0.8 eV for Cu; Ag exhibits a stronger concentration dependence from 2.2 eV for x = 0.014 to 0.75 eV for x = 1 (using the fcc metal as a reference). Partial atomic charge analysis indicates that approximately half an electron is transferred per metallic ion in the case of Cu at low concentrations and the ionicity decreases only slightly with concentration. In contrast, while Ag is only slightly less ionic than Cu for low concentrations, charge transfer reduces significantly to approximately 0.1 e for x = 1. This difference in ionicity between Cu and Ag correlates with their intercalation energies. Importantly, the predicted values indicate the possibility of electrochemical intercalation of both Cu and Ag into MoS2 and the calculated activation energies associated with ionic transport within the gaps, 0.32 eV for Cu and 0.38 eV for Ag, indicate these materials to be good ionic conductors. Analysis of the electronic structure shows that charge transfer leads to a shift of the Fermi energy into the conduction band resulting in a semiconductor-to-metal transition. Electron transport calculations based on non-equilibrium Green's function show that the low-bias conductance increases with metal concentration and is comparable in the horizontal and vertical transport directions. These properties make metal intercalated transition metal di-chalcogenides potential candidates for several applications including electrochemical metallization cells and contacts in electronics based on 2D materials.

  3. Liquid Water from First Principles: Validation of Different Sampling Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, C J; Kuo, W; Siepmann, J; McGrath, M J; Vondevondele, J; Sprik, M; Hutter, J; Parrinello, M; Mohamed, F; Krack, M; Chen, B; Klein, M

    2004-05-20

    A series of first principles molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for liquid water to assess the validity and reproducibility of different sampling approaches. These simulations include Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations using the program CPMD with different values of the fictitious electron mass in the microcanonical and canonical ensembles, Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics using the programs CPMD and CP2K in the microcanonical ensemble, and Metropolis Monte Carlo using CP2K in the canonical ensemble. With the exception of one simulation for 128 water molecules, all other simulations were carried out for systems consisting of 64 molecules. It is found that the structural and thermodynamic properties of these simulations are in excellent agreement with each other as long as adiabatic sampling is maintained in the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations either by choosing a sufficiently small fictitious mass in the microcanonical ensemble or by Nos{acute e}-Hoover thermostats in the canonical ensemble. Using the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange and correlation energy functionals and norm-conserving Troullier-Martins or Goedecker-Teter-Hutter pseudopotentials, simulations at a fixed density of 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and a temperature close to 315 K yield a height of the first peak in the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function of about 3.0, a classical constant-volume heat capacity of about 70 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, and a self-diffusion constant of about 0.1 Angstroms{sup 2}/ps.

  4. Risk reduction and the privatization option: First principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, D.J.; Jones, D.W.; Russell, M. [Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cummings, R.C.; Valdez, G. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Duemmer, C.L. [Hull, Duemmer and Garland (United States)

    1997-06-25

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) faces a challenging mission. To increase efficiency, EM is undertaking a number of highly innovative initiatives--two of which are of particular importance to the present study. One is the 2006 Plan, a planning and budgeting process that seeks to convert the clean-up program from a temporally and fiscally open-ended endeavor to a strictly bounded one, with firm commitments over a decade-long horizon. The second is a major overhauling of the management and contracting practices that define the relationship between the Department and the private sector, aimed at cost reduction by increasing firms` responsibilities and profit opportunities and reducing DOE`s direct participation in management practices and decisions. The goal of this paper is to provide an independent perspective on how EM should create new management practices to deal with private sector partners that are motivated by financial incentives. It seeks to ground this perspective in real world concerns--the background of the clean-up effort, the very difficult technical challenges it faces, the very real threats to environment, health and safety that have now been juxtaposed with financial drivers, and the constraints imposed by government`s unique business practices and public responsibilities. The approach is to raise issues through application of first principles. The paper is targeted at the EM policy officer who must implement the joint visions of the 2006 plan and privatization within the context of the tradeoff between terminal risk reduction and interim risk management.

  5. Transport and first-principles study of novel thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Hang

    Thermoelectric materials can recover waste industrial heat and convert it to electricity as well as provide efficient local cooling of electronic devices. The efficiency of such environmentally responsible and exceptionally reliable solid state energy conversion is determined by the dimensionless figure-of-merit ZT = alpha2 sigmaT/kappa, where alpha is the Seebeck coefficient, sigma is the electrical conductivity, kappa is the thermal conductivity, and T is the absolute temperature. The goal of the thesis is to (i) illustrate the physics to achieve high ZT of advanced thermoelectric materials and (ii) explore fundamental structure and transport properties in novel condensed matter systems, via an approach combining comprehensive experimental techniques and state-of-the-art first-principles simulation methods. Thermo-galvanomagnetic transport coefficients are derived from Onsager's reciprocal relations and evaluated via solving Boltzmann transport equation using Fermi-Dirac statistics, under the relaxation time approximation. Such understanding provides insights on enhancing ZT through two physically intuitive and very effective routes: (i) improving power factor PF = alpha2sigma; and (ii) reducing thermal conductivity kappa, as demonstrated in the cases of Mg2Si1-xSnx solid solution and Ge/Te double substituted skutterudites CoSb3(1-x)Ge1.5x Te1.5x, respectively. Motivated by recent theoretical predictions of enhanced thermoelectric performance in highly mismatched alloys, ZnTe:N molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) films deposited on GaAs (100) substrates are carefully examined, which leads to a surprising discovery of significant phonon-drag thermopower (reaching 1-2 mV/K-1) at ~13 K. Further systematic study in Bi2Te3 MBE thin films grown on sapphire (0001) and/or BaF2 (111) substrates, reveal that the peak of phonon drag can be tuned by the choice of substrates with different Debye temperatures. Moreover, the detailed transport and structure studies of Bi2-xTl xTe3

  6. First-principle study of nanostructures of functionalized graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Naveen Kumar; Jyoti Dhar Sharma; P K Ahluwalia

    2014-06-01

    We present first-principle calculations of 2D nanostructures of graphene functionalized with hydrogen and fluorine, respectively, in chair conformation. The partial density of states, band structure, binding energy and transverse displacement of C atoms due to functionalization (buckling) have been calculated within the framework of density functional theory as implemented in the SIESTA code. The variation in band gap and binding energy per add atom have been plotted against the number of add atoms, as the number of add atoms are incremented one by one. In all, 37 nanostructures with 18C atoms, 3 × 3 × 1 (i.e., the unit cell is repeated three times along -axis and three times along -axis) supercell, have been studied. The variation in C–C, C–H and C–F bond lengths and transverse displacement of C atoms (due to increase in add atoms) have been tabulated. A large amount of buckling is observed in the carbon lattice, 0.0053–0.7487 Å, due to hydrogenation and 0.0002–0.5379 Å, due to fluorination. As the number of add atoms (hydrogen or fluorine) is increased, a variation in the band gap is observed around the Fermi energy, resulting in change in behaviour of nanostructure from conductor to semiconductor/insulator. The binding energy per add atom increases with the increase in the number of add atoms. The nanostructures with 18C+18H and 18C+18F have maximum band gap of 4.98 eV and 3.64 eV, respectively, and binding energy per add atom –3.7562 eV and –3.3507 eV, respectively. Thus, these nanostructures are stable and are wide band-gap semiconductors, whereas the nanostructures with 18C+2H, 18C+4H, 18C+4F, 18C+8F, 18C+10F and 18C+10H atoms are small band-gap semiconductors with the band gap lying between 0.14 eV and 1.72 eV. Fluorine being more electronegative than hydrogen, the impact of electronegativity on band gap, binding energy and bond length is visible. It is also clear that it is possible to tune the electronic properties of functionalized

  7. ABINIT: First-principles approach to material and nanosystem properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, X.; Amadon, B.; Anglade, P.-M.; Beuken, J.-M.; Bottin, F.; Boulanger, P.; Bruneval, F.; Caliste, D.; Caracas, R.; Côté, M.; Deutsch, T.; Genovese, L.; Ghosez, Ph.; Giantomassi, M.; Goedecker, S.; Hamann, D. R.; Hermet, P.; Jollet, F.; Jomard, G.; Leroux, S.; Mancini, M.; Mazevet, S.; Oliveira, M. J. T.; Onida, G.; Pouillon, Y.; Rangel, T.; Rignanese, G.-M.; Sangalli, D.; Shaltaf, R.; Torrent, M.; Verstraete, M. J.; Zerah, G.; Zwanziger, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    ABINIT [ http://www.abinit.org] allows one to study, from first-principles, systems made of electrons and nuclei (e.g. periodic solids, molecules, nanostructures, etc.), on the basis of Density-Functional Theory (DFT) and Many-Body Perturbation Theory. Beyond the computation of the total energy, charge density and electronic structure of such systems, ABINIT also implements many dynamical, dielectric, thermodynamical, mechanical, or electronic properties, at different levels of approximation. The present paper provides an exhaustive account of the capabilities of ABINIT. It should be helpful to scientists that are not familiarized with ABINIT, as well as to already regular users. First, we give a broad overview of ABINIT, including the list of the capabilities and how to access them. Then, we present in more details the recent, advanced, developments of ABINIT, with adequate references to the underlying theory, as well as the relevant input variables, tests and, if available, ABINIT tutorials. Program summaryProgram title: ABINIT Catalogue identifier: AEEU_v1_0 Distribution format: tar.gz Journal reference: Comput. Phys. Comm. Programming language: Fortran95, PERL scripts, Python scripts Computer: All systems with a Fortran95 compiler Operating system: All systems with a Fortran95 compiler Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Sequential, or parallel with proven speed-up up to one thousand processors. RAM: Ranges from a few Mbytes to several hundred Gbytes, depending on the input file. Classification: 7.3, 7.8 External routines: (all optional) BigDFT [1], ETSF IO [2], libxc [3], NetCDF [4], MPI [5], Wannier90 [6] Nature of problem: This package has the purpose of computing accurately material and nanostructure properties: electronic structure, bond lengths, bond angles, primitive cell size, cohesive energy, dielectric properties, vibrational properties, elastic properties, optical properties, magnetic properties, non-linear couplings, electronic and

  8. First-Principles Study of Defects in CuGaO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Zhi-Jie; FANG Cheng; SHI Li-Jie; LIU Yong-Hui; HE Man-Chao

    2008-01-01

    @@ Using the first-principles methods, we study the electronic structure, intrinsic and extrinsic defects doping in transparent conducting oxides CuGaO2. Intrinsic defects, acceptor-type and donor-type extrinsic defects in their relevant charge state are considered. The calculation result show that copper vacancy and oxygen interstitial are the relevant defects in CuGaO2. In addition, copper vacancy is the most efficient acceptor. Substituting Be for Ga is the prominent acceptor, and substituting Ca for Cu is the prominent donors in CuGaO2. Our calculation results are expected to be a guide for preparing n-type and p-type materials in CuGaO2.

  9. First-principles theory, coarse-grained models, and simulations of ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghmare, Umesh V

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: A ferroelectric crystal exhibits macroscopic electric dipole or polarization arising from spontaneous ordering of its atomic-scale dipoles that breaks inversion symmetry. Changes in applied pressure or electric field generate changes in electric polarization in a ferroelectric, defining its piezoelectric and dielectric properties, respectively, which make it useful as an electromechanical sensor and actuator in a number of applications. In addition, a characteristic of a ferroelectric is the presence of domains or states with different symmetry equivalent orientations of spontaneous polarization that are switchable with large enough applied electric field, a nonlinear property that makes it useful for applications in nonvolatile memory devices. Central to these properties of a ferroelectric are the phase transitions it undergoes as a function of temperature that involve lowering of the symmetry of its high temperature centrosymmetric paraelectric phase. Ferroelectricity arises from a delicate balance between short and long-range interatomic interactions, and hence the resulting properties are quite sensitive to chemistry, strains, and electric charges associated with its interface with substrate and electrodes. First-principles density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations have been very effective in capturing this and predicting material and environment specific properties of ferroelectrics, leading to fundamental insights into origins of ferroelectricity in oxides and chalcogenides uncovering a precise picture of electronic hybridization, topology, and mechanisms. However, use of DFT in molecular dynamics for detailed prediction of ferroelectric phase transitions and associated temperature dependent properties has been limited due to large length and time scales of the processes involved. To this end, it is quite appealing to start with input from DFT calculations and construct material-specific models that are realistic yet simple for use in

  10. Sensitivity of cuprous azide towards heat and impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartar Singh

    1958-07-01

    Full Text Available "Rates of thermal decomposition of azide at six different temperatures have been measured. The sigmoid shapes of the curves representing increase in pressure with time suggest that a given temperature a fixed number of nuclei are formed at the end of the induction period. The nuclei increase in size in three dimensions. The radius of any nucleus at any instant (tis directly proportional to (t-t/Sub/owhere t/Sub/o is the induction period. The activation energy involved in thermal has been found decomposition to be 26.5K calories. It is suggested that this activation energy corresponds to the energy required for thermal transition of an electron 3 d band to the Fermi level of the metallic copper nuclei. The impact sensitivity and induction period necessary for explosion at various temperatures for crystalline and precipitated samples of cuprous azide have been measured. The results indicate that cuprous azide is more sensitive towards heat and impact than lead azide. The impact sensitivity of cuprous azide is found to increase in crystal size."

  11. First-principles computation of mantle materials in crystalline and amorphous phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Bijaya B.

    2015-03-01

    First-principles methods based on density functional theory are used extensively in the investigation of the behavior and properties of mantle materials over broad ranges of pressure, temperature, and composition that are relevant. A review of computational results reported during the last couple of decades shows that essentially all properties including structure, phase transition, equation of state, thermodynamics, elasticity, alloying, conductivity, defects, interfaces, diffusivity, viscosity, and melting have been calculated from first principles. Using MgO, the second most abundant oxide of Earth's mantle, as a primary example and considering many other mantle materials in their crystalline and amorphous phases, we have found that most properties are strongly pressure dependent, sometimes varying non-monotonically and anomalously, with the effects of temperature being systematically suppressed with compression. The overall agreement with the available experimental data is excellent; it is remarkable that the early-calculated results such as shear wave velocities of two key phases, MgO and MgSiO3 perovskite, were subsequently reproduced by experimentation covering almost the entire mantle pressure regime. As covered in some detail, the defect formation and migration enthalpies of key mantle materials increase with pressure. The predicted trend is that partial MgO Schottky defects are energetically most favorable in Mg-silicates but their formation enthalpies are high. So, the diffusion in the mantle is likely to be in the extrinsic regime. Preliminary results on MgO and forsterite hint that the grain boundaries can accommodate point defects (including impurities) and enhance diffusion rates at all pressures. The structures are highly distorted in the close vicinity of the defects and at the interface with excess space. Recent simulations of MgO-SiO2 binary and other silicate melts have found that the melt self-diffusion and viscosity vary by several orders of

  12. First Principles Theoretical Studies of Ferroelectric Lattice Instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-22

    systems that have yet to be synthesized. We also have performed work on the oxide-based systems based on the potential-induced-breathing ( PIB ) model which...with Dr. Boyer at the Naval Research Laboratory, extensions and applications of the PIB (potential induced breathing) model, which represented an...notably, ferroelectric perovskites. Unfortunately, this had only been carried to the point of determining the effect of PIB on rotational (nonpolar

  13. Chemical-state analysis of organic semiconductors using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Yutaka; Kohno, Teiichiro; Minakata, Takashi; Konishi, Tokuzo; Gullikson, Eric M; Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2012-02-16

    The chemical states of organic semiconductors were investigated by total-electron-yield soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TEY-XAS) and first-principles calculations. The organic semiconductors, pentacene (C(22)H(14)) and pentacenequinone (C(22)H(12)O(2)), were subjected to TEY-XAS and the experimental spectra obtained were compared with the 1s core-level excited spectra of C and O atoms, calculated by a first-principles planewave pseudopotential method. Excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated spectra were obtained for both materials. Using this methodology, we examined the chemical states of the aged pentacene, and confirmed that both C-OH and C═O chemical bonds are generated by exposure to air. This result implies that not only oxygen but also humidity causes pentacene oxidation.

  14. First Principles Atomistic Model for Carbon-Doped Boron Suboxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    spectroscopy (EELS). J. Solid State Chem. 1997;133:365. 3. Herrmann M, Thiele M, Jaenicke-Roessler K, Freemantle CS, Sigalas I. Oxidation resistance...boron suboxide. Mater Sci and Eng A. 2011;528:5778. 5. Herrmann M, Kleebe HJ, Raethel J, Sempf K, Lauterback S, Muller MM, Sigalas I. Field...assisted densification of superhard B6O materials with Y2O3/Al2O3 addition. J Am Ceram Soc. 2009;92:2368. 6. Herrmann , M. Raethel, J. Bales, A. Sempf, K

  15. A first-principles approach to total-dose hardness assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Radiation Technology and Assurance Dept.

    1995-11-01

    A first-principles approach to radiation hardness assurance was described that provides the technical background to the present US and European total-dose radiation hardness assurance test methods for MOS technologies, TM 1019.4 and BS 22900. These test methods could not have been developed otherwise, as their existence depends not on a wealth of empirical comparisons of IC data from ground and space testing, but on a fundamental understanding of MOS defect growth and annealing processes. Rebound testing should become less of a problem for advanced MOS small-signal electronics technologies for systems with total dose requirements below 50--100 krad(SiO{sub 2}) because of trends toward much thinner gate oxides. For older technologies with thicker gate oxides and for power devices, rebound testing is unavoidable without detailed characterization studies to assess the impact of interface traps on devices response in space. The QML approach is promising for future hardened technologies. A sufficient understanding of process effects on radiation hardness has been developed that should be able to reduce testing costs in the future for hardened parts. Finally, it is hoped that the above discussions have demonstrated that the foundation for cost-effective hardness assurance tests is laid with studies of the basic mechanisms of radiation effects. Without a diligent assessment of new radiation effects mechanisms in future technologies, one cannot be assured that the present generation of radiation test standards will continue to apply.

  16. Tunable redox potential of nonmetal doped monolayer MoS2: First principle calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S.; Li, C.; Zhao, Y. F.; Gong, Y. Y.; Niu, L. Y.; Liu, X. J.

    2016-10-01

    Doping is an effective method to alter the electronic behavior of materials by forming new chemical bonds and bringing bond relaxation. With this aid of first principle calculations, the crystal configuration and electronic properties of monolayer MoS2 have been modulated by the nonmetal (NM) dopants (H, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, Cl, As, Se, Br, Te and I), and the thermodynamic stability depending on the preparation conditions (Mo-rich and S-rich conditions) were discussed. Results shown that, the NM dopants substituted preferentially for S under Mo-rich condition, the electronic distribution around the dopants and the nearby Mo atoms are changed by the new formed Mo-NM bonds and bands relaxation. Compared to pristine monolayer MoS2, the NM ions with odd chemical valences enhance the oxidation potential and reduce the reduction potential of specimens, but the NM ions with even chemical valences have the opposite effects on the redox potentials. Compared to the NM ions with even chemical valences, the lone pair electrons in NM ions with odd chemical valences can extra interact with the Mo ions and reduces the ECBM and EVBM values of specimens. It offers a simple way to design various monolayer MoS2 based catalysts in order to catalyze different materials by chose the reasonable dopants for stronger oxidation or reduction potential.

  17. First-principles thermodynamics and defect kinetics guidelines for engineering a tailored RRAM device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clima, Sergiu, E-mail: clima@imec.be; Chen, Yang Yin; Goux, Ludovic; Govoreanu, Bogdan; Degraeve, Robin; Fantini, Andrea; Jurczak, Malgorzata [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Chen, Chao Yang [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Pourtois, Geoffrey [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); PLASMANT, University of Antwerp, 2610 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2016-06-14

    Resistive Random Access Memories are among the most promising candidates for the next generation of non-volatile memory. Transition metal oxides such as HfOx and TaOx attracted a lot of attention due to their CMOS compatibility. Furthermore, these materials do not require the inclusion of extrinsic conducting defects since their operation is based on intrinsic ones (oxygen vacancies). Using Density Functional Theory, we evaluated the thermodynamics of the defects formation and the kinetics of diffusion of the conducting species active in transition metal oxide RRAM materials. The gained insights based on the thermodynamics in the Top Electrode, Insulating Matrix and Bottom Electrode and at the interfaces are used to design a proper defect reservoir, which is needed for a low-energy reliable switching device. The defect reservoir has also a direct impact on the retention of the Low Resistance State due to the resulting thermodynamic driving forces. The kinetics of the diffusing conducting defects in the Insulating Matrix determine the switching dynamics and resistance retention. The interface at the Bottom Electrode has a significant impact on the low-current operation and long endurance of the memory cell. Our first-principles findings are confirmed by experimental measurements on fabricated RRAM devices.

  18. Monoclinic high-pressure polymorph of AlOOH predicted from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Hermann, Andreas; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2016-12-01

    Aluminum oxide hydroxide, AlOOH, is a prototypical hydrous mineral in the geonomy. The study of the high-pressure phase evolution of AlOOH is of fundamental importance in helping to understand the role of hydrous minerals in the water storage and transport in Earth, as in other planets. Here, we have systematically investigated the high-pressure phase diagram of AlOOH up to 550 GPa using the efficient crystal structure analysis by particle swarm optimization (CALYPSO) algorithm in conjunction with first principles calculations. We predict a peculiar monoclinic phase (space group P 21/c , 16 atoms/cell, Z =4 ) as the most stable phase for AlOOH above 340 GPa. The occurrence of this new phase results in the breakup of symmetric linear O-H-O hydrogen bonds into asymmetric, bent O-H-O linkages and in sevenfold coordinated metal cations. The new P 21/c phase turns out to be a universal high-pressure phase in group 13 oxide hydroxides, and stable for both compressed GaOOH and InOOH. The formation of the new phase in all compounds is favored by volume reduction due to denser packing.

  19. Thermodynamics and elastic properties of Ta from first-principles calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qiang; Huang Duo-Hui; Cao Qi-Long; Wang Fan-Hou; Cai Ling-Cang; Zhang Xiu-Lu; Jing Fu-Qian

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of the quasiharmonic approximation,the thermodynamics and elastic properties of Ta,including phonon density of states (DOS),equation of state,linear thermal expansion coefficient,entropy,enthalpy,heat capacity,elastic constants,bulk modulus,shear modulus,Young's modulus,microhardness,and sound velocity,are studied using the first-principles projector-augmented wave method.The vibrational contribution to Helmholtz free energy is evaluated from the first-principles phonon DOS and the Debye model.The thermal electronic contribution to Helmholtz free energy is estimated from the integration over the electronic DOS.By comparing the experimental results with the calculation results from the first-principles and the Debye model,it is found that the thermodynamic properties of Ta are depicted well by the first-principles.The elastic properties of Ta from the first-principles are consistent with the available experimental data.

  20. 纳米Cu2O及其复合物的制备及光催化性能研究%Preparation and Photocatalytic Property of Nano Cuprous Oxide and Its Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胥桂萍; 邱黎

    2013-01-01

    Cu2O powders and TiO2-Cu2O composite powders were prepared by chemical deposi-tion method. With prepared Cu2O nanoparticles as photocatalyst,photocatalytic oxidation degrada-tion of methylene blue solution was explored. The effects of dosage of H2O2,the initial concentration of methylene blue and composite samples on the degradation performance were investigated with UV-visible spectrophotometer. The results showed that the degradation efficiency was the best when the amount of H2O2 was 5mL in 30mL methylene blue solution and the initial concentration of methy-lene blue was 10mg/L,and the catalytic efficiency of TiO2-Cu2O composite powders was much high-er than that of Cu2O.%采用化学沉积法制备Cu2O粉体,并且制备了TiO2-Cu2O复合粉体。以制备的纳米Cu2O为光催化剂,对亚甲基蓝溶液进行光催化氧化降解。通过紫外-可见分光光度计考察了H2O2的加入量、亚甲基蓝的初始浓度及复合样品对降解性能的影响。结果表明,当H2O2的用量在5 mL/30 mL,亚甲基蓝的初始浓度为10 mg/L时降解效果最好;复合粉体的催化效率远高于Cu2O的光催化效率。

  1. Stabilization of rock salt ZnO nanocrystals by low-energy surfaces and Mg additions : A first-principles study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Rik S.; Fang, Changming M.; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Van Blaaderen, Alfons; Van Huis, Marijn A.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas bulk zinc oxide (ZnO) exhibits the wurtzite crystal structure, nanoscale ZnO was recently synthesized in the rock salt structure by addition of Mg. Using first-principles methods, we investigated two stabilization routes for accessing rock salt ZnO. The first route is stabilization by Mg add

  2. First principles based multiparadigm modeling of electronic structures and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai

    enabling the tunability of CBO. We predict that Na further improves the CBO through electrostatically elevating the valence levels to decrease the CBO, explaining the observed essential role of Na for high performance. Moreover we find that K leads to a dramatic decrease in the CBO to 0.05 eV, much better than Na. We suggest that the efficiency of CIGS devices might be improved substantially by tuning the ratio of Na to K, with the improved phase stability of Na balancing phase instability from K. All these defects reduce interfacial stability slightly, but not significantly. A number of exotic structures have been formed through high pressure chemistry, but applications have been hindered by difficulties in recovering the high pressure phase to ambient conditions (i.e., one atmosphere and room temperature). Here we use dispersion-corrected DFT (PBE-ulg flavor) to predict that above 60 GPa the most stable form of N2O (the laughing gas in its molecular form) is a 1D polymer with an all-nitrogen backbone analogous to cis-polyacetylene in which alternate N are bonded (ionic covalent) to O. The analogous trans-polymer is only 0.03-0.10 eV/molecular unit less stable. Upon relaxation to ambient conditions both polymers relax below 14 GPa to the same stable non-planar trans-polymer, accompanied by possible electronic structure transitions. The predicted phonon spectrum and dissociation kinetics validate the stability of this trans-poly-NNO at ambient conditions, which has potential applications as a new type of conducting polymer with all-nitrogen chains and as a high-energy oxidizer for rocket propulsion. This work illustrates in silico materials discovery particularly in the realm of extreme conditions. Modeling non-adiabatic electron dynamics has been a long-standing challenge for computational chemistry and materials science, and the eFF method presents a cost-efficient alternative. However, due to the deficiency of FSG representation, eFF is limited to low-Z elements with

  3. Spin-split bands of metallic hydrogenated ZnO ( 10 1 ¯ 0 surface: First-principles study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Adhib Ulil Absor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For spintronics applications, generation of significant spin transport is required, which is achieved by applying a semiconductor surface exhibiting metallic spin-split surface-state bands. We show that metallic spin-split surface-state bands are achieved on hydrogenated ZnO ( 10 1 ¯ 0 surface by using first-principles density-functional theory calculations. We find that these metallic surface-state bands with dominant Zn-s and p orbitals exhibit Rashba spin splitting with a strong anisotropic character. This finding makes spintronics devices using oxide electronics surface materials possible.

  4. First-principles calculation method for electron transport based on the grid Lippmann-Schwinger equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Shigeru; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Ono, Tomoya; Hirose, Kikuji

    2015-09-01

    We develop a first-principles electron-transport simulator based on the Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation within the framework of the real-space finite-difference scheme. In our fully real-space-based LS (grid LS) method, the ratio expression technique for the scattering wave functions and the Green's function elements of the reference system is employed to avoid numerical collapse. Furthermore, we present analytical expressions and/or prominent calculation procedures for the retarded Green's function, which are utilized in the grid LS approach. In order to demonstrate the performance of the grid LS method, we simulate the electron-transport properties of the semiconductor-oxide interfaces sandwiched between semi-infinite jellium electrodes. The results confirm that the leakage current through the (001)Si-SiO_{2} model becomes much larger when the dangling-bond state is induced by a defect in the oxygen layer, while that through the (001)Ge-GeO_{2} model is insensitive to the dangling bond state.

  5. Structure of naturally hydrated ferrihydrite revealed through neutron diffraction and first-principles modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Helen F.; Thom, William; Bowron, Daniel T.; Faria, Nuno; Hasnip, Philip J.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2017-08-01

    Ferrihydrite, with a ``two-line'' x-ray diffraction pattern (2L-Fh), is the most amorphous of the iron oxides and is ubiquitous in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. It also plays a central role in the regulation and metabolism of iron in bacteria, algae, higher plants, and animals, including humans. In this study, we present a single-phase model for ferrihydrite that unifies existing analytical data while adhering to fundamental chemical principles. The primary particle is small (20-50 Å) and has a dynamic and variably hydrated surface, which negates long-range order; collectively, these features have hampered complete characterization and frustrated our understanding of the mineral's reactivity and chemical/biochemical function. Near and intermediate range neutron diffraction (NIMROD) and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) were employed in this study to generate and interpret high-resolution data of naturally hydrated, synthetic 2L-Fh at standard temperature. The structural optimization overcomes transgressions of coordination chemistry inherent within previously proposed structures, to produce a robust and unambiguous single-phase model.

  6. Oxygen vacancies in amorphous-Ta2O5 from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihang; Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Lu, Wei

    Oxygen vacancies are thought to play a crucial role in the electrical and optical properties of tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) devices. Even though numerous experimental studies on oxygen vacancies in Ta2O5 exist, experimentally detected defects are ambiguously identified due to the absence of an accurate and conclusive theoretical analysis. We investigate oxygen vacancies in amorphous Ta2O5 with first-principles calculations based on hybrid density functional theory. The calculated thermodynamic and optical transition levels of stable oxygen vacancies are in good agreement with measured values from a variety of experimental methods, providing conclusive clues for the identification of the defect states observed in experiments. We determine the concentration of oxygen vacancies and their dominant oxidation state as a function of growth conditions. We analyze the characteristics of extra electrons introduced by donor-like oxygen vacancies, which include the formation of polarons. Our results provide insight into the fundamental properties of oxygen vacancies in Ta2O5, which is essential to controlling the properties of films and optimize the performance of devices. This research was supported by the AFOSR through MURI grant FA9550-12-1-0038 and the National Science Foundation CAREER award through Grant No. DMR-1254314. Computational resources were provided by the DOE NERSC facility.

  7. First principles simulations of F centers in cubic SrTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, J.; Illas, F.; Lopez, N. [Dept. Quimica Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Kotomin, E.A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, 1063 Riga (Latvia); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Zhukovskii, Yu.F.; Piskunov, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, 1063 Riga (Latvia); Maier, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Hermansson, K. [Aangstroemlaboratoriet, Uppsala Universitet, Laegerhyddsvaegen 1, 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Atomic and electronic structure of regular and O-deficient SrTiO{sub 3} have been studied. Several types of first principles atomistic simulations: Hartree-Fock method, Density Functional Theory, and hybrid HF-DFT functionals, have been applied to periodic models that consider supercells of different sizes (ranging between 40 and 240 atoms). We confirm the ionic character of the Sr-O bonds and the high covalency of the Ti-O{sub 2} substructure. For the stoichiometric cubic crystal; the lattice constant and bulk modulus correctly reproduce the experimental data whereas the band gap is only properly obtained by the B3PW functional. The relaxed geometry around the F center shows a large expansion of the two nearest Ti ions. Moreover, the vacancy formation energy is extremely sensitive to the size and the shape of the supercell as well as the calculation method. The electronic density map indicates the redistribution of two electrons of the missing O atom between the vacancy and 3d atomic orbitals of the two nearest Ti ions, in contrast to the F centers in ionic oxides where the charge centroid does not change. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Pressure-induced novel compounds in the Hf-O system from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Oganov, Artem R.; Li, Xinfeng; Xue, Kan-Hao; Wang, Zhenhai; Dong, Huafeng

    2015-11-01

    Using first-principles evolutionary simulations, we have systematically investigated phase stability in the Hf-O system at pressure up to 120 GPa. New compounds Hf5O2,Hf3O2 , HfO, and HfO3 are discovered to be thermodynamically stable at certain pressure ranges. Two new high-pressure phases are found for Hf2O : one with space group Pnnm and anti-CaCl2-type structure, another with space group I 41/amd. Pnnm-HfO3 shows interesting structure, simultaneously containing oxide O2 - and peroxide [O-O]2 - anions. Remarkably, it is P 6 ¯2 m -HfO rather than OII-HfO2 that exhibits the highest mechanical characteristics among Hf-O compounds. Pnnm-Hf2O , Imm2-Hf5O2 ,P 3 ¯1 m -Hf2O , and P 4 ¯m 2 -Hf2O3 phases also show superior mechanical properties; theoretically these phases become metastable phases to ambient pressure and their properties can be exploited.

  9. Carbon nanotube-cuprous oxide composite based pressure sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kh. S. Karimov; Muhammad Tariq Saeed Chani; Fazal Ahmad Khalid; Adam Khan; Rahim Khan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we present the design,the fabrication,and the experimental results of carbon nanotube (CNT) and Cu2O composite based pressure sensors.The pressed tablets of the CNT-Cu2O composite are fabricated at a pressure of 353 MPa.The diameters of the multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs) are between 10 nm and 30 nm.The sizes of the Cu2O micro particles are in the range of 3-4 μrn.The average diameter and the average thickness of the pressed tablets are 10 mm and 4.0 mm,respectively.In order to make low resistance electric contacts,the two sides of the pressed tablet are covered by silver pastes.The direct current resistance of the pressure sensor decreases by 3.3 times as the pressure increases up to 37 kN/m2.The simulation result of the resistance-pressure relationship is in good agreement with the experimental result within a variation of ±2%.

  10. First-principles modeling of catalysts: novel algorithms and reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Bryan Goldsmith

    A molecular level understanding of a reaction mechanism and the computation of rates requires knowledge of the stable structures and the corresponding transition states that connect them. Temperature, pressure, and environment effects must be included to bridge the 'materials gap' so one can reasonably compare ab initio (first-principles, i.e., having no empirical parameters) predictions with experimental measurements. In this thesis, a few critical problems pertaining to ab initio modeling of catalytic systems are addressed; namely, 1) the issue of building representative models of isolated metal atoms grafted on amorphous supports, 2) modeling inorganic catalytic reactions in non-ideal solutions where the solvent participates in the reaction mechanism, and 3) bridging the materials gap using ab initio thermodynamics to predict the stability of supported nanoparticles under experimental reaction conditions. In Chapter I, a background on first-principles modeling of heterogeneous and homogenous catalysts is provided. Subsequently, to address the problem of modeling catalysis by isolated metal atoms on amorphous supports, we present in Chapter II a sequential-quadratic programming algorithm that systematically predicts the structure and reactivity of isolated active sites on insulating amorphous supports. Modeling solution phase reactions is also a considerable challenge for first-principles modeling, yet when done correctly it can yield critical kinetic and mechanistic insight that can guide experimental investigations. In Chapter III, we examine the formation of peroxorhenium complexes by activation of H2O2, which is key in selective oxidation reactions catalyzed by CH3ReO3 (methyltrioxorhenium, MTO). New experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted to better understand the activation of H2O2 by MTO and to provide a strong experimental foundation for benchmarking computational studies involving MTO and its derivatives. It was found

  11. Unusual structural and electronic properties of porous silicene and germanene: insights from first-principles calculations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the geometric structures and electronic properties of porous silicene and germanene nanosheets, which are the Si and Ge analogues of α−graphyne...

  12. First-principles investigation of the electronic states at perovskite and pyrite hetero-interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2012-09-01

    Oxide heterostructures are attracting huge interest in recent years due to the special functionalities of quasi two-dimensional quantum gases. In this thesis, the electronic states at the interface between perovskite oxides and pyrite compounds have been studied by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Optimization of the atomic positions are taken into account, which is considered very important at interfaces, as observed in the case of LaAlO3/SrTiO3. The creation of metallic states at the interfaces thus is explained in terms of charge transfer between the transition metal and oxygen atoms near the interface. It is observed that with typical thicknesses of at least 10-12 °A the gases still extend considerably in the third dimension, which essentially determines the magnitude of quantum mechanical effects. To overcome this problem, we propose incorporation of highly electronegative cations (such as Ag) in the oxides. A fundamental interest is also the thermodynamic stability of the interfaces due to the possibility of atomic intermixing in the interface region. Therefore, different cation intermixed configurations are taken into account for the interfaces aiming at the energetically stable state. The effect of O vacancies is also discussed for both polar and non-polar heterostructures. The interface metallicity is enhanced for the polar system with the creation of O vacancies, while the clean interface at the non-polar heterostructure exhibits an insulating state and becomes metallic in presence of O vacancy. The O vacancy formation energies are calculated and explained in terms of the increasing electronegativity and effective volume of A the side cation. Along with these, the electronic and magnetic properties of an interface between the ferromagnetic metal CoS2 and the non-magnetic semiconductor FeS2 is investigated. We find that this contact shows a metallic character. The CoS2 stays quasi half metallic at the interface, while the

  13. On the electrostatic control achieved in transistors based on multilayered MoS2: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Anh Khoa Augustin; Pourtois, Geoffrey; Luisier, Mathieu; Radu, Iuliana P.; Houssa, Michel

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the electrostatic control in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors based on MoS2 is studied, with respect to the number of MoS2 layers in the channel and to the equivalent oxide thickness of the gate dielectric, using first-principles calculations combined with a quantum transport formalism. Our simulations show that a compromise exists between the drive current and the electrostatic control on the channel. When increasing the number of MoS2 layers, a degradation of the device performances in terms of subthreshold swing and OFF currents arises due to the screening of the MoS2 layers constituting the transistor channel.

  14. A Cu-amyloid β complex activating Fenton chemistry in Alzheimer's disease: Learning with multiple first-principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Penna, Giovanni; Hureau, Christelle; Faller, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Amyloid β peptides form complexes with copper, both in vitro and in vivo, relatively soluble in water as oligomers and active as catalysts for oxidation of organic substrates by hydrogen peroxide, a species always present in cells and in their aerobic environment. All these species are present in the synapse, thus making a connection between the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the oxidative damages by reactive oxygen species in neurons, when pathological dishomeostasis of amyloid peptides and metal ions occur. In order to understand the structural features of these toxic complexes, we built several models of Cu-Aβ peptides in monomeric and dimeric forms and we found, performing multiple first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, that Cu-induced dimers are more active than monomers in converting hydrogen peroxide into aggressive hydroxyl radicals.

  15. First-principles and classical molecular dynamics study of threshold displacement energy in beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, P. V.; Borodin, V. A.

    2017-02-01

    Beryllium selected as a neutron multiplier material for the tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactor should withstand high doses of fast neutron irradiation. The damage produced by irradiation is usually evaluated assuming that the number of atomic displacements to the threshold displacement energy, Ed, which is considered as an intrinsic material parameter. In this work the value of Ed for hcp beryllium is estimated simultaneously from classical and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Quite similar quantitative pictures of defect production are observed in both simulation types, though the predicted displacement threshold values seem to be approximately two times higher in the first-principles approach. We expect that, after more detailed first-principles investigations, this approach can be used for scaling the damage prediction predictions by classical molecular dynamics, opening a way for more consistent calculations of displacement damage in materials.

  16. Thermodynamics of the hexagonal close-packed iron-nitrogen system from first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakkedal, Morten Bjørn

    is assumed fixed.The models are developed entirely from first-principles calculations based on fundamen-tal quantum mechanical calculation through the density functional theory approach with the atomic numbers and crystal structures as the only input parameters. A complete thermody-namic description should......First-principles thermodynamic models are developed for the hexagonal close-packed ε-Fe-N system. The system can be considered as a hexagonal close-packed host lattice of iron atoms and with the nitrogen atoms residing on a sublattice formed by the octahedral interstices. The iron host lattice......, at least in principle, include vibrational as well as configurational contributions. As both contributions are computationally very demanding in first-principles calculations, the present work is divided in two parts, with a detailed accounts of each of these contributions.Vibrational degrees of freedom...

  17. First principles study of the electron density distribution in a pair of bare metallic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chun-Lan [Suzhou University of Science and Technology, School of Mathematics and Physics, Suzhou (China); Chen, Yu-Chang; Nghiem, Diu; Tseng, Allen; Huang, Pao-Chieh [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Electrophysics, Hsinchu (China)

    2011-07-15

    Self-consistent calculations of electron density distribution from first principles for a series of semi-infinite metals show that the electron density almost drops to zero at 8.5 a.u. away from a metal surface. The electron densities in a series of bimetallic-electrode systems with a distance between the two electrodes of 21.7 a.u. are further investigated. Spin-polarized calculations of electron density for nonmagnetic and magnetic bimetallic-electrode systems are compared. Our work is helpful for first principles investigation of spin-dependent metal-molecule-metal tunneling junctions. (orig.)

  18. Data set for diffusion coefficients of alloying elements in dilute Mg alloys from first-principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi-Cheng Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion coefficients of alloying elements in Mg are critical for the development of new Mg alloys for lightweight applications. Here we present the data set of the temperature-dependent dilute tracer diffusion coefficients for 47 substitutional alloying elements in hexagonal closed packed (hcp Mg calculated from first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT by combining transition state theory and an 8-frequency model. Benchmark for the DFT calculations and systematic comparison with experimental diffusion data are also presented. The data set refers to “Diffusion coefficients of alloying elements in dilute Mg alloys: A comprehensive first-principles study” by Zhou et al. [1].

  19. First Principles Calculations for X-ray Resonant Spectra and Elastic Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yongbin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss applications of first principles methods to x-ray resonant spectra and elastic properties calculation. We start with brief reviews about theoretical background of first principles methods, such as density functional theory, local density approximation (LDA), LDA+U, and the linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method to solve Kohn-Sham equations. After that we discuss x-ray resonant scattering (XRMS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and the branching problem in the heavy rare earths Ledges. In the last chapter we discuss the elastic properties of the second hardest material AlMgB14.

  20. First-principles calculation of the Curie temperature Slater-Pauling curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, C; Ogura, M; Akai, H

    2007-09-12

    It is well known that the magnetizations as a function of the valence electron number per atom of 3d transition metal substitutional alloys form the so-called Slater-Pauling curve. Similarly, the Curie temperatures of these alloys also show systematic behaviour against the valence electron number. Though this fact has long been known, no attempt has been made so far to explain this behaviour from first principles. In this paper we calculate T(C) of 3d transition metal alloys in the framework of first-principles electronic structure calculation based on the local density approximation.

  1. First-principles Theory of the Momentum-dependent Local Ansatz for Correlated Electron System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sumal; Kakehashi, Yoshiro

    The momentum-dependent local-ansatz (MLA) wavefunction describes well correlated electrons in solids in both the weak and strong interaction regimes. In order to apply the theory to the realistic system, we have extended the MLA to the first-principles version using the tight-binding LDA+U Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for the paramagnetic Fe that the first-principles MLA can describe a reasonable correlation energy gain and suppression of charge fluctuations due to electron correlations. Furthermore, we show that the MLA yields a distinct momentum dependence of the momentum distribution, and thus improves the Gutzwiller wavefunction.

  2. Using continuous time stochastic modelling and nonparametric statistics to improve the quality of first principles models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A methodology is presented that combines modelling based on first principles and data based modelling into a modelling cycle that facilitates fast decision-making based on statistical methods. A strong feature of this methodology is that given a first principles model along with process data, the......, the corresponding modelling cycle model of the given system for a given purpose. A computer-aided tool, which integrates the elements of the modelling cycle, is also presented, and an example is given of modelling a fed-batch bioreactor....

  3. Forecast of Piezoelectric Properties of Crystalline Materials from First Principle Calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Piezo crystals including quartz, quartz-like crystals, known and novel crystals of langasite-type structure were treated with density-functional perturb theory (DFPT) using plane-wave pseudopotentials method, within the local density approximation (LDA) to the exchange-correlation functional. Compared with experimental results, the ab initio calculation results have quantitative or semi-quantitative accuracy. It is shown that first principle calculation opens a door to the search and design of new piezoelectric material. Further application of first principle calculation to forecast the whole piezoelectric properties was also discussed.

  4. Chemical reaction dynamics of PeCB and TCDD decomposition: A tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics study with first-principles parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ai; Selvam, Parasuraman; Kusagaya, Tomonori; Takami, Seiichi; Kubo, Momoji; Imamura, Akira; Miyamoto, Akira

    The decomposition reaction dynamics of 2,3,4,4',5-penta-chlorinated biphenyl (2,3,4,4',5-PeCB), 3,3',4,4',5-penta-chlorinated biphenyl (3,3',4,4',5-PeCB), and 2,3,7,8-tetra-chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) was clarified for the first time at atomic and electronic levels, using our novel tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method with first-principles parameterization. The calculation speed of our new method is over 5000 times faster than that of the conventional first-principles molecular dynamics method. We confirmed that the structure, energy, and electronic states of the above molecules calculated by our new method are quantitatively consistent with those by first-principles calculations. After the confirmation of our methodology, we investigated the decomposition reaction dynamics of the above molecules and the calculated dynamic behaviors indicate that the oxidation of the 2,3,4,4',5-PeCB, 3,3',4,4',5-PeCB, and 2,3,7,8-TCDD proceeds through an epoxide intermediate, which is in good agreement with the previous experimental reports and consistent with our static density functional theory calculations. These results proved that our new tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method with first-principles parameterization is an effective tool to clarify the chemical reaction dynamics at reaction temperatures.

  5. A structured modeling approach for dynamic hybrid fuzzy-first principles models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lith, van Pascal F.; Betlem, Ben H.L.; Roffel, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Hybrid fuzzy-first principles models can be attractive if a complete physical model is difficult to derive. These hybrid models consist of a framework of dynamic mass and energy balances, supplemented with fuzzy submodels describing additional equations, such as mass transformation and transfer rate

  6. First-Principles Petascale Simulations for Predicting Deflagration to Detonation Transition in Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khokhlov, Alexei [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Enrico Fermi Inst.; Austin, Joanna [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Argonne Leadership Computing Facility; Bacon, C. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    2015-03-02

    Hydrogen has emerged as an important fuel across a range of industries as a means of achieving energy independence and to reduce emissions. DDT and the resulting detonation waves in hydrogen-oxygen can have especially catastrophic consequences in a variety of industrial and energy producing settings related to hydrogen. First-principles numerical simulations of flame acceleration and DDT are required for an in-depth understanding of the phenomena and facilitating design of safe hydrogen systems. The goals of this project were (1) to develop first-principles petascale reactive flow Navier-Stokes simulation code for predicting gaseous high-speed combustion and detonation (HSCD) phenomena and (2) demonstrate feasibility of first-principles simulations of rapid flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture (2H2 + O2). The goals of the project have been accomplished. We have developed a novel numerical simulation code, named HSCD, for performing first-principles direct numerical simulations of high-speed hydrogen combustion. We carried out a series of validating numerical simulations of inert and reactive shock reflection experiments in shock tubes. We then performed a pilot numerical simulation of flame acceleration in a long pipe. The simulation showed the transition of the rapidly accelerating flame into a detonation. The DDT simulations were performed using BG/Q Mira at the Argonne National Laboratory, currently the fourth fastest super-computer in the world.

  7. Interaction of H2 with a Double-Walled Armchair Nanotube by First-Principles Calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costanzo, F.; Ensing, B.; Scipioni, R.; Ancilotto, F.; Silvestrelli, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied, by first-principles methods, the interaction of molecular hydrogen with a double-walled (2,10) carbon nanotube (DWCNT). This combination of the smallest possible diameter for the inner nanotube with a significantly larger outer tube allows for substantial space between the nanotube

  8. Z2 Invariance of Germanene on MoS2 from First Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amlaki, T.; Bokdam, M.; Kelly, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a low energy Hamiltonian generalized to describe how the energy bands of germanene (Ge ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ) are modified by interaction with a substrate or a capping layer. The parameters that enter the Hamiltonian are determined from first-principles relativistic calculations for Ge ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ |MoS

  9. First-Principles Calculation of the Optical Properties of an Amphiphilic Cyanine Dye Aggregate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, Frank; Stradomska, Anna; Vries, Alex H. de; Knoester, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Using a first-principles approach, we calculate electronic and optical properties of molecular aggregates of the dye amphi-pseudoisocyanine, whose structures we obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the self-aggregation process. Using quantum chemistry methods, we translate the struct

  10. Interaction of H2 with a Double-Walled Armchair Nanotube by First-Principles Calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costanzo, F.; Ensing, B.; Scipioni, R.; Ancilotto, F.; Silvestrelli, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied, by first-principles methods, the interaction of molecular hydrogen with a double-walled (2,10) carbon nanotube (DWCNT). This combination of the smallest possible diameter for the inner nanotube with a significantly larger outer tube allows for substantial space between the nanotube

  11. First-principles theory of inelastic currents in a scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Thirstrup, C.

    1998-01-01

    A first-principles theory of inelastic tunneling between a model probe tip and an atom adsorbed on a surface is presented, extending the elastic tunneling theory of Tersoff and Hamann. The inelastic current is proportional to the change in the local density of states at the center of the tip due ...

  12. Low-energy electron reflectivity from graphene: First-principles computations and approximate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feenstra, R.M., E-mail: feenstra@cmu.edu [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Widom, M. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A computational method is developed whereby the reflectivity of low-energy electrons from a surface can be obtained from a first-principles solution of the electronic structure of the system. The method is applied to multilayer graphene. Two bands of reflectivity minima are found, one at 0–8 eV and the other at 14–22 eV above the vacuum level. For a free-standing slab with n layers of graphene, each band contains n−1 zeroes in the reflectivity. Two additional image-potential type states form at the ends of the graphene slab, with energies just below the vacuum level, hence producing a total of 2n states. A tight-binding model is developed, with basis functions localized in the spaces between the graphene planes (and at the ends of the slab). The spectrum of states produced by the tight-binding model is found to be in good agreement with the zeros of reflectivity (i.e. transmission resonances) of the first-principles results. - Highlights: ► Developed method for simulation of low-energy electron reflectivity spectra. ► Reflectivity spectra of graphene are computed by a first-principles method. ► Comparison is made between results from first-principles and from a tight-binding model.

  13. First-Principle Calculation for Scanning-Tunneling-Microscopic Images of a Monolayer Graphite Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向荣; 押山淳; 岡田晋; 芶清泉

    2003-01-01

    We have applied first-principle total-energy electronic structure calculations in the local density approximation to calculate the scanning tunnelling microscopy images of a monolayer graphite surface near the Fermi level. The results obtained agree well with the observation, which has not been interpreted before.

  14. The First Principle Formula of the Relativistic Heat Conductivity of Coulomb Electronic Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Chu-Shun; ZHANG Chi; LU Quan-Kang

    2001-01-01

    Making use of the relativistic BBGKY technique,the relativistic generalization of Landau collision integral is obtained.Furthermore,we calculate the relativistic hydrodynamic modes up to the second order in the hydrodynamic wave number.Combining Résibois' method,we present the first principle formula of the relativistic heat conductivity of Coulomb electronic plasmas for low-order corrections.

  15. First-principles molecular dynamics simulation of liquid Mg3Bi2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deWijs, GA; Pastore, G; Selloni, A; vanderLugt, W

    1996-01-01

    The liquid Mg-Bi system exhibits strong compound formation at the 'octet' composition (Mg3Bi2) We present results of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations of this alloy system at different compositions: the pure Mg and Bi liquid components, the stoichiometric liquid, and a Mg-rich composit

  16. First-principles Calculations of Twin-boundary and Stacking-fault Energies in Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The interfacial energies of twin boundaries and stacking faults in metal magnesium have been calculated using first-principles supercell approach...Four types of twin boundaries and two types of stacking faults are investigated, namely, those due to the mirror reflection, the mirror glide and the

  17. Spatially resolved quantum plasmon modes in metallic nano-films from first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten; Jacobsen, Karsten W.; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2012-01-01

    models. Here we present a method to identify and compute spatially resolved plasmon modes from first-principles based on a spectral analysis of the dynamical dielectric function. As an example we calculate the plasmon modes of 0.5 to 4 nm thick Na films and find that they can be classified...

  18. First-principle Calculation of the Properties of Ti3SiC2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties for Ti3SiC2 were studied using the first-principle calculation method. By using the calculated band structure and density of states, the high electrical conductivity of Ti3SiC2 are explained.The bonding character of Ti3SiC2 is analyzed in the map of charge density distribution.

  19. Intrinsic defects and dopants in LiNH2 : a first-principles study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazrati, E.; Brocks, G.; Buurman, B.; de Groot, R. A.; de Wijs, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    The lithium amide (LiNH2) + lithium hydride (LiH) system is one of the most attractive light-weight materials options for hydrogen storage. Its dehydrogenation involves mass transport in the bulk (amide) crystal through lattice defects. We present a first-principles study of native point defects and

  20. Comparison of first principles model of beer microfiltration to experiments via systematic parameter identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.; Willigenburg, van G.; Vollebregt, H.M.; Eisner, V.; Mepschen, A.

    2015-01-01

    A first principles microfiltration model based on shear-induced diffusion is compared to experiments performed on the clarification of beer. After performing an identifiability and sensitivity analysis, the model parameters are estimated using global minimization of the sum of least squares. The

  1. First-principles study of the interaction and charge transfer between graphene and metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khomyakov, Petr; Giovannetti, G.; Rusu, P.C.; Brocks, G.; van den Brink, J.; Kelly, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring the transport of electrons through a graphene sheet necessarily involves contacting it with metal electrodes. We study the adsorption of graphene on metal substrates using first-principles calculations at the level of density-functional theory. The bonding of graphene to Al, Ag, Cu, Au,

  2. Magnetic and Electric Phase Control in Epitaxial EuTiO3 from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennie, Craig J.; Rabe, Karin M.

    2006-12-01

    We propose a design strategy—based on the coupling of spins, optical phonons, and strain—for systems in which magnetic (electric) phase control can be achieved by an applied electric (magnetic) field. Using first-principles density-functional theory calculations, we present a realization of this strategy for the magnetic perovskite EuTiO3.

  3. First-principles calculation of nonlinear optical responses by Wannier interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Liu, Xiaoyu; Kang, Lei; Gu, Bing-Lin; Xu, Yong; Duan, Wenhui

    2017-09-01

    Various nonlinear optical (NLO) responses, like shift current and second harmonic generation (SHG), are revealed to be closely related to topological quantities involving the Berry connection and Berry curvature. First-principles prediction of NLO responses is of great importance to fundamental research and device design, but efficient computational methods are still lacking. The main challenge is that the calculations require a very dense k -point sampling that is computationally expensive and a proper treatment of the gauge problem for topological quantities. Here we present a Wannier interpolation method for first-principles calculation of NLO responses, which overcomes the challenge. This method interpolates physical quantities accurately for any desired k point with little computational cost and constructs a smooth gauge by the perturbation theory. To demonstrate the method, we study shift current of monolayer GeS and WS2 as well as SHG of bulk GaAs, getting good agreements with previous results. We show that the traditional sum rule method converges slowly with the number of bands, whereas the perturbation way does not. Moreover, our method is easily adapted to build tight-binding models for the following theoretical investigations. Last but not least, the method is compatible with most first-principles approaches, including density functional theory and beyond. With these advantages, Wannier interpolation is a promising method for first-principles studies of NLO phenomena.

  4. First principles dynamic modeling and multivariable control of a cryogenic distillation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roffel, B.; Betlem, B.H.L.; Ruijter, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of constrained multivariable control of a heat-integrated cryogenic distillation process, a rigorous first principles dynamic model was developed and tested against a limited number of experiments. It was found that the process variables showed a large amount

  5. Origin of current-induced forces in an atomic gold wire: A first-principles study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt; Taylor, Jeremy Philip;

    2003-01-01

    We address the microscopic origin of the current-induced forces by analyzing results of first principles density functional calculations of atomic gold wires connected to two gold electrodes with different electrochemical potentials. We find that current induced forces are closely related...

  6. Stability of Sb-Te layered structures: First-principles study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govaerts, K.; Sluiter, M.H.F.; Partoens, B.; Lamoen, D.

    2012-01-01

    Using an effective one-dimensional cluster expansion in combination with first-principles electronic structure calculations we have studied the energetics and electronic properties of Sb-Te layered systems. For a Te concentration between 0 and 60 at. % an almost continuous series of metastable

  7. First-principles study of point-defect production in Si and SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windl, W.; Lenosky, T.J.; Kress, J.D.; Voter, A.F.

    1998-03-01

    The authors have calculated the displacement-threshold energy E(d) for point-defect production in Si and SiC using empirical potentials, tight-binding, and first-principles methods. They show that -- depending on the knock-on direction -- 64-atom simulation cells can be sufficient to allow a nearly finite-size-effect-free calculation, thus making the use of first-principles methods possible. They use molecular dynamics (MD) techniques and propose the use of a sudden approximation which agrees reasonably well with the MD results for selected directions and which allows estimates of Ed without employing an MD simulation and the use of computationally demanding first-principles methods. Comparing the results with experiment, the authors find the full self-consistent first-principles method in conjunction with the sudden approximation to be a reliable and easy method to predict E{sub d}. Furthermore, they have examined the temperature dependence of E{sub d} for C in SiC and found it to be negligible.

  8. Hopping matrix elements from first-principles studies of overlapping fragments : Double exchange parameters in manganites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanova, A.; Sousa, C.; De Graaf, C.; Broer, R.

    2006-01-01

    We recently developed a scheme for first-principles calculations of hopping matrix elements between localized states in extended systems. We apply the scheme to the determination of double exchange (DE) parameters in lightly hole-doped LaMnO(3) and electron-doped CaMnO(3). DE is one of the important

  9. Lattice Dynamics of Beryllium from a First-Principles Nonlocal Pseudopotential Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, F. King; Cutler, P. H.

    1970-01-01

    The lattice dynamics of beryllium, a metal with hexagonal close-packed structure and two atoms per unit cell, is investigated within the framework of Harrison's first-principles pseudopotential theory, using (i) the Slater approximation for the conduction-band-core exchange, and (ii) a modified...

  10. First-principles study for vacancy-induced magnetism in nonmagnetic ferroelectric BaTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, D; Cai, M Q; Zheng, Yue; Hu, W Y

    2009-12-14

    The possibilities of vacancy-induced magnetism in perovskite BaTiO(3) are investigated by first-principles calculations. Calculated results show that both titanium and oxygen vacancies could induce magnetism, but the barium vacancy did not induce magnetism. New and interesting magnetic properties of half-metallic magnetism are found in BaTiO(3) induced by the Ti-vacancy. Based on the density of states and the spin charge density distribution of BaTiO(3), we discuss the different origins of magnetism induced by the partial spin-polarized O 2p states around Ti vacancies and the partially filled d-states Ti around the oxygen vacancies. The discrepancy between the magnetic moments in the cubic phase and the tetragonal phase is due to anisotropic spin polarization induced by structure distortions. Our calculations would enable exploring magneto-electric coupling in nonmagnetic ferroelectric oxides.

  11. Cation disorder in MgX2O4 (X = Al, Ga, In) spinels from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Sickafus, Kurt E.; Stanek, Christopher R.; Rudin, Sven P.; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2012-07-01

    We have performed first-principles density functional theory calculations to investigate the possible physical origins of the discrepancies between the existing theoretical and experimental studies on cation distribution in MgX2O4 (X = Al, Ga, In) spinel oxides. We show that for MgGa2O4 and MgIn2O4, it is crucial to consider the effects of lattice vibrations to achieve agreement between theory and experiment. For MgAl2O4, we find that neglecting short-range order effects in thermodynamic modeling can lead to significant underestimation of the degree of inversion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the common practice of representing disordered structures by randomly exchanging atoms within a small periodic supercell can incur large computational error due to either insufficient statistical sampling or finite supercell size effects.

  12. First-principles calculations of momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs in defects in UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Julia; Jomard, Gérald; Torrent, Marc; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2017-01-01

    We performed first-principles calculations of the momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs in vacancies in uranium dioxide. Full atomic relaxation effects (due to both electronic and positronic forces) were taken into account and self-consistent two-component density functional theory schemes were used. We present one-dimensional momentum distributions (Doppler-broadened annihilation radiation line shapes) along with line-shape parameters S and W. We studied the effect of the charge state of the defect on the Doppler spectra. The effect of krypton incorporation in the vacancy was also considered and it was shown that it should be possible to observe the fission gas incorporation in defects in UO2 using positron annihilation spectroscopy. We suggest that the Doppler broadening measurements can be especially useful for studying impurities and dopants in UO2 and of mixed actinide oxides.

  13. First-principles modelling of lithium iron oxides as battery cathode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catti, Michele; Montero-Campillo, Merced

    Starting from published charge/discharge curves and X-ray data on Pmmn-LiFeO 2 and LiFe 5O 8 as cathode materials vs. Li anode, a scheme of electrochemical reactions is proposed to explain the unclear electrode functionality of the 'corrugated layer' LiFeO 2 phase. The scheme was validated by quantum-mechanical calculations (CRYSTAL09 code, hybrid B3LYP Hamiltonian) on a number of structural models for Li 1- xFeO 2, LiFe 5O 8, and Li 3Fe 5O 8. Magnetic interactions were taken into account, finding antiferromagnetic (Li 1- xFeO 2) and ferrimagnetic (LiFe 5O 8 and Li 3Fe 5O 8) orderings as stable states. At variance with spinel-like LiFe 5O 8, Li 3Fe 5O 8 displays a rocksalt-type superstructure. The computed energies for reactions (I) 4LiFeO 2 → 4Li 0.75FeO 2 + Li, (II) 4Li 0.75FeO 2 + Li → 4/5LiFe 5O 8 + 8/5Li 2O, and (III) 1/2LiFe 5O 8 + Li ↔ 1/2Li 3Fe 5O 8 are 4.44, -3.62, and -2.10 eV, respectively. Such values compare satisfactorily with the average charge/discharge voltages observed for positive electrodes made up of Pmmn-LiFeO 2 and of LiFe 5O 8.

  14. Modeling of Semiconductors and Correlated Oxides with Point Defects by First Principles Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2014-06-15

    Point defects in silicon, vanadium dioxide, and doped ceria are investigated by density functional theory. Defects involving vacancies and interstitial oxygen and carbon in silicon are after formed in outer space and significantly affect device performances. The screened hybrid functional by Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof is used to calculate formation energies, binding energies, and electronic structures of the defective systems because standard density functional theory underestimates the bang gap of silicon. The results indicate for the A-center a −2 charge state. Tin is proposed to be an effective dopant to suppress the formation of A-centers. For the total energy difference between the A- and B-type carbon related G-centers we find close agreement with the experiment. The results indicate that the C-type G-center is more stable than both the A- and B-types. The electronic structures of the monoclinic and rutile phases of vanadium dioxide are also studied using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional. The ground states of the pure phases obtained by calculations including spin polarization disagree with the experimental observations that the monoclinic phase should not be magnetic, the rutile phase should be metallic, and the monoclinic phase should have a lower total energy than the rutile phase. By tuning the Hartree-Fock fraction α to 10% the agreement with experiments is improved in terms of band gaps and relative energies of the phases. A calculation scheme is proposed to simulate the relationship between the transition temperature of the metal-insulator transition and the dopant concentration in tungsten doped vanadium dioxide. We achieve good agreement with the experimental situation. 18.75% and 25% yttrium, lanthanum, praseodymium, samarium, and gadolinium doped ceria supercells generated by the special quasirandom structure approach are employed to investigate the impact of doping on the O diffusion. The experimental behavior of the conductivity for the different dopants is understood in terms of the calculated lattice constants and the O migration barriers obtained from nudged elastic band calculations.

  15. First-principles investigation of mechanical properties of silicene, germanene and stanene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Rahaman, Obaidur; Makaremi, Meysam; Dianat, Arezoo; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional allotropes of group-IV substrates including silicene, germanene and stanene have recently attracted considerable attention in nanodevice fabrication industry. These materials involving the buckled structure have been experimentally fabricated lately. In this study, first-principles density functional theory calculations were utilized to investigate the mechanical properties of single-layer and free-standing silicene, germanene and stanene. Uniaxial tensile and compressive simulations were carried out to probe and compare stress-strain properties; such as the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and ultimate strength. We evaluated the chirality effect on the mechanical response and bond structure of the 2D substrates. Our first-principles simulations suggest that in all studied samples application of uniaxial loading can alter the electronic nature of the buckled structures into the metallic character. Our investigation provides a general but also useful viewpoint with respect to the mechanical properties of silicene, germanene and stanene.

  16. New Optical Evaluation Approach for Parabolic Trough Collectors: First-Principle OPTical Intercept Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G.; Lewandowski, A.

    2012-11-01

    A new analytical method -- First-principle OPTical Intercept Calculation (FirstOPTIC) -- is presented here for optical evaluation of trough collectors. It employs first-principle optical treatment of collector optical error sources and derives analytical mathematical formulae to calculate the intercept factor of a trough collector. A suite of MATLAB code is developed for FirstOPTIC and validated against theoretical/numerical solutions and ray-tracing results. It is shown that FirstOPTIC can provide fast and accurate calculation of intercept factors of trough collectors. The method makes it possible to carry out fast evaluation of trough collectors for design purposes. The FirstOPTIC techniques and analysis may be naturally extended to other types of CSP technologies such as linear-Fresnel collectors and central-receiver towers.

  17. Pt Monolayer Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Pd-Cu Alloy: First-Principles Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Peles

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available First principles approach is used to examine geometric and electronic structure of the catalyst concept aimed to improve activity and utilization of precious Pt metal for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. The Pt monolayers on Pd skin and Pd1-xCux inner core for various compositions x were examined by building the appropriate models starting from Pd-Cu solid solution. We provided a detailed description of changes in the descriptors of catalytic behavior, d-band energy and binding energies of reaction intermediates, giving an insight into the underlying mechanism of catalytic activity enhancement based on the first principles density functional theory (DFT calculations. Structural properties of the Pd-Cu bimetallic were determined for bulk and surfaces, including the segregation profile of Cu under different environment on the surface.

  18. First-principles modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media

    CERN Document Server

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Yurkin, Maxim A; Bi, Lei; Cairns, Brian; Liu, Li; Panetta, R Lee; Travis, Larry D; Yang, Ping; Zakharova, Nadezhda T

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell-Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell-Lorentz equations, we trace the development of the first-principles formalism enabling accurate calculations of monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic scattering by static and randomly varying multiparticle groups. We illustrate how this general framework can be coupled with state-of-the-art computer solvers of the Maxwell equations and applied to direct modeling of electromagnetic scattering by representative random multi-particle groups with arbitrary packing densities. This first-principles modeling yields general physical insights unavailable with phenomenological approaches. We discuss how the first-order-scattering approximation, the radiative transfer theory, and the theory of weak localization of electromagnetic waves ...

  19. First-principles study of electron transport through monatomic Al and Na wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Brandbyge, Mads; Tsukada, Masaru

    2000-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations of electron transport, in particular, the conduction channels of monatomic Al and Na atom wires bridged between metallic jellium electrodes. The electronic structures are calculated by the first-principles recursion-transfer matrix method, and the conduction...... channels are investigated using the eigenchannel decomposition (ECD) of the conductance, the local density of states (LDOS), and the current density. The ECD is different from the conventional decomposition of atomic orbitals, and the study of decomposed electronic structures is shown to be effective...... in clarifying the details of transport through atomic wires. We show channel transmissions, channel resolved LDOS, and channel resolved current density, and elucidate the number of conduction channels, the relation between atomic orbitals and the channels, and their dependency on the geometry of the atomic wire...

  20. Lattice Anharmonicity and Thermal Conductivity from Compressive Sensing of First-Principles Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nielson, Weston [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Xia, Yi [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ozoliņš, Vidvuds [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    First-principles prediction of lattice thermal conductivity κL of strongly anharmonic crystals is a long-standing challenge in solid-state physics. Making use of recent advances in information science, we propose a systematic and rigorous approach to this problem, compressive sensing lattice dynamics. Compressive sensing is used to select the physically important terms in the lattice dynamics model and determine their values in one shot. Nonintuitively, high accuracy is achieved when the model is trained on first-principles forces in quasirandom atomic configurations. The method is demonstrated for Si, NaCl, and Cu12Sb4S13, an earth-abundant thermoelectric with strong phonon-phonon interactions that limit the room-temperature κL to values near the amorphous limit.

  1. The penetration barrier of water through graphynes' pores: first-principles predictions and force field optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Hernández, Marta I; Campos-Martínez, José; Pirani, Fernando; Giorgi, Giacomo; Yamashita, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Graphynes are novel two-dimensional carbon-based materials that -due to their nanoweb-like structure- have been proposed as molecular filters, especially for water purification technologies. In this work we carry out first principles electronic structure calculations at the MP2C level of theory to assess the interaction between water and graphyne, graphdiyne and graphtriyne pores. The computed penetration barriers suggest that water transport is unfeasible through graphyne while being unimpeded for graphtriyne. Nevertheless, for graphdiyne, which presents a pore size almost matching that of water, a low barrier is found which in turn disappears if an active hydrogen bond with an additional water molecule on the opposite side of the opening is taken into account. These results support the possibility of using graphtriyne as an efficient membrane for water filtration but, in contrast with previous determinations, they do not exclude graphdiyne. In fact, the related first principles penetration barrier leads to ...

  2. Lattice anharmonicity and thermal conductivity from compressive sensing of first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Nielson, Weston; Xia, Yi; Ozoliņš, Vidvuds

    2014-10-31

    First-principles prediction of lattice thermal conductivity κ(L) of strongly anharmonic crystals is a long-standing challenge in solid-state physics. Making use of recent advances in information science, we propose a systematic and rigorous approach to this problem, compressive sensing lattice dynamics. Compressive sensing is used to select the physically important terms in the lattice dynamics model and determine their values in one shot. Nonintuitively, high accuracy is achieved when the model is trained on first-principles forces in quasirandom atomic configurations. The method is demonstrated for Si, NaCl, and Cu(12)Sb(4)S(13), an earth-abundant thermoelectric with strong phonon-phonon interactions that limit the room-temperature κ(L) to values near the amorphous limit.

  3. First-Principles Atomic Force Microscopy Image Simulations with Density Embedding Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuki; Lee, Alex J; Chelikowsky, James R

    2016-05-11

    We present an efficient first-principles method for simulating noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) images using a "frozen density" embedding theory. Frozen density embedding theory enables one to efficiently compute the tip-sample interaction by considering a sample as a frozen external field. This method reduces the extensive computational load of first-principles AFM simulations by avoiding consideration of the entire tip-sample system and focusing on the tip alone. We demonstrate that our simulation with frozen density embedding theory accurately reproduces full density functional theory simulations of freestanding hydrocarbon molecules while the computational time is significantly reduced. Our method also captures the electronic effect of a Cu(111) substrate on the AFM image of pentacene and reproduces the experimental AFM image of Cu2N on a Cu(100) surface. This approach is applicable for theoretical imaging applications on large molecules, two-dimensional materials, and materials surfaces.

  4. First-Principles Momentum-Dependent Local Ansatz Wavefunction and Momentum Distribution Function Bands of Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehashi, Yoshiro; Chandra, Sumal

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a first-principles local ansatz wavefunction approach with momentum-dependent variational parameters on the basis of the tight-binding LDA+U Hamiltonian. The theory goes beyond the first-principles Gutzwiller approach and quantitatively describes correlated electron systems. Using the theory, we find that the momentum distribution function (MDF) bands of paramagnetic bcc Fe along high-symmetry lines show a large deviation from the Fermi-Dirac function for the d electrons with eg symmetry and yield the momentum-dependent mass enhancement factors. The calculated average mass enhancement m*/m = 1.65 is consistent with low-temperature specific heat data as well as recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data.

  5. First-principle optimal local pseudopotentials construction via optimized effective potential method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Wenhui; Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming; Miao, Maosheng

    2016-04-01

    The local pseudopotential (LPP) is an important component of orbital-free density functional theory, a promising large-scale simulation method that can maintain information on a material's electron state. The LPP is usually extracted from solid-state density functional theory calculations, thereby it is difficult to assess its transferability to cases involving very different chemical environments. Here, we reveal a fundamental relation between the first-principles norm-conserving pseudopotential (NCPP) and the LPP. On the basis of this relationship, we demonstrate that the LPP can be constructed optimally from the NCPP for a large number of elements using the optimized effective potential method. Specially, our method provides a unified scheme for constructing and assessing the LPP within the framework of first-principles pseudopotentials. Our practice reveals that the existence of a valid LPP with high transferability may strongly depend on the element.

  6. A first principle study of band structure of III-nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Rashid [Centre for High Energy Physics University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)]. E-mail: rasofi@hotmail.com; Akbarzadeh, H. [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, 841546 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fazal-e-Aleem [Centre for High Energy Physics University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2005-12-15

    The band structure of both phases, zinc-blende and wurtzite, of aluminum nitride, indium nitride and gallium nitride has been studied using computational methods. The study has been done using first principle full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). For the exchange correlation potential, generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and an alternative form of GGA proposed by Engel and Vosko (GGA-EV) have been used. Results obtained for band structure of these compounds have been compared with experimental results as well as other first principle computations. Our results show a significant improvement over other theoretical work and are closer to the experimental data.

  7. First-principles analysis of anharmonic nuclear motion and thermal transport in thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadano, Terumasa [Department of Applied Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tsuneyuki, Shinji [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    We show a first-principles approach for analyzing anharmonic properties of lattice vibrations in solids. We firstly extract harmonic and anharmonic force constants from accurate first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. Using the many-body perturbation theory of phonons, we then estimate the phonon scattering probability due to anharmonic phonon-phonon interactions. We show the validity of the approach by computing the lattice thermal conductivity of Si, a typical covalent semiconductor, and selected thermoelectric materials PbTe and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} based on the Boltzmann transport equation. We also show that the phonon lifetime and the lattice thermal conductivity of the high-temperature phase of SrTiO{sub 3} can be estimated by employing the perturbation theory on top of the solution of the self-consistent phonon equation.

  8. Computation of Reynolds stresses for barotropic turbulent jets from first principles

    CERN Document Server

    Woillez, Eric

    2016-01-01

    It is extremely uncommon to be able to predict analytically, from first principles, the velocity profile of a turbulent flow. In two-dimensional flows, atmosphere dynamics, and plasma physics, large scale coherent jets are created through inverse energy transfers from small scales to the largest scales of the flow. We prove that in the limits of vanishing energy injection, vanishing friction, and small scale forcing, the velocity profile of a jet obeys a universal equation independent of the details of the forcing. We find an other universal relation for the maximal curvature of a jet and we give strong arguments to support the existence of an hydrodynamic instability at the point with minimal jet velocity. Those results are the first computations of Reynolds stresses from first principle in a genuine turbulent flow, and the first consistent analytic theory of zonal jets in barotropic turbulence.

  9. Grain growth in U-7Mo alloy: A combined first-principles and phase field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Zhi-Gang; Liang, Linyun; Kim, Yeon Soo; Wiencek, Tom; O'Hare, Edward; Yacout, Abdellatif M.; Hofman, Gerard; Anitescu, Mihai

    2016-05-01

    Grain size is an important factor in controlling the swelling behavior in irradiated U-Mo dispersion fuels. Increasing the grain size in U-Mo fuel particles by heat treatment is believed to delay the fuel swelling at high fission density. In this work, a multiscale simulation approach combining first-principles calculation and phase field modeling is used to investigate the grain growth behavior in U-7Mo alloy. The density functional theory based first-principles calculations were used to predict the material properties of U-7Mo alloy. The obtained grain boundary energies were then adopted as an input parameter for mesoscale phase field simulations. The effects of annealing temperature, annealing time and initial grain structures of fuel particles on the grain growth in U-7Mo alloy were examined. The predicted grain growth rate compares well with the empirical correlation derived from experiments.

  10. Strontium ruthenate-anatase titanium dioxide heterojunctions from first-principles: Electronic structure, spin, and interface dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Naheed; Ertekin, Elif

    2016-07-01

    The epitaxial integration of functional oxides with wide band gap semiconductors offers the possibility of new material systems for electronics and energy conversion applications. We use first principles to consider an epitaxial interface between the correlated metal oxide SrRuO3 and the wide band gap semiconductor TiO2, and assess energy level alignment, interfacial chemistry, and interfacial dipole formation. Due to the ferromagnetic, half-metallic character of SrRuO3, according to which only one spin is present at the Fermi level, we demonstrate the existence of a spin dependent band alignment across the interface. For two different terminations of SrRuO3, the interface is found to be rectifying with a Schottky barrier of ≈1.3-1.6 eV, in good agreement with experiment. In the minority spin, SrRuO3 exhibits a Schottky barrier alignment with TiO2 and our calculated Schottky barrier height is in excellent agreement with previous experimental measurements. For majority spin carriers, we find that SrRuO3 recovers its exchange splitting gap and bulk-like properties within a few monolayers of the interface. These results demonstrate a possible approach to achieve spin-dependent transport across a heteroepitaxial interface between a functional oxide material and a conventional wide band gap semiconductor.

  11. Phase transition and elastic properties of zinc sulfide under high pressure from first principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Wei [Hubei Univ. of Education, Wuhan (China). Dept. of Physics and Electronics; Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China). Inst. of Fluid Physics; Song, Jin-Fan; Wang, Ping; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Zhi-Wen [Nanyang Normal Univ. (China). Dept. of Physics; Tan, Xiao-Ming [Ludong Univ., Yantai (China). Dept. of Physics

    2011-10-15

    A theoretical investigation on structural and elastic properties of zinc sulfide semiconductor under high pressure is performed by employing the first-principles method based on the density functional theory. The calculated results show that the transition pressure P{sub t} for the structural phase transition from the B3 structure to the B1 structure is 17.04 GPa. The calculated values are generally speaking in good agreement with experiments and with similar theoretical calculations. (orig.)

  12. Unusual structural and electronic properties of porous silicene and germanene: insights from first-principles calculations

    OpenAIRE

    ding,Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the geometric structures and electronic properties of porous silicene and germanene nanosheets, which are the Si and Ge analogues of α−graphyne (referred to as silicyne and germanyne). It is found that the elemental silicyne and germanyne sheets are energetically unfavourable. However, after the C-substitution, the hybrid graphyne-like sheets (c-silicyne/c-germanyne) possess robust energetic and dynamical stabilities. Different from silicene...

  13. First principles predictions of intrinsic defects in aluminum arsenide, AlAs : numerical supplement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2012-04-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in aluminum arsenide, AlAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz, 'First principles predictions of intrinsic defects in Aluminum Arsenide, AlAs', Materials Research Society Symposia Proceedings 1370 (2011; SAND2011-2436C), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

  14. Towards A Predictive First Principles Understanding Of Molecular Adsorption On Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    principles understanding of molecular adsorption on graphene 5a.   CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA8655-12-1-2099 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0039 Towards a predictive first principles understanding of molecular adsorption on graphene 122099 Angelos Michaelides...aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of

  15. Stability, structural, elastic and electronic properties of RuN polymorphs from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, V. V.; Shein, I. R.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2010-05-01

    First-principles FLAPW-GGA calculations for six possible polymorphs of ruthenium mononitride RuN indicate that the most stable structure is that of zinc blende rather than the rock salt structure recently reported for synthesized RuN samples. The elastic, electronic properties and the features of chemical bonds of zinc-blende RuN polymorph were investigated and discussed in detail.

  16. Surface energy and relaxation in boron carbide (101¯1) from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Todd D.; Smith, John R.; Adams, Jane W.

    2015-10-01

    The surface energy of the boron carbide polytype B11Cp(CBC) for planar separations along {101¯1} was determined to be 3.21 J/m2 via first-principles density-functional computations. Surface atomic relaxations are relatively large, thereby lowering the surface energy significantly. The icosahedra are not intact on the surface, i.e., severed polyhedra are the lowest energy surface configuration. Good agreement was found with an experimental average fracture surface energy.

  17. First-Principles Prediction of Phononic Thermal Conductivity of Silicene: a Comparison with Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Xiaokun; Yang, Ronggui

    2014-01-01

    There has been great interest in two-dimensional materials, beyond graphene, for both fundamental sciences and technological applications. Silicene, a silicon counterpart of graphene, has been shown to possess some better electronic properties than graphene. However, its thermal transport properties have not been fully studied. In this paper, we apply the first-principles-based phonon Boltzmann transport equation to investigate the thermal conductivity of silicene as well as the phonon scatte...

  18. First-principles study of the interaction and charge transfer between graphene and metals

    OpenAIRE

    Khomyakov, P.A.; Giovannetti, G.; Rusu, P. C.; Brocks, G.; Brink, J.G.J. van den; Kelly, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring the transport of electrons through a graphene sheet necessarily involves contacting it with metal electrodes. We study the adsorption of graphene on metal substrates using first-principles calculations at the level of density functional theory. The bonding of graphene to Al, Ag, Cu, Au and Pt(111) surfaces is so weak that its unique "ultrarelativistic" electronic structure is preserved. The interaction does, however, lead to a charge transfer that shifts the Fermi level by up to 0.5...

  19. Adsorption of CO molecules on doped graphene: A first-principles study

    OpenAIRE

    Weidong Wang; Yuxiang Zhang; Cuili Shen; Yang Chai

    2016-01-01

    As a typical kinds of toxic gases, CO plays an important role in environmental monitoring, control of chemical processes, space missions, agricultural and medical applications. Graphene is considered a potential candidate of gases sensor, so the adsorption of CO molecules on various graphene, including pristine graphene, Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-doped graphene) and Aluminum-doped graphene (Al-doped graphene), are studied by using first-principles calculations. The optimal configurations, ad...

  20. First principles interatomic potential for tungsten based on Gaussian process regression

    OpenAIRE

    Szlachta, Wojciech Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    An accurate description of atomic interactions, such as that provided by first principles quantum mechanics, is fundamental to realistic prediction of the properties that govern plasticity, fracture or crack propagation in metals. However, the computational complexity associated with modern schemes explicitly based on quantum mechanics limits their applications to systems of a few hundreds of atoms at most. This thesis investigates the application of the Gaussian Approximation Potential (GAP)...

  1. First-principles Electronic Structure Calculations for Scintillation Phosphor Nuclear Detector Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Inorganic scintillation phosphors (scintillators) are extensively employed as radiation detector materials in many fields of applied and fundamental research such as medical imaging, high energy physics, astrophysics, oil exploration and nuclear materials detection for homeland security and other applications. The ideal scintillator for gamma ray detection must have exceptional performance in terms of stopping power, luminosity, proportionality, speed, and cost. Recently, trivalent lanthanide dopants such as Ce and Eu have received greater attention for fast and bright scintillators as the optical 5d to 4f transition is relatively fast. However, crystal growth and production costs remain challenging for these new materials so there is still a need for new higher performing scintillators that meet the needs of the different application areas. First principles calculations can provide a useful insight into the chemical and electronic properties of such materials and hence can aid in the search for better new scintillators. In the past there has been little first-principles work done on scintillator materials in part because it means modeling f electrons in lanthanides as well as complex excited state and scattering processes. In this talk I will give an overview of the scintillation process and show how first-principles calculations can be applied to such systems to gain a better understanding of the physics involved. I will also present work on a high-throughput first principles approach to select new scintillator materials for fabrication as well as present more detailed calculations to study trapping process etc. that can limit their brightness. This work in collaboration with experimental groups has lead to the discovery of some new bright scintillators. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and carried out under U.S. Department of Energy Contract no. DE-AC02-05CH11231 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  2. First-principles modeling of strain in perovskite ferroelectric thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Diéguez, Oswaldo; Vanderbilt, David

    2008-01-01

    We review the role that first-principles calculations have played in understanding the effects of substrate-imposed misfit strain on epitaxially grown perovskite ferroelectric films. We do so by analyzing the case of BaTiO$_3$, complementing our previous publications on this subject with unpublished data to help explain in detail how these calculations are done. We also review similar studies in the literature for other perovskite ferroelectric-film materials.

  3. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism in Co2FeGa: First-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukusta, D. A.; Antonov, V. N.; Yaresko, A. N.

    2011-08-01

    The electronic structure and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra of the Heusler alloy Co2FeGa were investigated theoretically from first principles, using the fully relativistic Dirac linear MT-orbital (LMTO) band structure method. Densities of valence states, orbital and spin magnetic moments are analyzed and discussed. The origin of the XMCD spectra in the Co2FeGa compound is examined. The calculated results are compared with available experimental data.

  4. First principles total energy study of NbCr{sub 2} + V Laves phase ternary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormeci, A. [Koc Univ., Istanbul (Turkey); Chen, S.P.; Wills, J.M.; Albers, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1999-04-01

    The C15 NbCr{sub 2} + V Laves phase ternary system is studied by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. Equilibrium lattice parameters, cohesive energies, density of states and formation energies of substitutional defects are calculated. Results of all these calculations show that in the C15 NbCr{sub 2} + V compounds, V atoms substitute Cr atoms only.

  5. First-principles simulation of capacitive charging of graphene and implications for supercapacitor design

    OpenAIRE

    Radin, Maxwell D.; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Otani, Minoru; Biener, Juergen; Wood, Brandon C.

    2014-01-01

    Supercapacitors store energy via the formation of an electric double layer, which generates a strong electric field at the electrode-electrolyte interface. Unlike conventional metallic electrodes, graphene-derived materials suffer from a low electronic density of states (i.e., quantum capacitance), which limits their ability to redistribute charge and efficiently screen this field. To explore these effects, we introduce a first-principles approach based on the effective screening medium frame...

  6. First-Principles Calculations of Elastic Constants of Superconducting MgB2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hua-Zhong; CHEN Xiang-Rong; ZHU Jun; CAI Ling-Cang; GAO Jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ The five independent elastic constants of superconducting MgB2 are obtained using the first-principles plane wave method with the new relativistic analytic pseudopotential of the Hartwigsen-Goedecker-Hutter (HGH) scheme in the frame of local density approximation. The dependences of bulk modulus on temperature and pressure are also obtained. It is suggested that the HGH-type pseudopotentials are successful in investigating the ground-state mechanical properties of any solids.

  7. First-Principles Models for Biological Light-Harvesting: Phycobiliprotein Complexes from Cryptophyte Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Bravaya, Ksenia B; Coker, David F

    2017-06-14

    There have been numerous efforts, both experimental and theoretical, that have attempted to parametrize model Hamiltonians to describe excited state energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting systems. The Frenkel exciton model, with its set of electronically coupled two level chromophores that are each linearly coupled to dissipative baths of harmonic oscillators, has become the workhorse of this field. The challenges to parametrizing such Hamiltonians have been their uniqueness, and physical interpretation. Here we present a computational approach that uses accurate first-principles electronic structure methods to compute unique model parameters for a collection of local minima that are sampled with molecular dynamics and QM geometry optimization enabling the construction of an ensemble of local models that captures fluctuations as these systems move between local basins of inherent structure. The accuracy, robustness, and reliability of the approach is demonstrated in an application to the phycobiliprotein light harvesting complexes from cryptophyte algae. Our computed Hamiltonian ensemble provides a first-principles description of inhomogeneous broadening processes, and a standard approximate non-Markovian reduced density matrix dynamics description is used to estimate lifetime broadening contributions to the spectral line shape arising from electronic-vibrational coupling. Despite the overbroadening arising from this approximate line shape theory, we demonstrate that our model Hamiltonian ensemble approach is able to provide a reliable fully first-principles method for computation of spectra and can distinguish the influence of different chromophore protonation states in experimental results. A key feature in the dynamics of these systems is the excitation of intrachromophore vibrations upon electronic excitation and energy transfer. We demonstrate that the Hamiltonian ensemble approach provides a reliable first-principles description of these

  8. Novel two-dimensional silicon and germanium allotropes: a first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbert, Florian; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Friedlein, Rainer; Fleurence, Antoine; Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko; Ozaki, Taisuke

    2014-03-01

    Graphene has been extensively studied but its integration into Si-based device technologies is difficult. It has been recently predicted by first-principles calculations that freestanding silicene and germanene, the counterparts of graphene made of Si and Ge atoms respectively, have graphene-like electronic structure with a low buckled structure. So far, the models predicted by first-principles calculations were not able to describe completely the experimental results. These difficulties tend to suggest a more complex phase diagram for freestanding silicene or for silicene on a substrate than the simple buckled phase. We report for the first time a novel two-dimensional silicon and germanium allotropes, with a structure similar of that of MoS2 layer. After investigating a large range of lattice constants by first-principles calculations with OpenMX code, we show that this structure is the ground state for freestanding two-dimensional silicon and germanium layers instead of the usually considered low buckled silicene and germanene.

  9. Foundations of Quantum Mechanics: Derivation of a dissipative Schrödinger equation from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, L.A.; Olavo, L.S.F., E-mail: olavolsf@gmail.com

    2017-05-15

    Dissipation in Quantum Mechanics took some time to become a robust field of investigation after the birth of the field. The main issue hindering developments in the field is that the Quantization process was always tightly connected to the Hamiltonian formulation of Classical Mechanics. In this paper we present a quantization process that does not depend upon the Hamiltonian formulation of Classical Mechanics (although still departs from Classical Mechanics) and thus overcome the problem of finding, from first principles, a completely general Schrödinger equation encompassing dissipation. This generalized process of quantization is shown to be nothing but an extension of a more restricted version that is shown to produce the Schrödinger equation for Hamiltonian systems from first principles (even for Hamiltonian velocity dependent potential). - Highlights: • A Quantization process independent of the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum Mechanics is proposed. • This quantization method is applied to dissipative or absorptive systems. • A Dissipative Schrödinger equation is derived from first principles.

  10. Coarse graining approach to First principles modeling of radiation cascade in large Fe super-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; Nicholson, Don; Rusanu, Aurelian; Wang, Yang; Stoller, Roger; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Stocks, George

    2012-02-01

    First principles techniques employed to understand systems at an atomistic level are not practical for large systems consisting of millions of atoms. We present an efficient coarse graining approach to bridge the first principles calculations of local electronic properties to classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of large structures. Local atomic magnetic moments in crystalline Fe are perturbed by radiation generated defects. The effects are most pronounced near the defect core and decay with distance. We develop a coarse grained technique based on the Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) method that exploits the near-sightedness of the electron Green function. The atomic positions were determined by MD with an embedded atom force field. The local moments in the neighborhood of the defect cores are calculated with first-principles based on full local structure information. Atoms in the rest of the system are modeled by representative atoms with approximated properties. This work was supported by the Center for Defect Physics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  11. (Un)folding of a high-temperature stable polyalanine helix from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Volker; Rossi, Mariana; Tkatchenko, Alex; Scheffler, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    Peptides in vacuo offer a unique, well-defined testbed to match experiments directly against first-principles approaches that predict the intramolecular interactions that govern peptide and protein folding. In this respect, the polyalanine-based peptide Ac-Ala15-LysH^+ is particularly interesting, as it is experimentally known to form helices in vacuo, with stable secondary structure up to 750 K [1]. Room-temperature folding and unfolding timescales are usually not accessible by direct first-principles simulations, but this high T scale allows a rare direct first-principles view. We here use van der Waals corrected [2] density functional theory in the PBE generalized gradient approximation as implemented in the all-electron code FHI-aims [3] to show by Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics that Ac-Ala15-LysH^+ indeed unfolds rapidly (within a few ps) at T=800 K and 1000 K, but not at 500 K. We show that the structural stability of the α helix at 500 K is critically linked to a correct van der Waals treatment, and that the designed LysH^+ ionic termination is essential for the observed helical secondary structure. [1] M. Kohtani et al., JACS 126, 7420 (2004). [2] A. Tkatchenko, M. Scheffler, PRL 102, 073005 (2009). [3] V. Blum et al, Comp. Phys. Comm. 180, 2175 (2009).

  12. Copper electrodeposition from cuprous chloride solutions containing lead, zinc or iron ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Tchoumou; M. Roynette Ehics

    2005-01-01

    Cuprous chloride hydrochloric acid solutions were electrolysed in a two compartments cell without agitation for copper extraction. It is found that the current density affects the colour and the size of copper deposits. During electrodeposition of copper from cuprous solution in the presence of various concentrations of lead, zinc or iron ions at different current densities, it is observed that lead is codeposited with copper by increasing current density.In all experiments, the current efficiency for the copper deposition reaction fluctuates between 88.50% and 95.50%.

  13. A first-principles study of As doping at a disordered Si-SiO2 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, Fabiano; Mostofi, Arash A

    2014-02-05

    Understanding the interaction between dopants and semiconductor-oxide interfaces is an increasingly important concern in the drive to further miniaturize modern transistors. To this end, using a combination of first-principles density-functional theory and a continuous random network Monte Carlo method, we investigate electrically active arsenic donors at the interface between silicon and its oxide. Using a realistic model of the disordered interface, we find that a small percentage (on the order of ∼10%) of the atomic sites in the first few monolayers on the silicon side of the interface are energetically favourable for segregation, and that this is controlled by the local bonding and local strain of the defect centre. We also find that there is a long-range quantum confinement effect due to the interface, which results in an energy barrier for dopant segregation, but that this barrier is small in comparison to the effect of the local environment. Finally, we consider the extent to which the energetics of segregation can be controlled by the application of strain to the interface.

  14. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao, E-mail: weichaowang@nankai.edu.cn [College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Xie, Xinjian [College of Materials Science, Hebei Technology University, Tianjin 300401 (China)

    2015-04-07

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  15. A first-principles methodology for diffusion coefficients in metals and dilute alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantina, Manjeera

    This work is a study exploring the extent of suitability of static first-principles calculations for studying diffusion in metallic systems. Specifically, vacancy-mediated volume diffusion in pure elements and alloys with dilute concentration of impurities is studied. A novel procedure is discovered for predicting diffusion coefficients that overcomes the shortcomings of the well-known transition state theory, by Vineyard. The procedure that evolves from Eyring's reaction rate theory yields accurate diffusivity results that include anharmonic effects within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Alongside, the procedure is straightforward in its application within the conventional harmonic approximation, from the results of static first-principles calculations. To prove the extensibility of the procedure, diffusivities have been computed for a variety of systems. Over a wide temperature range, the calculated self-diffusion and impurity diffusion coefficients using local density approximation (LDA) of density functional theory (DFT) are seen to be in excellent match with experimental data. Self-diffusion coefficients have been calculated for: (i) fcc Al, Cu, Ni and Ag (ii) bcc W and Mo (v) hcp Mg, Ti and Zn. Impurity diffusion coefficients have been computed for: (i) Mg, Si, Cu, Li, Ag, Mo and 3d transition elements in fcc Al (ii) Mo, Ta in bcc W and Nb, Ta and W in bcc Mo (iii) Sn and Cd in hcp Mg and Al in hcp Ti. It is also an observation from this work, that LDA does not require surface correction for yielding energetics of vacancy-containing system in good comparison with experiments, unlike generalized gradient approximation (GGA). It is known that first-principles' energy minimization procedures based on electronic interactions are suited for metallic systems wherein the valence electrons are freely moving. In this thesis, research has been extended to study suitability of first-principles calculations within LDA/GGA including the localization parameter U, for Al

  16. Cyclic density functional theory: A route to the first principles simulation of bending in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amartya S.; Suryanarayana, Phanish

    2016-11-01

    We formulate and implement Cyclic Density Functional Theory (Cyclic DFT) - a self-consistent first principles simulation method for nanostructures with cyclic symmetries. Using arguments based on Group Representation Theory, we rigorously demonstrate that the Kohn-Sham eigenvalue problem for such systems can be reduced to a fundamental domain (or cyclic unit cell) augmented with cyclic-Bloch boundary conditions. Analogously, the equations of electrostatics appearing in Kohn-Sham theory can be reduced to the fundamental domain augmented with cyclic boundary conditions. By making use of this symmetry cell reduction, we show that the electronic ground-state energy and the Hellmann-Feynman forces on the atoms can be calculated using quantities defined over the fundamental domain. We develop a symmetry-adapted finite-difference discretization scheme to obtain a fully functional numerical realization of the proposed approach. We verify that our formulation and implementation of Cyclic DFT is both accurate and efficient through selected examples. The connection of cyclic symmetries with uniform bending deformations provides an elegant route to the ab-initio study of bending in nanostructures using Cyclic DFT. As a demonstration of this capability, we simulate the uniform bending of a silicene nanoribbon and obtain its energy-curvature relationship from first principles. A self-consistent ab-initio simulation of this nature is unprecedented and well outside the scope of any other systematic first principles method in existence. Our simulations reveal that the bending stiffness of the silicene nanoribbon is intermediate between that of graphene and molybdenum disulphide - a trend which can be ascribed to the variation in effective thickness of these materials. We describe several future avenues and applications of Cyclic DFT, including its extension to the study of non-uniform bending deformations and its possible use in the study of the nanoscale flexoelectric effect.

  17. First-principles simulation of Raman spectra and structural properties of quartz up to 5 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Lv, Chao-Jia; Zhuang, Chun-Qiang; Yi, Li; Liu, Hong; Du, Jian-Guo

    2015-12-01

    The crystal structure and Raman spectra of quartz are calculated by using first-principles method in a pressure range from 0 to 5 GPa. The results show that the lattice constants (a, c, and V) decrease with increasing pressure and the a-axis is more compressible than the c axis. The Si-O bond distance decreases with increasing pressure, which is in contrast to experimental results reported by Hazen et al. [Hazen R M, Finger L W, Hemley R J and Mao H K 1989 Solid State Communications 725 507-511], and Glinnemann et al. [Glinnemann J, King H E Jr, Schulz H, Hahn T, La Placa S J and Dacol F 1992 Z. Kristallogr. 198 177-212]. The most striking changes are of inter-tetrahedral O-O distances and Si-O-Si angles. The volume of the tetrahedron decreased by 0.9% (from 0 to 5 GPa), which suggests that it is relatively rigid. Vibrational models of the quartz modes are identified by visualizing the associated atomic motions. Raman vibrations are mainly controlled by the deformation of the tetrahedron and the changes in the Si-O-Si bonds. Vibrational directions and intensities of atoms in all Raman modes just show little deviations when pressure increases from 0 to 5 GPa. The pressure derivatives (dνi/dP) of the 12 Raman frequencies are obtained at 0 GPa-5 GPa. The calculated results show that first-principles methods can well describe the high-pressure structural properties and Raman spectra of quartz. The combination of first-principles simulations of the Raman frequencies of minerals and Raman spectroscopy experiments is a useful tool for exploring the stress conditions within the Earth. Project supported by the Key Laboratory of Earthquake Prediction, Institute of Earthquake Science, China Earthquake Administration (CEA) (Grant No. 2012IES010201) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41174071 and 41373060).

  18. $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ invariance of Germanene on MoS$_2$ from first principles

    OpenAIRE

    Amlaki, Taher; Bokdam, Menno; Paul J. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    We present a low energy Hamiltonian generalized to describe how the energy bands of germanene ($\\rm \\overline{Ge}$) are modified by interaction with a substrate or a capping layer. The parameters that enter the Hamiltonian are determined from first-principles relativistic calculations for $\\rm \\overline{Ge}|$MoS$_2$ bilayers and MoS$_2|\\rm \\overline{Ge} |$MoS$_2$ trilayers and are used to determine the topological nature of the system. For the lowest energy, buckled germanene structure, the g...

  19. Piezoelectric, Mechanical and Acoustic Properties of KNaNbOF5 from First-Principles Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Han

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a noncentrosymmetric crystal, KNaNbOF5, has attracted attention due to its potential to present piezoelectric properties. Although α- and β-KNaNbOF5 are similar in their stoichiometries, their structural frameworks, and their synthetic routes, the two phases exhibit very different properties. This paper presents, from first-principles calculations, comparative studies of the structural, electronic, piezoelectric, and elastic properties of the α and the β phase of the material. Based on the Christoffel equation, the slowness surface of the acoustic waves is obtained to describe its acoustic prosperities. These results may benefit further applications of KNaNbOF5.

  20. Elastic properties of Ca-based metallic glasses predicted by first-principles simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widom, M.; Sauerwine, B.; Cheung, A.M.; Poon, S.J.; Tong, P.; Louca, D.; Shiflet, G.J. (CM); (UV)

    2012-07-11

    First-principles simulations of Ca-based metallic glass-forming alloys yield sample amorphous structures whose structures can be compared to experiment and whose properties can be analyzed. In an effort to understand and control ductility, we investigate the elastic moduli. Calculated Poisson ratios depend strongly on alloying elements in a manner that correlates with ionicity (charge transfer). Consequently, we predict that alloying Ca with Mg and Zn should result in relatively ductile glasses compared to alloying with Ag, Cu, or Al. Experimental observations validate these predictions.

  1. Raman spectra of nitrogen-doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon from first principles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Li; ZHU JiaQi; GAO Wei; HAN Xiao; DU ShanYi

    2009-01-01

    The non-resonant vibrational Raman spectra of nitrogen-doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon have been calculated from first principles, including the generation of s structural model, and the calculation of vibrational frequencies, vibrational eigenmodes and Raman coupling tensors. The calculated Raman spectra are in good agreement with the experimental results. The broad band at around 500 cm~(-1) arises from mixed bonds. The T peak originates from the vibrations of sp~3 carbon and the G peak comes from the stretching vibrations of sp~2-type bonding of C=C and C=N. The simulation results indicate the direct contribution of N vibrations to Raman spectra.

  2. First-principles prediction of a ground state crystal structure of magnesium borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolins, V; Majzoub, E H; Wolverton, C

    2008-04-04

    Mg(BH(4))(2) contains a large amount of hydrogen by weight and by volume, but its promise as a candidate for hydrogen storage is dependent on the currently unknown thermodynamics of H2 release. Using first-principles density-functional theory calculations and a newly developed prototype electrostatic ground state search strategy, we predict a new T=0 K ground state of Mg(BH(4))(2) with I4[over ]m2 symmetry, which is 5 kJ/mol lower in energy than the recently proposed P6(1) structure. The calculated thermodynamics of H(2) release are within the range required for reversible storage.

  3. Crystal structure prediction from first principles: The crystal structures of glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the genetic algorithms search implemented in MGAC, modified genetic algorithm for crystals, coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable.

  4. First-principles calculation of core-level binding energy shift in surface chemical processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combined with third generation synchrotron radiation light sources, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with higher energy resolution, brilliance, enhanced surface sensitivity and photoemission cross section in real time found extensive applications in solid-gas interface chemistry. This paper reports the calculation of the core-level binding energy shifts (CLS) using the first-principles density functional theory. The interplay between the CLS calculations and XPS measurements to uncover the structures, adsorption sites and chemical reactions in complex surface chemical processes are highlight. Its application on clean low index (111) and vicinal transition metal surfaces, molecular adsorption in terms of sites and configuration, and reaction kinetics are domonstrated.

  5. 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA): a First Principles Density-Functional Study

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, B J

    2016-01-01

    We report first principles density functional calculations for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) and several reduced forms. DHICA and 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) are believed to be the basic building blocks of the eumelanins. Our results show that carboxylation has a significant effect on the physical properties of the molecules. In particular, the relative stabilities and the HOMO-LUMO gaps (calculated with the $\\Delta$SCF method) of the various redox forms are strongly affected. We predict that, in contrast to DHI, the density of unpaired electrons, and hence the ESR signal, in DHICA is negligibly small.

  6. First principles calculations of the ground state properties and structural phase transformation in YN

    CERN Document Server

    Mancera, L; Takeuchi, N

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties of YN in rock salt (sodium chloride), caesium chloride, zinc blende and wurtzite structures using first-principles total energy calculations. Rock salt is the calculated ground state structure with a = 4.93 A, B sub 0 = 157 GPa. The experimental lattice constant is a = 4.877 A. There is an additional local minimum in the wurtzite structure with total energy 0.28 eV/unit cell higher. At high pressure (approx 138 GPa), our calculations predict a phase transformation from a NaCl to a CsCl structure.

  7. Inelastic transport theory from first principles: Methodology and application to nanoscale devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Paulsson, Magnus; Brandbyge, Mads

    2007-01-01

    We describe a first-principles method for calculating electronic structure, vibrational modes and frequencies, electron-phonon couplings, and inelastic electron transport properties of an atomic-scale device bridging two metallic contacts under nonequilibrium conditions. The method extends...... approximation. While these calculations often are computationally demanding, we show how they can be approximated by a simple and efficient lowest order expansion. Our method also addresses effects of energy dissipation and local heating of the junction via detailed calculations of the power flow. We...

  8. First-principles investigations of the physical properties of RCd (R=Ce, La, Pr, Nd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Jianping, E-mail: jianpinglong@cdut.cn [College of Materials and Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)

    2012-12-15

    The crystal structural, electronic, elastic and the thermodynamic properties of RCd are investigated by using the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential density function theory within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculated equilibrium lattice parameters for RCd are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Furthermore, the optical properties, namely the dielectric function, refractive index and electron energy loss are reported for radiation up to 30 eV. Finally, the elastic properties, the bulk modulus and the Debye temperature of RCd are given for reference.

  9. Effect of curvature on structures and vibrations of zigzag carbon nanotubes: A first-principles study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mousumi Upadhyay Kahaly; Umesh V Waghmare

    2008-06-01

    First-principles pseudopotential-based density functional theory calculations of atomic and electronic structures, full phonon dispersions and thermal properties of zigzag single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are presented. By determining the correlation between vibrational modes of a graphene sheet and of the nanotube, we understand how rolling of the sheet results in mixing between modes and changes in vibrational spectrum of graphene. We find that the radial breathing mode softens with decreasing curvature. We estimate thermal expansion coefficient of nanotubes within a quasiharmonic approximation and identify the modes that dominate thermal expansion of some of these SWCNTs both at low and high temperatures.

  10. High applicability of two-dimensional phosphorous in Kagome lattice predicted from first-principles calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Peng-Jen Chen; Horng-Tay Jeng

    2016-01-01

    A new semiconducting phase of two-dimensional phosphorous in the Kagome lattice is proposed from first-principles calculations. The band gaps of the monolayer (ML) and bulk Kagome phosphorous (Kagome-P) are 2.00 and 1.11 eV, respectively. The magnitude of the band gap is tunable by applying the in-plane strain and/or changing the number of stacking layers. High optical absorption coefficients at the visible light region are predicted for multilayer Kagome-P, indicating potential applications ...

  11. Atomistic spin dynamic method with both damping and moment of inertia effects included from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Satadeep; Nordström, Lars; Fransson, Jonas

    2012-02-03

    We consider spin dynamics for implementation in an atomistic framework and we address the feasibility of capturing processes in the femtosecond regime by inclusion of moment of inertia. In the spirit of an s-d-like interaction between the magnetization and electron spin, we derive a generalized equation of motion for the magnetization dynamics in the semiclassical limit, which is nonlocal in both space and time. Using this result we retain a generalized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, also including the moment of inertia, and demonstrate how the exchange interaction, damping, and moment of inertia, all can be calculated from first principles.

  12. Dynamic stability of fcc crystals under isotropic loading from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehák, Petr; Cerný, Miroslav; Pokluda, Jaroslav

    2012-05-30

    Lattice dynamics and stability of four fcc crystals (Al, Ir, Pt and Au) under isotropic (hydrostatic) tensile loading are studied from first principles using the linear response method and the harmonic approximation. The results reveal that, contrary to former expectations, strengths of all the studied crystals are limited by instabilities related to soft phonons with finite or vanishing wavevectors. The critical strains associated with such instabilities are remarkably lower than those related to the volumetric instability. On the other hand, the corresponding reduction of the tensile strength is by 20% at the most. An analysis of elastic stability conditions is also performed and the results obtained by means of both approaches are compared.

  13. First-principle study on the electronic structure of stressed CrSi2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU ShiYun; XIE Quan; YAN WanJun; CHEN Qian

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure of stressed CrSi2 was calculated using the first-principle methods based on plane-wave pseudo-potential theory. The calculated results showed that, under the uniaxial compres-sion, the energy level of CrSi2 shifted toward high energy and its energy gap became wider with the increasing uniaxial stress, while the gap became narrower under the negative uniaxial stress. When the negative uniaxial stress was up to -18.5 Gpa, CrSi2 was converted into a direct-gap semiconductor with the band gap of 0.32 eV.

  14. First-principle study on the electronic structure of stressed CrSi2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure of stressed CrSi2 was calculated using the first-principle methods based on plane-wave pseudo-potential theory. The calculated results showed that, under the uniaxial compression, the energy level of CrSi2 shifted toward high energy and its energy gap became wider with the increasing uniaxial stress, while the gap became narrower under the negative uniaxial stress. When the negative uniaxial stress was up to -18.5 GPa, CrSi2 was converted into a direct-gap semiconductor with the band gap of 0.32 eV.

  15. First principles study of structural, electronic and mechanical properties of alkali nitride-KN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugan, A.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R., E-mail: rrpalanichamy@gmail.com; Santhosh, M. [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S.V.N college, Madurai, Tamilnadu-625019 (India); Iyakutti, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Chennai, Tamilnadu-603203 (India)

    2015-06-24

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of alkali- metal nitride (KN) is investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory as implemented in Vienna ab-initio simulation package. At ambient pressure KN is stable in the ferromagnetic state with NaCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that the KN is half metallic ferromagnet at normal pressure. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from NaCl to ZB phase is observed in KN. Half metallicity and ferromagnetism is maintained at all pressures.

  16. Structural phase transition and elastic properties of hafnium dihydride: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, M., E-mail: rrpalanichamy@gmail.com; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R., E-mail: rrpalanichamy@gmail.com; Sudhapriyanga, G.; Murugan, A.; Chinthia, A. Jemmy [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S.V.N College, Madurai, Tamil Nadu-625019 (India); Kanagaprabha, S. [Department of Physics, Kamaraj College, Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu-628003 (India); Iyakutti, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu-603203 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The structural and elastic properties of Hafnium dihydride (HfH{sub 2}) are investigated by first principles calculation based on density functional theory using Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP). The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. A pressure induced structural phase transition from CaF{sub 2} to FeS{sub 2} phase is observed in HfH{sub 2} at 10.75 GPa. The calculated elastic constants indicate that this hydride is mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  17. Half metallic ferromagnetism in alkali metal nitrides MN (M = Rb, Cs): A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugan, A., E-mail: rrpalanichamy@gmail.com; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R., E-mail: rrpalanichamy@gmail.com; Santhosh, M., E-mail: rrpalanichamy@gmail.com; Sudhapriyanga, G., E-mail: rrpalanichamy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S.V.N College, Madurai, Tamilnadu-625019 (India); Kanagaprabha, S. [Department of Physics, Kamaraj College, Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu-628003 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of two alkali metal nitrides (MN: M= Rb, Cs) are investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package. At ambient pressure the two nitrides are stable in ferromagnetic state with CsCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that these materials are half metallic in nature. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from CsCl to ZB phase is observed in RbN and CsN.

  18. A novel first-principles approach to effective Hamiltonians for high Tc superconducting cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, W.-G.; Ku, W.

    2008-03-01

    We report our recent progress of deriving the low-energy effective one-band Hamiltonians for the prototypical cuprate superconductor Ca2CuO2Cl2, based on a newly developed first-principles Wannier-states approach that takes into account large on-site Coulomb repulsion. The apical atom pz state is found to affect the general properties of the low-energy hole state, namely the Zhang-Rice singlet, via additional intra-sublattice hoppings, nearest-neighbor 'super-repulsion,' and other microscopic many-body processes.

  19. Control-Oriented First Principles-Based Model of a Diesel Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jesper Viese; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Andersen, Palle;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a control-oriented tenth-order nonlinear model of a diesel driven generator set, using first principles modeling. The model provides physical system insight, while keeping the complexity at a level where it can be a tool for future design of improved automatic...... generation control (AGC), by including important nonlinearities of the machine. The nonlinearities are, as would be expected for a generator, primarily of bilinear nature. Validation of the model is done with measurements on a 60 kVA/48 kW diesel driven generator set in island operation during steps...

  20. Electronic structures of N- and C-doped NiO from first-principles calculations

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The large intrinsic band gap of NiO has hindered severely its potential application under visible-light irradiation. In this study, we have performed first-principles calculations on the electronic properties of N- and C-doped NiO to ascertain if its band gap may be narrowed theoretically. It was found that impurity bands driven by N 2p or C 2p states appear in the band gap of NiO and that some of these locate at the conduction band minimum, which leads to a significant band gap narrowing. Ou...

  1. First Principles Calculation of Terahertz Vibrational Modes of a Disaccharide Monohydrate Crystal of Lactose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shigeki; Inerbaev, Talgat M.; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Nobuaki; Note, Ryunosuke; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2006-11-01

    First-principles calculations of the crystalline vibrations of a lactose monohydrate crystal in the terahertz (THz) region were performed using periodic density functional theory calculations. The calculated vibrational modes in the THz region were derived from group motions with different sizes: molecules of lactose and crystal water, pyranose rings, and intramolecular frames. The intermolecular modes with large vibrational amplitude of lactose of 17.5-100.6 cm-1 and of crystal-water of 136.1-237.7 cm-1 were clearly separated. This article especially refers to the intermolecular vibrational modes of crystal water with the THz absorption, which provide detectable spectral features of hydrated crystals.

  2. Ammonia synthesis and decomposition on a Ru-based catalyst modeled by first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, A.; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Remediakis, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    A recently published first-principles model for the ammonia synthesis on an unpromoted Ru-based catalyst is extended to also describe ammonia decomposition. In addition, further analysis concerning trends in ammonia productivity, surface conditions during the reaction, and macro......-properties, such as apparent activation energies and reaction orders are provided. All observed trends in activity are captured by the model and the absolute value of ammonia synthesis/decomposition productivity is predicted to within a factor of 1-100 depending on the experimental conditions. Moreover it is shown: (i...

  3. Molecular adsorption study of nicotine and caffeine on single-walled carbon nanotubes from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-June; Kim, Gunn; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2013-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic structures and binding properties of nicotine and caffeine adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes to determine whether CNTs are appropriate for filtering or sensing nicotine and caffeine molecules. We find that caffeine adsorbs more strongly than nicotine. The different binding characteristics are discussed by analyzing the modification of the electronic structure of the molecule-adsorbed CNTs. We also calculate the quantum conductance of the CNTs in the presence of nicotine or caffeine adsorbates and demonstrate that the influence of caffeine is stronger than nicotine on the conductance of the host CNT.

  4. Stability and electronic structure of InN nanotubes from first-principles study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li-Juan

    2006-01-01

    The stability and electronic structure of hypothetical InN nanotubes were studied by first-principles density functional theory.It was found that the strain energies of InN nanotubes are smaller than those of carbon nanotubes of the same radius.Single-wall zigzag InN nanotubes were found to be semiconductors with a direct band gap while the armchair counterparts have an indirect band gap.The band gaps of nanotubes decrease with increasing diameter,similar to the case of carbon nanotubes.

  5. First-principles study on bottom-up fabrication process of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the energetics of a polyanthracene formation in the bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons on Au(111) using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. We show that the structure of precursor molecules plays a decisive role in the C-C coupling reaction. The reaction energy of the dimerization of anthracene dimers is a larger negative value than that of the dimerization of anthracene monomers, suggesting that the precursor molecule used in experiments has a favorable structure for graphene nanoribbon fabrication.

  6. Quantum confinement effect in Si/Ge core-shell nanowires: First-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Musin, Ryza N.; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Chou, M. Y.

    2008-05-01

    The electronic structure of Si/Ge core-shell nanowires along the [110] and [111] directions are studied with first-principles calculations. We identify the near-gap electronic states that are spatially separated within the core or the shell region, making it possible for a dopant to generate carriers in a different region. The confinement energies of these core and shell states provide an operational definition of the “band offset,” which is not only size dependent but also component dependent. The optimal doping strategy in Si/Ge core-shell nanowires is proposed based on these energy results.

  7. First-principles prediction of the equation of state for TcC with rocksalt structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Wei; Chu, Yan-Dong; Liu, Zi-Jiang; Song, Ting; Tian, Jun-Hong; Wei, Xiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    The equation of state of TcC with rocksalt structure is investigated by means of first-principles density functional theory calculations combined with the quasi-harmonic Debye model in which the phononic effects are considered. Particular attention is paid to the predictions of the compressibility, the isothermal bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative which play a central role in the formulation of approximate equations of state for the first time. The properties of TcC with rocksalt structure are summarized in the pressure range of 0-80 GPa and the temperature up to 2500 K.

  8. Crystal structure of Mg3Pd from first-principles calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yong-he; WANG Tao-fen; ZHANG Wei-bing; TANG Bi-yu; ZENG Xiao-qin; DING Wen-jiang

    2008-01-01

    Crystal structure of Mg3Pd alloy was studied by first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. The total energy, formation heat and cohesive energy of the two types of Mg3Pd were calculated to assess the stability and the preferentiality. The results show that Mg3Pd alloy with Cu3P structure is more stable than Na3As structure, and Mg3Pd alloy is preferential to Cu3P structure. The obtained densities of states and charge density distribution for the two types of crystal structure were analyzed and discussed in combination with experimental findings for further discussion of the Mg3Pd structure.

  9. Substitutional Co dopant on the GaAs(110) surface: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhou; Yi, Zhijun

    2016-12-01

    Using the first principles ground state method, the electronic properties of single Co dopant replacing one Ga atom on the GaAs(110) surface are studied. Our calculated local density of states (LDOS) at Co site presents several distinct peaks above the valence band maximum (VBM), and this agrees with recent experiments. Moreover, the calculated STM images at bias voltages of 2 eV and -2 eV also agree with experiments. We discussed the origin of Co impurity induced distinct peaks, which can be characterized with the hybridization between Co d orbitals and p-like orbitals of surface As and Ga atoms.

  10. Interactions of gas molecules with monolayer MoSe2: A first principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Munish; Jamdagni, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a first principle study of interaction of toxic gas molecules (NO, NO2 and SO2) with monolayer MoSe2. The predicted order of sensitivity of gas molecule is NO2 > SO2 > NO. Adsorbed molecules strongly influence the electronic behaviour of monolayer MoSe2 by inducing impurity levels in the vicinity of Fermi energy. NO and SO2 is found to induce p-type doping effect while semiconductor to metallic transitions occur on NO2 adsorption. Our findings may guide the experimentalist for fabricating sensor devices based on MoSe2 monolayer.

  11. First principle study of structural, electronic and magnetic properties of silicon doped zigzag boron nitride nanoribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Amar; Verma, Mohan L.; Mishra, Madhukar

    2015-04-01

    Using first principle calculation, we investigate the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of silicon doped zigzag boron nitride nanoribbon (ZBNNR). Our results show that the shift in position of silicon doping with respect to the ribbon edge causes change in the structural geometry, electronic structure and magnetization of ZBNNR. The band gap of silicon doped ZBNNR is found to become narrower as compared to that of perfect ZBNNR. We find that band gap and magnetic moment of ZBNNR can be tuned by substitutional silicon doping position and doping concentration.

  12. First Principle Study of Ferromagnetism in Cr-Doped In2O3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Zhi; CHENG Wen-Dan; WU Dong-Sheng; HUANG Shu-Ping; HU Jian-Ming; ZHANG Hao; HU Hui

    2008-01-01

    We present a first principle study of Cr-doped In2O3 system using density func- tional theory. The obtained results show that the Cr ion prefers the cation site of the center of trigonally distorted octahedron and converges to high spin-polarized configuration in the ground state. The hybridization between d-states and the donor states is strong, and the spin-split donor impurity-band model is found to be the most favorable mechanism for the ferromagnetism in this system. The good ferromagnetic property of high Curie temperature is discussed in view of the electronic structure analyses.

  13. First principles calculations of relationship between the Cu surface states and relaxations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Yao-Ping; Luo Ying; Liu Shao-Jun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between the surface relaxations and the electron density distributions of surface states of Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111) surfaces is obtained by first-principles calculations. The calculations indicate that relaxations mainly occur in the layers at which the surface states electrons are localized, and the magnitudes of the multilayer relaxations correspond to the difference of electron density of surface states between adjacent layers. The larger the interlayer relaxation is, the larger the difference of electron density of surface states between two layers is.

  14. Phonon transport in perovskite SrTiO3 from first principles

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Lei; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate phonon transport in perovskite strontium titanate (SrTiO3) which is stable above its phase transition temperature (~105 K) by using first-principles molecular dynamics and anharmonic lattice dynamics. Unlike conventional ground-state-based perturbation methods that give imaginary phonon frequencies, the current calculation reproduces stable phonon dispersion relations observed in experiments. We find the contribution of optical phonons to overall lattice thermal conductivity is larger than 60%, markedly different from the usual picture with dominant contribution from acoustic phonons. The mode- and pseudopotential-dependence analysis suggests the strong attenuation of acoustic phonons transport originated from strong anharmonic coupling with the transversely-polarized ferroelectric modes.

  15. First-principles study of the dipole layer formation at metal-organic interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We study the dipole layer formed at metal-organic interfaces by means of first-principles calculations. Interface dipoles are monitored by calculating the work function change of Au, Ag, Al, Mg and Ca surfaces upon adsorption of a monolayer of PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetra-carboxylic-di-anhydride), perylene or benzene molecules. Adsorption of PTCDA leads to pinning of the work function for a range of metal substrates. It gives interface dipoles that compensate for the difference in the clean...

  16. First-Principles Calculations for Structures and Melting Temperature of Si6 Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-Lin; CHEN Xiang-Rong; ZHOU Xiao-Lin; CHENG Xiao-Hong; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2006-01-01

    @@ We investigate the structures and the melting temperature of the Si6 cluster by using the first-principles pseudopotential method in real space and Langevin molecular dynamics. It is shown that the ground structure of the Si6 cluster is a square bipyramid, and the corresponding melting temperature is about 1923 K. In the heating procedure, the structures of the Si6 cluster change from high symmetry structures containing 5-8 bonds, via prolate structures containing 3-4 bonds, to oblate structures containing 1-2 bonds.

  17. First-principle study of Mg adsorption on Si(111) surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Min-Ju; Zhang Ping; Du Xiao-Long

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out first-principle calculations of Mg adsorption on Si(111) surfaces. Different adsorption sites and coverage effects have been considered. We found that the threefold hollow adsorption is energy-favoured in each coverage considered, while for the clean Si(111) surface of metallic feature, we found that 0.25 and 0.5 ML Mg adsorption leads to a semiconducting surface. The results for the electronic behaviour suggest a polarized covalent bonding between the Mg adatom and Si(111) surface.

  18. First principles study of CuAlO2 doping with S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We study the electronic properties of CuAlO2 doped with S by the first principles calculations and find that the band gap of CuAlO2 is reduced after the doping.At the same time,the effective masses are also reduced and the density of states could cross the Fermi level.These results show that the conductivity of CuAlO2 could be enhanced by doping the impurities of S,which needs to be further studied.

  19. First-Principles Study on Electronic Structures and Optical Properties of Doped Ag Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Can; CHEN Ling-Na; JIA Shu-Ting; ZHANG Dan; XU Hui

    2012-01-01

    By using the first-principles calculation based on density functional theory,we investigate the electronic structures and optical properties of Cl-doped Ag crystal. The results show that the electronic structure of Cl-doped Ag crystal depends on the doped concentration and the site of impurity defect.Interestingly,the calculated adsorption spectra of Cl-doped Ag crystal show isotropy or anisotropy coincide with the symmetry of Ag crystal. These features are discussed to provide guidance to experimental efforts for Ag-based nanoeletronic devices.

  20. First-principles study of hydrogen storage on Li12F12 nano-cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafei; Cheng, Xinlu

    2017-03-01

    We use the first-principles calculation based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the hydrogen storage on Li12F12 nano-cage. Our result indicates the largest hydrogen gravimetric density is 7.14 wt% and this is higher than the 2017 target from the US department of energy (DOE). Meanwhile, the average adsorption energy is -0.161 eV/H2, which is desirable for absorbing and desorbing H2 molecules at near ambient conditions. These findings will have important implications on designing hydrogen storage materials in the future.

  1. Arsenene as a promising candidate for NO and NO2 sensor: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Can; Liu, Chun-Sheng; Yan, Xiaohong

    2017-03-01

    Based on first-principles calculations, we have studied the adsorption of CO, CO2, N2, NH3, NO and NO2 molecules on the pristine arsenene monolayer. These gas molecules are held by an interaction that is intermediate between the physisorbed and chemisorbed states. Furthermore, the adsorption of NO and NO2 can produce a noticeable modifications of the density of states near the Fermi level. Interestingly, only the adsorption of NO and NO2 can lead to a magnetic moment of 1 μB. Therefore, our results can provide a theoretical basis for the potential applications of arsenene monolayer in gas sensing with electrical and magnetic methods.

  2. From First Principles: The Application of Quantum Mechanics to Complex Molecules and Solvated Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Mark A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-12-31

    The major title of this dissertation, 'From first principles,' is a phase often heard in the study of thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. These words embody a powerful idea in the physical sciences; namely, that it is possible to distill the complexities of nature into a set of simple, well defined mathematical laws from which specific relations can then be derived . In thermodynamics, these fundamental laws are immediately familiar to the physical scientist by their numerical order: the First, Second and Third Laws. However, the subject of the present volume is quantum mechanics-specifically, non-relativistic quantum mechanics, which is appropriate for most systems of chemical interest.

  3. First-principles study of water adsorption on α-SiO2 [110] surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venu Mankad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of water molecule adsorbed silicon dioxide (α-SiO2 [110] surface and analyzed the influence of water molecule on its energetics, structure and elctronic propertes using density functional theory based first principles calculations. The inhomogeneous topology of the α-SiO2 clean surface promotes a total charge density displacement on the adsorbed water molecule and giving rise to electron-rich as well as hole-rich region. The electronic charge transfer from a α-SiO2 to the water molecule occurs upon the formation of a partially occupied level laying above conduction band level.

  4. First-principles study of the elastic constants and optical properties of uranium metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Qiu-Yun; Tan Shi-Yong; Lai Xin-Chun; Chen Jun

    2012-01-01

    We perform first-principles calculations of the lattice constants,elastic constants,and optical properties for alphaand gamma-uranium based on the ultra-soft pseudopotential method.Lattice constants and equilibrium atomic volume are consistent pretty well with the experimental results.Some difference exists between our calculated elastic constants and the experimental data.Based on the satisfactory ground state electronic structure calculations,the optical conductivity,dielectric function,refractive index,and extinction coefficients are also obtained.These calculated optical properties are compared with our results and other published experimental data.

  5. Elastic and thermodynamic properties of c-BN from first-principles calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yan-Jun; Cheng Yan; Wang Yan-Ju; Chen Xiang-Rong

    2007-01-01

    The elastic constants and thermodynamic properties of c-BN are calculated using the first-principles plane wave method with the relativistic analytic pseudopotential of the Hartwigen, Goedecker and Hutter (HGH) type in the frame of local density approximation and using the quasi-harmonic Debye model, separately. Moreover, the dependences of the normalized volume V/V0 on pressure P, as well as the bulk modulus B, the thermal expansion α, and the heat capacity CV on pressure P and temperature T are also successfully obtained.

  6. First-principles investigation of the electronic, elastic and thermodynamic properties of VC under high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Ai-Min; Zhou Tie-Jun; Zhu Yan; Zhang Xin-Yu; Liu Ri-Ping

    2011-01-01

    An investigation of the electronic, elastic and thermodynamic properties of VC under high pressure has been conducted using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT)with the plane-wave basis set,as implemented in the CASTEP code. At elevated pressures, VC is predicted to undergo a structural transition from a relatively open NaCl-type structure to a more dense CsCl-type one. The predicted transition pressure is 520 GPa.The elastic constant, Debye temperature and heat capacity each as a function of pressure and/or temperature of VC are presented for the first time.

  7. Elastic and magnetic properties of cubic Fe$_{4}$C from first-principles

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Gul; Jan, Haseen Ullah

    2014-01-01

    First-principles based on density functional theory is used to study the phase stability, elastic, magnetic, and electronic properties of cubic (c)-Fe$_4$C. Our results show that c-Fe$_{4}$C has a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state structure compared with antiferromagnetic (AFM) and nonmagnetic (NM)states. To study the phase stability of c-Fe$_4$C, BCC Fe$_4$C, FCC Fe$_4$C, and BCC Fe$_{16}$C, where C is considered at tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites, are also considered. Although, ...

  8. First-principles calculation of the electric-field gradient in hcp metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, P.; Schwarz, K.; Dederichs, P. H.

    1988-02-01

    The electric-field gradient (EFG) for all hcp metals from Be to Cd is obtained from energy-band calculations using the full-potential linearized-augmented-plane-wave (LAPW) method. Our first-principles method, which does not rely on any Sternheimer antishielding factor, yields EFG's in good agreement with experiment and predicts also the sign of the EFG's. The EFG was found to be determined mainly by the nonspherical distribution of the valence-electron density close to the nucleus. In general, contributions to the EFG originating from p states dominate. This is the case even for transition metals, where the d anisotropy is large.

  9. Is the log-law a first principle result from Lie-group invariance analysis?

    CERN Document Server

    Frewer, Michael; Foysi, Holger

    2014-01-01

    The invariance method of Lie-groups in the theory of turbulence carries the high expectation of being a first principle method for generating statistical scaling laws. The purpose of this comment is to show that this expectation has not been met so far. In particular for wall-bounded turbulent flows, the prospects for success are not promising in view of the facts we will present herein. Although the invariance method of Lie-groups is explicitly able to generate statistical scaling laws for wall-bounded turbulent flows, like the log-law for example, these invariant results yet not only fail to fulfil the basic requirements for a first principle result, but also are strongly misleading. The reason is that not the functional structure of the log-law itself is misleading, but that its invariant Lie-group based derivation yielding this function is what is misleading. By revisiting the study of Oberlack (2001) [Oberlack, M., 2001. A unified approach for symmetries in plane parallel turbulent shear flows. J. Fluid ...

  10. First-principles study on dielectric function of isolated and bundled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J. Y.; Liu, L. H.; Tan, J. Y.

    2015-06-01

    The dielectric function fundamentally determines the thermal radiative properties of nanomaterials. In this work, the first-principles method is applied to investigate the finite temperature dielectric function of isolated and bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes in the visible-ultraviolet spectral range without empirical models. The effects of diameter, intertube interactions and temperature on dielectric functions are discussed. The calculated extraordinary dielectric functions of four isolated (5,5), (6,6), (7,7) and (8,8) armchair nanotubes with different diameters are compared to study the diameter effect. It shows that the locations of absorption peaks of dielectric functions consistently shift to lower energy with increasing diameter. To analyze the influence of non-local intertube interactions, the dielectric functions of bundled (6,6) armchair nanotubes with varying intertube distance are calculated within the van der Waals theory. As nanotubes bundle together, the intertube interactions become strong and the absorption peaks enhance. The temperature effect is included into computing dielectric function of isolated (5,0) zigzag nanotubes via first-principles molecular dynamics method. It observes that the dominant absorption peak shifts to lower energy as temperature increases from 0 to 600 K. To interpret the temperature influence, the temperature perturbed density of states is presented.

  11. First-Principles Investigation of Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Water under Proton Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Kyle; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-03-01

    A predictive and quantitative understanding of electronic excitation dynamics in water under proton irradiation is of great importance in many technological areas ranging from utilizing proton beam therapy to preventing nuclear reactor damages. Despite its importance, an atomistic description of the excitation mechanism has yet to be fully understood. Identifying how a high-energy proton dissipates its kinetic energy into the electronic excitation is crucial for predicting atomistic damages, later resulting in the formation of different chemical species. In this work, we use our new, large-scale first-principles Ehrenfest dynamics method based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory to simulate the electronic response of bulk water to a fast-moving proton. In particular, we will discuss the topological nature of the electronic excitation as a function of the proton velocity. We will employ maximally-localized functions to bridge our quantitative findings from first-principles simulations to a conceptual understanding in the field of water radiolysis.

  12. Astrophysical reaction rates from a symmetry-informed first-principles perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfuss, Alison; Launey, Kristina; Baker, Robert; Draayer, Jerry; Dytrych, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    With a view toward a new unified formalism for studying bound and continuum states in nuclei, to understand stellar nucleosynthesis from a fully ab initio perspective, we studied the nature of surface α-clustering in 20Ne by considering the overlap of symplectic states with cluster-like states. We compute the spectroscopic amplitudes and factors, α-decay width, and absolute resonance strength - characterizing major contributions to the astrophysical reaction rate through a low-lying 1- resonant state in 20Ne. As a next step, we consider a fully microscopic treatment for the n+4 He system, based on the successful first-principles No-Core Shell Model/Resonating Group Method (NCSM/RGM) for light nuclei, but with the capability to reach intermediate-mass nuclei. The new model takes advantage of the symmetry-based concept central to the Symmetry-Adapted No-Core Shell Model (SA-NCSM) to reduce computational complexity in physically-informed and methodical way, with sights toward first-principles calculations of rates for important astrophysical reactions, such as the 23 Al(p , γ) 24 Si reaction, believed to have a strong influence on X-ray burst light curves. Supported by the U.S. NSF (OCI-0904874, ACI -1516338) and the U.S. DOE (DE-SC0005248), and benefitted from computing resources provided by Blue Waters and the LSU Center for Computation & Technology.

  13. Electronic Non-Resonant Tunneling through Diaminoacenes: A First-Principles Investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ji-Ming; HUANG Yao-Qing; REN Zhao-Yu; YANG Hui-Jing; CAO Mao-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The electron transport through diaminoacenes sandwiched between two Au electrodes is simulated by using a first-principles analysis. The nonlinear current-voltage characteristic is observed. Effects of the ring number and positions of amine groups on equilibrium transport properties are found. For 1,4 series, the greater the number of the rings, the stronger the transmission spectrum near the Fermi energy. For 2,6 series, the larger the number of the rings, the weaker the transmission spectrum near the Fermi energy. This is helpful for understanding the recently reported results on conductance measurements using amines.%@@ The electron transport through diaminoacenes sandwiched between two Au electrodes is simulated by using a first-principles analysis.The nonlinear current-voltage characteristic is observed.Effects of the ring number and positions of amine groups on equilibrium transport properties are found.For 1,4 series, the greater the number of the rings, the stronger the transmission spectrum near the Fermi energy.For 2,6 series, the larger the number of the rings, the weaker the transmission spectrum near the Fermi energy.This is helpful for understanding the recently reported results on conductance measurements using amines.

  14. First-principles calculations, experimental study, and thermodynamic modeling of the Al-Co-Cr system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan L Liu

    Full Text Available The phase relations and thermodynamic properties of the condensed Al-Co-Cr ternary alloy system are investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT and phase-equilibria experiments that led to X-ray diffraction (XRD and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA measurements. A thermodynamic description is developed by means of the calculations of phase diagrams (CALPHAD method using experimental and computational data from the present work and the literature. Emphasis is placed on modeling the bcc-A2, B2, fcc-γ, and tetragonal-σ phases in the temperature range of 1173 to 1623 K. Liquid, bcc-A2 and fcc-γ phases are modeled using substitutional solution descriptions. First-principles special quasirandom structures (SQS calculations predict a large bcc-A2 (disordered/B2 (ordered miscibility gap, in agreement with experiments. A partitioning model is then used for the A2/B2 phase to effectively describe the order-disorder transitions. The critically assessed thermodynamic description describes all phase equilibria data well. A2/B2 transitions are also shown to agree well with previous experimental findings.

  15. First principles molecular dynamics of metal/water interfaces under bias potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza, Luana; Brandimarte, Pedro; Rocha, Alexandre; Fernandez-Serra, Marivi

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of the water-metal system at an atomic level is extremely important in electrocatalysts for fuel cells, photocatalysis among other systems. The question of the interface energetics involves a detailed study of the nature of the interactions between water-water and water-substrate. A first principles description of all components of the system is the most appropriate methodology in order to advance understanding of electrochemically processes. In this work we describe, using first principles molecular dynamics simulations, the dynamics of a combined surface(Au and Pd)/water system both in the presence and absence of an external bias potential applied to the electrodes, as one would come across in electrochemistry. This is accomplished using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium Green's functions methods (NEGF), thus accounting for the fact that one is dealing with an out-of-equilibrium open system, with and without van der Waals interactions. DOE Early Career Award No. DE-SC0003871.

  16. Structures and magnetic properties of Co-Zr-B magnets studied by first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin; Ke, Liqin; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang, E-mail: wangcz@ameslab.gov; Ho, Kai-Ming, E-mail: kmh@ameslab.gov [Ames Laboratory, U.S. DOE and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2015-06-28

    The structures and magnetic properties of Co-Zr-B alloys near the composition of Co{sub 5}Zr with B at. % ≤6% were studied using adaptive genetic algorithm and first-principles calculations. The energy and magnetic moment contour maps as a function of chemical composition were constructed for the Co-Zr-B magnet alloys through extensive structure searches and calculations. We found that Co-Zr-B system exhibits the same structure motif as the “Co{sub 11}Zr{sub 2}” polymorphs, and such motif plays a key role in achieving strong magnetic anisotropy. Boron atoms were found to be able to substitute cobalt atoms or occupy the “interruption” sites. First-principles calculations showed that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies of the boron-doped alloys are close to that of the high-temperature rhombohedral Co{sub 5}Zr phase and larger than that of the low-temperature Co{sub 5.25}Zr phase. Our calculations provide useful guidelines for further experimental optimization of the magnetic performances of these alloys.

  17. Waltzing of a helium pair in tungsten: Migration barrier and trajectory revealed from first-principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Niu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite well documented first-principles theoretical determination of the low migration energy (0.06 eV of a single He in tungsten, fully quantum mechanical calculations on the migration of a He pair still present a challenge due to the complexity of its trajectory. By identifying the six most stable configurations of the He pair in W and decomposing its motion into rotational, translational, and rotational-translational routines, we are able to determine its migration barrier and trajectory. Our density functional theory calculations demonstrate a He pair has three modes of motion: a close or open circular two-dimensional motion in (100 plane with an energy barrier of 0.30 eV, a snaking motion along [001] direction with a barrier of 0.30 eV, and a twisted-ladder motion along [010] direction with the two He swinging in the plane (100 and a barrier of 0.31 eV. The graceful associative movements of a He pair are related to the chemical-bonding-like He-He interaction being much stronger than its migration barrier in W. The excellent agreement with available experimental measurements (0.24–0.32 eV on He migration makes our first-principles result a solid input to obtain accurate He-W interatomic potentials in molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Anisotropic intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of borophane from first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Haifeng; Gao, Yan; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-25

    Borophene (boron sheet) as a new type of two-dimensional (2D) material was grown successfully recently. Unfortunately, the structural stability of freestanding borophene is still an open issue. Theoretical research has found that full hydrogenation can remove such instability, and the product is called borophane. In this paper, using first-principles calculations we investigate the lattice dynamics and thermal transport properties of borophane. The intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity and the relaxation time of borophane are investigated by solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. We find that the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of borophane is anisotropic, as the higher value (along the zigzag direction) is about two times of the lower one (along the armchair direction). The contributions of phonon branches to the lattice thermal conductivities along different directions are evaluated. It is found that both the anisotropy of thermal conductivity and the different phonon branches which dominate the thermal transport along different directions are decided by the group velocity and the relaxation time of phonons with very low frequency. In addition, the size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated using cumulative thermal conductivity. The underlying physical mechanisms of these unique properties are also discussed in this paper.

  19. Terahertz spectra of biotin based on first principle, molecular mechanical, and hybrid simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykhovski, Alexei; Woolard, Dwight

    2013-07-01

    Terahertz (THz) absorption of biotin was simulated using the first principle and the density functional theory (DFT) both in the harmonic approximation and with corrections for the anharmonicity. Anharmonicity corrections were calculated using two different approaches. First, the perturbation theory-based first principle calculations were performed to include third- and fourth-order anharmonicity corrections in atomic displacements to harmonic vibrational states. Second, the atom-centered density matrix propagation molecular dynamics model that provides a good energy conservation was used to calculate the atomic trajectories, velocities, and a dipole moment time history of biotin at low and room temperatures. Predicted low-THz lines agree well with the experimental spectra. The influence of the polyethylene (PE) matrix embedment on the THz spectra of biotin at the nanoscale was studied using the developed hybrid DFT/molecular mechanical approach. While PE is almost transparent at THz frequencies, additional low-THz lines are predicted in the biotin/PE system, which reflects a dynamic interaction between biotin and a surrounding PE cavity.

  20. Magnetism, microstructure and First Principles calculations of atomized and annealed Ni{sub 3}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Escorial, A., E-mail: age@cenim.csic.es [CENIM-CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Crespo, P.; Hernando, A. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, IMA-UCM, P.O. Box 155, 28230 Madrid (Spain); Lieblich, M. [CENIM-CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Marín, P.; Velasco, V. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, IMA-UCM, P.O. Box 155, 28230 Madrid (Spain); Ynduráin, F. [Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, UAM, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • The microstructure and order of as-atomized Ni{sub 3}Al powder change with annealing. • The change of the magnetic properties shows the influence of the chemical order. • First Principles calculations show the effect of the density of states to the order. - Abstract: In this work Ni{sub 3}Al powder particles obtained by atomization were characterized magnetically and microstructurally in as-atomized state and after annealing. Upon annealing the X-ray diffraction patterns show a noticeable increase of the signal of the ordered phase γ′-Ni{sub 3}Al, L1{sub 2}, phase and the microstructure evolves from a lamellar and dendrite to a large grain microstructure. The Curie temperature of the as-atomized powder particles is 85 K and decreases after annealing down to 50 K. First Principles calculations were carried out to correlate the experimental observations with local order of Ni and Al atoms and illustrate the importance of the local order in the density of states at the Fermi level, showing how the magnetic moment depends on the Ni and Al atomic position.

  1. First principles derived, transferable force fields for CO2 adsorption in Na-exchanged cationic zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hanjun; Kamakoti, Preeti; Ravikovitch, Peter I; Aronson, Matthew; Paur, Charanjit; Sholl, David S

    2013-08-21

    The development of accurate force fields is vital for predicting adsorption in porous materials. Previously, we introduced a first principles-based transferable force field for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites (Fang et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 10692). In this study, we extend our approach to CO2 adsorption in cationic zeolites which possess more complex structures. Na-exchanged zeolites are chosen for demonstrating the approach. These methods account for several structural complexities including Al distribution, cation positions and cation mobility, all of which are important for predicting adsorption. The simulation results are validated with high-resolution experimental measurements of isotherms and microcalorimetric heats of adsorption on well-characterized materials. The choice of first-principles method has a significant influence on the ability of force fields to accurately describe CO2-zeolite interactions. The PBE-D2 derived force field, which performed well for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites, does not do so for Na-exchanged zeolites; the PBE-D2 method overestimates CO2 adsorption energies on multi-cation sites that are common in cationic zeolites with low Si/Al ratios. In contrast, a force field derived from the DFT/CC method performed well. Agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment not only for LTA-4A on which the force field fitting is based, but for other two common adsorbents, NaX and NaY.

  2. Quantum Mechanics and First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Selection of Polymer Sensing Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Mario; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Ryan, Margaret A.

    We present two first-principles methods, density functional theory (DFT) and a molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulation protocol, as computational means for the selection of polymer sensing materials. The DFT methods can yield binding energies of polymer moieties to specific vapor bound compounds, quantities that were found useful in materials selection for sensing of organic and inorganic compounds for designing sensors for the electronic nose (ENose) that flew on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008-2009. Similarly, we present an MD protocol that offers high consistency in the estimation of Hildebrand and Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) for vapor bound compounds and amorphous polymers. HSP are useful for fitting measured polymer sensor responses with physically rooted analytical models. We apply the method to the JPL electronic nose (ENose), an array of sensors with conducting leads connected through thin film polymers loaded with carbon black. Detection relies on a change in electric resistivity of the polymer film as function of the amount of swelling caused by the presence of the analyte chemical compound. The amount of swelling depends upon the chemical composition of the polymer and the analyte molecule. The pattern is unique and it unambiguously identifies the compound. Experimentally determined changes in relative resistivity of fifteen polymer sensor materials upon exposure to ten vapors were modeled with the first-principles HSP model.

  3. First-principles calculation of mechanical properties of Si <001> nanowires and comparison to nanomechanical theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B; Rudd, R E

    2006-10-19

    We report the results of first-principles density functional theory calculations of the Young's modulus and other mechanical properties of hydrogen-passivated Si {l_angle}001{r_angle} nanowires. The nanowires are taken to have predominantly {l_brace}100{r_brace}surfaces, with small {l_brace}110{r_brace} facets according to the Wulff shape. The Young's modulus, the equilibrium length and the constrained residual stress of a series of prismatic beams of differing sizes are found to have size dependences that scale like the surface area to volume ratio for all but the smallest beam. The results are compared with a continuum model and the results of classical atomistic calculations based on an empirical potential. We attribute the size dependence to specific physical structures and interactions. In particular, the hydrogen interactions on the surface and the charge density variations within the beam are quantified and used both to parameterize the continuum model and to account for the discrepancies between the two models and the first-principles results.

  4. Phonon spectrum, thermal expansion and heat capacity of UO{sub 2} from first-principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Younsuk, E-mail: younsuk.yun@psi.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratory of Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Legut, Dominik [Nanotechnology Centre, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, CZ-708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Atomistic Modeling and Design of Materials, University of Leoben, Leoben (Austria); Oppeneer, Peter M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-07-15

    We report first-principles calculations of the phonon dispersion spectrum, thermal expansion, and heat capacity of uranium dioxide. The so-called direct method, based on the quasiharmonic approximation, is used to calculate the phonon frequencies within a density functional framework for the electronic structure. The phonon dispersions calculated at the theoretical equilibrium volume agree well with experimental dispersions. The computed phonon density of states (DOSs) compare reasonably well with measured data, as do also the calculated frequencies of the Raman and infrared active modes including the LO/TO splitting. To study the pressure dependence of the phonon frequencies we calculate phonon dispersions for several lattice constants. Our computed phonon spectra demonstrate the opening of a gap between the optical and acoustic modes induced by pressure. Taking into account the phonon contribution to the total free energy of UO{sub 2} its thermal expansion coefficient and heat capacity have been computed from first-principles. Both quantities are in good agreement with available experimental data for temperatures up to about 500 K.

  5. Isobaric-isothermal Monte Carlo simulations from first principles: Application to liquid water at ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, M; Siepmann, J I; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J; VandeVondele, J; Hutter, J; Mohamed, F; Krack, M

    2004-12-02

    A series of first principles Monte Carlo simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble were carried out for liquid water at ambient conditions (T = 298 K and p = 1 atm). The Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) exchange and correlation energy functionals and norm-conserving Goedecker-Teter-Hutter (GTH) pseudopotentials were employed with the CP2K simulation package to examine systems consisting of 64 water molecules. The fluctuations in the system volume encountered in simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble requires a reconsideration of the suitability of the typical charge density cutoff and the regular grid generation method previously used for the computation of the electrostatic energy in first principles simulations in the microcanonical or canonical ensembles. In particular, it is noted that a much higher cutoff is needed and that the most computationally efficient method of creating grids can result in poor simulations. Analysis of the simulation trajectories using a very large charge density cutoff at 1200 Ry and four different grid generation methods point to a substantially underestimated liquid density of about 0.85 g/cm{sup 3} resulting in a somewhat understructured liquid (with a value of about 2.7 for the height of the first peak in the oxygen/oxygen radial distribution function) for BLYP-GTH water at ambient conditions.

  6. First-principles approach to excitons in time-resolved and angle-resolved photoemission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, E.; Sangalli, D.; Marini, A.; Stefanucci, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we put forward a first-principles approach and propose an accurate diagrammatic approximation to calculate the time-resolved (TR) and angle-resolved photoemission spectrum of systems with excitons. We also derive an alternative formula to the TR photocurrent which involves a single time-integral of the lesser Green's function. The diagrammatic approximation applies to the relaxed regime characterized by the presence of quasistationary excitons and vanishing polarization. The nonequilibrium self-energy diagrams are evaluated using excited Green's functions; since this is not standard, the analytic derivation is presented in detail. The final result is an expression for the lesser Green's function in terms of quantities that can all be calculated in a first-principles manner. The validity of the proposed theory is illustrated in a one-dimensional model system with a direct gap. We discuss possible scenarios and highlight some universal features of the exciton peaks. Our results indicate that the exciton dispersion can be observed in TR and angle-resolved photoemission.

  7. Epitaxial-strain-induced multiferroicity in SrMnO3 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Rabe, Karin M.

    2010-03-01

    In the first-principles search for new ferromagnetic-ferroelectric multiferroics, one key indicator is the softening of the lowest frequency polar phonon with ferromagnetic ordering from a paraelectric antiferromagnetic bulk state. In a first-principles survey of the phonon dispersions of a wide range of magnetic perovskites, we identified SrMnO3 as a promising candidate system. We find that a ferromagnetic-ferroelectric phase is stabilized by both compressive and tensile epitaxial strain. For compressive strain, there is a sequence of intermediate magnetic transitions, first to C-AFM and then to A-AFM ordering, with an increasing fraction of ferromagnetically aligned nearest neighbor Mn. At each of these, the change in magnetic order is accompanied by a jump in the magnitude of the electric polarization, so, near the A-AFM-FE->FE-FM phase boundary at 3.4% and G-AFM-FE->FE-FM phase boundary at -2.9%, an applied electric field can induce a nonzero magnetization, and the jump in c-lattice constant at -2.9% strain can generate a large piezomagnetic response. The origin of the large phonon softening in SrMnO3 will be examined, which should provide guidance in identifying additional candidate systems for epitaxial-strain-induced multiferroicity.

  8. Superfluid density in He II near the lambda transition: First principles theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, H.W., E-mail: hwjackson2@gmail.com

    2015-03-15

    A first principles theory of the λ transition in liquid {sup 4}He was introduced in a recent paper [H. W. Jackson, J. Low Temp. Phys. 155, 1 (2009)]. In that theory critical fluctuations consisting of isothermal fourth sound waves are treated with quantum statistical mechanics methods in deriving formulas for constant volume conditions for specific heat, correlation length, equal time pair correlation function, and isothermal compressibility. To leading order terms in (T{sub λ}−T) the theory yields exact results α′=0 and ν′=2/3 for critical exponents at constant volume. A follow-up study in the present paper demonstrates by a least squares fit that a logarithmic function accurately describes the specific heat at svp when (T{sub λ}−T) is between 10{sup −9} K and 10{sup −5} K. This logarithmic divergent behavior conflicts with previous analyses of experimental data and predictions of renormalization group theory that constant pressure specific heat is finite at T{sub λ}, but Is thermodynamically consistent with logarithmic asymptotic behavior of specific heat at constant volume predicted in the new theory. The first principles theory is extended in this paper to derive formulas for superfluid density and for a relation between superfluid density and correlation length in He II near T{sub λ}. Numerical results based on these formulas are in good agreement with experimental data produced by second sound measurements.

  9. First-principles investigation of negative thermal expansion in II-VI semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Yuan, Peng-Fei; Wang, Fei; Sun, Qiang [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Center for Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Guo, Zheng-Xiao [Deparment of Chemistry, University College London, London WCIHOAJ (United Kingdom); Liang, Er-Jun, E-mail: ejliang@zzu.edu.cn [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Center for Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Jia, Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Center for Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2014-11-14

    Within the framework of first-principles, all II-VI semiconductors with cubic zinc blende structure have negative thermal expansion (NTE) behavior at low temperatures. Negative mode Grüneisen parameters are found for two transverse acoustic (TA) branches near the Brillouin-zone boundaries. Through the analysis of vibrational modes, it shows that the librational mode which brings about the bond tension effect by atomic motions perpendicular to the bonds can contribute to the NTE. Related thermodynamic properties of II-VI semiconductors have also been studied. It is demonstrated that with increased ionic radius and atomic mass, the variety of electronegativity can cause more covalent character in bonding nature, weaker interatomic force constants and lower frequencies in lattice vibrations. Thus, despite the same vibrational modes, II-VI semiconductors can present different NTE behavior and thermodynamic properties. - Highlights: • The NTE properties of II-VI semiconductors are investigated by first-principles calculation. • Negative mode Grüneisen parameters are found for two TA branches. • The librational mode can contribute to the NTE behavior. • Various ionic radius and electronegativity can cause different NTE behavior and thermodynamic properties.

  10. First-Principles Modeling of Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Karl Johnson

    2011-05-20

    The objective of this project is to complement experimental efforts of MHoCE partners by using state-of-the-art theory and modeling to study the structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics of hydrogen storage materials. Specific goals include prediction of the heats of formation and other thermodynamic properties of alloys from first principles methods, identification of new alloys that can be tested experimentally, calculation of surface and energetic properties of nanoparticles, and calculation of kinetics involved with hydrogenation and dehydrogenation processes. Discovery of new metal hydrides with enhanced properties compared with existing materials is a critical need for the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. New materials discovery can be aided by the use of first principles (ab initio) computational modeling in two ways: (1) The properties, including mechanisms, of existing materials can be better elucidated through a combined modeling/experimental approach. (2) The thermodynamic properties of novel materials that have not been made can, in many cases, be quickly screened with ab initio methods. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to explore millions of possible reaction conditions consisting of different element spaces, compositions, and temperatures. We have identified potentially promising single- and multi-step reactions that can be explored experimentally.

  11. Unified understanding of superconductivity and Mott transition in alkali-doped fullerides from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2015-08-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides A 3C60 (A = K, Rb, Cs) are surprising materials where conventional phonon-mediated superconductivity and unconventional Mott physics meet, leading to a remarkable phase diagram as a function of volume per C60 molecule. We address these materials with a state-of-the-art calculation, where we construct a realistic low-energy model from first principles without using a priori information other than the crystal structure and solve it with an accurate many-body theory. Remarkably, our scheme comprehensively reproduces the experimental phase diagram including the low-spin Mott-insulating phase next to the superconducting phase. More remarkably, the critical temperatures T c's calculated from first principles quantitatively reproduce the experimental values. The driving force behind the surprising phase diagram of A 3C60 is a subtle competition between Hund's coupling and Jahn-Teller phonons, which leads to an effectively inverted Hund's coupling. Our results establish that the fullerides are the first members of a novel class of molecular superconductors in which the multiorbital electronic correlations and phonons cooperate to reach high T c s-wave superconductivity.

  12. Preparation of Cystein from Cysteine Cuprous Mercaptide%由半胱氨酸亚铜制取半胱氨酸

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勋; 胡敏; 姚小平

    2015-01-01

    In this paper ,a new preparation method of cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate from cysteine cu‐prous mcercaptide ,which is prepared by the reduction and precipitation of cystine with cuprous oxide has been introduced ,including re‐precipitation of cysteine cuprous mercaptide ,removal of copper using H2 S , decoloration ,crystallization and recrystalization .The yield of the product is up to 12 .4% ,with the quality according with the Japanese AJI standards .%研究了一种用氧化亚铜将胱氨酸还原沉淀为半胱氨酸亚铜,再由此制备半胱氨酸盐酸盐一水物的新方法.该方法包含半胱氨酸亚铜再沉淀,H2 S法脱铜,脱色,产品结晶,重结晶等步骤,半胱氨酸盐酸盐一水物收率达12.4%,产品质量符合日本味之素标准.

  13. Origin of giant spin-lattice coupling and the suppression of ferroelectricity in EuTiO3 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birol, Turan; Fennie, Craig J.

    2013-09-01

    We elucidate the microscopic mechanism that causes a suppression of ferroelectricity and an enhancement of octahedral rotations in EuTiO3 from first principles. We find that the hybridization of the rare-earth Eu 4f states with the B-site Ti cation drives the system away from ferroelectricity. We also show that the magnetic order dependence of this hybridization is the dominant source of spin-phonon coupling in this material. Our results underline the importance of rare-earth f electrons on the lattice dynamics and stability of these transition metal oxides.

  14. Discovery of Novel Perovskites for Solar Thermochemical Water Splitting from High-Throughput First-Principles Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Antoine; Wolverton, Chris

    Among the several possible routes of hydrogen synthesis, thermochemical water splitting (TWS) cycles is a promising method for large scale production of hydrogen. The choice of metal oxide used in a TWS cycle is critical since it governs the rate and efficiency of the gas splitting process. In this work, we present a high-throughput density functional theory (HT-DFT) study of ABO3 perovskite compounds to screen for thermodynamically favorable two-step thermochemical water splitting materials. We demonstrate the use of two screens, based on thermodynamic stability and oxygen vacancy formation energy, on 5,329 different compositions to predict 139 stable potential candidate materials for water splitting applications. Several of these compounds have not been experimentally explored yet and present promising avenues for further research. Additionally, the large dataset of compounds and stability in our possession allowed us to revisit the structural maps for perovskites. This study shows the benefit of using first-principles calculations to efficiently screen an exhaustively large number of compounds at once. It provides a baseline for further studies involving more detailed exploration of a restricted number of those compounds.

  15. First principles study of Al-doped graphene as nanostructure adsorbent for NO2 and N2O: DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Ali Shokuhi

    2015-12-01

    We studied the first principles adsorption phenomena of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) molecules on the surface of pristine graphene and Al-doped graphene using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The adsorption energies have been calculated for different possible configurations of the molecules on the surface of pristine and Al-doped graphene. Our calculations reveal that the Al-doped graphene has significant adsorption energy, elevated net charge transferring values and smaller bond distances to gases than that of pristine graphene because of the chemical interaction of the mentioned molecules. Furthermore, the calculated density of states (DOS) show the existing of noteworthy orbital hybridization between NO2 as well as N2O and Al-doped graphene during adsorption process which is proving to strong interaction while there is no evidence for hybridization between the those molecules and the pristine graphene. Our calculated adsorption energies for the most stable states for NO2 and N2O was -62.2 kJ mol-1 (-48.5 kJ mol-1 BSSE corrected energy) and -33.9 kJ mol-1 (-22.7 kJ mol-1 corrected energy), which are correspond to chemisorption process. These results point to the suitability of Al-doped graphene as a powerful sensor for practical applications.

  16. Electronic and optical properties of new multifunctional materials via half-substituted hematite: First principles calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Electronic structure and optical properties of α-FeMO 3 systems (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Cd or In) have been investigated using first principles calculations. All of the FeMO 3 systems have a large net magnetic moment. The ground state of pure α-Fe 2O 3 is an antiferromagnetic insulator. For M = Cu or Cd, the systems are half-metallic. Strong absorption in the visible region can be observed in the Cu and Cd-doped systems. Systems with M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr or In are not half-metallic and are insulators. The strongest peaks shift toward shorter wavelengths in the absorption spectra. It is concluded that transition metal doping can modify the electronic structure and optical properties of α-FeMO 3 systems. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Strength and bonding nature of superhard Z-carbon from first-principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqian Qin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Z-carbon is a candidate structure proposed recently for the cold-compressed phase of carbon. We have studied the mechanical properties of Z-carbon by performing the first-principles density functional calculations. The single-crystal elastic constants calculations show that Z-carbon is mechanically stable. The predicted bulk and shear moduli of Z-carbon are comparable to diamond and cubic BN, suggesting that Z-carbon can be a superhard material. We also obtained the ideal tensile and shear strengths for Z-carbon through deformation from the elastic regime to structural instability. The failure modes under tensile deformation were explored carefully based on the calculated charge density distribution and bonding evolution.

  18. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A.; Chobot, Sarah E.; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C.; Leslie Dutton, P.; Discher, Bohdana M.

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics — the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  19. Charge Carrier Trapping at Surface Defects of Perovskite Solar Cell Absorbers: A First-Principles Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uratani, Hiroki; Yamashita, Koichi

    2017-02-16

    The trapping of charge carriers at defects on surfaces or grain boundaries is detrimental for the performance of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). For example, it is the main limiting factor for carrier lifetime. Moreover, it causes hysteresis in the current-voltage curves, which is considered to be a serious issue for PSCs' operation. In this work, types of surface defects responsible for carrier trapping are clarified by a comprehensive first-principles investigation into surface defects of tetragonal CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3). Considering defect formation energetics, it is proposed that a Pb-rich condition is preferred to an I-rich one; however, a moderate condition might possibly be the best choice. Our result paves the way for improving the performance of PSCs through a rational strategy of suppressing carrier trapping at surface defects.

  20. First-Principles Calculations of Elastic Properties of Cubic Ni2MnGa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dong; XIAO Qi-Min; ZHAO Ying-Lu; YU Ben-Hai; WANG Chun-Lei; SHI De-Seng

    2009-01-01

    Dependence of bulk modulus on both pressure and temperature, the elastic constants Cij and the pressure and temperature dependence of normalized volume V/Vo of cubic Ni2MnGa alloy axe successfully obtained using the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential (PW-PP) method as well as the quasi-harmonic Debye model. We analyse the relationship between bulk modulus and temperature up to 800 K and obtain the relationships between bulk modulus B and pressures at different temperatures. It is found that the bulk modulus B increases monotonically with increasing pressure. Moreover, the temperature dependences of the Debye temperature are also analysed. The calculated results are in agreement with the available experimental data and the previous theoretical results.

  1. Nitrogen-induced magnetism in stannates from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wen-Zhi; Meng, Bo; Xu, Hai-Qing; Chen, Qiao; Wang, Ling-Ling

    2016-09-01

    First-principles calculations have been used to comparatively investigate electronic and magnetic properties of nitrogen-doped (N-doped) nonmagnetic semiconductor perovskite-type stannate (MSnO3, M = Ca, Sr, Ba). A total magnetic moment of 1.0 μB induced by N is found in MSnO3 supercell with one N dopant. The spontaneous polarization mainly originates from spin splitting on 2p state of N. The medium-sized formation energy shows that the N-doped MSnO3 can be realized experimentally under the metal-rich environments, but the clustering tendency and short-range coupling imply that the stannate matrices are unsuitable for magnetizing by substituting N for O. Our study offers a fresh sight of spontaneous spin polarization in d0 magnetism. The FM coupling in N-doped MSnO3 should be attributed to the hole-mediated p-p coupling mechanism.

  2. Domains and ferroelectric switching pathways in Ca3Ti2O7 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowadnick, Elizabeth A.; Fennie, Craig J.

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid improper ferroelectricity, where an electrical polarization can be induced via a trilinear coupling to two nonpolar structural distortions of different symmetries, recently was demonstrated experimentally in the n =2 Ruddlesden-Popper compound Ca3Ti2O7 . In this paper we use group theoretic methods and first-principles calculations to identify possible ferroelectric switching pathways in Ca3Ti2O7 . We identify low-energy paths that reverse the polarization direction by switching via an orthorhombic twin domain or via an antipolar structure. We also introduce a chemically intuitive set of local order parameters to give insight into how these paths are relevant to ferroelectric switching nucleated at domain walls. Our findings suggest that switching may proceed via more than one mechanism in this material.

  3. The first-principles study on the doping effect of Re in Ni3A1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Yu; Chongyu Wang; Tao Yu

    2008-01-01

    Using first-principles density function for molecules method (DMol) and discrete variational method (DVM) based on the density functional theory, we studied the doping effect of Re in Ni3Al. The structure relaxation and the alloying energy show that Re has a strong A1 site preference and leads to the local deformation, which is in agreement with the experimental results and other theoretical results. In addition, the charge density difference and the bond order show that Re can strongly enhance the interatomic interaction between the nearest neighbor atoms. From the density of states and the Pauli spectrum, we find that resonance states and localized states are induced by doping Re, and the doped Re atom forms the hybridized bond with the nearest neighbor atoms.

  4. Electronic structure and optical properties of boron suboxide B6O system: First-principles investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinjin; Wang, Zhanyu; Jing, Yueyue; Wang, Songyou; Chou, Che-Fu; Hu, Han; Chiou, Shan-Haw; Tsoo, Chia-Chin; Su, Wan-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    The structural, mechanical, electronic, and optical properties of B6O were explored by means of first-principles calculations. Such a system is mechanically stable and also a relatively hard material which are derived from obtained elastic constants and bulk moduli. Bulk B6O is a direct-gap semiconductor with a bandgap of about 2.93 eV within G0W0 approximation. Furthermore, the optical properties, such as real and imaginary parts of dielectric functions, refractive index and extinction coefficient, and the comparison of optical properties between the density-functional theory (DFT) and G0W0 Bethe-Salpeter equation (G0W0-BSE) results, were computed and discussed. The results obtained from our calculations open a possibility for expanding its use in device applications.

  5. Thermodynamic description of the Al-Cu-Yb ternary system supported by first-principles calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase relationships of the ternary Al-Cu-Yb system have been assessed using a combination of CALPHAD method and first principles calculations. A self-consistent thermodynamic parameter was established based on the experimental and theoretical information. Most of the binary intermetallic phases, except Al3Yb, Al2Yb, Cu2Yb and Cu5Yb, were assumed to be zero solubility in the ternary system. Based on the experimental data, eight ternary intermetallic compounds were taken into consideration in this system. Among them, three were treated as line compounds with large homogeneity ranges for Al and Cu. The others were treated as stoichiometric compounds. The calculated phase diagrams were in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data.

  6. Obtaining Mixed-Basis Ising-Like Expansions of Binary Alloys from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Gus L. W.; Sanati, Mahdi; Wang, Ligen; Zunger, Alex

    2002-03-01

    Many electronic and structural properties of A_1-xBx alloys can be predicted theoretically if one can find (and quickly compute) the ``configurational energy function''--that is, the energy for any given configuration of A and B atoms on the crystal lattice. Cluster expansion methods provide one such approach. We describe our mixed-basis cluster expansion (MBCE) based on first-principles total energy calculations for only a few ordered A_mBn compounds. Our MBCE can robustly predict a variety of material properties including ground states, phase diagrams, precipitate formation, etc. Specifically, we illustrate how systematic choice of interaction parameters, numerical parameters, and choice of input structures can significantly increase the accuracy and the predictive capability of the expansion. We illustrate how the fit of LDA data can be done essentially automatically. Examples include Cu-Au, Ni-Pt, and Sc_1-xBox_xS.

  7. Z2 Invariance of Germanene on MoS2 from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlaki, Taher; Bokdam, Menno; Kelly, Paul J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a low energy Hamiltonian generalized to describe how the energy bands of germanene (Ge ¯ ) are modified by interaction with a substrate or a capping layer. The parameters that enter the Hamiltonian are determined from first-principles relativistic calculations for Ge ¯ |MoS2 bilayers and MoS2|Ge ¯ |MoS2 trilayers and are used to determine the topological nature of the system. For the lowest energy, buckled germanene structure, the gap depends strongly on how germanene is oriented with respect to the MoS2 layer(s). Topologically nontrivial gaps for bilayers and trilayers can be almost as large as for a freestanding germanene layer.

  8. First-principles calculations of magnetic properties for CdCrO{sub 2} under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amari, S., E-mail: siham_amari@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Modelisation et de Simulation en Sciences des Materiaux, Departement de Physique Universite Djillali Liabes, Faculte des sciences, Universite Djillali Liabes, BP 89 Sidi Bel Abbes 22000 (Algeria); Mecabih, S.; Abbar, B.; Bouhafs, B. [Laboratoire de Modelisation et de Simulation en Sciences des Materiaux, Departement de Physique Universite Djillali Liabes, Faculte des sciences, Universite Djillali Liabes, BP 89 Sidi Bel Abbes 22000 (Algeria)

    2013-02-15

    By employing the first-principles method of the full potential linear augmented plane waves plus the local orbitals (FP-L/APW+lo) within the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation potential, the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of chalcopyrite compound CdCrO{sub 2} are investigated. In order to take into account the strong on-site Coulomb interaction, we also performed the generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard correlation terms. We systematically study how the exchange interactions and magnetic moments of CdCrO{sub 2} are affected by the different choice of U as well as the exchange correlation potential. We have also carried out the pressure effect on the magnetic properties. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculation of the exchange constants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pressure dependence of the magnetic properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The exchange correlation potential effect on the magnetic properties.

  9. Vibrational and mechanical properties of single layer MXene structures: a first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Uğur; Özden, Ayberk; Perkgöz, Nihan K.; Ay, Feridun; Sevik, Cem

    2016-08-01

    MXenes, carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides of early transition metals are the new members of two dimensional materials family given with a formula of {{{M}}}n+1 X n . Recent advances in chemical exfoliation and CVD growth of these crystals together with their promising performance in electrochemical energy storage systems have triggered the interest in these two dimensional structures. In this work, we employ first principles calculations for n = 1 structures of Sc, Ti, Zr, Mo and Hf pristine MXenes and their fully surface terminated forms with F and O. We systematically investigated the dynamical and mechanical stability of both pristine and fully terminated MXene structures to determine the possible MXene candidates for experimental realization. In conjunction with an extensive stability analysis, we report Raman and infrared active mode frequencies for the first time, providing indispensable information for the experimental elaboration of MXene field. After determining dynamically stable MXenes, we provide their phonon dispersion relations, electronic and mechanical properties.

  10. First principles study on the structural, electronic, and elastic properties of Na-As systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozisik, H. B.; Colakoglu, K.; Deligoz, E.; Ozisik, H.

    2011-10-01

    We have performed the first principles calculation by using the plane-wave pseudopotential approach with the generalized gradient approximation for investigating the structural, electronic, and elastic properties Na-As systems (NaAs in NaP, LiAs and AuCu-type structures, NaAs 2 in MgCu 2-type structure, Na 3As in Na 3As, Cu 3P and Li 3Bi-type structures, and Na 5As 4 in A 5B 4-type structure). The lattice parameters, cohesive energy, formation energy, bulk modulus, and the first derivative of bulk modulus (to fit to Murnaghan's equation of state) of the related structures are calculated. The second-order elastic constants and the other related quantities such as Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, sound velocities, and Debye temperature are also estimated.

  11. First-principles study on the elastic properties of Cu2GeSe3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hezhu; Tan, Xiaojian; Jiang, Jun; Jiang, Haochuan

    2016-01-01

    The elastic properties of Cu2GeSe3, including bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Possion's ratio, and their anisotropic properties, have been investigated by using first-principles calculations. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with previous calculations and experimental measurements. The result of bulk modulus by fitting the Birch-Murnaghan 3rd-order equation of state is well consistent with that calculated from the elastic constants. The ductile nature of Cu2GeSe3 is characterized according to Pugh's rule. The Debye temperature calculated from fitting heat capacity data is consistent with that obtained from sound velocity. Additionally, the elastic anisotropy is depicted in detail by plotting the directional dependence of the bulk and Young's moduli.

  12. First-principles photoemission spectroscopy of DNA and RNA nucleobases from Koopmans-compliant functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Ngoc Linh; Ferretti, Andrea; Marzari, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The need to interpret ultraviolet photoemission data strongly motivates the refinement of first-principles techniques able to accurately predict spectral properties. In this work we employ Koopmans-compliant functionals, constructed to enforce piecewise linearity in approximate density functionals, to calculate the structural and electronic properties of DNA and RNA nucleobases. Our results show that not only ionization potentials and electron affinities are accurately predicted with mean absolute errors < 0.1 eV, but also that calculated photoemission spectra are in excellent agreement with experimental ultraviolet photoemission spectra. In particular, the role and contribution of different tautomers to the photoemission spectra are highlighted and discussed in detail. The structural properties of nucleobases are also investigated, showing an improved description with respect to local and semilocal density-functional theory. Methodologically, our results further consolidate the role of Koopmans-compliant ...

  13. First principles computation of lattice energies of organic solids: the benzene crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Ashley L; Sherrill, C David

    2008-01-01

    We provide a first-principles methodology to obtain converged results for the lattice energy of crystals of small, neutral organic molecules. In particular, we determine the lattice energy of crystalline benzene using an additive system based on the individual interaction energies of benzene dimers. Enthalpy corrections are estimated so that the lattice energy can be directly compared to the experimentally determined sublimation energy. Our best estimate of the sublimation energy is 49.4 kJ mol(-1), just over the typical experimentally reported values of 43-47 kJ mol(-1). Our results underscore the necessity of using highly correlated electronic structure methods to determine thermodynamic properties within chemical accuracy. The first coordination sphere contributes about 90 % of the total lattice energy, and the second coordination sphere contributes the remaining 10 %. Three-body interactions are determined to be negligible.

  14. Near-infrared radiation absorption properties of covellite (CuS using first-principles calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Xiao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available First-principles density functional theory was used to investigate the electronic structure, optical properties and the origin of the near-infrared (NIR absorption of covellite (CuS. The calculated lattice constant and optical properties are found to be in reasonable agreement with experimental and theoretical findings. The electronic structure reveals that the valence and conduction bands of covellite are determined by the Cu 3d and S 3p states. By analyzing its optical properties, we can fully understand the potential of covellite (CuS as a NIR absorbing material. Our results show that covellite (CuS exhibits NIR absorption due to its metal-like plasma oscillation in the NIR range.

  15. Role of Rate of Specific Growth Rate in Different Growth Processes: A First Principle Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Dibyendu; Patra, Sankar Nayaran

    2015-01-01

    In the present communication, effort is given for the development of a common platform that helps to address several growth processes found in literature. Based on first principle approach, the role of rate of specific growth rate in different growth processes has been considered in an unified manner. It is found that different growth equations can be derived from the same rate equation of specific growth rate. The dependence of growth features of different growth processes on the parameters of the rate equation of specific growth rate has been examined in detail. It is found that competitive environment may increase the saturation level of population size. The exponential growth could also be addressed in terms of two important factors of growth dynamics, as reproduction and competition. These features are, most probably, not reported earlier.

  16. First-principles investigation of helium dissolution and clustering at a tungsten (1 1 0) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Ying, E-mail: zhyi@buaa.edu.cn; Zhou, Hong-Bo; Jin, Shuo; Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: lgh@buaa.edu.cn

    2015-06-15

    Using a first-principles method, we have investigated dissolution, self-trapping and clustering of He at a W(1 1 0) surface. We found that the He atom is not energetically favorable at both the surface and the subsurface, but it becomes stable under the second atomic layer from the surface. The He is easier to be self-trapped to form an He cluster at the near surface in comparison with the bulk due to the larger self-trapping range and the stronger binding energy. With the formation of such He cluster, the vacancy and thus the He-vacancy complex are able to form at the near surface. The results will provide a useful reference for understanding formation of the He bubble at the W surface.

  17. First Principle Calculation on Aun Ag2 (n = 1 ~ 4) Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The first-principles method based on density-functional theory is used to investigate the geometries of the lowest-lying isomers of Aun Ag2 (n = 1 ~ 4) clusters. Several low-lying isomers are determined, and many of them in electronic configurations with a high spin multiplicity. The stability trend of Ag-doped Aun clusters is compared to that of pure Aun clusters. Our results indicate that the inclusion of two Ag atoms in the clusters lowers the cluster stability, indicating higher stability as the structures grow in size. The bigger energy difference between the Aun and Aun Ag2 curves as the structures grows in size. This information will be useful to understanding the enhanced catalytic activity and selectivity gained by using silver-doped gold catalyst.

  18. Titanium Trisulfide Monolayer as a Potential Thermoelectric Material: A First-Principles-Based Boltzmann Transport Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Xiaolin; Wen, Yanwei; Shi, Lu; Chen, Rong; Liu, Huijun; Shan, Bin

    2017-01-25

    Good electronic transport capacity and low lattice thermal conductivity are beneficial for thermoelectric applications. In this study, the potential use as a thermoelectric material for the recently synthesized two-dimensional TiS3 monolayer is explored by applying first-principles method combined with Boltzmann transport theory. Our work demonstrates that carrier transport in the TiS3 sheet is orientation-dependent, caused by the difference in charge density distribution at band edges. Due to a variety of Ti-S bonds with longer lengths, we find that the TiS3 monolayer shows thermal conductivity much lower compared with that of transition-metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2. Combined with a high power factor along the y-direction, a considerable n-type ZT value (3.1) can be achieved at moderate carrier concentration, suggesting that the TiS3 monolayer is a good candidate for thermoelectric applications.

  19. Lattice dynamics and thermal conductivity of cesium chloride via first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cui; Hu, Cui-E.; Zhang, Tian; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2017-03-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity of CsCl crystal is theoretically investigated from a first-principles theoretical approach based on an iterative solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. Real-space finite-difference supercell approach is employed to generate the harmonic and anharmonic interatomic force constants. Phonon frequencies, velocities, and specific heat capacity as well as anharmonic properties are then obtained and applied to calculate the bulk thermal conductivity of CsCl crystal at the temperatures ranging from 20 K to 700 K. The calculated lattice thermal conductivity 1.14 W/mK of CsCl at room temperature agrees well with the experimental value, demonstrating that this parameter-free approach can provide a good description for the thermal transport of this material. The RTA and iterative solution of BTE are both presented. Our results show that both methods can obtain the thermal conductivity successfully.

  20. Pressure-induced phase transition for ScVO{sub 4}: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Shu-Fang, E-mail: shengshf@gmail.com [School of Physical Science and Information Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Communication Science and Technology, Liaocheng 252059 (China)

    2013-10-01

    We theoretically investigated the structural stability and electronic properties of ScVO{sub 4} by the first-principles pseudopotential method. The tetragonal zircon-type and scheelite-type structures, LaTaO{sub 4}-type structure of ScVO{sub 4} have been considered. The calculations indicate that the LaTaO{sub 4}-type phase is not stable in the pressure 0–100 GPa, and the structural phase transformation from zircon to scheelite-type structure occurs at 5.4 GPa. The band structure shows that zircon-type structure at zero pressure and scheelite-type structure at transition pressure have direct gaps of 2.58 eV and 2.35 eV, respectively. The detailed volume changes during the phase transition were analyzed.