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Sample records for cupressoides tree rings

  1. Desarrollo de cronologías de ancho de anillos para alerce (Fitzroya cupressoides en Contao y Mirador, Chile Development of tree-ring chronologies for alerce (Fitzroya Cupressoides in Contao and Mirador, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO NEIRA

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrollaron dos cronologías de ancho de anillos de crecimiento a partir de muestras de alerce (Fitzroya cupressoides (Molina Johnston, colectadas en dos sitios: Contao, Cordillera de los Andes (41º 33'S, 72º 38'W, y Mirador, en la Cordillera de la Costa (40º 10'S, 73º 42'W. En la elaboración de las cronologías se utilizó el programa COFECHA para verificar el cofechado y se desarrolló para cada sitio una cronología utilizando el programa computacional ARSTAN. Se compararon las cronologías Contao y Mirador, con otras existentes para alerce encontrándose una alta similitud de la cronología Contao con la desarrollada para Lenca (41º 33'S, 72º 36' W. Contao presentó los valores más altos en los estadígrafos analizados con relación a las demás cronologías. Se observaron diferencias entre las cronologías provenientes de la Cordillera de la Costa y de los Andes en los últimos 150 años, probablemente producto de explotaciones humanas e incendios ocurridos en la cordillera de la Costa. La correlación con variables climáticas fue similar en su tendencia a la de otros estudios previos, documentando una correlación negativa con las temperaturas y positiva con las precipitaciones del verano anterior al período de crecimientoTwo ring-width chronologies were developed using samples from alerce (Fitzroya cupressoides (Molina Johnston. These were collected from two different sites; Contao, in the Andean Range and Mirador, in the Coastal Range. The series from the each site were cross-dated and COFECHA program was used to verify this process. Once correctly cross-dated, ARSTAN program was used to build up a chronology for each site (Contao and Mirador. These chronologies were compared with other existing chronologies. Contao presented the best statistics when compared to the other chronologies. Differences between chronologies from the Coastal and Andes Ranges were detected mainly during the last 150 years. Before this period

  2. Dendroecological analysis of a Fitzroya cupressoides and a Nothofagus nitida stand in the Cordillera Pelada, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret S. Devall; Bernard R. Parresol; Juan J. Armesto

    1998-01-01

    Lumbering of Fitzroya cupressoides in Chile began in 1599 and continued until 1976, when the species was declared a national monument and cutting of live trees was prohibited. Today, F. cupressoides is threatened; many of the remaining stands in the coastal range appear to be declining, with a predominance of standing dead stems and patchy, sparse regeneration. The...

  3. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  4. North Patagonia climate over the last millennium inferred from variations in tree-ring width and isotopic composition

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    Lavergne, Aliénor; Villalba, Ricardo; Daux, Valérie

    2014-05-01

    To disentangle natural variability from man-induced climate changes, current climatic trends should be placed in a longer perspective. Tree-rings provide a wealth of information on past climates with high-resolution records covering up to thousands years. Recent tree-ring studies have highlighted the divergence phenomenon in Northern Hemisphere forests. At some temperature-limited northern sites, tree growth responses to climate during recent decades have changed, raising concerns about the quality of historical climate reconstructions based on tree-ring widths. This shift in the eco-physiological response of trees to climate has not yet been documented in the Southern Hemisphere. The aim of this study is to present the tree-ring evolution over the last centuries in northern Patagonia (southern South America; 41° 10'S-71° 50'W) in order to assess 1) divergence in tree-growth response to climate in recent decades, and 2) the potential of tree-ring parameters (width and δ18O) to reconstruct temperature and atmospheric circulation patterns such as the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Based on quality and extent, instrumental temperature records across North Patagonia (39° -41° S) were selected for comparison with tree-ring records. Detection and correction of series inhomogeneities were conducted using HOMER software. A set of homogenized temperature data was developed for the period 1901-2013. Increment-borer samples from Fitzroya cupressoides and Nothofagus pumilio were collected along the regional precipitation gradient from the wet Valdivian rainforest to the mesic Patagonian forests during the austral summer of 2013. Six sampling sites (2 for Fitzroya, 4 for Nothofagus) along the gradient were established to maximize differences in tree-growth responses to climate and to assess the effect of precipitation on the responses. More than 500 cores were cross-dated, detrended and indexed. Composite tree-ring index (TRI) chronologies of F. cupressoides and N. pumilio

  5. Tree rings and radiocarbon calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbetti, M. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). NWG Macintosh Centre for Quaternary Dating

    1999-11-01

    Only a few kinds of trees in Australia and Southeast Asia are known to have growth rings that are both distinct and annual. Those that do are therefore extremely important to climatic and isotope studies. In western Tasmania, extensive work with Huon pine (Lagarostrobos franklinii) has shown that many living trees are more than 1,000 years old, and that their ring widths are sensitive to temperature, rainfall and cloud cover (Buckley et al. 1997). At the Stanley River there is a forest of living (and recently felled) trees which we have sampled and measured. There are also thousands of subfossil Huon pine logs, buried at depths less than 5 metres in an area of floodplain extending over a distance of more than a kilometre with a width of tens of metres. Some of these logs have been buried for 50,000 years or more, but most of them belong to the period between 15,000 years and the present. In previous expeditions in the 1980s and 1990s, we excavated and sampled about 350 logs (Barbetti et al. 1995; Nanson et al. 1995). By measuring the ring-width patterns, and matching them between logs and living trees, we have constructed a tree-ring dated chronology from 571 BC to AD 1992. We have also built a 4254-ring floating chronology (placed by radiocarbon at ca. 3580 to 7830 years ago), and an earlier 1268-ring chronology (ca. 7,580 to 8,850 years ago). There are many individuals, or pairs of logs which match and together span several centuries, at 9,000 years ago and beyond 15 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  6. International Tree Ring Data Bank (ITRDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tree ring data from the International Tree Ring Data Bank and World Data Center for Paleoclimatology archives. Data include raw treering measurements (most are...

  7. TREE SELECTING AND TREE RING MEASURING IN DENDROCHRONOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Akbulut

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Dendrochronology is a method of dating which makes use of the annual nature of tree growth. Dendrochronology may be divided into a number of subfields, each of which covers one or more aspects of the use of tree ring data: dendroclimatology, dendrogeomorphology, dendrohydrology, dendroecology, dendroarchaelogy, and dendrogylaciology. Basic of all form the analysis of the tree rings. The wood or tree rings can aid to dating past events about climatology, ecology, geology, hydrology. Dendrochronological studies are conducted either on increment cores or on discs. It may be seen abnormalities on tree rings during the measurement like that false rings, missing rings, reaction wood. Like that situation, increment cores must be extracted from four different sides of each tree and be studied as more as on tree.

  8. Tree Growth Rings: What They Tell Us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunal, Dennis W.; Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski

    1991-01-01

    Activities in which students can learn to determine the history of a tree from the growth pattern recorded in the rings of a cross-section of a tree are described. Activities include background information, objectives, a list of needed materials per group, and procedures. Cross-sections of four different tree types are included if real tree…

  9. Reconstructing streamflow variation of the Baker River from tree-rings in Northern Patagonia since 1765

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Antonio; Bahamondez, Alejandra; González-Reyes, Alvaro; Muñoz, Ariel A.; Cuq, Emilio; Ruiz-Gómez, Carolina

    2015-10-01

    The understanding of the long-term variation of large rivers streamflow with a high economic and social relevance is necessary in order to improve the planning and management of water resources in different regions of the world. The Baker River has the highest mean discharge of those draining both slopes of the Andes South of 20°S and it is among the six rivers with the highest mean streamflow in the Pacific domain of South America (1100 m3 s-1 at its outlet). It drains an international basin of 29,000 km2 shared by Chile and Argentina and has a high ecologic and economic value including conservation, tourism, recreational fishing, and projected hydropower. This study reconstructs the austral summer - early fall (January-April) streamflow for the Baker River from Nothofagus pumilio tree-rings for the period 1765-2004. Summer streamflow represents 45.2% of the annual discharge. The regression model for the period (1961-2004) explains 54% of the variance of the Baker River streamflow (R2adj = 0.54). The most significant temporal pattern in the record is the sustained decline since the 1980s (τ = -0.633, p = 1.0144 ∗ 10-5 for the 1985-2004 period), which is unprecedented since 1765. The Correlation of the Baker streamflow with the November-April observed Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is significant (1961-2004, r = -0.55, p development of new tree-ring reconstructions to increase the geographic range and to cover the last 1000 or more years using long-lived species (e.g. Fitzroya cupressoides and Pilgerodendron uviferum). Expanding the network and quality of instrumental weather, streamflow and other monitoring stations as well as the study and modeling of the complex hydrological processes in the Baker basin are necessary. This should be the basis for planning, policy design and decision making regarding water resources in the Baker basin.

  10. Lateglacial environmental variability from Swiss tree rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub, Matthias; Büntgen, Ulf; Kaiser, Klaus Felix

    2008-01-01

    Evidence of annually resolved environmental variations during the Allerød interstadial is presented using 81 fossil Scots pine tree-ring series from Gaenziloo and Landikon, near Zurich, Switzerland. The absolute age of the trees ranges between 11,920 and 10,610 14C BP, which was determined...... by wiggle-matching radiocarbon ages to the Cariaco 14C data set. From the two sites we created a composite floating Allerød chronology on the basis of their 632 years of overlap (r = 0.57), after individual spline detrending. Merging both data sets resulted in a Lateglacial tree-ring chronology covering...... 1050 years. Regional curve standardization (RCS) was applied to preserve low-frequency information. Growth behavior of the fossil trees was compared with a recent composite pine data set from the central Swiss Alps and reveals distinct differences. The new Allerød RCS chronology reveals major...

  11. DATING OF LATE PLEISTOCENE TREE-RING SERIES FROM JAPAN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plicht, J.; Imamura, M.; Sakamoto, M.; Boaretto, E.; Rebollo Franco, N.R.

    2012-01-01

    We have radiocarbon dated series of tree rings from 2 fossil trees (named ND-113 and the Fuji tree) buried in fossil volcanic avalanche deposits in Japan. They are dendrochronologically floating, dating beyond the tree-ring part of the C-14 calibration curve. The trees show about 350 and 400 annual

  12. An intensive tree-ring experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Salguero, Raúl; Hevia, Andrea; Camarero, J.J.; Treydte, Kerstin; Frank, Dave; Crivellaro, Alan; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta; Hellman, Lena; Kaczka, Ryszard J.; Kaye, Margot; Akhmetzyanov, Linar; Ashiq, Muhammad Waseem; Bhuyan, Upasana; Bondarenko, Olesia; Camisón, Álvaro; Camps, Sien; García, Vicenta Constante; Vaz, Filipe Costa; Gavrila, Ionela G.; Gulbranson, Erik; Huhtamaa, Heli; Janecka, Karolina; Jeffers, Darren; Jochner, Matthias; Koutecký, Tomáš; Lamrani-Alaoui, Mostafa; Lebreton-Anberrée, Julie; Seijo, María Martín; Matulewski, Pawel; Metslaid, Sandra; Miron, Sergiu; Morrisey, Robert; Opdebeeck, Jorgen; Ovchinnikov, Svyatoslav; Peters, Richard; Petritan, Any M.; Popkova, Margarita; Rehorkova, Stepanka; Ariza, María O.R.; Sánchez-Miranda, Ángela; Linden, Van der Marjolein; Vannoppen, Astrid; Volařík, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The European Dendroecologial Fieldweek (EDF) provides an intensive learning experience in tree-ring research that challenges any participant to explore new multidisciplinary dendro-sciences approaches within the context of field and laboratory settings. Here we present the 25th EDF, held in

  13. Tree Rings in the Tropics: Insights into the Ecology and Climate Sensitivity of Tropical Trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brienen, R.J.W.; Schöngart, J.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Tree-ring studies provide important contributions to understanding the climate sensitivity of tropical trees and the effects of global change on tropical forests. This chapter reviews recent advances in tropical tree-ring research. In tropical lowlands, tree ring formation is mainly driven by season

  14. Improvement of isotope-based climate reconstructions in Patagonia through a better understanding of climate influences on isotopic fractionation in tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Aliénor; Daux, Valérie; Villalba, Ricardo; Pierre, Monique; Stievenard, Michel; Srur, Ana Marina

    2017-02-01

    Very few studies of stable isotopes exist across the Andes in South America. This study is the first presenting annually resolved chronologies of both δ18 O and δ13 C in Nothofagus pumilio and Fitzroya cupressoides trees from Northern Patagonia. Interannual variability in δ18 O and δ13 C was assessed over the period 1952-2011. Based on these chronologies, we determined the primary climatic controls on stable isotopes and tree physiological responses to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations (ca), temperature and humidity. Changes in specific intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) were inferred from variations in δ13 C whereas the effects of CO2 increase on stomatal conductance were explored using δ18 O. Over the 60-year period, iWUE increased significantly (by ca. 25%) in coincidence with the rise of ca. The two species appear to have different strategies of gas-exchange. Whereas iWUE variations were likely driven by both stomatal conductance and photosynthetic assimilation rates in F. cupressoides, they were largely related to stomatal conductance in N. pumilio. After removing the low-frequency trends related to increasing ca, significant relationships between δ13 C and summer temperatures were recorded for both species. However, δ13 C variations in F. cupressoides were more strongly influenced by summer temperatures than in N. pumilio. Our results advocate for an indirect effect of summer temperatures on stable isotope ratios, which is mostly influenced by sunlight radiation in F. cupressoides and relative humidity/soil moisture in N. pumilio. δ13 C variations in F. cupressoides were spatially correlated to a large area south of 35°S in southern South America. These promising results encourage the use of δ13 C variations in F. cupressoides for reconstructing past variations in temperature and large-scale circulation indexes such as the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) in the Southern Hemisphere.

  15. Arctic tree rings as recorders of variations in light availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, A R; Huybers, P

    2014-05-07

    Annual growth ring variations in Arctic trees are often used to reconstruct surface temperature. In general, however, the growth of Arctic vegetation is limited both by temperature and light availability, suggesting that variations in atmospheric transmissivity may also influence tree-ring characteristics. Here we show that Arctic tree-ring density is sensitive to changes in light availability across two distinct phenomena: explosive volcanic eruptions (Ptree-ring density relative to temperature is seen in the least light-limited regions of the Arctic. Consistent results follow from analysis of tree-ring width and from individually analysing each of seven tree species. Light availability thus appears an important control, opening the possibility for using tree rings to reconstruct historical changes in surface light intensity.

  16. Basic tree-ring sample preparation techniques for aging aspen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance A. Asherin; Stephen A. Mata

    2001-01-01

    Aspen is notoriously difficult to age because of its light-colored wood and faint annual growth rings. Careful preparation and processing of aspen ring samples can overcome these problems, yield accurate age and growth estimates, and concisely date disturbance events present in the tree-ring record. Proper collection of aspen wood is essential in obtaining usable ring...

  17. Correlation Between Chemical Element Contents in Tree Rings and Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANJUN-LONG; KESHAN-ZHE; 等

    1993-01-01

    The annual growth rings of ten trees and the soils near the tree roots were sampled from the mining ares of lead-and zinc-dominant metals in the Xixia Mountain,Nanjing,for the determination of chemical element contents.The study results showed that the elemental contents in the tree rings were correlated with those in the soils,i.e.,the elemental contents in the tree rings increased with those in the soils,even in the cases of different environments and different tree species.Therefore,a time-concentration sequence could be set up on the basis of determining the elemental contents in the successive annual growth rings of trees to qualitatively reflect the annual variations of relevant elements in the soils,and a time-concentration sequence of elemental contents in soils could also be established in terms of related model to reproduce the dynamic changes of the surroundings.

  18. Parameterization of tree-ring growth in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychkov, Ivan; Popkova, Margarita; Shishov, Vladimir; Vaganov, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    No doubt, climate-tree growth relationship is an one of the useful and interesting subject of studying in dendrochronology. It provides an information of tree growth dependency on climatic environment, but also, gives information about growth conditions and whole tree-ring growth process for long-term periods. New parameterization approach of the Vaganov-Shashkin process-based model (VS-model) is developed to described critical process linking climate variables with tree-ring formation. The approach (co-called VS-Oscilloscope) is presented as a computer software with graphical interface. As most process-based tree-ring models, VS-model's initial purpose is to describe variability of tree-ring radial growth due to variability of climatic factors, but also to determinate principal factors limiting tree-ring growth. The principal factors affecting on the growth rate of cambial cells in the VS-model are temperature, day light and soil moisture. Detailed testing of VS-Oscilloscope was done for semi-arid area of southern Siberia (Khakassian region). Significant correlations between initial tree-ring chronologies and simulated tree-ring growth curves were obtained. Direct natural observations confirm obtained simulation results including unique growth characteristic for semi-arid habitats. New results concerning formation of wide and narrow rings under different climate conditions are considered. By itself the new parameterization approach (VS-oscilloscope) is an useful instrument for better understanding of various processes in tree-ring formation. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (RSF # 14-14-00219).

  19. Kinetics of tracheid development explain conifer tree-ring structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Frank, David; Fonti, Patrick; Fournier, Meriem

    2014-09-01

    Conifer tree rings are generally composed of large, thin-walled cells of light earlywood followed by narrow, thick-walled cells of dense latewood. Yet, how wood formation processes and the associated kinetics create this typical pattern remains poorly understood. We monitored tree-ring formation weekly over 3 yr in 45 trees of three conifer species in France. Data were used to model cell development kinetics, and to attribute the relative importance of the duration and rate of cell enlargement and cell wall deposition on tree-ring structure. Cell enlargement duration contributed to 75% of changes in cell diameter along the tree rings. Remarkably, the amount of wall material per cell was quite constant along the rings. Consequently, and in contrast with widespread belief, changes in cell wall thickness were not principally attributed to the duration and rate of wall deposition (33%), but rather to the changes in cell size (67%). Cell enlargement duration, as the main driver of cell size and wall thickness, contributed to 56% of wood density variation along the rings. This mechanistic framework now forms the basis for unraveling how environmental stresses trigger deviations (e.g. false rings) from the normal tree-ring structure.

  20. Physiological and morphological acclimation to height in cupressoid leaves of 100-year-old Chamaecyparis obtusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Ayumi; Azuma, Wakana; Kuroda, Keiko; Ishii, H Roaki

    2016-10-15

    Cupressoid (scale-like) leaves are morphologically and functionally intermediate between stems and leaves. While past studies on height acclimation of cupressoid leaves have focused on acclimation to the vertical light gradient, the relationship between morphology and hydraulic function remains unexplored. Here, we compared physiological and morphological characteristics between treetop and lower-crown leaves of 100-year-old Chamaecyparis obtusa Endl. trees (~27 m tall) to investigate whether height-acclimation compensates for hydraulic constraints. We found that physiological acclimation of leaves was determined by light, which drove the vertical gradient of evaporative demand, while leaf morphology and anatomy were determined by height. Compared with lower-crown leaves, treetop leaves were physiologically acclimated to water stress. Leaf hydraulic conductance was not affected by height, and this contributed to higher photosynthetic rates of treetop leaves. Treetop leaves had higher leaf area density and greater leaf mass per area, which increase light interception but could also decrease hydraulic efficiency. We inferred that transfusion tissue flanking the leaf vein, which was more developed in the treetop leaves, contributes to water-stress acclimation and maintenance of leaf hydraulic conductance by facilitating osmotic adjustment of leaf water potential and efficient water transport from xylem to mesophyll. Our findings may represent anatomical adaptation that compensates for hydraulic constraints on physiological function with increasing height.

  1. Growth cessation uncouples isotopic signals in leaves and tree rings of drought-exposed oak trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, Ellen E; Siegwolf, R; Buchmann, N; Dobbertin, M; Kuster, T M; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Arend, M

    2015-10-01

    An increase in temperature along with a decrease in summer precipitation in Central Europe will result in an increased frequency of drought events and gradually lead to a change in species composition in forest ecosystems. In the present study, young oaks (Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) were transplanted into large mesocosms and exposed for 3 years to experimental warming and a drought treatment with yearly increasing intensities. Carbon and oxygen isotopic (δ(13)C and δ(18)O) patterns were analysed in leaf tissue and tree-ring cellulose and linked to leaf physiological measures and tree-ring growth. Warming had no effect on the isotopic patterns in leaves and tree rings, while drought increased δ(18)O and δ(13)C. Under severe drought, an unexpected isotopic pattern, with a decrease in δ(18)O, was observed in tree rings but not in leaves. This decrease in δ(18)O could not be explained by concurrent physiological analyses and is not supported by current physiological knowledge. Analysis of intra-annual tree-ring growth revealed a drought-induced growth cessation that interfered with the record of isotopic signals imprinted on recently formed leaf carbohydrates. This missing record indicates isotopic uncoupling of leaves and tree rings, which may have serious implications for the interpretation of tree-ring isotopes, particularly from trees that experienced growth-limiting stresses.

  2. Tree rings and the local environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    2011-01-01

    The amount of wood produced by a tree each year depends on tree condition, genetic programming, and growing conditions. Wood is mature xylem, the result of inward cell divisions by the vascular cambium, the new cell generator located between the wood and the inner bark (phloem). In temperate climatic zones, where a spring and summer growing season alternates with...

  3. Divergence problem in Japanese tree-ring records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonenobu, H.; Ohyama, M.; Hoshino, Y.

    2007-12-01

    It is a critical issue in tree-ring based climatic reconstructions to search for possible causes of divergence between tree-ring and temperature records. The divergence problem has been evidenced mainly by ring-width and density records from circumpolar northern forest sites. In this study, we compiled recently developed tree-ring chronologies in Japan. We performed running correlation analysis between the ring-width data and local climate records. A decreased temperature sensitivity since 1960s was observed in ring-width data for Hinoki cypress trees in central Japan. It was suggested that the divergence at this location was cased by anthropogenic SO2 emission that increased rapidly until 1970 and by then decreased gradually. On the other hand, a Japanese cedar chronology in north-eastern Japan showed stable response to April temperature and increased sensitivity to February, March and May temperatures. Adding some other forest sites to these, we present some conclusions with regards to the current understanding of the divergence problem in Japan.

  4. Arsenic in tree rings at a highly contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhongqi; Buckley, Brendan M; Katz, Beth; Wright, William; Bailey, Richard; Smith, Kevin T; Li, Jingbo; Curtis, Ashley; Geen, Alexander van

    2007-04-15

    Arsenic concentrations were measured in annual rings, pith, bark, and leaves of five tree species (four genera) from a site highly contaminated with As in Vineland, New Jersey, and two nearby uncontaminated areas. The highest As concentrations were found in bark (0.68+/-0.89 mg/kg, n=16) and leaves (1.9+/-1.8 mg/kg, n=4) from the contaminated area. Tree-ring As levels from the contaminated area (0.28+/-0.15 mg/kg, n=32) were low but still considerably higher than those from the control areas (0.06+/-0.06 mg/kg, n=30). There is a generally positive relationship between soil and tree-ring As levels. The overall low uptake of As by trees contrasts with that of P, a chemical analog for As(V) in aerated soils. Much higher P concentration in sapwood than in heartwood indicates that P is exported into more recently formed wood during the conversion from sapwood to heartwood; this again is drastically different than the behavior of As which is present in sapwood and heartwood at comparable levels. Variable sapwood As concentrations observed in detailed radial profiles of tree-ring chemistry of a pine and an oak from the contaminated site suggest that As is most likely transported among multiple rings within the sapwood. Therefore, tree species for which sapwood is thin (e.g., oak as in this study) should be preferred for reconstructing the history of contamination of a site. Due to the possibility of lateral translocation between growth rings, further studies are necessary to understand within-tree As transport and storage before dendrochemistry can be confidently accepted for such applications.

  5. Number of winter rainy days reconstructed from southwestern tree rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhouse, C. [NOAA Paleoclimatology Program, Boulder, CO (United States); Meko, D. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to explore the usefulness of tree-ring data for quantifying the temporal variability of winter rainy-day frequency over the past three centuries in the southwestern United States. The climatological variable, number of rainy days, has not previously been used in dendroclimatic reconstructions. It is reasonable to expect that the number of rainy days might be more strongly related than total precipitation to seasonally aggregated moisture conditions sensed by trees, especially in areas where rainfall from infrequent, heavy storms may run off before much moisture is absorbed into the soil. This study uses a network of tree-ring chronologies with a common time period 1702-1983 to reconstruct number of winter rainy days for a sub-region within the Southwest. The variance in the rainy day record explained by the tree-ring chronologies exceeds the 60% variance commonly yielded from arid-site trees in western North America. Calibration and verification statistics are highly significant, and a comparison with an independent gauge record helps validate the reconstruction. Conceptually and by the objective criterion of percent variance explained, number of rainy days appears, for this region, to be superior to total winter precipitation as a climatic variable for tree-ring reconstruction. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Tamarind tree seed dispersal by ring-tailed lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertl-Millhollen, Anne S; Blumenfeld-Jones, Kathryn; Raharison, Sahoby Marin; Tsaramanana, Donald Raymond; Rasamimanana, Hantanirina

    2011-10-01

    In Madagascar, the gallery forests of the south are among the most endangered. Tamarind trees (Tamarindus indica) dominate these riverine forests and are a keystone food resource for ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). At Berenty Reserve, the presence of tamarind trees is declining, and there is little recruitment of young trees. Because mature tamarinds inhibit growth under their crowns, seeds must be dispersed away from adult trees if tree recruitment is to occur. Ring-tailed lemurs are likely seed dispersers; however, because they spend much of their feeding, siesta, and sleeping time in tamarinds, they may defecate a majority of the tamarind seeds under tamarind trees. To determine whether they disperse tamarind seeds away from overhanging tamarind tree crowns, we observed two troops for 10 days each, noted the locations of feeding and defecation, and collected seeds from feces and fruit for germination. We also collected additional data on tamarind seedling recruitment under natural conditions, in which seedling germination was abundant after extensive rain, including under the canopy. However, seedling survival to 1 year was lower when growing under mature tamarind tree crowns than when growing away from an overhanging crown. Despite low fruit abundance averaging two fruits/m(3) in tamarind crowns, lemurs fed on tamarind fruit for 32% of their feeding samples. Daily path lengths averaged 1,266 m, and lemurs deposited seeds throughout their ranges. Fifty-eight percent of the 417 recorded lemur defecations were on the ground away from overhanging tamarind tree crowns. Tamarind seeds collected from both fruit and feces germinated. Because lemurs deposited viable seeds on the ground away from overhanging mature tamarind tree crowns, we conclude that ring-tailed lemurs provide tamarind tree seed dispersal services.

  7. Hydrological reconstruction from tree rings and varved lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, D.; Nicault, A.; Francus, P.; Bégin, Y.; Perreault, L.; Arsenault, D.; Bégin, C.; Savard, M. M.; Marion, J.; Guiot, J.

    2011-12-01

    The ARCHIVES project aims at reconstructing the annual hydro-climatic variability of the boreal region of the Quebec-Labrador Peninsula (Canada) over the past millennia. The project is based on tree-ring chronologies of more than one hundred years-old black spruce stands, several millennial tree-ring chronologies developed from sub-fossil trees and a network of lake sediment cores over a territory of more than 700 000 km2 (1400km in longitude x 500km in latitude). The dendrochronological network includes various tree-ring proxies such as ring width, ring density and ∂13C and ∂18O series. An extensive search for annually laminated lakes in the area permitted the identification of several sites with a strong potential for hydro-climatic reconstitution using annual varve thickness, grain size variability and sub-annual lamination as proxies for changes in river competency. We present here a 300 years-long reconstruction of hydrological variables at the watershed scale (annual water supply, spring and summer runoff) and some climate variables used in hydrologic forecast models, including an atmospheric index used by the modelling team of Hydro-Quebec (hydroelectric power supplier) to forecast spring flood volumes using both tree rings and annually laminated sediments. The sensitivity of the tree-ring chronologies and of varved series to hydrologic parameters were tested using statistical response functions. Our reconstruction methodology combines an analogue technique for the estimation of missing tree-ring data with an artificial neural network for optimal nonlinear calibration, including a bootstrap error assessment. Transfer functions were calibrated with water supply and meteorological data provided by Hydro-Quebec, and with Climate Research Unit (CRU) gridded climate data. The reconstructed series were validated using Reduction error (RE) and Root mean square error (RMSE) coefficients, standard cross-validation tests and verified with independent instrumental

  8. A tree-ring perspective on the terrestrial carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst, Flurin; Alexander, M Ross; Szejner, Paul; Bouriaud, Olivier; Klesse, Stefan; Roden, John; Ciais, Philippe; Poulter, Benjamin; Frank, David; Moore, David J P; Trouet, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    Tree-ring records can provide valuable information to advance our understanding of contemporary terrestrial carbon cycling and to reconstruct key metrics in the decades preceding monitoring data. The growing use of tree rings in carbon-cycle research is being facilitated by increasing recognition of reciprocal benefits among research communities. Yet, basic questions persist regarding what tree rings represent at the ecosystem level, how to optimally integrate them with other data streams, and what related challenges need to be overcome. It is also apparent that considerable unexplored potential exists for tree rings to refine assessments of terrestrial carbon cycling across a range of temporal and spatial domains. Here, we summarize recent advances and highlight promising paths of investigation with respect to (1) growth phenology, (2) forest productivity trends and variability, (3) CO2 fertilization and water-use efficiency, (4) forest disturbances, and (5) comparisons between observational and computational forest productivity estimates. We encourage the integration of tree-ring data: with eddy-covariance measurements to investigate carbon allocation patterns and water-use efficiency; with remotely sensed observations to distinguish the timing of cambial growth and leaf phenology; and with forest inventories to develop continuous, annually-resolved and long-term carbon budgets. In addition, we note the potential of tree-ring records and derivatives thereof to help evaluate the performance of earth system models regarding the simulated magnitude and dynamics of forest carbon uptake, and inform these models about growth responses to (non-)climatic drivers. Such efforts are expected to improve our understanding of forest carbon cycling and place current developments into a long-term perspective.

  9. BOREAS TE-5 Tree Ring and Carbon Isotope Ratio Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected several data sets to investigate the vegetation-atmosphere CO2 and H2O exchange processes. These data include tree ring widths and cellulose carbon isotope data from coniferous trees collected at the BOREAS NSA and SSA in 1993 and 1994 by the BOREAS TE-5 team. Ring width data are provided for both Picea mariana and Pinus banksiana. The carbon isotope data are provided only for Pinus banksiana. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. Forward modelling of tree-ring width and comparison with a global network of tree-ring chronologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Breitenmoser

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the relationship between climate and tree-ring data on a global scale using the process-based Vaganov–Shashkin–Lite (VSL forward model of tree-ring width formation. The VSL model requires as inputs only latitude, monthly mean temperature, and monthly accumulated precipitation. Hence, this simple, process-based model enables ring-width simulation at any location where monthly climate records exist. In this study, we analyse the growth response of simulated tree-rings to monthly climate conditions obtained from the CRU TS3.1 data set back to 1901. Our key aims are (a to examine the relations between simulated and observed growth at 2287 globally distributed sites and (b to evaluate the potential of the VSL model to reconstruct past climate. The assessment of the growth-onset threshold temperature of approximately 4–6 °C for most sites and species using a Bayesian estimation approach complements other studies on the lower temperature limits where plant growth may be sustained. Our results suggest that the VSL model skilfully simulates site level tree-ring series in response to climate forcing for a wide range of environmental conditions and species. Spatial aggregation of the tree-ring chronologies to reduce non-climatic noise at the site level yields notable improvements in the coherence between modelled and actual growth. The resulting distinct and coherent patterns of significant relationships between the aggregated and simulated series further demonstrate the VSL model's ability to skilfully capture the climatic signal contained in tree-series. Finally, we propose that the VSL model can be used as an observation operator in data assimilation approaches to reconstruct past climate.

  11. Recent tree ring analyses at the ANTARES AMS centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.E.; Zoppi, U.; Lawson, E.M.; Smith, A.M.; Lenh, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Barbetti, M. [University of Sydney, NSW (Australia). The NWG Macintosh Centre for Quaternary Dating

    1998-12-31

    A total of 48 annual tree rings (24 pairs) from 1952 to 1975 AD have been carefully split, milled and pretreated to alpha-cellulose, the most reliable component of wood for dating. Due to the small amount of material available in each ring, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) rather than the conventional method (radiometry) has been used for the determination of the {sup 14}C content in tree rings. Pretreated material was combusted to CO2 and then converted to graphite for the {sup 14}C measurement in ANTARES, the tandem accelerator at ANSTO. Excellent matching between our measured {sup 14}C tree-ring data and atmospheric {sup 14}C records at the same latitude has been found. Our data can therefore be used for: extension of atmospheric {sup 14}C bomb-pulse curves in tropical regions and the Southern Hemisphere back to the early stage of the nuclear age in the 1950`s, for which few direct atmospheric records are available. This is needed to gain a better understanding of global carbon cycle and air-sea interactions; determination of the growth rate of trees in tropical regions (Murphy et al., 1997); and dating of modern organic material in tropical regions and the Southern Hemisphere (in combination with {sup 14}C atmospheric data) Extended abstract. 3 refs.

  12. Magnetic record associated with tree ring density: Possible climate proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruner Petr

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A magnetic signature of tree rings was tested as a potential paleo-climatic indicator. We examined wood from sequoia tree, located in Mountain Home State Forest, California, whose tree ring record spans over the period 600 – 1700 A.D. We measured low and high-field magnetic susceptibility, the natural remanent magnetization (NRM, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM, and stability against thermal and alternating field (AF demagnetization. Magnetic investigation of the 200 mm long sequoia material suggests that magnetic efficiency of natural remanence may be a sensitive paleoclimate indicator because it is substantially higher (in average >1% during the Medieval Warm Epoch (700–1300 A.D. than during the Little Ice Age (1300–1850 A.D. where it is

  13. Pooled versus separate measurements of tree-ring stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado Liñán, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Emilia; Helle, Gerhard; Heinrich, Ingo; Andreu-Hayles, Laia; Planells, Octavi; Leuenberger, Markus; Bürger, Carmen; Schleser, Gerhard

    2011-05-01

    δ(13)C and δ(18)O of tree rings contain time integrated information about the environmental conditions weighted by seasonal growth dynamics and are well established as sources of palaeoclimatic and ecophysiological data. Annually resolved isotope chronologies are frequently produced by pooling dated growth rings from several trees prior to the isotopic analyses. This procedure has the advantage of saving time and resources, but precludes from defining the isotopic error or statistical uncertainty related to the inter-tree variability. Up to now only a few studies have compared isotope series from pooled tree rings with isotopic measurements from individual trees. We tested whether or not the δ(13)C and the δ(18)O chronologies derived from pooled and from individual tree rings display significant differences at two locations from the Iberian Peninsula to assess advantages and constraints of both methodologies. The comparisons along the period 1900-2003 reveal a good agreement between pooled chronologies and the two mean master series which were created by averaging raw individual values (Mean) or by generating a mass calibrated mean (MassC). In most of the cases, pooled chronologies show high synchronicity with averaged individual samples at interannual scale but some differences also show up especially when comparing δ(18)O decadal to multi-decadal variations. Moreover, differences in the first order autocorrelation among individuals may be obscured by pooling strategies. The lack of replication of pooled chronologies prevents detection of a bias due to a higher mass contribution of one sample but uncertainties associated with the analytical process itself, as sample inhomogeneity, seems to account for the observed differences.

  14. Tree ring study of Cordia alliodora (Ruiz & Pav. in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Briceño

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cordia alliodora has a high ecological and economical value in the dry forest of Colombia. We documented the relationship between tree growth and climate variables (total annual precipitation, mean annual temperature and the southern oscillation index (SOI in this study. Standard dendrochronological methods were applied on 28 individuals. Presence of annual growth rings weas defined by semicircular porosity and terminal parenchyma. The tree-ring chronology spanned over the period 1944-2013 (70 years. Gompertz model was the mathematical function that best represented the growth. Radial growth was positively influenced by total annual precipitation and negatively related to mean annual temperature. There was no relation between tree growth and the SOI index (indicator of El Niño/La Niña events. A spectral density analysis of the residual tree-ring chronology showed a periodicity of 3.3 years cycle, similar to those cycles recorded on the precipitation and temperature series. According to the results, C. alliodora diameter growth would peak 205.5 cm at 65 years old.

  15. Bomb radiocarbon in annual tree rings from Thailand and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Q.; Barbetti, M.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Zoppi, U.; Lawson, E. M.

    2000-10-01

    We have examined the atmospheric 14C excess in the tropics and the southern hemisphere temperate region in the bomb pulse period, using two sets of cross-dated tree rings. One set was from a medium-sized three-leaf pine ( Pinus kesiya) grown in northwestern Thailand and the other was from a Huon pine ( Lagarostrobos franklinii) grown in northwestern Tasmania, Australia. A total of 48 annual tree rings (24 pairs) from 1952 to 1975 AD were pretreated to alpha-cellulose, combusted to CO 2 and converted to graphite for 14C measurement in the tandem accelerator at ANSTO. Excellent agreement was found between our measured 14C data from tree rings and atmospheric 14C records at similar latitudes. A large depletion of atmospheric 14C for Thailand in 1953-1954 AD was observed. This might be due to a combination of the Suess effect and upwelling in the tropical Indian Ocean. The results also showed the rise and decay of bomb 14C peaks from north to south with a time delay of about 1.5 yr, and the effects of minor atmospheric nuclear tests in the late 1960s and early 1970s. A delay of at least one month for 14C in tree cellulose of Huon pine compared with that in the atmosphere was also found.

  16. Dating floodplain sediments using tree-ring response to burial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, J.M.; Vincent, K.R.; Shafroth, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Floodplain sediments can be dated precisely based on the change in anatomy of tree rings upon burial. When a stem of tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima) or sandbar willow (Salix exigua) is buried, subsequent annual rings in the buried section resemble the rings of roots: rings become narrower, vessels within the rings become larger, and transitions between rings become less distinct. We combined observations of these changes with tree-ring counts to determine the year of deposition of sedimentary beds exposed in a 150-m-long trench across the floodplain of the Rio Puerco, a rapidly filling arroyo in New Mexico. This method reliably dated most beds thicker than about 30 cm to within a year of deposition. Floodplain aggradation rates varied dramatically through time and space. Sediment deposition was mostly limited to brief overbank flows occurring every few years. The most rapid deposition occurred on channel-margin levees, which migrated laterally during channel narrowing. At the decadal timescale, the cross-section-average sediment deposition rate was steady, but there was a shift in the spatial pattern of deposition in the 1980s. From 1936 to 1986, sediment deposition occurred by channel narrowing, with little change in elevation of the thalweg. After 1986 sediment deposition occurred by vertical aggradation. From 1936 to 2000 about 27 per cent of the arroyo cross-section filled with sediment. The rate of filling from 1962 to 2000 was 0-8 vertical m/decade or 85 m2/decade. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Tree ring reconstructed rainfall over the southern Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Lidio; Stahle, David; Villalba, Ricardo; Torbenson, Max; Feng, Song; Cook, Edward

    2017-07-01

    Moisture sensitive tree ring chronologies of Centrolobium microchaete have been developed from seasonally dry forests in the southern Amazon Basin and used to reconstruct wet season rainfall totals from 1799 to 2012, adding over 150 years of rainfall estimates to the short instrumental record for the region. The reconstruction is correlated with the same atmospheric variables that influence the instrumental measurements of wet season rainfall. Anticyclonic circulation over midlatitude South America promotes equatorward surges of cold and relatively dry extratropical air that converge with warm moist air to form deep convection and heavy rainfall over this sector of the southern Amazon Basin. Interesting droughts and pluvials are reconstructed during the preinstrumental nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but the tree ring reconstruction suggests that the strong multidecadal variability in instrumental and reconstructed wet season rainfall after 1950 may have been unmatched since 1799.

  18. Tree rings and time: recent historical studies in England

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Bridge

    2000-01-01

    By studying the annual growth rings of long-lived trees, and those preserved in ancient timbers that have survived in waterlogged or very dry conditions, it is possible to date past events in calendar years and to investigate climatic and other environmental changes. Dendrochronology has many applications, including the dating of buildings and ships and the calibration of the radiocarbon timescale that is so widely used in archaeology. Here the technique is outlined and some recent applicatio...

  19. Use of Tritium Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Tree Ring Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; ROBERTS, MARK L.; SOUTHON, JOHN R.; CHIARAPPA - ZUCCA, MARINA L.; DINGLEY, KAREN H.

    2010-01-01

    Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment. PMID:12144257

  20. Wood density variation and tree ring distinctness in Gmelina arborea trees by x-ray densitometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Moya

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its relationship with other properties, wood density is the main wood quality parameter. Modern, accuratemethods such as X-ray densitometry - are applied to determine the spatial distribution of density in wood sections and to evaluatewood quality. The objectives of this study were to determinate the influence of growing conditions on wood density variation andtree ring demarcation of gmelina trees from fast growing plantations in Costa Rica. The wood density was determined by X-raydensitometry method. Wood samples were cut from gmelina trees and were exposed to low X-rays. The radiographic films weredeveloped and scanned using a 256 gray scale with 1000 dpi resolution and the wood density was determined by CRAD and CERDsoftware. The results showed tree-ring boundaries were distinctly delimited in trees growing in site with rainfall lower than 2510 mm/year. It was demonstrated that tree age, climatic conditions and management of plantation affects wood density and its variability. Thespecific effect of variables on wood density was quantified by for multiple regression method. It was determined that tree yearexplained 25.8% of the total variation of density and 19.9% were caused by climatic condition where the tree growing. Wood densitywas less affected by the intensity of forest management with 5.9% of total variation.

  1. Pooled versus separate measurements of tree-ring stable isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorado Linan, Isabel, E-mail: isabel@gfz-potsdam.de [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Ecologia, Diagonal 645, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); German Centre for Geosciences, Climate Dynamics and Landscape Evolution, Dendro Laboratory, Telegrafenberg, 14473, Potsdam (Germany); Gutierrez, Emilia, E-mail: emgutierrez@ub.edu [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Ecologia, Diagonal 645, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Helle, Gerhard, E-mail: ghelle@gfz-potsdam.de [German Centre for Geosciences, Climate Dynamics and Landscape Evolution, Dendro Laboratory, Telegrafenberg, 14473, Potsdam (Germany); Heinrich, Ingo, E-mail: heinrich@gfz-potsdam.de [German Centre for Geosciences, Climate Dynamics and Landscape Evolution, Dendro Laboratory, Telegrafenberg, 14473, Potsdam (Germany); Andreu-Hayles, Laia, E-mail: laiandreu@ub.edu [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Ecologia, Diagonal 645, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Tree-Ring Laboratory, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades NY (United States); Planells, Octavi, E-mail: leocarpus@hotmail.com [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Ecologia, Diagonal 645, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Leuenberger, Markus, E-mail: leuenberger@climate.unibe.ch [Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Oeschger Centre of Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Zaehringerstrasse 25, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Buerger, Carmen, E-mail: buerger@gfz-potsdam.de [German Centre for Geosciences, Climate Dynamics and Landscape Evolution, Dendro Laboratory, Telegrafenberg, 14473, Potsdam (Germany); Schleser, Gerhard, E-mail: schleser@gfz-potsdam.de [German Centre for Geosciences, Climate Dynamics and Landscape Evolution, Dendro Laboratory, Telegrafenberg, 14473, Potsdam (Germany)

    2011-05-01

    {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of tree rings contain time integrated information about the environmental conditions weighted by seasonal growth dynamics and are well established as sources of palaeoclimatic and ecophysiological data. Annually resolved isotope chronologies are frequently produced by pooling dated growth rings from several trees prior to the isotopic analyses. This procedure has the advantage of saving time and resources, but precludes from defining the isotopic error or statistical uncertainty related to the inter-tree variability. Up to now only a few studies have compared isotope series from pooled tree rings with isotopic measurements from individual trees. We tested whether or not the {delta}{sup 13}C and the {delta}{sup 18}O chronologies derived from pooled and from individual tree rings display significant differences at two locations from the Iberian Peninsula to assess advantages and constraints of both methodologies. The comparisons along the period 1900-2003 reveal a good agreement between pooled chronologies and the two mean master series which were created by averaging raw individual values (Mean) or by generating a mass calibrated mean (MassC). In most of the cases, pooled chronologies show high synchronicity with averaged individual samples at interannual scale but some differences also show up especially when comparing {delta}{sup 18}O decadal to multi-decadal variations. Moreover, differences in the first order autocorrelation among individuals may be obscured by pooling strategies. The lack of replication of pooled chronologies prevents detection of a bias due to a higher mass contribution of one sample but uncertainties associated with the analytical process itself, as sample inhomogeneity, seems to account for the observed differences. - Research Highlights: {yields} Pooled {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O chronologies are expected to be similar to the mean. {yields} Empirical pooled chronologies {delta}{sup 13}C and

  2. Tree demography dominates long-term growth trends inferred from tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, Roel J W; Gloor, Manuel; Ziv, Guy

    2017-02-01

    Understanding responses of forests to increasing CO2 and temperature is an important challenge, but no easy task. Tree rings are increasingly used to study such responses. In a recent study, van der Sleen et al. (2014) Nature Geoscience, 8, 4 used tree rings from 12 tropical tree species and find that despite increases in intrinsic water use efficiency, no growth stimulation is observed. This challenges the idea that increasing CO2 would stimulate growth. Unfortunately, tree ring analysis can be plagued by biases, resulting in spurious growth trends. While their study evaluated several biases, it does not account for all. In particular, one bias may have seriously affected their results. Several of the species have recruitment patterns, which are not uniform, but clustered around one specific year. This results in spurious negative growth trends if growth rates are calculated in fixed size classes, as 'fast-growing' trees reach the sampling diameter earlier compared to slow growers and thus fast growth rates tend to have earlier calendar dates. We assessed the effect of this 'nonuniform age bias' on observed growth trends and find that van der Sleen's conclusions of a lack of growth stimulation do not hold. Growth trends are - at least partially - driven by underlying recruitment or age distributions. Species with more clustered age distributions show more negative growth trends, and simulations to estimate the effect of species' age distributions show growth trends close to those observed. Re-evaluation of the growth data and correction for the bias result in significant positive growth trends of 1-2% per decade for the full period, and 3-7% since 1950. These observations, however, should be taken cautiously as multiple biases affect these trend estimates. In all, our results highlight that tree ring studies of long-term growth trends can be strongly influenced by biases if demographic processes are not carefully accounted for. © 2016 The Authors. Global Change

  3. A relationship between galactic cosmic radiation and tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengel, Sigrid; Aeby, Dominik; Grace, John

    2009-11-01

    Here, we investigated the interannual variation in the growth rings formed by Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) trees in northern Britain (55 degrees N, 3 degrees W) over the period 1961-2005 in an attempt to disentangle the influence of atmospheric variables acting at different times of year. Annual growth rings, measured along the north radius of freshly cut (frozen) tree discs and climatological data recorded at an adjacent site were used in the study. Correlations were based on Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients between the annual growth anomaly and these climatic and atmospheric factors. Rather weak correlations between these variables and growth were found. However, there was a consistent and statistically significant relationship between growth of the trees and the flux density of galactic cosmic radiation. Moreover, there was an underlying periodicity in growth, with four minima since 1961, resembling the period cycle of galactic cosmic radiation. * We discuss the hypotheses that might explain this correlation: the tendency of galactic cosmic radiation to produce cloud condensation nuclei, which in turn increases the diffuse component of solar radiation, and thus increases the photosynthesis of the forest canopy.

  4. Building the Forest Inventory and Analysis Tree-Ring Data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. DeRose; John D. Shaw; James N. Long

    2017-01-01

    The Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis (IW-FIA) program measures forestland conditions at great extent with relatively high spatial resolution, including the collection of tree-ring data. We describe the development of an unprecedented spatial tree-ring data set for the IW-FIA that enhances the baseline plot data by incorporating ring-width increment measured...

  5. On the Assimilation of Tree-Ring-Width Chronologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Walter; Reich, Sebastian; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Data assimilation (DA) of climate proxy records is currently acknowledged as a promising approach to the paleoclimate reconstruction problem, with the potential to bring physical consistency to reconstructed fields. Previous paleo-DA studies have typically assumed a linear relationship between climate forcing and the resulting proxy data, whereas there exist growing evidence of complex, potentially non-linear, proxy formation processes. Accordingly, it appears natural to simulate the proxy response to climate in a more realistic fashion, by way of proxy-specific forward models. Following this train of thought, we investigate the assimilation of the most traditional climate proxy type, Tree-Ring-Width (TRW) chronologies, using the process-based tree-ring growth forward model Vaganov-Shashkin-Lite (VSL) and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) techniques. Used as observation operator, VSL's formulation implies three compounding, challenging features: (i) time averaging, (ii) "switching recording" of 2 variables and (iii) bounded response windows leading to "thresholded response". DA experiments involving VSL-based pseudo-TRW observations are performed first for a chaotic 2-scale dynamical system, used as a cartoon of the atmosphere-land system, and then for an atmospheric general circulation model of intermediate complexity. Our results reveal that VSL's nonlinearities may considerable deteriorate the performance of EnKF for Time-Averaged (TA) estimation, as compared to the utilization of a TA linear observation operator. Moreover, we show that this assimilation skill loss can be considerably reduced by embedding VSL's formulation into fuzzy logic theory, which fosters new interpretations of tree-ring growth limitation processes.

  6. Measuring tree-ring increments on tree bole sections with a video-based robotic positioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R A; Kaufmann, M R; Porth, L; Watkins, R K

    1996-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of a system that speeds measurement of radial tree-ring increments on tree stem disks; this method replaces the usual binocular microscope with a video image, and automates the measuring and recording processes. The system was used to measure bole sections cut from stems at various heights to determine volume growth of representative trees in an old-growth ponderosa pine stand. The objective of the measurement system was to speed acquisition of annual growth increments from a large number of disks. A personal computer controls the location of a video camera in a 3-axis positioning system. The operator views the sample on a video monitor and positions the camera over each ring by selecting it with a computer-driven mouse. The computer measures and records the distance that the camera moves between each ring. Task selection is facilitated by menu-driven software that also formats, checks and organizes data files. Measurements have a resolution of 0.026 mm; however, finer resolution could be obtained with a different camera lens. Tests of measurement variability (repeated measurements by individual operators on a single radius) indicated standard errors of 0.006 mm or less for the first measurement sets for four operators. Correlation coefficients among four radii per bole section were as low as 0.66 for a whole tree, suggesting that measurements on single radii may provide poor estimates of radial growth for old trees. This system also offers the potential for automatic ring detection and measurement.

  7. Tree rings and time: recent historical studies in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bridge

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available By studying the annual growth rings of long-lived trees, and those preserved in ancient timbers that have survived in waterlogged or very dry conditions, it is possible to date past events in calendar years and to investigate climatic and other environmental changes. Dendrochronology has many applications, including the dating of buildings and ships and the calibration of the radiocarbon timescale that is so widely used in archaeology. Here the technique is outlined and some recent applications of it in England are described.

  8. Radiocarbon concentration in modern tree rings from Fukushima, Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.; Cresswell, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica), collected from Iwaki, Fukushima in 2014, was analyzed for the long-lived radionuclide 14C. Values of δ14C varied from 211.7‰ in 1984 to 16.9‰ in 2013. The temporal δ14C variation can be described as an exponential decline, indistinguishable from.......e. fossil carbon) source. This change coincides with local traffic increases since two nearby expressways were opened in the 1990's. In addition, the small but visible 14C pulse observed in the 2011 tree-ring might be caused by release from the damaged reactors during the Fukushima nuclear accident....

  9. Application of tree-ring isotopic analyses to reconstruct historical water use of riparian trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstad, Karrin P; Hart, Stephen C; Horton, Jonathan L; Kolb, Thomas E

    2008-03-01

    Historical patterns of water source use by trees inferred from long-term records of tree-ring stable isotopic content could assist in evaluating the impact of human alterations to natural stream flow regimes (e.g., water impoundments, stream flow diversions, and groundwater extraction). Our objective was to assess the utility of the hydrogen stable isotopic composition (SD) of tree rings as an index of historical water source use by riparian trees. We investigated the influence of site conditions that varied in climate and hydrology on the relationship between deltaD of Populus xylem water (deltaD(xyl)) and tree-ring cellulose (deltaD(cell)). deltaD(xyl) and deltaD(cell) were strongly correlated across sites (r2 = 0.89). However, the slope of this relationship was less than 1, indicating that factors other than deltaD(xyl) influenced deltaD(cell). Inverse modeling with an isotopic fractionation model for tree-ring cellulose suggested that the lack of one-to-one correspondence between deltaD(xyl) and deltaD(cell) was due to the influence of the hydrogen isotopic content of the atmospheric water vapor (deltaD(atm)). Empirically measured values of deltaD(cell) were typically within the seasonal range of deltaD(cell) predicted from the fractionation model. Sensitivity analyses showed that changes in deltaD(xyl) generally had a greater influence at high-elevation montane sites, whereas deltaD(xyl) and deltaD(atm) had about equal influence on deltaD(cell) at low-elevation desert sites. The intrasite relationship between deltaD(cell) and deltaD(xyl) among individual trees was poor, perhaps because of the within-site spatial variation in hydrologic conditions and associated tree physiological responses. Our study suggests that historical variation in deltaD(cell) of Populus provides information on historical variation in both time-integrated water source use and atmospheric conditions; and that the influence of atmospheric conditions is not consistent over sites with large

  10. Olive tree-ring problematic dating: a comparative analysis on Santorini (Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Paolo; Humbel, Turi; Beeckman, Hans; Gärtner, Holger; Mannes, David; Pearson, Charlotte; Schoch, Werner; Tognetti, Roberto; Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2013-01-01

    Olive trees are a classic component of Mediterranean environments and some of them are known historically to be very old. In order to evaluate the possibility to use olive tree-rings for dendrochronology, we examined by various methods the reliability of olive tree-rings identification. Dendrochronological analyses of olive trees growing on the Aegean island Santorini (Greece) show that the determination of the number of tree-rings is impossible because of intra-annual wood density fluctuations, variability in tree-ring boundary structure, and restriction of its cambial activity to shifting sectors of the circumference, causing the tree-ring sequences along radii of the same cross section to differ.

  11. Olive tree-ring problematic dating: a comparative analysis on Santorini (Greece.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cherubini

    Full Text Available Olive trees are a classic component of Mediterranean environments and some of them are known historically to be very old. In order to evaluate the possibility to use olive tree-rings for dendrochronology, we examined by various methods the reliability of olive tree-rings identification. Dendrochronological analyses of olive trees growing on the Aegean island Santorini (Greece show that the determination of the number of tree-rings is impossible because of intra-annual wood density fluctuations, variability in tree-ring boundary structure, and restriction of its cambial activity to shifting sectors of the circumference, causing the tree-ring sequences along radii of the same cross section to differ.

  12. Chrono—sequences of Elemental COntents in Tree Rings and Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANJUN-LONG; KESHAN-ZHE

    1994-01-01

    There exists a logarithmic linear correlation,i.e.,lnC'(Z,t)=a(Z)+b(Z)ln(Z,t) where Z is the atomic number of element and t the year when tree ring grow,between the chemical element contents in tree rings C(Z,t)and those in soils near the tree roots C'(Z,t).By determining the elemental contents of the annual growth rings of trees,we could establish the chronosequences of elemental contents in the tree rings.thus calculating that of the soil,that is,reproducing the dynamic changes of contents of elements in the soil C'(Z,t),The background values of elements in the soil under site conditions of the tree could be estimated from the miniumu C(Z,to) in the chrono-sequences of elemental contents in the tree rings.

  13. Biological basis of tree-ring formation: a crash course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Barthélémy Karl Rathgeber

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wood is of crucial importance for man and biosphere. In this mini review, we present the fundamental processes involved in tree-ring formation and intra-annual dynamics of cambial activity, along with the influences of the environmental factors. During wood formation, new xylem cells produced by the cambium are undergoing profound transformations, passing through successive differentiation stages, which enable them to perform their functions in trees. Xylem cell formation can be divided in five major phases: (1 the division of a cambial mother cell that creates a new cell; (2 the enlargement of this newly formed cell; (3 the deposition of its secondary wall; (4 the lignification of its cell wall; and finally, (5 its programmed cell death. In most regions of the world cambial activity follows a seasonal cycle. At the beginning of the growing season, when temperature increases, the cambium resumes activity, producing new xylem cells. These cells are disposed along radial files, and start their differentiation program according to their birth date, creating typical developmental strips in the forming xylem. The width of these strips smoothly changes along the growing season. Finally, when climatic conditions deteriorate (temperature or water availability in particular, cambial activity stops, soon followed by cell enlargement, and later on by secondary wall deposition. Without a clear understanding of the xylem formation process, it is not possible to comprehend how annual growth rings and typical wood structures are formed, recording seasonal variations of the environment as well as extreme climatic events.

  14. Periodicity in tree rings from the corn belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meko, D M; Stockton, C W; Blasing, T J

    1985-07-26

    Previous tree-ring studies indicated that the total area affected by drought in the western United States has rhythmically expanded and contracted over the past 300 years, with a period near the 18.6-year lunar nodal and 22-year double-sunspot cycles. Recently collected tree-ring data from the U.S. Corn Belt for the years 1680 to 1980 were examined for evidence of either of these cycles on a regional scale. Spectral analysis indicated no periodicity in the eastern part of the Corn Belt, but a significant 18.33-year period in the western part. The period length changed from 17.60 to 20.95 years between the first 150 years and the last 151. High-resolution frequency analysis showed that the structure of the 18.33-year spectral peak was complex, with contributions from several frequencies near both the lunar nodal and double-sunspot periods. A t-test of difference of means in reconstructed annual precipitation weakly corroborated a previous finding of an association between drought area and the phase of the double-sunspot cycle. Both the high-resolution frequency analysis and the t-test results indicate that the periodic component of drought near 20 years is too weak and irregular to be of use in drought forecasting for the Corn Belt.

  15. Tree-ring reconstructed rainfall variability in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrell, Matthew D.; Stahle, David W.; Ries, Lydia P.; Shugart, Herman H.

    2006-06-01

    We present the first tree-ring reconstruction of rainfall in tropical Africa using a 200-year regional chronology based on samples of Pterocarpus angolensis from Zimbabwe. The regional chronology is significantly correlated with summer rainfall (November-February) from 1901 to 1948, and the derived reconstruction explains 46% of the instrumental rainfall variance during this period. The reconstruction is well correlated with indices of the El Niño-southern oscillation (ENSO), and national maize yields. An aridity trend in instrumental rainfall beginning in about 1960 is partially reproduced in the reconstruction, and similar trends are evident in the nineteenth century. A decadal-scale drought reconstructed from 1882 to 1896 matches the most severe sustained drought during the instrumental period (1989-1995), and is confirmed in part by documentary evidence. An even more severe drought is indicated from 1859 to 1868 in both the tree-ring and documentary data, but its true magnitude is uncertain. A 6-year wet period at the turn of the nineteenth century (1897-1902) exceeds any wet episode during the instrumental era. The reconstruction exhibits spectral power at ENSO, decadal and multi-decadal frequencies. Composite analysis of global sea surface temperature during unusually wet and dry years also suggests a linkage between reconstructed rainfall and ENSO.

  16. Tree-ring reconstructed rainfall variability in Zimbabwe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therrell, Matthew D.; Ries, Lydia P.; Shugart, Herman H. [University of Virginia, Department of Environmental Sciences, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Stahle, David W. [University of Arkansas, Department of Geosciences, Fayetteville, AR (United States)

    2006-06-15

    We present the first tree-ring reconstruction of rainfall in tropical Africa using a 200-year regional chronology based on samples of Pterocarpus angolensis from Zimbabwe. The regional chronology is significantly correlated with summer rainfall (November-February) from 1901 to 1948, and the derived reconstruction explains 46% of the instrumental rainfall variance during this period. The reconstruction is well correlated with indices of the El Nino-southern oscillation (ENSO), and national maize yields. An aridity trend in instrumental rainfall beginning in about 1960 is partially reproduced in the reconstruction, and similar trends are evident in the nineteenth century. A decadal-scale drought reconstructed from 1882 to 1896 matches the most severe sustained drought during the instrumental period (1989-1995), and is confirmed in part by documentary evidence. An even more severe drought is indicated from 1859 to 1868 in both the tree-ring and documentary data, but its true magnitude is uncertain. A 6-year wet period at the turn of the nineteenth century (1897-1902) exceeds any wet episode during the instrumental era. The reconstruction exhibits spectral power at ENSO, decadal and multi-decadal frequencies. Composite analysis of global sea surface temperature during unusually wet and dry years also suggests a linkage between reconstructed rainfall and ENSO. (orig.)

  17. A new serial pooling method of shifted tree ring blocks to construct millennia long tree ring isotope chronologies with annual resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Tatjana; Friedrich, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The study presents a new serial pooling method of shifted tree ring blocks for the building of isotope chronologies. This method combines the advantages of traditional 'serial' and 'intertree' pooling, and can be recommended for the construction of sub-regional long isotope chronologies with sufficient replication, and on annual resolution, especially for the case of extremely narrow tree rings. For Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L., Khibiny Low Mountains, NW Russia) and Silver firs (Abies alba Mill., Franconia, Southern Germany), serial pooling of five consecutive tree rings seems appropriate because the species- and site-specific particularities lead to blurs of climate linkages in their tree rings for the period up to ca. five years back. An equivalent to a five-year running means that curve gained on the base annual data sets of single trees can be derived from the analysis of yearly shifted five-year blocks of consecutive tree rings, and therefore, with approximately 20% of the expense. Good coherence of delta(13)C- and delta(18)O-values between calculated means of annual total rings or late wood data and means of five-year blocks of consecutive total tree rings analysed experimentally on most similar material confirms this assumption.

  18. Stable carbon isotopes in tree rings: the failure of uniformitarianism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Danny

    2010-05-01

    When tree rings are used to reconstruct past climate we rely on the uniformitarian principle that ‘the present is the key to the past'. Relationships between measured parameters and climate that can be calibrated and verified over the instrumental period are assumed to be applicable at longer timescales. In the case of δ13C, however, the uniformitarian principle fails for two reasons. (1) The instrumental calibration period is also the period of anthropogenic increase in atmospheric CO2. δ13C is a function of the ratio of internal to ambient CO2, so maintaining constant δ13C over the industrial period requires an active plastic response, either restricting stomatal conductance or increasing assimilation rate. In some areas trees may have reached the limits of their plasticity so that over the last few decades δ13C values have been declining, independent of any changes in climate. If no correction is made, the recent response to climate will be a poor indicator of behaviour in the past. (2) Tree ring δ13C is often used to reconstruct past temperatures even though temperature rarely has a strong direct control over fractionation. The link is therefore via either sunshine or humidity, which over the calibration period may be very strongly correlated with temperature. Long isotope chronologies, when compared with independent evidence of past temperatures, however, can show periods of marked divergence. The strong covariance of temperature, sunshine and humidity over the last century may not have persisted over longer timescales with larger climatic perturbations. In the case of carbon isotopes the key to the past is not statistical inference based on recent behaviour, but a clear mechanistic understanding of the influence of climate and other factors on fractionation.

  19. Analysis of contaminating elements in tree rings in Santiago, Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romo-Kroeger, C.M.; Avila, M.J.; Eaton, L.C.; Lopez, L.A. [Faculty of Sciences. Univ. of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    1996-12-31

    Using the 22`` isochronous cyclotron at the University of Chile, we have performed PIXE analyses on a group of samples collected from trees of metropolitan parks in Santiago. Dendrochronology was performed on each sample, which was then sectioned for the PIXE and other analyses, neutron activation and electro-chemistry. Available samples are trunk sections or cores obtained by the use of a 4.0 mm stainless steel incremental corer. We took three cores from each tree with permission of the municipalities. For the PIXE we use infinitely thick targets, as wood slabs taken along the trunk radius, and thin targets obtained by acid digestion of wood pieces and deposition on Kapton foils. Self supporting thick targets were placed directly in the PIXE chamber in a position so as to allow the irradiation of a specific annual ring. Potassium and Calcium appear as the most abundant elements in wood. Other elements such as S, Cu, Zn, As, Br and Pb were detected in amounts above the natural background in wood, and can be attributed to environmental contamination. The K/Ca ratios appear to be different for each species of tree, and seem to be related to the physico-chemical properties of wood. Preliminary results show important amounts of As and Cu (supposedly from mining origin) with increasing presence in the recent years. Pb and Zn (supposedly from vehicle origin) are also higher in recent years. (author)

  20. Dissecting the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets using the partial triadic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Nardin, Maxime; Godefroid, Martin; Ruiz-Diaz, Manuela; Sergent, Anne-Sophie; Martinez-Meier, Alejandro; Pâques, Luc; Rozenberg, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Tree-ring datasets are used in a variety of circumstances, including archeology, climatology, forest ecology, and wood technology. These data are based on microdensity profiles and consist of a set of tree-ring descriptors, such as ring width or early/latewood density, measured for a set of individual trees. Because successive rings correspond to successive years, the resulting dataset is a ring variables × trees × time datacube. Multivariate statistical analyses, such as principal component analysis, have been widely used for extracting worthwhile information from ring datasets, but they typically address two-way matrices, such as ring variables × trees or ring variables × time. Here, we explore the potential of the partial triadic analysis (PTA), a multivariate method dedicated to the analysis of three-way datasets, to apprehend the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets. We analyzed a set of 11 tree-ring descriptors measured in 149 georeferenced individuals of European larch (Larix decidua Miller) during the period of 1967-2007. The processing of densitometry profiles led to a set of ring descriptors for each tree and for each year from 1967-2007. The resulting three-way data table was subjected to two distinct analyses in order to explore i) the temporal evolution of spatial structures and ii) the spatial structure of temporal dynamics. We report the presence of a spatial structure common to the different years, highlighting the inter-individual variability of the ring descriptors at the stand scale. We found a temporal trajectory common to the trees that could be separated into a high and low frequency signal, corresponding to inter-annual variations possibly related to defoliation events and a long-term trend possibly related to climate change. We conclude that PTA is a powerful tool to unravel and hierarchize the different sources of variation within tree-ring datasets.

  1. Dissecting the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets using the partial triadic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Rossi

    Full Text Available Tree-ring datasets are used in a variety of circumstances, including archeology, climatology, forest ecology, and wood technology. These data are based on microdensity profiles and consist of a set of tree-ring descriptors, such as ring width or early/latewood density, measured for a set of individual trees. Because successive rings correspond to successive years, the resulting dataset is a ring variables × trees × time datacube. Multivariate statistical analyses, such as principal component analysis, have been widely used for extracting worthwhile information from ring datasets, but they typically address two-way matrices, such as ring variables × trees or ring variables × time. Here, we explore the potential of the partial triadic analysis (PTA, a multivariate method dedicated to the analysis of three-way datasets, to apprehend the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets. We analyzed a set of 11 tree-ring descriptors measured in 149 georeferenced individuals of European larch (Larix decidua Miller during the period of 1967-2007. The processing of densitometry profiles led to a set of ring descriptors for each tree and for each year from 1967-2007. The resulting three-way data table was subjected to two distinct analyses in order to explore i the temporal evolution of spatial structures and ii the spatial structure of temporal dynamics. We report the presence of a spatial structure common to the different years, highlighting the inter-individual variability of the ring descriptors at the stand scale. We found a temporal trajectory common to the trees that could be separated into a high and low frequency signal, corresponding to inter-annual variations possibly related to defoliation events and a long-term trend possibly related to climate change. We conclude that PTA is a powerful tool to unravel and hierarchize the different sources of variation within tree-ring datasets.

  2. Is wood pre-treatment essential for tree-ring nitrogen concentration and isotope analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Annick; Savard, Martine M; Bégin, Christian; Smirnoff, Anna

    2011-02-28

    Tree-ring nitrogen concentrations and isotope ratios (δ(15)N) are gaining in popularity for environmental research although their use is still debated because of nitrogen mobility in tree stems. Modern studies generally present results on wood that is pre-treated to remove soluble nitrogen compounds and to minimize the impact of radial translocation on tree-ring nitrogen environmental records. However, the necessity to use such pre-treatment has never been fully assessed. Here we compare the nitrogen concentrations and δ(15)N values of two wood preparation protocols applied to beech and red spruce tree rings for the removal of soluble compounds from ring pairs with non pre-treated tree rings. For both tree species, pre-treatment did not minimize the radial patterns of tree-ring nitrogen concentrations and the increasing concentration trends that are coincident with the heartwood-sapwood boundary. Therefore, even if the tree-ring nitrogen concentrations are slightly modified by pre-treatment, these concentrations are considered to reflect internal stem processes rather than environmental conditions in both species. The δ(15)N values were similar for untreated and pre-treated ring pairs, suggesting that wood pre-treatment did not substantially change the δ(15)N values and temporal trends in ring series. In addition, tree-ring δ(15)N series of untreated and pre-treated wood did not show any sign of influence of the heartwood-sapwood boundary in either tree species, indicating that nitrogen translocation did not generate significant isotopic fractionation. We therefore suggest that untreated ring δ(15)N values of beech and red spruce trees can be used for environmental research.

  3. Nonannual tree rings in a climate-sensitive Prioria copaifera chronology in the Atrato River, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Ramirez, David; Andreu-Hayles, Laia; Del Valle, Jorge I; Santos, Guaciara M; Gonzalez, Paula L M

    2017-08-01

    In temperate climates, tree growth dormancy usually ensures the annual nature of tree rings, but in tropical environments, determination of annual periodicity can be more complex. The purposes of the work are as follows: (1) to generate a reliable tree-ring width chronology for Prioria copaifera Griseb. (Leguminoceae), a tropical tree species dwelling in the Atrato River floodplains, Colombia; (2) to assess the climate signal recorded by the tree-ring records; and (3) to validate the annual periodicity of the tree rings using independent methods. We used standard dendrochronological procedures to generate the P. copaifera tree-ring chronology. We used Pearson correlations to evaluate the relationship of the chronology with the meteorological records, climate regional indices, and gridded precipitation/sea surface temperature products. We also evaluated 24 high-precision (14)C measurements spread over a range of preselected tree rings, with assigned calendar years by dendrochronological techniques, before and after the bomb spike in order to validate the annual nature of the tree rings. The tree-ring width chronology was statistically reliable, and it correlated significantly with local records of annual and October-December (OND) streamflow and precipitation across the upper river watershed (positive), and OND temperature (negative). It was also significantly related to the Oceanic Niño Index, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and the Southern Oscillation Index, as well as sea surface temperatures over the Caribbean and the Pacific region. However, (14)C high-precision measurements over the tree rings demonstrated offsets of up to 40 years that indicate that P. copaifera can produce more than one ring in certain years. Results derived from the strongest climate-growth relationship during the most recent years of the record suggest that the climatic signal reported may be due to the presence of annual rings in some of those trees in recent years. Our study alerts

  4. Tracing the history of nuclear releases: determination of 129I in tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Usha; Fehn, Udo; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; McNeil, Heather; Sharma, Pankaj; Elmore, David

    2002-03-15

    Concentrations of the long-lived radioisotope 1291 were measured in dated tree rings in order to determine whether the distribution of this isotope reflects the history of nuclear deposition. 129I concentrations and 129I/127I ratios were analyzed in tree rings and bark samples from four trees at West Valley, NY, and from one tree at Rochester, NY. West Valley was the site of short-lived nuclear fuel reprocessing activities (1966-1972), while Rochester, located 115 km to the northeast, provided a regional control site for the study. The selected trees reflect different modes of fluid and nutrient transport in trees, with three species of ring-porous trees (elm, oak, and locust), one semidiffuse (cherry), and one diffuse-porous tree (maple). The results show that 1291 levels in ring-porous trees, in which xylem or hydrologic tissue is localized in the outermost growth ring, are generally well correlated with the expected 1291 deposition pattern for the region. In contrast, tree rings of the more common semidiffuse to diffuse-porous wood, where xylem is disseminated throughout the trunk, show a less well developed 129I signal, probably due to the transport of iodine ions across annual rings. Iodine concentrations in the tree rings range from 0.04 to 2 mg/kg, 129I/127I ratios from 6 x 10(-10) to 3.8 x 10(-6). Tree bark and the outermost rings show significantly higher 129I concentrations than the wood of the trunk. The 129I/127I ratios for bark are very similar to values obtained for surface soil and water at the two localities, while inner rings have ratios similar to those in deeper layers of the soil, reflecting different pathways for 129I uptake and the differences in ambient 1291 levels between the atmosphere and deep soil. Although ring porous trees preserve the depositional pattern of nuclear releases, rings older than or close to the onset of the nuclear age have 129I/127I ratios significantly above the preanthropogenic level, suggesting that even in these

  5. An Optimal Algorithm for Conflict-Free Coloring for Tree of Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Pira, Einollah

    2012-01-01

    An optimal algorithm is presented about Conflict-Free Coloring for connected subgraphs of tree of rings. Suppose the number of the rings in the tree is |T| and the maximum length of rings is |R|. A presented algorithm in [1] for a Tree of rings used O(log|T|.log|R|) colors but this algorithm uses O(log|T|+log|R|) colors. The coloring earned by this algorithm has the unique-min property, that is, the unique color is also minimum.

  6. ORPOM model for optimum distribution of tree ring sampling based on the climate observation network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Tree ring dating plays an important role in obtaining past climate information.The fundamental study of obtaining tree ring samples in typical climate regions is particularly essential.The optimum distribution of tree ring sampling sites based on climate information from the Climate Observation Network(ORPOM model) is presented in this article.In this setup,the tree rings in a typical region are used for surface representation,by applying excellent correlation with the climate information as the main principle.Taking the Horqin Sandy Land in the cold and arid region of China as an example,the optimum distribution range of the tree ring sampling sites was obtained through the application of the ORPOM model,which is considered a reasonably practical scheme.

  7. Isotopic evidence in tree rings for historical changes in atmospheric sulfur sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Hidehisa; Matsuoka, Nobuaki; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Koike, Masami; Takashima, Yoshimasa

    2006-09-15

    Little is understood about the usefulness of sulfur isotopic ratios (sigma 34S) in tree rings because the sulfur content in rings is generally insufficient for analysis using conventional methods. We present sigma 34S values of the water-soluble and the organically bound sulfur fractions in rings of coniferous trees grown in Japan, analyzed using a large-volume oxygen bomb. Comparing the sigma 34S values of the organically bound fraction in tree rings with past atmospheric sulfur concentrations and with those of their sources, we find clear evidence that the sigma 34S values of the organically bound fraction in the rings are dependent upon the values of the atmospheric sulfur sources. The evidence suggests that the sigma 34S values in tree rings are a useful chronological proxy for evaluating possible causes of past atmospheric sulfur pollution.

  8. Development of a rainfall sensitive tree-ring chronology in Zimbabwe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahle, D.W.; Cleaveland, M.K. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AK (United States); Nicholson, S.E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)] [and others

    1997-11-01

    This paper reports the discovery of annual tree ring formation in two species of trees in Zimbabwe and describes their paleoclimatic reconstruction potential. Due to the strong influence of El Nino-Southern Oscillation on the climate and crop yields of Zimbabwe and surrenting areas, and the rarity of annual tree ring chronologies in the tropics, the discovery of climatically sensitive growth rings is extremely significant. In particular, the Pterocarpus angolensis shows a strong correlation between the derived tree ring chronology and regional rainfall amounts. Based on sampling at the Sikumi Forest, it is speculated that P. angolensis may routinely achieve over 200 years in age. Four lines of evidence are identified which indicate that the semi-ring porous growth bands in P. angolensis are exactly annual growth rings. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Angular Distribution of Element Contents in Tree Rings and the Environmental Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KESHANZHE; QIANJUNLONG; 等

    1999-01-01

    Element contents of tree rings and soils near tree roots collected from Deodar cedar (Cedrus deodara (Roxb.) G.Don) and Masson pine(Pinus massoniana lamb).were determined to study the relationship between the angular distribution of element contents in tree rings and the environmental information.The chemical composition and properties of soil are very much cmoplicated,which leads to the non-uniform distribution of the element contents in tree rings.The statistical multi-varialbe regression method was used to get the information of the tree-centered distribution of element contents in the environment(soil),(C'),C'(Z,θj),from the distribtuion of element contents in tree rings(C),C(Z,θi),which depends on the plane azimuth angle(θi),i.e.,C=C(Z,θi),where Z is the atomic number of the element,with a satisfactory result though this study is only a primary one.

  10. Long tree-ring chronologies provide evidence of recent tree growth decrease in a Central African tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; Zalloni, Enrica; Castaldi, Simona; Marzaioli, Fabio; Cazzolla-Gatti, Roberto; Lasserre, Bruno; Tognetti, Roberto; Marchetti, Marco; Valentini, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    It is still unclear whether the exponential rise of atmospheric CO2 concentration has produced a fertilization effect on tropical forests, thus incrementing their growth rate, in the last two centuries. As many factors affect tree growth patterns, short -term studies might be influenced by the confounding effect of several interacting environmental variables on plant growth. Long-term analyses of tree growth can elucidate long-term trends of plant growth response to dominant drivers. The study of annual rings, applied to long tree-ring chronologies in tropical forest trees enables such analysis. Long-term tree-ring chronologies of three widespread African species were measured in Central Africa to analyze the growth of trees over the last two centuries. Growth trends were correlated to changes in global atmospheric CO2 concentration and local variations in the main climatic drivers, temperature and rainfall. Our results provided no evidence for a fertilization effect of CO2 on tree growth. On the contrary, an overall growth decline was observed for all three species in the last century, which appears to be significantly correlated to the increase in local temperature. These findings provide additional support to the global observations of a slowing down of C sequestration in the trunks of forest trees in recent decades. Data indicate that the CO2 increase alone has not been sufficient to obtain a tree growth increase in tropical trees. The effect of other changing environmental factors, like temperature, may have overridden the fertilization effect of CO2.

  11. Identification, measurement and interpretation of tree rings in woody species from mediterranean climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Paolo; Gartner, Barbara L; Tognetti, Roberto; Bräker, Otto U; Schoch, Werner; Innes, John L

    2003-02-01

    We review the literature dealing with mediterranean climate, vegetation, phenology and ecophysiology relevant to the understanding of tree-ring formation in mediterranean regions. Tree rings have been used extensively in temperate regions to reconstruct responses of forests to past environmental changes. In mediterranean regions, studies of tree rings are scarce, despite their potential for understanding and predicting the effects of global change on important ecological processes such as desertification. In mediterranean regions, due to the great spatio-temporal variability of mediterranean environmental conditions, tree rings are sometimes not formed. Often, clear seasonality is lacking, and vegetation activity is not always associated with regular dormancy periods. We present examples of tree-ring morphology of five species (Arbutus unedo, Fraxinus ornus, Quercus cerris, Q. ilex, Q. pubescens) sampled in Tuscany, Italy, focusing on the difficulties we encountered during the dating. We present an interpretation of anomalies found in the wood structure and, more generally, of cambial activity in such environments. Furthermore, we propose a classification of tree-ring formation in mediterranean environments. Mediterranean tree rings can be dated and used for dendrochronological purposes, but great care should be taken in selecting sampling sites, species and sample trees.

  12. Radiation densitometry in tree-ring analysis: a review and procedure manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, M.L.; Taylor, F.G.; Doyle, T.W.; Foster, B.E.; Cooper, C.; West, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    An x-ray densitometry of wood facility is being established by the Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge Natioanl Laboratory (ORNL). The objective is to apply tree-ring data to determine whether or not there is a fertilizer effect on tree growth from increased atmospheric carbon dioxide since the beginning of the industrial era. Intra-ring width and density data, including ring-mass will be detemined from tree-ring samples collected from sites located throughout the United States and Canada. This report is designed as a guide to assist ORNL scientists in building the x-ray densitometry system. The history and development of x-ray densitometry in tree-ring research is examined and x-ray densitometry is compared with other techniques. Relative wood and tree characteristics are described as are environmental and genetic factors affecting tree growth responses. Methods in x-ray densitometry are examined in detail and the techniques used at four operating laboratories are described. Some ways that dendrochronology has been applied in dating, in wood quality, and environmental studies are presented, and a number of tree-ring studies in Canada are described. An annotated bibliography of radiation densitometry in tree-ring analysis and related subjects is included.

  13. Looking backwards : using tree rings to evaluate long-term growth patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, D.M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837067

    2010-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the ecology of tropical forest trees, it is essential to obtain information on tree growth over periods of decades to centuries. Using tree-ring analysis such data can be derived as this technique allows reconstructing the growth history over the entire lifespan of a

  14. Ideas and perspectives: use of tree-ring width as an indicator of tree growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hember, R. A.; Kurz, W. A.; Metsaranta, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    By taking core samples, dendroecological studies can reconstruct radial growth over the lifespan of a tree, providing a valuable way to estimate the sensitivity of tree productivity to environmental change. With increasing prevalence of such studies in global change science, it is worth cautioning that the incremental growth rate of a sub-dimension of a tree organ, such as annual ring width (w), does not respond to extrinsic perturbations with the same relative magnitude as the primary production of that organ. For example, if an extrinsic force causes a two-fold increase in the absolute growth rate of stemwood biomass (AGR), it should only theoretically translate into a 1.3-fold increase in w, or a 1.7-fold increase in basal area increment (BAI), when a 2:1 ratio in resource allocation to lateral and apical meristems is assumed. Expressing the magnitude of a response in relative terms does not, therefore, provide a valid means of comparing estimates of relative growth derived from measurement of different dimensional traits of the tree. From our perspective, enough conformity to facilitate comparison of environmental sensitivity across studies of tree growth is warranted so we emphasize the benefit of dimension analysis to transform measurements of w and BAI into the AGR. Although conversion to AGR introduces an error from the use of allometric equations, the approach is widely accepted in mainstream ecology and global change science at least partially because it avoids discrepancies in response magnitude owing to differences in dimension. Studies of organ elongation have historically provided invaluable information, yet it must be recognized that they systematically underestimate the response magnitude of primary production, and confound comparisons of growth sensitivity between many dendroecological studies that focus on w and studies of primary production.

  15. Determining the annual periodicity of growth rings in seven tree species of a tropical moist forest in Santa Cruz, Bolivia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, L.; Villalba, R.; Peña-Claros, M.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the annual periodicity of growth rings in seven tree species from a tropical moist forest in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, a fire scar was used as a marker point to verify the annual nature of tree rings. The number of tree rings formed between the 1995 fire scar and the collection of the cross

  16. Radiocarbon in tropical tree rings during the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Q.; Barbetti, M.; Zoppi, U.; Fink, D.; Watanasak, M.; Jacobsen, G. E.

    2004-08-01

    Cross-dated tree-ring cores (Pinus merkusii) from north-central Thailand, spanning AD 1620-1780, were used to investigate atmospheric 14C for the tropics during the latter part of the Little Ice Age. In addition, a cross-dated section of Huon pine from western Tasmania, covering the same period of time, was investigated. A total of 16 pairs of decadal samples were extracted to alpha-cellulose for AMS 14C analysis using the ANTARES facility at ANSTO. The 14C results from Thailand follow the trend of the southern hemisphere, rather than that of the northern hemisphere. This is a surprising result, and we infer that atmospheric 14C for north-central Thailand, at 17° N, was strongly influenced by the entrainment of southern hemisphere air parcels during the southwest Asian monsoon, when the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone moves to the north of our sampling site. Such atmospheric transport and mixing are therefore considered to be one of the principal mechanisms for regional 14C offsets.

  17. Radiocarbon concentration in modern tree rings from Fukushima, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T; Cresswell, Alan J; Dunbar, Elaine; Freeman, Stewart P H T; Hastie, Helen; Hou, Xiaolin; Jacobsson, Piotr; Naysmith, Philip; Sanderson, David C W

    2015-08-01

    A 30-year-old Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica), collected from Iwaki, Fukushima in 2014, was analyzed for the long-lived radionuclide (14)C. Values of Δ(14)C varied from 211.7‰ in 1984 to 16.9‰ in 2013. The temporal Δ(14)C variation can be described as an exponential decline, indistinguishable from the general Northern Hemisphere Zone 2 (NH Zone 2) values in the atmosphere, until at least 1994. Values of Δ(14)C for 1999 and 2004 are slightly depleted compared with NH Zone 2 values, while from 1999 to 2013 the data suggest a clear depletion with a 2-8 ppmV additional CO2 contribution from a (14)C-free (i.e. fossil carbon) source. This change coincides with local traffic increases since two nearby expressways were opened in the 1990's. In addition, the small but visible (14)C pulse observed in the 2011 tree-ring might be caused by release from the damaged reactors during the Fukushima nuclear accident.

  18. Measuring mercury and other elemental components in tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, C.; Hollerman, W.A.; Doyle, T.W.; Lewis, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in measuring heavy metal pollution, such as mercury, using tree ring analysis. Since 1970, this method has provided a historical snapshot of pollutant concentrations near hazardous waste sites. Traditional methods of analysis have long been used with heavy metal pollutants such as mercury. These methods, such as atomic fluorescence and laser ablation, are sometimes time consuming and expensive to implement. In recent years, ion beam techniques, such as Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE), have been used to measure large numbers of elements. Most of the existing research in this area has been completed for low to medium atomic number pollutants, such as titanium, cobalt, nickel, and copper. Due to the reduction of sensitivity, it is often difficult or impossible to use traditional low energy (few MeV) PIXE analysis for pollutants with large atomic numbers. For example, the PIXE detection limit for mercury was recently measured to be about 1 ppm for a spiked Southern Magnolia wood sample [ref. 1]. This presentation will compare PIXE and standard chemical concentration results for a variety of wood samples. Copyright 2004 by ISA.

  19. Biomonitoring of atmospheric particulate matter using magnetic properties of Salix matsudana tree ring cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Huang, Baochun; Piper, John D A; Luo, Rensong

    2008-04-01

    Magnetic properties of atmospheric particulate matter collected by both natural and artificial dust receptors are increasingly being used as proxy parameters for environmental analyses. This study reports the first investigation of the relationship between smelting factory activity and the impact on the environment as recorded by the magnetic signature in Salix matsudana tree rings. Magnetic techniques including low-temperature experiments, successive acquisition of isothermal remanent magnetisation (IRM), hysteresis loops and measurements of saturated IRM (SIRM) indicated that magnetic particles were omnipresent in tree bark and trunk wood, and that these particles were predominantly magnetite with multidomain properties. The magnetic properties of tree trunk and branch cores sampled from different directions and heights implied that the acquisition of magnetic particles by a tree depends on both orientation and height. The differences of SIRM values of tree ring cores indicated that pollution source-facing tree trunk wood contained significantly more magnetic particles than other faces. The results indicated that magnetic particles are most likely to be intercepted and collected by tree bark and then enter into tree xylem tissues during the growing season to become finally enclosed into the tree ring by lignification. There was a significant correlation between time-dependent SIRM values of tree ring cores and the annual iron production of the smelting factory. From the dependence of magnetic properties with sampling direction and height, it is argued that magnetic particles in the xylem cannot move between tree rings. Accordingly, the SIRM of tree ring cores from the source-facing side can contribute to historic studies of atmospheric particulate matter produced by heavy metal smelting activities.

  20. Response of the nitrogen isotopic composition of tree-rings following tree-clearing and land-use change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukata, Andrew R; Kyser, T Kurtis

    2005-10-15

    Clear-cutting of forests affects the nitrogen cycle and the nitrogen isotopic composition of bioavailable ammonium and nitrate in the soil. Here, we have used nitrogen isotopic variations of tree-rings in red oak (Quercus rubra) and white oak (Quercus alba) as indicators of changes in the nitrogen cycle on a local scale. The delta15N values of late-wood from trees at two remnant forest stands in Ontario, Canada, that underwent large-scale tree-clearing and permanent land-use change at different times were measured. Trees from the perimeter of each stand record a marked 1.5-2.5 per thousand increase in the delta15N values of their tree-rings relative to the values in trees from the center of the stand, with the shift synchronous with the tree-clearing and land-use change. This shift was most likely due to increased rates of nitrification and nitrate leaching in the soil as a result of tree-clearing combined with permanent changes in hydrology and probable fertilizer use accompanying the change in land-use. Nitrogen concentration in tree-rings was not affected bytree-clearing and the associated change in land-use. These results indicate that changes in nitrogen cycling in forest ecosystems, whether due to climate change, land-use change, or other environmental changes (increased O3, other atmospheric pollutants, insects, etc.), can be faithfully monitored with nitrogen isotopic compositions of tree-rings and that dendrogeochemical analysis can be incorporated into studies of the effects of long-term anthropogenic effects on forest ecosystems.

  1. An 854-Year Tree-Ring Chronology of Scots Pine for South-West Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helama Samuli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A near-millennial tree-ring chronology (AD 1147-2000 is presented for south-west Finland and analyzed using dendroclimatic methods. This is a composite chronology comprising samples both from standing pine trees (Pinus sylvestris L. and subfossil trunks as recovered from the lake sediments, with a total sample size of 189 tree-ring sample series. The series were dendrochronologically cross-dated to exact calendar years to portray variability in tree-ring widths on inter-annual and longer scales. Al though the studied chronology correlates statistically significantly with other long tree-ring width chronologies from Finland over their common period (AD 1520-1993, the south-west chronology did not exhibit similarly strong mid-summer temperature or spring/early-summer precipitation signals in comparison to published chronologies. On the other hand, the south-west chronology showed highest correlations to the North Atlantic Oscillation indices in winter/spring months, this association following a dendroclimatic feature common to pine chronologies over the region and adjacent areas. Paleoclimatic comparison showed that tree-rings had varied similarly to central European spring temperatures. It is postulated that the collected and dated tree-ring material could be studied for wood surface reflectance (blue channel light intensity and stable isotopes, which both have recently shown to correlate notably well with summer temperatures.

  2. Climatic significance of δD time series in tree rings from Tianmu Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on cross-dating tree ring age from Tianmu Mountain, Zhejiang Province, the δD(D/H)sample 1 xl000 of each tree ring nitrocellulose was measured and then the δ D annual time series was established. Using meteorological data from Tianmu Mountain Observatory,the responds of δ D of tree ring to climatic factors were analyzed. The results suggest that the δ D time series of the tree ring correlates well with climatic conditions, primarily with precipitation of the second half of each year, average annual air temperature and average annual maximum air temperature. The reconstructed maximum winter air temperature by the δ D of tree ring is in good correlation with local instrumental data. The Iow-frequency variations of reconstructed mean maximum air temperature of the winter in lianmu Mountain corroborate with the temperature change in a large special scale. Tianmu Mountain is located in winter monsoon sensitive zone,thus the influence of winter temperature on tree growth is quite obvious. The results in this paper suggest that δD of tree ring is an effective proxy for winter temperature in non-limited regions.

  3. Using Tree-Ring Data to Develop Critical Scientific and Mathematical Thinking Skills in Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiondella, F.; Davi, N. K.; Wattenberg, F.; Pringle, P. T.; Greidanus, I.; Oelkers, R.

    2015-12-01

    Tree-ring science provides an engaging, intuitive, and relevant entryway into understanding both climate change and environmental research. It also sheds light on the process of science--from inspiration, to fieldwork, to analysis, to publishing and communication. The basic premise of dendrochronology is that annual rings reflect year-to-year environmental conditions and that by studying long-lived trees we can learn about environmental and climatic conditions going back hundreds to thousands of years. Conceptually, this makes tree-ring studies accessible to students and faculty for a number of reasons. First, in order to collect their data, dendrochronologists often launch expeditions to stunningly picturesque and remote places in search of long-lived, climate sensitive trees. The exciting stories and images that scientists bring back from the field can help connect students to the studies, their motivation, and the data collected. Second, tree rings can be more easily explained as a proxy for climate than ice cores, speleothems and others. Most people have prior knowledge about trees and annual growth rings. It is even possible, for example, for non-expert audiences to see climate variability through time with the naked eye by looking at climate-sensitive tree cores. Third, tree rings are interdisciplinary and illustrate the interplay between the mathematical sciences, the biological sciences, and the geosciences—that is, they show that the biosphere is a fundamental component of the Earth system. Here, we present online, multi-media learning modules for undergraduates that introduce students to several foundational studies in tree-ring science. These include evaluating tree-ring cores from ancient hemlock trees growing on a talus slope in New Paltz, NY to learn about drought in the Northeastern US, evaluating long-term streamflow and drought of the Colorado River based on tree-ring records, and using tree-ring dating techniques to develop construction

  4. Ancient Forests and the Tree-Ring Reconstruction of Past Climate (Ancient Forests and Dendroclimatology)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahle, David (Tree-Ring Laboratory, University of Arkansas)

    2003-02-12

    The original presettlement forests of North America have been dramatically altered, but thousands of unmolested ancient forests survive on remote or noncommercial terrain, including dry-site eastern hardwoods such as chestnut oak and post oak, the pinyon-juniper woodlands of the semiarid West, oak woodlands of California and in northeast Mexico, and the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska. Long tree-ring chronologies derived from these ancient forest remnants provide irreplaceable archives of environmental variability which are crucial for evaluating present and future change. Temperature sensitive tree -ring chronologies from cold treeline environments place 20th century warming into long historical perspective, and moisture sensitive tree-ring chronologies provide analogs to the decadal moisture regimes of the 20th century. These tree-ring data suggests that the 16th century megadrought was the most severe-sustained drought to impact North America in 1500 years, and had huge environmental and social impacts at the dawn of European settlement.

  5. Spurious shear induced by the tree rings of the LSST CCDs

    CERN Document Server

    Okura, Yuki; May, Morgan; Tamagawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of the tree rings seen in the candidate sensors of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) on galaxy-shape measurements. The tree rings are a consequence of transverse electric fields caused by circularly symmetric impurity gradients in the silicon of the sensors. They effectively modify the pixel area and shift the photogenerated charge around, displacing the observed photon positions. The displacement distribution generates distortions that cause spurious shears correlated with the tree-rings patterns, potentially biasing cosmic shear measurements. In this paper we quantify the amplitude of the spurious shear caused by the tree rings on the LSST candidate sensors, and calculate its 2-point correlation function. We find that 2-point correlation function of the spurious shear on an area equivalent to the LSST field of view is order of about $10^{-13}$, providing a negligible contribution to the 2-point correlation of the cosmic shear signal. Additional work is underway,...

  6. Climate variability of Late Pleistocene deglaciation in the North American midcontinent derived from tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyushkina, Irina P.; Livina, Valerie N.; Leavitt, Steve W.; Mode, William N.

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution climatic proxies, such as tree rings spanning millennia, have excellent potential to describe high- and low-frequency variability of climate. In practice, however, although the number of Holocene millennium-length tree-ring records is still rather limited, they are especially rare for the Late Pleistocene warming period following the Last Glacial Maximum. Furthermore, detection of climatic variability in tree-ring data is hindered due to intricate methodology of chronology development that transforms changes in tree geometry and a variety of environmental responses of tree growth to a climatic signal. Following meticulous derivation of a new tree-ring chronology, we propose a novel approach to analyze annual, decadal, multi-decadal and centennial climate-related variability of floating tree rings dated back near the end of the Pleistocene. We have developed a 1400-year tree-ring width chronology of spruce from the Green Bay area (Wisconsin) dated from 14.5 ka to 13.1ka cal BP. This new North American midcontinent record is composed of 10 overlapped site chronologies and has two short gaps filled with linear interpolation. The Green Bay chronology covers most of the warm and moist Bølling-Allerød interstadial (14.7 ka -12.7 ka BP). Within the Bølling-Allerød interstadial, there were several abrupt and brief cooling excursions such as the Older Dryas with full-glacial-like temperature conditions. We have applied tipping point analysis to detect the changes of climate-system states during these turbulent times and obtained early warning signals in the tree-ring variance. The analysis detected four short-term bifurcations dated ca. 14,450 cal BP, 14,000 cal BP, 13,750-13,600 cal BP and 13,180-13,100 cal BP. The bifurcation events of the tree-ring record correspond well to the abrupt and short cooling temperature excursions of the Bølling-Allerød interstadial documented in δ18O and Ca of GRIP ice-core records, and the Laurentide ice sheet dynamics

  7. Climatic signal from Pinus leucodermis axial resin ducts: a tree-ring time series approach

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Saracino; Angelo Rita; Sergio Rossi; Laia Andreu-Hayles; G. Helle; Luigi Todaro

    2016-01-01

    Developing long-term chronologies of tree-ring anatomical features to evaluate climatic relationships within species might serve as an annual proxy to explore and elucidate the climatic drivers affecting xylem differentiation. Pinus leucodermis response to climate was examined by analyzing vertical xylem resin ducts in wood growing at high elevation in the Apennines of peninsular Southern Italy. Early- and latewood tree-ring resin duct chronologies, spanning the 1804–2010 time period, were co...

  8. Tree-ring C-H-O isotope variability and sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Steven W

    2010-10-15

    In light of the proliferation of tree-ring isotope studies, the magnitude and cause of variability of tree-ring δ(13)C, δ(18)O and δ(2)H within individual trees (circumferential) and among trees at a site is examined in reference to field and laboratory sampling requirements and strategies. Within this framework, this paper provides a state-of-knowledge summary of the influence of "juvenile" isotope effects, ageing effects, and genetic effects, as well as the interchangeability of species, choice of ring segment to analyze (whole ring, earlywood or latewood), and the option of sample pooling. The range of isotopic composition of the same ring among trees at a site is ca. 1-3‰ for δ(13)C, 1-4‰ δ(18)O, and 5-30‰ for δ(2)H, whereas the circumferential variability within a tree is lower. A standard prescription for sampling and analysis does not exist because of differences in field environmental circumstances and mixed findings represented in relevant published literature. Decisions in this regard will usually be tightly constrained by goals of the study and project resources. Sampling 4-6 trees at a site while avoiding juvenile effects in rings near the pith seems to be the most commonly used methodology, and although there are some reasoned arguments for analyzing only latewood and developing separate isotope records from each tree, the existence of some contradictory findings together with efforts to reduce cost and effort have prompted alternate strategies (e.g., most years pooled with occasional analysis of rings in the sequence separately for each tree) that have produced useful results in many studies.

  9. On the tree-like structure of rings in dense solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michieletto, D

    2016-11-28

    One of the most challenging problems in polymer physics is providing a theoretical description for the behaviour of rings in dense solutions and melts. Although it is nowadays well established that the overall size of a ring in these conditions scales like that of a collapsed globule, there is compelling evidence that rings may exhibit ramified and tree-like conformations. In this work I show how to characterise these local tree-like structures by measuring the local writhing of the rings' segments and by identifying the patterns of intra-chain contacts. These quantities reveal two major topological structures: loops and terminal branches which strongly suggest that the strictly double-folded "lattice animal" picture for rings in the melt may be replaced by a more relaxed tree-like structure accommodating loops. In particular, I show that one can identify hierarchically looped structures whose degree increases linearly with the size of a ring, and that terminal branches are found to store about 30% of the whole ring mass, irrespectively of its length. Finally, I draw an analogy between rings in the melt and slip-linked chains, where contact points are enforced by mobile slip-links and for which a field-theoretic treatment can be employed to get some insight into their typical conformations. These findings are ultimately discussed in the light of recent works on the static structure of rings and on the existence of inter-ring threadings.

  10. Southwestern (U.S.A. Archaeological Tree-Ring Dating: 1930-1942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Nash

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendrochronology, the science of assigning precise and accurate calendar dates to annual growth rings in trees (Stokes and Smiley 1968, was the first independent dating technique available to prehistorians. Ar­chaeological tree-ring dating came of age at a time when North American archaeologists concerned them­selves primarily with time/space systematics (Willey and Sabloff 1980 and yet had no absolute and inde­pendent dating techniques available to guide their analyses. Histories of archaeology typically have not considered the development of archaeological tree-ring dating in detail. Willey and Sabloff (1980:12 devote one paragraph to the development of Southwestern archaeological tree-ring dating, as does Steibing (1993:261. Trigger (1989:305 considers dendrochronology (in the sense of the Douglass method only in light of radiocarbon dating. Textbooks and regional histories of archaeology do a little better in their treat­ment of dendrochronology, though discussions typically focus on the interpretation of tree-ring dates and not on the developmental history of the technique itself (e.g. Cordell 1984:88-90; Fagan 1991:129-133; Lyon 1996:46; Michels 1973:116; Thomas 1979:190-194. Scott (1966:9 argues that 'the story of the discovery of archaeological tree-ring dating by A E. Douglass and others has been told and retold and is now familiar to scientists and laymen alike'. I beg to differ.

  11. Relationships between tree-ring width index and NDVI of grassland in Delingha

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jicheng; SHAO Xuemei

    2006-01-01

    Using five well-replicated Qilian juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) tree-ring width index series, monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) of grassland, and climatic data from 1982 to 2001, the relationships between tree-ring width index, NDVI of grassland, and climatic data were analyzed firstly. Then, the relationship between tree-ring width index and NDVI of grassland was explored. The results showed that: (1) Temperature and precipitation in June influenced tree-ring width index and NDVI of grassland deeply in Delingha. (2) There were significant relationships between five tree-ring width index series (DLH1-DLH5) and monthly NDVI of grassland from June to September, with the most significant relationship being between tree-ring width index series and NDVI of grassland in August. (3) The PC1 (the first principal component derived from DLH1-DLH5 series) exhibited good agreement with monthly NDVI of grassland in the grass growth season (from June to September) and the averaged NDVI in the growth season, which was attributed to their common responses to water-supply limit in Delingha. This study may allow an increase in studying the past dynamics of grassland in Delingha in that the variation of grassland NDVI during the last millennium has been reconstructed from PC1.

  12. Long tree-ring chronologies provide evidence of recent tree growth decrease in a Central African tropical forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Battipaglia

    Full Text Available It is still unclear whether the exponential rise of atmospheric CO2 concentration has produced a fertilization effect on tropical forests, thus incrementing their growth rate, in the last two centuries. As many factors affect tree growth patterns, short -term studies might be influenced by the confounding effect of several interacting environmental variables on plant growth. Long-term analyses of tree growth can elucidate long-term trends of plant growth response to dominant drivers. The study of annual rings, applied to long tree-ring chronologies in tropical forest trees enables such analysis. Long-term tree-ring chronologies of three widespread African species were measured in Central Africa to analyze the growth of trees over the last two centuries. Growth trends were correlated to changes in global atmospheric CO2 concentration and local variations in the main climatic drivers, temperature and rainfall. Our results provided no evidence for a fertilization effect of CO2 on tree growth. On the contrary, an overall growth decline was observed for all three species in the last century, which appears to be significantly correlated to the increase in local temperature. These findings provide additional support to the global observations of a slowing down of C sequestration in the trunks of forest trees in recent decades. Data indicate that the CO2 increase alone has not been sufficient to obtain a tree growth increase in tropical trees. The effect of other changing environmental factors, like temperature, may have overridden the fertilization effect of CO2.

  13. Tree-ring isotopes reveal drought sensitivity in trees killed by spruce beetle outbreaks in south-central Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Adam Z; Miller, Amy E; Sherriff, Rosemary L; Berg, Edward E; Welker, Jeffrey M

    2016-10-01

    Increasing temperatures have resulted in reduced growth and increased tree mortality across large areas of western North American forests. We use tree-ring isotope chronologies (δ(13) C and δ(18) O) from live and dead trees from four locations in south-central Alaska, USA, to test whether white spruce trees killed by recent spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) outbreaks showed evidence of drought stress prior to death. Trees that were killed were more sensitive to spring/summer temperature and/or precipitation than trees that survived. At two of our sites, we found greater correlations between the δ(13) C and δ(18) O chronologies and spring/summer temperatures in dead trees than in live trees, suggesting that trees that are more sensitive to temperature-induced drought stress are more likely to be killed. At one site, the difference between δ(13) C in live and dead trees was related to winter/spring precipitation, with dead trees showing stronger correlations between δ(13) C and precipitation, again suggesting increased water stress in dead trees. At all sites where δ(18) O was measured, δ(18) O chronologies showed the greatest difference in climate response between live and dead groups, with δ(18) O in live trees correlating more strongly with late winter precipitation than dead trees. Our results indicate that sites where trees are already sensitive to warm or dry early growing-season conditions experienced the most beetle-kill, which has important implications for forecasting future mortality events in Alaska.

  14. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Dendrochronology in Sub-Fossil Bog Oak Tree Rings - A Preliminary Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sass, U.G.W.; Poole, I.; Wils, T.; Helle, G.; Schleser, G.H.; Bergen, van P.

    2005-01-01

    Isotope dendroclimatology is a relatively new field investigating environmental factors that control the radial growth of trees. Tree-ring series of sub-fossil bog oaks can be dated from sites across northwest Europe indicating that the environmental change(s) were regional rather than local. Bog

  15. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Dendrochronology in Sub-Fossil Bog Oak Tree Rings - A Preliminary Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sass, U.G.W.; Poole, I.; Wils, T.; Helle, G.; Schleser, G.H.; Bergen, van P.

    2005-01-01

    Isotope dendroclimatology is a relatively new field investigating environmental factors that control the radial growth of trees. Tree-ring series of sub-fossil bog oaks can be dated from sites across northwest Europe indicating that the environmental change(s) were regional rather than local. Bog oa

  16. The Potential of Tree Rings for the Study of Forest Succession in Southern Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brienen, R.J.W.; Lebrija Trejos, E.E.; Breugel, van M.; Bongers, F.; Meave, J.; Martinez-Ramos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of tropical secondary forest succession face strong limitations due to the slow pace of succession and the time-consuming task of monitoring processes. The occurrence of tree rings in secondary forest trees may help expand our knowledge on succession in these systems and may be useful for fa

  17. Development of environmental assessment by tree ring (1). Characteristics of tree ring width in pine tree. Jumoku nenrin ni yoru kankyo eikyo hyoka shuho no kaihatsu (1). Matsu no nenrin haba no jittai to kiso tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinada, Yasushi; Nashimoto, Makoto; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu.

    1988-12-01

    In order to investigate the causal relation of change in vegetation status with the power station after starting the operation, pine trees in the surrounding area were studied in tree ring characteristics. The sampling was made at six stands ranged from the Tohhoku district to the Chugoku district. Pinus densiflora and P. Thunbergii were 0.1 to 16.2mm and 0.05 to 9.05mm, respectively, in tree ring width. They were, in frequency distribution, both a logarithmic normal distribution with 1.05 to 1.50mm in mode. Their frequency distribution being a logarithmic normal distribution, along with advance in years thereafter it transfers to a normal distribution, then to a logarithmic normal distribution, then to an L-shaped distribution. Pinus densiflora and P. Thunbergii were 6.5+-3.5mm and 6.5+-2.5mm, respectively, in maximum tree ring width, of which the appearance ratio was high in trees, 4 to 12 years old. While the minimum tree ring width appears, when the tree is very young in age and in specific calendar years during its second half of life. As for the time series of tree ring width, it, small when one year old, continues to enlarge along with advance in years until about ten years old, attains the maximum and, after then, diminishes along with advance in years. 6 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Tree Rings as Chroniclers of Mercury Exposure in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riscassi, A. L.; Camper, T.; Lee, T. R.; Druckenbrod, D.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    Although historical Hg emissions and subsequent deposition play a dominant role in shaping present and future Hg cycling, our knowledge of this is limited in both space and time. Recent studies have shown Hg concentrations in tree rings have the potential to archive historical Hg exposure from local, regional, and global sources, however, no studies have evaluated tree rings in the eastern U.S., a region of elevated Hg deposition from upwind power plants. In order to chronicle the historical Hg exposure of the central Appalachian region through dendrochemical analysis, tree rings were cored along a latitudinal gradient in Shenandoah National Park with sites clustered in North, Central and Southern regions. Long-lived tree species with low radial permeability, chosen to avoid the potential for chemical translocation, included white oak (Quercus Alba), northern red oak (Quercus rubra), and pitch pine (Pinus rigida). In each of the three regions, we collected a core from three individuals of each tree species (27 total cores) and analyzed each for Hg content in 10-yr increments. Overall, tree ring Hg concentrations (average 0.88 ng Hg g-1) were similar to other studies and varied between species. Temporal tree-core Hg trends did not relate to trends in modeled global atmospheric Hg concentrations or regional sources (e.g., fire, coal production), but rather tracked the use of Hg from a local industrial point source. Contemporary wind data originating from the location of the local Hg source in conjunction with an atmospheric model indicate emissions from the plant likely impact the southern region of the park, with a lesser influence in the central and north regions, matching the longitudinal gradient observed in tree rings. This study raises questions about the extent of historical contamination from the industrial site and demonstrates the potential usefulness of tree ring dendrochemistry for identifying historical sources of atmospheric Hg exposure.

  19. Response of tree-ring width to rainfall gradient along the Tianshan Mountains of northwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    By comparing the long-term tree-ring growths at various geographic scales, we can make clear the effects of environmental variations on tree growth, and get an understanding of the responses of forest ecosystems to the possible changes in global and regional climate. Radial tree-ring growth of Picea schrenkiana and its relationship to air temperature and precipitation were investigated across longitude transects on the north slopes of the Tianshan Mountains in northwestern China. Tree-ring samples were collected and residual chronologies were developed for three different regions along a gradient of decreasing precipitation from west to east. Response-function analysis was conducted to quantify the relationships between tree-ring chronologies and climate variables, such as monthly mean temperature and monthly precipitation from 1961 to 1998, using the PRECON software program. The statistical characteristics of the chronologies showed that the three chronologies constructed in this study contained significant environmental signals and were well suitable to reveal the impacts of climatic change on tree growth and forest productivity. Annual ring-width variations were similar among the three sites, but the variability was greatest in the east. This research showed that the growth trends of Picea schrenkiana in the Tianshan Mountains have not followed a uniform pattern. Response-function analysis indicated that there were significant correlations between tree growth and climatic factors in all the three regions, among which precipitation was the principal. With decreasing precipitation, the response of tree-ring widths to increasing temperature changed from a positive to a negative correlation. As for precipitation, the positive relationship to tree-ring width always dominates. It could be expected that with increased temperature and decreased precipitation, the importance of precipitation to tree growth would increase, and the response of tree growth to environmental

  20. Herbivory, plant resistance, and climate in the tree ring record: interactions distort climatic reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, R Talbot; Cobb, Neil S; Whitham, Thomas G

    2002-07-23

    To understand climate change, dendrochronologists have used tree ring analyses to reconstruct past climates, as well as ecological processes such as herbivore population dynamics. Such reconstructions, however, have been hindered by a lack of experiments that separate the influences of confounding impacts on tree rings, such as herbivores and the interactions of multiple factors. Our long-term experiments with scale insects on resistant and susceptible pines demonstrate three major points that are important to the application of this commonly used tool. (i) Herbivory reduced tree ring growth by 25-35%. (ii) The impact on ring growth distorted climate reconstruction, resulting in the overestimation of past moisture levels by more than 2-fold. Our data suggest that, if distortion because of herbivory has been a problem in previous reconstructions, estimates of the magnitude of recent climate changes are likely to be conservative. (iii) Our studies support a detectible plant resistance x herbivore x climate interaction in the tree ring record. Because resistance and susceptibility to herbivory are known to be genetically based in many systems, the potential exists to incorporate plant genetics into the field of dendrochronology, where it may be used to screen distortions from the tree ring record.

  1. Laser photoacoustic detection of CO2 in old disc tree-rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, Boris; Ponomarev, Yurii; Sapozhnikova, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    A homemade CO2-laser photoacoustic spectrometer has been used for monitoring CO2 in gas samples extracted under vacuum from the wood of old spruce disc tree-rings for a ∼60 year series. The experimental results show that (1) the CO2 concentration exhibits annual trends correlated with an increase in atmospheric CO2 in a number of cases; (2) at the time when the annual CO2 trend changes from positive to negative, the annual tree-ring stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of CO2 change as well; (3) the disc tree-ring widths are observed to decrease in most cases where the annual CO2 increased; (4) simultaneously with the annual CO2 variation, annual H2O distribution was detected in gas samples of the wood tree-rings of one spruce disc. The observed patterns of the annual CO2 distribution in the disc tree-rings are assumed to be the evidence of the impact of the atmospheric CO2 increase. In other words, a change in the concentration gradient between the stem and the atmospheric CO2 may lead to a gradual CO2 accumulation in the stem because of a decrease in the diffusion rate and to a change in the tree parameters.

  2. Spatiotemporal reconstruction of lead contamination using tree rings and organic soil layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, J-C; Richer-Laflèche, M; Bégin, C; Rodrigue, R

    2008-12-15

    An atmospheric dispersion model predicting ground-level concentrations from a point source of metal emissions (Murdochville smelter) was calibrated on tree rings in black spruce (Picea mariana Mill. B.S.P.) in order to reconstruct the spatial and temporal Pb-contamination pattern in the Gaspé Peninsula (Canada). Model predictions were validated with forest-floor Pb concentrations that resulted from accumulation of this element over the years and that provide a robust spatial-deposition pattern. Atmospheric emission records were also used to verify the good agreement between the smelter emissions and the temporal-information pattern present in tree rings. Tree rings that formed during the period of smelter emissions exhibited Pb concentrations that correlated with those measured in humus. Temporal variability in tree-ring concentrations was closely associated with the smelter emissions, suggesting that black spruce trees were able to record Pb pollution from a point source. However, a time gap of at least 15years must be considered between the emissions and the actual uptake and incorporation of Pb in the tree rings. A decrease in the level of contamination in the area was associated with the decrease in smelting activities, suggesting a natural resilience of the forest ecosystems to the contamination. This study highlights the strong potential for combining dendrochemical, soil, and modeling approaches in environmental research.

  3. Markers inside wood : tree rings as archives of insect outbreaks, drift-sand dynamics, and spring flooding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copini, P.

    2015-01-01

    MARKERS INSIDE WOOD – TREE RINGS AS ARCHIVES OF INSECT OUTBREAKS, DRIFT-SAND DYNAMICS AND SPRING FLOODING Trees are long-living organisms that record ecologically relevant information in their xylem that can be accessed by dendrochronology, the study of tree rings. Specific environmental event

  4. The Tree-Ring Mercury Record of Gold Mining in the Klondike, Central Yukon Territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clackett, S.; Porter, T. J.; Lehnherr, I.

    2016-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is an atmospherically mixed pollutant of global concern with the potential to become toxic methyl-Hg (MeHg) is some environments. Accurate projections of future health impacts caused by Hg pollution will partly depend on changes in the atmospheric Hg pool, but knowledge of natural Hg variability is limited by a lack of long term monitoring data, which precludes a robust analysis of how it may evolve in the future. Natural archives such as lake sediments, ice cores and tree-rings have the potential to fill this knowledge gap. Tree-rings may be ideally suited for this purpose since they are annually resolved, they span multiple centuries in some areas, and cover large portions of the Earth's surface. Few studies have evaluated tree-ring Hg, and generally agree tree-rings are a passive archive for local Hg emissions. However, further studies are needed to validate this hypothesis. An ideal site to test this proxy is Bear Creek in the Klondike where the Hg amalgamation method was used during the period 1918-1966 to recover fine gold from placer ore. Gaseous Hg was lost to the local environment during operations, as is confirmed by high soil Hg concentrations at the site today. Local trees would have been exposed to the elevated Hg emissions. We measured tree-ring Hg at Bear Creek to determine if historical Hg trends are preserved. Our preliminary results from a single tree reveal that: (1) peak tree-ring Hg coincides with Bear Creek operations; (2) the lowest tree-ring Hg is observed during the pre-industrial control period (1870-1880); and (3) post-Bear Creek operations (1970-2010) coincides with intermediate tree-ring Hg levels, presumably due to higher Hg global backgrounds in recent decades. Additional trees are being analysed to determine if this result is robust, and will provide important insights on the reliability of this proxy for reconstructing long-term atmospheric Hg at local and potentially broader spatial scales.

  5. Study on Model of Correlation Between Chemical Element Contents in Tree Rings and Soils near Tree Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KESHAN-ZHE; QIANJUN-LONG; 等

    1994-01-01

    The chemical element contents in tree rings are correlated with those in the soils near the tree roots,The results in the present study showed that the correlation between them could be described using the following logarithmic linear correlation model:lgC'(Z)=a(Z)+b(Z)lgC(Z).Therefor,by determining the chrono-sequence C(Z,t),where Z is the atomic number and t the year,of elemental contents in the annual growth rings of trees,we could get the chrono-sequence C'(Z,t) of elemental contents in the soil,thus inferring the dynaminc variations of relevant elemental contents in the soil.

  6. Radial patterns of 13 elements in the tree rings of beech trees from Mavrovo National park, FYROM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristovski S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The radial patterns of 13 elements (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Na, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd and Co were analyzed in the tree rings of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.. The study site was located in an 'unpolluted' beech ecosystem in Mavrovo National Park. Thus, the obtained radial patterns in the beech trees were considered to be physiologically driven without significant pollution influence. The influence of the main climatic factors (temperature and rainfall was tested. The radial patterns of individual trees were compared in order to find individual responses to environmental impacts. For most of the elements, higher concentrations were recorded in the pith and outer-most rings and lower in the middle part of the wood. The concentration of heavy metals was low, and followed the physiological patterns of other biogenic elements.

  7. Tree ring imprints of long-term changes in climate in western Himalaya, Indi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R R Yadav

    2009-11-01

    Tree-ring analyses from semi-arid to arid regions in western Himalaya show immense potential for developing millennia long climate records. Millennium and longer ring-width chronologies of Himalayan pencil juniper (Juniperus polycarpos), Himalayan pencil cedar (Cedrus deodara) and Chilgoza pine (Pinus gerardiana) have been developed from different sites in western Himalaya. Studies conducted so far on various conifer species indicate strong precipitation signatures in ring-width measurement series. The paucity of weather records from stations close to tree-ring sampling sites poses difficulty in calibrating tree-ring data against climate data especially precipitation for its strong spatial variability in mountain regions. However, for the existence of strong coherence in temperature, even in data from distant stations, more robust temperature reconstructions representing regional and hemispheric signatures have been developed. Tree-ring records from the region indicate multi-century warm and cool anomalies consistent with the Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age anomalies. Significant relationships noted between mean premonsoon temperature over the western Himalaya and ENSO features endorse utility of climate records from western Himalayan region in understanding long-term climate variability and attribution of anthropogenic impact.

  8. The relationship between needle sugar carbon isotope ratios and tree rings of larch in Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, K T; Saurer, M; Kirdyanov, A V; Loader, N J; Bryukhanova, M V; Werner, R A; Siegwolf, R T W

    2015-11-01

    Significant gaps still exist in our knowledge about post-photosynthetic leaf level and downstream metabolic processes and isotopic fractionations. This includes their impact on the isotopic climate signal stored in the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of leaf assimilates and tree rings. For the first time, we compared the seasonal δ(13)C variability of leaf sucrose with intra-annual, high-resolution δ(13)C signature of tree rings from larch (Larix gmelinii Rupr.). The trees were growing at two sites in the continuous permafrost zone of Siberia with different growth conditions. Our results indicate very similar low-frequency intra-seasonal trends of the sucrose and tree ring δ(13)C records with little or no indication for the use of 'old' photosynthates formed during the previous year(s). The comparison of leaf sucrose δ(13)C values with that in other leaf sugars and in tree rings elucidates the cause for the reported (13)C-enrichment of sink organs compared with leaves. We observed that while the average δ(13)C of all needle sugars was 1.2‰ more negative than δ(13)C value of wood, the δ(13)C value of the transport sugar sucrose was on an average 1.0‰ more positive than that of wood. Our study shows a high potential of the combined use of compound-specific isotope analysis of sugars (leaf and phloem) with intra-annual tree ring δ(13)C measurements for deepening our understanding about the mechanisms controlling the isotope variability in tree rings under different environmental conditions.

  9. Isotope variability in larch tree rings of Siberia: climate and ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyushkina, I. P.; Knorre, A.; Leavitt, S. W.; Kirdyanov, A.; Grachev, A.; Brukhanova, M.; Vaganov, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Paleoclimate reconstructions from tree-ring widths and maximum wood density are most successful in localities with extreme climates for particular tree species that are most responsive. Climate proxy records from other, less conventional, tree-ring parameters have been rapidly increasing over the last decade. We assembled a unique dataset of carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of larch tree rings from the northern and southern tree-lines of Siberia, variously sub-sampled and analyzed (whole wood and cellulose & annual and 5-year sequences from individual trees and pooled). Larch samples from the north in Taymyr (Larix gmelinii Rupr.) published by Sidorova et al. (2010) and from the south collected in Khakasia (Larix sibirica Ledeb.) both came from highly temperate continental climates exhibiting similar amounts of precipitation and observed temperature trends. However, the sites differ because temperature is the dominant factor limiting radial tree growth in the north, whereas precipitation is the dominant limiting factor in the south. Climatic signals documented in the chronologies of tree-ring widths, wood density, and stable carbon and oxygen isotopes were compared from 1896 to 2005 and interpreted based on site ecology and larch physiology. We found a wide range of climatic responses in the variability of isotopic ratios, which suggest influence by combined interaction of precipitation and temperature changes rather than either climate factor alone. We discuss the improvement in our understanding of climatic mechanisms that control isotope compositions and tree growth in boreal forests. At certain locations where tree-ring widths are less sensitive to climate factors, isotope analysis may have greater value to successful climate modeling. It seems crucial to measure both isotopes (C and O) in tree rings and to incorporate these mechanisms properly in developing reliable climate predictors. It is noteworthy that despite the identified differences in climatic

  10. The longevity of broadleaf deciduous trees in Northern Hemisphere temperate forests: insights from tree-ring series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo eDi Filippo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors controlling the expression of longevity in trees is still an outstanding challenge for tree biologists and forest ecologists. We gathered tree-ring data and literature for broadleaf deciduous (BD temperate trees growing in closed-canopy old-growth forests in the Northern Hemisphere to explore the role of geographic patterns, climate variability, and growth rates on longevity. Our pan-continental analysis, covering 32 species from 12 genera, showed that 300-400 years can be considered a baseline threshold for maximum tree lifespan in many temperate deciduous forests. Maximum age varies greatly in relation to environmental features, even within the same species. Tree longevity is generally promoted by reduced growth rates across large genetic differences and environmental gradients. We argue that slower growth rates, and the associated smaller size, provide trees with an advantage against biotic and abiotic disturbance agents, supporting the idea that size, not age, is the main constraint to tree longevity. The oldest trees were living most of their life in subordinate canopy conditions and/or within primary forests in cool temperate environments and outside major storm tracks. Very old trees are thus characterized by slow growth and often live in forests with harsh site conditions and infrequent disturbance events that kill much of the trees. Temperature inversely controls the expression of longevity in mesophilous species (Fagus spp., but its role in Quercus spp. is more complex and warrants further research in disturbance ecology. Biological, ecological and historical drivers must be considered to understand the constraints imposed to longevity within different forest landscapes.

  11. Potential for assessing long-term dynamics in soil nitrogen availability from variations in delta15N of tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S C; Classen, A T

    2003-03-01

    Numerous researchers have used the isotopic signatures of C, H, and O in tree rings to provide a long-term record of changes in the physiological status, climate, or water-source use of trees. The frequently limiting element N is also found in tree rings, and variation in its isotopic signature may provide insight into long-term changes in soil N availability of a site. However, research has suggested that N is readily translocated among tree ring of different years; such infidelity between the isotopic compositions of the N taken up from the soil and the N contained in the ring of that growth year would obscure the long-term N isotopic record. We used a 15-year 15N-tracer study to assess the degree of N translocation among tree rings in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees growing in a young, mixed-conifer plantation. We also measured delta13C and delta15N values in unlabeled trees to assess the degree of their covariance in wood tissue, and to explore the potential for a biological linkage between them. We found that the maximum delta15N values in rings from the labeled trees occurred in the ring formed one-year after the 15N was applied to the roots. The delta15N value of rings from labeled trees declined exponentially and bidirectionally from this maximum peak, toward younger and older rings. The unlabeled trees showed considerable interannual variation in the delta15N values of their rings (up to 3 and 5 per thousand), but these values correlated poorly between trees over time and differed by as much as 6 per thousand. Removal of extractives from the wood reduced their delta15N value, but the change was fairly small and consistent among unlabeled trees. The delta13C and delta15N values of tree rings were correlated over time in only one of the unlabeled trees. Across all trees, both delta13C values of tree rings and annual stem wood production were well correlated with annual precipitation, suggesting that soil water balance is an important environmental

  12. Effects of high-severity fire drove the population collapse of the subalpine Tasmanian endemic conifer Athrotaxis cupressoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Andrés; Wood, Sam W; Veblen, Thomas T; Bowman, David M J S

    2015-01-01

    Athrotaxis cupressoides is a slow-growing and long-lived conifer that occurs in the subalpine temperate forests of Tasmania, a continental island to the south of Australia. In 1960-1961, human-ignited wildfires occurred during an extremely dry summer that killed many A. cupressoides stands on the high plateau in the center of Tasmania. That fire year, coupled with subsequent regeneration failure, caused a loss of ca. 10% of the geographic extent of this endemic Tasmanian forest type. To provide historical context for these large-scale fire events, we (i) collected dendroecological, floristic, and structural data, (ii) documented the postfire survival and regeneration of A. cupressoides and co-occurring understory species, and (iii) assessed postfire understory plant community composition and flammability. We found that fire frequency did not vary following the arrival of European settlers, and that A. cupressoides populations were able to persist under a regime of low-to-mid severity fires prior to the 1960 fires. Our data indicate that the 1960 fires were (i) of greater severity than previous fires, (ii) herbivory by native marsupials may limit seedling survival in both burned and unburned A. cupressoides stands, and (iii) the loss of A. cupressoides populations is largely irreversible given the relatively high fuel loads of postfire vegetation communities that are dominated by resprouting shrubs. We suggest that the feedback between regeneration failure and increased flammability will be further exacerbated by a warmer and drier climate causing A. cupressoides to contract to the most fire-proof landscape settings.

  13. Climatic variations on longest tree-ring chronologies for Kola Peninsula and Finnish Lapland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkina, E. A.; Shumilov, O. I.; Timonen, M.; Mielikainen, K.; Helama, S.; Kanatjev, A. G.; Kirtsideli, I. Yu.

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the external factor (solar activity, volcanic eruptions) influence on tree growth at high latitudes. We analysed a 561-year tree-ring record of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and a 676-year juniper (Juniperus Sibirica Burgst.) tree-ring chronology collected nearby the northern timberline (67.77-68.63N; 33.25-36.52 E) at the Kola Peninsula, northwestern Russia. As well known the climatic impacts of solar and volcanic activity vary regionally, and major volcanic eruptions do not always result in regional cooling. A response of tree growth at the Kola Peninsula to climatic changes due to solar variability and volcanic eruptions was revealed. For example, Dalton minimum of solar activity (1801-1816 AD) and Laki (1783 AD) and Tambora (1815 AD) volcanic eruptions appeared to cause the greatest ring-width reduction and cooling. The minima of solar activity Sporer (1416-1534 AD) and Maunder (1645-1715 AD) were as well accompanied by temperature decreases. Intervals with an absence of significant volcanic eruptions correspond to intervals of increased ring-width values. A superposed epoch analysis of 19 large (Volcanic Explosivity Index, VEI>5) volcanic events revealed a significant suppression of tree growth for up to 8 years following volcanic eruptions. The similar effect (supression of tree growth after powerful volcanic eruptions) was obtained under analysis of the 7641-year supra-long pine tree-ring chronology for Finnish Lapland. Our results documenting the regional climatic impacts of solar and volcanic activity permit us to understand the dynamics of the climate system and its response to external forcing. This work is financially supported by grant from Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 09-04-98801), by the Program of the Russian Academy and by the Regional Scientific Program of Murmansk region.

  14. ENSO flavors in a tree-ring δ18O record of Tectona grandis from Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    K. Schollaen; C. Karamperidou; P. Krusic; Cook, E; Helle, G.

    2015-01-01

    Indonesia's climate is dominated by the equatorial monsoon system, and has been linked to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events that often result in extensive droughts and floods over the Indonesian archipelago. In this study we investigate ENSO-related signals in a tree-ring δ18O record (1900–2007) of Javanese teak. Our results reveal a clear influence of Warm Pool (central Pacific) El Niño events on Javanese tree-ring δ18O, and no clear signal of Cold Tongue (eastern ...

  15. First Detection of Nitrogen from NO{sub x} in Tree Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurer, M.; Cherubini, P. [WSL Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Ammann, M.; Siegwolf, R.T.W

    2004-03-01

    Nitrogen isotope analysis ({delta}{sup 15}N) of tree rings may be useful for evaluating the temporal development of the nitrogen (N) deposition in forests and for studying the long-term effects of N accumulation in ecosystems. We investigated three sites across a pollution gradient with differing distances (20 m, 150 m, 1000 m) from a motorway in Switzerland. The {delta}{sup 15}N values in tree rings of Picea abies (spruce) increased by up to 0.79% after the construction of the motorway (1965) at the most polluted site, reflecting the uptake of isotopically heavy NO{sub x} from car exhausts. (author)

  16. Patterns of Hydroclimatic Variability in Proxy: Tree-Rings from the Khangai Mountains of Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassnacht, S. R.; Venable, N. B. H.

    2015-12-01

    The sparse water resources of semi-arid regions such as Mongolia are important for sustaining traditional livelihoods and supporting modern development. Nomadic pastoralists of the Khangai Mountain region rely on surface water supplies for their livestock. Increasing agricultural and industrial development, particularly mining, will place strain on already limited water resources. The large amounts of spatial and temporal hydroclimatic variability inherent to this region can be assessed through dendrohydrology, or the application of tree-ring research to study long-term past hydrologic phenomena. The Larix sibirica, and Pinus sibirica trees of the region provide records of the persistence of moisture limitation over the last several hundred years. We analyze a network of ten tree-ring sites, two of which are newly developed and examine correlations of ring width to monthly and seasonal streamflow in four river basins across the region to inform the selection of tree-ring predictor sites for use in streamflow reconstruction. Precipitation correlations were also assessed using data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre as previous research suggests gridded precipitation data correlates as strongly with the selected tree-ring sites as station-based data, yet have no missing data. The streamflow data had fewer missing values than station-based precipitation data, but were also not complete. Missing monthly mean flow values from five gages were filled using Predictive Mean Matching methods. Moderate (r=0.35-0.54) to strong (r=0.55-0.74) significant positive correlations were found for previous year's (PY) and current year's (CY) summer precipitation, mainly in June, July, and August. More strong and moderate correlations were observed with streamflow in PY and CY summer months than with precipitation; some spring months were also well correlated. Northern river gages correlated with more tree ring sites and had overall higher correlation values than southern

  17. Detecting instabilities in tree-ring proxy calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Visser

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has been found for reduced sensitivity of tree growth to temperature in a number of forests at high northern latitudes and alpine locations. Furthermore, at some of these sites, emergent subpopulations of trees show negative growth trends with rising temperature. These findings are typically referred to as the "Divergence Problem" (DP. Given the high relevance of paleoclimatic reconstructions for policy-related studies, it is important for dendrochronologists to address this issue of potential model uncertainties associated with the DP. Here we address this issue by proposing a calibration technique, termed "stochastic response function" (SRF, which allows the presence or absence of any instabilities in growth response of trees (or any other climate proxy to their calibration target to be visualized and detected. Since this framework estimates confidence limits and subsequently provides statistical significance tests, the approach is also very well suited for proxy screening prior to the generation of a climate-reconstruction network.

    Two examples of tree growth/climate relationships are provided, one from the North American Arctic treeline and the other from the upper treeline in the European Alps. Instabilities were found to be present where stabilities were reported in the literature, and vice versa, stabilities were found where instabilities were reported. We advise to apply SRFs in future proxy-screening schemes, next to the use of correlations and RE/CE statistics. It will improve the strength of reconstruction hindcasts.

  18. Detecting instabilities in tree-ring proxy calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Visser

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has been found for reduced sensitivity of tree growth to temperature in a number of forests at high northern latitudes and alpine locations. Furthermore, at some of these sites, emergent subpopulations of trees show negative growth trends with rising temperature. These findings are typically referred to as the "Divergence Problem" (DP. Given the high relevance of paleoclimatic reconstructions for policy-related studies, it is important for dendrochronologists to address this issue of potential model uncertainties associated with the DP. Here we address this issue by proposing a calibration technique, termed "stochastic response function" (SRF, which allows the presence or absence of any instabilities in growth response of trees (or any other climate proxy to their calibration target to be visualized and detected. Since this framework estimates confidence limits and subsequently provides statistical significance tests, the approach is also very well suited for proxy screening prior to the generation of a climate-reconstruction network.

    Two examples of tree growth/climate relationships are provided, one from the North American Arctic treeline and the other from the upper treeline in the European Alps. Instabilities were found to be present where stabilities were reported in the literature, and vice versa, stabilities were found where instabilities were reported. We advise to apply SRFs in future proxy-screening schemes, next to the use of correlations and RE/CE statistics. It will improve the strength of reconstruction hindcasts.

  19. THE STUDY OF GROWTH RING OF TREES AT NATIONAL PARK OF SIBERUT IN MENTAWAI ISLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansyurdin,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Growth ring trees are formed by activity of the cambium which is influenced by the changing seasons. In the tropical are not all of trees species produce the growth ring, because the season of tropics is more uniform throughout the year and does not show sharp distinction between the periods of high rainfall and period of low rainfall. This study has concentred on several tree forest areas in Siberut National Park, Mentawai Islands. Samples were ollected by using borer on the main stem on the height of 130 cm. To see or not to see growing circle with to be checked macroscopically and microscopically. The macroscopic examination was done polished core by several grades of sandpaper in the transverse surface Tree species which have growth ring continued to microscopic observation with making slice anatomy. Based on 46 species of trees were examined, and 6 species were with found a growth ring in the number of cell mixture early wood and late wood from these species.

  20. Chinese pine tree ring width chronology and its relation to climate conditions in the Qianshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenju CHEN; Yu SUN; Xingyuan HE; Wei CHEN; Xuemei SHAO; Huayu ZHANG; Zhongyu WANG; Xiaoyu LIU

    2008-01-01

    Taking Chinese pine in Qianshan Mountains as a sample, the tree ring width chronology including Standard, Residual, and Arstan chronologies was estab-lished. The results show that the tree ring width of Chinese pine is highly correlated with the temperatures from May to July and from September to November. Statistically significant positive correlations were observed between tree ring width and the extreme minimum temperatures in July and mean minimum temperatures in September. The chronology was significantly or very significantly correlated with extreme minimum temperatures in December and the following January, with mean min-imum temperatures in January, with annual precipita-tion and with precipitation in April, May and the following December. The Chinese pine responded strongly to the monthly/yearly water vapor pressure and relative humidity. Annual and largely monthly evaporation in April-July had a negative effect on tree growth, and was particularly striking for evaporation in April-July. The narrow tree rings recorded by the chro-nology demonstrated the 30 occasions of extreme drought since 1800. The growth of ChineSe pine in the Qianshan mountains were also affected by climate changes on a hemispheric and global scale. There were 11-, 23-and 50-year-common periodicities between the chronology and solar activity and 10-, 20- and 45-year-common periodicit-ies between the chronology and geomagnetic activity.

  1. Oxygen Isotope Analysis in Tree-Rings of Pterocarpus angolensis in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeran, K.; Therrell, M. D.; Lefticariu, L.

    2012-12-01

    Our study was designed to identify the relationships between climate parameters, such as precipitation, and δ18O values of tree ring α-cellulose extracted from exactly dated tree rings of Pterocarpus angolensis trees growing in the arid to semiarid Mzola region of western Zimbabwe. This species is known to be sensitive to variation in rainfall. In this region, the wet season occurs during the austral summer from mid November to early April followed by a dry winter season from around June through October. Overall, the total annual rainfall exhibits a high degree of spatial and temporal variation with a mean of less than 600 mm per year. We applied the Modified Brendel technique to isolate α-cellulose from raw wood samples extracted from two P. angolensis trees and measured the δ18O values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. We developed a 30-year (1955-1984) δ18O chronology and correlated it with tree-ring width, meteoric water δ18O values, monthly and seasonal precipitation totals, and mean monthly temperature. The δ18O values of meteoric water for this region were obtained from the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) and correlated with the δ18O values of tree ring α-cellulose. We identified a positive correlation (p=.03) between the δ18O in tree ring α-cellulose and the δ18O values of meteoric water. The δ18O values are significantly negatively correlated (p=0.01) with precipitation during November through February. This trend is consistent with depleted δ18O values measured in summer precipitation during periods of high rainfall, most likely the result of the isotopic amount effect reported in tropical regions. We also investigated the possibility of an isotopic temperature effect for δ18O in rainfall, which also may be reflected in the δ18O values in tree ring α-cellulose. The strongest correlations with temperature (positive values) were found in the previous December, June and July, with p-values ranging from

  2. The influence of sampling design on tree-ring-based quantification of forest growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrbass-Ahles, Christoph; Babst, Flurin; Klesse, Stefan; Nötzli, Magdalena; Bouriaud, Olivier; Neukom, Raphael; Dobbertin, Matthias; Frank, David

    2014-09-01

    Tree-rings offer one of the few possibilities to empirically quantify and reconstruct forest growth dynamics over years to millennia. Contemporaneously with the growing scientific community employing tree-ring parameters, recent research has suggested that commonly applied sampling designs (i.e. how and which trees are selected for dendrochronological sampling) may introduce considerable biases in quantifications of forest responses to environmental change. To date, a systematic assessment of the consequences of sampling design on dendroecological and-climatological conclusions has not yet been performed. Here, we investigate potential biases by sampling a large population of trees and replicating diverse sampling designs. This is achieved by retroactively subsetting the population and specifically testing for biases emerging for climate reconstruction, growth response to climate variability, long-term growth trends, and quantification of forest productivity. We find that commonly applied sampling designs can impart systematic biases of varying magnitude to any type of tree-ring-based investigations, independent of the total number of samples considered. Quantifications of forest growth and productivity are particularly susceptible to biases, whereas growth responses to short-term climate variability are less affected by the choice of sampling design. The world's most frequently applied sampling design, focusing on dominant trees only, can bias absolute growth rates by up to 459% and trends in excess of 200%. Our findings challenge paradigms, where a subset of samples is typically considered to be representative for the entire population. The only two sampling strategies meeting the requirements for all types of investigations are the (i) sampling of all individuals within a fixed area; and (ii) fully randomized selection of trees. This result advertises the consistent implementation of a widely applicable sampling design to simultaneously reduce uncertainties in

  3. Understanding the dynamics of rings in the melt in terms of the annealed tree model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrek, Jan; Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2015-02-18

    The dynamical properties of a long polymer ring in a melt of unknotted and unconcatenated rings are calculated. We re-examine and generalize the well known model of a ring confined to a lattice of topological obstacles in light of the recently developed Flory theory of untangled rings which maps every ring on an annealed branched polymer and establishes that the backbone associated with each ring follows self-avoiding rather than Gaussian random walk statistics. We find the scaling of the ring relaxation time and diffusion coefficient with ring length, as well as the time dependence of stress relaxation modulus, zero shear viscosity and the mean square averaged displacements of both individual monomers and the ring's mass centre. Our results agree within error bars with all available experimental and simulation data of the ring melt, although the quality of the data so far is insufficient to make a definitive judgement for or against the annealed tree theory. At the end we review briefly the relation between our findings and experimental data on chromatin dynamics.

  4. Missing Rings in Pinus halepensis – The Missing Link to Relate the Tree-Ring Record to Extreme Climatic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Klemen; de Luis, Martin; Saz, Miguel A.; Longares, Luis A.; Serrano-Notivoli, Roberto; Raventós, Josep; Čufar, Katarina; Gričar, Jožica; Di Filippo, Alfredo; Piovesan, Gianluca; Rathgeber, Cyrille B. K.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Smith, Kevin T.

    2016-01-01

    Climate predictions for the Mediterranean Basin include increased temperatures, decreased precipitation, and increased frequency of extreme climatic events (ECE). These conditions are associated with decreased tree growth and increased vulnerability to pests and diseases. The anatomy of tree rings responds to these environmental conditions. Quantitatively, the width of a tree ring is largely determined by the rate and duration of cell division by the vascular cambium. In the Mediterranean climate, this division may occur throughout almost the entire year. Alternatively, cell division may cease during relatively cool and dry winters, only to resume in the same calendar year with milder temperatures and increased availability of water. Under particularly adverse conditions, no xylem may be produced in parts of the stem, resulting in a missing ring (MR). A dendrochronological network of Pinus halepensis was used to determine the relationship of MR to ECE. The network consisted of 113 sites, 1,509 trees, 2,593 cores, and 225,428 tree rings throughout the distribution range of the species. A total of 4,150 MR were identified. Binomial logistic regression analysis determined that MR frequency increased with increased cambial age. Spatial analysis indicated that the geographic areas of south-eastern Spain and northern Algeria contained the greatest frequency of MR. Dendroclimatic regression analysis indicated a non-linear relationship of MR to total monthly precipitation and mean temperature. MR are strongly associated with the combination of monthly mean temperature from previous October till current February and total precipitation from previous September till current May. They are likely to occur with total precipitation lower than 50 mm and temperatures higher than 5°C. This conclusion is global and can be applied to every site across the distribution area. Rather than simply being a complication for dendrochronology, MR formation is a fundamental response of trees

  5. Missing Rings in Pinus halepensis - The Missing Link to Relate the Tree-Ring Record to Extreme Climatic Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Klemen; de Luis, Martin; Saz, Miguel A; Longares, Luis A; Serrano-Notivoli, Roberto; Raventós, Josep; Čufar, Katarina; Gričar, Jožica; Di Filippo, Alfredo; Piovesan, Gianluca; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Smith, Kevin T

    2016-01-01

    Climate predictions for the Mediterranean Basin include increased temperatures, decreased precipitation, and increased frequency of extreme climatic events (ECE). These conditions are associated with decreased tree growth and increased vulnerability to pests and diseases. The anatomy of tree rings responds to these environmental conditions. Quantitatively, the width of a tree ring is largely determined by the rate and duration of cell division by the vascular cambium. In the Mediterranean climate, this division may occur throughout almost the entire year. Alternatively, cell division may cease during relatively cool and dry winters, only to resume in the same calendar year with milder temperatures and increased availability of water. Under particularly adverse conditions, no xylem may be produced in parts of the stem, resulting in a missing ring (MR). A dendrochronological network of Pinus halepensis was used to determine the relationship of MR to ECE. The network consisted of 113 sites, 1,509 trees, 2,593 cores, and 225,428 tree rings throughout the distribution range of the species. A total of 4,150 MR were identified. Binomial logistic regression analysis determined that MR frequency increased with increased cambial age. Spatial analysis indicated that the geographic areas of south-eastern Spain and northern Algeria contained the greatest frequency of MR. Dendroclimatic regression analysis indicated a non-linear relationship of MR to total monthly precipitation and mean temperature. MR are strongly associated with the combination of monthly mean temperature from previous October till current February and total precipitation from previous September till current May. They are likely to occur with total precipitation lower than 50 mm and temperatures higher than 5°C. This conclusion is global and can be applied to every site across the distribution area. Rather than simply being a complication for dendrochronology, MR formation is a fundamental response of trees

  6. Missing rings in Pinus halepensis – the missing link to relate the tree-ring record to extreme climatic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen eNovak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate predictions for the Mediterranean Basin include increased temperatures, decreased precipitation, and increased frequency of extreme climatic events (ECE. These conditions are associated with decreased growth of trees and their increased vulnerability to pests and diseases. The anatomy of tree rings is responsive to these environmental conditions. Quantitatively, the width of a tree ring is largely determined by the rate and duration of cell division by the vascular cambium. In the Mediterranean climate, cambial cell division may occur throughout almost the entire year. Alternatively, cell division may stop during relatively cool and dry winters, only to resume in the same year with milder temperatures and increased availability of water. Under particularly adverse conditions, no xylem may be produced in parts of the stem, resulting in a missing ring (MR, which can link tree-ring anatomy to the occurrence of extreme events. A dendrochronological network of Pinus halepensis, a widespread tree species in the Mediterranean basin, was used to determine the relationship of MR to ECE. The network consisted of 113 sites throughout its distribution range. Binomial logistic regression analysis of 2595 MR series determined that MR increased in frequency with increased cambial age. Spatial analysis indicated that the geographic areas of southeastern Spain and northern Algeria contained the greatest frequency of MR. Further regression analysis indicated that the relationship of MR to total monthly precipitation and mean temperature was non-linear. In this first determination of climatic influences on MR, the formation of MR was most strongly associated with the combination of monthly mean temperature above 10°C from previous October till current February and total precipitation below 50 mm from previous September till current May. This conclusion is global and can be applied to every site across the distribution area. Rather than simply being a

  7. Sap Flux Scaled Transpiration in Ring-porous Tree Species: Assumptions, Pitfalls and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, S. E.; Hultine, K. R.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Thermal dissipation probes for measuring sap flow (Granier-type) at the whole tree and stand level are routinely used in forest ecology and site water balance studies. While the original empirical relationship used to calculate sap flow was reported as independent of wood anatomy (ring-porous, diffuse-porous, tracheid), it has been suggested that potentially large errors in sap flow calculations may occur when using the original calibration for ring-porous species, due to large radial trends in sap velocity and/or shallow sapwood depth. Despite these concerns, sap flux measurements have rarely been calibrated in ring-porous taxa. We used a simple technique to calibrate thermal dissipation sap flux measurements on ring-porous trees in the lab. Calibration measurements were conducted on five ring-porous species in the Salt Lake City, USA metropolitan area including Quercus gambelii (Gambel oak), Gleditsia triacanthos (Honey locust), Elaeagnus angustifolia (Russian olive), Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda), and Celtis occidentalis (Common hackberry). Six stems per species of approximately 1 m in length were instrumented with heat dissipation probes to measure sap flux concurrently with gravimetric measurements of water flow through each stem. Safranin dye was pulled through the stems following flow rate measurements to determine sapwood area. As expected, nearly all the conducting sapwood area was limited to regions within the current year growth rings. Consequently, we found that the original Granier equation underestimated sap flux density for all species considered. Our results indicate that the use of thermal dissipation probes for measuring sap flow in ring-porous species should be independently calibrated, particularly when species- specific calibration data are not available. Ring-porous taxa are widely distributed and represent an important component of the regional water budgets of many temperate regions. Our results are important for evaluating plant water

  8. Tree ring carbon isotopes record predisposition to drought-induced mortality and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, N.; Allen, C.; Levanič, T.; Marshall, L.

    2009-04-01

    Drought-induced tree mortality is predicted to increase in intensity and frequency in mid-latitude regions over the next 50 years. We report on tree ring records of growth and carbon isotope discrimination in a variety of species from N. America and Europe that demonstrate a consistent pattern of predisposition to mortality during drought. Trees that die show greater sensitivity of growth to climate as has been previously demonstrated. Trees that die; however, have consistently lower discrimination and significantly less sensitivity of discrimination to climate than trees that survive. A simple hydraulic model based on Darcy's law successfully recreated the observed patterns of discrimination, and supports the interpretation that trees that die have consistently lower leaf-level stomatal conductance than trees that survive. Furthermore, the model supports the conclusion that these trees are less responsive to inter-annual climate variation due to chronic water stress. It appears that such chronic water stress predisposes trees to mortality. Consideration of the sensitivity of these isotope records to mesophyll conductance, photosynthetic capacity, photorespiration, and carbon recyling is critical to robust conclusions. Continued intensification of drought in mid-latitude regions may force trees undergoing chronic water stress to undergo increased mortality, resulting in ecotone shifts and regional mortality events in temperate forests.

  9. Paleoclimate from Tree Rings of Picea morrisonicola in Ta-Ta-Chia Area of Central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Wright, W. E.; Wei, K.; Cook, E. R.

    2009-12-01

    Almost no dendrochronology has been reported internationally from Taiwan, despite the existence of many dendrochronologically appropriate tree species. In this study, we reconstruct the regional paleoclimate using a multi-century tree ring-width chronology developed from Picea morrisonicola ( the endemic Taiwan Spruce), a subtropical species growing in the Ta-Ta-Chia subalpine mountain areas of central Taiwan. Picea morrisonicola in Taiwan is the only member of the Picea genus whose distribution crosses the Tropic of Cancer. Statistical analysis of the climate signal demonstrates that both the temperature and precipitation have significant effects on tree growth.

  10. Climate signal in a Picea abies tree ring chronology in Eastern Romanian Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieru, I.; Holobâcǎ, I. H.; Pop, O.; Irimuş, I. A.; Georgescu, M.

    2012-04-01

    Trees are both sensitive and adaptive to environmental change; consequently they are often used as indicators for past climate variability. The correlation between climate and growth of spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) in Eastern Romanian Carpathians was tested by choosing a sample site situated beneath the upper timberline (where the climatic factor would be more restrictive), at the altitude of 900 - 1000 m, on the north facing left slope of the Gošman valley (Neamt county). The tree ring width chronology covering most of the last three centuries was derived from the 25 living spruce trees sampled. The climatic dataset comprises monthly average temperature and precipitation values from the closest 7 weather stations, as well as for the nearest grid point of CRU TS. 3.1 dataset. One of the methods consists of detrending and standardization the tree ring using a negative exponential function and a linear function, the average population index being calculated using a bi-weight robust mean. The statistical significance of correlation is tested with the bootstrap method and the coefficients that exceed the 95% confidence level are highlighted. Preliminary results indicate a significant correlation between the tree ring chronology and the average winter temperatures (November, December and January) of the grid dataset. The length of this temperature dataset also allows the performance of correlation with evolutionary and moving intervals, which is not possible in the case of instrumental data. Further on, differences in standardization methods used and the corresponding results are detailed. The results of Regional Curve Standardization are of particular interest, considering the limited length of the chronology, and the possible bias introduced by the modern sample of uneven aged trees that is prone to a contemporaneous-growth-rate-bias. Keywords: dendroclimatology, tree ring, standardization, correlation, RCS method.

  11. Application and Verification of Logarithmic Linear Correlation Mode of Element Contents Between Tree Rings and Soils near the Tree Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANJUNLONG; YINZHUOSI; 等

    1998-01-01

    Nine Platanus acerifolia(Ait),Willd.trees growing in the Nanjing Children Teacher's School,Nanjing,China ,were selected to determine the contents of 13 chemical elements both in the 1994's growth rings,C(Z,t),and in the soils near the roots,C′(Z,t),of the trees ,The results showed that the relationship be-tween C(Z,t) and C′(Z,t) followed the logarithmic liner correlation moedl.lgC′(Z,t),=a(Z)+b(Z)lgC(Z,t),Based on this model the chrono-sequences of chemical element contents in the soils were reproduced fromt those ih the tree rings;i.e., the dynamic variations in the chemical element contents of the soils at the sites were trced.In this study the chrono-sequences of the chemical elements including Cd,Pb,Mn,Co and Zn in the soils near the roots of a Platanus acerifolia tree from 1957 to 1994 were established ,and the background values of Cd,Pb,Mn,Co and Zn in the soil were calcuated by taking the lowest values of the chrono-sequences of the element conents as upper limits of the background values.

  12. The DCCD: a digital data infrastructure for tree-ring research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, E.; Lanen, R.J. van; Brewer, P.; Kramer, R. de

    2012-01-01

    Existing on-line databases for dendrochronology are not flexible in terms of user permissions, tree-ring data formats, metadata administration and language. This is why we developed the Digital Collaboratory for Cultural Dendrochronology (DCCD). This TRiDaS-based multi-lingual database allows users

  13. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedhelm Steinhilber; Jose A. Abreu; Jürg Beer; Irene Brunner; Marcus Christl; Hubertus Fischer; Ulla Heikkilä; Peter W. Kubik; Mathias Mann; Ken G. McCracken; Heinrich Miller; Hiroko Miyahara; Hans Oerter; Frank Wilhelms

    2012-01-01

    .... Cosmic-ray produced radionuclides, such as ¹⁰Be and ¹⁴C which are stored in polar ice cores and tree rings, offer the unique opportunity to reconstruct the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia...

  14. The DCCD: a digital data infrastructure for tree-ring research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, E.; Lanen, R.J. van; Brewer, P.; Kramer, R. de

    2012-01-01

    Existing on-line databases for dendrochronology are not flexible in terms of user permissions, tree-ring data formats, metadata administration and language. This is why we developed the Digital Collaboratory for Cultural Dendrochronology (DCCD). This TRiDaS-based multi-lingual database allows users

  15. Growth characteristics and response to climate change of Larix Miller tree-ring in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As one of the earliest species used in dendrochronological studies, Larix responds sensitively to climate change. In this study, nine larch species and one variety from eleven sites were collected to study the growth characteristics of tree-ring width using dendrochronological methods. Ten residual tree-ring chronologies were developed to analyze their relationships with regional standardized anomaly series by Pearson’s correlation analysis. The results suggest that most of the chronologies had significantly positive correlations with the mean temperature and mean maximum temperature in May. The spring temperature evidently limited the radial growth of the larch species without precipitation control. The largest mean tree-ring width was found in Himalayan Larch in Jilong, whereas Master Larch in Si’er reflected the smallest mean value. Both species presented little climate information in this study. Chinese, Potanin, and Tibetan larches are significantly correlated with climate change, implying a huge potential for climate history reconstruction. The elevation of the sampling sites appears to be an important condition for tree-ring growth of larches responding to climate factors.

  16. Dendropedagogy: Teaching Botany, Ecology and Statistical Principles through Tree-Ring Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Darrin L.; McCarthy, Brian C.

    2002-01-01

    Develops a simple tree-ring laboratory to demonstrate the basics of dendrochronology. Provides two upper-level laboratory exercises primarily intended to demonstrate the specific dendrochronology subdisciplines of dendroclimatology and dendroecology. Suggests using the exercises separately or in unison as part of a multidisciplinary capstone…

  17. Wolves, moose, and tree rings on isle royale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, B E; Peterson, R O

    1994-12-01

    Investigation of tree growth in Isle Royale National Park in Michigan revealed the influence of herbivores and carnivores on plants in an intimately linked food chain. Plant growth rates were regulated by cycles in animal density and responded to annual changes in primary productivity only when released from herbivory by wolf predation. Isle Royale's dendrochronology complements a rich literature on food chain control in aquatic systems, which often supports a trophic cascade model. This study provides evidence of top-down control in a forested ecosystem.

  18. Temperature variations recovered from tree-rings in the middle Qilian Mountain over the last millennium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaohong; QIN Dahe; SHAO Xuemei; CHEN Tuo; REN Jiawen

    2005-01-01

    Based on the cross-dated tree-ring samples collected from the middle Qilian Mountain, a standard ring-width chronology had been developed, which covered the period AD 1000 to 2000. The correlations between the chronology and climatic records from the nearby meteorological stations indicated that temperature was the dominant climatic factor for tree growth at upper timberline, and the most important climatic factor for the tree growth in the area was the mean temperature from previous December to current April. The temperature variations recovered from the ring-width data showed a cold period during the "Little Ice Age" and the continuous warming during the twentieth century. Comparison between the ring-width chronology and δ18O records from the Dunde ice core in the Qilian Mountain indicated that there was a consistent trend in both time series. A significant correlation existed between our ring-width chronology and the Northern Hemispheric temperature, suggesting that the climate changes in the Qilian Mountain were not only driven by regional factors, but also responsive to the global climate.

  19. Silicified wood from the Permian and Triassic of Antarctica: Tree rings from polar paleolatitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, P.E.; Taylor, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    The mass extinction at the Permian-Triassic boundary produced a floral turnover in Gondwana in which Paleozoic seed ferns belonging to the Glossopteridales were replaced by corystosperm seed ferns and other seed plant groups in the Mesozoic. Secondary growth (wood production) in both plant groups provides information on plant growth in relation to environment in the form of permineralized tree rings. Techniques utilized to analyze extant wood can be used on fossil specimens to better understand the climate from both of these periods. Late Permian and early Middle Triassic tree rings from the Beardmore Glacier area indicate an environment where extensive plant growth occurred at polar latitudes (~80–85°S, Permian; ~75°S, Triassic). A rapid transition to dormancy in both the Permian and Triassic woods suggests a strong influence of the annual light/dark cycle within the Antarctic Circle on ring production. Latewood production in each ring was most likely triggered by the movement of the already low-angled sun below the horizon. The plants which produced the wood have been reconstructed as seasonally deciduous, based on structural and sedimentologic evidence. Although the Late Permian climate has been reconstructed as cold temperate and the Middle Triassic as a greenhouse, these differences are not reflected in tree ring anatomy or wood production in these plant fossils from the central Transantarctic Mountains.

  20. Tree rings, Populus nigra L., as mercury data logger in aquatic environments: case study of an historically contaminated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, S N; Soares, A M V M; Nogueira, A J A; Morgado, F

    2008-03-01

    In this study, a tree (Populus nigra L.) has been presented as data logger of mercury release in aquatic environments using tree rings chemistry to provide chronological historical monitoring of mercury discharge from a chlor-alkali industrial effluent to a coastal lagoon. Tree rings (Populus nigra L.) as mercury data logger is suggested by mercury accumulation trends in the tree rings reflecting the industrial plant capacity increments in the early stages of mercury discharges and enhancing industrial plant controls to minimize mercury discharges in the last two decades after imposed global regulations on mercury emissions.

  1. Tree rings in the tropics: a study on growth and ages of Bolivian rain forest trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brienen, Roel Jacobus Wilhelmus

    2005-01-01

    Detailed information on long-term growth rates and ages of tropical rain forest trees is important to obtain a better understanding of the functioning of tropical rain forests. Nevertheless, little is known about long-term growth or ages of tropical forest trees, due to a supposed lack of annual tre

  2. Process based model sheds light on climate signal of mediterranean tree rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Touchan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We use the process-based VS (Vaganov-Shashkin model to investigate whether a regional Pinus halapensis tree-ring chronology from Tunisia can be simulated as a function of climate alone by employing a biological model linking day length and daily temperature and precipitation (AD 1959–2004 from a climate station to ring-width variations. We use two periods to calibrate (1982–2004 and verify (1959–1981 the model. We have obtained highly significant positive correlation between the residual chronology and estimated growth curve (r = 0.76 p < 0.001. The model shows that the average duration of the growing season is 191 days. On average, soil moisture limits tree-ring growth for 128 days and temperature for 63 days.

  3. Tree-ring width reveals the preparation of the 1974 Mt. Etna eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Ruedi; Houlié, Nicolas; Cherubini, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Reduced near-infrared reflectance observed in September 1973 in Skylab images of the western flank of Mt. Etna has been interpreted as an eruption precursor of the January 1974 eruption. Until now, it has been unclear when this signal started, whether it was sustained and which process(es) could have caused it. By analyzing tree-ring width time-series, we show that the reduced near-infrared precursory signal cannot be linked to a reduction in annual tree growth in the area. However, comparing the tree-ring width time-series with both remote sensing observations and volcano-seismic activity enables us to discuss the starting date of the pre-eruptive period of the 1974 eruption.

  4. Tree ring variability and climate response of Abies spectabilis along an elevation gradient in Mustang, Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharal, D.K.; Meilby, Henrik; Rayamajhi, S.

    2014-01-01

    In mountainous areas including the Himalayas, tree lines are expected to advance to higher altitudes due to global climate change affecting the distribution and growth of plant species. This study aimed at identifying the tree ring variability of Abies spectabilis (D. Don) and its response...... to the climate along an elevation gradient in the high Himalayas of central Nepal. Tree core samples were collected from four sites in Mustang district. All sites were located in the same valley and exposed to similar weather conditions. Out of 232 samples collected from the sites, Titi lower (2700 m), Titi...... upper (2900 m), Pangukhark (3100 m) and Lete upper (3300 m), 44, 40, 39 and 41 series were successfully cross-dated and ring width chronologies including 168, 79, 138 and 156 years previous to 2012 were developed, respectively. Statistically significant differences in average annual radial growth were...

  5. Imprint of the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation on tree-ring widths in northeastern Asia since 1568.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochun; Brown, Peter M; Zhang, Yanni; Song, Laiping

    2011-01-01

    We present a new tree-ring reconstruction of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) spanning 1568-2007 CE from northeast Asia. Comparison of the instrumental AMO index, an existing tree-ring based AMO reconstruction, and this new record show strongly similar annual to multidecadal patterns of variation over the last 440 years. Warm phases of the AMO are related to increases in growth of Scots pine trees and moisture availability in northeast China and central eastern Siberia. Multi-tape method (MTM) and cross-wavelet analyses indicate that robust multidecadal (∼64-128 years) variability is present throughout the new proxy record. Our results have important implications concerning the influence of North Atlantic sea surface temperatures on East Asian climate, and provide support for the possibility of an AMO signature on global multidecadal climate variability.

  6. Imprint of the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation on tree-ring widths in northeastern Asia since 1568.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Wang

    Full Text Available We present a new tree-ring reconstruction of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO spanning 1568-2007 CE from northeast Asia. Comparison of the instrumental AMO index, an existing tree-ring based AMO reconstruction, and this new record show strongly similar annual to multidecadal patterns of variation over the last 440 years. Warm phases of the AMO are related to increases in growth of Scots pine trees and moisture availability in northeast China and central eastern Siberia. Multi-tape method (MTM and cross-wavelet analyses indicate that robust multidecadal (∼64-128 years variability is present throughout the new proxy record. Our results have important implications concerning the influence of North Atlantic sea surface temperatures on East Asian climate, and provide support for the possibility of an AMO signature on global multidecadal climate variability.

  7. A Test of Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratio Process Models in Tree Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, J. S.; Farquhar, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotopes ratios of carbon and oxygen in tree ring cellulose have been used to infer environmental change. Process-based models have been developed to clarify the potential of historic tree ring records for meaningful paleoclimatic reconstructions. However, isotopic variation can be influenced by multiple environmental factors making simplistic interpretations problematic. Recently, the dual isotope approach, where the variation in one stable isotope ratio (e.g. oxygen) is used to constrain the interpretation of variation in another (e.g. carbon), has been shown to have the potential to de-convolute isotopic analysis. However, this approach requires further testing to determine its applicability for paleo-reconstructions using tree-ring time series. We present a study where the information needed to parameterize mechanistic models for both carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios were collected in controlled environment chambers for two species (Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus globulus). The seedlings were exposed to treatments designed to modify leaf temperature, transpiration rates, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Both species were grown for over 100 days under two humidity regimes that differed by 20%. Stomatal conductance was significantly different between species and for seedlings under drought conditions but not between other treatments or humidity regimes. The treatments produced large differences in transpiration rate and photosynthesis. Treatments that effected photosynthetic rates but not stomatal conductance influenced carbon isotope discrimination more than those that influenced primarily conductance. The various treatments produced a range in oxygen isotope ratios of 7 ‰. Process models predicted greater oxygen isotope enrichment in tree ring cellulose than observed. The oxygen isotope ratios of bulk leaf water were reasonably well predicted by current steady-state models. However, the fractional difference between models that

  8. Alternative standardization approaches to improving streamflow reconstructions with ring-width indices of riparian trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meko, David M; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Touchan, Ramzi; Edmondson, Jesse R.; Griffin, Eleanor R.; Scott, Julian A.

    2015-01-01

    Old, multi-aged populations of riparian trees provide an opportunity to improve reconstructions of streamflow. Here, ring widths of 394 plains cottonwood (Populus deltoids, ssp. monilifera) trees in the North Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota, are used to reconstruct streamflow along the Little Missouri River (LMR), North Dakota, US. Different versions of the cottonwood chronology are developed by (1) age-curve standardization (ACS), using age-stratified samples and a single estimated curve of ring width against estimated ring age, and (2) time-curve standardization (TCS), using a subset of longer ring-width series individually detrended with cubic smoothing splines of width against year. The cottonwood chronologies are combined with the first principal component of four upland conifer chronologies developed by conventional methods to investigate the possible value of riparian tree-ring chronologies for streamflow reconstruction of the LMR. Regression modeling indicates that the statistical signal for flow is stronger in the riparian cottonwood than in the upland chronologies. The flow signal from cottonwood complements rather than repeats the signal from upland conifers and is especially strong in young trees (e.g. 5–35 years). Reconstructions using a combination of cottonwoods and upland conifers are found to explain more than 50% of the variance of LMR flow over a 1935–1990 calibration period and to yield reconstruction of flow to 1658. The low-frequency component of reconstructed flow is sensitive to the choice of standardization method for the cottonwood. In contrast to the TCS version, the ACS reconstruction features persistent low flows in the 19th century. Results demonstrate the value to streamflow reconstruction of riparian cottonwood and suggest that more studies are needed to exploit the low-frequency streamflow signal in densely sampled age-stratified stands of riparian trees.

  9. Impact of Site Conditions Changes on the Tree Ring Records Suitability as Climate Proxies in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Dünisch

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The increment zones width in the xylem of Swietenia macrophylla King was investigated by dendrochronological methods in an undisturbed and a strongly disturbed tropical site near Aripuanã, Mato Grosso, Brazil (10°09’ S, 59°26’W. The study aimed to assess the impact of forest disturbance on the relationship between precipitation and the cambial growth of this species. Tree-ring width chronologies were developed for both sites from cross-dated increment curves. Simple correlations were computed between monthly precipitation records and the annual increment of Swietenia for the period between 1870 and 2000. Logging activities and altered land use caused a significant decrease of the water supply of the Swietenia trees grown in the disturbed area compared to trees grown in the undisturbed area. Consequently, the precipitation of almost the total growing season had a significant influence on the tree ring width of Swietenia grown in the disturbed area, while in the undisturbed forest area the significant correlation between monthly precipitation and the tree ring width of Swietenia was restricted to the beginning of the growing season (November to January. However, the reconstruction of monthly precipitation data from the tree ring width records was more precise using the chronology developed from tree ring width records of undisturbed trees compared to the chronology developed from tree ring widths from the disturbed area. It was concluded that the use of the tree ring widths of Swietenia as climate proxies is restricted to certain months of the year and requires tree ring width chronologies developed from trees grown in undisturbed or only slightly disturbed forest areas without severe anthropogenic changes in microclimate.

  10. Technical Note: An improved guideline for rapid and precise sample preparation of tree-ring stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schollaen, K.; Baschek, H.; Heinrich, I.; Helle, G.

    2015-07-01

    The procedure of wood sample preparation, including tree-ring dissection, cellulose extraction, homogenization and finally weighing and packing for stable isotope analysis is labour intensive and time consuming. We present an elaborated methodical guideline from pre-analyses considerations, wood sample preparation through semi-automated chemical extraction of cellulose directly from tree-ring cross-sections to tree-ring dissection for high-precision isotope ratio mass spectrometry. This guideline reduces time and maximizes the tree-ring stable isotope data throughput significantly. The method was applied to ten different tree species (coniferous and angiosperm wood) with different wood growth rates and differently shaped tree-ring boundaries. The tree-ring structures of the cellulose cross-sections largely remained well identifiable. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectrometry and the comparison of stable isotope values with classical method confirm chemical purity of the resultant cellulose. Sample homogenization is no longer necessary. Cellulose extraction is now faster, cheaper and more user friendly allowing (i) the simultaneous treatment of wood cross-sections of a total length of 180 cm (equivalent to 6 increment cores of 30 cm length) and thickness of 0.5 to 2 mm, and (ii) precise tree-ring separation at annual to high-resolution scale utilizing manual devices or UV-laser microdissection microscopes.

  11. Technical Note: An improved guideline for rapid and precise sample preparation of tree-ring stable isotope analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schollaen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The procedure of wood sample preparation, including tree-ring dissection, cellulose extraction, homogenization and finally weighing and packing for stable isotope analysis is labour intensive and time consuming. We present an elaborated methodical guideline from pre-analyses considerations, wood sample preparation through semi-automated chemical extraction of cellulose directly from tree-ring cross-sections to tree-ring dissection for high-precision isotope ratio mass spectrometry. This guideline reduces time and maximizes the tree-ring stable isotope data throughput significantly. The method was applied to ten different tree species (coniferous and angiosperm wood with different wood growth rates and differently shaped tree-ring boundaries. The tree-ring structures of the cellulose cross-sections largely remained well identifiable. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and the comparison of stable isotope values with classical method confirm chemical purity of the resultant cellulose. Sample homogenization is no longer necessary. Cellulose extraction is now faster, cheaper and more user friendly allowing (i the simultaneous treatment of wood cross-sections of a total length of 180 cm (equivalent to 6 increment cores of 30 cm length and thickness of 0.5 to 2 mm, and (ii precise tree-ring separation at annual to high-resolution scale utilizing manual devices or UV-laser microdissection microscopes.

  12. Carbon and nitrogen isotope variations in tree-rings as records of perturbations in regional carbon and nitrogen cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukata, Andrew R; Kyser, T Kurtis

    2007-02-15

    Increasing anthropogenic pollution from urban centers and fossil fuel combustion can impact the carbon and nitrogen cycles in forests. To assess the impact of twentieth century anthropogenic pollution on forested system carbon and nitrogen cycles, variations in the carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of tree-rings were measured. Individual annual growth rings in trees from six sites across Ontario and one in New Brunswick, Canada were used to develop site chronologies of tree-ring delta 15N and delta 13C values. Tree-ring 615N values were approximately 0.5% per hundred higher and correlated with contemporaneous foliar samples from the same tree, but not with delta 15N values of soil samples. Temporal trends in carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of these tree-rings are consistent with increasing anthropogenic influence on both the carbon and nitrogen cycles since 1945. Tree-ring delta 13C values and delta 15N values are correlated at both remote and urban-proximal sites, with delta 15N values decreasing since 1945 and converging on 1% per hundred at urban-proximal sites and decreasing but not converging on a single delta 15N value in remote sites. These results indicate that temporal trends in tree-ring nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions record the regional extent of pollution.

  13. Seasonal transfer of oxygen isotopes from precipitation and soil to the tree ring: source water versus needle water enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treydte, Kerstin; Boda, Sonja; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Fonti, Patrick; Frank, David; Ullrich, Bastian; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Werner, Willy; Gessler, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    For accurate interpretation of oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ(18) O), it is necessary to disentangle the mechanisms underlying the variations in the tree's internal water cycle and to understand the transfer of source versus leaf water δ(18) O to phloem sugars and stem wood. We studied the seasonal transfer of oxygen isotopes from precipitation and soil water through the xylem, needles and phloem to the tree rings of Larix decidua at two alpine sites in the Lötschental (Switzerland). Weekly resolved δ(18) O records of precipitation, soil water, xylem and needle water, phloem organic matter and tree rings were developed. Week-to-week variations in needle-water (18) O enrichment were strongly controlled by weather conditions during the growing season. These short-term variations were, however, not significantly fingerprinted in tree-ring δ(18) O. Instead, seasonal trends in tree-ring δ(18) O predominantly mirrored trends in the source water, including recent precipitation and soil water pools. Modelling results support these findings: seasonal tree-ring δ(18) O variations are captured best when the week-to-week variations of the leaf water signal are suppressed. Our results suggest that climate signals in tree-ring δ(18) O variations should be strongest at temperate sites with humid conditions and precipitation maxima during the growing season.

  14. Synoptic-scale circulation patterns during summer derived from tree rings in mid-latitude Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Andrea; Schultz, Johannes A.; Leland, Caroline; Davi, Nicole; Byambasuren, Oyunsanaa; Liang, Eryuan; Wang, Xiaochun; Beck, Christoph; Linderholm, Hans W.; Pederson, Neil

    2016-11-01

    Understanding past and recent climate and atmospheric circulation variability is vital for regions that are affected by climate extremes. In mid-latitude Asia, however, the synoptic climatology is complex and not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate dominant synoptic-scale circulation patterns during the summer season using a multi-species tree-ring width (TRW) network comprising 78 sites from mid-latitude Asia. For each TRW chronology, we calculated an atmospheric circulation tree-ring index (ACTI), based on 1000 hPa geopotential height data, to directly link tree growth to 13 summertime weather types and their associated local climate conditions for the period 1871-1993. Using the ACTI, three groups of similarly responding tree-ring sites can be associated with distinct large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns: 1. growth of drought sensitive trees is positively affected by a cyclone over northern Russia; 2. temperature sensitive trees show positive associations to a cyclone over northwestern Russia and an anticyclone over Mongolia; 3. trees at two high elevation sites show positive relations to a zonal cyclone extending from mid-latitude Eurasia to the West Pacific. The identified synoptic-scale circulation patterns showed spatiotemporal variability in their intensity and position, causing temporally varying climate conditions in mid-latitude Asia. Our results highlight that for regions with less pronounced atmospheric action centers during summer such as the occurrence of large-scale cyclones and anticyclones, synoptic-scale circulation patterns can be extracted and linked to the Northern Hemisphere circulation system. Thus, we provide a new and solid envelope for climate studies covering the past to the future.

  15. Testing for the Influence of Light Availability on Tree-Ring Reconstructed Temperature at Sonora Pass, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L.; Stine, A.

    2015-12-01

    Tree-ring width and density near treeline tend to covary with local interannual temperature, motivating the use of such records to reconstruct past temperature variability. However, recent work has introduced the possibility of multiple environmental factors contributing to tree growth in cold environments. We investigate the influence of small-scale light variability on tree-ring based temperature reconstructions from a treeline ecotone. We establish an experimental plot near Sonora Pass in the California Sierra Nevada (38.32N, 119.64W; elev. 3130 m). This treeline environment is dominated by whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) growing as individuals and in stands, providing an opportunity to test the sensitivity of mean growth rate and interannual variability to light availability. For each tree we quantify the local light environment using three approaches: (i.) geometrical estimates of shading from neighboring trees, (ii.) photographic estimates of shading from neighboring trees, and (iii.) geometric estimates of direct light availability resulting from aspect and local topography. Geometrical estimates of shading are made by mapping the relative position and crown dimensions of each tree in the plot in order to calculate a shading index that will be used to test hypotheses about the influence of shading on tree growth. Photographic estimates of tree-level shading are created by taking hemispheric photographs at the crown edge of each tree and calculating the effects of neighboring trees on direct and diffuse light availability using the Gap Light Analyzer software. To quantify tree growth, increment cores are collected from all trees in the plot to develop sub-chronologies of ring records grouped by different light environments. We hypothesize that trees growing in open areas or at edge of stands, which experience little inter-tree competition, would likely produce ring records more closely correlated with the temperature record; whereas trees growing in middle

  16. Process based model sheds light on climate sensitivity of Mediterranean tree-ring width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchan, R.; Shishov, V. V.; Meko, D. M.; Nouiri, I.; Grachev, A.

    2012-03-01

    We use the process-based VS (Vaganov-Shashkin) model to investigate whether a regional Pinus halepensis tree-ring chronology from Tunisia can be simulated as a function of climate alone by employing a biological model linking day length and daily temperature and precipitation (AD 1959-2004) from a climate station to ring-width variations. We check performance of the model on independent data by a validation exercise in which the model's parameters are tuned using data for 1982-2004 and the model is applied to generate tree-ring indices for 1959-1981. The validation exercise yields a highly significant positive correlation between the residual chronology and estimated growth curve (r=0.76 pseason is 191 days, with considerable variation from year to year. On average, soil moisture limits tree-ring growth for 128 days and temperature for 63 days. Model results depend on chosen values of parameters, in particular a parameter specifying a balance ratio between soil moisture and precipitation. Future work in the Mediterranean region should include multi-year natural experiments to verify patterns of cambial-growth variation suggested by the VS model.

  17. Process based model sheds light on climate sensitivity of Mediterranean tree-ring width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Touchan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We use the process-based VS (Vaganov-Shashkin model to investigate whether a regional Pinus halepensis tree-ring chronology from Tunisia can be simulated as a function of climate alone by employing a biological model linking day length and daily temperature and precipitation (AD 1959–2004 from a climate station to ring-width variations. We check performance of the model on independent data by a validation exercise in which the model's parameters are tuned using data for 1982–2004 and the model is applied to generate tree-ring indices for 1959–1981. The validation exercise yields a highly significant positive correlation between the residual chronology and estimated growth curve (r=0.76 p<0.0001, n=23. The model shows that the average duration of the growing season is 191 days, with considerable variation from year to year. On average, soil moisture limits tree-ring growth for 128 days and temperature for 63 days. Model results depend on chosen values of parameters, in particular a parameter specifying a balance ratio between soil moisture and precipitation. Future work in the Mediterranean region should include multi-year natural experiments to verify patterns of cambial-growth variation suggested by the VS model.

  18. Reconstructing Tritium Exposure Using Tree Rings at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; KNEZOVICH, JOHN P.

    2010-01-01

    Annual tritium exposures were reconstructed using tree cores from Pinus jeffreyi and Eucalyptus globulus near a tritiated water vapor release stack. Both tritium (3H) and carbon-14 (14C) from the wood were measured from milligram samples using accelerator mass spectrometry. Because the annual nature of the eucalyptus tree rings was in doubt, 14C measurements provided growth rates used to estimate the age for 3H determinations. A 30-yr comparison of organically bound tritium (OBT) levels to reported 3H release data is achieved using OBT measurements from three trees near the stack. The annual average 3H, determined from atmospheric water vapor monitoring stations, is comparable to the OBT in proximal trees. For situations without adequate historical monitoring data, this measurement-based historical assessment provides the only independent means of assessing exposure as compared to fate and transport models that require prior knowledge of environmental conditions and 3H discharge patterns. PMID:14572081

  19. Correlation and causation in tree-ring-based reconstruction of paleohydrology in cold semiarid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshorbagy, Amin; Wagener, Thorsten; Razavi, Saman; Sauchyn, David

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses ways in which the tree-ring-based reconstruction of paleohydrology can be better understood and better utilized to support water resource management, especially in cold semiarid regions. The relationships between tree growth as represented by tree ring chronologies (TRCs), runoff (Q), precipitation (P), and evapotranspiration (ET) are discussed and analyzed within both statistical and hydrological contexts. Data from the Oldman River Basin (OMRB), Alberta, Canada, are used to demonstrate the relevant issues. Instrumental records of Q and P data were available while actual ET was estimated using a lumped conceptual hydrological model developed in this study. Correlation analysis was conducted to explore the relationships between TRCs and each of Q, P, and ET over the entire historical record (globally) as well as locally in time within the wet and dry subperiods. Global and local correlation strengths and linear relationships appear to be substantially different. This outcome particularly affects tree-ring-based inferences about the hydrology of wet and dry episodes when reconstructions are made using regression models. Important findings include (i) reconstruction of paleo-runoff may not be as credible as paleo-precipitation and paleo-evapotranspiration; (ii) a moving average window of P and ET larger than 1 year might be necessary for reconstruction of these variables; and (iii) the long-term mean of reconstructed P, Q, and ET leads us to conclude that there is uncertainty about the past climate. Finally, we suggest using the topographic index to prejudge side suitability for dendrohydrological analysis.

  20. North American Monsoon Variability from Instrumental and Tree-Ring Data: A Progress Report (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, C. A.; Meko, D. M.; Touchan, R.; Leavitt, S. W.; Griffin, D.; Castro, C. L.; Ciancarelli, B.

    2009-12-01

    The main goal of this research project is to investigate the long-term variability of the North American Monsoon (NAM), both spatially and temporally, using instrumental data and paleoclimatic data from tree-ring widths and stable-carbon isotopes. The NAM has been the topic of much research in recent years and a great deal of progress has been made in improving our understanding of the NAM. However, questions remain about the long-term behavior of the monsoon, as well as its relationship to cool season climate and to large-scale circulation. In addition, it is unclear how the monsoon will respond to global warming as GCMs do not yet appear to adequately capture the monsoon system dynamics. This research project involves analyses of instrumental and paleoclimatic data to determine NAM spatial patterns in the U.S., relationships to large-scale atmospheric circulation drivers, and the nature of the NAM variability over past centuries. Paleoclimatic data will also be used to assess the skill of downscaled GCMs in replicating the range of NAM variability. The first step in this work has been to design and implement a sampling and analysis strategy for a network of tree-ring data that reflects summer moisture in the NAM region, informed by previous collections and analysis of instrumental data. Here we report on the results from our first year, focusing on three specific areas: 1) definition of dominant patterns of NAM variability using the standard precipitation index (SPI), and relationships to large-scale atmospheric circulation, 2) the tree-ring collection network and preliminary results, and 3) strategies for enhancing and extracting summer precipitation information from tree rings using partial ring widths and isotope analysis. Although our collections have included both the monsoon core region of southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico, and areas at the fringe of the monsoon influence in the U.S, our initial focus is on the analysis of the collections for

  1. Detecting long-term growth trends using tree rings: a critical evaluation of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Richard L; Groenendijk, Peter; Vlam, Mart; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2015-05-01

    Tree-ring analysis is often used to assess long-term trends in tree growth. A variety of growth-trend detection methods (GDMs) exist to disentangle age/size trends in growth from long-term growth changes. However, these detrending methods strongly differ in approach, with possible implications for their output. Here, we critically evaluate the consistency, sensitivity, reliability and accuracy of four most widely used GDMs: conservative detrending (CD) applies mathematical functions to correct for decreasing ring widths with age; basal area correction (BAC) transforms diameter into basal area growth; regional curve standardization (RCS) detrends individual tree-ring series using average age/size trends; and size class isolation (SCI) calculates growth trends within separate size classes. First, we evaluated whether these GDMs produce consistent results applied to an empirical tree-ring data set of Melia azedarach, a tropical tree species from Thailand. Three GDMs yielded similar results - a growth decline over time - but the widely used CD method did not detect any change. Second, we assessed the sensitivity (probability of correct growth-trend detection), reliability (100% minus probability of detecting false trends) and accuracy (whether the strength of imposed trends is correctly detected) of these GDMs, by applying them to simulated growth trajectories with different imposed trends: no trend, strong trends (-6% and +6% change per decade) and weak trends (-2%, +2%). All methods except CD, showed high sensitivity, reliability and accuracy to detect strong imposed trends. However, these were considerably lower in the weak or no-trend scenarios. BAC showed good sensitivity and accuracy, but low reliability, indicating uncertainty of trend detection using this method. Our study reveals that the choice of GDM influences results of growth-trend studies. We recommend applying multiple methods when analysing trends and encourage performing sensitivity and reliability

  2. Stable oxygen isotopes ( δ 18O) in Austrocedrus chilensis tree rings reflect climate variability in northwestern Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, F. A.; Siegwolf, R.; Boninsegna, J. A.

    2006-11-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ( δ 18O) composition of Austrocedrus chilensis (D. Don) Endl. (Cupressaceae) tree rings potentially provide retrospective views of changes in environment and climate in the semi-arid lands of Patagonia. We report the development of the first annually resolved δ 18O tree-ring chronology obtained from natural forests of the foothills of the northwestern Patagonian Andes. The isotope record spans between 1890 and 1994 AD. We explore the probable links between this record and the climate of the region. Air temperatures during summer conditions are significantly, but not strongly, inversely correlated with annual δ 18O values from Austrocedrus tree rings. The strongest correlations are between the southern oscillation index (SOI) and the tree rings. The existence of millennial-age Austrocedrus trees in northern Patagonia provides interesting possibilities for examining these climate-related isotopic signals over most of the last 1,000 years.

  3. Stable oxygen isotopes (delta18(O)) in Austrocedrus chilensis tree rings reflect climate variability in northwestern Patagonia, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, F A; Siegwolf, R; Boninsegna, J A

    2006-11-01

    The stable oxygen isotope (delta (18)O) composition of Austrocedrus chilensis (D. Don) Endl. (Cupressaceae) tree rings potentially provide retrospective views of changes in environment and climate in the semi-arid lands of Patagonia. We report the development of the first annually resolved delta (18)O tree-ring chronology obtained from natural forests of the foothills of the northwestern Patagonian Andes. The isotope record spans between 1890 and 1994 AD. We explore the probable links between this record and the climate of the region. Air temperatures during summer conditions are significantly, but not strongly, inversely correlated with annual delta (18)O values from Austrocedrus tree rings. The strongest correlations are between the southern oscillation index (SOI) and the tree rings. The existence of millennial-age Austrocedrus trees in northern Patagonia provides interesting possibilities for examining these climate-related isotopic signals over most of the last 1,000 years.

  4. Climatic Signals in Tree Rings of Heritiera fomes Buch.-Ham. in the Sundarbans, Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Qumruzzaman Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Mangroves occur along the coastlines throughout the tropics and sub-tropics, supporting a wide variety of resources and services. In order to understand the responses of future climate change on this ecosystem, we need to know how mangrove species have responded to climate changes in the recent past. This study aims at exploring the climatic influences on the radial growth of Heritiera fomes from a local to global scale. A total of 40 stem discs were collected at breast height position from two different zones with contrasting salinity in the Sundarbans, Bangladesh. All specimens showed distinct tree rings and most of the trees (70% could be visually and statistically crossdated. Successful crossdating enabled the development of two zone-specific chronologies. The mean radial increment was significantly higher at low salinity (eastern zone compared to higher salinity (western zone. The two zone-specific chronologies synchronized significantly, allowing for the construction of a regional chronology. The annual and monsoon precipitation mainly influence the tree growth of H. fomes. The growth response to local precipitation is similar in both zones except June and November in the western zone, while the significant influence is lacking. The large-scale climatic drivers such as sea surface temperature (SST of equatorial Pacific and Indian Ocean as well as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO revealed no teleconnection with tree growth. The tree rings of this species are thus an indicator for monsoon precipitation variations in Bangladesh. The wider distribution of this species from the South to South East Asian coast presents an outstanding opportunity for developing a large-scale tree-ring network of mangroves.

  5. Climatic Signals in Tree Rings of Heritiera fomes Buch.-Ham. in the Sundarbans, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Md Qumruzzaman; De Ridder, Maaike; Beeckman, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves occur along the coastlines throughout the tropics and sub-tropics, supporting a wide variety of resources and services. In order to understand the responses of future climate change on this ecosystem, we need to know how mangrove species have responded to climate changes in the recent past. This study aims at exploring the climatic influences on the radial growth of Heritiera fomes from a local to global scale. A total of 40 stem discs were collected at breast height position from two different zones with contrasting salinity in the Sundarbans, Bangladesh. All specimens showed distinct tree rings and most of the trees (70%) could be visually and statistically crossdated. Successful crossdating enabled the development of two zone-specific chronologies. The mean radial increment was significantly higher at low salinity (eastern) zone compared to higher salinity (western) zone. The two zone-specific chronologies synchronized significantly, allowing for the construction of a regional chronology. The annual and monsoon precipitation mainly influence the tree growth of H. fomes. The growth response to local precipitation is similar in both zones except June and November in the western zone, while the significant influence is lacking. The large-scale climatic drivers such as sea surface temperature (SST) of equatorial Pacific and Indian Ocean as well as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) revealed no teleconnection with tree growth. The tree rings of this species are thus an indicator for monsoon precipitation variations in Bangladesh. The wider distribution of this species from the South to South East Asian coast presents an outstanding opportunity for developing a large-scale tree-ring network of mangroves.

  6. French summer droughts since 1326 AD: a reconstruction based on tree ring cellulose δ18O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Labuhn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of droughts is essential for the understanding of past drought dynamics, and can help evaluate future drought scenarios in a changing climate. This article presents a reconstruction of summer droughts in France based on annually resolved, absolutely dated chronologies of oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O in tree ring cellulose from Quercus spp. Samples were taken from living trees and timber wood from historic buildings at two sites: Fontainebleau (48° 23' N, 2° 40' E; 1326–2000 AD and Angoulême (45° 44' N, 0° 18' E; 1360–2004 AD. Cellulose δ18O from these sites proved to be a good proxy of summer climate, as the trees were sensitive to temperature and moisture availability. However, offsets in average δ18O values between tree cohorts necessitated a correction before joining them to the final chronologies. Using the corrected δ18O chronologies, we developed models based on linear regression to reconstruct drought, expressed by the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI. The significant correlations between the SPEI and cellulose δ18O (r ≈ −0.70, as well as the verification of the models by independent data support the validity of these reconstructions. At both sites, recent decades are characterized by increasing drought. Fontainebleau displays dominantly wetter conditions during earlier centuries, whereas the current drought intensity is not unprecedented in the Angoulême record. While the δ18O chronologies at the two studied sites are highly correlated during the 19th and 20th century, there is a significant decrease in the correlation coefficient between 1550 and 1800 AD, which indicates either a weaker climate sensitivity of the tree ring proxies during this period, or a more heterogeneous climate in the north and the south of France. Future studies of tree ring isotope networks might reveal if the seasonality and spatial patterns of past droughts can explain this decoupling.

  7. French summer droughts since 1326 AD: a reconstruction based on tree ring cellulose δ18O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuhn, I.; Daux, V.; Girardclos, O.; Stievenard, M.; Pierre, M.; Masson-Delmotte, V.

    2015-11-01

    The reconstruction of droughts is essential for the understanding of past drought dynamics, and can help evaluate future drought scenarios in a changing climate. This article presents a reconstruction of summer droughts in France based on annually resolved, absolutely dated chronologies of oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) in tree ring cellulose from Quercus spp. Samples were taken from living trees and timber wood from historic buildings at two sites: Fontainebleau (48° 23' N, 2° 40' E; 1326-2000 AD) and Angoulême (45° 44' N, 0° 18' E; 1360-2004 AD). Cellulose δ18O from these sites proved to be a good proxy of summer climate, as the trees were sensitive to temperature and moisture availability. However, offsets in average δ18O values between tree cohorts necessitated a correction before joining them to the final chronologies. Using the corrected δ18O chronologies, we developed models based on linear regression to reconstruct drought, expressed by the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI). The significant correlations between the SPEI and cellulose δ18O (r ≈ -0.70), as well as the verification of the models by independent data support the validity of these reconstructions. At both sites, recent decades are characterized by increasing drought. Fontainebleau displays dominantly wetter conditions during earlier centuries, whereas the current drought intensity is not unprecedented in the Angoulême record. While the δ18O chronologies at the two studied sites are highly correlated during the 19th and 20th century, there is a significant decrease in the correlation coefficient between 1550 and 1800 AD, which indicates either a weaker climate sensitivity of the tree ring proxies during this period, or a more heterogeneous climate in the north and the south of France. Future studies of tree ring isotope networks might reveal if the seasonality and spatial patterns of past droughts can explain this decoupling.

  8. Tree-ring widths are good proxies of annual variation in forest productivity in temperate forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Wang, Xiangping; Liang, Penghong; An, Hailong; Sun, Han; Han, Wei; Li, Qiaoyan

    2017-05-16

    Tree rings have long been used to calibrate the net primary production (NPP) time-series predicted by process-based models, based on an implicit assumption that ring-width indices (RWI) can well reflect temporal NPP change. However, this assumption has seldom been tested systematically. In this study, 36 plots were set in three forest types from four sites along a latitudinal gradient in northeast China. For each plot, we constructed chronologies and stand NPP of the past 20 years to examine: is RWI a good proxy of inter-annual variation of forest NPP for different forest types under different climate? If it is, why? Our results indicate that RWI was closely related to stand NPP in most cases, and could be used as a good proxy of NPP in temperate forests. Standard and arstan chronologies were better related to NPP series than residual chronology. Stand NPP time-series were mainly determined by large trees, and the correlation between RWI and NPP was also higher for larger trees. We suggest that large trees and dominant species of canopy layer should be sampled for chronology construction. Large trees are major contributors of forest biomass and productivity, and should have priority in forest conservation in a rapid-warming world.

  9. Flow reconstructions in the Upper Missouri River Basin using riparian tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schook, Derek M.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Rathburn, Sara L.

    2016-10-01

    River flow reconstructions are typically developed using tree rings from montane conifers that cannot reflect flow regulation or hydrologic inputs from the lower portions of a watershed. Incorporating lowland riparian trees may improve the accuracy of flow reconstructions when these trees are physically linked to the alluvial water table. We used riparian plains cottonwoods (Populus deltoides ssp. monilifera) to reconstruct discharge for three neighboring rivers in the Upper Missouri River Basin: the Yellowstone (n = 389 tree cores), Powder (n = 408), and Little Missouri Rivers (n = 643). We used the Regional Curve Standardization approach to reconstruct log-transformed discharge over the 4 months in early summer that most highly correlated to tree ring growth. The reconstructions explained at least 57% of the variance in historical discharge and extended back to 1742, 1729, and 1643. These are the first flow reconstructions for the Lower Yellowstone and Powder Rivers, and they are the furthest downstream among Rocky Mountain rivers in the Missouri River Basin. Although mostly free-flowing, the Yellowstone and Powder Rivers experienced a shift from early-summer to late-summer flows within the last century. This shift is concurrent with increasing irrigation and reservoir storage, and it corresponds to decreased cottonwood growth. Low-frequency flow patterns revealed wet conditions from 1870 to 1980, a period that includes the majority of the historical record. The 1816-1823 and 1861-1865 droughts were more severe than any recorded, revealing that drought risks are underestimated when using the instrumental record alone.

  10. Rockfall and snow avalanche impacts leave different anatomical signatures in tree rings of juvenile Larix decidua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Markus; Hitz, Oliver M

    2008-11-01

    Rockfall and snow avalanche events often cause injury to European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) trees, giving rise to the formation of callus tissue and tangential rows of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs). We analyzed and quantified anatomical reactions of juvenile trees injured before the start of the growing season by snow avalanches (15 trees, 324 cross sections) or rockfalls (18 trees, 270 cross sections). Traumatic resin ducts were observed in the growth ring formed following injury in 94.3% of the rockfall samples and 87.3% of the snow avalanche samples. Traumatic resin ducts were formed at the beginning of the new annual ring around wounds caused by rockfalls. In contrast, in trees injured by snow avalanches, TRDs were not formed until after the formation of several rows of early earlywood (EE) tracheids (mean +/- SD = 4.19 +/- 2.56 rows). The dimensions of the EE tracheids observed in the snow avalanche samples were greatly reduced in the tissues bordering the wound, with radial width reaching an average of only 50% and lumen cross-sectional area an average of only 46% of pre-event values. It is therefore possible to differentiate injuries due to past snow avalanches from injuries due to rockfall based on anatomical growth reactions in the tissues bordering scars.

  11. Can a climate record be extracted from giant sequoia tree rings?

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, M. K.; Richards, B J; Swetnam, T. W.; Baisan, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    Extreme low growth events in giant sequoia ring-width index series coincide with severe droughts in the San Joaquin drainage, on whose eastern flank the sequoia groves stand. Comparison with a network of 102 largely moisture-sensitive tree-ring chronologies from western North America suggests that this relationship has been stable for at least 380 years. The twentieth century is not unusual in the frequency of these events. We expect the growth record will soon be replicated for over 2000 yea...

  12. No evidence for consistent long-term growth stimulation of 13 tropical tree species: results from tree-ring analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendijk, Peter; van der Sleen, Peter; Vlam, Mart; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Bongers, Frans; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2015-10-01

    The important role of tropical forests in the global carbon cycle makes it imperative to assess changes in their carbon dynamics for accurate projections of future climate-vegetation feedbacks. Forest monitoring studies conducted over the past decades have found evidence for both increasing and decreasing growth rates of tropical forest trees. The limited duration of these studies restrained analyses to decadal scales, and it is still unclear whether growth changes occurred over longer time scales, as would be expected if CO2 -fertilization stimulated tree growth. Furthermore, studies have so far dealt with changes in biomass gain at forest-stand level, but insights into species-specific growth changes - that ultimately determine community-level responses - are lacking. Here, we analyse species-specific growth changes on a centennial scale, using growth data from tree-ring analysis for 13 tree species (~1300 trees), from three sites distributed across the tropics. We used an established (regional curve standardization) and a new (size-class isolation) growth-trend detection method and explicitly assessed the influence of biases on the trend detection. In addition, we assessed whether aggregated trends were present within and across study sites. We found evidence for decreasing growth rates over time for 8-10 species, whereas increases were noted for two species and one showed no trend. Additionally, we found evidence for weak aggregated growth decreases at the site in Thailand and when analysing all sites simultaneously. The observed growth reductions suggest deteriorating growth conditions, perhaps due to warming. However, other causes cannot be excluded, such as recovery from large-scale disturbances or changing forest dynamics. Our findings contrast growth patterns that would be expected if elevated CO2 would stimulate tree growth. These results suggest that commonly assumed growth increases of tropical forests may not occur, which could lead to erroneous

  13. Tree-ring records of variation in flow and channel geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigliano, M.F.; Friedman, J. M.; Scott, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    We review the use of tree rings to date flood disturbance, channel change, and sediment deposition, with an emphasis on rivers in semi-arid landscapes in the western United States. As watershed area decreases and aridity increases, large floods have a more pronounced and sustained effect on channel width and location, resulting in forest area-age distributions that are farther from a steady-state exponential relation. Furthermore, forests along three major snowmelt rivers in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA, have smaller than expected areas of young trees, suggesting that high flows and channel migration have decreased since the late 1800s.

  14. Responses of tree-ring growth and crop yield to drought indices in the Shanxi province, North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junyan; Liu, Yu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the relationships among the tree-ring chronology, meteorological drought (precipitation), agricultural drought (Palmer Drought Severity Index PDSI), hydrological drought (runoff), and agricultural data in the Shanxi province of North China. Correlation analyses indicate that the tree-ring chronology is significantly correlated with all of the drought indices during the main growing season from March to July. Sign test analyses further indicate that the tree-ring chronology shows variation similar to that of the drought indices in both high and low frequencies. Comparisons of the years with narrow tree rings to the severe droughts reflected in all three indices from 1957 to 2008 reveal that the radial growth of the trees in the study region can accurately record the severe drought for which all three indices were in agreement (1972, 1999, 2000, and 2001). Comparisons with the dryness/wetness index indicate that tree-ring growth can properly record the severe droughts in the history. Correlation analyses among agricultural data, tree-ring chronology, and drought indices indicate that the per-unit yield of summer crops is relatively well correlated with the agricultural drought, as indicated by the PDSI. The PDSI is the climatic factor that significantly influences both tree growth and per-unit yield of summer crops in the study region. These results indicate that the PDSI and tree-ring chronology have the potential to be used to monitor and predict the yield of summer crops. Tree-ring chronology is an important tool for drought research and for wider applications in agricultural and hydrological research.

  15. Spatial and temporal variation of radiocarbon in tree rings - some preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higham, T.F.G.; Hogg, A.G. [Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand); McCormac, F.G.; Baillie, M.G.L.; Brown, D. [Queens`s University, Belfast, (Ireland). School of Geosciences; Palmer, J.G.; Xiong, L. [Lincoln University, Canterbury (New Zealand). Department of Plant Science

    1997-12-31

    A number of researchers have identified a measurable difference between the {sup 14}C activities of tree rings of identical dendochronological age between the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres. It is also acknowledged that there is an urgent need for new high precision {Delta}{sup 14}C data from tree rings in both Hemispheres to help resolve the questions relating to the magnitude and cause of the locality and temporal dependence of the {Delta}{sup 14}C record, to provide a reliable Southern Hemisphere calibration curve and to throw light upon the 1986 and 1993 Calibration data set discrepancies. In this paper, the authors present the research design of a project to investigate these critical issues in radiocarbon age calibration and describe the preliminary results. Paper no. 30; Extended abstract; 12 refs.

  16. Luni-solar 18.6-year signal in tree-rings from Argentina and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cùrrie, Robert G.

    1991-09-01

    Spectrum analysis of 32 tree-ring chronologies from Argentina and Chile yields evidence for two peaks with periods 19.2±1.6 years (30 out of 32 records) and 10.5±0.4 years in 22 instances. Tests by the t-statistic show that the long-period peak is significant at a confidence level of 99%. This signal is identified as the luni-solar 18.6-year M n term reported earlier by Currie (1983) in two treering chronologies from the same region, and later in tree-rings from North America, Tasmania, New Zealand, and South Africa ( Currie, 1991a-c). Amplitude and phase of the M n signal are nonstationary with respect to both time and geography. In particular, abrupt 180° phase changes in wave polarity are often observed.

  17. Spatial and temporal variation of radiocarbon in tree rings - some preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higham, T.F.G.; Hogg, A.G. [Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand); McCormac, F.G.; Baillie, M.G.L.; Brown, D. [Queens`s University, Belfast, (Ireland). School of Geosciences; Palmer, J.G.; Xiong, L. [Lincoln University, Canterbury (New Zealand). Department of Plant Science

    1997-12-31

    A number of researchers have identified a measurable difference between the {sup 14}C activities of tree rings of identical dendochronological age between the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres. It is also acknowledged that there is an urgent need for new high precision {Delta}{sup 14}C data from tree rings in both Hemispheres to help resolve the questions relating to the magnitude and cause of the locality and temporal dependence of the {Delta}{sup 14}C record, to provide a reliable Southern Hemisphere calibration curve and to throw light upon the 1986 and 1993 Calibration data set discrepancies. In this paper, the authors present the research design of a project to investigate these critical issues in radiocarbon age calibration and describe the preliminary results. Paper no. 30; Extended abstract; 12 refs.

  18. Long-term summer temperature reconstruction inferred from tree-ring records from the Eastern Carpathians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, Ionel [Forest Research and Management Institute, Research Station for Norway Spruce Silviculture, Campulung Moldovenesc (Romania); Kern, Zoltan [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Geochemical Research, Budapest (Hungary)

    2009-06-15

    The first 1,000 year long Carpathian tree-ring width chronology was established based on living and subfossil stone pine (Pinus cembra L.) samples from an upper timberline forest located in Calimani Mts. (Romania). Tree-ring data were standardized using the regional curve standardization method in order to preserve the low and medium frequency climate signals. The de-trended index strongly correlates with summer mean temperature both at annual and decadal scales. The Calimani summer mean temperature anomalies were reconstructed for the period ad 1163-2005 applying the rescaling method. This new climate proxy from the Carpathians shows similar fluctuations to other North Hemispheric temperature reconstructions, but with periods of distinct differences. The fingerprint of Little Ice Age in the Calimani area is visible between ad 1370 and 1630 followed by lagged cold decades in ad 1820 and 1840. The recent warming is evident only after the 1980s in our reconstruction. (orig.)

  19. ENSO flavors in a tree-ring δ18O record of Tectona grandis from Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schollaen, K.; Karamperidou, C.; Krusic, P.; Cook, E.; Helle, G.

    2015-10-01

    Indonesia's climate is dominated by the equatorial monsoon system, and has been linked to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events that often result in extensive droughts and floods over the Indonesian archipelago. In this study we investigate ENSO-related signals in a tree-ring δ18O record (1900-2007) of Javanese teak. Our results reveal a clear influence of Warm Pool (central Pacific) El Niño events on Javanese tree-ring δ18O, and no clear signal of Cold Tongue (eastern Pacific) El Niño events. These results are consistent with the distinct impacts of the two ENSO flavors on Javanese precipitation, and illustrate the importance of considering ENSO flavors when interpreting palaeoclimate proxy records in the tropics, as well as the potential of palaeoclimate proxy records from appropriately selected tropical regions for reconstructing past variability of. ENSO flavors.

  20. Climatic significance of stable carbon isotope in tree rings of Abies spectabibis in southeastern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaohong; Qin Dahe; SHAO Xuemei; CHEN Tuo; REN Jiawen

    2003-01-01

    The annually cross-dated stable carbon isotope of tree-ring α-cellulose of Abies spectabibis collected from the southeastern Tibetan Plateau is used to examine its relationship with climatic parameters. The residual △13C series in treerings is constructed after removing the effects of age trend and rising CO2. We found a close relationship between △13C in tree rings and the relative humidity of September-November of the previous year measured at the nearby Nyingchi Meteorological Station, albeit a strong "lagged effect". Thus we developed a transfer function to reconstruct the autumn relative humidity for the Nyingchi region, which explained 37.9% of the total variance (p < 0.001). Our results suggest a high frequency and moderate amplitude variance of the relative humidity before 1800, and the variance reversed afterwards.

  1. The mobility of nitrogen across tree-rings of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) and the effect of extraction method on tree-ring δ¹⁵N and δ¹³C values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, G; Siegwolf, R T W; Buchmann, N; Schleppi, P; Waldner, P; Weber, P

    2014-06-15

    The use of stable nitrogen (N) isotope ratios (δ(15)N values) in dendroecological studies is often preceded by an extraction procedure using organic solvents to remove mobile N compounds from tree-rings. Although these mobile N compounds may be capable of distorting potential environmental signals in the tree-ring δ(15)N values, recent investigations question the necessity of such an extraction. We used an on-going experiment with simulated elevated N deposition previously labelled with (15)N, in conjunction with control trees, to investigate the necessity of extracting mobile N compounds (using a rapid extraction procedure) for tree-ring δ(15)N and δ(13)C studies, as well as N and C concentration analyses. In addition, we examined the magnitude of radial redistribution of N across tree-rings of Norway spruce (Picea abies). The (15)N label, applied in 1995/96, was found in tree-rings as far back as 1951, although the increased N availability did not cause any significant relative increase in tree growth. The rapid extraction procedure had no significant effect on tree-ring δ(15)N or δ(13)C values in either labelled or control trees, or on N concentration. The C concentrations, however, were significantly higher after extraction in control samples, with the opposite effect observed in labelled samples. Our results indicate that the extraction of mobile N compounds through the rapid extraction procedure is not necessary prior to the determination of Norway spruce δ(15)N or δ(13)C values in dendrochemical studies. δ(15)N values, however, must be interpreted with great care, particularly when used as a proxy for the N status of trees, due to the very high mobility of N within the tree stem sapwood of Norway spruce over several decades. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Tropical tree rings reveal preferential survival of fast-growing juveniles and increased juvenile growth rates over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozendaal, Danaë M A; Brienen, Roel J W; Soliz-Gamboa, Claudia C; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2010-02-01

    Long-term juvenile growth patterns of tropical trees were studied to test two hypotheses: fast-growing juvenile trees have a higher chance of reaching the canopy ('juvenile selection effect'); and tree growth has increased over time ('historical growth increase'). Tree-ring analysis was applied to test these hypotheses for five tree species from three moist forest sites in Bolivia, using samples from 459 individuals. Basal area increment was calculated from ring widths, for trees rings formed by small juveniles. Thus, extant adult trees in these species have had higher juvenile growth rates than extant juvenile trees. By contrast, rings formed by somewhat larger juveniles in four species showed the opposite pattern: a historical growth increase. For most size classes of > 10 cm diameter none of the patterns was found. Fast juvenile growth may be essential to enable tropical trees to reach the forest canopy, especially for small juvenile trees in the dark forest understorey. The historical growth increase requires cautious interpretation, but may be partially attributable to CO(2) fertilization.

  3. Sensitivity of ring growth and carbon allocation to climatic variation vary within ponderosa pine trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerhoulas, Lucy P; Kane, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Most dendrochronological studies focus on cores sampled from standard positions (main stem, breast height), yet vertical gradients in hydraulic constraints and priorities for carbon allocation may contribute to different growth sensitivities with position. Using cores taken from five positions (coarse roots, breast height, base of live crown, mid-crown branch and treetop), we investigated how radial growth sensitivity to climate over the period of 1895-2008 varies by position within 36 large ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa Dougl.) in northern Arizona. The climate parameters investigated were Palmer Drought Severity Index, water year and monsoon precipitation, maximum annual temperature, minimum annual temperature and average annual temperature. For each study tree, we generated Pearson correlation coefficients between ring width indices from each position and six climate parameters. We also investigated whether the number of missing rings differed among positions and bole heights. We found that tree density did not significantly influence climatic sensitivity to any of the climate parameters investigated at any of the sample positions. Results from three types of analyses suggest that climatic sensitivity of tree growth varied with position height: (i) correlations of radial growth and climate variables consistently increased with height; (ii) model strength based on Akaike's information criterion increased with height, where treetop growth consistently had the highest sensitivity and coarse roots the lowest sensitivity to each climatic parameter; and (iii) the correlation between bole ring width indices decreased with distance between positions. We speculate that increased sensitivity to climate at higher positions is related to hydraulic limitation because higher positions experience greater xylem tensions due to gravitational effects that render these positions more sensitive to climatic stresses. The low sensitivity of root growth to all climatic variables

  4. Seasonal, Inter-annual and Long Term Trends in the Element Composition of Tropical Tree Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, A.; Beeckman, H.; Andre, L.

    2008-12-01

    The inorganic composition of Rhizophora mucronata wood was studied on 11 stem discs collected from two mangrove forests in Kenya. The aim of this preliminary study was to assess if elements could be used as proxies of environmental and/or anthropogenic change. Earlywood and late wood were separated and analyzed on ICP-MS and ICP-OES. A remarkable synchronicity was found between ring width and Mg/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios, both of which have been used as soil pH proxies. However, there was also a negative correlation between Ca and ring width, indicating a dilution effect at higher growth rates. The essential elements P and K were significantly higher in fast growing plantation trees, suggesting that these elements might be useful as nutrient proxies in mangrove wood. A high correlation was found between Ca and Sr in the wood, indicating that probably no differentiation is made by the tree during incorporation of these elements in the wood. Since Sr/Ca of seawater is related to salinity, we suggest that the Sr/Ca in the wood could be used as a salinity proxy for tree species growing in brackish waters. Finally, a high-resolution study was also conducted using LA-ICP-MS, which revealed a high spatial variability within one ring. This high variability was the result of different concentrations in each wood cell type analyzed. The heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb and Cr), as well as Ba, had highest concentrations in the fibers and lowest in the vessels. On the other hand, B, Mn, Ca, P, and Sr were highest in the rays and vessels and lowest in the fibers, while Mg was the highest in the rays, but lowest in the vessels. The implications of these results for the use of trace elements to delimit chemical ring boundaries in tropical trees will be discussed.

  5. Growth and physiological responses of larch trees to climate changes deduced from tree-ring widths and δ13C at two forest sites in eastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Shunsuke; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Ohta, Takeshi; Maximov, Trofim C.

    2014-06-01

    Tree-ring chronologies of ring width and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) over the past 160 years were developed using living larch trees at two forest sites, each with different annual precipitation, in eastern Siberia: Spasskaya Pad (SP) (62°14‧N, 129°37‧E); and Elgeeii (EG) (60°0‧N, 133°49‧E). Intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) was derived from tree-ring δ13C. The physiological responses of the larch trees to climate varied between these sites and over time. Ring widths correlated negatively with summer temperatures at SP, where summer precipitation is lower than at EG, probably due to temperature-induced water stress. Since the 1990s, however, the negative effect of warming has been more severe at EG, where the productivity of larch trees is higher than at SP. A greater reduction of larch tree growth and higher increase rate of iWUE at EG reflects greater temperature-induced water stress, which is incident to the larger forest biomass. Our results suggest that effect of increase in atmospheric CO2 on larch tree growth is not sufficient to compensate for temperature-induced water stress on larch growth in eastern Siberia and differences in precipitation and forest productivity largely affect the larch tree response to changing climate in eastern Siberia.

  6. Tree-ring responses to extreme climate events as benchmarks for terrestrial dynamic vegetation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rammig

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate extremes can trigger exceptional responses in terrestrial ecosystems, for instance by altering growth or mortality rates. Effects of this kind are often manifested in reductions of the local net primary production (NPP. Investigating a set of European long-term data on annual radial tree growth confirms this pattern: we find that 53% of tree ring width (TRW indices are below one standard deviation, and up to 16% of the TRW values are below two standard deviations in years with extremely high temperatures and low precipitation. Based on these findings we investigate if climate driven patterns in long-term tree growth data may serve as benchmarks for state-of-the-art dynamic vegetation models such as LPJmL. The model simulates NPP but not explicitly the radial tree ring growth, hence requiring a generic method to ensure an objective comparison. Here we propose an analysis scheme that quantifies the coincidence rate of climate extremes with some biotic responses (here TRW or simulated NPP. We find that the reduction in tree-ring width during drought extremes is lower than the corresponding reduction of simulated NPP. We identify ten extreme years during the 20th century in which both, model and measurements indicate high coincidence rates across Europe. However, we detect substantial regional differences in simulated and observed responses to extreme events. One explanation for this discrepancy could be that the tree-ring data have preferentially been sampled at more climatically stressed sites. The model-data difference is amplified by the fact that dynamic vegetation models are designed to simulate mean ecosystem responses at landscape or regional scale. However, we find that both model-data and measurements display carry-over effects from the previous year. We conclude that using radial tree growth is a good basis for generic model-benchmarks if the data are analyzed by scale-free measures such as coincidence analysis. Our study shows

  7. Ranking of tree-ring based temperature reconstructions of the past millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jan; Krusic, Paul J.; Ljungqvist, Fredrik C.; Luterbacher, Jürg; Carrer, Marco; Cook, Ed; Davi, Nicole K.; Hartl-Meier, Claudia; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Konter, Oliver; Myglan, Vladimir; Timonen, Mauri; Treydte, Kerstin; Trouet, Valerie; Villalba, Ricardo; Yang, Bao; Büntgen, Ulf

    2016-08-01

    Tree-ring chronologies are widely used to reconstruct high-to low-frequency variations in growing season temperatures over centuries to millennia. The relevance of these timeseries in large-scale climate reconstructions is often determined by the strength of their correlation against instrumental temperature data. However, this single criterion ignores several important quantitative and qualitative characteristics of tree-ring chronologies. Those characteristics are (i) data homogeneity, (ii) sample replication, (iii) growth coherence, (iv) chronology development, and (v) climate signal including the correlation with instrumental data. Based on these 5 characteristics, a reconstruction-scoring scheme is proposed and applied to 39 published, millennial-length temperature reconstructions from Asia, Europe, North America, and the Southern Hemisphere. Results reveal no reconstruction scores highest in every category and each has their own strengths and weaknesses. Reconstructions that perform better overall include N-Scan and Finland from Europe, E-Canada from North America, Yamal and Dzhelo from Asia. Reconstructions performing less well include W-Himalaya and Karakorum from Asia, Tatra and S-Finland from Europe, and Great Basin from North America. By providing a comprehensive set of criteria to evaluate tree-ring chronologies we hope to improve the development of large-scale temperature reconstructions spanning the past millennium. All reconstructions and their corresponding scores are provided at http://www.blogs.uni-mainz.de/fb09climatology.

  8. Gridded Snow Water Equivalent Reconstruction for Utah Using Forest Inventory and Analysis Tree-Ring Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Barandiaran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Snowpack observations in the Intermountain West are sparse and short, making them difficult for use in depicting past variability and extremes. This study presents a reconstruction of April 1 snow water equivalent (SWE for the period of 1850–1989 using increment cores collected by the U.S. Forest Service, Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis program (FIA. In the state of Utah, SWE was reconstructed for 38 snow course locations using a combination of standardized tree-ring indices derived from both FIA increment cores and publicly available tree-ring chronologies. These individual reconstructions were then interpolated to a 4-km grid using an objective analysis with elevation correction to create an SWE product. The results showed a significant correlation with observed SWE as well as good correspondence to regional tree-ring-based drought reconstructions. Diagnostic analysis showed statewide coherent climate variability on inter-annual and inter-decadal time-scales, with added geographical details that would not be possible using courser pre-instrumental proxy datasets. This SWE reconstruction provides water resource managers and forecasters with better spatial resolution to examine past variability in snowpack, which will be important as future hydroclimatic variability is amplified by climate change.

  9. Winter-spring precipitation reconstructions from tree rings for northeast Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva-Diaz, J.; Cerano-Paredes, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales y Agropecuarias, Centro Nacional de Investigacion Disciplinarioa en Relacion Agua, Suelo, Planta. Km 6.5 Margen Derecha del Canal Sacramento Gomez Palacio, Durango, 35140 (Mexico); Stahle, D.W.; Cleaveland, M.K. [Tree-Ring Laboratory, Department of Geosciences, University of Arkansas, fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Luckman, B.H. [Department of Geography, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A5C3 (Canada); Therrell, M.D. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 29904 (United States); Cornejo-Oviedo, E. [Departamento Forestal, Universidad Autonoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2007-07-15

    The understanding of historic hydroclimatic variability is basic for planning proper management of limited water resources in northeastern Mexico. The objective of this study was to develop a network of tree-ring chronologies to reconstruct hydroclimate variability in northeastern Mexico and to analyze the influence of large-scale circulation patterns, such as ENSO. Precipitation sensitive tree-ring chronologies of Douglas-fir were developed in mountain ranges of the Sierra Madre Oriental and used to produce winter-spring precipitation reconstructions for central and southern Nuevo Leon, and southeastern Coahuila. The seasonal winter-spring precipitation reconstructions are 342 years long (1659-2001) for Saltillo, Coahuila and 602 years long (1400-2002) for central and southern Nuevo Leon. Both reconstructions show droughts in the 1810s, 1870s, 1890s, 1910s, and 1970s, and wet periods in the 1770s, 1930s, 1960s, and 1980s. Prior to 1800s the reconstructions are less similar. The impact of ENSO in northeastern Mexico (as measured by the Tropical Rainfall Index) indicated long-term instability of the Pacific equatorial teleconnection. Atmospheric circulation systems coming from higher latitudes (cold fronts or 'nortes') and others developed in the Gulf of Mexico (tropical storms, hurricanes) also influence the climatic conditions characterizing this region. The recent development of new and longer tree-ring chronologies for the region will contribute to a better understanding of the interannual and multidecadal climatic variability of northeastern Mexico.

  10. Severe winter rings of oak trees (Quercus robur L.) from Central European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanov, B F

    2013-11-01

    Oak trees were sampled in a flood plain forest in the valley of the Zapadnaya Dvina (Daugava) river (Tver region, Russia). Annual rings of the time period from 1826 to 2010 were studied. Anatomically distinct rings with a stripe of small-sized cells in the innermost part and narrow earlywood vessels located in three to four rows occurred in 1861, 1862, 1929, 1940, 1942, 1956 and 1979. Deviations of earlywood development were associated with the drop of winter temperature below -42 °C. The percentage of severe winter ring (SWR) occurrence depends upon tree age and decreases from 75.6 % in younger specimens (under 41 years old at the time of the severe winter) to 27.1 % in middle-aged ones (from 41 to 80 years) to 3.5 % in trees older than 80 years. Described anatomical features can be used in the reconstruction of severe winter frequency in the past.

  11. Increase of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from Kujawy (SE Poland) around AD 774-775

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z.; Krąpiec, Marek; Huels, Mathias; Pawlyta, Jacek; Dreves, Alexander; Meadows, John

    2015-10-01

    Evidence of a rapid increase in atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) content in AD 774-775 was presented by Miyake et al. (2012), who observed an increase of about 12‰ in the 14C content in annual tree rings from Japanese cedar. Usoskin et al. (2013) report a similar 14C spike in German oak, and attribute it to exceptional solar activity. If this phenomenon is global in character, such rapid changes in 14C concentration may affect the accuracy of calibrated dates, as the existing calibration curve is composed mainly of decadal samples. Single-year samples of dendro-chronologically dated tree rings of deciduous oak (Quercus robur) from Kujawy, a village near Krakow (SE Poland), spanning the years AD 765-796, were collected and their 14C content was measured using the AMS system in the Leibniz Laboratory. The results clearly show a rapid increase of 9.2 ± 2.1‰ in the 14C concentration in tree rings between AD 774 and AD 775, with maximum Δ14C = 4.1 ± 2.3‰ noted in AD 776.

  12. Radiocarbon calibration uncertainties during the last deglaciation: Insights from new floating tree-ring chronologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Friedrich, Michael; Güttler, Dominik; Wacker, Lukas; Talamo, Sahra; Kromer, Bernd

    2017-08-01

    Radiocarbon dating is the most commonly used chronological tool in archaeological and environmental sciences dealing with the past 50,000 years, making the radiocarbon calibration curve one of the most important records in paleosciences. For the past 12,560 years, the radiocarbon calibration curve is constrained by high quality tree-ring data. Prior to this, however, its uncertainties increase rapidly due to the absence of suitable tree-ring 14C data. Here, we present new high-resolution 14C measurements from 3 floating tree-ring chronologies from the last deglaciation. By using combined information from the current radiocarbon calibration curve and ice core 10Be records, we are able to absolutely date these chronologies at high confidence. We show that our data imply large 14C-age variations during the Bølling chronozone (Greenland Interstadial 1e) - a period that is currently characterized by a long 14C-age plateau in the most recent IntCal13 calibration record. We demonstrate that this lack of structure in IntCal13 may currently lead to erroneous calibrated ages by up to 500 years.

  13. Increase of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from Kujawy (SE Poland) around AD 774–775

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z., E-mail: arakowski@polsl.pl [Leibniz-Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Institute of Physics – Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego Str. 22B, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Krąpiec, Marek [AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza Av. 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Huels, Mathias [Leibniz-Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Pawlyta, Jacek [Institute of Physics – Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego Str. 22B, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Dreves, Alexander [Leibniz-Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Meadows, John [Leibniz-Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Centre for Baltic and Scandinavian Archaeology, Schleswig-Holstein State Museums Foundation, Schloss Gottorf, Schloßinsel, 24837 Schleswig (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Evidence of a rapid increase in atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) content in AD 774–775 was presented by Miyake et al. (2012), who observed an increase of about 12‰ in the {sup 14}C content in annual tree rings from Japanese cedar. Usoskin et al. (2013) report a similar {sup 14}C spike in German oak, and attribute it to exceptional solar activity. If this phenomenon is global in character, such rapid changes in {sup 14}C concentration may affect the accuracy of calibrated dates, as the existing calibration curve is composed mainly of decadal samples. Single-year samples of dendro-chronologically dated tree rings of deciduous oak (Quercus robur) from Kujawy, a village near Krakow (SE Poland), spanning the years AD 765–796, were collected and their {sup 14}C content was measured using the AMS system in the Leibniz Laboratory. The results clearly show a rapid increase of 9.2 ± 2.1‰ in the {sup 14}C concentration in tree rings between AD 774 and AD 775, with maximum Δ{sup 14}C = 4.1 ± 2.3‰ noted in AD 776.

  14. Temperature signal instability of tree-ring δ13C chronology in the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhi; Liu, Xiaohong; Xu, Guobao; Zeng, Xiaomin; Wu, Guoju; Zhang, Xuanwen; Qin, Dahe

    2016-04-01

    Tree ring δ13C as a climate proxy is widely used for palaeoclimate research, however, its temporal stability response to the climate change remains unclear under more than one limited factors on tree growth. Here, we used a millennium tree-ring δ13C chronology combining two annual-resolution δ13C chronologies since 1800 from long-lived Qilian juniper (Sabina przewalskii) to assess its instability of the climate signal in the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Tree-ring δ13C chronologies were strongly correlated with the regional mean April to August temperature from 1956 to 2008, but the associations were absent within the period 1901 to 1955 values in the CRU TS dataset. Comparison of the millennium-long δ13C series with reconstructed Asian temperatures also demonstrated that the δ13C chronology exhibited climate signal temporal instability. Substantial oscillations were revealed using a frequency-dependent analysis and 51-year running correlation analysis from the millennium-long tree-ring δ13C and δ18O series. Dual-isotope approach indicated that stomatal limitations created a statistical significant positive correlation between tree-ring δ13C and δ18O, but photosynthetic rate may be dominant when the correlations were not significant. Our results suggest that tree-ring δ13C series in the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is responded instability to temperature variations in the past 1000 years.

  15. Towards a common methodology to simulate tree mortality based on ring-width data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailleret, Maxime; Bigler, Christof; Bugmann, Harald; Davi, Hendrik; Minunno, Francesco; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi

    2015-04-01

    Individual mortality is a key process of population and community dynamics, especially for long-lived species such as trees. As the rates of vegetation background mortality and of massive diebacks accelerated during the last decades and would continue in the future due to rising temperature and increasing drought, there is a growing demand of early warning signals that announce that the likelihood of death is very high. If physiological indicators have a high potential to predict tree mortality, their development requires an intensive tree monitoring which cannot be currently done on a representative sample of a population and on several species. An easier approach is to use radial growth data such as tree ring-widths measurements. During the last decades, an increasing number of studies aimed to derive these growth-mortality functions. However, as they followed different approaches concerning the choice of the sampling strategy (number of dead and living trees), of the type of growth explanatory variables (growth level, growth trend variables…), and of the length of the time-window (number of rings before death) used to calculate them, it makes difficult to compare results among studies and a subsequent biological interpretation. We detailed a new methodology for assessing reliable tree-ring based growth-mortality relationships using binomial logistic regression models. As examples we used published tree-ring datasets from Abies alba growing in 13 different sites, and from Nothofagus dombeyi and Quercus petraea located in one single site. Our first approach, based on constant samplings, aims to (1) assess the dependency of growth-mortality relationships on the statistical sampling scheme used; (2) determine the best length of the time-window used to calculate each growth variable; and (3) reveal the presence of intra-specific shifts in growth-mortality relationships. We also followed a Bayesian approach to build the best multi-variable logistic model considering

  16. Studying global change through investigation of the plastic responses of xylem anatomy in tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonti, Patrick; von Arx, Georg; García-González, Ignacio; Eilmann, Britta; Sass-Klaassen, Ute; Gärtner, Holger; Eckstein, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Variability in xylem anatomy is of interest to plant scientists because of the role water transport plays in plant performance and survival. Insights into plant adjustments to changing environmental conditions have mainly been obtained through structural and functional comparative studies between taxa or within taxa on contrasting sites or along environmental gradients. Yet, a gap exists regarding the study of hydraulic adjustments in response to environmental changes over the lifetimes of plants. In trees, dated tree-ring series are often exploited to reconstruct dynamics in ecological conditions, and recent work in which wood-anatomical variables have been used in dendrochronology has produced promising results. Environmental signals identified in water-conducting cells carry novel information reflecting changes in regional conditions and are mostly related to short, sub-annual intervals. Although the idea of investigating environmental signals through wood anatomical time series goes back to the 1960s, it is only recently that low-cost computerized image-analysis systems have enabled increased scientific output in this field. We believe that the study of tree-ring anatomy is emerging as a promising approach in tree biology and climate change research, particularly if complemented by physiological and ecological studies. This contribution presents the rationale, the potential, and the methodological challenges of this innovative approach.

  17. Climate signal age effects in boreal tree-rings: Lessons to be learned for paleoclimatic reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konter, Oliver; Büntgen, Ulf; Carrer, Marco; Timonen, Mauri; Esper, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Age-related alternation in the sensitivity of tree-ring width (TRW) to climate variability has been reported for different forest species and environments. The resulting growth-climate response patterns are, however, often inconsistent and similar assessments using maximum latewood density (MXD) are still missing. Here, we analyze climate signal age effects (CSAE, age-related changes in the climate sensitivity of tree growth) in a newly aggregated network of 692 Pinus sylvestris L. TRW and MXD series from northern Fennoscandia. Although summer temperature sensitivity of TRW (rAll = 0.48) ranges below that of MXD (rAll = 0.76), it declines for both parameters as cambial age increases. Assessment of CSAE for individual series further reveals decreasing correlation values as a function of time. This declining signal strength remains temporally robust and negative for MXD, while age-related trends in TRW exhibit resilient meanderings of positive and negative trends. Although CSAE are significant and temporally variable in both tree-ring parameters, MXD is more suitable for the development of climate reconstructions. Our results indicate that sampling of young and old trees, and testing for CSAE, should become routine for TRW and MXD data prior to any paleoclimatic endeavor.

  18. Community Structure of Urban Forest and Disposition Characteristics of Trees in Hefei Ring Park

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUZemin; WANGYuan; ZHANGShaojie; YANGHaiyan; XUYinbi

    2004-01-01

    The methods of vegetation ecology were used to analyze the community structure of Hefei Ring Park, and species composition, distribution pattern of tree height and DBH were described. Through calculation of tree growth index and association correlation of component species, the community structures were analyzed. The results showed that community structures are complex, there are 22 pairs of species with positive association, and tree individual in the following communities grow well and are more stable, the major are Platycladus orientalis-Prunus cerasifera fatropurpurea-Osmanthus fragrans, Robinia pseduacacia-Ligustrum lucidum, Robinia pseudoacacia-Ginkgo biloba-Photinia serrulata, Populus cadadensis-Ligustrum lucidum-Osmanthus fragrans, Sophora japonica-Ligustrum lucidum-Buxus sinica, Cyclobalanopsis glauca-Distylium racemosum.

  19. Anticoagulant activity of a sulfated polysaccharide isolated from the green seaweed Caulerpa cupressoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ariévilo Gurgel Rodrigues

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate certain molecular characteristics of a sulfated polysaccharide (SPs with anticoagulant properties, isolated from Caulerpa cupressoides (Chlorophyta. Crude SPs were extracted by proteolytic digestion (papain, followed by ion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column. The fractions obtained were analyzed for molecular mass, 0.5% agarose gel electrophoresis and chemical composition. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT test was applied using normal human plasma and standard heparin (HEP (193 IU mg-1. The yield was ~ 3%, and the chromatography procedure separated the material into three different SP fractions (F I, F II and F III, eluted at the concentrations of 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 M of NaCl, respectively. Only fraction F II was active (24.62 IU mg-1, with high sulfate content (23.79% and number of molecular mass peaks. Therefore, the APTT of a fraction isolated from C. cupressoides was less potent than HEP.

  20. Spring temperature variability over Turkey since 1800 CE reconstructed from a broad network of tree-ring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Nesibe; Tuncay Güner, H.; Harley, Grant L.; Guiot, Joel

    2017-01-01

    The meteorological observational period in Turkey, which starts ca. 1930 CE, is too short for understanding long-term climatic variability. Tree rings have been used intensively as proxy records to understand summer precipitation history of the region, primarily because they have a dominant precipitation signal. Yet, the historical context of temperature variability is unclear. Here, we used higher-order principle components of a network of 23 tree-ring chronologies to provide a high-resolution spring (March-April) temperature reconstruction over Turkey during the period 1800-2002. The reconstruction model accounted for 67 % (Adj. R2 = 0.64, p tree-ring network (first principle component) showed highly significant correlations with gridded summer drought index reconstruction over Turkey and Mediterranean countries. Our results showed that, beside the dominant precipitation signal, a temperature signal can be extracted from tree-ring series and they can be useful proxies in reconstructing past temperature variability.

  1. Tree-ring cellulose exhibits several distinct intramolecular 13C signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieloch, Thomas; Ehlers, Ina; Frank, David; Gessler, Arthur; Grabner, Michael; Yu, Jun; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopes are a key tool in biogeosciences. Present applications including compound-specific isotope analysis measure 13C/12C ratios (δ13C) of bulk material or of whole molecules. However, it is well known that primary metabolites also show large intramolecular 13C variation - also called isotopomer variation. This variation reflects 13C fractionation by enzyme reactions and therefore encodes metabolic information. Furthermore, δ13C must be considered an average of the intramolecular 13C distribution. Here we will present (1) methodology to analyse intramolecular 13C distributions of tree-ring cellulose by quantitative 13C NMR (Chaintreau et al., 2013, Anal Chim Acta, 788, 108-113); (2) intramolecular 13C distributions of an annually-resolved tree ring chronology (Pinus nigra, 1961-1995); (3) isotope parameters and terminology for analysis of intramolecular isotope time series; (4) a method for correcting for heterotrophic C redistribution. We will show that the intramolecular 13C distribution of tree-ring cellulose shows large variation, with differences between isotopomers exceeding 10‰Ṫhus, individual 13C isotopomers of cellulose constitute distinct 13C inputs into major global C pools such as wood and soil organic matter. When glucose units with the observed intramolecular 13C pattern are broken down along alternative catabolic pathways, it must be expected that respired CO2 with strongly differing δ13C will be released; indicating that intramolecular 13C variation affects isotope signals of atmosphere-biosphere C exchange fluxes. taking this variation into account will improve modelling of the global C cycle. Furthermore, cluster analysis shows that tree-ring glucose exhibits several independent intramolecular 13C signals, which constitute distinct ecophysiological information channels. Thus, whole-molecule 13C analysis likely misses a large part of the isotope information stored in tree rings. As we have shown for deuterium (Ehlers et al

  2. A likelihood perspective on tree-ring standardization: eliminating modern sample bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecile, J.; Pagnutti, C.; Anand, M.

    2013-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that non-random sampling and differences in mortality between trees of different growth rates is responsible for a widespread, systematic bias in dendrochronological reconstructions of tree growth known as modern sample bias. This poses a serious challenge for climate reconstruction and the detection of long-term changes in growth. Explicit use of growth models based on regional curve standardization allow us to investigate the effects on growth due to age (the regional curve), year (the standardized chronology or forcing) and a new effect, the productivity of each tree. Including a term for the productivity of each tree accounts for the underlying cause of modern sample bias, allowing for more reliable reconstruction of low-frequency variability in tree growth. This class of models describes a new standardization technique, fixed effects standardization, that contains both classical regional curve standardization and flat detrending. Signal-free standardization accounts for unbalanced experimental design and fits the same growth model as classical least-squares or maximum likelihood regression techniques. As a result, we can use powerful and transparent tools such as R2 and Akaike's Information Criteria to assess the quality of tree ring standardization, allowing for objective decisions between competing techniques. Analyzing 1200 randomly selected published chronologies, we find that regional curve standardization is improved by adding an effect for individual tree productivity in 99% of cases, reflecting widespread differing-contemporaneous-growth rate bias. Furthermore, modern sample bias produced a significant negative bias in estimated tree growth by time in 70.5% of chronologies and a significant positive bias in 29.5% of chronologies. This effect is largely concentrated in the last 300 yr of growth data, posing serious questions about the homogeneity of modern and ancient chronologies using traditional standardization

  3. Drought negatively affects communities on a foundation tree: growth rings predict diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Adrian C; Gehring, Catherine A; Whitham, Thomas G

    2010-11-01

    Understanding how communities respond to extreme climatic events is important for predicting the impact of climate change on biodiversity. The plant vigor and stress hypotheses provide a theoretical framework for understanding how arthropods respond to stress, but are rarely tested at the community level. Following a record drought, we compared the communities of arthropods on pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) that exhibited a gradient in physical traits related to environmental stress (e.g., growth rate, branch dieback, and needle retention). Six patterns emerged that show how one of the predicted outcomes of climate change in the southwestern USA (i.e., increased drought severity) alters the communities of a foundation tree species. In accordance with the plant vigor hypothesis, increasing tree stress was correlated with an eight to tenfold decline in arthropod species richness and abundance. Trees that were more similar in their level of stress had more similar arthropod communities. Both foliage quantity and quality contributed to arthropod community structure. Individual species and feeding groups differed in their responses to plant stress, but most were negatively affected. Arthropod richness (r(2) = 0.48) and abundance (r(2) = 0.48) on individual trees were positively correlated with the tree's radial growth during drought. This relationship suggests that tree ring analysis may be used as a predictor of arthropod diversity, which is similar to findings with ectomycorrhizal fungi. A contrast of our findings on arthropod abundance with published data on colonization by mutualistic fungi on the same trees demonstrates that at low stress these two communities respond differently, but at high stress both are negatively affected. These results suggest that the effect of extreme climatic events such as drought on foundation tree species are likely to decrease multi-trophic diversity and shift arthropod community composition, which in turn could cascade to affect other

  4. Decadal record of monsoon dynamics across the Himalayas using tree ring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunello, Camilla Francesca; Andermann, Christoff; Helle, Gerhard; Comiti, Francesco; Tonon, Giustino; Ventura, Maurizio; Hovius, Niels

    2017-04-01

    The temporal variability of the Indian monsoon penetrating through the Himalayan range and into the southern Tibetan Plateau is poorly understood. Intermittent ingress of wet monsoon air masses into the otherwise arid and deserted landscapes beyond the orographic barrier can have consequences for erosion and flooding, as well as for water availability. Furthermore, the latitudinal rainfall distribution across the mountain range is crucial to better understand the hydrological cycles of rivers originating there. Because instrumental measurements are rare in the High Himalayas and on the Plateau, hydro-climatic sensitive proxies, such as oxygen stable isotope ratios in cellulose of tree-rings, are a valuable source of data covering decades to centuries. Here we present new findings on how often and how far the Indian monsoon penetrated into trans-Himalayan region over the last century. To cope with the lack of direct measurements, we strive to reconstruct a record of intense monsoon years based on tree-ring width chronologies along a latitudinal gradient. Thus, we need to answer whether water availability is the main driver of tree growth in the trans-Himalayan region and how dendro-isotopic data relate to seasonal precipitation inputs and sources. In order to study the monsoon dynamics, we selected four sites along the Kali Gandaki River valley in the central Himalayas (Nepal). This valley connects the very wet, monsoon dominated south Himalayan front with the arid trans-Himalayan region and the southern Tibetan Plateau. Our study area covers the sensitive northern end of the precipitation gradient, located in the upper part of the catchment. Water availability, which drastically varies at each site, was explored by using the climate signal- and isotope-transfer within arboreal systems composed of Juniperus sp., Cupressus sp. and Pinus sp. Results from continuous dendrometer measurements for the entire growing season (Mar-Oct) allowed us to assess the link between

  5. Fuel Treatment Effects on Water Use Efficiency in Western Pine Forests Under Fire Suppression Evaluated Using Tree Ring Carbon Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.; Belmecheri, S.; Harris, L. B.

    2016-12-01

    We identified variation on water use efficiency interpreted from carbon 13 in tree ring cellulose in dense ponderosa pines forests in Washington and Arizona. Historically, these forests burned every decade until fires were suppressed beginning in the early twentieth century. The reduction in fire caused large increases in forest density and forest biomass and potential for intense fire. Forests with hazardous fuels are common in the western United States and these types of forests are treated with mechanical thinning and mechanical thinning and burning to reduce hazardous fuels and fire intensity. At each site we extracted tree ring samples from five trees in each treatment type and a control to identify the effects of fuel treatment of concentration of carbon 13 in tree ring cellulose. Water use efficiency as measured by carbon 13 increased after fuel treatments. Treatment effects were larger for the mechanical plus burn treatment than for the mechanical treatment in each study area compared to the control stands Our results suggest that fuel treatments reduce sensitivity of tree growth to climate and increase water use efficiency. Since tree ring carbon 13 is related to plant productivity, carbon 13 in tree rings can be used as a metric of change in ecosystem function for evaluating fuel treatments.

  6. Environmental signals in tree-ring δ18O from a temperate catchment in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Annika; Treydte, Kerstin; Michel, Dominik; Tschumi, Elisabeth; Kahmen, Ansgar; Frank, David; Seneviratne, Sonia Isabelle

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen isotopes (δ18O) in tree rings are a valuable proxy for past environmental conditions. Yet, the contribution of source water δ18O versus signals generated at the leaf level as well as the influence of tree-physiological responses on tree-ring δ18O differences between individual trees at a site remain uncertain. To address this topic, we conducted a study at a catchment research site in northeastern Switzerland. Its unique long-term sampling design allowed for bi-weekly δ18O measurements of precipitation and creek water for the 2002 to 2014 period. Four ash trees (Fraxinus sp.) situated at a creek and four on a nearby steep slope were selected for δ18O measurements of tree-ring cellulose for the same 13 year period. δ18O of soil water as well as cryogenically extracted stem and twig xylem water were determined for three days within the 2016 vegetation period for comparison of xylem and soil water δ18O between the slope and the creek site. Gas exchange measurements with a LI-COR (Li-6400) allowed for comparison of transpiration rate, stomatal conductance and productivity between sites. We calculated correlations to environmental variables and applied the mechanistic Péclet-modified-Craig-Gordon (PMCG) model to simulate observed δ18O cellulose values while varying the parameterization of physiological and environmental variables according to the measured values. Mean inter-series correlations between the tree-level δ18O time series are similarly high at the slope and the creek locations, and both site-chronologies are tightly correlated (r=0.9) although offset by 0.9 ‰ on average. Both chronologies contain a similarly strong summer VPD/RH signal, but we find correlations to precipitation and creek discharge δ18O are just as high. Our results suggest that i) both leaf-level and source water signals are imprinted in cellulose δ18O, and ii) in addition to leaf-level evaporative enrichment the VPD signal at least partly results from its correlation to

  7. An Updated Review of Dendrochronological Investigations in Mexico, a Megadiverse Country with a High Potential for Tree-Ring Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Acosta-Hernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendrochronology is a very useful science to reconstruct the long-term responses of trees and other woody plants forming annual rings in response to their environment. The present review considered Mexico, a megadiverse country with a high potential for tree-ring sciences given its high climatic and environmental variability. We reviewed papers considering Mexican tree species that were published from 2001 to 2016. Most of these studies examined tree species from temperate forests, mainly in the pine and fir species. The review included 31 tree species. The most intensively sampled family and species were the Pinaceae and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziessi (Mirb. Franco, respectively. Some threatened tree species were also studied. Dendrochronological investigations were mainly conducted in northern and central Mexico, with Durango being the most sampled state. The reviewed studies were mostly developed for hydroclimatic reconstructions, which were mainly based on the tree-ring width as a proxy for the climate. Tree-ring studies were carried out in both national and foreign institutions. Our review identified relevant research gaps for dendrochronologists such as: (i biomes which are still scarcely studied (e.g., tropical dry forests and (ii approaches still rarely applied to Mexican forests as dendroecology.

  8. A 9111 year long conifer tree-ring chronology for the European Alps : a base for environmental and climatic investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolussi, K.; Kaufmann, M.; Melvin, Thomas M.; van der Plicht, J.; Schiessling, P.; Thurner, A.

    2009-01-01

    An ultra-long tree-ring width chronology (9111 years long, 7109 BC to AD 2002) has been established based on the analysis and dating of 1432 subfossil/dry dead wood samples and cores from 335 living trees. The material was collected from treeline or near-treeline sites (c. 2000 to 2400 m a.s.l.) mai

  9. Fire history in western Patagonia from paired tree-ring fire-scar and charcoal records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Holz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fire history reconstructions are typically based on tree ages and tree-ring fire scars or on charcoal in sedimentary records from lakes or bogs, but rarely on both. In this study of fire history in western Patagonia (47–48° S in southern South America (SSA we compared three sedimentary charcoal records collected in bogs with tree-ring fire-scar data collected at 13 nearby sample sites. We examined the temporal and spatial correspondence between the two fire proxies and also compared them to published charcoal records from distant sites in SSA, and with published proxy reconstructions of regional climate variability and large-scale climate modes. Two of our three charcoal records record fire activity for the last 4 ka yr and one for the last 11 ka yr. For the last ca. 400 yr, charcoal accumulation peaks tend to coincide with high fire activity in the tree-ring fire scar records, but the charcoal records failed to detect some of the fire activity recorded by tree rings. Potentially, this discrepancy reflects low-severity fires that burn in herbaceous and other fine fuels without depositing charcoal in the sedimentary record. Periods of high fire activity tended to be synchronous across sample areas, across proxy types, and with proxy records of regional climatic variability as well as major climate drivers. Fire activity throughout the Holocene in western Patagonia has responded to regional climate variation affecting a broad region of southern South America that is teleconnected to both tropical- and high-latitude climate drivers-El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. An early Holocene peak in fire activity pre-dates any known human presence in our study area, and consequently implicates lightning as the ignition source. In contrast, the increased fire activity during the 20th century, which was concomitantly recorded by charcoal from all the sampled bogs and at all fire-scar sample sites, is attributed to human-set fires

  10. Fire history in western Patagonia from paired tree-ring fire-scar and charcoal records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, A.; Haberle, S.; Veblen, T. T.; de Pol-Holz, R.; Southon, J.

    2012-03-01

    Fire history reconstructions are typically based on tree ages and tree-ring fire scars or on charcoal in sedimentary records from lakes or bogs, but rarely on both. In this study of fire history in western Patagonia (47-48° S) in southern South America (SSA) we compared three sedimentary charcoal records collected in bogs with tree-ring fire-scar data collected at 13 nearby sample sites. We examined the temporal and spatial correspondence between the two fire proxies and also compared them to published charcoal records from distant sites in SSA, and with published proxy reconstructions of regional climate variability and large-scale climate modes. Two of our three charcoal records record fire activity for the last 4 ka yr and one for the last 11 ka yr. For the last ca. 400 yr, charcoal accumulation peaks tend to coincide with high fire activity in the tree-ring fire scar records, but the charcoal records failed to detect some of the fire activity recorded by tree rings. Potentially, this discrepancy reflects low-severity fires that burn in herbaceous and other fine fuels without depositing charcoal in the sedimentary record. Periods of high fire activity tended to be synchronous across sample areas, across proxy types, and with proxy records of regional climatic variability as well as major climate drivers. Fire activity throughout the Holocene in western Patagonia has responded to regional climate variation affecting a broad region of southern South America that is teleconnected to both tropical- and high-latitude climate drivers-El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. An early Holocene peak in fire activity pre-dates any known human presence in our study area, and consequently implicates lightning as the ignition source. In contrast, the increased fire activity during the 20th century, which was concomitantly recorded by charcoal from all the sampled bogs and at all fire-scar sample sites, is attributed to human-set fires and is outside the

  11. Drought frequency in central California since 101 B.C. recordered in giant sequoia tree rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, M.K.; Brown, P.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Well replicated tree-ring width index chronologies have been developed for giant sequoia at three sites in the Sierra Nevada, California. Extreme low-growth events in these chronologies correspond with regional drought events in the twentieth century in the San Joaquin drainage, in which the giant sequoia sites are located. This relationship is based upon comparison of tree-ring indices with August Palmer Drought Severity Indices for California Climate Division 5. Ring-width indices in the lowest decile from each site were compared. The frequency of low-growth events which occurred at all three sites in the same year is reconstructed from 101 B.C. to A.D. 1988. The inferred frequency of severe drought events changes through time, sometimes suddenly. The period from roughly 1850 to 1950 had one of the lowest frequencies of drought of any one hundred year period in the 2089 year record. The twentieth century so far has had a below-average frequency of extreme droughts. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Drought frequency in central California since 101 B.C. recorded in giant sequoia tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Malcolm K.; Brown, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    Well replicated tree-ring width index chronologies have been developed for giant sequoia at three sites in the Sierra Nevada, California. Extreme low-growth events in these chronologies correspond with regional drought events in the twentieth century in the San Joaquin drainage, in which the giant sequoia sites are located. This relationship is based upon comparison of tree-ring indices with August Palmer Drought Severity Indices for California Climate Division 5. Ring-width indices in the lowest decile from each site were compared. The frequency of low-growth events which occurred at all three sites in the same year is reconstructed from 101 B.C. to A.D. 1988. The inferred frequency of severe drought events changes through time, sometimes suddenly. The period from roughly 1850 to 1950 had one of the lowest frequencies of drought of any one hundred year period in the 2089 year record. The twentieth century so far has had a below-average frequency of extreme droughts.

  13. Reconstructions of Columbia River streamflow from tree-ring chronologies in the Pacific Northwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Jeremy; Pederson, Gregory T.; Gray, Stephen T.; Tjoelker, Michael; Hamlet, Alan F.; Woodhouse, Connie A.

    2016-01-01

    We developed Columbia River streamflow reconstructions using a network of existing, new, and updated tree-ring records sensitive to the main climatic factors governing discharge. Reconstruction quality is enhanced by incorporating tree-ring chronologies where high snowpack limits growth, which better represent the contribution of cool-season precipitation to flow than chronologies from trees positively sensitive to hydroclimate alone. The best performing reconstruction (back to 1609 CE) explains 59% of the historical variability and the longest reconstruction (back to 1502 CE) explains 52% of the variability. Droughts similar to the high-intensity, long-duration low flows observed during the 1920s and 1940s are rare, but occurred in the early 1500s and 1630s-1640s. The lowest Columbia flow events appear to be reflected in chronologies both positively and negatively related to streamflow, implying low snowpack and possibly low warm-season precipitation. High flows of magnitudes observed in the instrumental record appear to have been relatively common, and high flows from the 1680s to 1740s exceeded the magnitude and duration of observed wet periods in the late-19th and 20th Century. Comparisons between the Columbia River reconstructions and future projections of streamflow derived from global climate and hydrologic models show the potential for increased hydrologic variability, which could present challenges for managing water in the face of competing demands

  14. Biogeochemical modelling vs. tree-ring data - comparison of forest ecosystem productivity estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorana Ostrogović Sever, Maša; Barcza, Zoltán; Hidy, Dóra; Paladinić, Elvis; Kern, Anikó; Marjanović, Hrvoje

    2017-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are sensitive to environmental changes as well as human-induce disturbances, therefore process-based models with integrated management modules represent valuable tool for estimating and forecasting forest ecosystem productivity under changing conditions. Biogeochemical model Biome-BGC simulates carbon, nitrogen and water fluxes, and it is widely used for different terrestrial ecosystems. It was modified and parameterised by many researchers in the past to meet the specific local conditions. In this research, we used recently published improved version of the model Biome-BGCMuSo (BBGCMuSo), with multilayer soil module and integrated management module. The aim of our research is to validate modelling results of forest ecosystem productivity (NPP) from BBGCMuSo model with observed productivity estimated from an extensive dataset of tree-rings. The research was conducted in two distinct forest complexes of managed Pedunculate oak in SE Europe (Croatia), namely Pokupsko basin and Spačva basin. First, we parameterized BBGCMuSo model at a local level using eddy-covariance (EC) data from Jastrebarsko EC site. Parameterized model was used for the assessment of productivity on a larger scale. Results of NPP assessment with BBGCMuSo are compared with NPP estimated from tree ring data taken from trees on over 100 plots in both forest complexes. Keywords: Biome-BGCMuSo, forest productivity, model parameterization, NPP, Pedunculate oak

  15. Tree ring inferred summer temperature variations over the last millennium in western Himalaya, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Ram Ratan [Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, Lucknow (India); Braeuning, Achim [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Geography, Erlangen (Germany); Singh, Jayendra [University Greifswald, Ecosystem Dynamics, Institute of Botany and Landscape Ecology, Greifswald (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    We report the first millennium-long reconstruction of mean summer (May-June-July-August) temperature extending back to AD 940 derived from tree-ring width data of Himalayan pencil juniper (Juniperus polycarpos C. Koch) from the monsoon-shadow zone in the western Himalaya, India. Centennial-scale variations in the reconstruction reveal periods of protracted warmth encompassing the 11-15th centuries. A decreasing trend in mean summer temperature occurred since the 15th century with the 18-19th centuries being the coldest interval of the last millennium, coinciding with the expansion of glaciers in the western Himalaya. Since the late 19th century summer temperatures increased again. However, current warming may be underestimated due to a weakening in tree growth-temperature relationship noticeable in the latter part of the 20th century. Mean summer temperature over the western Himalaya shows a positive correlation with summer monsoon intensity over north central India. Low-frequency variations in mean summer temperature anomalies over northwestern India are consistent with tree-ring inferred aridity in western North America. These far-distance linkages reported here for the first time underscore the utility of long-term temperature records from the western Himalayan region in understanding global-scale climatic patterns. (orig.)

  16. Temperature variability in the Iberian Range since 1602 inferred from tree-ring records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Ernesto; Ángel Saz, Miguel; María Cuadrat, José; Esper, Jan; de Luis, Martín

    2017-02-01

    Tree rings are an important proxy to understand the natural drivers of climate variability in the Mediterranean Basin and hence to improve future climate scenarios in a vulnerable region. Here, we compile 316 tree-ring width series from 11 conifer sites in the western Iberian Range. We apply a new standardization method based on the trunk basal area instead of the tree cambial age to develop a regional chronology which preserves high- to low-frequency variability. A new reconstruction for the 1602-2012 period correlates at -0.78 with observational September temperatures with a cumulative mean of the 21 previous months over the 1945-2012 calibration period. The new IR2Tmax reconstruction is spatially representative for the Iberian Peninsula and captures the full range of past Iberian Range temperature variability. Reconstructed long-term temperature variations match reasonably well with solar irradiance changes since warm and cold phases correspond with high and low solar activity, respectively. In addition, some annual temperature downturns coincide with volcanic eruptions with a 3-year lag.

  17. A 400-year tree-ring chronology from the tropical treeline of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, F

    2001-05-01

    High-elevation sites in the tropics may be particularly sensitive to rapid climate change. By sampling treeline populations, I have developed the first extensive (> 300 years) tree-ring chronology in tropical North America. The site is Nevado de Colima, at the western end of the Mexican Neovolcanic Belt, and the species studied is Mexican mountain pine (Pinus hartwegii). Despite past logging in the area, 300 to 500-year old pines were found at 3600-3700 m elevation, about 300 m below the present treeline. The Nevado de Colima tree-ring chronology is well replicated from 1600 to 1997. Calibration with Colima climatic records points to summer monsoon precipitation as the strongest dendroclimatic signal. Most trees also exhibit extremely low growth in 1913 and 1914, following the January 1913 Plinian eruption of the Volcan de Colima. Because P. hartwegii is found on top of high mountains from Mexico to Guatemala, there is potential for developing a network of tropical treeline chronologies.

  18. French summer droughts since 1326 CE: a reconstruction based on tree ring cellulose δ18O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuhn, Inga; Daux, Valérie; Girardclos, Olivier; Stievenard, Michel; Pierre, Monique; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-05-01

    The reconstruction of droughts is essential for the understanding of past drought dynamics and can help evaluate future drought scenarios in a changing climate. This article presents a reconstruction of summer droughts in France based on annually resolved, absolutely dated chronologies of oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) in tree ring cellulose from Quercus spp. Samples were taken from living trees and timber wood from historic buildings at two sites: Fontainebleau (48°23' N, 2°40' E; 1326-2000 CE) and Angoulême (45°44' N, 0°18' E; 1360-2004 CE). Cellulose δ18O from these sites proved to be a good proxy of summer climate, as the trees were sensitive to temperature and moisture availability. However, offsets in average δ18O values between tree cohorts necessitated a correction before joining them to the final chronologies. Using the corrected δ18O chronologies, we developed models based on linear regression to reconstruct drought, expressed by the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI). The significant correlations between the SPEI and cellulose δ18O (r ≈ -0.70), as well as the verification of the models by independent data support the validity of these reconstructions. At both sites, recent decades are characterized by increasing drought. Fontainebleau displays dominantly wetter conditions during earlier centuries, whereas the current drought intensity is not unprecedented in the Angoulême record. While the δ18O chronologies at the two studied sites are highly correlated during the 19th and 20th centuries, there is a significant decrease in the correlation coefficient between 1600 and 1800 CE, which indicates either a weaker climate sensitivity of the tree ring proxies during this period, or a more heterogeneous climate in the north and the south of France. Future studies of tree ring isotope networks might reveal if the seasonality and spatial patterns of past droughts can explain this decoupling. A regional drought reconstruction

  19. Divergence of Temperature and Wind Signals in Tree Rings at Port Angeles, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W. L.

    2007-12-01

    At Port Angeles, WA some divergence of tree response to temperature may be explained by previously reported response of trees to wind. Near a weather station there two intermixed populations of low elevation Douglas-fir were found, of which roughly half showed positive response of annual ring width eccentricity to integrated, instrumentally measured hourly wind velocity over the same time interval and in the same direction. The other half responded negatively to the same wind along the same measurement transect azimuth. A similar result was obtained for wind when using ring width data from the downwind sides of the trees, where much of the wind signal was retained by modulation of early wood growth. This is similar to the Wilmking et al. description of divergent temperature response of transect mean ring width in high elevation trees on the Alaska Brooks Range; where a third showed positive, a third showed negative and a third had insignificant correlation with temperature. Eccentricity in Port Angeles northeast-southwest and southeast-northwest transects shows significant divergence of both wind and wind-associated temperature response from 1997 to 2001. Alternating power and lag of wind and temperature correlations with eccentricity at certain azimuths suggests that wind and temperature may operate interdependently in affecting eccentric growth. Response power and sign were highly dependent on the tree, transect azimuth and lag. Trees responded with wind azimuth resolution close to 10°, suggesting that accuracy and precision of sampling azimuth are important. Response power on most transects in most trees was usually higher at zero response lag. Eccentricity response to temperature and wind was usually of opposite sign. Northeast and southeast transect mean width showed weak, temperature-driven divergence at one-year lag. Analysis is underway back to 1982. At Port Angeles warmer winds from the Strait of Juan de Fuca flowed from the northern sector. No clear time

  20. Tracing carbon and oxygen isotope signals from newly assimilated sugars in the leaves to the tree ring archive (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, A.; Brandes, E.; Buchmann, N. C.; Helle, G.; Barnard, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    The analysis of δ13C and δ18O in tree ring archives offers retrospective insights into environmental conditions and ecophysiological processes. While photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and evaporative oxygen isotope enrichment are well understood, we lack information on how the isotope signal is altered by downstream metabolic processes. In Pinus sylvestris, we traced the isotopic signals from their origin in the leaf water (δ18O) or the newly assimilated carbon (δ13C), via phloem sugars to the tree ring, over a time scale that ranges from hours to a growing season. Seasonally variable 13C enrichment of sugars related to phloem loading and transport did lead to uncoupling between δ13C in the tree ring and the ci/ca ratio at the leaf level. In contrast, the oxygen isotope signal was transferred from the leaf water to the tree ring with an expected enrichment of 27 ‰, with time lags of approx. 2 weeks, and with a 40 % exchange between organic oxygen and xylem water oxygen during cellulose synthesis. This integrated overview of the fate of carbon and oxygen isotope signals within the model tree species P. sylvestris provides a novel physiological basis for the interpretation of δ13C and δ18O in tree ring ecology.

  1. Negative feedback adjustment challenges reconstruction study from tree rings: A study case of response of Populus euphratica to river discontinuous flow and ecological water conveyance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hongbo; Zhang, Pei; Guo, Bin; Xu, Hailiang; Ye, Mao; Deng, Xiaoya

    2017-01-01

    Drought stress changes the relationship between the growth of tree rings and variations in ambient temperature. However, it is not clear how the growth of trees changes in response to drought of varying intensities, especially in arid areas. Therefore, Tree rings were studied for 6years in Populus euphratica to assess the impacts of abrupt changes in environment on tree rings using the theories and methods in dendrohydrology, ecology and phytophysiology. The width of tree rings increased by 8.7% after ecological water conveyance downstream of Tarim River compared to that when the river water had been cut off. However, during intermediate drought, as the depth of the groundwater increases, the downward trend in the tree rings was reversed because of changes in the physiology of the tree. Therefore, the growth of tree rings shows a negative feedback to intermediate drought stress, an observation that challenges the homogenization theory of tree ring reconstruction based on the traditional methods. Owing to the time lag, the cumulative effect and the negative feedback between the growth of tree rings and drought stress, the reconstruction of past environment by studying the patterns of tree rings is often inaccurate. Our research sets out to verify the hypothesis that intermediate drought stress results in a negative feedback adjustment and thus to answers two scientific questions: (1) How does the negative feedback adjustment promote the growth of tree rings as a result of intermediate drought stress? (2) How does the negative feedback adjustment lower the accuracy with which the past is reconstructed based on tree rings? This research not only enriches the connotations of intermediate disturbance hypothesis and reconstruction theory of tree rings, but also provides a scientific basis for the conservation of desert riparian forests worldwide.

  2. Reconstructing 800 years of summer temperatures in Scotland from tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydval, Miloš; Loader, Neil J.; Gunnarson, Björn E.; Druckenbrod, Daniel L.; Linderholm, Hans W.; Moreton, Steven G.; Wood, Cheryl V.; Wilson, Rob

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a summer temperature reconstruction using Scots pine tree-ring chronologies for Scotland allowing the placement of current regional temperature changes in a longer-term context. `Living-tree' chronologies were extended using `subfossil' samples extracted from nearshore lake sediments resulting in a composite chronology >800 years in length. The North Cairngorms (NCAIRN) reconstruction was developed from a set of composite blue intensity high-pass and ring-width low-pass filtered chronologies with a range of detrending and disturbance correction procedures. Calibration against July-August mean temperature explains 56.4% of the instrumental data variance over 1866-2009 and is well verified. Spatial correlations reveal strong coherence with temperatures over the British Isles, parts of western Europe, southern Scandinavia and northern parts of the Iberian Peninsula. NCAIRN suggests that the recent summer-time warming in Scotland is likely not unique when compared to multi-decadal warm periods observed in the 1300s, 1500s, and 1730s, although trends before the mid-sixteenth century should be interpreted with some caution due to greater uncertainty. Prominent cold periods were identified from the sixteenth century until the early 1800s—agreeing with the so-called Little Ice Age observed in other tree-ring reconstructions from Europe—with the 1690s identified as the coldest decade in the record. The reconstruction shows a significant cooling response 1 year following volcanic eruptions although this result is sensitive to the datasets used to identify such events. In fact, the extreme cold (and warm) years observed in NCAIRN appear more related to internal forcing of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation.

  3. Volcano-induced regime shifts in millennial tree-ring chronologies from northeastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaretti, Fabio; Arseneault, Dominique; Nicault, Antoine; Perreault, Luc; Bégin, Yves

    2014-07-15

    Dated records of ice-cap growth from Arctic Canada recently suggested that a succession of strong volcanic eruptions forced an abrupt onset of the Little Ice Age between A.D. 1275 and 1300 [Miller GH, et al. (2012) Geophys Res Lett 39(2):L02708, 10.1029/2011GL050168]. Although this idea is supported by simulation experiments with general circulation models, additional support from field data are limited. In particular, the Northern Hemisphere network of temperature-sensitive millennial tree-ring chronologies, which principally comprises Eurasian sites, suggests that the strongest eruptions only caused cooling episodes lasting less than about 10 y. Here we present a new network of millennial tree-ring chronologies from the taiga of northeastern North America, which fills a wide gap in the network of the Northern Hemisphere's chronologies suitable for temperature reconstructions and supports the hypothesis that volcanoes triggered both the onset and the coldest episode of the Little Ice Age. Following the well-expressed Medieval Climate Anomaly (approximately A.D. 910-1257), which comprised the warmest decades of the last millennium, our tree-ring-based temperature reconstruction displays an abrupt regime shift toward lower average summer temperatures precisely coinciding with a series of 13th century eruptions centered around the 1257 Samalas event and closely preceding ice-cap expansion in Arctic Canada. Furthermore, the successive 1809 (unknown volcano) and 1815 (Tambora) eruptions triggered a subsequent shift to the coldest 40-y period of the last 1100 y. These results confirm that series of large eruptions may cause region-specific regime shifts in the climate system and that the climate of northeastern North America is especially sensitive to volcanic forcing.

  4. A simple program to measure and analyse tree rings using Excel, R and SigmaScan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietz, Peter

    I present a new software that links a program for image analysis (SigmaScan), one for spreadsheets (Excel) and one for statistical analysis (R) for applications of tree-ring analysis. The first macro measures ring width marked by the user on scanned images, stores raw and detrended data in Excel and calculates the distance to the pith and inter-series correlations. A second macro measures darkness along a defined path to identify latewood-earlywood transition in conifers, and a third shows the potential for automatic detection of boundaries. Written in Visual Basic for Applications, the code makes use of the advantages of existing programs and is consequently very economic and relatively simple to adjust to the requirements of specific projects or to expand making use of already available code.

  5. A simple program to measure and analyse tree rings using Excel, R and SigmaScan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    I present a new software that links a program for image analysis (SigmaScan), one for spreadsheets (Excel) and one for statistical analysis (R) for applications of tree-ring analysis. The first macro measures ring width marked by the user on scanned images, stores raw and detrended data in Excel and calculates the distance to the pith and inter-series correlations. A second macro measures darkness along a defined path to identify latewood–earlywood transition in conifers, and a third shows the potential for automatic detection of boundaries. Written in Visual Basic for Applications, the code makes use of the advantages of existing programs and is consequently very economic and relatively simple to adjust to the requirements of specific projects or to expand making use of already available code. PMID:26109835

  6. Splitting trees stopped when the first clock rings and Vervaat's transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, Amaury

    2011-01-01

    We consider a branching population where individuals have i.i.d.\\ life lengths (not necessarily exponential) and constant birth rate. We let $N_t$ denote the population size at time $t$. %(called homogeneous, binary Crump--Mode--Jagers process). We further assume that all individuals, at birth time, are equipped with independent exponential clocks with parameter $\\delta$. We are interested in the genealogical tree stopped at the first time $T$ when one of those clocks rings. This question has applications in epidemiology, in population genetics, in ecology and in queuing theory. We show that conditional on $\\{T<\\infty\\}$, the joint law of $(N_T, T, X^{(T)})$, where $X^{(T)}$ is the jumping contour process of the tree truncated at time $T$, is equal to that of $(M, -I_M, Y_M')$ conditional on $\\{M\

  7. Toward understanding nonstationarity in climate and hydrology through tree ring proxy records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Saman; Elshorbagy, Amin; Wheater, Howard; Sauchyn, David

    2015-03-01

    Natural proxy records of hydroclimatic behavior, such as tree ring chronologies, are a rich source of information of past climate-driven nonstationarities in hydrologic variables. In this study, we investigate tree ring chronologies that demonstrate significant correlations with streamflows, with the objective of identifying the spatiotemporal patterns and extents of nonstationarities in climate and hydrology, which are essentially representations of past "climate changes." First and second-order nonstationarities are of particular interest in this study. As a prerequisite, we develop a methodology to assess the consistency and credibility of a regional network of tree ring chronologies as proxies for hydrologic regime. This methodology involves a cluster analysis of available tree ring data to understand and evaluate their dependence structure, and a regional temporal-consistency plot to assess the consistency of different chronologies over time. The major headwater tributaries of the Saskatchewan River basin (SaskRB), the main source of surface water in the Canadian Prairie Provinces, are used as the case study. Results indicate that stationarity might never have existed in the hydrology of the region, as the statistical properties of annual paleo-hydrologic proxy records across the basin, i.e., the mean and autocorrelation structure, have consistently undergone significant changes (nonstationarities) at different points in the history of the region. The spatial pattern of the changes in the mean statistic has been variable with time, indicating a time-varying cross-correlation structure across the tributaries of the SaskRB. Conversely, the changes in the autocorrelation structure across the basin have been in harmony over time. The results demonstrate that the 89 year period of observational record in this region is a poor representation of the long-term properties of the hydrologic regime, and shorter periods, e.g., 30 year periods, are by no means

  8. Bivariate Drought Analysis Using Streamflow Reconstruction with Tree Ring Indices in the Sacramento Basin, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewon Kwak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term streamflow data are vital for analysis of hydrological droughts. Using an artificial neural network (ANN model and nine tree-ring indices, this study reconstructed the annual streamflow of the Sacramento River for the period from 1560 to 1871. Using the reconstructed streamflow data, the copula method was used for bivariate drought analysis, deriving a hydrological drought return period plot for the Sacramento River basin. Results showed strong correlation among drought characteristics, and the drought with a 20-year return period (17.2 million acre-feet (MAF per year in the Sacramento River basin could be considered a critical level of drought for water shortages.

  9. Stable carbon isotope in tree rings from Huangling, China and climatic variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘禹; 吴祥定; Steven W.Leavitt; Malcolm K.Hughes

    1996-01-01

    By using a single-year discrimination chronology detrended from a δ13C chronology from Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) tree rings and meteorological data, the δ13C-climatic response is analyzed. The results show that high-frequency δ13C is significantly related to both temperatures of June (with r=-0.65) and the total precipitation of May, June and July (r=-0.46). This suggests that δ13C records reflects some features of the East Asian summer monsoon. In addition, temperature departure for June is reconstructed from a transfer function developed with δ13C-climatic response.

  10. Forest response to increasing typhoon activity on the Korean peninsula: evidence from oak tree-rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Jan; Doležal, Jiří; Cerný, Tomáš; Song, Jong-Suk

    2013-02-01

    The globally observed trend of changing intensity of tropical cyclones over the past few decades emphasizes the need for a better understanding of the effects of such disturbance events in natural and inhabited areas. On the Korean Peninsula, typhoon intensity has increased over the past 100 years as evidenced by instrumental data recorded from 1904 until present. We examined how the increase in three weather characteristics (maximum hourly and daily precipitation, and maximum wind speed) during the typhoon activity affected old-growth oak forests. Quercus mongolica is a dominant species in the Korean mountains and the growth releases from 220 individuals from three sites along a latitudinal gradient (33-38°N) of decreasing typhoon activity were studied. Growth releases indicate tree-stand disturbance and improved light conditions for surviving trees. The trends in release events corresponded to spatiotemporal gradients in maximum wind speed and precipitation. A high positive correlation was found between the maximum values of typhoon characteristics and the proportion of trees showing release. A higher proportion of disturbed trees was found in the middle and southern parts of the Korean peninsula where typhoons are most intense. This shows that the releases are associated with typhoons and also indicates the differential impact of typhoons on the forests. Finally, we present a record of the changing proportion of trees showing release based on tree-rings for the period 1770-1979. The reconstruction revealed no trend during the period 1770-1879, while the rate of forest disturbances increased rapidly from 1880 to 1979. Our results suggest that if typhoon intensity rises, as is projected by some climatic models, the number of forest disturbance events will increase thus altering the disturbance regime and ecosystem processes.

  11. Four centuries of reconstructed hydroclimatic variability for Northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico, based on tree rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Villanueva Díaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A Douglas-fir chronology with a length of 409 years (1600-2008 was developed for northwestern Chihuahua in Mesa de las Guacamayas, a “Natural Protected Area” known as an important nesting habitat for the thickbilled parrot (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha an endangered neotropical bird. Increment cores and cross-sections from selected Douglas-fir trees (Pseudotsuga menziesii in a mixed conifer forest were obtained with an increment borer and a chain-saw. Standard dendrochronological techniques were used to process and date each one of the rings to their exact year of formation. The quality of dating of the measured series was analyzed with the COFECHA program, while biological trends not related to climate (age differences, stem-size increases, and disturbances were removed by standardization procedures in the ARSTAN program. Tree ring series of earlywood, latewood and total ring width were developed for the last four centuries. The total ring-width chronology was significantly associated (r>0.40, p=0.000 with nearby chronologies, particularly those located <200 km apart along the western slopes of the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO observing correlations as high as 0.69 (p<0.001. Association between chronologies decreased for those sites in the state of Durango along the SMO but separated more than 200 km in straight line and also for sites in nearby borderline in the USA side. The similar climatic response among distant chronologies implies the influence of common atmospheric circulatory patterns affecting a large portion of land simultaneously. ENSO is one of the most important factors in determining inter-annual and multiannual hydroclimatic variability in northern Mexico, increasing winter-spring precipitation in its warm phase and causing extreme droughts in its cold phase.

  12. Integrating tree-ring and wine data from the Palatinate (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konter, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Tree-ring growth of conifer trees originating from central European low mountain ranges often reveal indistinct growth-climate relationships. Temperature variations can play a crucial role, whereas water availability can also control the annual growth and become the main dominating factor. The low mountain range Pfälzerwald in the Palatinate region represents the largest contiguous forested area in Germany and features at its most eastern limitation a unique ecological setting due to its sandy soils and reduced water availability. In addition, its north-south orientation and associated lee-effects due to predominating westerlies together with altitudinal differences of more than 300 m lead to higher temperatures, lower precipitation amounts, and, as a forest management consequence, to a proportion of up to 80 % of pine trees. Despite these exceptional ecological and climatological prerequisites, calibrating tree-ring width data from 487 Pinus sylvestris core samples against regional meteorological stations (1950-2011) and gridded data (1901-2011) confirm alternating climate control mechanisms. Comparison with drought-related indices (scPDSI), combining precipitation and temperature, unfolds highest correlations with May-July conditions (r=0.34, pwine-growing regions in Germany. We collected and analyzed a 24 datasets of 57 consecutive years (1959-2015) of must sugar content, acidity, alcohol content, and sugar-free extracts in Riesling, Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc, and Silvaner wines, originating from 15 wineries adjoining the forested area into the plain. Correlation of Riesling must sugar content against regional April-August temperature data reveals a highly significant signal (r=0.73, pextract variations of Pinot Gris are significantly controlled by March-September precipitation (r=0.76, pextract data from Riesling and Pinot Gris wine can further elucidate our understanding of longer-term climate variability in the Palatinate region.

  13. Studies on Variation of Poplar I-69 Tree-ring Width and Tree-ring Density%I-69杨年轮宽度和密度变异规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王家祥; 夏萍; 刘盛全

    2011-01-01

    Poplar I-69 wood was chosen as the sample, the data of the components of tree-ring width and density were accessed by Tree-Ring Image Analysis System and Tree-Ring Analysis System and the radial and axial varia-tions of the components were analyzed. The results showed that; the radial variation of the density of poplar I-69 in-creased along with the tree age. The maximum density fluctuated heavy, the minimum density decreased along with increase of the tree age on the whole. The density of earlywood and latewood increased along with the tree age. The radial variation of the tree-ring components was significant within individual trunk, but no difference among trunks. The components of the tree-ring density increased along with the tree height, there into, the tree-ring average densi-ty , earlywood density and minimum density increased less, while the tree-ring maximum density and latewood densi-ty increased more. Comparatively, the radial variation of the density of poplar 1-69 was larger than that of the axial variation.%以I-69杨木材为试样,运用树木年轮图像分析系统和树木年轮分析系统获取年轮宽度和年轮密度数据,并对组成成分径向变异和轴向变异规律进行了分析.结果表明:I-69杨木材密度的径向变异规律随树龄增加而增大,最大密度波动较大,最小密度随树龄增加总体趋势下降,早材密度、晚材密度随树龄增加而增加;年轮组成成分各项指标株内径向变异极显著,株间径向变异不显著.年轮密度各组成成分随高度增加而增加,其中年轮平均密度、早材密度、最小密度增加量较小,年轮最大密度、晚材密度增加量较大;相对而言,I-69杨木材密度径向变异大于轴向变异.

  14. Tree growth and its climate signal along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients: comparison of tree rings between Finland and the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Lixin; Suvanto, Susanne; Nöjd, Pekka; Henttonen, Helena M.; Mäkinen, Harri; Zhang, Qi-Bin

    2017-06-01

    Latitudinal and altitudinal gradients can be utilized to forecast the impact of climate change on forests. To improve the understanding of how these gradients impact forest dynamics, we tested two hypotheses: (1) the change of the tree growth-climate relationship is similar along both latitudinal and altitudinal gradients, and (2) the time periods during which climate affects growth the most occur later towards higher latitudes and altitudes. To address this, we utilized tree-ring data from a latitudinal gradient in Finland and from two altitudinal gradients on the Tibetan Plateau. We analysed the latitudinal and altitudinal growth patterns in tree rings and investigated the growth-climate relationship of trees by correlating ring-width index chronologies with climate variables, calculating with flexible time windows, and using daily-resolution climate data. High latitude and altitude plots showed higher correlations between tree-ring chronologies and growing season temperature. However, the effects of winter temperature showed contrasting patterns for the gradients. The timing of the highest correlation with temperatures during the growing season at southern sites was approximately 1 month ahead of that at northern sites in the latitudinal gradient. In one out of two altitudinal gradients, the timing for the strongest negative correlation with temperature at low-altitude sites was ahead of treeline sites during the growing season, possibly due to differences in moisture limitation. Mean values and the standard deviation of tree-ring width increased with increasing mean July temperatures on both types of gradients. Our results showed similarities of tree growth responses to increasing seasonal temperature between latitudinal and altitudinal gradients. However, differences in climate-growth relationships were also found between gradients due to differences in other factors such as moisture conditions. Changes in the timing of the most critical climate variables

  15. Tree growth and its climate signal along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients: comparison of tree rings between Finland and the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lyu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Latitudinal and altitudinal gradients can be utilized to forecast the impact of climate change on forests. To improve the understanding of how these gradients impact forest dynamics, we tested two hypotheses: (1 the change of the tree growth–climate relationship is similar along both latitudinal and altitudinal gradients, and (2 the time periods during which climate affects growth the most occur later towards higher latitudes and altitudes. To address this, we utilized tree-ring data from a latitudinal gradient in Finland and from two altitudinal gradients on the Tibetan Plateau. We analysed the latitudinal and altitudinal growth patterns in tree rings and investigated the growth–climate relationship of trees by correlating ring-width index chronologies with climate variables, calculating with flexible time windows, and using daily-resolution climate data. High latitude and altitude plots showed higher correlations between tree-ring chronologies and growing season temperature. However, the effects of winter temperature showed contrasting patterns for the gradients. The timing of the highest correlation with temperatures during the growing season at southern sites was approximately 1 month ahead of that at northern sites in the latitudinal gradient. In one out of two altitudinal gradients, the timing for the strongest negative correlation with temperature at low-altitude sites was ahead of treeline sites during the growing season, possibly due to differences in moisture limitation. Mean values and the standard deviation of tree-ring width increased with increasing mean July temperatures on both types of gradients. Our results showed similarities of tree growth responses to increasing seasonal temperature between latitudinal and altitudinal gradients. However, differences in climate–growth relationships were also found between gradients due to differences in other factors such as moisture conditions. Changes in the timing of the most

  16. Use of tree rings to investigate the onset of contamination of a shallow aquifer by chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanosky, T.M.; Hansen, B.P.; Schening, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Oaks (Quercus velutina Lam.) growing over a shallow aquifer contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons were studied to determine if it was possible to estimate the approximate year that contamination began. The annual rings of some trees downgradient from the contaminant release site contained elevated concentrations of chloride possibly derived from dechlorination of contaminants. Additionally, a radial-growth decline began in these trees at approximately the same time that chloride became elevated. Growth did not decline in trees that contained smaller concentrations of chloride. The source of elevated chloride and the corresponding reductions in tree growth could not be explained by factors other than contamination. On the basis of tree-ring evidence alone, the release occurred in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Contaminant release at a second location apparently occurred in the mid- to late 1970s, suggesting that the area was used for disposal for at least 5 years and possibly longer. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Evaluation of Whole Tree Growth Increment Derived from Tree-Ring Series for Use in Assessments of Changes in Forest Productivity across Various Spatial Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Metsaranta, Juha M.; Bhatti, Jagtar S.

    2016-01-01

    The inherent predictability of inter-annual variation in forest productivity remains unknown. Available field-based data sources for understanding this variability differ in their spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and typical units of measure. Nearly all other tree and forest characteristics are in practice derived from measurements of diameter at breast height (DBH). Therefore, diameter increment reconstructed annually from tree-ring data can be used to estimate annual growth incremen...

  18. Extracting a common high frequency signal from northern Quebec black spruce tree-rings with a Bayesian hierarchical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-J. Boreux

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrochronology, the scientific dating method based on the analysis of tree-ring growth patterns, has been frequently applied in climatology. The basic premise of dendroclimatology is that tree rings can be viewed as climate proxies, i.e. rings are assumed to contain some hidden information about past climate. From a statistical perspective, this extraction problem can be understood as the search of a hidden variable which represents the common signal within a collection of tree-ring width series. Classical average-based techniques used in dendrochronology have been, with different degrees of success (depending on tree species, regional factors and statistical methods, applied to estimate the mean behavior of this latent variable. Still, a precise quantification of uncertainties associated to the hidden variable distribution is difficult to assess. To model the error propagation throughout the extraction procedure, we propose and study a Bayesian hierarchical model that focuses on extracting an inter-annual high frequency signal. Our method is applied to black spruce (Picea mariana tree-rings recorded in northern Quebec and compared to a classical average-based techniques used by dendrochronologists.

  19. Preliminary December-January inflow and streamflow reconstructions from tree rings for western Tasmania, southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, K. J.; Nichols, S. C.; Evans, R.; Cook, E. R.; Allie, S.; Carson, G.; Ling, F.; Baker, P. J.

    2015-07-01

    Projected decreases and changes in the seasonal distribution of precipitation will have profound impacts on southeastern Australia, including its ability to generate renewable hydroelectricity. Recent decreases in precipitation over the region may be significant in the context of instrumental records, but the question of whether these decreases are within long-term natural variability remains. To help address this issue, we present December-January streamflow and dam inflow reconstructions for southeastern Australia. These reconstructions for the Tasmanian west coast are based solely on local tree ring chronologies and span up to 1600 years. Nonparametric estimates, however, indicate good model skill for the last 458 years (streamflow) and 478 years (dam inflow). The reconstructions indicate that twentieth century conditions were well within the range of historical variability, and were in fact relatively wet. The period from approximately 1600 to 1750 CE was one of the enhanced variability and a high proportion of low and high flow events occurred in the seventeenth century. There are significant relationships between streamflow and inflow reconstructions and large-scale ocean-atmosphere processes such as ENSO and the Southern Annular Mode. Critically, our two reconstructions rely heavily on new tree ring chronologies based on properties such as tracheid radial diameter, cell wall thickness, and density, underscoring the importance of these different types of chronologies in reconstructions.

  20. SNOW AVALANCHE ACTIVITY IN PARÂNG SKI AREA REVEALED BY TREE-RINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. MESEȘAN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Snow Avalanche Activity in Parâng Ski Area Revealed by Tree-Rings. Snow avalanches hold favorable conditions to manifest in Parâng Mountains but only one event is historically known, without destructive impact upon infrastructure or fatalities and this region wasn’t yet the object of avalanche research. The existing ski infrastructure of Parâng resort located in the west of Parâng Mountains is proposed to be extended in the steep slopes of subalpine area. Field evidence pinpoints that these steep slopes were affected by snow avalanches in the past. In this study we analyzed 11 stem discs and 31 increment cores extracted from 22 spruces (Picea abies (L. Karst impacted by avalanches, in order to obtain more information about past avalanches activity. Using the dendrogeomorphological approach we found 13 avalanche events that occurred along Scărița avalanche path, since 1935 until 2012, nine of them produced in the last 20 years. The tree-rings data inferred an intense snow avalanche activity along this avalanche path. This study not only calls for more research in the study area but also proves that snow avalanches could constitute an important restrictive factor for the tourism infrastructure and related activities in the area. It must be taken into consideration by the future extension of tourism infrastructure. Keywords: snow avalanche, Parâng Mountains, dendrogeomorphology, ski area.

  1. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhilber, Friedhelm; Abreu, Jose A; Beer, Jürg; Brunner, Irene; Christl, Marcus; Fischer, Hubertus; Heikkilä, Ulla; Kubik, Peter W; Mann, Mathias; McCracken, Ken G; Miller, Heinrich; Miyahara, Hiroko; Oerter, Hans; Wilhelms, Frank

    2012-04-17

    Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential for studies of the solar-terrestrial relationship. Cosmic-ray produced radionuclides, such as (10)Be and (14)C which are stored in polar ice cores and tree rings, offer the unique opportunity to reconstruct the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia. Although records from different archives basically agree, they also show some deviations during certain periods. So far most reconstructions were based on only one single radionuclide record, which makes detection and correction of these deviations impossible. Here we combine different (10)Be ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica with the global (14)C tree ring record using principal component analysis. This approach is only possible due to a new high-resolution (10)Be record from Dronning Maud Land obtained within the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica in Antarctica. The new cosmic radiation record enables us to derive total solar irradiance, which is then used as a proxy of solar activity to identify the solar imprint in an Asian climate record. Though generally the agreement between solar forcing and Asian climate is good, there are also periods without any coherence, pointing to other forcings like volcanoes and greenhouse gases and their corresponding feedbacks. The newly derived records have the potential to improve our understanding of the solar dynamics and to quantify the solar influence on climate.

  2. Towards the assimilation of tree-ring-width records using ensemble Kalman filtering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Walter; Reich, Sebastian; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of the Vaganov-Shashkin-Lite (VSL) forward model for tree-ring-width chronologies as observation operator within a proxy data assimilation (DA) setting. Based on the principle of limiting factors, VSL combines temperature and moisture time series in a nonlinear fashion to obtain simulated TRW chronologies. When used as observation operator, this modelling approach implies three compounding, challenging features: (1) time averaging, (2) "switching recording" of 2 variables and (3) bounded response windows leading to "thresholded response". We generate pseudo-TRW observations from a chaotic 2-scale dynamical system, used as a cartoon of the atmosphere-land system, and attempt to assimilate them via ensemble Kalman filtering techniques. Results within our simplified setting reveal that VSL's nonlinearities may lead to considerable loss of assimilation skill, as compared to the utilization of a time-averaged (TA) linear observation operator. In order to understand this undesired effect, we embed VSL's formulation into the framework of fuzzy logic (FL) theory, which thereby exposes multiple representations of the principle of limiting factors. DA experiments employing three alternative growth rate functions disclose a strong link between the lack of smoothness of the growth rate function and the loss of optimality in the estimate of the TA state. Accordingly, VSL's performance as observation operator can be enhanced by resorting to smoother FL representations of the principle of limiting factors. This finding fosters new interpretations of tree-ring-growth limitation processes.

  3. Multicentury Reconstruction of Precipitations (1300-2014) in Eastern Canada from Tree-Ring Width and Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Claudie; Boucher, Étienne; Bergeron, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Tree ring series enabling long hydroclimatic reconstructions are scarce in Northeastern America, mostly because most boreal species are rather thermo-dependant. Here we propose a new multi-proxy analysis (tree-ring, δ13C and δ18O) from one of the oldest Thuja occidentalis population in NE America (lake Duparquet, Quebec). These rare precipitation-sensitive, long-living trees (> 800 years) grow on xeric rocky shores and their potential for paleo-hydroclimatic reconstructions (based on ring widths solely) was previously assessed. The objectives of this study are twofold i) to strengthen the hydroclimatic signal of this long tree-ring chronology by adding analysis of stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ18O) and ii) to reconstruct summer precipitation back to 1300 AD, which will represent, by far, the longest high-resolution hydroclimatic reconstruction in this region. A tree-ring chronology was constructed from 61 trees sampled in standing position. Eleven trees were also sampled to produce pooled carbon and oxygen isotope chronologies (annually resolved) with a replication of five to six trees per year. Signal analysis (correlation between climatic data and proxy values) confirms that growth is positively influenced by spring precipitations (May-June), while δ13C is negatively correlated to summer precipitation (June to August) and positively to June temperature. Adding δ18O analysis will strengthen the signal even more, since wood cellulose should be enriched in δ18O when high evapotranspiration conditions prevail. Based on a multi-proxy approach, a summer precipitation reconstruction was developed and compared to other temperature reconstructions from this region as well as to southernmost hydroclimatic reconstructions (e.g. Cook et al). A preliminary analysis of external and internal forcing is proposed in conclusion.

  4. Three centuries of Myanmar monsoon climate variability inferred from teak tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Palmer, Jonathan; Ummenhofer, Caroline C.; Kyaw, Nyi Nyi; Krusic, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Asian monsoon extremes critically impact much of the globe’s population. Key gaps in our understanding of monsoon climate remain due to sparse coverage of paleoclimatic information, despite intensified recent efforts. Here we describe a ring width chronology of teak, one of the first high-resolution proxy records for the nation of Myanmar. Based on 29 samples from 20 living trees and spanning from 1613-2009, this record, from the Maingtha forest reserve north of Mandalay, helps fill a substantial gap in spatial coverage of paleoclimatic records for monsoon Asia. Teak growth is positively correlated with rainfall and Palmer Drought Severity Index variability over Myanmar, during and prior to the May-September monsoon season (e.g., r = 0.38 with Yangon rainfall, 0.001, n 68). Importantly, this record also correlates significantly with larger-scale climate indices, including core Indian rainfall (23°N, 76°E a particularly sensitive index of the monsoon), and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The teak ring width value following the so-called 1997-98 El Niño of the Century suggests that this was one of the most severe droughts in the past ˜300 years in Myanmar. Evidence for past dry conditions inferred for Myanmar is consistent with tree-ring records of decadal megadroughts developed for Thailand and Vietnam. These results confirm the climate signature related to monsoon rainfall in the Myanmar teak record and the considerable potential for future development of climate-sensitive chronologies from Myanmar and the broader region of monsoon Asia.

  5. Reconstruction of Ob River, Russia, discharge from ring widths of floodplain trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonov, Leonid I.; Meko, David M.; Panyushkina, Irina P.

    2016-12-01

    The Ob is the third largest Eurasian river supplying heat and freshwater to the Arctic Ocean. These inputs influence water salinity, ice coverage, ocean temperatures and ocean circulation, and ultimately the global climate system. Variability of Ob River flow on long time scales is poorly understood, however, because gaged flow records are short. Eleven tree-ring width chronologies of Pinus sibirica and Larix sibirica are developed from the floodplain of the Lower Ob River, analyzed for hydroclimatic signal and applied as predictors in a regression model to reconstruct 8-month average (December-July) discharge of the Ob River at Salekhard over the interval 1705-2012 (308 yrs). Correlation analysis suggests the signal for discharge comes through air temperature: high discharge and floodplain water levels favor cool growing-season air temperature, which limits tree growth for the sampled species at these high latitudes. The reconstruction model (R2 = 0.31, 1937-2009 calibration period) is strongly supported by cross-validation and analysis of residuals. Correlation of observed with reconstructed discharge improves with smoothing. The long-term reconstruction correlates significantly with a previous Ob River reconstruction from ring widths of trees outside the Ob River floodplain and extends that record by another century. Results suggest that large multi-decadal swings in discharge have occurred at irregular intervals, that variations in the 20th and 21st centuries have been within the envelope of natural variability of the past 3 centuries, and that discharge data for 1937-2009 underestimate both the variability and persistence of discharge in the last 3 centuries. The reconstruction gives ecologists, climatologists and water resource planners a long-term context for assessment of climate change impacts.

  6. Assimilation of pseudo-tree-ring-width observations into an atmospheric general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Walter; Fallah, Bijan; Reich, Sebastian; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    Paleoclimate data assimilation (DA) is a promising technique to systematically combine the information from climate model simulations and proxy records. Here, we investigate the assimilation of tree-ring-width (TRW) chronologies into an atmospheric global climate model using ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) techniques and a process-based tree-growth forward model as an observation operator. Our results, within a perfect-model experiment setting, indicate that the "online DA" approach did not outperform the "off-line" one, despite its considerable additional implementation complexity. On the other hand, it was observed that the nonlinear response of tree growth to surface temperature and soil moisture does deteriorate the operation of the time-averaged EnKF methodology. Moreover, for the first time we show that this skill loss appears significantly sensitive to the structure of the growth rate function, used to represent the principle of limiting factors (PLF) within the forward model. In general, our experiments showed that the error reduction achieved by assimilating pseudo-TRW chronologies is modulated by the magnitude of the yearly internal variability in the model. This result might help the dendrochronology community to optimize their sampling efforts.

  7. Identification of Cherry green ring mottle virus on Sweet Cherry Trees in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Sook Cho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 2012 growing season, 154 leaf samples were collected from sweet cherry trees in Hwaseong, Pyeongtaek, Gyeongju, Kimcheon, Daegu, Yeongju and Eumseong and tested for the presence of Cherry green ring mottle virus (CGRMV. PCR products of the expected size (807 bp were obtained from 6 samples. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequences of the clones showed over 88% identities to published coat protein sequences of CGRMV isolates in the GenBank database. The sequences of CGRMV isolates, CGR-KO 1−6 shared 98.8 to 99.8% nucleotide and 99.6 to 100% amino acid similarities. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Korean CGRMV isolates belong to the group II of CGRMV coat protein genes. The CGRMV infected sweet cherry trees were also tested for Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV, Apple mosaic virus (ApMV, Cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus (CNRMV, Cherry mottle leaf virus (CMLV, Cherry rasp leaf virus (CRLV, Cherry leafroll virus (CLRV, Cherry virus A (CVA, Little cherry virus 1 (LChV1, Prune dwarf virus (PDV and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV by RT-PCR. All of the tested trees were also infected with ACLSV.

  8. PIXE and RBS elemental analyses of tree rings from Mexico Basin forests as a record of pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J.; Calva-Vásquez, G.; Solís, C.; Huerta, L.

    2003-08-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PÏXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) elemental analyses of tree rings and soils from forests around the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) were performed. The aim was to estimate the impact of pollution on the forests. Cores from Pinus montezumae and Abies religiosa trees, in four forests around the MCMA (Desierto de los Leones, Iztapopocatépetl, Villa del Carbón and Zoquiapan) and a reference site (El Chico). Differences were observed in samples from the different forests, showing higher values in the areas closest to the MCMA. A correlation of several elements with ring width was found using cluster analysis. Additionally, soil analyses from different depths in the forests were carried out, trying to relate the elemental concentrations measured in the tree rings with cation mobility. In this case, samples taken in 1993 and 1999 were analyzed, showing elemental mobility to the various depths.

  9. Distribution of Mercury Concentrations in Tree Rings and Surface Soils Adjacent to a Phosphate Fertilizer Plant in Southern Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Raae; Ahn, Young Sang

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine mercury concentrations in tree rings and surface soils at distances of 4, 26 and 40 km from a fertilizer plant located in Yeosu City, Korea. Mercury concentrations in all tree rings were low prior to the establishment of the plant in 1977 and became elevated thereafter. The highest average mercury concentration in the tree rings was 11.96 ng g(-1) at the Yeosu site located nearest to the plant, with the lowest average mercury concentration of 4.45 ng g(-1) at the Suncheon site furthest away from the plant. In addition, the highest mercury content in the surface soil was 108.51 ng cm(-3) at the Yeosu site, whereas the lowest mercury content in the surface soil was 31.47 ng cm(-3) at the Suncheon site. The mercury levels decreased gradually with increasing distance from the plant.

  10. Dating of dipterocarp tree rings: establishing a record of carbon cycling and climatic change in the tropics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Robertson, I

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available (2004) 19(7) 657–664 Copyright � 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI: 10.1002/jqs.885 The dating of dipterocarp tree rings: establishing a record of carbon cycling and climatic change... demonstrates that palaeoenvironmental information can be obtained from trees growing in aseasonal environ- ments, where climatic conditions prevent the formation of well-defined annual rings. Copyright � 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: dipterocarp...

  11. Tree-ring growth and hydro-climatic variability in temperate dendrochronologies of northern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Návar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This report addresses the following questions: a is the diameter growth described by the standard ring width anomaly (SRWA of Psudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco trees related to precipitation (P, pan evaporation (E, evapotranspiration (Et, runoff (Q, and soil moisture content (q derived from a water balance model?; b is the SRWA associated with synoptic climate events such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO, and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO?, and c are P, Et and q related to ENSO, PDO and AMO events? The SRWA for three dendrochronologies (Las Bayas and Banderas in Durango and El Gato in Zacatecas from 1665 to 2001 addressed these questions. Instrumental measurements of P and E (1947-2007 and, using parameterized sub-models for the rainfall interception of Gash model (I and Et, a mass balance approach evaluated Q and q for a forest site near El Salto, Durango, Mexico. SRWA oscillations of several timescales had spectral peaks every 2-3; 3-7; and 9-12 years. The ENSO indices explained most of the total SRWA variation for all three chronologies (1990-2001. For the short (1990-2001 and middle-term (1945-2001 seasonal data, the SRWA variability was only linked to q. The strength of the relationship weakened as the length of the time series increased, indicating that other variables control tree growth as well. The ENSO takes, on average, 4 to 8 months to display its effect on the hydrological variables and diameter growth in northern P. mensiezii trees of Mexico, making tree growth predictable.

  12. 14C AMS measurements in tree rings to estimate local fossil CO 2 in Bosco Fontana forest (Mantova, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capano, Manuela; Marzaioli, Fabio; Sirignano, Carmina; Altieri, Simona; Lubritto, Carmine; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon concentration in atmosphere changes overtime due to anthropogenic and natural factors. Species growth preserves the local atmospheric radiocarbon signature over their life span in the annual tree rings and make it possible to use tree rings for the monitoring of changes in fossil-fuel emissions due to an increase of traffic exhaust, during the last decades. In this paper, the CIRCE AMS system has been used to measure the 14C concentration in tree rings of plants grown near an industrial area and a very busy State Road, in a forest in north Italy. Preliminary results related to tree rings of several years of plants respectively near and far the emitting sources are displayed, in order to estimate the local pollution effect. It is possible to find a dilution in years 2000 and 2006 in both the trees analysed, but not enough data have been analysed yet in order to distinguish the fossil dilution derived from the street vehicular traffic or that from the industries.

  13. Differential response of two Pinus spp. to avian nitrogen input as revealed by nitrogen isotope analysis for tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizota, Chitoshi; Lopez Caceres, Maximo Larry; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Nobori, Yoshihiro

    2011-03-01

    Temporal variations in N concentration and δ(15)N value of annual tree rings (1 year of time resolution) of two Japanese Black Pine (Pinus thunbergii) and three Japanese Red Pine (Pinus densiflora) trees under current breeding activity of the Great Cormorant (Pharacrocorax carbo) and the Black-tailed Gull (Larus crassirostris), respectively, in central and northeastern Japan were studied. Both species from control sites where no avian input occurs show negative values (δ(15)N = around -4 ‰ to -2 ‰) which are common among higher plants growing under high rainfall regimes. The δ(15)N values of P. densiflora show uniformly positive values several years before and after the breeding event, indicating N translocation that moved the absorbed N of a given growth year to tree rings of the previous year while a clear historical value of soil N dynamics was kept intact in the annual rings of P. thunbergii. Long-term N trends inferred from tree rings must take into account tree species with limited translocation rates that can retain actual N annual acquisition.

  14. Mediterranean drought fluctuation during the last 500 years based on tree-ring data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicault, A. [CEREGE, UMR 6635 CNRS/Universite Paul Cezanne, Aix-en-Provence (France); I.N.R.S., Centre ETE, Quebec, QC (Canada); Alleaume, S. [Cemagref, Aix en Provence (Germany); Brewer, S.; Guiot, J. [CEREGE, UMR 6635 CNRS/Universite Paul Cezanne, Aix-en-Provence (France); Carrer, M. [Universita degli Studi di Padova, Dipt. TeSAF - Treeline Ecology Research Unit - Agripolis, Legnaro (Italy); Nola, P. [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Dipt. Ecologia del Territorio, Pavia (Italy)

    2008-08-15

    A 2.5 x 2.5 gridded summer (April-September) drought reconstruction over the larger Mediterranean land area (32.5 /47.5 N, 10 W/50 E; 152 grid points) is described, based on a network of 165 tree-ring series. The drought index used is the self-calibrated Palmer Drought Severity Index, and the period considered is 1500-2000. The reconstruction technique combines an analogue technique for the estimation of missing tree-ring data with an artificial neural network for optimal non-linear calibration, including a bootstrap error assessment. Tests were carried out on the various sources of error in the reconstructions. Errors related to the temporal variations of the number of proxies were tested by comparing four reconstructions calibrated with four different sized regressor datasets, representing the decrease in the number of available proxies over time. Errors related to the heterogeneous spatial density of predictors were tested using pseudo-proxies, provided by the global climate model ECHO-G. Finally the errors related to the imperfect climate signal recorded by tree-ring series were tested by adding white noise to the pseudo-proxies. Reconstructions pass standard cross-validation tests. Nevertheless tests using pseudo-proxies show that the reconstructions are less good in areas where proxies are rare, but that the average reconstruction curve is robust. Finally, the noise added to proxies, which is by definition a high frequency component, has a major effect on the low frequency signal, but not on the medium frequencies. The comparison of the low frequency trends of our mean reconstruction and the GCM simulation indicates that the detrending method used is able to preserve the long-term variations of reconstructed PDSI. The results also highlight similar multi-decadal PDSI variations in the central and western parts of the Mediterranean basin and less clear low frequency changes in the east. The sixteenth and the first part of the seventeenth centuries are

  15. Isotope abundance ratios of sr in wine provenance determinations, in a tree-root activity study, and of pb in a pollution study on tree-rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, P; Hölzl, S; Todt, W; Matthies, D

    1997-07-01

    Abstract In this contribution, the various and fundamentally different uses and applications of isotope signatures (of both heavy and light elements) are discussed. Examples are given for the successful use of (87)Sr/(86)Sr in uncovering fraud in wine trade. Also, in an experiment related to "Waldsterben", (87)Sr/(86)Sr analyses reveal rather unexpected responses of spruces and maple-trees to mechanical damage of their roots. In another study, from (206)Pb/(207)Pb (and (208)Pb/(207)Pb) analyses of tree growth-rings it is demonstrated that they do not accurately record lead burdens in the environment. This is contrary to current views on the subject of tree-rings as reliable banks of past heavy metal pollutions of the biosphere. Furthermore, new perspectives of applications of isotopes in biological tissues, including those of cosmogenic and nucleogenic origin will be shortly outlined.

  16. Sensitivity of tree ring growth to local and large-scale climate variability in a region of Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas-González, Alejandro; Chagas, Matheus Peres; Anholetto Júnior, Claudio Roberto; Alvares, Clayton Alcarde; Roig, Fidel Alejandro; Tomazello Filho, Mario

    2016-01-01

    We explored the relationship between tree growth in two tropical species and local and large-scale climate variability in Southeastern Brazil. Tree ring width chronologies of Tectona grandis (teak) and Pinus caribaea (Caribbean pine) trees were compared with local (Water Requirement Satisfaction Index—WRSI, Standardized Precipitation Index—SPI, and Palmer Drought Severity Index—PDSI) and large-scale climate indices that analyze the equatorial pacific sea surface temperature (Trans-Niño Index-TNI and Niño-3.4-N3.4) and atmospheric circulation variations in the Southern Hemisphere (Antarctic Oscillation-AAO). Teak trees showed positive correlation with three indices in the current summer and fall. A significant correlation between WRSI index and Caribbean pine was observed in the dry season preceding tree ring formation. The influence of large-scale climate patterns was observed only for TNI and AAO, where there was a radial growth reduction in months preceding the growing season with positive values of the TNI in teak trees and radial growth increase (decrease) during December (March) to February (May) of the previous (current) growing season with positive phase of the AAO in teak (Caribbean pine) trees. The development of a new dendroclimatological study in Southeastern Brazil sheds light to local and large-scale climate influence on tree growth in recent decades, contributing in future climate change studies.

  17. How to make a tree ring: Coupling stem water flow and cambial activity in mature Alpine conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Richard L.; Frank, David C.; Treydte, Kerstin; Steppe, Kathy; Kahmen, Ansgar; Fonti, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Inter-annual tree-ring measurements are used to understand tree-growth responses to climatic variability and reconstruct past climate conditions. In parallel, mechanistic models use experimentally defined plant-atmosphere interactions to explain past growth responses and predict future environmental impact on forest productivity. Yet, substantial inconsistencies within mechanistic model ensembles and mismatches with empirical data indicate that significant progress is still needed to understand the processes occurring at an intra-annual resolution that drive annual growth. However, challenges arise due to i) few datasets describing climatic responses of high-resolution physiological processes over longer time-scales, ii) uncertainties on the main mechanistic process limiting radial stem growth and iii) complex interactions between multiple environmental factors which obscure detection of the main stem growth driver, generating a gap between our understanding of intra- and inter-annual growth mechanisms. We attempt to bridge the gap between inter-annual tree-ring width and sub-daily radial stem-growth and provide a mechanistic perspective on how environmental conditions affect physiological processes that shape tree rings in conifers. We combine sub-hourly sap flow and point dendrometer measurements performed on mature Alpine conifers (Larix decidua) into an individual-based mechanistic tree-growth model to simulate sub-hourly cambial activity. The monitored trees are located along a high elevational transect in the Swiss Alps (Lötschental) to analyse the effect of increasing temperature. The model quantifies internal tree hydraulic pathways that regulate the turgidity within the cambial zone and induce cell enlargement for radial growth. The simulations are validated against intra-annual growth patterns derived from xylogenesis data and anatomical analyses. Our efforts advance the process-based understanding of how climate shapes the annual tree-ring structures

  18. Multi-decadal carbon and water relations of African tropical humid forests: a tree-ring stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufkens, Koen; Helle, Gerd; Beeckman, Hans; de Haulleville, Thales; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Boeckx, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the temporal dynamics of the carbon sequestering capacity and dynamics of African tropical humid forest ecosystems in response to various environmental drivers. This lack of knowledge is mainly due to the absence of ecosystem scale flux measurements of gas exchange. However, tree growth often displays itself as alternating pattern of visible rings due to the seasonally varying growth speed of the vascular cambium. Consequently, analysis of tree growth through tree-ring analysis provides us with insights into past responses of the carbon sequestering capacity of key species to abrupt ecosystem disturbances and, while slower, a changing climate. Not only does the width and density of growth rings reflect annual growth but their isotopic composition of 13C/12C and 18O/16O isotopes also reveal the environmental conditions in which the trees were growing. In particular, stable isotope ratios in tree-rings of carbon are influenced by fractionation through carboxylation during photosynthesis and changes in leaf stomatal conductance. Similarly, fractionation of oxygen isotopes of soil water occurs at the leaf level through evapo-transipiration. As a consequence, 18O/16O (δ18O) values in wood cores will reflect both the signal of the source water as well as that of for example summer humidity. Therefore, both C and O stable isotopes might not only be valuable as proxy data for past climatic conditions but they also serve as an important tool in understanding carbon and water relations within a tropical forest ecosystems. To this end we correlate long term climate records (1961 - present) with tree ring measurement of incremental growth and high resolution analysis of tree-core stable isotope composition(δ13C , δ18O) at a tropical humid forests in the DR Congo. The Yangambi Man And Biosphere (MAB) reserve is located in the north-eastern part of DR Congo, with a distinct tropical rainforest climate. In addition to the tree-core data records and

  19. [Dendroclimatic potentials for the tree rings of Huangshan pine (Pinus taiwanensis ) at Xiaolinhai in the western Dabie Mountains, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jian-Feng; Li, Guo-Dong; Li, Ling-Ling

    2014-07-01

    By using the dendrochronology research methods, this paper developed the 1915-2011 tree ring-width standard chronology of the Huangshan pine (Pinus taiwanesis) at the north slope of western Dabie Mountains in the junction of Hubei, Henan and Anhui provinces. High mean sensitivity (MS) indicated that there was conspicuous high-frequency climate signals and high first-order autocorrelation (AC) showed there were significant lag-effects of tree previous growth. The higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and expressed population signal (EPS) indicated that the trees had high levels of common climate signals. Correlations between the tree ring-width standard chronology and climatic factors (1959-2011) revealed the significant influences of temperature, precipitation and relative humidity on the tree width growth of Huangshan pine by the end of growing season (September and October). Significant positive correlations were found between the tree-ring indices and the Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) of current September and October. In conclusion, the combination of water and heat of September and October is the major effect factor for the growth of Huangshan pine in western Dabie Mountains.

  20. Tree-ring based reconstruction of rockfalls at Cofre de Perote volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Ramos, Osvaldo; Stoffel, Markus; Vázquez-Selem, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    In this study, dendrogeomorphic techniques are employed to analyse the temporal frequency and spatial distribution of rockfalls on a talus slope of La Teta valley, located on the NW slopes of Cofre de Perote volcano at 4000 m above sea level. Based on the interpretation of disturbance signals in growth rings of old-growth Pinus hartwegii Lindl. trees, we identify 100 growth disturbances related with rockfall events dated between 1780 and 2011, with slightly more than half of these events being dated to the last 50 years. The sectors most susceptible to rockfall correspond with the young rock lobes located at the foot of scarps. Roughly three in ten events has been triggered by regional, M > 6 earthquakes, whereas half of the events activity coincides with periods characterized by severe, prolonged summer rainfalls such as the ones occurred in 1995, 1998, 2005 and 2011.

  1. Variations of anthropogenic CO2 in urban area deduced by radiocarbon concentration in modern tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z; Nakamura, Toshio; Pazdur, Anna

    2008-10-01

    Radiocarbon concentration in the atmosphere is significantly lower in areas where man-made emissions of carbon dioxide occur. This phenomenon is known as Suess effect, and is caused by the contamination of clean air with non-radioactive carbon from fossil fuel combustion. The effect is more strongly observed in industrial and densely populated urban areas. Measurements of carbon isotope concentrations in a study area can be compared to those from areas of clear air in order to estimate the amount of carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel combustion by using a simple mathematical model. This can be calculated using the simple mathematical model. The result of the mathematical model followed in this study suggests that the use of annual rings of trees to obtain the secular variations of 14C concentration of atmospheric CO2 can be useful and efficient for environmental monitoring and modeling of the carbon distribution in local scale.

  2. Tree-ring 14C links seismic swarm to CO2 spike at Yellowstone, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William C.; Bergfeld, D.; McGeehin, J.P.; King, J.C.; Heasler, H.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms to explain swarms of shallow seismicity and inflation-deflation cycles at Yellowstone caldera (western United States) commonly invoke episodic escape of magma-derived brines or gases from the ductile zone, but no correlative changes in the surface efflux of magmatic constituents have ever been documented. Our analysis of individual growth rings in a tree core from the Mud Volcano thermal area within the caldera links a sharp ~25% drop in 14C to a local seismic swarm in 1978. The implied fivefold increase in CO2 emissions clearly associates swarm seismicity with upflow of magma-derived fluid and shows that pulses of magmatic CO2 can rapidly traverse the 5-kmthick brittle zone, even through Yellowstone's enormous hydrothermal reservoir. The 1978 event predates annual deformation surveys, but recognized connections between subsequent seismic swarms and changes in deformation suggest that CO2 might drive both processes. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  3. A tree-ring based reconstruction of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation since 1567 A.D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, S.T.; Graumlich, L.J.; Betancourt, J.L.; Pederson, G.T.

    2004-01-01

    We present a tree-ring based reconstruction of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) which demonstrates that strong, low-frequency (60-100 yr) variability in basin-wide (0-70??N) sea surface temperatures (SSTs) has been a consistent feature of North Atlantic climate for the past five centuries. Intervention analysis of reconstructed AMO indicates that 20th century modes were similar to those in the preceding ???350 yr, and wavelet spectra show robust multidecadal oscillations throughout the reconstruction. Though the exact relationships between low-frequency SST modes, higher frequency (???7-25 yr) atmospheric modes (e.g., North Atlantic Oscillation/Arctic Oscillation), and terrestrial climates must still be resolved, our results confirm that the AMO should be considered in assessments of past and future Northern Hemisphere climates. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Tree ring growth by core sampling at the CONECOFOR Permanent Monitoring Plots. The deciduous oak (Quercus cerris L. type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara MANETTI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Radial growth analysis evaluates the ability of trees to grow under different site and environmental conditions, thus contributing to bio-ecological studies aimed at increasing understanding of forest stand evolution. Tree ring growth is analysed in five Permanent Monitoring Plots (PMPs dominated by Turkey oak (Quercus cerris L.. Common structural features of these PMPs are their origin (coppice forest and their current physiognomy as stored coppice and transitory crop. A dendroecological approach was used to analyse past radial stem growth, the influence of silvicultural background and stand age, as well as to compare the growth rhythm of stands in different site-indexes and environmental conditions. Tree coring was carried out at the time of the first inventory (winter 1996/97 by sampling 8 to 11 dominant and co-dominant trees representative of the upper storey in the buffer area of each PMP. The basic stem and crown growth variables were measured for each tree sampled and two cores collected at 1.30 m. Annual ring width was determined by the Tree Ring Measurement System SMIL3 and the data were elaborated by the ANAFUS software. Site mean curves and growth trend per social class in each stand were defined both by visual comparison and statistical analysis among individual tree series. The main results were as follows: i social differentiation becomes established earlier with better site indexes and higher tree densities; ii sensitivity to external disturbances is higher and more defined in the dominant class than in the co-dominant tree layer; iii competition cycles are clearly discernible and related to both stand density and site-index in young stands under natural evolution (stored coppices; iv when silvicultural interventions were performed in the past is quite visible readable in the stands under conversion into high forest (transitory crops; v the mean series per site are statistically related and common periods characterized by a

  5. Suwannee River flow variability 1550-2005 CE reconstructed from a multispecies tree-ring network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Grant L.; Maxwell, Justin T.; Larson, Evan; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; Henderson, Joseph; Huffman, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the long-term natural flow regime of rivers enables resource managers to more accurately model water level variability. Models for managing water resources are important in Florida where population increase is escalating demand on water resources and infrastructure. The Suwannee River is the second largest river system in Florida and the least impacted by anthropogenic disturbance. We used new and existing tree-ring chronologies from multiple species to reconstruct mean March-October discharge for the Suwannee River during the period 1550-2005 CE and place the short period of instrumental flows (since 1927 CE) into historical context. We used a nested principal components regression method to maximize the use of chronologies with varying time coverage in the network. Modeled streamflow estimates indicated that instrumental period flow conditions do not adequately capture the full range of Suwannee River flow variability beyond the observational period. Although extreme dry and wet events occurred in the gage record, pluvials and droughts that eclipse the intensity and duration of instrumental events occurred during the 16-19th centuries. The most prolonged and severe dry conditions during the past 450 years occurred during the 1560s CE. In this prolonged drought period mean flow was estimated at 17% of the mean instrumental period flow. Significant peaks in spectral density at 2-7, 10, 45, and 85-year periodicities indicated the important influence of coupled oceanic-atmospheric processes on Suwannee River streamflow over the past four centuries, though the strength of these periodicities varied over time. Future water planning based on current flow expectations could prove devastating to natural and human systems if a prolonged and severe drought mirroring the 16th and 18th century events occurred. Future work in the region will focus on updating existing tree-ring chronologies and developing new collections from moisture-sensitive sites to improve

  6. Central Vietnam climate over the past five centuries from cypress tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Brendan M.; Stahle, Daniel K.; Luu, Hong Truong; Wang, S.-Y. Simon; Nguyen, Tran Quoc Trung; Thomas, Philip; Le, Canh Nam; Ton, That Minh; Bui, The Hoang; Nguyen, Van Thiet

    2016-08-01

    We present the first crossdated tree ring record from central Vietnam, derived from the growth rings of the rare cypress Fokienia hodginsii from the mountains of Quang Nam Province near the Laos border. The Quang Nam Fokienia hodginsii time series (QNFH), based on the crossdated sequences of 71 increment core samples from 37 mature trees, is the third published dendrochronological record from this species. The record extends 667 years from AD 1347 to 2013 and exhibits a mean series intercorrelation of 0.526, similarly significant with the first two published Fokienia hodginsii records: 0.474 for Mu Cang Chai (MCFH) and 0.578 for Bidoup-Nui Ba National Park (BDFH) in the north and south of Vietnam, respectively. The Expressed Population Signal (EPS) for the QNFH record exceeds the generally accepted threshold of 0.85 back to AD 1567, but remains above 0.8 back to 1550. Similar to the MCFH and BDFH records, QNFH expresses statistically significant linkages to regional hydroclimate metrics and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Here we present a reconstruction of the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index for the month of April, averaged over a large region of Southeast Asia. As with prior studies we demonstrate that cool phase (La Niña) and warm phase (El Niño) events are linked to regional wet and dry conditions, respectively, with linkages to modulation of the surface water temperature over the adjacent sea to the east of Vietnam as well as the Indian Ocean. A late eighteenth century megadrought that is expressed widely across South and Southeast Asia, and notably from the MCFH and BDFH records described above, is not as pronounced in Central Vietnam and we explore the reasons why.

  7. Millennium-long summer temperature variations in the European Alps as reconstructed from tree rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Corona

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a reconstruction of the summer temperatures over the Greater Alpine Region (44.05°–47.41° N, 6.43°–13° E during the last millennium based on a network of 38 multi-centennial larch and stone pine chronologies. Tree ring series are standardized using an Adaptative Regional Growth Curve, which attempts to remove the age effect from the low frequency variations in the series. The proxies are calibrated using the June to August mean temperatures from the HISTALP high-elevation temperature time series spanning the 1818–2003. The method combines an analogue technique, which is able to extend the too short tree-ring series, an artificial neural network technique for an optimal non-linear calibration including a bootstrap technique for calculating error assessment on the reconstruction. About 50% of the temperature variance is reconstructed. Low-elevation instrumental data back to 1760 compared to their instrumental target data reveal divergence between (warmer early instrumental measurements and (colder proxy estimates. The proxy record indicates cool conditions, from the mid-11th century to the mid-12th century, related to the Oort solar minimum followed by a short Medieval Warm Period (1200–1420. The Little Ice Age (1420–1830 appears particularly cold between 1420 and 1820 with summers that are 0.8 °C cooler than the 1901–2000 period. The new record suggests that the persistency of the late 20th century warming trend is unprecedented. It also reveals significant similarities with other alpine reconstructions.

  8. Central Vietnam climate over the past five centuries from cypress tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Brendan M.; Stahle, Daniel K.; Luu, Hong Truong; Wang, S.-Y. Simon; Nguyen, Tran Quoc Trung; Thomas, Philip; Le, Canh Nam; Ton, That Minh; Bui, The Hoang; Nguyen, Van Thiet

    2017-06-01

    We present the first crossdated tree ring record from central Vietnam, derived from the growth rings of the rare cypress Fokienia hodginsii from the mountains of Quang Nam Province near the Laos border. The Quang Nam Fokienia hodginsii time series (QNFH), based on the crossdated sequences of 71 increment core samples from 37 mature trees, is the third published dendrochronological record from this species. The record extends 667 years from AD 1347 to 2013 and exhibits a mean series intercorrelation of 0.526, similarly significant with the first two published Fokienia hodginsii records: 0.474 for Mu Cang Chai (MCFH) and 0.578 for Bidoup-Nui Ba National Park (BDFH) in the north and south of Vietnam, respectively. The Expressed Population Signal (EPS) for the QNFH record exceeds the generally accepted threshold of 0.85 back to AD 1567, but remains above 0.8 back to 1550. Similar to the MCFH and BDFH records, QNFH expresses statistically significant linkages to regional hydroclimate metrics and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Here we present a reconstruction of the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index for the month of April, averaged over a large region of Southeast Asia. As with prior studies we demonstrate that cool phase (La Niña) and warm phase (El Niño) events are linked to regional wet and dry conditions, respectively, with linkages to modulation of the surface water temperature over the adjacent sea to the east of Vietnam as well as the Indian Ocean. A late eighteenth century megadrought that is expressed widely across South and Southeast Asia, and notably from the MCFH and BDFH records described above, is not as pronounced in Central Vietnam and we explore the reasons why.

  9. Millennium-long summer temperature variations in the European Alps as reconstructed from tree rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Corona

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a reconstruction of the summer temperatures over the Greater Alpine Region (44.05°–47.41° N, 6.43°–13° E during the last millennium based on a network of 36 multi-centennial larch and stone pine chronologies. Tree ring series are standardized using an Adaptative Regional Growth Curve, which attempts to remove the age effect from the low frequency variations in the series. The proxies are calibrated using the June to August mean temperatures from the HISTALP high-elevation temperature time series spanning the 1818–2003. The method combines an analogue technique, which is able to extend the too short tree-ring series, an artificial neural network technique for an optimal non-linear calibration including a bootstrap technique for calculating error assessment on the reconstruction. About 50% of the temperature variance is reconstructed. Low-elevation instrumental data back to 1760 compared to their instrumental target data reveal divergence between (warmer early instrumental measurements and (colder proxy estimates. The proxy record indicates cool conditions, from the mid-11th century to the mid-12th century, related to the Oort solar minimum followed by a short Medieval Warm Period (1200–1420. The Little Ice Age (1420–1830 appears particularly cold between 1420 and 1820 with summers are 0.8°C cooler than the 1901–2000 period. The new record suggests that the persistency of the late 20th century warming trend is unprecedented. It also reveals significant similarities with other alpine reconstructions.

  10. Bayesian Models for Streamflow and River Network Reconstruction using Tree Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, A.; Devineni, N.

    2016-12-01

    Water systems face non-stationary, dynamically shifting risks due to shifting societal conditions and systematic long-term variations in climate manifesting as quasi-periodic behavior on multi-decadal time scales. Water systems are thus vulnerable to long periods of wet or dry hydroclimatic conditions. Streamflow is a major component of water systems and a primary means by which water is transported to serve ecosystems' and human needs. Thus, our concern is in understanding streamflow variability. Climate variability and impacts on water resources are crucial factors affecting streamflow, and multi-scale variability increases risk to water sustainability and systems. Dam operations are necessary for collecting water brought by streamflow while maintaining downstream ecological health. Rules governing dam operations are based on streamflow records that are woefully short compared to periods of systematic variation present in the climatic factors driving streamflow variability and non-stationarity. We use hierarchical Bayesian regression methods in order to reconstruct paleo-streamflow records for dams within a basin using paleoclimate proxies (e.g. tree rings) to guide the reconstructions. The riverine flow network for the entire basin is subsequently modeled hierarchically using feeder stream and tributary flows. This is a starting point in analyzing streamflow variability and risks to water systems, and developing a scientifically-informed dynamic risk management framework for formulating dam operations and water policies to best hedge such risks. We will apply this work to the Missouri and Delaware River Basins (DRB). Preliminary results of streamflow reconstructions for eight dams in the upper DRB using standard Gaussian regression with regional tree ring chronologies give streamflow records that now span two to two and a half centuries, and modestly smoothed versions of these reconstructed flows indicate physically-justifiable trends in the time series.

  11. Tree-ring 14C and CO2 emissions at Mammoth Mountain and Yellowstone, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeld, D.; McGeehin, J. P.; King, J.; Heasler, H.; Evans, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    A large pulse of magmatic CO2 began venting through soils on the flanks of Mammoth Mountain CA within months of a local seismic swarm in 1989. Previous workers have shown that the CO2 efflux rate was large enough to kill ~0.5 km2 of forest and cause substantial depletion of 14C in the wood of surviving trees at the edges of the kill zones. CO2 efflux at Mammoth Mountain continues to be well-studied, in part because of the obvious link between the seismic swarm and the onset of outgassing. A somewhat similar event apparently occurred a decade previously in the Yellowstone caldera, where we see a record of 14C depletion of 10-25% in a tree at Cooking Hillside in the Mud Volcano area. The 14C levels in tree core data show that CO2 emissions began to increase during a local seismic swarm in 1978. A huge drop in 14C in the 1979 growth ring suggests that CO2 emissions increased about 5-fold over values earlier in the decade. The emissions spike persisted into 1980 but at greatly reduced levels. This event at Mud Volcano occurred in a thermal area long known to emit CO2 gas and was associated with a substantial increase in surface heating and steam emission, in contrast to the case of Mammoth Mountain. However, the two events share some important similarities: increased CO2 emissions began within months of the onset of shallow (emissions peaked within 1-2 years later, and peak emissions are estimated at ~1000 tonnes of CO2 per day. Seismicity in both cases was likely driven by CO2-rich hydrous fluids; intrusion of magma into the shallow crust seems unlikely, particularly at Yellowstone where the youngest intra-caldera lavas are 70 ka. These similarities imply that, while each event has unique attributes, both are more likely variants on a process that may be fairly common in areas of magmatism. Additional tree coring at Mammoth Mountain will allow a direct comparison between 14C depletion and annual CO2 flux surveys. Ongoing tree-core 14C studies at Yellowstone focus on

  12. Growth tree rings as bioindicator of environmental pollution employing SR-TXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Bruna Fernanda; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Medeiros, Jean Gabriel da Silva; Tomazello Filho, Mario [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]. E-mail: jeangm@esalq.usp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda Luiza Araujo Domingues [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    The present work has the aim to evaluate the use of tree ring as a bioindicator of the environmental pollution in urban and industrial areas. The sampling was made in a area located at the Forest Park, in the Bauru city, Sao Paulo state/Brazil. The area was contaminated by battery industries residues, which was interdicted by the Environmental Control Agency of the Sao Paulo State (CETESB), on March, 2002. Trees of Copaifera langsdorffi L. species were sampling in two different sites. The first one is near to the industry and other site 1700 m far. Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence technique (SR-TXRF) was employed to identify and quantify the metals of toxicological importance in the wood samples. The analysis was performed in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory using a white beam for excitation and a hyperpure germanium detector for X-ray detection. In wood samples Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As and Pb were determined. (author)

  13. Tree ring variability and climate response of Abies spectabilis along an elevation gradient in Mustang, Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharal, D.K.; Meilby, Henrik; Rayamajhi, S.;

    2014-01-01

    In mountainous areas including the Himalayas, tree lines are expected to advance to higher altitudes due to global climate change affecting the distribution and growth of plant species. This study aimed at identifying the tree ring variability of Abies spectabilis (D. Don) and its response...... to the climate along an elevation gradient in the high Himalayas of central Nepal. Tree core samples were collected from four sites in Mustang district. All sites were located in the same valley and exposed to similar weather conditions. Out of 232 samples collected from the sites, Titi lower (2700 m), Titi......-elevation sites the correlation between pre-monsoon precipitation and tree growth was positive, and for the month of May this was statistically significant (ptemperature (March-June) was negatively correlated with precipitation and with tree growth at all sites, and at the upper elevation...

  14. Evidence of solar activity and El Niño signals in tree rings of Araucaria araucana and A. angustifolia in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perone, A.; Lombardi, F.; Marchetti, M.; Tognetti, R.; Lasserre, B.

    2016-10-01

    Tree rings reveal climatic variations through years, but also the effect of solar activity in influencing the climate on a large scale. In order to investigate the role of solar cycles on climatic variability and to analyse their influences on tree growth, we focused on tree-ring chronologies of Araucaria angustifolia and Araucaria araucana in four study areas: Irati and Curitiba in Brazil, Caviahue in Chile, and Tolhuaca in Argentina. We obtained an average tree-ring chronology of 218, 117, 439, and 849 years for these areas, respectively. Particularly, the older chronologies also included the period of the Maunder and Dalton minima. To identify periodicities and trends observable in tree growth, the time series were analysed using spectral, wavelet and cross-wavelet techniques. Analysis based on the Multitaper method of annual growth rates identified 2 cycles with periodicities of 11 (Schwebe cycle) and 5.5 years (second harmonic of Schwebe cycle). In the Chilean and Argentinian sites, significant agreement between the time series of tree rings and the 11-year solar cycle was found during the periods of maximum solar activity. Results also showed oscillation with periods of 2-7 years, probably induced by local environmental variations, and possibly also related to the El-Niño events. Moreover, the Morlet complex wavelet analysis was applied to study the most relevant variability factors affecting tree-ring time series. Finally, we applied the cross-wavelet spectral analysis to evaluate the time lags between tree-ring and sunspot-number time series, as well as for the interaction between tree rings, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and temperature and precipitation. Trees sampled in Chile and Argentina showed more evident responses of fluctuations in tree-ring time series to the variations of short and long periodicities in comparison with the Brazilian ones. These results provided new evidence on the solar activity-climate pattern-tree ring connections over

  15. Extracting a common high frequency signal from Northern Quebec black spruce tree-rings with a Bayesian hierarchical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-J. Boreux

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available One basic premise of dendroclimatology is that tree rings can be viewed as climate proxies, i.e. rings are assumed to contain some hidden information about past climate. From a statistical perspective, this extraction problem can be understood as the search of a hidden variable which represents the common signal within a collection of tree-ring width series. Classical average-based techniques used in dendrochronology have been applied to estimate the mean behavior of this latent variable. Still, depending on tree species, regional factors and statistical methods, a precise quantification of uncertainties associated to the hidden variable distribution is difficult to assess. To model the error propagation throughout the extraction procedure, we propose and study a Bayesian hierarchical model that focuses on extracting an inter-annual high frequency signal. Our method is applied to black spruce (Picea mariana tree-rings recorded in Northern Quebec and compared to a classical average-based techniques used by dendrochronologists (Cook and Kairiukstis, 1992.

  16. Radiocarbon content in the annual tree rings during last 150 years and time variation of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Metskvarishvili, R. Y.; Tsereteli, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the high accuracy measurements of radiocarbon abundance in precisely dated tree rings in the interval 1800 to 1950 yrs are discussed. Radiocarbon content caused by solar activity is established. The temporal dependence of cosmic rays is constructed, by use of radio abundance data.

  17. Physiological responses to fertilization recorded in tree rings: isotopic lessons from a long-term fertilization trial - 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen fertilizer applications are common land-use management tools, but details on physiological responses to these applications are often lacking, particularly for long-term responses over decades of forest management. We used tree-ring growth patterns and stable isotopes to...

  18. Physiological responses to fertilization recorded in tree rings: Isotopic lessons from a long-term fertilization trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen fertilizer applications are common land use management tools, but details on physiological responses to these applications are often lacking, particularly for long-term responses over decades of forest management. We used tree ring growth patterns and stable isotopes to ...

  19. Sampling strategy and climatic implication of tree-ring cellulose oxygen isotopes of Hippophae tibetana and Abies georgei on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenxi; Zhu, Haifeng; Nakatsuka, Takeshi; Sano, Masaki; Li, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Liang, Eryuan; Guo, Zhengtang

    2017-05-01

    The tree-ring cellulose oxygen isotopes (δ18O) for four trees of Hippophae tibetana and four trees of Abies georgei growing in different locations around the terminal moraine in Xincuo from 1951 to 2010 were measured to explore its potential for reconstructing climatic variations in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. The mean and standard deviation of tree-ring δ18O at different heights do not have significant differences, and there are no significant differences in the mean and standard deviation of tree-ring δ18O between trees near the brook and trees at the top of moraine, indicating that we can collect samples for tree-ring δ18O analysis regardless of sampling heights and that the micro-environment does not affect tree-ring δ18O significantly. The mean inter-series correlations of cellulose δ18O for A. georgei/H. tibetana are 0.84/0.93, and the correlation between δ18O for A. georgei and H. tibetana is 0.92. The good coherence between inter-tree and inter-species cellulose δ18O demonstrates the possibility of using different species to develop a long chronology. Correlation analysis between tree-ring δ18O and climate parameters revealed that δ18O for A. georgei/H. tibetana had negative correlations (r = -0.62/r = -0.69) with relative humidity in July-August, and spatial correlation revealed that δ18O for A. georgei/H. tibetana reflected the regional Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (29°-32° N, 88°-98° E). In addition, tree-ring δ18O in Xincuo has a significant correlation with tree-ring δ18O in Bhutan. The results indicate that cellulose δ18O for A. georgei and H. tibetana in Xincuo is a good proxy for the regional hydroclimate.

  20. Tree-ring analysis and modeling approaches yield contrary response of circumboreal forest productivity to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Shunsuke; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Matsuura, Yojiro; Osawa, Akira; Sato, Hisashi; Fujinuma, Junichi; Maximov, Trofim

    2017-06-06

    Circumboreal forest ecosystems are exposed to a larger magnitude of warming in comparison with the global average, as a result of warming-induced environmental changes. However, it is not clear how tree growth in these ecosystems responds to these changes. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of forest productivity to climate change using ring width indices (RWI) from a tree-ring width dataset accessed from the International Tree-Ring Data Bank and gridded climate datasets from the Climate Research Unit. A negative relationship of RWI with summer temperature and recent reductions in RWI were typically observed in continental dry regions, such as inner Alaska and Canada, southern Europe, and the southern part of eastern Siberia. We then developed a multiple regression model with regional meteorological parameters to predict RWI, and then applied to these models to predict how tree growth will respond to twenty-first-century climate change (RCP8.5 scenario). The projections showed a spatial variation and future continuous reduction in tree growth in those continental dry regions. The spatial variation, however, could not be reproduced by a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM). The DGVM projected a generally positive trend in future tree growth all over the circumboreal region. These results indicate that DGVMs may overestimate future wood net primary productivity (NPP) in continental dry regions such as these; this seems to be common feature of current DGVMs. DGVMs should be able to express the negative effect of warming on tree growth, so that they simulate the observed recent reduction in tree growth in continental dry regions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Measurement of {sup 14}C time scale of the rings of a tree by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Hirotaka; Furukawa, Michiaki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Science; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Ikeda, Akiko; Nakamura, Toshio

    1996-12-01

    {sup 14}C time scale is different from a histrical data in order that it is calculated by assuming that the concentration of {sup 14}C in the sample has not been changed by age. The object of this work is to make clear the errors in measurement of {sup 14}C time scale of the ring of a tree known the tree age. The every year ring of a Hinoki in Kiso, 950 years old, was used as a sample. The most external ring is determined as 1923 years old on the basis of the dendrochronology. The rings after 1120 years were used as the samples. {alpha}-cellulose, the most stable component in the structural components of cell of tree, was prepared from each ring. About 8 mg of {alpha}-cellulose was reduced to graphite to be measured by the tandem thoron analytic meter. The results obtained showed that {sup 14}C time scale was older than that of the histrical data in the twelfth and thirteenth century, but it was more new than that of the histrical data from the late seventeenth to the middle of eighteenth century. The results were agreement with that of Stuiver and Pearson (1933). (S.Y.)

  2. Using Tree-Ring Width Data From 1000 Sites to Predict how American Forests Will Respond to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P.; Still, C. J.; Leavitt, S. W.; Fischer, D. T.

    2007-12-01

    Beginning in the early 1900s, tree-ring scientists began analyzing the relative widths of annual growth rings preserved in the cross-sections of trees. Over the years, many ring-width index chronologies, each representing a specific site and species, have been developed and analyzed to infer details regarding past climate, growth response to environmental fluctuation, fire activity, logging practices by past societies, and more. Of the many ring-width chronologies constructed, 1035 represent sites within the continental United States and have been published online within The International Tree-Ring Data Bank as of September 2007 (ITRDB, http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/treering.html). Approximately 85% of these sites are located west of the Mississippi River. Here we present results from a three-step study, using this large reserve of tree-growth data to determine how various tree species in various regions have responded to climate fluctuations in the past and how they can be expected to respond to future change. In the first step, we used linear regression to compare each time series of ring-width index values to a suite of local monthly climate variables that may influence tree growth, such as rainfall, temperature, and drought severity (PDSI). We identified the range of months (of a 24- month period) during which each climate parameter most strongly affects growth by comparing Pearson correlation coefficients. In the second step, we identified all sites where at least one climate parameter, during some rage of months, correlates significantly (95% confidence) with ring-width index values. For each of these sites, we constructed a growth model that uses each significantly correlating climate parameter as a growth predictor. In the third step, we applied the growth model to predict the next 100 years of growth response to a monthly climate forecast created by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research. This forecast (HadCM3 IS92a) assumes a business as

  3. Environment and paleoecology of a 12 ka mid-North American Younger Dryas forest chronicled in tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyushkina, Irina P.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Thompson, Todd A.; Schneider, Allan F.; Lange, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Until now, availability of wood from the Younger Dryas abrupt cooling event (YDE) in N. America ca. 12.9 to 11.6 ka has been insufficient to develop high-resolution chronologies for refining our understanding of YDE conditions. Here we present a multi-proxy tree-ring chronology (ring widths, “events” evidenced by microanatomy and macro features, stable isotopes) from a buried black spruce forest in the Great Lakes area (Liverpool East site), spanning 116 yr at ca. 12,000 cal yr BP. During this largely cold and wet period, the proxies convey a coherent and precise forest history including frost events, tilting, drowning and burial in estuarine sands as the Laurentide Ice Sheet deteriorated. In the middle of the period, a short mild interval appears to have launched the final and largest episode of tree recruitment. Ultimately the tops of the trees were sheared off after death, perhaps by wind-driven ice floes, culminating an interval of rising water and sediment deposition around the base of the trees. Although relative influences of the continental ice sheet and local effects from ancestral Lake Michigan are indeterminate, the tree-ring proxies provide important insight into environment and ecology of a N. American YDE boreal forest stand.

  4. Temporal changes in tree-ring nitrogen of Pinus thunbergii trees exposed to Black-tailed Gull (Larus crassirostris) breeding colonies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry, Lopez C.M., E-mail: larry@iwate-u.ac.jp [United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8550 (Japan); Chitoshi, Mizota [Faculty of Agriculture, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8550 (Japan); Toshiro, Yamanaka [Division of Earth Science, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 1-1, Naka 3-Chome, Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yoshihiro, Nobori [Faculty of Agriculture, Yamagata University, 1-23 Wakabamachi, Tsuruoka, Yamagata 997-8555 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} N concentration and isotope ratio on tree-rings can be an important tool to infer past N soil conditions where trees grow. {yields} Changes in avian population on established or new breeding grounds caused by natural or anthropogenic mechanism could be inferred from the analysis shown in this paper. {yields} The property of trees to retain N concentration and N isotope characteristics is found in Pinus thunbergii. The use of other trees for similar analysis have to be determined because other species (Pinus densiflora, for example) do not have this property. - Abstract: Natural abundances of {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N ratios (commonly designated by {delta}{sup 15}N notation) of annual rings from Pinus thunbergii trees were determined after transplantation from a nursery to breeding colonies of Black-tailed Gull (Larus crassirostris) in Miyagi and Aomori and a control site in Yamagata, in northeastern Japan. Tree-rings were collected in July/August/September, 2009. Transplanting was conducted in the year 2000 in the Miyagi site, whereas there is no information about transplanting data in the Aomori and Yamagata sites. Soils associated with piscivorous (fish eating) avian colonies receive large seasonal input of organic N in the form of feces. The organic N is microbiologically transformed into inorganic N in soils, from which P. thunbergii derives its N. The resulting NH{sub 4}{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -}N are characterized by distinctly heavy {delta}{sup 15}N ratios, due to coupled processes of mineralization, volatilization, nitrification and denitrification of feces. In general, total N concentration along with {delta}{sup 15}N values stored in the annual rings of P. thunbergii increased steadily after transplanting from the nursery to locations under continued avian N input. Tree-ring N content and isotopic ratios provided a reliable record of past annual available soil N caused by changes in the Black-tailed Gull population, and thus can

  5. Long term January–March and May–August temperature reconstructions from tree-ring records from Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Levanič

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the first spring and summer temperature reconstruction for the north-western part of the Balkan Peninsula. The reconstruction is based on tree-ring width measurements from 7 representative black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold sites in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH. We found a significant, positive influence of above-average January–March temperatures on 4 sites (Blace, Peručica, Šator, Konjuh and a negative influence of above-average May–August temperatures and a positive relationship with an above-average sum of May–August precipitation on tree-ring width formation from 3 sites (Krivaja, Prusac, Šipovo. A 31-yr running correlation between temperature and precipitation of the May–August period and tree-ring indices gave a stable relationship between 1901 and the 1960s, after which values of correlation coefficients decrease to the level of significance. A change in summer cyclones in the central part of the Adriatic Sea is presented as a possible cause of the divergence with the climate signal. In the period of calibration and verification of the linear model for the group of 3 sites (Krivaja, Prusac, Šipovo, the best relationship was found between tree-ring indices and mean May–August temperatures of the current year. For the group of 4 sites (Blace, Peručica, Šator, Konjuh, the relationship between tree-ring indices and mean January–March temperatures of the current year is the strongest. The developed models were used for reconstruction of May–August temperatures for BiH for the period 1701–1901 and January–March temperatures for the period 1685–1901. Using the method of percentiles (85th and 15th we identified extreme hot/cool summers and warm/cold springs and compared them to available documentary historical sources and other reconstructions from the broader region.

  6. Quantitative Reconstruction of Sulfur Deposition Using a Mixing Model Based on Sulfur Isotope Ratios in Tree Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takuya; Tayasu, Ichiro; Takenaka, Chisato

    2015-11-01

    Quantification of sulfur (S) deposition is critical to deciphering the environmental archive of S in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we propose a mixing model that quantifies S deposition based on the S isotope ratio (δS) in tree rings. We collected samples from Japanese cedar ( D. Don) stumps from two sites: one near Yokkaichi City (YOK), which is well known for having the heaviest S air pollution in the world, and one at Inabu-cho (INA) in central Japan, which has been much less affected by air pollution. The δS profiles at both sites are consistent with S air pollution and contributions of anthropogenic S. The minimum value in YOK is lower than the δS values of anthropogenic S or any other possible source. Because the δS in the tree rings is affected by fractionation in the forest ecosystems, we used a mixing model to account for the isotope effects and to distinguish the sources of S. Based on the model results, we infer that the peak of S emissions at YOK occurred sometime between the late 1960s and early 1970s (489 mmol m yr). This estimated value is comparable with the highest reported values in Europe. This is the first quantitative estimate of anthropogenic input of S in forest systems based on δS in tree rings. Our results suggest that tree ring data can be used when monitoring stations of atmospheric S are lacking and that estimates of S deposition using δS in tree rings will advance our understanding of the local-scale S dynamics and the effect of human activities on it.

  7. Calibration curve from AD 1250 to AD 1650 by measurements of tree-rings grown on the Korean peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wan, E-mail: whong@kigam.re.kr [Geologic Environment Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.H. [Geologic Environment Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, W.K. [Tree-Ring Material Bank, Chungbuk National University, 52 Naesoodong-Ro, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, K.S.; Lee, K.H.; Park, G.; Kim, Y.E.; Kim, J.K.; Choi, H.W.; Kim, G.D.; Woo, H.J. [Geologic Environment Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nam, T.G. [Tree-Ring Material Bank, Chungbuk National University, 52 Naesoodong-Ro, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    A 1 MV AMS machine installed at Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) in 2007 has been dedicated to study on paleoclimate change and the environmental issues. Because the possibility of regional age offset has been suggested by several previous studies, the consistency of the data set of IntCal04, which is used to calibrate radiocarbon ages in our laboratory, with data obtained from {sup 14}C in tree rings grown in the Korean peninsula has been examined in this study. Tree-ring samples were collected from the building materials of Korean historical wooden buildings. Remaining historical records regarding the construction times of the buildings were consulted. The ages of the tree-ring samples ranged from AD 1250 to AD 1650 and were measured by dendrochronological method. After the samples were cut into single-year rings, alpha cellulose was extracted from each ring. Then, their annual {sup 14}C concentrations were measured by AMS. Accurate radiocarbon ages during the 400 year period were evaluated from the concentrations. The ages of the tree rings were compared with the IntCal04 calibration curve. The average deviation of {sup 14}C concentration was calculated to be -2.14 Per-Mille-Sign . By the Fourier transform of the single-year variation of the concentration, six major periodic components could be found. One of the components has a period of 10.9 years and it is thought to be related to a sunspot variation known as the Schwabe cycle, which has a period of 11 years.

  8. TIMING OF FALSE RING FORMATION IN PINUS HALEPENSIS AND ARBUTUS UNEDO IN SOUTHERN ITALY: OUTLOOK FROM AN ANALYSIS OF XYLOGENESIS AND TREE-RING CHRONOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eDe Micco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean tree rings are characterized by Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations (IADFs due to partly climate-driven cambial activity. IADFs are used as structural signals to gain information on relations between environmental conditions and eco-physiological processes during xylogenesis, with intra-annual resolution.To reach an unbiased synchronization of the IADF position within tree rings and seasonal fluctuations in environmental conditions, it is necessary to know the timing of cambial activity and wood formation, which are species- and site-specific processes.We applied the microcoring technique to analyze xylogenesis in Pinus halepensis and Arbutus unedo. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to study xylogenesis in a hardwood species forming frequent IADFs. Both species co-occur at a site in southern Italy characterized by a Mediterranean climate. To facilitate tree-ring dating and identification of IADFs, we performed traditional dendroecological analysis. We analyzed xylogenesis during summer, which is considered a constraint for xylogenesis and a trigger for IADF formation. We followed the different phases of cell development in the current wood increment with the aim of evaluating whether and which type of IADFs were formed. We additionally analyzed the same phases again in September and in winter to verify the possible formation of IADFs in fall and whether cell production and differentiation was completed by the end of the calendar year.Both species formed the same type of IADFs (earlywood-like cells within latewood, due to temporary growth restoration triggered by rain events during the period of summer drought. At the end of the calendar year, no cells in the phases of enlargement and secondary cell wall deposition occurred. A. unedo was more sensitive than P. halepensis because IADFs were formed earlier in the season and were more frequent in the tree-ring series.The dendro-anatomical approach, combining

  9. Historical changes in lead concentrations in tree-rings of sycamore, oak and Scots pine in north-west England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Shaun A; Hutchinson, Thomas C

    2002-07-01

    Lead concentrations in tree rings of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), oak (Quercus robur L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sampled at a parkland in north-west England were measured in wood formed since the mid-1800s. Concentrations of Pb in Scots pine and oak peaked in wood formed between 1900 and 1940, most likely because of Pb accumulation in heartwood, indicating that oak and Scots pine are unsuitable for monitoring temporal changes in Pb deposition at the study site. In contrast, Pb concentrations in sycamore, a species that has similar heartwood and sapwood chemistry, were relatively constant in wood formed between the mid-1800s and 1950. Lead concentrations decreased steadily in sycamore tree rings formed after the 1950s, and decreased more abruptly in wood formed after 1985. This sharp decrease in wood Pb cannot be due to decreases in soil Pb concentration. Stable Pb isotope analysis was used to further investigate Pb patterns in sycamore wood. Excess 206Pb/207Pb ratios in tree-rings of sycamore were relatively constant, approximately 1.17, in wood formed prior to the 1930s, but decreased steadily thereafter reaching a minimum value of approximately 1.16 in wood formed between 1975 and 1985 after which time 206Pb/207Pb ratios increased. This pattern is consistent with changes in Pb isotope ratios measured in peat, sediment and aerosol samples in the UK. However, the magnitude of the decrease in 206Pb/207Pb (largely due to gasoline Pb) is considerably lower than in other studies and our estimates indicate that less than 20% of the total Pb in sycamore wood measured since the mid-1800s is derived from gasoline emissions. A more likely explanation for the pattern of Pb observed in sycamore tree rings is that soil Pb accumulates within rings of the diffuse porous wood over a number of years. Such uptake patterns would result in lower Pb concentrations in the outer (more recently formed) tree rings, which coincide with recent reductions in Pb deposition

  10. Influence of wood density in tree-ring based annual productivity assessments and its errors in Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouriaud, O.; Teodosiu, M.; Kirdyanov, A. V.; Wirth, C.

    2015-04-01

    Estimations of tree annual biomass increments are used by a variety of studies related to forest productivity or carbon fluxes. Biomass increment estimations can be easily obtained from diameter surveys or historical diameter reconstructions based on tree rings records. However, the biomass models rely on the assumption of a constant wood density. Converting volume increment into biomass also requires assumptions on the wood density. Wood density has been largely reported to vary both in time and between trees. In Norway spruce, wood density is known to increase with decreasing ring width. This could lead to underestimating the biomass or carbon deposition in bad years. The variations between trees of wood density has never been discussed but could also contribute to deviations. A modelling approach could attenuate these effects but will also generate errors. Here were developed a model of wood density variations in Norway spruce, and an allometric model of volume growth. We accounted for variations in wood density both between years and between trees, based on specific measurements. We compared the effects of neglecting each variation source on the estimations of annual biomass increment. We also assessed the errors of the biomass increment predictions at tree level, and of the annual productivity at plot level. Our results showed a partial compensation of the decrease in ring width in bad years by the increase in wood density. The underestimation of the biomass increment in those years reached 15%. The errors related to the use of an allometric model of volume growth were modest, around ±15%. The errors related to variations in wood density were much larger, the biggest component being the inter-tree variability. The errors in plot-level annual biomass productivity reached up to 40%, with a full account of all the error sources.

  11. Influence of wood density in tree-ring-based annual productivity assessments and its errors in Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouriaud, O.; Teodosiu, M.; Kirdyanov, A. V.; Wirth, C.

    2015-10-01

    Estimations of tree annual biomass increments are used by a variety of studies related to forest productivity or carbon fluxes. Biomass increment estimations can be easily obtained from diameter surveys or historical diameter reconstructions based on tree rings' records. However, the biomass models rely on the assumption that wood density is constant. Converting volume increment into biomass also requires assumptions about the wood density. Wood density has been largely reported to vary both in time and between trees. In Norway spruce, wood density is known to increase with decreasing ring width. This could lead to underestimating the biomass or carbon deposition in bad years. The variations between trees of wood density have never been discussed but could also contribute to deviations. A modelling approach could attenuate these effects but will also generate errors. Here a model of wood density variations in Norway spruce, and an allometric model of volume growth were developed. We accounted for variations in wood density both between years and between trees, based on specific measurements. We compared the effects of neglecting each variation source on the estimations of annual biomass increment. We also assessed the errors of the biomass increment predictions at tree level, and of the annual productivity at plot level. Our results showed a partial compensation of the decrease in ring width in bad years by the increase in wood density. The underestimation of the biomass increment in those years reached 15 %. The errors related to the use of an allometric model of volume growth were modest, around ±15 %. The errors related to variations in wood density were much larger, the biggest component being the inter-tree variability. The errors in plot-level annual biomass productivity reached up to 40 %, with a full account of all the error sources.

  12. Looking for age-related growth decline in natural forests: unexpected biomass patterns from tree rings and simulated mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jane R.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Forest biomass growth is almost universally assumed to peak early in stand development, near canopy closure, after which it will plateau or decline. The chronosequence and plot remeasurement approaches used to establish the decline pattern suffer from limitations and coarse temporal detail. We combined annual tree ring measurements and mortality models to address two questions: first, how do assumptions about tree growth and mortality influence reconstructions of biomass growth? Second, under what circumstances does biomass production follow the model that peaks early, then declines? We integrated three stochastic mortality models with a census tree-ring data set from eight temperate forest types to reconstruct stand-level biomass increments (in Minnesota, USA). We compared growth patterns among mortality models, forest types and stands. Timing of peak biomass growth varied significantly among mortality models, peaking 20–30 years earlier when mortality was random with respect to tree growth and size, than when mortality favored slow-growing individuals. Random or u-shaped mortality (highest in small or large trees) produced peak growth 25–30 % higher than the surviving tree sample alone. Growth trends for even-aged, monospecific Pinus banksiana or Acer saccharum forests were similar to the early peak and decline expectation. However, we observed continually increasing biomass growth in older, low-productivity forests of Quercus rubra, Fraxinus nigra, and Thuja occidentalis. Tree-ring reconstructions estimated annual changes in live biomass growth and identified more diverse development patterns than previous methods. These detailed, long-term patterns of biomass development are crucial for detecting recent growth responses to global change and modeling future forest dynamics.

  13. Influence of wood density in tree-ring based annual productivity assessments and its errors in Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bouriaud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Estimations of tree annual biomass increments are used by a variety of studies related to forest productivity or carbon fluxes. Biomass increment estimations can be easily obtained from diameter surveys or historical diameter reconstructions based on tree rings records. However, the biomass models rely on the assumption of a constant wood density. Converting volume increment into biomass also requires assumptions on the wood density. Wood density has been largely reported to vary both in time and between trees. In Norway spruce, wood density is known to increase with decreasing ring width. This could lead to underestimating the biomass or carbon deposition in bad years. The variations between trees of wood density has never been discussed but could also contribute to deviations. A modelling approach could attenuate these effects but will also generate errors. Here were developed a model of wood density variations in Norway spruce, and an allometric model of volume growth. We accounted for variations in wood density both between years and between trees, based on specific measurements. We compared the effects of neglecting each variation source on the estimations of annual biomass increment. We also assessed the errors of the biomass increment predictions at tree level, and of the annual productivity at plot level. Our results showed a partial compensation of the decrease in ring width in bad years by the increase in wood density. The underestimation of the biomass increment in those years reached 15%. The errors related to the use of an allometric model of volume growth were modest, around ±15%. The errors related to variations in wood density were much larger, the biggest component being the inter-tree variability. The errors in plot-level annual biomass productivity reached up to 40%, with a full account of all the error sources.

  14. Looking for age-related growth decline in natural forests: unexpected biomass patterns from tree rings and simulated mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jane R; D'Amato, Anthony W; Bradford, John B

    2014-05-01

    Forest biomass growth is almost universally assumed to peak early in stand development, near canopy closure, after which it will plateau or decline. The chronosequence and plot remeasurement approaches used to establish the decline pattern suffer from limitations and coarse temporal detail. We combined annual tree ring measurements and mortality models to address two questions: first, how do assumptions about tree growth and mortality influence reconstructions of biomass growth? Second, under what circumstances does biomass production follow the model that peaks early, then declines? We integrated three stochastic mortality models with a census tree-ring data set from eight temperate forest types to reconstruct stand-level biomass increments (in Minnesota, USA). We compared growth patterns among mortality models, forest types and stands. Timing of peak biomass growth varied significantly among mortality models, peaking 20-30 years earlier when mortality was random with respect to tree growth and size, than when mortality favored slow-growing individuals. Random or u-shaped mortality (highest in small or large trees) produced peak growth 25-30% higher than the surviving tree sample alone. Growth trends for even-aged, monospecific Pinus banksiana or Acer saccharum forests were similar to the early peak and decline expectation. However, we observed continually increasing biomass growth in older, low-productivity forests of Quercus rubra, Fraxinus nigra, and Thuja occidentalis. Tree-ring reconstructions estimated annual changes in live biomass growth and identified more diverse development patterns than previous methods. These detailed, long-term patterns of biomass development are crucial for detecting recent growth responses to global change and modeling future forest dynamics.

  15. Annual tree rings in Piptadenia gonoacantha (Mart. J.F.Macbr. in a restoration experiment in the Atlantic Forest: potential for dendroecological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Fritz das Neves Brandes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The tree Piptadenia gonoachantha is widely used in forestry and in forest restoration projects, which require methods for evaluating tree growth. Long-term studies are necessary to determine patterns and detect changes in species growth rhythms. Tree ring analysis provides a precise method for determining age and documenting long-term growth trends in tropical tree species. The present study evaluated the periodicity of tree ring formation and radial growth dynamics of P. gonoachantha from a population of known age in the Poço das Antas Biological Reserve. Two radii from six trees were sampled using non-destructive methods. Tree rings were counted and measured to estimate age and to calculate diametric increment. All samples had 16 tree rings, which matched the known plantation age and confirmed the annual formation of rings. The individuals sampled had a mean annual diametric increment of 9.5 mm / year. Results showed a trend towards decreasing growth rate with increasing age. Individuals of P. gonoachantha in Ombrophilous Dense Forest produce annual tree rings, which holds potential for future dendroecological studies.

  16. Tree-ring δ13C and δ18O, leaf δ13C and wood and leaf N status demonstrate tree growth strategies and predict susceptibility to disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, S A; Boone, A S; Stephen, F M

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how tree growth strategies may influence tree susceptibility to disturbance is an important goal, especially given projected increases in diverse ecological disturbances this century. We use growth responses of tree rings to climate, relationships between tree-ring stable isotopic signatures of carbon (δ(13)C) and oxygen (δ(18)O), wood nitrogen concentration [N], and contemporary leaf [N] and δ(13)C values to assess potential historic drivers of tree photosynthesis in dying and apparently healthy co-occurring northern red oak (Quercus rubra L. (Fagaceae)) during a region-wide oak decline event in Arkansas, USA. Bole growth of both healthy and dying trees responded negatively to drought severity (Palmer Drought Severity Index) and temperature; healthy trees exhibited a positive, but small, response to growing season precipitation. Contrary to expectations, tree-ring δ(13)C did not increase with drought severity. A significantly positive relationship between tree-ring δ(13)C and δ(18)O was evident in dying trees (P trees. Healthy trees' wood exhibited lower [N] than that of dying trees throughout most of their lives (P trees between contemporary leaf δ(13)C and leaf N (by mass), but not in dying trees. Our work provides evidence that for plants in which strong relationships between δ(13)C and δ(18)O are not evident, δ(13)C may be governed by plant N status. The data further imply that historic photosynthesis in healthy trees was linked to N status and, perhaps, C sink strength to a greater extent than in dying trees, in which tree-ring stable isotopes suggest that historic photosynthesis was governed primarily by stomatal regulation. This, in turn, suggests that assessing the relative dominance of photosynthetic capacity vs stomatal regulation as drivers of trees' C accrual may be a feasible means of predicting tree responses to some disturbance events. Our work demonstrates that a dual isotope, tree-ring approach can be integrated with

  17. Multi-century lake area changes in the Southern Altiplano: a tree-ring-based reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M. S.; Carilla, J.; Grau, H. R.; Villalba, R.

    2015-09-01

    Size fluctuations in endorheic lakes in northwestern Argentina (NWA) and southwestern Bolivia (SWB) are very sensitive to basin hydrological balances, and consequently, very vulnerable to deleterious effects from climatic changes. The management of these water resources and their biodiversity requires a comprehensive knowledge of their natural variability over multiple timescales. In this study, we present a multi-century reconstruction of past lake-area fluctuations in NWA and SWB. The evidence used to develop and validate this reconstruction includes satellite images and a century-long tree-ring record from P. tarapacana. Inter-annual fluctuations in lake area of nine lakes were quantified based on Landsat satellite images over the period 1975 to 2009. A regional P. tarapacana tree-ring chronology, composite from two sampling sites, was used as predictors in a regression model to reconstruct the mean annual (January-December) lake area from the nine lakes. The reconstruction model captures 62 % of the total variance in lake-area fluctuations and shows adequate levels of cross-validation. This high-resolution reconstruction covers the past 601 years and characterizes the occurrence of annual to multi-decadal lake area fluctuations and its main oscillation modes of variability. Our reconstruction points out that the late 20th century decrease in lake area was exceptional over the period 1407-2007; a persistent negative trend in lake area is clear in the reconstruction and consistent with glacier retreat and other climate proxies from the Altiplano and the tropical Andes. Since the mid 1970s, the Vilama-Coruto lake system recorded an accelerated decrease in area consistent with an increasing recurrence of extremely small lake-area events. Throughout the 601 years, the reconstruction provides valuable information about spatial and temporal stabilities of the relationships between changes in lake area, ENSO, and PDO, highlighting the Pacific influence over most modes

  18. Precipitation changes in the South American Altiplano since 1300 AD reconstructed by tree-rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Morales

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the second half of the 20th century, the Central Andes has experienced significant climatic and environmental changes characterized by a persistent warming trend, an increase in elevation of the 0 °C isotherm, and sustained glacier shrinkage. These changes have occurred in conjunction with a steadily growing demand for water resources. Given the short span of instrumental hydroclimatic records in this region, longer time span records are needed to understand the nature of climate variability and to improve the predictability of precipitation, a key factor modulating the socio-economic development in the South American Altiplano and adjacent arid lowlands. In this study we present the first quasi-millennial, tree-ring based precipitation reconstruction for the South American Altiplano. This annual (November–October precipitation reconstruction is based on the Polylepis tarapacana tree-ring width series and represents the closest dendroclimatological record to the Equator in South America. This high-resolution reconstruction covers the past 707 yr and provides a unique record characterizing the occurrence of extreme events and consistent oscillations in precipitation. It also allows an assessment of the spatial and temporal stabilities of the teleconnections between rainfall in the Altiplano and hemispheric forcings such as El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Since the 1930s to present, a persistent negative trend in precipitation has been recorded in the reconstruction, with the three driest years since 1300 AD occurring in the last 70 yr. Throughout the 707 yr, the reconstruction contains a clear ENSO-like pattern at interannual to multidecadal time scales, which determines inter-hemispheric linkages between our reconstruction and other precipitation sensitive records modulated by ENSO in North America. Our reconstruction points out that century-scale dry periods are a recurrent feature in the Altiplano climate, and that the

  19. Megadroughts: The scary past told by tree rings and its implications for the future (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, E. R.

    2013-12-01

    Drought occurs over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, from local single-year events to continental-scale droughts lasting several years or even decades. Much of our understanding of severe multi-year droughts or megadroughts has been possible through the development and analysis of drought-sensitive tree-ring chronologies spanning the past several centuries to a thousand or more years. Individually, these chronologies have provided us with a new understanding of megadroughts at the local level. When many tree-ring chronologies distributed over large regions are used collectively to reconstruct gridded instrumental drought indices like the Palmer Drought Severity Indices (PDSI), it is possible to produce drought atlases (annual maps of reconstructed drought), which can be used to study the large-scale spatiotemporal variability of megadroughts. Drought atlases have been produced now for North American (the North American Drought Atlas - NADA), monsoon Asia (the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas - MADA), and Europe-North Africa-Middle East (the Old World Drought Atlas - OWDA). This covers most of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) land area. In every region, megadroughts of unprecedented duration - in some cases over 100 years long - have been identified prior to the 20th Century instrumental record and the frequency of megadroughts is greater during medieval and early post-medieval times approximately 600-1000 years ago, a period of generally warmer-than-average temperatures over large areas of the NH. Examples from the NADA, MADA, and OWDA, some associated with past cultural decline and collapse, illustrate the severe impacts that some of these megadroughts have had on humanity. These epochs of unprecedented aridity clearly predate the recent buildup of atmospheric greenhouse gases and, thus, must be viewed as a natural property of the climate system. This is a scary finding because it means that the climate system has the inherent capacity to slip into a more

  20. Precipitation changes in the South American Altiplano since 1300 AD reconstructed by tree-rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Morales

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During the second half of the 20th century, the Central Andes has experienced significant climatic and environmental changes characterized by a persistent warming trend, an increase in elevation of the 0 °C isotherm, and a sustained shrinkage of glaciers. These changes have occurred in conjunction with a steady growing demand for water resources. Given the short span of instrumental hidroclimatic records in this region, longer records are needed to understand the nature of climate variability and improve the predictability of precipitation, a key factor modulating the socio-economic development in the South American Altiplano and the adjacent arid lowlands. In this study we present the first quasi-millennial, tree-ring based precipitation reconstruction for the South American Altiplano. This annual (November–October precipitation reconstruction is based on Polylepis tarapacana tree-ring series and represents the closest dendroclimatological record to the Equator in South America. This high-resolution reconstruction covers the past 707 yr and provides a unique record to characterize the occurrence of extreme events and consistent oscillations in precipitation, as well as to check the spatial and temporal stabilities of the teleconnections between rainfall in the Altiplano and hemispheric forcings such as El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Since the 1930s up to present a persistent negative trend in precipitation is recorded in the reconstruction, with the three driest years since 1300 AD occurring in the last 70 yr. The reconstruction contains a clear ENSO-like pattern at interannual to multicentennial time scales which determines inter-hemispheric linkages between our reconstruction and other precipitation-sensitive records modulated by ENSO in North America. Our reconstruction points out that century-scale dry periods are a recurrent feature in the Altiplano climate, and that the potential coupling of natural and anthropogenic

  1. Tree ring effects and ice core acidities clarify the volcanic record of the first millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, M. G. L.; McAneney, J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 Plummer et al., in presenting the volcanic chronology of the Antarctic Law Dome ice core, chose to list connections to acid layers in other ice cores and also possible chronological coincidences between ice acid dates and the precise dates of frost damage, and/or reduced growth in North American bristlecone pines. We disagree with the chronological links indicated by Plummer et al. for the period before AD 700, and in this paper we show that a case can be made that better linkages between ice acid and tree ring effects occur for this period if the ice chronologies are systematically moved forward by around 7 years, consistent with a hypothesis published by Baillie in 2008. In the paper we seek to explore the proposition that frost damage rings in North American bristlecone pines are a very useful indicator of the dates of certain large explosive volcanic eruptions; the dating of major eruptions being critical for any clear understanding of volcanic forcing. This paper cannot prove that there is an error in the Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05), and in equivalent ice chronologies from the Antarctic, however, it does provide a coherent argument for an apparent ice dating offset. If the suggested offset were to prove correct it would be necessary to locate where the error occurs in the ice chronologies and in this regard the dating of the increasingly controversial Icelandic Eldgjá eruption in the AD 930s, and the China/Korean Millennium eruption which occurs some 7 years after Eldgjá, may well be critical. In addition, if the offset were to be substantiated it would have implications for the alleged identification of tephra at 429.3 m in the Greenland GRIP core, currently attributed to the Italian volcano Vesuvius and used as a critical zero error point in the GICC05 chronology.

  2. Tree-ring-based drought reconstruction in the Iberian Range (east of Spain) since 1694.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Ernesto; de Luis, Martín; Cuadrat, José María; Esper, Jan; Saz, Miguel Ángel

    2016-03-01

    Droughts are a recurrent phenomenon in the Mediterranean basin with negative consequences for society, economic activities, and natural systems. Nevertheless, the study of drought recurrence and severity in Spain has been limited so far due to the relatively short instrumental period. In this work, we present a reconstruction of the standardized precipitation index (SPI) for the Iberian Range. Growth variations and climatic signals within the network are assessed developing a correlation matrix and the data combined to a single chronology integrating 336 samples from 169 trees of five different pine species distributed throughout the province of Teruel. The new chronology, calibrated against regional instrumental climatic data, shows a high and stable correlation with the July SPI integrating moisture conditions over 12 months forming the basis for a 318-year drought reconstruction. The climate signal contained in this reconstruction is highly significant (p < 0.05) and spatially robust over the interior areas of Spain located above 1000 meters above sea level (masl). According to our SPI reconstruction, seven substantially dry and five wet periods are identified since the late seventeenth century considering ≥±1.76 standard deviations. Besides these, 36 drought and 28 pluvial years were identified. Some of these years, such as 1725, 1741, 1803, and 1879, are also revealed in other drought reconstructions in Romania and Turkey, suggesting that coherent larger-scale synoptic patterns drove these extreme deviations. Since regional drought deviations are also retained in historical documents, the tree-ring-based reconstruction presented here will allow us to cross-validate drought frequency and magnitude in a highly vulnerable region.

  3. Study of Z > 18 elements concentration in tree rings from surroundings forests of the Mexico Valley using external beam PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calva-Vázquez, G.; Razo-Angel, G.; Rodríguez-Fernández, L.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J. L.

    2006-08-01

    The concentration of elements with Z > 18 is measured in tree rings from forests at the surroundings of the Mexico Valley: El Chico National Park (ECP) and Desierto de los Leones National Park (DLP). The analysis was done by simultaneous PIXE-RBS using an external proton beam on tree rings of Pine and Sacred fir (species Pinus montezumae and Abies religiosa, respectively). This study provides information about the elemental concentration in trees of those parks during the years from 1965 to 2003. Typical elements such as K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr and Pb were detected using PIXE technique while the wood matrix composition (mainly C and O) was determined by RBS. In general, elemental contents present large variations but concentrations oscillate around the mean value during this period of time. Nevertheless, the measurements showed some trends for Fe and Zn in the tree-rings elemental composition that may be correlated to recent volcanic activities in the region. The low Mn contents indicate soil acidification in DLP from 1968 and the forest decline in ECP during the last 15 years.

  4. Study of Z > 18 elements concentration in tree rings from surroundings forests of the Mexico Valley using external beam PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calva-Vazquez, G. [Laboratorio de Contaminacion Atmosferica, FES Zaragoza, UNAM, Calzada I. Zaragoza esq., Av. Guelatao s/n, 09230 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Razo-Angel, G. [Laboratorio de Contaminacion Atmosferica, FES Zaragoza, UNAM, Calzada I. Zaragoza esq., Av. Guelatao s/n, 09230 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Rodriguez-Fernandez, L. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Ruvalcaba-Sil, J.L. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)]. E-mail: sil@fisica.unam.mx

    2006-08-15

    The concentration of elements with Z > 18 is measured in tree rings from forests at the surroundings of the Mexico Valley: El Chico National Park (ECP) and Desierto de los Leones National Park (DLP). The analysis was done by simultaneous PIXE-RBS using an external proton beam on tree rings of Pine and Sacred fir (species Pinus montezumae and Abies religiosa, respectively). This study provides information about the elemental concentration in trees of those parks during the years from 1965 to 2003. Typical elements such as K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr and Pb were detected using PIXE technique while the wood matrix composition (mainly C and O) was determined by RBS. In general, elemental contents present large variations but concentrations oscillate around the mean value during this period of time. Nevertheless, the measurements showed some trends for Fe and Zn in the tree-rings elemental composition that may be correlated to recent volcanic activities in the region. The low Mn contents indicate soil acidification in DLP from 1968 and the forest decline in ECP during the last 15 years.

  5. Long-term summer sunshine/moisture stress reconstruction from tree-ring widths from Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poljanšek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the first summer sunshine reconstruction from tree-ring data for the western part of the Balkan Peninsula. Summer sunshine is tightly connected with moisture stress in trees, because the moisture stress and therefore the width of annual tree-rings is under the influence of the direct and interactive effects of sunshine duration (temperature, precipitation, cloud cover and evapotranspiration. The reconstruction is based on a calibrated z-scored mean chronology, calculated from tree-ring width measurements from 7 representative black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold sites in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH. A combined regression and scaling approach was used for the reconstruction of the summer sunshine. We found a significant negative correlation (r = −0.54, p < 0.0001 with mean June–July sunshine hours from Osijek meteorological station (Croatia. The developed model was used for reconstruction of summer sunshine for the time period 1660–2010. We identified extreme summer events and compared them to available documentary historical sources of drought, volcanic eruptions and other reconstructions from the broader region. All extreme summers with low sunshine hours (1712, 1810, 1815, 1843, 1899 and 1966 are connected with volcanic eruptions.

  6. New star on the stage: amount of ray parenchyma in tree rings shows a link to climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olano, José Miguel; Arzac, Alberto; García-Cervigón, Ana I; von Arx, Georg; Rozas, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Tree-ring anatomy reflects the year-by-year impact of environmental factors on tree growth. Up to now, research in this field has mainly focused on the hydraulic architecture, with ray parenchyma neglected despite the growing recognition of its relevance for xylem function. Our aim was to address this gap by exploring the potential of the annual patterns of xylem parenchyma as a climate proxy. We constructed ring-width and ray-parenchyma chronologies from 1965 to 2004 for 20 Juniperus thurifera trees growing in a Mediterranean continental climate. Chronologies were related to climate records by means of correlation, multiple regression and partial correlation analyses. Ray parenchyma responded to climatic conditions at critical stages during the xylogenetic process; namely, at the end of the previous year's xylogenesis (October) and at the onset of earlywood (May) and latewood formation (August). Ray parenchyma-based chronologies have potential to complement ring-width chronologies as a tool for climate reconstructions. Furthermore, medium- and low-frequency signals in the variation of ray parenchyma may improve our understanding of how trees respond to environmental fluctuations and to global change.

  7. Plant phenological data and tree-rings as palaeoclimate indicators in south-west Finland since AD 1750.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Jari; Helama, Samuli; Timonen, Mauri

    2006-09-01

    Plant phenological data and tree-rings were tested for their palaeoclimatic value in south-west Finland since AD 1750. The information from fragmentary, partly overlapping, partly non-systematically biased plant phenological records of 14 different phenomena (a total of 3,144 observations) was combined into one continuous time series of phenological indices. All site- and phenomenon-specific series were standardized to present an average of zero and standard deviation of one. The mean phenomenon-specific series were then averaged as arithmetic means for annually resolved time series representing the variability in the particular plant phenomenon. Consequently, each phenomenon-specific mean series was based on spatially normalized site-specific index series. These series were compared to each other, living-tree and subfossil tree-rings, and to early and modern meteorological time series. Phenological indices showed strong positive correlation with February to June temperatures. On the other hand, the correlations between phenological indices and precipitation data were around zero. Analysis using time-dependent running correlations showed non-stationary relationship between the tree-rings and phenological indices and observed spring temperatures. The skill of phenological data for reconstructing the spring temperatures was statistically proved.

  8. Adjustment of the tree-ring response of Juniperus thurifera to climate in the Western Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varino, Filipa; DeSoto, Lucia; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Gouveia, Célia; Andrade, José; campelo, Filipe; Nabais, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    Juniperus thurifera L. is a long-lived conifer tree endemic to western Mediterranean region. It is well adapted to continental Mediterranean weather conditions such as negative winter temperatures or summer drought and is capable to maintain the photosynthetic activity all year round, making it a suitable species to study tree-ring sensitivity to climate change. In this work we have used tree-ring width data of J. thurifera trees from six stands located in northern Spain (Soria, Barrios de Luna and Desert of Monegros) and High Atlas in Morocco (Armd, Oukaimeden and Ourika) and correlated with climatic information (temperature and precipitation) from the Climate Research Unity (CRU) database. We have evaluated separately the growth patterns and climatic response of the populations from Spain and Morocco as they showed distinct seasonal dependence to temperature and precipitation. Afterwards, according to the length of both databases (ring-width and surface climate variables), we evaluated the role played by the climatic variables on the species growth pattern through time. We observed an increase of growth sensitivity to summer drought in Spain, whereas such sensitivity was not verify in Morocco"

  9. Tree Rings and Volcanic Eruptions: Reviewing the Potential of Dendrochemistry for the Absolute Dating of Past Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, C.; Manning, S. W.; Coleman, M.; Jarvis, K.

    2003-12-01

    Investigations of volcanic impact on human society and the environment are presently restrained by a lack of secure absolute dates for eruptions prior to the last few hundred years. The degree of impact and recovery, and the scope of any sociological repercussions, can only be fully explored if working from a precise, known, starting point and against a secure absolute timescale. A potential means to high resolution dating for the majority of the Holocene lies with globally available, absolutely dated tree ring chronologies. Many of these have been shown to record short term climatic alterations in periods following volcanic eruptions of known or approximate date. This argument however, has been based on an apparent correlation between the dates of specific tree ring growth anomalies and the dates of a number of eruptions in the recent historical period. The statistical correlation is less than decisive and the exact volcano-climate-tree growth linkage is by no means universally agreed. It has been suggested that a potential means to solve this problem and to attach absolute dates to volcanic eruptions via tree rings may lie in the chemistry of the annual woody increment. This paper assesses the potential of conventional Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) versus laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) in terms of exploring this research objective. It also reviews the prospects for a dendrochemical resolution to the problem of attributing an absolute date to the volcanic eruptions of prehistory.

  10. Evaluation of Whole Tree Growth Increment Derived from Tree-Ring Series for Use in Assessments of Changes in Forest Productivity across Various Spatial Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha M. Metsaranta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The inherent predictability of inter-annual variation in forest productivity remains unknown. Available field-based data sources for understanding this variability differ in their spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and typical units of measure. Nearly all other tree and forest characteristics are in practice derived from measurements of diameter at breast height (DBH. Therefore, diameter increment reconstructed annually from tree-ring data can be used to estimate annual growth increments of wood volume, but the accuracy and precision of these estimates requires assessment. Annual growth estimates for n = 170 trees sampled for whole stem analysis from five tree species (jack pine, lodgepole pine, black spruce, white spruce, and trembling aspen in Western Canada were compared against increments derived from breast height measurements only. Inter-annual variability of breast height and whole tree growth increments was highly correlated for most trees. Relative errors varied by species, diameter class, and the equation used to estimate volume (regional vs. national. A simple example of the possible effect of this error when propagated to the stand level is provided.

  11. The impact of tree age on biomass growth and carbon accumulation capacity: A retrospective analysis using tree ring data of three tropical tree species grown in natural forests of Suriname

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Prem R.

    2017-01-01

    The world’s forests play a pivotal role in the mitigation of global climate change. By photosynthesis they remove CO2 from the atmosphere and store carbon in their biomass. While old trees are generally acknowledged for a long carbon residence time, there is no consensus on their contribution to carbon accumulation due to a lack of long-term individual tree data. Tree ring analyses, which use anatomical differences in the annual formation of wood for dating growth zones, are a retrospective approach that provides growth patterns of individual trees over their entire lifetime. We developed time series of diameter growth and related annual carbon accumulation for 61 trees of the species Cedrela odorata L. (Meliacea), Hymenaea courbaril L. (Fabacea) and Goupia glabra Aubl. (Goupiacea). The trees grew in unmanaged tropical wet-forests of Suriname and reached ages from 84 to 255 years. Most of the trees show positive trends of diameter growth and carbon accumulation over time. For some trees we observed fluctuating growth—periods of lower growth alternate with periods of increased growth. In the last quarter of their lifetime trees accumulate on average between 39 percent (C. odorata) and 50 percent (G. glabra) of their final carbon stock. This suggests that old-growth trees in tropical forests do not only contribute to carbon stocks by long carbon resistance times, but maintain high rates of carbon accumulation at later stages of their life time. PMID:28813429

  12. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tree-rings of Masson pine (Pinus massoniana L.) from two industrial sites in the Pearl River Delta, south China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yuan-wen; Zhou, Guo-yi; Wen, Da-zhi; Li, Jiong; Sun, Fang-fang

    2011-09-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were examined and potential sources of PAHs were identified from the dated tree-rings of Masson pine (Pinus massoniana L.) near two industrial sites (Danshuikeng, DSK and Xiqiaoshan, XQS) in the Pearl River Delta of south China. Total concentrations of PAHs (∑PAHs) were revealed with similar patterns of temporal trends in the tree-rings at both sites, suggesting tree-rings recorded the historical variation in atmospheric PAHs. The differences of individual PAHs and of ∑PAHs detected in the tree-rings between the two sites reflected the historical differences of airborne PAHs. Regional changes in industrial activities might contribute to the site-specific and period-specific patterns of the tree-ring PAHs. The diagnostic PAH ratios of Ant/(Ant + PA), FL/(FL + Pyr), and BaA/(BaA + Chr)) revealed that PAHs in the tree-rings at both sites mainly stemmed from the combustion process (pyrogenic sources). Principal component analysis further confirmed that wood burning, coal combustion, diesel, and gasoline-powered vehicular emissions were the dominant contributors of PAHs sources at DSK, while diesel combustion, gasoline and natural gas combustion, and incomplete coal combustion were responsible for the main origins of PAHs at XQS. Tree-ring analysis of PAHs was indicative of PAHs from a mixture of sources of combustion, thus minimizing the bias of short-term active air sampling.

  13. Tree-ring stable isotopes record the impact of a foliar fungal pathogen on CO(2) assimilation and growth in Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffell, Brandy J; Meinzer, Frederick C; Voelker, Steven L; Shaw, David C; Brooks, J Renée; Lachenbruch, Barbara; McKay, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    Swiss needle cast (SNC) is a fungal disease of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) that has recently become prevalent in coastal areas of the Pacific Northwest. We used growth measurements and stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in tree-rings of Douglas-fir and a non-susceptible reference species (western hemlock, Tsuga heterophylla) to evaluate their use as proxies for variation in past SNC infection, particularly in relation to potential explanatory climate factors. We sampled trees from an Oregon site where a fungicide trial took place from 1996 to 2000, which enabled the comparison of stable isotope values between trees with and without disease. Carbon stable isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) of treated Douglas-fir tree-rings was greater than that of untreated Douglas-fir tree-rings during the fungicide treatment period. Both annual growth and tree-ring Δ(13)C increased with treatment such that treated Douglas-fir had values similar to co-occurring western hemlock during the treatment period. There was no difference in the tree-ring oxygen stable isotope ratio between treated and untreated Douglas-fir. Tree-ring Δ(13)C of diseased Douglas-fir was negatively correlated with relative humidity during the two previous summers, consistent with increased leaf colonization by SNC under high humidity conditions that leads to greater disease severity in following years.

  14. Asymmetric variability between maximum and minimum temperatures in Northeastern Tibetan Plateau: Evidence from tree rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Ecological systems in the headwaters of the Yellow River, characterized by hash natural environmental conditions, are very vulnerable to climatic change. In the most recent decades, this area greatly attracted the public's attention for its more and more deteriorating environmental conditions. Based on tree-ring samples from the Xiqing Mountain and A'nyêmagên Mountains at the headwaters of the Yellow River in the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau, we reconstructed the minimum temperatures in the winter half year over the last 425 years and the maximum temperatures in the summer half year over the past 700 years in this region. The variation of minimum temperature in the winter half year during the time span of 1578-1940 was a relatively stable trend, which was followed by an abrupt warming trend since 1941. However, there is no significant warming trend for the maximum temperature in the summer half year over the 20th century. The asymmetric variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures were observed in this study over the past 425 years. During the past 425 years, there are similar variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures; however, the minimum temperatures vary about 25 years earlier compared to the maximum temperatures. If such a trend of variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures over the past 425 years continues in the future 30 years, the maximum temperature in this region will increase significantly.

  15. Drought indicated in carbon-13/carbon-12 ratios of southwestern tree rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, S.W. (Univ. of Wisconsin-Parkside, Kenosha (United States)); Long, A. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States))

    1989-04-01

    Stomatal closure during periods of moisture deficiency should theoretically lead to elevated {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios as reduction of available CO{sub 2} leads to diminished photosynthetic discrimination against {sup 13}C in favor of {sup 12}C. Stable-carbon isotope ratio chronologies developed from 5-yr tree-ring groups at 17 sites in six southwestern states were tested for a drought relationship by first fitting a spline curve to each chronology to remove the long-term trend and calculating indices as the ratio of actual to spline curve value. The time series of Del Indices so developed are significantly correlated with 5-yr mean Palmer Hydrological Drought Indices and reconstructed July Palmer Drought Severity Indices from respective areas. Overall, in the period since 1790, and driest pentads were 1900-04 and 1960-64, whereas the wettest were 1980-84 and 1915-19. Maps of drought represented for two pentads seem to be reasonable representations, although spatial correlations of Del Indices with PHDI were generally not significant. These Del Index drought reconstructions may provide a useful measure of past physiological response to drought, although the present cost of analysis would prevent this from being a routine method.

  16. Tree-ring density variations during the 1450s period of strong volcanic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jan; Büntgen, Ulf; Hartl-Meier, Claudia; Oppenheimer, Clive; Schneider, Lea

    2017-04-01

    Ice core based reconstructions of the magnitude and timing of volcanic eruptions are used to force climate models and therefore are of critical importance for assessing the dynamics of the global climate system. The forcing timeseries of the past millennium are punctuated by a few very large volcanic events including a major eruption in the 1450s. This event was originally attributed to the Kuwae caldera in the South Pacific dated to the year 1452. Recent evidence from high-resolution ice core records, however, indicated a shift by six years (to 1458), a change that will fundamentally alter 15th century climate simulations and affect model/proxy comparisons. Here we compile a Northern Hemisphere network of 25 tree-ring maximum latewood density chronologies extending back over the past 650+ years and analyze the 1450s temperature deviations. Warm season temperature reconstructions from these data reveal the spatially most coherent and by far most severe cooling of the 15th century occurred in 1453. Cooling was overall stronger in the Eurasian high latitudes and northwestern North America, and less severe in central and southern Europe. These findings indicate that the original dating of a large eruption in 1452 was correct.

  17. Tree rings reveal recent intensified spring drought in the central Himalaya, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthi, Shankar; Bräuning, Achim; Zhou, Zhe-Kun; Fan, Ze-Xin

    2017-10-01

    To better understand long-term drought variations in the central Himalaya, we developed new tree-ring width chronologies of Himalayan spruce (Picea smithiana (Wall.) Boiss.) from three sites in the north-western Nepal. The local site chronologies showed high cross correlations and similar growth-climate responses to regional spring drought variability. We thus combined all site chronologies into a regional composite (RC) standard chronology that spans 516 years (1498-2013 CE). The RC chronology showed significant positive (negative) correlations with spring (March-May) precipitation (temperature) variability. Meanwhile, RC chronology showed the highest correlation with spring self-calibrating Palmer drought severity index (scPDSI, r = 0.652, p correlation analysis indicate that spring drought variability in the central Himalaya may be linked to large scale climatic drivers, mainly Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation activities due to sea surface temperatures variation in the Atlantic Ocean. Our reconstruction revealed a continuous shift toward drier conditions in the central Himalaya since early 1980s that coincide with continental-scale warming and reduced spring precipitation in the central Himalaya.

  18. Paleo Data Assimilation of Pseudo-Tree-Ring-Width Chronologies in a Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah Hassanabadi, B.; Acevedo, W.; Reich, S.; Cubasch, U.

    2016-12-01

    Using the Time-Averaged Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) and a forward model, we assimilate the pseudo Tree-Ring-Width (TRW) chronologies into an Atmospheric Global Circulation model. This study investigates several aspects of Paleo-Data Assimilation (PDA) within a perfect-model set-up: (i) we test the performance of several forward operators in the framework of a PDA-based climate reconstruction, (ii) compare the PDA-based simulations' skill against the free ensemble runs and (iii) inverstigate the skill of the "online" (with cycling) DA and the "off-line" (no-cycling) DA. In our experiments, the "online" (with cycling) PDA approach did not outperform the "off-line" (no-cycling) one, despite its considerable additional implementation complexity. On the other hand, it was observed that the error reduction achieved by assimilating a particular pseudo-TRW chronology is modulated by the strength of the yearly internal variability of the model at the chronology site. This result might help the dendrochronology community to optimize their sampling efforts.

  19. A Performance Comparison of Tree and Ring Topologies in Distributed System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    A distributed system is a collection of computers that are connected via a communication network. Distributed systems have become commonplace due to the wide availability of low-cost, high performance computers and network devices. However, the management infrastructure often does not scale well when distributed systems get very large. Some of the considerations in building a distributed system are the choice of the network topology and the method used to construct the distributed system so as to optimize the scalability and reliability of the system, lower the cost of linking nodes together and minimize the message delay in transmission, and simplify system resource management. We have developed a new distributed management system that is able to handle the dynamic increase of system size, detect and recover the unexpected failure of system services, and manage system resources. The topologies used in the system are the tree-structured network and the ring-structured network. This thesis presents the research background, system components, design, implementation, experiment results and the conclusions of our work. The thesis is organized as follows: the research background is presented in chapter 1. Chapter 2 describes the system components, including the different node types and different connection types used in the system. In chapter 3, we describe the message types and message formats in the system. We discuss the system design and implementation in chapter 4. In chapter 5, we present the test environment and results, Finally, we conclude with a summary and describe our future work in chapter 6.

  20. Asymmetric variability between maximum and minimum temperatures in Northeastern Tibetan Plateau:Evidence from tree rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacoby; GORDON

    2008-01-01

    Ecological systems in the headwaters of the Yellow River, characterized by hash natural environmental conditions, are very vulnerable to climatic change. In the most recent decades, this area greatly attracted the public’s attention for its more and more deteriorating environmental conditions. Based on tree-ring samples from the Xiqing Mountain and A’nyêmagên Mountains at the headwaters of the Yellow River in the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau, we reconstructed the minimum temperatures in the winter half year over the last 425 years and the maximum temperatures in the summer half year over the past 700 years in this region. The variation of minimum temperature in the winter half year during the time span of 1578―1940 was a relatively stable trend, which was followed by an abrupt warming trend since 1941. However, there is no significant warming trend for the maximum temperature in the summer half year over the 20th century. The asymmetric variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures were observed in this study over the past 425 years. During the past 425 years, there are similar variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures; however, the minimum temperatures vary about 25 years earlier compared to the maximum temperatures. If such a trend of variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures over the past 425 years continues in the future 30 years, the maximum temperature in this region will increase significantly.

  1. What drives interannual variation in tree ring oxygen isotopes in the Amazon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J. C. A.; Gloor, M.; Spracklen, D. V.; Arnold, S. R.; Tindall, J. C.; Clerici, S. J.; Leng, M. J.; Brienen, R. J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios in tree rings (δ18OTR) from northern Bolivia record local precipitation δ18O and correlate strongly with Amazon basin-wide rainfall. While this is encouraging evidence that δ18OTR can be used for paleoclimate reconstructions, it remains unclear whether variation in δ18OTR is truly driven by within-basin processes, thus recording Amazon climate directly, or if the isotope signal may already be imprinted on incoming vapor, perhaps reflecting a pan-tropical climate signal. We use atmospheric back trajectories combined with satellite observations of precipitation, together with water vapor transport analysis to show that δ18OTR in Bolivia are indeed controlled by basin-intrinsic processes, with rainout over the basin the most important factor. Furthermore, interannual variation in basin-wide precipitation and atmospheric circulation are both shown to affect δ18OTR. These findings suggest δ18OTR can be reliably used to reconstruct Amazon precipitation and have implications for the interpretation of other paleoproxy records from the Amazon basin.

  2. Comparing forest measurements from tree rings and a space-based index of vegetation activity in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Andrew G.; Hughes, Malcolm K.; Kirdyanov, Alexander V.; Losleben, Mark; Shishov, Vladimir V.; Berner, Logan T.; Oltchev, Alexander; Vaganov, Eugene A.

    2013-09-01

    Different methods have been developed for measuring carbon stocks and fluxes in the northern high latitudes, ranging from intensively measured small plots to space-based methods that use reflectance data to drive production efficiency models. The field of dendroecology has used samples of tree growth from radial increments to quantify long-term variability in ecosystem productivity, but these have very limited spatial domains. Since the cambium material in tree cores is itself a product of photosynthesis in the canopy, it would be ideal to link these two approaches. We examine the associations between the normalized differenced vegetation index (NDVI) and tree growth using 19 pairs of tree-ring widths (TRW) and maximum latewood density (MXD) across much of Siberia. We find consistent correlations between NDVI and both measures of tree growth and no systematic difference between MXD and TRW. At the regional level we note strong correspondence between the first principal component of tree growth and NDVI for MXD and TRW in a temperature-limited bioregion, indicating that canopy reflectance and cambial production are broadly linked. Using a network of 21 TRW chronologies from south of Lake Baikal, we find a similarly strong regional correspondence with NDVI in a markedly drier region. We show that tree growth is dominated by variation at decadal and multidecadal time periods, which the satellite record is incapable of recording given its relatively short record.

  3. 11-year cycle solar modulation of cosmic ray intensity inferred from C-14 content variation in dated tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, C. Y.; Chen, T. M.; Yun, S. X.; Dai, K. M.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid scintillation-photomultiplier tube counter system was used to measure the Delta-C-14 values of 60 tree rings, dating from 1866 to 1925, that were taken from a white spruce grown in Canada at 68 deg N, 130 deg W. A 10-percent variation is found which is anticorrelated with sunspot numbers, although the amplitude of the variation is 2-3 times higher than expected in trees grown at lower latitudes. A large dip in the data at about 1875 suggests an anomalously large modulation of cosmic ray intensity during the 1867-1878 AD solar cycle, which was the most active of the 19th century.

  4. Comparison of drought-sensitive tree-ring records from the Tien Shan of Kyrgyzstan and Xinjiang (China during the last six centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Qin Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, tree-ring width data of Schrenk spruce (Picea schrenkiana from the upper timberline of the Tien Shan (Kyrgyzstan were analyzed to investigate the effect of climate change. Growth–climate response analyses revealed that the tree rings of spruce at the upper timberline of the Tien Shan also can provide hydrometeorological (precipitation and streamflow signals. Tree-ring records from both Kyrgyzstan and Xinjiang exhibited similar tree-growth variability at both annual and decadal time scales during the common period 1457–2009. In Xinjiang and Kyrgyzstan, tree growth was reduced during the Little Ice Age (LIA; however, the timing and magnitude of LIA differ between the two regions. During 1470–1660, the two chronologies diverged, and this phenomenon is considered to be caused by a different response to the harsh climate of the LIA. In this study, the tree-ring width series from the upper tree line of the Tien Shan is negatively associated with temperature. As opposed to previous studies, the tree-ring width series from the upper timberline of the Tien Shan appears to respond well to hydrometeorological factors. Therefore, we highlight the need for more detailed ecophysiological response studies for spruce trees at the upper timberline of the Tien Shan, in particular, with regard to the role of water availability and temperature during the growth season.

  5. Tree-ring analysis of teak (Tectona grandis L.F.) in central India and its relationship with rainfall and moisture index

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Somaru Ram; H P Borgaonkar; A B Sikder

    2008-10-01

    Tree-ring-width index chronologies of teak (Tectona grandis L.F.)from three sites in central India have been studied for their dendroclimatic potential.The existence of good correlation among the three site chronologies indicates the influence of common forcing factor to the tree growth of the region.Tree growth and climate relationship based on correlation analysis revealed the important contribution of moisture index and rainfall rather than the direct in fluence of the temperature on tree growth during different seasons.Significant positive relationship of moisture index and rainfall during the monsoon months as well as on the annual scale with tree-ring width variations over the region indicates the important role of moisture availability at the root zone.The results suggest that the teak tree-ring chronologies can be used as high resolution proxy for past precipitation and moisture level in the environment.

  6. Retrospective study of {sup 14}C concentration in the vicinity of NPP Jaslovské Bohunice using tree rings and the AMS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ješkovský, Miroslav [CENTA Laboratory, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Povinec, Pavel P., E-mail: Povinec@fmph.uniba.sk [CENTA Laboratory, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Steier, Peter [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Šivo, Alexander; Richtáriková, Marta [CENTA Laboratory, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Golser, Robin [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    Atmospheric radiocarbon has been monitored around the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Jaslovské Bohunice (Slovakia) using CO{sub 2} absorption in NaOH solution since 1969. In 2012, tree ring samples were collected from Tilia cordata using an increment borer at Žlkovce monitoring station situated close to the Bohunice NPP. Each tree ring was identified and graphite targets were produced for {sup 14}C analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. The {sup 14}C concentrations obtained from the tree-ring samples have been in a reasonable agreement with the averaged annual {sup 14}C concentrations in atmospheric CO{sub 2}.

  7. Reconstruction of precipitation in Morocco since 1100 A.D. Based on Cedrus atlantica tree-ring widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Claudine; Guiot, Joël

    1990-05-01

    Annual (October through September) precipitation from 1100 A.D. to modern times is reconstructed for Morocco, using Cedrus atlantica (Endl.) Carrière tree-ring chronologies. Both multiple regression on principal components and the bootstrap method are use to calibrate tree-ring width with precipitation; precipitation variation is reconstructed for three climatically distinct areas: the humid, subhumid, and arid regions of Morocco. A series of successive wet and dry periods is identified for the past 1000 years; the maximum length of the 13 dry periods (during which precipitation was at least 1σ below normal) is 6 years. Twenty-one years are identified during which precipitation fell more than 2σ below normal. We are unable to identify significant correspondence in climatic variation in Morocco, Europe, and the Sahel during this time period.

  8. Monsoonal precipitation variation in the East Asia since A.D. 1840--Tree-ring evidences from China and Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Yu(刘禹); Won-Kyu; Park; CAI; Qiufang(蔡秋芳); Jung-Wook; Seo; Hyun-Sook; Jung

    2003-01-01

    Three tree-ring rainfall reconstructions from China and Korea are used in this paper to investigate the East Asian summer monsoon-related precipitation variation over the past 160 years. Statistically, there is no linear correlation on a year-by-year basis between Chinese and Korean monsoon rainfall, but region-wide synchronous variation on a decadal-scale was observed. More rainfall intervals were 1860-1890, 1910-1925, and 1940-1960, and dry or even drought periods were 1890-1910, 1925-1940, and 1960-present. Reconstructions also display that the East Asian summer monsoon precipitation suddenly changed from more into less around mid-1920. These tree-ring precipitation records were also confirmed by Chinese historical dryness/wetness index and Korean historical rain gauge data.

  9. Re-examining the reliability of tree-ring isotope ratio as a his- torical CO2 proxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To examine the reliability of using tree ring d 13C and the modelof isotopic fractionation in reconstructing atmospheric CO2 levels, we studied the variations of some important parameters of several subtropical species under natural field conditions. It was found that, different from other researchers' results, leaf conductance to CO2 transfer, g, did not change in proportion to the change in rate of CO2 assimilation, A, with the result that intercellular concen- tration of CO2, Ci, could not keep constant. Thus, we con-clude that the use of tree-ring isotope ratios in the recon-struction of atmospheric CO2 variation based on the presup-position that Ci keeps constant during assimilation is not reliable under current circumstances.

  10. [Response of Picea purpurea and Abies faxoniana tree rings at different slope aspects to rapid warming in western Sichuan, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bin-de; Zhang, Yuan-dong; Wang, Xiao-chun

    2016-02-01

    By using an empirical 'signal-free' standardization approach, we constructed four Picea purpurea and Abies faxoniana tree-ring chronologies at southeast and northwest slope aspects of Erdaohai and east slope aspect of Zharisi, Songpan, west Sichuan, China. The response analysis and multivariate analysis of variance between tree rings and climatic variables were conducted to explore the divergent responses of tree growth at different slope aspects to the recent warming climate. Results showed that tree growth of P. purpurea at east slope aspect was obviously accelerated (0.011 a-1) since rapid warming in 1980, whereas those at northwest slope aspect was significantly reduced (-0.006 a-1). Tree growth of P. purpurea at southeast slope aspect and A. faxoniana at northwest slope aspect decreased in significantly. With the rapid warming, growth-climate relationships of P. purpurea and A. faxoniana at different slope aspects changed significantly. After rapid warming in 1980, the promoting effects of growing season temperature (GST) on P. purpurea growth at east slope increased significantly, while the inhibitory effects of GST on its growth at southeast and northwest slopes also increased significantly. However, the effects of GST on A. faxoniana growth at northwest slope did not change significantly before and after rapid warming. The effects of precipitation in May (PM) on P. purpurea growth at east slope was changed from inhibition before rapid warming to significant promotion after rapid warming, while the inhibitory effects of PM on P. purpurea growth at southeast and northwest slopes increased significantly. For A. faioniana at northwest slope, however, it did not change obviously before and after rapid warming. The response analysis between tree growth and the Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) showed that soil moisture variations at different slope aspects were an important reason of tree-ring growth response difference since rapid warming. In addition, the

  11. A stable lead isotopic investigation of the use of sycamore tree rings as a historical biomonitor of environmental lead contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Gavin J; Farmer, John G

    2006-06-01

    The validity of the use of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) tree-rings for the reconstruction of atmospheric lead pollution histories was investigated. Tree cores spanning 1892-2003 were collected from several sycamores from the eastern shore of Loch Lomond, Scotland, an area with no local point sources of lead emission. The lead concentration and 206Pb/207Pb profiles of the Loch Lomond region cores were compared with corresponding data for the 210Pb-dated loch sediment, and also with data for moss of known age from a Scottish herbarium collection. Two of the seven sycamore cores showed the same lead concentration trend as the lead flux to the loch, the rest having no similarity to either each other or the loch sediment record. Two further sycamore cores showed some similarity in their temporal 206Pb/207Pb trends to those seen in the sediment and moss records, but only in part of their profiles, whilst the 206Pb/207Pb ratios of the other sycamore cores remained relatively unchanged for the majority of the time covered, or exhibited an opposite trend. The 206Pb/207Pb ratios of the tree cores were also mostly higher than those of the previously established records for any given time period. Tree cores covering 1878-2002 were also collected along transects from Wanlockhead and Tyndrum, two areas of former lead mining and smelting associated with distinct 206Pb/207Pb ratios of 1.170 and 1.144, respectively. The Wanlockhead tree cores exhibited a generally decreasing trend in lead concentration with both time and distance from the lead mine. The characteristic 206Pb/207Pb ratio of 1.170 was observed in samples close to the mine but a decrease in the influence of the mine-derived lead was observed in more distant samples. The tree sampled at Tyndrum showed elevated lead concentrations, which decreased with time, and a fairly constant 206Pb/207Pb ratio of 1.15 reflecting input from the mine, features not observed in any other trees along the transect. Overall the data

  12. δ18O and δ13C Analysis in Tree Rings of Pterocarpus angolensis Growing in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeran, K.; Schoof, J. T.; Lefticariu, L.; Therrell, M.

    2015-12-01

    Instrumental weather records in southern Africa are largely limited to the last 100 years and documentary weather-related data are rare prior to the 1800s, hindering our understanding of the natural and/or anthropogenic factors that influence climate variability over this region. Measuring stable isotopes ratios (commonly 13C/12C and 18O/16O) in tree rings can provide a good proxy for extending climate data beyond the instrumental record. The objective of this study is to characterize historical variations in the climatology underlying extreme climatic events in Zimbabwe using instrumental climate records (precipitation and temperature) and a multi-proxy approach (ring width, δ18O, and δ13C) for dendroclimatic proxy reconstructions. A 90-year (1900-1990) δ18O and δ13C tree ring record using four Pterocarpus angolensis samples is being developed and compared to tree ring width, monthly, seasonal, and annual precipitation totals, meteoric water δ18O values, and mean monthly and seasonal temperature. Preliminary results indicate significant correlations between the average δ18O record and the previous year December precipitation totals (r=0.41, p<0.0001), current year January precipitation totals (r=0.45, p<0.0001), and combined total precipitation for the previous year November and December and current year January (r=0.57, p<0.0001). Furthermore, we find that the δ18O values are strongly influenced by maximum temperature during the previous year December (r=0.39, p=0.0001) and current year January (r=0.40, p=0.0001), and average maximum temperature during the months of the previous year December and current year January and February (r=0.47, p<0.001). We thus present one of the first studies to integrate a multi-proxy approach to investigate historical climate variability in southern Africa using ring widths, and tree ring δ18O and δ13C values of trees growing in Zimbabwe.

  13. Tree-Ring Based Streamflow Reconstructions of the Yaqui River, MX and Implications for Drought and Water Management Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, K. J.; Ray, A. J.; Lukas, J. J.; Villanueva-Diaz, J.

    2008-05-01

    The Yaqui River is the irrigation source for an economically important agricultural region of Northwest Mexico. Currently, planning and forecasting are based on streamflow gauge data of only about 50 years. Understanding past variations in Yaqui streamflow is important to developing river forecasts and management plans. This presentation describes an effort to develop longer proxy records of streamflow to better understand the region's climate variability and drought history. The result is a 363-year dendrochronology based reconstruction model of Yaqui River streamflow. The model is based on a correlation between 44-years of Yaqui streamflow data and tree-ring chronologies dating to A.D. 1639. Chronologies are from Bisaloachi (28.66 N, 108.29 W), Cebadilla de Ocampo (28.122 N, 107.95 W) and Mesa de las Guacamayas (30.55 N, 108.62 W) in the state of Chihuahua, MX. The binary model uses a normalized index of annual total tree ring width (Tree-Ring Index, TRI). The model output is the probability that a given year experienced less than median streamflow, a possible indicator of drought. This model correctly predicts 100% of less than median streamflow years using a TRI input of precipitation. Total ring width (TRW) is typically associated with winter precipitation (October-June, in this case), which represents less than 40% of annual streamflow in this region where much of the precipitation and streamflow are related to the North American Monsoon (NAM), typically from July-September. The late wood (LW) growth portion of tree-rings may better reflect the NAM precipitation and streamflow, and produce a better reconstruction model. These results show that representation of NAM streamflow is essential for a more accurate streamflow reconstruction model. More tree-ring chronologies from other parts of the basin may increase the signal of natural streamflow variance captured, strengthening the reconstruction model. In particular, analyses of LW correlation with summer

  14. Reconstruction of precipitation variability in Estonia since the eighteenth century, inferred from oak and spruce tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helama, Samuli; Sohar, Kristina; Läänelaid, Alar; Bijak, Szymon; Jaagus, Jaak

    2017-08-01

    There is plenty of evidence for intensification of the global hydrological cycle. In Europe, the northern areas are predicted to receive more precipitation in the future and observational evidence suggests a parallel trend over the past decades. As a consequence, it would be essential to place the recent trend in precipitation in the context of proxy-based estimates of reconstructed precipitation variability over the past centuries. Tree rings are frequently used as proxy data for palaeoclimate reconstructions. Here we use deciduous (Quercus robur) and coniferous (Picea abies) tree-ring width chronologies from western Estonia to deduce past early-summer (June) precipitation variability since 1771. Statistical model transforming our tree-ring data into estimates of precipitation sums explains 42% of the variance in instrumental variability. Comparisons with products of gridded reconstructions of soil moisture and summer precipitation illustrate robust correlations with soil moisture (Palmer Drought Severity Index), but lowered correlation with summer precipitation estimates prior to mid-nineteenth century, these instabilities possibly reflecting the general uncertainties inherent to early meteorological and proxy data. Reconstructed precipitation variability was negatively correlated to the teleconnection indices of the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Scandinavia pattern, on annual to decadal and longer scales. These relationships demonstrate the positive precipitation anomalies to result from increase in zonal inflow and cyclonic activity, the negative anomalies being linked with the high pressure conditions enhanced during the atmospheric blocking episodes. Recently, the instrumental data have demonstrated a remarkable increase in summer (June) precipitation in the study region. Our tree-ring based reconstruction reproduces this trend in the context of precipitation history since eighteenth century and quantifies the unprecedented abundance of June

  15. Comparing carbon isotope composition of bulk wood and holocellulose from Quercus cerris, Fraxinus ornus and Pinus radiata tree rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Alessandro CM

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Tree-ring δ13C is widely employed in ecophysiological studies, because it represents an integrated proxy of the ratio between photosynthesis (A and stomatal conductance (g, which expresses the intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE, strongly affected by the environmental conditions experienced by the plant during its life span. Tree-ring δ13C also reflects long term variations of atmospheric CO2 concentration and of its carbon isotope composition, partly due to increasing anthropogenic emissions. Carbon isotope abundances in tree rings can be assessed on bulk wood as well as on wood? biochemical components, wich show different δ13C values because of secondary discrimination during biosynthesis.We present the results of a comparison between δ13C values of bulk wood and holocellulose samples obtained from the last three (1999, 2000 and 2001 annual growth rings of two hardwood (Quercus cerris L. and Fraxinus ornus L. and one conifer (Pinus radiata D. Don, species. We found that δ13C values differed significantly among tree species, both in the case of holocellulose and bulk wood, but only in the case of P. radiata bulk wood samples tend to provide more negative δ13C values than holocellulose, as reported in the literature. We suggest that, at least for the two hardwood species studied, bulk wood is a suitable material to work with for δ13C assessment, whilst in P. radiata holocellulose could provide a more stable and reliable index, when studying plant ecophysiological responses to changing environmental conditions.

  16. Using a Tree Ring δ13C Annual Series to Reconstruct Atmospheric CO2 Concentration over the Past 300 Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xing-Yun; QIAN Jun-Long; WANG Jian; HE Qing-Yan; WANG Zu-Liang; CHEN Cheng-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    The annual series of δ13C were measured in tree rings of three Cryptomeria fortunei disks (CF-1, CF-2, and CF 3) collected from West Tianmu Mountain, Zhejiang Province, China, according to cross-dating tree ring ages. There was no obvious decreasing trend of the δ13C annual time series of CF-2 before 1835. However, from 1835 to 1982 the three tree ring δ13C annual series exhibited similar decreasing trends that were significantly (P ≤ 0.001) correlated. The distribution characteristics of a scatter diagram between estimated δ13C series of CF-2 from modeling and the atmospheric CO2 concentration extracted from the Law Dome ice core from 1840 to 1978 were analyzed and a curvilinear regression equation for reconstructing atmospheric CO2 concentration was established with R2 = 0.98.Also, a test of independent samples indicated that between 1685 and 1839 the reconstructed atmospheric CO2 concentration .using the δ13C series of CF-2 had a close relationship with the Law Dome and Siple ice cores, with a standard deviation of 1.98.The general increasing trend of the reconstructed atmospheric CO2 concentration closely reflected the long-term variation of atmospheric CO2 concentration recorded both before and after the Industrial Revolution. Between 1685 and 1840 the evaluated atmospheric CO2 concentration was stable, but after 1840 it exhibited a rapid increase. Given a longer δ13C annual time series of tree rings, it was feasible to rebuild a representative time series to describe the atmospheric CO2 concentration for an earlier period and for years that were not in the ice core record.

  17. Comparison of stable carbon isotope ratios in the whole wood, cellulose and lignin of Oak tree-rings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loader, NJ

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available borers. Each tree-ring sequence was absolutely dated against local site and regional dendrochronologies using the TSAP software package (Frank Rinn Associates, Heidelberg, Germany) and a 55-year sequence (1946^2000) isolated for isotopic analysis. During... of the previous year (Hill et al., 1995), latewood samples were removed from each se- quence using a chiropodic raspe. Table 1 Correlation matrix (R) demonstrating the statistical relationship between individual wood components of the core samples ana- lysed SP07...

  18. Climatic interpretation of tree-ring methoxyl d2H time-series from a central alpine larch forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechelmann, Dana F. C.; Greule, Markus; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Esper, Jan; Keppler, Frank

    2017-04-01

    We measured stable hydrogen isotope ratios of lignin methoxyl groups (d2HLM) in high elevation larch trees (Larix decidua Mill.) from the Simplon Valley in southern Switzerland. Thirty-seven larch trees were sampled and five individuals analysed for their d2HLM values at annual (1971-2009) and pentadal resolution (1746-2009). Testing the climate response of the d2HLM series, the annually resolved series show a positive correlation of r = 0.60 with June/July precipitation and weaker but negative correlation with June/July temperature. In addition, a negative correlation with June-August d2H in precipitation of the nearby GNIP station in Locarno is observed. The pentadally resolved d2HLM series show no significant correlation to climate parameters. The positive correlation of the annually resolved data to summer precipitation is uncommon to d2H measurements from tree-rings (Feakins et al., 2013; Helle and Schleser, 2004; McCarroll and Loader, 2004; Mischel et al., 2015; White et al., 1994). However, we explain the positive association with warm season hydroclimate as follows: methoxyl groups of lignin are directly formed from tissues in the xylem water. More precipitation during June and July, which are on average relatively dry month, results in higher d2H values of the xylem water and therefore, higher d2H value in the lignin methoxyl groups. Therefore, we suggest that d2HLM values of high elevation larch trees might likely serve as a summer precipitation proxy. References: Feakins, S.J., Ellsworth, P.V., Sternberg, L.d.S.L., 2013. Lignin methoxyl hydrogen isotope rations in a coastal ecosystem. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 121: 54-66. Helle, G., Schleser, G.H., 2004. Interpreting Climate Proxies from Tree-rings. In: Fischer, H., Floeser, G., Kumke, T., Lohmann, G., Miller, H., Negendank, J.F.W., et al., editors. The Climate in Historical Times. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 129-148. McCarroll, D., Loader, N.J., 2004. Stable isotopes in tree rings. Quaternary

  19. High resolution tree-ring based spatial reconstructions of snow avalanche activity in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Gregory T.; Reardon, Blase; Caruso, C.J.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    Effective design of avalanche hazard mitigation measures requires long-term records of natural avalanche frequency and extent. Such records are also vital for determining whether natural avalanche frequency and extent vary over time due to climatic or biophysical changes. Where historic records are lacking, an accepted substitute is a chronology developed from tree-ring responses to avalanche-induced damage. This study evaluates a method for using tree-ring chronologies to provide spatially explicit differentiations of avalanche frequency and temporally explicit records of avalanche extent that are often lacking. The study area - part of John F. Stevens Canyon on the southern border of Glacier National Park – is within a heavily used railroad and highway corridor with two dozen active avalanche paths. Using a spatially geo-referenced network of avalanche-damaged trees (n=109) from a single path, we reconstructed a 96-year tree-ring based chronology of avalanche extent and frequency. Comparison of the chronology with historic records revealed that trees recorded all known events as well as the same number of previously unidentified events. Kriging methods provided spatially explicit estimates of avalanche return periods. Estimated return periods for the entire avalanche path averaged 3.2 years. Within this path, return intervals ranged from ~2.3 yrs in the lower track, to ~9-11 yrs and ~12 to >25 yrs in the runout zone, where the railroad and highway are located. For avalanche professionals, engineers, and transportation managers this technique proves a powerful tool in landscape risk assessment and decision making.

  20. Tree-ring growth and wood chemistry response to manipulated precipitation variation for two temperate Quercus species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Rebekah J. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Kaye, Margot W. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Abrams, Marc D. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship among ambient and manipulated precipitation, wood chemistry, and their relationship with radial growth for two oak species in eastern Tennessee. The study took place on the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment (TDE) site, located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN. Two dominant species, white oak (Quercus alba) and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus), were selected for study from a 13-year experiment of whole-stand precipitation manipulation (wet, ambient and dry). The relationships between tree-ring width and climate were compared for both species to determine the impact of precipitation manipulations on ring width index. This study used experimental spectroscopy techniques to measure the sensitivity of tree-ring responses to directional changes in precipitation over 13 years, and the results suggest that oaks at this study site are resilient to imposed changes, but sensitive to inter-annual variations in climate. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) allowed us to measure nutrient intensities (similar to element concentrations) at 0.5-1.0 mm spacing along the radial growth axis of trees growing in the wet, ambient, and dry treatment sites. A difference in stemwood nutrient levels was observed between the two oak species and among the three treatments. Significant variation in element intensity was observed across treatments for some elements (Ca, K, Mg, Na, N and P) suggesting the potential for long-term impacts on growth under a changing climate regimes for southeastern oaks.

  1. Mid 19th century divergence between tree-ring proxy and instrumental target data at hemispheric scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konter, Oliver; Dienst, Mauel; Kolbe, Christine; Luterbacher, Juerg; Esper, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The development of new millennial-length chronologies enables a continuous improvement of large-scale temperature reconstructions inferred from tree-rings. Reliable reconstructions require highly synchronized proxy and instrumental time-series during their overlapping period. Here we use a recently developed network of 53 tree-ring chronologies from the Northern Hemisphere together with state-of-the-art global gridded temperature datasets (CRU TS3.2, HadCRUT4) to test the coherence between early, 19th century instrumental and proxy data. Tree-ring calibration reveals synchronous trends in the 20th century but systematically cooler reconstructed temperatures pre-1880 compared to instrumental summer temperatures. This early divergence phenomenon could be explained by several biological or statistical hypotheses. However, solely positive residuals between summer and winter temperature anomalies during this early instrumental period indicate systematic overestimation of summer warmth in 19th century observational data. Our findings suggest direct insolation effects biased the early instrumental temperatures at large, hemispheric scales. Despite multiple homogenization efforts, state-of-the-art global gridded datasets seem to still systematically overestimated 19th century summer temperatures.

  2. Determination of As in tree-rings of poplar (Populus alba L.) by U-shaped DC arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, D M; Novović, I; Vilotić, D; Ignjatović, Lj

    2009-04-01

    An argon-stabilized U-shaped DC arc with a system for aerosol introduction was used for determination of As in poplar (Populus alba L.) tree-rings. After optimization of the operating parameters and selection of the most appropriate signal integration time (30 s), the limit of detection for As was reduced to 15.0 ng/mL. This detection limit obtained with the optimal integration time was compared with those for other methods: inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), direct coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES), microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) and improved thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS). Arsenic is toxic trace element which can adversely affect plant, animal and human health. As an indicator of environment pollution we collected poplar tree-rings from two locations. The first area was close to the "Nikola Tesla" (TENT-A) power plant, Obrenovac, while the other was in the urban area of Novi Sad. In all cases elevated average concentrations of As were registered in poplar tree-rings from the Obrenovac location.

  3. Trace elements in tree rings and their environmental effects: A case study in Xi'an City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yu; TA WeiYuan; BAO TingYi; YANG ZengYue; SONG HuiMing; LIU Na; WANG WeiPing; ZHANG HongYi; ZHANG Wei; AN ZhiSheng

    2009-01-01

    Using wet digested method and ICP mass spectrometer, we analyzed the concentration of five trace elements (Cd, Mn, P, Zn and Pb) for the tree rings from both urban and suburbs of Xi'an. At the urban sampling site, one Chinese mahogany (Toona sinensis) disc and one phoenix tree (Firmiana simplex) disc were sampled from a steelworks in Xi'an City. At the suburb site, a Chinese mahogany disc was collected from a village in the south of the City. In addition, some soils near the roots of the sampled trees were collected. The analysis results indicate that the concentration of each of the five elements in annual rings has a positive correlation with the production of the steelworks. Statistical calculations show that Pb and Mn elements were stable without lag effects. That means these two elements do not move between rings. Cd displayed one year moving, P two years and Zn three yeare. These results are quite similar to those found by other methods.

  4. Tree rings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) as a source of information about past climate in northern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Rajmund; Zielski, Andrzej; Pospieszyńska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a very common tree in Polish forests, and therefore was widely used as timber. A relatively large amount of available wood allowed a long-term chronology to be built up and used as a source of information about past climate. The analysis of reconstructed indexed values of mean temperature in 51-year moving intervals allowed the recognition of the coldest periods in the years 1207-1346, 1383-1425, 1455-1482, 1533-1574, 1627-1646, and 1694-1785. The analysis of extreme wide and narrow rings forms a complementary method of examining climatic data within tree rings. The tree ring widths, early wood and late wood widths of 16 samples were assessed during the period 1581-1676. The most apparent effect is noted in the dry summer of 1616. According to previous research and our findings, temperature from February to March seems to be one of the most stable climatic factors which influenced pine growth in Poland. Correlation coefficients in the calibration and validation procedure gave promising results for temperature reconstruction from the pine chronology.

  5. Trace elements in tree rings and their environmental effects: A case study in Xi’an City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using wet digested method and ICP mass spectrometer, we analyzed the concentration of five trace elements (Cd, Mn, P, Zn and Pb) for the tree rings from both urban and suburbs of Xi’an. At the urban sampling site, one Chinese mahogany (Toona sinensis) disc and one phoenix tree (Firmiana simplex) disc were sampled from a steelworks in Xi’an City. At the suburb site, a Chinese mahogany disc was collected from a village in the south of the City. In addition, some soils near the roots of the sampled trees were collected. The analysis results indicate that the concentration of each of the five elements in annual rings has a positive correlation with the production of the steelworks. Statistical calculations show that Pb and Mn elements were stable without lag effects. That means these two elements do not move between rings. Cd displayed one year moving, P two years and Zn three years. These results are quite similar to those found by other methods.

  6. Long-term change in the sensitivity of tree-ring growth to climate forcing in Larix decidua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Marco; Urbinati, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Tree rings are widely used long-term proxy data which, if combined with long-term instrumental climate records, can provide excellent information on global climate variability. This research aimed to determine whether interannual climate-growth responses in Alpine treeline forests are stationary over time. We used tree-ring width chronologies of Larix decidua (European larch) from 17 sites and monthly temperatures and precipitation data for the period 1800-1999. Climate-growth relationships were assessed with correlation and response functions, and their stationarity and consistency over time were measured using moving correlation. Tree-ring chronologies showed similar interannual variations over the last two centuries, suggesting that the same climatic factors synchronously limited growth at most sites. The most sensitive variables showed significant transient responses varying within the time period, indicating a possible deviation from the uniformitarian principle applied to dendroclimatology. If these findings are confirmed in future studies on other species and in other regions, we suggest that time-dependent variables should be taken into account to avoid overestimation of treeline advance, future forest carbon storage in temperature-limited environments and inaccurate reconstruction of past climate variability.

  7. The dating of dipterocarp tree rings: establishing a record of carbon cycling and climatic change in the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, I.; Froyd, C. A.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Newbery, D. M.; Woodborne, S.; Ong, R. C.

    2004-10-01

    In a first step to obtain a proxy record of past climatic events (including the El Niño-Southern Oscillation) in the normally aseasonal tropical environment of Sabah, a radial segment from a recently fallen dipterocarp (Shorea superba) was radiocarbon dated and subjected to carbon isotope analysis. The high-precision radiocarbon results fell into the ambiguous modern plateau where several calibrated dates can exist for each sample. Dating was achieved by wiggle matching using a Bayesian approach to calibration. Using the defined growth characteristics of Shorea superba, probability density distributions were calculated and improbable dates rejected. It was found that the tree most likely started growing around AD 1660-1685. A total of 173 apparent growth increments were measured and, therefore, it could be determined that the tree formed one ring approximately every two years. Stable carbon isotope values were obtained from resin-extracted wholewood from each ring. Carbon cycling is evident in the juvenile effect, resulting from the assimilation of respired carbon dioxide and lower light levels below the canopy, and in the anthropogenic effect caused by increased industrial activity in the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This study demonstrates that palaeoenvironmental information can be obtained from trees growing in aseasonal environments, where climatic conditions prevent the formation of well-defined annual rings. Copyright

  8. Increased tree-ring network density reveals more precise estimations of sub-regional hydroclimate variability and climate dynamics in the Midwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Justin T.; Harley, Grant L.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the historic variability in the hydroclimate provides important information on possible extreme dry or wet periods that in turn inform water management plans. Tree rings have long provided historical context of hydroclimate variability of the U.S. However, the tree-ring network used to create these countrywide gridded reconstructions is sparse in certain locations, such as the Midwest. Here, we increase (n = 20) the spatial resolution of the tree-ring network in southern Indiana and compare a summer (June-August) Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) reconstruction to existing gridded reconstructions of PDSI for this region. We find both droughts and pluvials that were previously unknown that rival the most intense PDSI values during the instrumental period. Additionally, historical drought occurred in Indiana that eclipsed instrumental conditions with regard to severity and duration. During the period 1962-2004 CE, we find that teleconnections of drought conditions through the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation have a strong influence (r = -0.60, p tree growth in this region for the late spring-early summer season. These findings highlight the importance of continuing to increase the spatial resolution of the tree-ring network used to infer past climate dynamics to capture the sub-regional spatial variability. Increasing the spatial resolution of the tree-ring network for a given region can better identify sub-regional variability, improve the accuracy of regional tree-ring PDSI reconstructions, and provide better information for climatic teleconnections.

  9. [Tree-ring growth responses of Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica) to climate change in southern northeast: a case study in Qianshan Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Li; Xing-Yuan, He; Zhen-Ju, Chen

    2014-07-01

    Mongolian oak is one of the most important broad-leaved tree species in forests, Northeast China. Based on the methodology of dendrochronology, the variations of tree ring radial growth of Mongolian oak in Qianshan Mountains, south of Northeast China, were analyzed. Combined with the temperature and precipitation data from meteorological stations since 1951, the relationships between standardized tree ring width chronology and main climatic factors were analyzed. In this region, the precipitation between April and July of the current year had an significant relationship with the tree ring width of Mongolian oak, and was the main factor limiting the radial growth. The extreme maximum temperature of May was also a key factor influencing the tree ring width, which had a significant on the tree ring width of Mongolian oak. The precipitation in April had a significant and stable relationship with the growth of Mongolian oak since the 1950s. The 'divergence problem' was found in the study area, which the sensitivity of tree growth to summer temperature reduced since the 1980s. The tree growth response to temperature showed a seasonal change from summer to spring.

  10. A signature of cosmic-ray increase in AD 774-775 from tree rings in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Fusa; Nagaya, Kentaro; Masuda, Kimiaki; Nakamura, Toshio

    2012-06-03

    Increases in (14)C concentrations in tree rings could be attributed to cosmic-ray events, as have increases in (10)Be and nitrate in ice cores. The record of the past 3,000 years in the IntCal09 data set, which is a time series at 5-year intervals describing the (14)C content of trees over a period of approximately 10,000 years, shows three periods during which (14)C increased at a rate greater than 3‰ over 10 years. Two of these periods have been measured at high time resolution, but neither showed increases on a timescale of about 1 year (refs 11 and 12). Here we report (14)C measurements in annual rings of Japanese cedar trees from ad 750 to ad 820 (the remaining period), with 1- and 2-year resolution. We find a rapid increase of about 12‰ in the (14)C content from ad 774 to 775, which is about 20 times larger than the change attributed to ordinary solar modulation. When averaged over 10 years, the data are consistent with the decadal IntCal (14)C data from North American and European trees. We argue that neither a solar flare nor a local supernova is likely to have been responsible.

  11. Can tree-ring density data reflect summer temperature extremes and associated circulation patterns over Fennoscandia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Ionita, Monica; Lohmann, Gerrit; Chen, Deliang; Linderholm, Hans W.

    2016-12-01

    Tree-ring maximum latewood density (MXD) records from Fennoscandia have been widely used to infer regional- and hemispheric-scale mean temperature variability. Here, we explore if MXD records can also be used to infer past variability of summer temperature extremes across Fennoscandia. The first principal component (PC1) based on 34 MXD chronologies in Fennoscandia explains 50% of the total variance in the observed warm-day extremes over the period 1901-1978. Variations in both observed summer warm-day extremes and PC1 are influenced by the frequency of anomalous anticyclonic pattern over the region, summer sea surface temperatures over the Baltic, North and Norwegian Seas, and the strength of the westerly zonal wind at 200 hPa across Fennoscandia. Both time series are associated with nearly identical atmospheric circulation and SST patterns according to composite map analysis. In a longer context, the first PC based on 3 millennium-long MXD chronologies in central and northern Fennoscandia explains 83% of the total variance of PC1 from the 34 MXD chronologies over the period 1901-1978, 48% of the total variance of the summer warm-day extreme variability over the period 1901-2006, and 36% of the total variance in the frequency of a summer anticyclonic pattern centered over eastern-central Fennoscandia in the period 1948-2006. The frequency of summer warm-day extremes in Fennoscandia is likely linked to a meridional shift of the northern mid-latitude jet stream. This study shows that the MXD network can be used to infer the variability of past summer warm-day extremes and the frequency of the associated summer anticyclonic circulation pattern over Fennoscandia.

  12. Tree-ring reconstructed May-June precipitation in the Caucasus since 1752 CE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Benito, Dario; Ummenhofer, Caroline C.; Köse, Nesibe; Güner, Hüseyin Tuncay; Pederson, Neil

    2016-11-01

    The Caucasus region experiences recurrent droughts that affect natural vegetation and the agriculture-based economies of several countries. Because meteorological records are in general scarce and of short timespan, little is known about the magnitude and frequency of past climate variability. Despite the recent increase of climate reconstructions for parts of Eurasia, no study has focused on past hydroclimate variability in the Caucasus. Here, we use a multispecies network of tree-ring width chronologies from the Lesser Caucasus to develop the first precipitation reconstruction for the region back to 1752 CE. Despite the high annual precipitation in the region, our reconstruction accounted for 51.2 % of the variability in May-June precipitation from 1930 to 2001. In comparison with reconstructions in the eastern Mediterranean, our new reconstruction revealed important and distinct drought periods and pluvials. Previous winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and spring East Atlantic/Western Russia (EA/WR) and North Sea Caspian patterns are likely key drivers of May-June precipitation in the Caucasus and Anatolia. NAO appeared to negatively affect rainfall low-frequency variability while effects of EA/WR were more apparent at the interannual timescales. We also show a potential positive effect of Black Sea surface temperatures on May-June precipitation. In the Caucasus, May-June represents the period of major water supply in semi-arid areas and the period with the highest potential of water scarcity in mesic areas. It is also a period of potential catastrophic flood events. Thus, changes to the precipitation regime during this season will be critical to both human and natural systems of the Caucasus region.

  13. A tree-ring field reconstruction of Fennoscandian summer hydroclimate variability for the last millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seftigen, Kristina; Björklund, Jesper; Cook, Edward R.; Linderholm, Hans W.

    2014-05-01

    Hydroclimatological extremes, such as droughts and floods, are expected to increase in frequency and intensity with global climate change. An improved knowledge of its natural variability and the underlying physical mechanisms for changes in the hydrological cycle will help understand the response of extreme hydroclimatic events to climate warming. This study presents the first gridded hydroclimatic reconstruction (0.5° × 0.5° grid resolution), as expressed by the warm season Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), for most of Fennoscandia. A point-by-point regression approach is used to develop the reconstruction from a network of moisture sensitive tree-ring chronologies spanning over the past millennium. The reconstruction gives a unique opportunity to examine the frequency, severity, persistence, and spatial characteristics of Fennoscandian hydroclimatic variability in the context of the last 1,000 years. The full SPEI reconstruction highlights the seventeenth century as a period of frequent severe and widespread hydroclimatic anomalies. Although some severe extremes have occurred locally throughout the domain over the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, the period is surprisingly free from any spatially extensive anomalies. The twentieth century is not anomalous in terms of the number of severe and spatially extensive hydro climatic extremes in the context of the last millennium. Principle component analysis reveals that there are two dominant modes of spatial moisture variability across Fennoscandia. The same patterns are evident in the observational record and in the reconstructed dataset over the instrumental era and two paleoperiods. The 500 mb pressure patterns associated with the two modes suggests the importance of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation.

  14. Population differentiation in tree-ring growth response of white fir (Abies concolor) to climate: Implications for predicting forest responses to climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Deborah Bowne [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Forest succession models and correlative models have predicted 200--650 kilometer shifts in the geographic range of temperate forests and forest species as one response to global climate change. Few studies have investigated whether population differences may effect the response of forest species to climate change. This study examines differences in tree-ring growth, and in the phenotypic plasticity of tree-ring growth in 16-year old white fir, Abies concolor, from ten populations grown in four common gardens in the Sierra Nevada of California. For each population, tree-ring growth was modelled as a function of precipitation and degree-day sums. Tree-ring growth under three scenarios of doubled CO2 climates was estimated.

  15. Alpha-cellulose δ13C variation in mangrove tree rings correlates well with annual sea level trend between 1982 and 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke-Fu; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Liu, Tung-Sheng; Wang, Pin-Xian; Qian, Jun-Long; Chen, Te-Gu

    2004-06-01

    A pilot study of tree rings in a modern mangrove tree (Rhizophora apiculata) from Leizhou Peninsula, northern South China Sea shows that (1) the tree-rings are annual; (2) the ring widths decrease; and (3) their alpha-cellulose δ13C values increase from 1982 to 1999 AD, consistent with the trends of annual sea level, salinity and sea surface temperatures in the same period. We propose that such changes were caused by increasingly longer duration of waterlogging in response to sea-level rise. If this is the case, alpha-cellulose δ13C in mangrove tree rings can be used as a potential indicator of past sea level fluctuations.

  16. Mexican drought: an observational modeling and tree ring study of variability and climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seager, R.; Ting, M. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY (United States)]. E-mail: seager@ldeo.columbia.edu; Davis, M. [Department of History, University of California at Irvine, CA (United States); Cane, M.; Naik, N.; Nakamura, J.; Li, C.; Cook, E. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY (United States); Stahle, D.W. [Tree Ring Laboratory, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Variability of Mexican hydroclimate, with special attention to persistent drought, is examined using observations, model simulations forced by historical sea surface temperature (SST), tree ring reconstructions of past climate and model simulations and projections of naturally and anthropogenically forced climate change. During the winter half year, hydroclimate across Mexico is influenced by the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean with the Atlantic playing little role. Mexican winters tend to be wetter during El Nino conditions. In the summer half year northern Mexico is also wetter when El Nino conditions prevail, but southern Mexico is drier. A warm tropical North Atlantic Ocean makes northern Mexico dry and southern Mexico wet. These relationships are reasonably well reproduced in ensembles of atmosphere model simulations forced by historical SST for the period from 1856 to 2002. Large ensembles of 100 day long integrations are used to examine the day to day evolution of the atmospheric circulation and precipitation in response to a sudden imposition of a El Nino SST anomaly in the summer half year. Kelvin waves propagate east and immediately cause increased column-integrated moisture divergence and reduced precipitation over the tropical Americas and Intra-America Seas. Within a few days a low level high pressure anomaly develops over the Gulf of Mexico. A forced nonlinear model is used to demonstrate that this low is forced by the reduced atmospheric heating over the tropical Atlantic-Intra-America Seas area. Tree ring reconstructions that extend back before the period of instrumental precipitation data coverage are used to verify long model simulations forced by historical SST. The early to mid 1950s drought in northern Mexico appears to have been the most severe since the mid nineteenth century and likely arose as a response to both a multiyear La Nina and a warm tropical North Atlantic. A drought in the 1890s was also severe and appears driven by a

  17. Integrated Tree-Ring-Radiocarbon High-Resolution Timeframe to Resolve Earlier Second Millennium BCE Mesopotamian Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Carol B.; Lorentzen, Brita; Barjamovic, Gojko; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Kromer, Bernd; Wild, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    500 years of ancient Near Eastern history from the earlier second millennium BCE, including such pivotal figures as Hammurabi of Babylon, Šamši-Adad I (who conquered Aššur) and Zimrilim of Mari, has long floated in calendar time subject to rival chronological schemes up to 150+ years apart. Texts preserved on clay tablets provide much information, including some astronomical references, but despite 100+ years of scholarly effort, chronological resolution has proved impossible. Documents linked with specific Assyrian officials and rulers have been found and associated with archaeological wood samples at Kültepe and Acemhöyük in Turkey, and offer the potential to resolve this long-running problem. Here we show that previous work using tree-ring dating to place these timbers in absolute time has fundamental problems with key dendrochronological crossdates due to small sample numbers in overlapping years and insufficient critical assessment. To address, we have integrated secure dendrochronological sequences directly with radiocarbon (14C) measurements to achieve tightly resolved absolute (calendar) chronological associations and identify the secure links of this tree-ring chronology with the archaeological-historical evidence. The revised tree-ring-sequenced 14C time-series for Kültepe and Acemhöyük is compatible only with the so-called Middle Chronology and not with the rival High, Low or New Chronologies. This finding provides a robust resolution to a century of uncertainty in Mesopotamian chronology and scholarship, and a secure basis for construction of a coherent timeframe and history across the Near East and East Mediterranean in the earlier second millennium BCE. Our re-dating also affects an unusual tree-ring growth anomaly in wood from Porsuk, Turkey, previously tentatively associated with the Minoan eruption of the Santorini volcano. This tree-ring growth anomaly is now directly dated ~1681–1673 BCE (68.2% highest posterior density range), ~20

  18. Integrated Tree-Ring-Radiocarbon High-Resolution Timeframe to Resolve Earlier Second Millennium BCE Mesopotamian Chronology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturt W Manning

    Full Text Available 500 years of ancient Near Eastern history from the earlier second millennium BCE, including such pivotal figures as Hammurabi of Babylon, Šamši-Adad I (who conquered Aššur and Zimrilim of Mari, has long floated in calendar time subject to rival chronological schemes up to 150+ years apart. Texts preserved on clay tablets provide much information, including some astronomical references, but despite 100+ years of scholarly effort, chronological resolution has proved impossible. Documents linked with specific Assyrian officials and rulers have been found and associated with archaeological wood samples at Kültepe and Acemhöyük in Turkey, and offer the potential to resolve this long-running problem. Here we show that previous work using tree-ring dating to place these timbers in absolute time has fundamental problems with key dendrochronological crossdates due to small sample numbers in overlapping years and insufficient critical assessment. To address, we have integrated secure dendrochronological sequences directly with radiocarbon (14C measurements to achieve tightly resolved absolute (calendar chronological associations and identify the secure links of this tree-ring chronology with the archaeological-historical evidence. The revised tree-ring-sequenced 14C time-series for Kültepe and Acemhöyük is compatible only with the so-called Middle Chronology and not with the rival High, Low or New Chronologies. This finding provides a robust resolution to a century of uncertainty in Mesopotamian chronology and scholarship, and a secure basis for construction of a coherent timeframe and history across the Near East and East Mediterranean in the earlier second millennium BCE. Our re-dating also affects an unusual tree-ring growth anomaly in wood from Porsuk, Turkey, previously tentatively associated with the Minoan eruption of the Santorini volcano. This tree-ring growth anomaly is now directly dated ~1681-1673 BCE (68.2% highest posterior density

  19. Integrated Tree-Ring-Radiocarbon High-Resolution Timeframe to Resolve Earlier Second Millennium BCE Mesopotamian Chronology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Sturt W; Griggs, Carol B; Lorentzen, Brita; Barjamovic, Gojko; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Kromer, Bernd; Wild, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    500 years of ancient Near Eastern history from the earlier second millennium BCE, including such pivotal figures as Hammurabi of Babylon, Šamši-Adad I (who conquered Aššur) and Zimrilim of Mari, has long floated in calendar time subject to rival chronological schemes up to 150+ years apart. Texts preserved on clay tablets provide much information, including some astronomical references, but despite 100+ years of scholarly effort, chronological resolution has proved impossible. Documents linked with specific Assyrian officials and rulers have been found and associated with archaeological wood samples at Kültepe and Acemhöyük in Turkey, and offer the potential to resolve this long-running problem. Here we show that previous work using tree-ring dating to place these timbers in absolute time has fundamental problems with key dendrochronological crossdates due to small sample numbers in overlapping years and insufficient critical assessment. To address, we have integrated secure dendrochronological sequences directly with radiocarbon (14C) measurements to achieve tightly resolved absolute (calendar) chronological associations and identify the secure links of this tree-ring chronology with the archaeological-historical evidence. The revised tree-ring-sequenced 14C time-series for Kültepe and Acemhöyük is compatible only with the so-called Middle Chronology and not with the rival High, Low or New Chronologies. This finding provides a robust resolution to a century of uncertainty in Mesopotamian chronology and scholarship, and a secure basis for construction of a coherent timeframe and history across the Near East and East Mediterranean in the earlier second millennium BCE. Our re-dating also affects an unusual tree-ring growth anomaly in wood from Porsuk, Turkey, previously tentatively associated with the Minoan eruption of the Santorini volcano. This tree-ring growth anomaly is now directly dated ~1681-1673 BCE (68.2% highest posterior density range), ~20

  20. Pooled versus separate tree-ring δD measurements, and implications for reconstruction of the Arctic Oscillation in northwestern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaohong, E-mail: liuxh@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Sciences, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); An, Wenling [MOE, Key Laboratory for Coast and Island Development, School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Treydte, Kerstin [Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Dendro Sciences Unit, Zürcherstrasse 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Wang, Wenzhi; Xu, Guobao; Zeng, Xiaomin; Wu, Guoju; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Xuanwen [State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Sciences, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) in tree rings are an attractive but still rarely explored terrestrial archive of past climatic information. Because the preparation of the cellulose nitrate for δD measurements requires more wood and a longer preparation time than preparation techniques for other isotopes in cellulose (δ{sup 18}O or δ{sup 13}C), it is challenging to obtain high-resolution records, especially for slow-growing trees at high elevations and in boreal regions. Here, we tested whether annually pooled samples of Qinghai spruce (Picea crassifolia Kom.) trees from northwestern China provided results similar to those derived as the mean of individual measurements of the same trees and whether the resulting chronologies recorded useful climate information. Inter-tree variability of δD was higher than that of measured ring width for the same trees. We found higher and significant coherence between pooled and mean isotope chronologies than that among the individual series. It showed a logarithmic relationship between ring mass and δD; however, accounting for the influence of ring mass on δD values only slightly improved the strength of climatic signals in the pooled records. Tree-ring δD was significantly positively correlated with the mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures during the previous winter and with maximum temperature during the current August, and significantly negatively correlated with precipitation in the previous November to January and the current July. The winter climate signal seems to dominate tree-ring δD through the influence of large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, i.e. the Arctic Oscillation. These results will facilitate reconstruction of winter atmospheric circulation patterns over northwestern China based on a regional tree-ring δD networks. - Highlights: • The difference between mean and pooled tree-ring δD chronologies was tested. • High coherence between the chronologies for northwestern China. • Tree-ring

  1. Traffic pollution affects P. pinea growth according to tree ring width and C and N isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; Marzaioli, Fabio; Lubritto, Carmine; Altieri, Simona; Strumia, Sandro; Cherubini, Paolo; Cotrufo, M. Francesca

    2010-05-01

    Urbanization and industrialization are rapidly growing, as a consequence roads and their associated vehicular traffic exerts major and increasing impacts on adjacent ecosystems. Various studies have shown the impact of vehicle exhausts on road side vegetation through their visible and non-visible effects (Farmer and Lyon 1977, Sarkar et al., 1986, Angold 1997, Nuhoglu 2005) but, presently there is little known about the long term effect of air pollution on vegetation and on trees, in particular. Developing proxies for atmospheric pollution that would be used to identify the physiological responses of trees under roadside car exhaust pollution stress is needed. In this context we propose a novel method to determine the effect of car exhaust pollution on tree growth, coupling classical dendrochronological analyses and analyses of 15N and 13C in tree rings, soils and leaves with tree ring radiocarbon (14C) data. Pinus pinea individuals, adjacent to main roads in the urban area of Caserta (South Italy) and exposed to large amounts of traffic exhausts since 1980, were sampled and the time-related trend in the growth residuals was estimated. We found a consistent decrease in the ring width starting from 1980, with a slight increase in δ13C value, which was considered to be a consequence of environmental stress. No clear pattern was identified in δ15N, while an increasing effect of the fossil fuel dilution on the atmospheric bomb-enriched 14C background was detected in tree rings, as a consequence of the increase in traffic exhausts. Our findings suggest that radiocarbon is a very sensitive tool to investigate small-scale (i.e. traffic exhaust at the level crossing) and large-scale (urban area pollution) induced disturbances. References Angold PG. Impact of a road upon adjacent heathland vegetations: effect on plant species compositions. J Appl Ecol 1997; 34 (2): 409-417. Farmer JC, Lyon TDB. Lead in Glasgow street dirt and soil. Sci Tot Environ 1977; 8: 89-93. Nuhoglu

  2. Tree-Rings, Timbers and Trees: A dendrochronological survey of the 14th-century cog, Doel 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haneca, Kristof; Daly, Aoife

    2014-01-01

    In 2000, the remains of a cog, Doel 1, were found in Doel, Belgium. Wood species identification of all ship timbers and smaller elements was performed. European oak was the dominant species, followed by alder that was used for the fairings. In total 150 ring-width series were recorded. The constr......In 2000, the remains of a cog, Doel 1, were found in Doel, Belgium. Wood species identification of all ship timbers and smaller elements was performed. European oak was the dominant species, followed by alder that was used for the fairings. In total 150 ring-width series were recorded...

  3. Pooled versus separate tree-ring δD measurements, and implications for reconstruction of the Arctic Oscillation in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohong; An, Wenling; Treydte, Kerstin; Wang, Wenzhi; Xu, Guobao; Zeng, Xiaomin; Wu, Guoju; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Xuanwen

    2015-04-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) in tree rings are an attractive but still rarely explored terrestrial archive of past climatic information. Because the preparation of the cellulose nitrate for δD measurements requires more wood and a longer preparation time than preparation techniques for other isotopes in cellulose (δ18O or δ13C), it is challenging to obtain high-resolution records, especially for slow-growing trees at high elevations and in boreal regions. Here, we tested whether annually pooled samples of Qinghai spruce (Picea crassifolia Kom.) trees from northwestern China provided results similar to those derived as the mean of individual measurements of the same trees and whether the resulting chronologies recorded useful climate information. Inter-tree variability of δD was higher than that of measured ring width for the same trees. We found higher and significant coherence between pooled and mean isotope chronologies than that among the individual series. It showed a logarithmic relationship between ring mass and δD; however, accounting for the influence of ring mass on δD values only slightly improved the strength of climatic signals in the pooled records. Tree-ring δD was significantly positively correlated with the mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures during the previous winter and with maximum temperature during the current August, and significantly negatively correlated with precipitation in the previous November to January and the current July. The winter climate signal seems to dominate tree-ring δD through the influence of large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, i.e. the Arctic Oscillation. These results will facilitate reconstruction of winter atmospheric circulation patterns over northwestern China based on a regional tree-ring δD networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of pre-treatment on the nitrogen isotope composition of Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergii) tree-rings as affected by high N input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, M Larry Lopez; Mizota, Chitoshi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Nobori, Yoshihiro

    2011-11-15

    Temporal changes in the acquisition of nitrogen (N) are recorded in tree-rings together with unique N isotopic values. Some debate continues regarding the importance of wood pre-treatment in isotope analysis and, thus, this study focuses on the removal of labile components to determine the intrinsic nature of N in tree-rings. The total concentration and stable isotopic value of N in annual tree-rings were determined for two cores from Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergii) from areas colonized by black cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo). One core sample was also collected from a control site, without cormorants. Sharp increases in tree-ring δ(15)N values associated with migration of the cormorant population indicate positive incorporation of N from soils, whereas a less pronounced trend was observed for ring samples for periods without or substantially less migration, and for those obtained from the control site. All labile N components were removed by repeated extraction with toluene/ethanol (1:1) solution. Radial translocation of labile N is limited in tree-rings from Japanese black pine, providing intrinsic records on N acquisition. The difference in N isotopic values (up to 7.0‰) following pre-treatment was statistically significant for trees affected by the avian colony, whereas the pre-treatment of the control samples did not influence N values. The implication is that in agreement with previous studies pre-treatment is not necessary when trees are exposed to natural N concentrations in the soil but the removal of enriched δ(15)N labile components is necessary when woody plants are exposed to unusually high inputs of N into soils. However, the temporal trend in tree-ring δ(15)N series of the avian N affected trees did not change. Thus, if the priority is not the value but the trend then pre-treatment is not necessary.

  5. Tree-Ring:一种结构化的应用层组播模型%Tree-Ring: A Structured Application Level Multicast Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永刚; 贾春福; 吕述望; 徐亮

    2008-01-01

    在分析现有应用层组播协议基础上,提出Tree-Ring模型,该模型构建于Pastry之上,采用Pastry的路由与定位机制,构造一个树与环相结合的覆盖网络.实验显示,模型中70%以上的节点出度为1,80%以上的节点的相对延迟比控制在2.7以内.结果表明,Tree-Ring能有效地平衡节点负载,满足大规模网络中大内容传播的需要.

  6. (15)N in tree rings as a bio-indicator of changing nitrogen cycling in tropical forests: an evaluation at three sites using two sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sleen, Peter; Vlam, Mart; Groenendijk, Peter; Anten, Niels P R; Bongers, Frans; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Hietz, Peter; Pons, Thijs L; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is currently causing a more than twofold increase of reactive nitrogen input over large areas in the tropics. Elevated (15)N abundance (δ(15)N) in the growth rings of some tropical trees has been hypothesized to reflect an increased leaching of (15)N-depleted nitrate from the soil, following anthropogenic nitrogen deposition over the last decades. To find further evidence for altered nitrogen cycling in tropical forests, we measured long-term δ(15)N values in trees from Bolivia, Cameroon, and Thailand. We used two different sampling methods. In the first, wood samples were taken in a conventional way: from the pith to the bark across the stem of 28 large trees (the "radial" method). In the second, δ(15)N values were compared across a fixed diameter (the "fixed-diameter" method). We sampled 400 trees that differed widely in size, but measured δ(15)N in the stem around the same diameter (20 cm dbh) in all trees. As a result, the growth rings formed around this diameter differed in age and allowed a comparison of δ(15)N values over time with an explicit control for potential size-effects on δ(15)N values. We found a significant increase of tree-ring δ(15)N across the stem radius of large trees from Bolivia and Cameroon, but no change in tree-ring δ(15)N values over time was found in any of the study sites when controlling for tree size. This suggests that radial trends of δ(15)N values within trees reflect tree ontogeny (size development). However, for the trees from Cameroon and Thailand, a low statistical power in the fixed-diameter method prevents to conclude this with high certainty. For the trees from Bolivia, statistical power in the fixed-diameter method was high, showing that the temporal trend in tree-ring δ(15)N values in the radial method is primarily caused by tree ontogeny and unlikely by a change in nitrogen cycling. We therefore stress to account for tree size before tree-ring δ(15)N values can be properly

  7. Oxygen isotope values of tree ring α-cellulose as a proxy of hydroclimate variability in arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, J. P.; Freimuth, E. J.; Olson, E. J.; Diefendorf, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    One of the main goals of tree ring isotope studies is to reconstruct climate-driven variations in the source water and antecedent precipitation; however, evaporation in the soil and leaves can significantly modify the isotope values of the source water. This is particularly the case in arid environments where evaporative effects are perhaps the most significant unknown variable when attempting to reconstruct regional-scale hydroclimate variations from tree ring isotope proxies. To quantify the effects of extreme aridity on α-cellulose δ18O values, we measured the oxygen isotope values of groundwater, xylem water, leaf water, and tree ring α-cellulose in an endemic species of drought-resistant trees (Prosopis tamarugo) from different microenvironments throughout the Atacama Desert of Northern Chile. Average annual precipitation is <5 mm/yr, and groundwater is the primary water source for P. tamarugo trees in the region. Groundwater δ18O values at the sample locations range from -6.7 to -9.7‰, and xylem water δ18O values record a systematic increase (ave. Δ18Ox-gw =+1.3‰; 2σ =1.0‰). Leaf waters are significantly affected by evaporative enrichment with a range of δ18O values from 7 to 23‰. This range most likely reflects a number of physiological and environmental conditions including tree size, canopy development, and sample time (i.e. morning vs. evening). However, despite the large variation in leaf water δ18O values, the average difference between the α-cellulose and groundwater is very consistent (Δ18Oc-gw = +39.7‰; 2σ =1.3‰). P. tamarugo samples were collected in austral spring, when tree growth was at its maximum; therefore, any seasonal variations in plant physiology not captured with this dataset will have a limited impact on cellulose production. These data demonstrate that despite the variable evaporative enrichment of 18O in the leaf water, the α-cellulose δ18O values provide a remarkably consistent record of variations in

  8. {delta}{sup 13}C of Tree-Ring Lignin as an Indirect Measure of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, I. [CSIR Environmentek, Quaternary Dating Research Unit (South Africa)], E-mail: i.robertson@swansea.ac.uk; Loader, N. J.; McCarroll, D. [University of Wales Swansea, Department of Geography (United Kingdom); Carter, A. H. C. [University of Cambridge, Godwin Institute for Quaternary Research (United Kingdom); Cheng, L.; Leavitt, S. W. [University of Arizona, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research (United States)

    2004-06-15

    High-resolution paleoclimatic data are an essential requirement for testing numerical models of climate change and the global carbon cycle. If the long tree-ring chronologies, originally established for the purpose of dendrochronology, are to be fully exploited as an indirect measure of past climatic variability, additional techniques are required to obtain this information. The determination of the {delta}{sup 13}C value of tree-ring cellulose has been used successfully to reconstruct past climates. However, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the polysaccharide components of vascular plants (mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses) are more prone to rapid degradation than lignin. This has serious implications for the use of carbon isotope values of tree-ring cellulose as an indirect measure of past climates. An absolutely dated ring-width chronology was established for oaks (Quercus robur L.) growing at Sandringham Park in eastern England. Carbon isotope values were determined on {alpha}-cellulose and 'Klason' lignin isolated from annual latewood samples over the period AD 1895-1999. The carbon isotope values of earlywood lignin are correlated with the latewood carbon isotope values of the previous year, supporting the theory that some of the carbon utilised in earlywood synthesis is assimilated in the previous year. The high-frequency variance in the carbon isotope indices of latewood lignin and cellulose is highly correlated with combined July and August environmental variables, indicating that they were formed at similar times. There was no evidence of secondary lignification. These results demonstrate that the determination of carbon isotope values of latewood lignin offers the potential to obtain unambiguous proxy climatic data covering several millennia.

  9. 4种林木年轮水分输导模式研究%Patterns of water transport in tree rings of four tree species.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘盛; 宋彩民; 李国伟

    2011-01-01

    We took tree tings as the basic unit to investigate water transport patterns of four tree species (Populus alba × P. berolinensis , Quercus mongolica , Pinus koraiensis , Larix olgensis ) through dye test of sap flow and titration analysis. The results showed that the capability of water transport remarkably differed among tree tings. The newly-formed rings( latest three rings) were more capable of transporting water, accounting for over 2/3 of the total water transport area. However, inter-ring water transport was not detected. The four tree species demonstrated different patterns of water transport in longitudinal direction ( from the root to the top), i. e. , linear, helical, sartorially radial or their combinations. These types were referred to as “water transport patterns in tree rings”.%以年轮为基本研究单位,对选择的4个树种(银中杨、蒙古栎、红松、落叶松)采用水分输导轨迹的染色标记和定量滴定方法,研究了林木的水分输导模式.结果表明:树干中不同年轮间的水分输送能力存在显著差异,新生年轮(近3年)的水分输送能力明显较强,从输送面积看均超过了总输送面积的2/3.在年轮与年轮之间没有发现水分的横向输导现象;水分的纵向输导在所研究的4个树种的各年轮中,分别呈现直线型、螺旋型、扇型或几种形式的组合从根向上输送,将其称为林木的"年轮水分输导模式".

  10. Tree-Rings, Timbers and Trees: A dendrochronological survey of the 14th-century cog, Doel 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haneca, Kristof; Daly, Aoife

    2014-01-01

    In 2000, the remains of a cog, Doel 1, were found in Doel, Belgium. Wood species identification of all ship timbers and smaller elements was performed. European oak was the dominant species, followed by alder that was used for the fairings. In total 150 ring-width series were recorded. The constr...

  11. Oxygen isotopes in tree rings record variation in precipitation δ18O and amount effects in the south of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, Roel J W; Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gloor, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    [1] Natural archives of oxygen isotopes in precipitation may be used to study changes in the hydrological cycle in the tropics, but their interpretation is not straightforward. We studied to which degree tree rings of Mimosa acantholoba from southern Mexico record variation in isotopic composition of precipitation and which climatic processes influence oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ18Otr). Interannual variation in δ18Otr was highly synchronized between trees and closely related to isotopic composition of rain measured at San Salvador, 710 km to the southwest. Correlations with δ13C, growth, or local climate variables (temperature, cloud cover, vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) were relatively low, indicating weak plant physiological influences. Interannual variation in δ18Otr correlated negatively with local rainfall amount and intensity. Correlations with the amount of precipitation extended along a 1000 km long stretch of the Pacific Central American coast, probably as a result of organized storm systems uniformly affecting rainfall in the region and its isotope signal; episodic heavy precipitation events, of which some are related to cyclones, deposit strongly 18O-depleted rain in the region and seem to have affected the δ18Otr signal. Large-scale controls on the isotope signature include variation in sea surface temperatures of tropical north Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In conclusion, we show that δ18Otr of M. acantholoba can be used as a proxy for source water δ18O and that interannual variation in δ18Oprec is caused by a regional amount effect. This contrasts with δ18O signatures at continental sites where cumulative rainout processes dominate and thus provide a proxy for precipitation integrated over a much larger scale. Our results confirm that processes influencing climate-isotope relations differ between sites located, e.g., in the western Amazon versus coastal Mexico, and that tree ring isotope records can help in disentangling the processes

  12. Nitrogen isotopes in Tree-Rings - An approach combining soil biogeochemistry and isotopic long series with statistical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Martine M.; Bégin, Christian; Paré, David; Marion, Joëlle; Laganière, Jérôme; Séguin, Armand; Stefani, Franck; Smirnoff, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring atmospheric emissions from industrial centers in North America generally started less than 25 years ago. To compensate for the lack of monitoring, previous investigations have interpreted tree-ring N changes using the known chronology of human activities, without facing the challenge of separating climatic effects from potential anthropogenic impacts. Here we document such an attempt conducted in the oil sands (OS) mining region of Northeastern Alberta, Canada. The reactive nitrogen (Nr)-emitting oil extraction operations began in 1967, but air quality measurements were only initiated in 1997. To investigate if the beginning and intensification of OS operations induced changes in the forest N-cycle, we sampled white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) stands located at various distances from the main mining area, and receiving low, but different N deposition. Our approach combines soil biogeochemical and metagenomic characterization with long, well dated, tree-ring isotopic series. To objectively delineate the natural N isotopic behaviour in trees, we have characterized tree-ring N isotope (15N/14N) ratios between 1880 and 2009, used statistical analyses of the isotopic values and local climatic parameters of the pre-mining period to calibrate response functions and project the isotopic responses to climate during the extraction period. During that period, the measured series depart negatively from the projected natural trends. In addition, these long-term negative isotopic trends are better reproduced by multiple-regression models combining climatic parameters with the proxy for regional mining Nr emissions. These negative isotopic trends point towards changes in the forest soil biogeochemical N cycle. The biogeochemical data and ultimate soil mechanisms responsible for such changes will be discussed during the presentation.

  13. Oxygen isotopes in tree rings record variation in precipitation δ(18)O and amount effects in the south of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, Roel J W; Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gloor, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    [1] Natural archives of oxygen isotopes in precipitation may be used to study changes in the hydrological cycle in the tropics, but their interpretation is not straightforward. We studied to which degree tree rings of Mimosa acantholoba from southern Mexico record variation in isotopic composition of precipitation and which climatic processes influence oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ(18)Otr). Interannual variation in δ(18)Otr was highly synchronized between trees and closely related to isotopic composition of rain measured at San Salvador, 710 km to the southwest. Correlations with δ(13)C, growth, or local climate variables (temperature, cloud cover, vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) were relatively low, indicating weak plant physiological influences. Interannual variation in δ(18)Otr correlated negatively with local rainfall amount and intensity. Correlations with the amount of precipitation extended along a 1000 km long stretch of the Pacific Central American coast, probably as a result of organized storm systems uniformly affecting rainfall in the region and its isotope signal; episodic heavy precipitation events, of which some are related to cyclones, deposit strongly (18)O-depleted rain in the region and seem to have affected the δ(18)Otr signal. Large-scale controls on the isotope signature include variation in sea surface temperatures of tropical north Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In conclusion, we show that δ(18)Otr of M. acantholoba can be used as a proxy for source water δ(18)O and that interannual variation in δ(18)Oprec is caused by a regional amount effect. This contrasts with δ(18)O signatures at continental sites where cumulative rainout processes dominate and thus provide a proxy for precipitation integrated over a much larger scale. Our results confirm that processes influencing climate-isotope relations differ between sites located, e.g., in the western Amazon versus coastal Mexico, and that tree ring isotope records can help in

  14. The suitability of the dual isotope approach (δ13C and δ18O) in tree ring studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The use of stable isotopes, complementary to tree ring width data in tree ring research has proven to be a powerful tool in studying the impact of environmental parameters on tree physiology and growth. These three proxies are thus instrumental for climate reconstruction and improve the understanding of underlying causes of growth changes. In various cases, however, their use suggests non-plausible interpretations. Often the use of one isotope alone does not allow the detection of such "erroneous isotope responses". A careful analysis of these deviating results shows that either the validity of the carbon isotope discrimination concept is no longer true (Farquhar et al. 1982) or the assumptions for the leaf water enrichment model (Cernusak et al., 2003) are violated and thus both fractionation models are not applicable. In this presentation we discuss such cases when the known fractionation concepts fail and do not allow a correct interpretation of the isotope data. With the help of the dual isotope approach (Scheidegger et al.; 2000) it is demonstrated, how to detect and uncover the causes for such anomalous isotope data. The fractionation concepts and their combinations before the background of CO2 and H2O gas exchange are briefly explained and the specific use of the dual isotope approach for tree ring data analyses and interpretations are demonstrated. References: Cernusak, L. A., Arthur, D. J., Pate, J. S. and Farquhar, G. D.: Water relations link carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination to phloem sap sugar concentration in Eucalyptus globules, Plant Physiol., 131, 1544-1554, 2003. Farquhar, G. D., O'Leary, M. H. and Berry, J. A.: On the relationship between carbon isotope discrimination and the intercellular carbon dioxide concentration in leaves, Aust. J. Plant Physiol., 9, 121-137, 1982. Scheidegger, Y., Saurer, M., Bahn, M. and Siegwolf, R.: Linking stable oxygen and carbon isotopes with stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity: A conceptual model

  15. Oxygen isotopes in tree rings record variation in precipitation δ18O and amount effects in the south of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, Roel J. W.; Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gloor, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    Natural archives of oxygen isotopes in precipitation may be used to study changes in the hydrological cycle in the tropics, but their interpretation is not straightforward. We studied to which degree tree rings of Mimosa acantholoba from southern Mexico record variation in isotopic composition of precipitation and which climatic processes influence oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ18Otr). Interannual variation in δ18Otr was highly synchronized between trees and closely related to isotopic composition of rain measured at San Salvador, 710 km to the southwest. Correlations with δ13C, growth, or local climate variables (temperature, cloud cover, vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) were relatively low, indicating weak plant physiological influences. Interannual variation in δ18Otr correlated negatively with local rainfall amount and intensity. Correlations with the amount of precipitation extended along a 1000 km long stretch of the Pacific Central American coast, probably as a result of organized storm systems uniformly affecting rainfall in the region and its isotope signal; episodic heavy precipitation events, of which some are related to cyclones, deposit strongly 18O-depleted rain in the region and seem to have affected the δ18Otr signal. Large-scale controls on the isotope signature include variation in sea surface temperatures of tropical north Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In conclusion, we show that δ18Otr of M. acantholoba can be used as a proxy for source water δ18O and that interannual variation in δ18Oprec is caused by a regional amount effect. This contrasts with δ18O signatures at continental sites where cumulative rainout processes dominate and thus provide a proxy for precipitation integrated over a much larger scale. Our results confirm that processes influencing climate-isotope relations differ between sites located, e.g., in the western Amazon versus coastal Mexico, and that tree ring isotope records can help in disentangling the processes

  16. Intra-annual variability of anatomical structure and delta(13)C values within tree rings of spruce and pine in alpine, temperate and boreal Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaganov, Eugene A; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Skomarkova, Marina V; Knohl, Alexander; Brand, Willi A; Roscher, Christiane

    2009-10-01

    Tree-ring width, wood density, anatomical structure and (13)C/(12)C ratios expressed as delta(13)C-values of whole wood of Picea abies were investigated for trees growing in closed canopy forest stands. Samples were collected from the alpine Renon site in North Italy, the lowland Hainich site in Central Germany and the boreal Flakaliden site in North Sweden. In addition, Pinus cembra was studied at the alpine site and Pinus sylvestris at the boreal site. The density profiles of tree rings were measured using the DENDRO-2003 densitometer, delta(13)C was measured using high-resolution laser-ablation-combustion-gas chromatography-infra-red mass spectrometry and anatomical characteristics of tree rings (tracheid diameter, cell-wall thickness, cell-wall area and cell-lumen area) were measured using an image analyzer. Based on long-term statistics, climatic variables, such as temperature, precipitation, solar radiation and vapor pressure deficit, explained tree-ring width and wood density over consecutive years, while 29-58% of the variation in tree-ring width were explained by autocorrelation between tree rings. An intensive study of tree rings between 1999 and 2003 revealed that tree ring width and delta(13)C-values of whole wood were significantly correlated with length of the growing season, net radiation and vapor pressure deficit. The delta(13)C-values were not correlated with precipitation or temperature. A highly significant correlation was also found between delta(13)C of the early wood of one year and the late wood of the previous year, indicating a carry-over effect of the growing conditions of the previous season on current wood production. This latter effect may explain the high autocorrelation of long-term tree-ring statistics. The pattern, however, was complex, showing stepwise decreases as well as stepwise increases in the delta(13)C between late wood and early wood. The results are interpreted in the context of the biochemistry of wood formation and its

  17. Unravelling airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in southern China using tree-rings of 100-yr old Pinus Kwangtungensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Huang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable perennial biomonitoring of airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs is urgently necessary to detect long-term impacts of anthropogenic emission, in response to industrial policies and combustion technology adoption. One hundred records of airborne PAHs were novelly demonstrated by analyzing the tree-rings of Kwangtung pine (Pinus kwangtungensis formed from 1883 to 2007 at Naling Mountains of southern China. The total concentrations of PAHs (∑PAHs detected in the tree xylem did not progressively increase against the time. Temporal increase of high molecular-weight PAHs (HMW-PAHs coincided well to the historical-socioeconomic status in China, suggesting HMW-PAHs in old trees growing at high mountains were more indicative of regionally historical changes in airborne PAHs compared with ∑PAHs. Compositional analysis indicated airborne PAHs absorbed and accumulated in tree tissues were pyrogenic origination. Principal component analysis revealed PAHs inputs were quite historically diversiform and unevenly distributed in the atmosphere of Nanling Mountains of southern China. Dendroanalysis of old trees grown at geographically sink locations could be a useful biomonitoring technique for unravelling historical changes in PAHs composition and intensity in the atmosphere, in relation to regional industrial development and fuel consumptions.

  18. Can the solar cycle and climate synchronize the snowshoe hare cycle in Canada? Evidence from tree rings and ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A R; Gosline, J M; Holdsworth, G; Krebs, C J; Boutin, S; Smith, J N; Boonstra, R; Dale, M

    1993-02-01

    Dark marks in the rings of white spruce less than 50 yr old in Yukon, Canada, are correlated with the number of stems browsed by snowshoe hares. The frequency of these marks is positively correlated with the density of hares in the same region. The frequency of marks in trees germinating between 1751 and 1983 is positively correlated with the hare fur records of the Hudson Bay Company. Both tree marks and hare numbers are correlated with sunspot numbers, and there is a 10-yr periodicity in the correlograms. Phase analysis shows that tree marks and sunspot numbers have periods of nearly constant phase difference during the years 1751-1787, 1838-1870, and 1948 to the present, and these periods coincide with those of high sunspot maxima. The nearly constant phase relations between the annual net snow accumulation on Mount Logan and (1) tree mark ratios, (2) hare fur records before about 1895, and (3) sunspot number during periods of high amplitude in the cycles suggest there is a solar cycle-climate-hare population and tree mark link. We suggest four ways of testing this hypothesis.

  19. Long-term changes in tree-ring - climate relationships at Mt. Patscherkofel (Tyrol, Austria) since the mid 1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Kofler, Werner; Pfeifer, Klaus; Seeber, Andrea; Gruber, Andreas; Wieser, Gerhard

    2008-02-01

    Although growth limitation of trees at Alpine and high-latitude timberlines by prevailing summer temperature is well established, loss of thermal response of radial tree growth during last decades has repeatedly been addressed. We examined long-term variability of climate-growth relationships in ring width chronologies of Stone pine (Pinus cembra L.) by means of moving response functions (MRF). The study area is situated in the timberline ecotone (c. 2000 - 2200 m a.s.l.) on Mt. Patscherkofel (Tyrol, Austria). Five site chronologies were developed within the ecotone with constant sample depth (≥ 19 trees) throughout most of the time period analysed. MRF calculated for the period 1866-1999 and 1901-1999 for c. 200 and c. 100 yr old stands, respectively, revealed that mean July temperature is the major and long-term stable driving force of Pinus cembra radial growth within the timberline ecotone. However, since the mid 1980s, radial growth in timberline and tree line chronologies strikingly diverges from the July temperature trend. This is probably a result of extreme climate events (e.g. low winter precipitation, late frost) and/or increasing drought stress on cambial activity. The latter assumption is supported by a < 10 % increase in annual increments of c. 50 yr old trees at the timberline and at the tree line in 2003 compared to 2002, when extraordinary hot and dry conditions prevailed during summer. Furthermore, especially during the second half of the 20(th) century, influence of climate variables on radial growth show abrupt fluctuations, which might also be a consequence of climate warming on tree physiology.

  20. A 430 year record of hydroclimate variability for NE-Germany based on stable carbon and oxygen isotopes from pine and oak tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Gerhard; Baschek, Heiko; Heinrich, Ingo; Navabzadeh, Nadia; Riedel, Frank; Wilmking, Martin; Heußner, Karl-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    European lowlands experience many direct and indirect influences of global warming, particularly related to the hydrological cycle which lately faces increasing flood and drought events. Although important for humans and the ecosystems in which they live, little is known about the long-term spatiotemporal hydrological changes in various European regions. Here we present the first 430-year stable carbon and oxygen chronologies from tree ring cellulose in lowland oak and pine trees (P. sylvestris, Q. petraea) for the region of NE-Germany and provide annually resolved high quality hydroclimatic reconstructions. When compared to ring width data isotope data can be used with only minor adjustments to their means (besides correction of short juvenile trends) and sample depths of 4-5 trees are normally enough for a significant expressed population signal being representative for a site. For this study more than 20 individual tree ring sub-samples for isotopic analyses were obtained from well replicated tree ring chronologies built using living trees as well as historical timber originating from four different lowland sites (50-90m asl.). By a calibration and verification approach we have evaluated the response to instrumental climate and trends of atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 (13C, only) data. While ring widths shows strong correlation to winter temperature, highly significant correlations with summer (JJA) hydroclimate conditions were found for both tree ring 13C and 18O. Strongest relationships were found with summer water vapour pressure deficit (13C and 18O) and Tmax (JJA). Although significant, relationships between 13C and climate data were found considerably weaker than climate/18O relations. On the other hand, the 13C record reveals high similarity with solar irradiance, whereas 18O does not. Based on this profound calibration the presentation will show and discuss annually resolved hydroclimatic variability of the region from our multi-centennial isotope

  1. Tree-Ring Chronology of Pedunculate Oak (Quercus robur and its Potential for Development of Dendrochronological Research in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Čufar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the local tree-ring chronology of pedunculate oak (Qercus robur from Kobiljak near Zagreb, Croatia (16º09’ E, 45º49’ N, 140 m a.s.l.. The chronology is based on 17 trees and is 127 years long and covers the period of 1883-2009. The well replicated part of the residual version of the ARSTAN chronology with SSS>0.80 (interval of 88 years, period 1922-2009 was used for dendroclimatological analysis, which showed that June precipitation has positive and temperature has negative effect on tree-ring variation. Comparison with 40 available oak chronologies from the surrounding countries confi rmed its good teleconnection with 2 local oak chronologies from Austria, 2 from Hungary, and 3 from Slovenia. It also exhibits good heteroconnection, i.e. similarity with chronologies of beech (Fagus sylvatica, from various sites in Slovenia. The similarities can be ascribed to response to common climatic factors. The results indicate that the chronology could be a good reference point for constructing a longer regional chronology in Croatia and surrounding countries, which could be used for different purposes including dating of objects of cultural heritage.

  2. The Response of Tree-Ring Growth to Climate at Upper Timberline of Southern Aspect of Mt. Taibai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the impact of climate change on vegetation in Qinling mountainous area has already been authenticated by numerous investigations, nevertheless, as the major ridge of Qinling Mountains as well as national natural conservation reserve, the ecology response of Mt. Taibai sub-alpine vegetation to climate change has not yet gained enough public attention.In this study, in accordance with the method of dendrochronology, response analysis was carried out to contrast characteristic parameters of tree-ring width chronologies for Larix chinensis from different elevations as well as their response pattern to climate change. The result showed that, Mean sensitivity, standard deviation and variance in first eigenvector are increasing with the rise of elevation, but the correlation coefficients (R1, R2, R3 were decreasing which indicated that the strength of the tree’s common or relative response to environment was decreasing with altitude. Precipitation had stronger correlation with the tree-ring radial growth than air temperature in both of the sites, during the growing season, trees in lower altitude had better correlation with temperature than in higher altitude, thus showing the different response to climate between the two different sites.

  3. A novel procedure to measure shrinkage-free tree-rings from very large wood samples combining photogrammetry, high-resolution image processing, and GIS tools

    OpenAIRE

    Latte, Nicolas; Beeckman, Hans; Bauwens, Sébastien; Bonnet, Stéphanie; Lejeune, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We present a new procedure for wood sampling and tree-ring measurement that can be used for dendrochronological investigation on very large trees, specifically adapted for tropical rainforest species. This procedure takes advantage of the technological developments in computing, image processing, and geographic information systems (GIS) to overcome the technical limitations of the currently used methods. Two types of wood samples can be used (stem disks and/or bars) depending on tree diameter...

  4. Did the late spring frost in 2007 and 2011 affect tree-ring width and earlywood vessel size in Pedunculate oak ( Quercus robur) in northern Poland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchałka, Radosław; Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Julia; Przybylak, Rajmund; Dąbrowski, Henryk P.

    2016-08-01

    Trees are sensitive to extreme weather and environmental conditions. This sensitivity is visible in tree-ring widths and cell structure. In our study, we hypothesized that the sudden frost noted at the beginning of May in both 2007 and 2011 affected cambial activity and, consequently, the number and size of vessels in the tree rings. It was decided to test this hypothesis after damage to leaves was observed. The applied response function model did not show any significant relationships between spring temperature and growth. However, this method uses average values for long periods and sometimes misses the short-term effects. This is why we decided to study each ring separately, comparing them with rings unaffected by the late frost. Our study showed that the short-term effect of sudden frost in late spring did not affect tree rings and selected cell parameters. The most likely reasons for this are (i) cambial activity producing the earlywood vessels before the occurrence of the observed leaf damage, (ii) the forest micro-climate protecting the trees from the harsh frost and (iii) the temperature decline being too short-lived an event to affect the oaks. On the other hand, the visible damage may be occasional and not affect cambium activity and tree vitality at all. We conclude that oak is well-adapted to this phenomenon.

  5. Tree-ring-width-based PDSI reconstruction for central Inner Mongolia, China over the past 333 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Xinjia; Song, Huiming; Cai, Qiufang; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Boyang; Liu, Han; Mei, Ruochen

    2016-04-01

    A tree-ring-width chronology was developed from Pinus tabulaeformis aged up to 333 years from central Inner Mongolia, China. The chronology was significantly correlated with the local Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI). We therefore reconstructed the first PDSI reconstruction from March to June based on the local tree ring data from 1680 to 2012 AD. The reconstruction explained 40.7 % of the variance (39.7 % after adjusted the degrees of freedom) of the actual PDSI during the calibration period (1951-2012 AD). The reconstructed PDSI series captured the severe drought event of the late 1920s, which occurred extensively in northern China. Running variance analyses indicated that the variability of drought increased sharply after 1960, indicating more drought years, which may imply anthropogenic related global warming effects in the region. In the entire reconstruction, there were five dry periods: 1730-1814 AD, 1849-1869 AD, 1886-1942 AD (including severe drought in late 1920s), 1963-1978 AD and 2004-2007 AD; and five wet periods: 1685-1729 AD, 1815-1848 AD, 1870-1885 AD, 1943-1962 AD and 1979-2003 AD. Conditions turned dry after 2003 AD, and the PDSI from March to June (PDSI36) captured many interannual extreme drought events since then, such as 2005-2008 AD. The reconstruction is comparable to other tree-ring-width-based PDSI series from the neighboring regions, indicating that our reconstruction has good regional representativeness. Significant relationships were found between our PDSI reconstruction and the solar radiation cycle and the sun spot cycle, North Atlantic Oscillation, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, as well as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Power spectral analyses detected 147.0-, 128.2-, 46.5-, 6.5-, 6.3-, 2.6-, 2.2- and 2.0-year quasi-cycles in the reconstructed series.

  6. Multi-century tree-ring based reconstruction of the Neuquén River streamflow, northern Patagonia, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Mundo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In most cases, gauged river flow records in southern South America extend for only a few decades, hampering the detection of long-term, decadal to centennial-scale cycles and trends. Long streamflow series can be reconstructed from tree-ring records, offering the opportunity of extending the limited hydrological instrumental data to several centuries. In northern Patagonia, Argentina, the Neuquén River has great importance for local and national socio-economic activities such as hydroelectric power generation, agriculture and tourism. In this study, new and updated tree-ring chronologies from Araucaria araucana and Austrocedrus chilensis are used to reconstruct the October–June mean streamflow for the Neuquén River and place the period of gauged flows (1903–2009, in a long-term, multi-century context. The reconstruction covers the period 1346–2000 AD and was developed from a network of 43 tree-ring chronologies, grouped in composite series, using a nested principal component regression approach. Analyses of the frequency, intensity, and duration of droughts and pluvial events indicate that the 20th century contains some of the driest and wettest annual to decadal-scale events in the last 654 yr, but longer and more severe events were recorded in previous centuries. Blackman-Tukey and singular spectral analyses identified quasiperiodic oscillations from 3.5 to 17.5 yr. A dominant 6.8-yr cycle explains ca. 23.6% of the total variance in the Neuquén River streamflow reconstruction. Correlation analyses showed that discharges of the Neuquén River are related to variations in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM, a measure of air mass exchanges between middle and high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. This association is consistent with previous studies that indicate a strong correlation between rainfall in northern Patagonia and SAM variations.

  7. Tree-ring proxy based temperature reconstructions and climate model simulations: cross-comparison at the Pyrenees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dorado Liñán

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available May-to-September mean temperatures over the larger Pyrenees area (Northern Spain and Southern France are reconstructed for the last Millennium from 22 maximum density (MXD tree-ring chronologies. For the standardization of the tree-ring series, two detrending methods (Regional Curve Standardization (RCS and 300-yr spline were combined with and without an adaptive power transform (PT for variance stabilization in the individual series. Thus, four different standardization procedures were applied to the data. Additionally, different regional chronologies were generated by computing a mean composite, averaging the local chronologies, or by applying Principal Components Analysis (PCA to extract common variance from the subsets of individual MXD chronologies.

    Calibration-verification trials were performed using the product of the three regional aggregation methods in split periods: 1900–1952 and 1953–2006. Two methods were used to calibrate the regional chronology: regression and a simple variance-matching, sometimes also known as composite-plus-scaling. The resulting set of temperature reconstructions was compared with climate simulations performed with global (ECHO-G over the last Millennium for the target region and regional (MM5 climate models.

    The reconstructions reveal inter-annual to multi-centennial temperature variations at the Pyrenees region for the last 750 yr. Generally, variations at inter-decadal timescales, including the cold periods associated with the solar minima, are common to all reconstruction variants although some discrepancies are found at longer timescales.

    The simulations of the global circulation model ECHO-G and the regional model MM5 agree with the tree-ring based reconstructions at decadal to multi-decadal time-scales. However, the comparison also highlights differences that need to be understood, such as the amplitude of the temperature variations and the discrepancies regarding the 20th

  8. Multi-century tree-ring based reconstruction of the Neuquén River streamflow, northern Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundo, I. A.; Masiokas, M. H.; Villalba, R.; Morales, M. S.; Neukom, R.; Le Quesne, C.; Urrutia, R. B.; Lara, A.

    2012-04-01

    In most cases, gauged river flow records in southern South America extend for only a few decades, hampering the detection of long-term, decadal to centennial-scale cycles and trends. Long streamflow series can be reconstructed from tree-ring records, offering the opportunity of extending the limited hydrological instrumental data to several centuries. In northern Patagonia, Argentina, the Neuquén River has great importance for local and national socio-economic activities such as hydroelectric power generation, agriculture and tourism. In this study, new and updated tree-ring chronologies from Araucaria araucana and Austrocedrus chilensis are used to reconstruct the October-June mean streamflow for the Neuquén River and place the period of gauged flows (1903-2009), in a long-term, multi-century context. The reconstruction covers the period 1346-2000 AD and was developed from a network of 43 tree-ring chronologies, grouped in composite series, using a nested principal component regression approach. Analyses of the frequency, intensity, and duration of droughts and pluvial events indicate that the 20th century contains some of the driest and wettest annual to decadal-scale events in the last 654 yr, but longer and more severe events were recorded in previous centuries. Blackman-Tukey and singular spectral analyses identified quasiperiodic oscillations from 3.5 to 17.5 yr. A dominant 6.8-yr cycle explains ca. 23.6% of the total variance in the Neuquén River streamflow reconstruction. Correlation analyses showed that discharges of the Neuquén River are related to variations in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM), a measure of air mass exchanges between middle and high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. This association is consistent with previous studies that indicate a strong correlation between rainfall in northern Patagonia and SAM variations.

  9. Multi-century tree-ring based reconstruction of the Neuquén River streamflow, northern Patagonia, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Mundo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In most cases, gauged river flow records in southern South America exist for only a few decades, hampering the detection of long-term, decadal to centennial-scale cycles and trends. Long streamflow series can be reconstructed from tree-ring records, offering the opportunity of extending the limited hydrological instrumental data for several centuries or millennia. In northern Patagonia, Argentina, the Neuquén River has great importance for local and national socio-economic activities such as hydroelectric power generation, agriculture and tourism. In this study, new and updated tree-ring chronologies from Araucaria araucana and Austrocedrus chilensis are used to reconstruct the October–June mean streamflow for the Neuquén River and place the period of gauged flows, 1903–2009, in a long-term, multi-century context. The reconstruction covers the period 1346–2000 AD and was developed through a nested principal components regression approach using a network of 43 tree-ring chronologies grouped in composite series. Analyses of the frequency, intensity, and duration of droughts and pluvial events indicate that the 20th century contains some of the driest and wettest annual to decadal-scale events in the past millennium, but longer and more severe events can also be observed in previous centuries. Blackman-Tukey and Singular Spectral Analyses identified various multi-decadal quasiperiodic oscillations with a dominant 6.8-year cycle explaining ca. 23.6% of the total variance in the Neuquén River streamflow reconstruction. We also found that the Neuquén River discharges are related to variations in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM, a measure of air mass exchanges between middle and high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. This association is consistent with previous studies which indicate a strong connection between rainfall patterns in northern Patagonia and SAM activity.

  10. Tree-ring-width-based PDSI reconstruction for central Inner Mongolia, China over the past 333 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Xinjia; Song, Huiming; Cai, Qiufang; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Boyang; Liu, Han; Mei, Ruochen

    2017-02-01

    A tree-ring-width chronology was developed from Pinus tabulaeformis aged up to 333 years from central Inner Mongolia, China. The chronology was significantly correlated with the local Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI). We therefore reconstructed the first PDSI reconstruction from March to June based on the local tree ring data from 1680 to 2012 AD. The reconstruction explained 40.7 % of the variance (39.7 % after adjusted the degrees of freedom) of the actual PDSI during the calibration period (1951-2012 AD). The reconstructed PDSI series captured the severe drought event of the late 1920s, which occurred extensively in northern China. Running variance analyses indicated that the variability of drought increased sharply after 1960, indicating more drought years, which may imply anthropogenic related global warming effects in the region. In the entire reconstruction, there were five dry periods: 1730-1814 AD, 1849-1869 AD, 1886-1942 AD (including severe drought in late 1920s), 1963-1978 AD and 2004-2007 AD; and five wet periods: 1685-1729 AD, 1815-1848 AD, 1870-1885 AD, 1943-1962 AD and 1979-2003 AD. Conditions turned dry after 2003 AD, and the PDSI from March to June (PDSI36) captured many interannual extreme drought events since then, such as 2005-2008 AD. The reconstruction is comparable to other tree-ring-width-based PDSI series from the neighboring regions, indicating that our reconstruction has good regional representativeness. Significant relationships were found between our PDSI reconstruction and the solar radiation cycle and the sun spot cycle, North Atlantic Oscillation, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, as well as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Power spectral analyses detected 147.0-, 128.2-, 46.5-, 6.5-, 6.3-, 2.6-, 2.2- and 2.0-year quasi-cycles in the reconstructed series.

  11. Elevated CO₂ increases tree-level intrinsic water use efficiency: insights from carbon and oxygen isotope analyses in tree rings across three forest FACE sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; Saurer, Matthias; Cherubini, Paolo; Calfapietra, Carlo; McCarthy, Heather R; Norby, Richard J; Francesca Cotrufo, M

    2013-01-01

    Elevated CO₂ increases intrinsic water use efficiency (WUE(i) ) of forests, but the magnitude of this effect and its interaction with climate is still poorly understood. We combined tree ring analysis with isotope measurements at three Free Air CO₂ Enrichment (FACE, POP-EUROFACE, in Italy; Duke FACE in North Carolina and ORNL in Tennessee, USA) sites, to cover the entire life of the trees. We used δ¹³C to assess carbon isotope discrimination and changes in water-use efficiency, while direct CO₂ effects on stomatal conductance were explored using δ¹⁸O as a proxy. Across all the sites, elevated CO₂ increased ¹³C-derived water-use efficiency on average by 73% for Liquidambar styraciflua, 77% for Pinus taeda and 75% for Populus sp., but through different ecophysiological mechanisms. Our findings provide a robust means of predicting water-use efficiency responses from a variety of tree species exposed to variable environmental conditions over time, and species-specific relationships that can help modelling elevated CO₂ and climate impacts on forest productivity, carbon and water balances.

  12. Teberda valley runoff variability (AD 1850-2005) based on tree-ring reconstruction (Northern Caucasus, Russia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matskovsky, Vladimir V; Dolgova, E A; Solomina, O N, E-mail: matskovsky@gmail.co [Institute of Geography, Russian Academy of Sciences, 29 Staromonetniy pereulok, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-15

    Seven tree-ring chronologies are used to reconstruct Teberda River (Northern Caucasus, Russia) smoothed runoff for May, July and August. Six chronologies were developed from Pinus sylvestris and one from Abies nordmanniana. Tree growth is significantly, but weakly, correlated with maximum temperatures (negatively) and relative humidity (positively) during summer. All possible combinations of seven predictors were tried to get the best result on the cross-validation. Two of three reconstructions showed high wavelet coherence with instrumental data on decadal timescales and were analysed for spectrum stability. Minima of moving trends at the end of the reconstructions along with weakening of decadal cycles may be a marker of significant change of Teberda River hydrological regime during the second half of the 20th century.

  13. Analysis of past surface temperature reconstructions based on the tree-ring chronologies and borehole temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornov, O. V.; Nikitaev, V. G.; Pronichev, A. N.; Tyuflin, S. A.; Bukharova, T. I.

    2016-06-01

    There have been done many past surface temperature reconstructions based on the temperature measurements in rock and glacier boreholes. However, the reliability of these reconstructions connected with the uniqueness and stability properties is not studied. We carried out the reconstruction by search of the past surface temperature in form of the finite set of the Fourier series that provides the unique and stable solution. The tree-ring chronologies are used as the high-resolution proxy climate indicator to find out the dominant periods of the Fourier series. The Tikhonov regularization method is applied to solve the inverse problem.

  14. Teberda valley runoff variability (AD 1797-2003) based on tree-ring reconstruction (Northern Caucasus, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matskovskiy, V. V.; Dolgova, E. A.; Solomina, O. N.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we provide a new tree-ring based runoff reconstruction for Teberda river for 1797-2003. Teberda river is a tributary of Kuban' (Azov Sea basin), 60 km long with the watershed surface equal to 1080 km2. 60% of runoff occurs in summer, 17% - in the fall, 5% - in winter, 18% - in spring. 55,8% of runoff (at Teberda hydrological station) is provided by snow and ice melt (Lurye 2000). No statistically significant trend is identified in the Teberda runoff records in 1930-2000 despite of some important climatic and environmental changes occurred in this period in the Northern Caucasus, namely a general warming in winter, increase in solid precipitation and recession of glaciers. Tree-ring properties were successfully used previously to reconstruct streamflow (Stockton and Jacoby, 1976, Woodhouse et al., 2006) in the regions where drought influence both tree growth and river runoff regime. In the Northern Caucasus, even at the upper tree limit pine and spruce growth is largely limited by the availability of water (Dologva et al., 2007). The correlation between Pinus silvestris ring width and June-July Teberda river runoff is 0.4, while it increases up to 0.69 for 11-years running mean. We used linear regression of instrumental records of Teberda runoff (1927-2000) and first principal component of the pine ring width chronologies from the same valley to reconstruct the June-July runoff for the period 1797-2003. Our chronology is two centuries longer, but its reliable portion (EPS > 0.8) begin in the late 18th century. We used cross-validation to verify the reconstruction, so the correlation coefficient is 0.72 and mean difference is 23.13 (52% of interquartile range) between reconstruction and instrumental record for the verification period. The reconstruction reproduces well the general trends in runoff variability, but slightly underestimates the amplitude of the runoff positive anomalies in 1940s. The positive peaks of reconstructed runoff are centered

  15. Four new tree-ring chronologies from old black pine forests of Sandıras Mountain (Mugla, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Doğan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sandıras Mountain is located in southwest of Gölgeli Mountain, which lies parallel to border of Aegean and Mediterranean Regions, in Southwestern Anatolia. This mountainous area is one of the natural distribution areas of black pine (Pinus nigra Arn. and has the oldest black pine communities in Turkey. Monumental black pine stands and the large number of individual monumental trees can be observed between the 1200 and 2000 m elevations of the mountain (especially north slope of the mountain. In this paper, we present preliminary results of a dendrochronological research on old black pine trees of Sandıras Mountain. Four new tree-ring chronologies were built from upper and lower elevations of south and north slopes of the mountain. The shortest and the longest chronologies were 241 and 820 years-long (obtained from upper elevation of the north slope, respectively. In this research, we record the most sensitive black pine trees (mean sensitivity value is 0.27 of Turkey from the north slope of Sandıras Mountain.

  16. Flood-Ring Formation and Root Development in Response to Experimental Flooding of Young Quercus robur Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copini, Paul; den Ouden, Jan; Robert, Elisabeth M. R.; Tardif, Jacques C.; Loesberg, Walter A.; Goudzwaard, Leo; Sass-Klaassen, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Spring flooding in riparian forests can cause significant reductions in earlywood-vessel size in submerged stem parts of ring-porous tree species, leading to the presence of ‘flood rings’ that can be used as a proxy to reconstruct past flooding events, potentially over millennia. The mechanism of flood-ring formation and the relation with timing and duration of flooding are still to be elucidated. In this study, we experimentally flooded 4-year-old Quercus robur trees at three spring phenophases (late bud dormancy, budswell, and internode expansion) and over different flooding durations (2, 4, and 6 weeks) to a stem height of 50 cm. The effect of flooding on root and vessel development was assessed immediately after the flooding treatment and at the end of the growing season. Ring width and earlywood-vessel size and density were measured at 25- and 75-cm stem height and collapsed vessels were recorded. Stem flooding inhibited earlywood-vessel development in flooded stem parts. In addition, flooding upon budswell and internode expansion led to collapsed earlywood vessels below the water level. At the end of the growing season, mean earlywood-vessel size in the flooded stem parts (upon budswell and internode expansion) was always reduced by approximately 50% compared to non-flooded stem parts and 55% compared to control trees. This reduction was already present 2 weeks after flooding and occurred independent of flooding duration. Stem and root flooding were associated with significant root dieback after 4 and 6 weeks and mean radial growth was always reduced with increasing flooding duration. By comparing stem and root flooding, we conclude that flood rings only occur after stem flooding. As earlywood-vessel development was hampered during flooding, a considerable number of narrow earlywood vessels present later in the season, must have been formed after the actual flooding events. Our study indicates that root dieback, together with strongly reduced hydraulic

  17. Detecting long-term changes in point-source fossil CO2 emissions with tree ring archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Elizabeth D.; Turnbull, Jocelyn C.; Norris, Margaret W.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the utility of tree ring 14C archives for detecting long-term changes in fossil CO2 emissions from a point source. Trees assimilate carbon from the atmosphere during photosynthesis, in the process faithfully recording the average atmospheric 14C content in each new annual tree ring. Using 14C as a proxy for fossil CO2, we examine interannual variability over six years of fossil CO2 observations between 2004-2005 and 2011-2012 from two trees growing near the Kapuni Gas Treatment Plant in rural Taranaki, New Zealand. We quantify the amount of variability that can be attributed to transport and meteorology by simulating constant point-source fossil CO2 emissions over the observation period with the atmospheric transport model WindTrax. We compare model simulation results to observations and calculate the amount of change in emissions that we can detect with new observations over annual or multi-year time periods, given both the measurement uncertainty of 1ppm and the modelled variation in transport. In particular, we ask, what is the minimum amount of change in emissions that we can detect using this method, given a reference period of six years? We find that changes of 42 % or more could be detected in a new sample from one year at the same observation location or 22 % in the case of four years of new samples. This threshold is reduced and the method becomes more practical the more the size of the signal increases. For point sources 10 times larger than the Kapuni plant (a more typical size for power plants worldwide), it would be possible to detect sustained emissions changes on the order of 10 %, given suitable meteorology and observations.

  18. The Oldest, Slowest Rainforests in the World? Massive Biomass and Slow Carbon Dynamics of Fitzroya cupressoides Temperate Forests in Southern Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Urrutia-Jalabert

    Full Text Available Old-growth temperate rainforests are, per unit area, the largest and most long-lived stores of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere, but their carbon dynamics have rarely been described. The endangered Fitzroya cupressoides forests of southern South America include stands that are probably the oldest dense forest stands in the world, with long-lived trees and high standing biomass. We assess and compare aboveground biomass, and provide the first estimates of net primary productivity (NPP, carbon allocation and mean wood residence time in medium-age stands in the Alerce Costero National Park (AC in the Coastal Range and in old-growth forests in the Alerce Andino National Park (AA in the Andean Cordillera. Aboveground live biomass was 113-114 Mg C ha(-1 and 448-517 Mg C ha(-1 in AC and AA, respectively. Aboveground productivity was 3.35-3.36 Mg C ha(-1 year(-1 in AC and 2.22-2.54 Mg C ha(-1 year(-1 in AA, values generally lower than others reported for temperate wet forests worldwide, mainly due to the low woody growth of Fitzroya. NPP was 4.21-4.24 and 3.78-4.10 Mg C ha(-1 year(-1 in AC and AA, respectively. Estimated mean wood residence time was a minimum of 539-640 years for the whole forest in the Andes and 1368-1393 years for only Fitzroya in this site. Our biomass estimates for the Andes place these ecosystems among the most massive forests in the world. Differences in biomass production between sites seem mostly apparent as differences in allocation rather than productivity. Residence time estimates for Fitzroya are the highest reported for any species and carbon dynamics in these forests are the slowest reported for wet forests worldwide. Although primary productivity is low in Fitzroya forests, they probably act as ongoing biomass carbon sinks on long-term timescales due to their low mortality rates and exceptionally long residence times that allow biomass to be accumulated for millennia.

  19. Effect of Climatic Conditions on Tree-Ring Widths in Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L. in the city of Wrocław

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kalbarczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The response of trees to weather conditions, expressed in the tree-ring widths, depends on the extent of urbanization in the area. Specifi c climatic conditions in an urban heat island can be expected to result in growth differences to trees growing in non-urban areas. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to characterize the effect of climatic conditions on tree-ring widths of black locust in the city of Wrocław. Materials consisted of wooden discs taken from felled trees at four sampling sites (4 streets of Wrocław at a height of 1.3 m from the ground. Meteorological data were obtained for the period 1971-2013 from the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMGW in Wrocław. Analysis of the multiannual period showed a significant negative trend in annual ring widths of black locust in the city of Wrocław. A code WROB was assigned to the chronology. The annual ring widths averaged 3.4 mm, ranging from 1.6 to 5.6 mm. In the urban conditions of Wrocław, the air temperature and precipitation significantly influenced the annual ring widths of black locust. The results indicate the need for further research on a larger number of samples.

  20. The history of mercury pollution near the Spolana chlor-alkali plant (Neratovice, Czech Republic) as recorded by Scots pine tree rings and other bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Šimeček, Martin; Shanley, James B; Rohovec, Jan; Hojdová, Maria; Houška, Jakub

    2017-05-15

    We assessed >100years of mercury (Hg) pollution recorded in the tree rings of Scots Pine near a Czech chlor-alkali plant operating since 1941. Hg concentrations in tree rings increased with the launching of plant operations and decreased when Hg emissions decreased in 1975 due to an upgrade in production technology. Similar to traditional bioindicators of pollution such as pine needles, bark and forest floor humus, Hg concentrations in Scots Pine boles decreased with distance from the plant. Mean Hg in pine bole in the 1940s ranged from 32.5μg/kg Hg at a distance of 0.5km from the plant to 5.4μg/kg at a distance of >4.7km, where tree ring Hg was the same as at a reference site, and other bioindicators also suggest that the effect of the plant was no longer discernible. Tree ring Hg concentrations decreased by 8-29μg/kg since the 1940s at all study sites including the reference site. The lack of exact correspondence between changes at the plant and tree ring Hg indicated some smearing of the signal due to lateral translocation of Hg from sapwood to heartwood. Bole Hg concentrations reflected local and regional atmospheric Hg concentrations, and not Hg wet deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sea-level pressure variability around Antarctica since A.D. 1750 inferred from subantarctic tree-ring records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba, R. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory]|[Departamento de Dendrocronologia e Historia Ambientol, IANIGLA, CONICET, C.C. 330, 5500 Mena (Argentina); Cook, E.R.; D`Arrigo, R.D.; Jacoby, G.C. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Jones, P.D. [Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Salinger, M.J. [National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, P O Box 109-695, New market, Auckland (New Zealand); Palmer, J. [Department of Plant Science, Lincoln University, P O Box 84, Canterbury (New Zealand)

    1997-07-01

    A tree-ring chronology network recently developed from the subantarctic forests provides an opportunity to study long-term climatic variability at higher latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Fifty long (1911-1985), homogeneous records of monthly mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) from the southern latitudes (15-65 S) were intercorrelated on a seasonal basis to establish the most consistent, long-term transpolar teleconnections during this century. Variations in summer MSLP between the South America-Antarctic Peninsula and the New Zealand sectors of the Southern Ocean are significantly correlated in a negative sense (r=-0.53, P<0.001). Climatically sensitive chronologies from Tierra del Fuego (54-55 ) and New Zealand (39-47 ) were used to develop verifiable reconstructions of summer (November to February) MSLP for both sectors of the Southern Ocean. These reconstructions, which explain between 37 and 43% of the instrumentally recorded pressure variance, indicate that inverse trends in MSLP from diametrically opposite sides of Antarctica have prevailed during the past two centuries. However, the strength of this relationship varies over time. Differences in normalized MSLP between the New Zealand and the South America-Antarctic Peninsula sectors were used to develop a summer transpolar index (STPI), which represents an index of sea-level pressure wavenumber one in the Southern Hemisphere higher latitudes. Tree-ring based reconstructions of STPI show significant differences in large-scale atmospheric circulation between the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries. (orig.). With 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Carbon-14 in tree rings and other terrestrial samples in the vicinity of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant, Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeika, Jonas; Petrosius, Rimantas; Pukiene, Rutile

    2008-02-01

    The results of (14)C measurements in the annual tree rings from the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) surroundings, Lithuania, for the period of its operation from 1984 to 2002 are presented. The terrestrial samples, mainly moss and related soil, are studied in places as well. The tree rings have shown slightly enhanced (14)C activity due to operation of the nuclear power plant. The maximal calculated normalized (14)C release of 11TBqGW(e)(-1)year(-1) and the maximal effective dose of 2.0x10(-3)mSvyear(-1) resulting from the (14)C were estimated for 1999. For other years of INPP operation these values are lower. The excess of (14)C specific activity measured in the moss and soil samples from moss-covered sites near the nuclear power plant (up to 0.5km) showed highly elevated (14)C contents (up to 813pMC), probably indicating releases of particulate material.

  3. Moisture increase in response to high-altitude warming evidenced by tree-rings on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinbao; Shi, Jiangfeng; Zhang, David D.; Yang, Bao; Fang, Keyan; Yue, Pak Hong

    2017-01-01

    Rapid warming has been observed in the high-altitude areas around the globe, but the implications on moisture change are not fully understood. Here we use tree-rings to reveal common moisture change on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau (TP) during the past five centuries, and show that regional moisture change in late spring to early summer (April-June) is closely related to large-scale temperature anomaly over the TP, with increased moisture coincident with periods of high temperature. The most recent pluvial during the 1990s-2000s is likely the wettest for the past five centuries, which coincides with the warmest period on the TP during the past millennium. Dynamic analysis reveals that vertical air convection is enhanced in response to anomalous TP surface warming, leading to an increase in lower-tropospheric humidity and effective precipitation over the southeastern TP. The coherent warm-wet relationship identified in both tree-rings and dynamic analysis implies a generally wetter condition on the southeastern TP under future warming.

  4. Wavelet analysis of low-frequency variability in oak tree-ring chronologies from east Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Asok K.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the low-frequency (interannual and longer period variability in three hydroclimatic records from east Central Europe. Two of these records consist of climate proxies derived from oak-tree rings in Bakta forest, and Balaton Highlands in Hungary, for the time interval 1783-2003. The third record consists of homogenized instrumental precipitation data from Budapest, Hungary, from 1842 to 2003. Using wavelet analysis, the three time series are analyzed and compared with one another. It is found that all three time series exhibit strong interannual variability at the 2-4 years timescales, and these variations occur intermittently throughout the length of each record. Significant variability is also observed in all the records at decadal timescales, but these variations persist for only two to three cycles. Wavelet coherence among the various time series is used to explore their time-varying correlation. The results reveal significant coherence at the 2-4 years band. At these timescales, the climatic variations are correlated to the tree-ring signal over different time intervals with changing phase. Increased (decreased contribution of large-scale stratiform precipitation offers a potential explanation for enhanced (faded coherence at the interannual timescale. Strong coherence was also observed occasionally at decadal timescales, however these coherences did not appear uniformly. These results reinforce the earlier assertion that neither the strength nor the rank of the similarity of the local hydroclimate signals is stable throughout the past two centuries.

  5. A Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index Reconstruction in the Taihe Mountains Using Tree-Ring Widths for the Last 283 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yongyong; Liu, Yu; Song, Huiming; Sun, Junyan; Lei, Ying; Wang, Yanchao

    2015-01-01

    Tree-ring samples from Chinese Pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) that were collected in the Taihe Mountains on the western Loess Plateau, China, were used to analyze the effects of climate and drought on radial growth and to reconstruct the mean April-June Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) during the period 1730-2012 AD. Precipitation positively affected tree growth primarily during wet seasons, while temperature negatively affected tree growth during dry seasons. Tree growth responded positively to SPEI at long time scales most likely because the trees were able to withstand water deficits but lacked a rapid response to drought. The 10-month scale SPEI was chosen for further drought reconstruction. A calibration model for the period 1951-2011 explained 51% of the variance in the modeled SPEI data. Our SPEI reconstruction revealed long-term patterns of drought variability and captured some significant drought events, including the severe drought of 1928-1930 and the clear drying trend since the 1950s which were widespread across northern China. The reconstruction was also consistent with two other reconstructions on the western Loess Plateau at both interannual and decadal scales. The reconstructed SPEI series showed synchronous variations with the drought/wetness indices and spatial correlation analyses indicated that this reconstruction could be representative of large-scale SPEI variability in northern China. Period analysis discovered 128-year, 25-year, 2.62-year, 2.36-year, and 2.04-year cycles in this reconstruction. The time-dependency of the growth response to drought should be considered in further studies of the community dynamics. The SPEI reconstruction improves the sparse network of long-term climate records for an enhanced understanding of climatic variability on the western Loess Plateau, China.

  6. A Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index Reconstruction in the Taihe Mountains Using Tree-Ring Widths for the Last 283 Years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyong Ma

    Full Text Available Tree-ring samples from Chinese Pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. that were collected in the Taihe Mountains on the western Loess Plateau, China, were used to analyze the effects of climate and drought on radial growth and to reconstruct the mean April-June Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI during the period 1730-2012 AD. Precipitation positively affected tree growth primarily during wet seasons, while temperature negatively affected tree growth during dry seasons. Tree growth responded positively to SPEI at long time scales most likely because the trees were able to withstand water deficits but lacked a rapid response to drought. The 10-month scale SPEI was chosen for further drought reconstruction. A calibration model for the period 1951-2011 explained 51% of the variance in the modeled SPEI data. Our SPEI reconstruction revealed long-term patterns of drought variability and captured some significant drought events, including the severe drought of 1928-1930 and the clear drying trend since the 1950s which were widespread across northern China. The reconstruction was also consistent with two other reconstructions on the western Loess Plateau at both interannual and decadal scales. The reconstructed SPEI series showed synchronous variations with the drought/wetness indices and spatial correlation analyses indicated that this reconstruction could be representative of large-scale SPEI variability in northern China. Period analysis discovered 128-year, 25-year, 2.62-year, 2.36-year, and 2.04-year cycles in this reconstruction. The time-dependency of the growth response to drought should be considered in further studies of the community dynamics. The SPEI reconstruction improves the sparse network of long-term climate records for an enhanced understanding of climatic variability on the western Loess Plateau, China.

  7. Tree-ring records of the historic pollution along Novăţ river, Maramureş Mountains, (Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai HOTEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mining activities cause heavy metal pollution of the water, the soil and the air in the affected areas. Metal toxicity, acidic pH and changes in soil structure are supposed to induce a stress on the riparian forest. Coniferous trees affected by this type of human-induced environmental stress react by producing different anatomical changes, commonly the abrupt radial growth decrease and traumatic resin duct production. By analysing growth anomalies formed in tree-rings, it is therefore possible to reconstruct retrospectively the dynamics of forest under environmental polluted, conditions.On the 10th of March 2000 an ecological disaster occurred in Maramureş Mountains, Romania. A tailing pond of the Baia Borşa mines (district Maramures burst after heavy precipitations and thawing. About 20 000 t of heavy metal contaminated sludge flooded along Novăţ and Vaser Valleys and then reached the rivers Vişeu and Tisa.The 2000 event severely pollutes with heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn etc. the soil and ground water in the riparian forest areas. Moreover, these trees were buried under toxic sediments left after the passage of the flood. Riparian forest stands along Novăţ river are mainly composed by Norway spruce (Picea abies (L Karst. trees. This tree species is known to have a high susceptibility to soil pollution, because of the shallow growing roots within the upper part of the soil profile. It has therefore a high potential for dendrochronological studies. In this mining area, so far relations between pollution events and the growth response of Norway spruce have not been tested. 

  8. Unthinned slow-growing ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees contain muted isotopic signals in tree rings as compared to thinned trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    We analysed the oxygen isotopic values of wood (δ18Ow) of 12 ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees from control, moderately, and heavily thinned stands and compared them with existing wood-based estimates of carbon isotope discrimination (∆13C), basal area increment (BAI), and g...

  9. Tree-ring based PDSI reconstruction since AD 1842 in the Ortindag Sand Land, east Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on three Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) and one Meyer spruce (Picea meyeri Rehd. et Wils.) ring-width chronologies, a 163-year drought history was reconstructed in the eastern Ortindag Sand Land. All tree-ring chronologies show large inter-annual variations and strong common signals and fairly consistent variation between different chronologies, indicating that they are excellent proxy of regional climate. A regional chronology (RC) was established by averaging the four standard chronologies and further employed for the analysis and climatic reconstruction. The analysis revealed that tree growth is primarily limited by low precipitation in February-March and June-July and high temperature in May-July. In addition, RC has high correlations with the monthly Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) prior to and during the growing season because the PDSI considers the accumulation of the droughts. Response function analysis revealed that RC only exhibits significant correlations with the PDSI in June and July (close to the 95% significance level in May). Because May―July is a critical period for tree growth, the average May-July PDSI (PDSI5-7) was reconstructed back to 1842 using RC in the Ortindag Sand Land. The reconstruction can explain 52% of the PDSI variance and the equation was rather stable over time. It agrees well with the variation of the average dryness/wetness indices in North China,and captures the decline process of the East Asian summer monsoon since the mid-1960s. It is worth noting that the Ortindag Sand Land has experienced the most severe drought in the recent 40 years based on the 163-year drought reconstruction. Like summer precipitation in North China the reconstructed PDSI5-7 also displays a 20-year oscillation.

  10. Summer rainfall variability in European Mediterranean mountains from the sixteenth to the twentieth century reconstructed from tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Labourdette, D; Génova, M; Schmitz, M F; Urrutia, R; Pineda, F D

    2014-09-01

    Since the end of the last glacial period, European Mediterranean mountains have provided shelter for numerous species of Eurosiberian and Boreal origin. Many of these species, surviving at the southern limit of their range in Europe and surrounded by Mediterranean ones, are relatively intolerant to summer drought and are in grave danger of loss, as a result of increasingly long and frequent droughts in this region. This is the case of the Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and the Austrian pine (Pinus nigra ssp. salzmannii) which are found on Central Iberian Peninsula at the edge of their natural range. We used a tree ring network of these two species to reconstruct past variations in summer rainfall. The reconstruction, based upon a tree ring composite chronology of the species, dates back to 1570 (adjusted R(2) = 0.49, P tree radial growth, we employed a principal component analysis to calculate the resultant of the relationship between the growth data of both species, using this resultant as a dependent variable of a multiple regression whose independent variables are monthly mean temperature and precipitation from the average records. Spatial correlation patterns between instrumental precipitation datasets for southern Europe and reconstructed values for the 1950-1992 period indicate that the reconstruction captures the regional signal of drought variability in the study region (the origin of this precipitation is convective: thermal low pressure zones induced in the inland northeastern areas of the Iberian Peninsula). There is a clear increase in the recurrence of extreme dry events as from the beginning of twentieth century and an abrupt change to drier conditions. There appears to be a tendency toward recurrent exceptionally dry summers, which could involve a significant change for the Eurosiberian refugee species.

  11. Tree-ring growth of Scots pine, Common beech and Pedunculate oak under future climate in northeastern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurasinski, Gerald; Scharnweber, Tobias; Schröder, Christian; Lennartz, Bernd; Bauwe, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Tree growth depends, among other factors, largely on the prevailing climatic conditions. Therefore, tree growth patterns are to be expected under climate change. Here, we analyze the tree-ring growth response of three major European tree species to projected future climate across a climatic (mostly precipitation) gradient in northeastern Germany. We used monthly data for temperature, precipitation, and the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) over multiple time scales (1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months) to construct models of tree-ring growth for Scots pine (Pinus syl- vestris L.) at three pure stands, and for Common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) at three mature mixed stands. The regression models were derived using a two-step approach based on partial least squares regression (PLSR) to extract potentially well explaining variables followed by ordinary least squares regression (OLSR) to consolidate the models to the least number of variables while retaining high explanatory power. The stability of the models was tested with a comprehensive calibration-verification scheme. All models were successfully verified with R2s ranging from 0.21 for the western pine stand to 0.62 for the beech stand in the east. For growth prediction, climate data forecasted until 2100 by the regional climate model WETTREG2010 based on the A1B Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) emission scenario was used. For beech and oak, growth rates will likely decrease until the end of the 21st century. For pine, modeled growth trends vary and range from a slight growth increase to a weak decrease in growth rates depending on the position along the climatic gradient. The climatic gradient across the study area will possibly affect the future growth of oak with larger growth reductions towards the drier east. For beech, site-specific adaptations seem to override the influence of the climatic gradient. We conclude that in Northeastern

  12. Evaluation of the effect of the 2011 Tsunami on coastal forests by means of multiple isotopic analyses on tree-rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Caceres, Maximo Larry; Nakano, Sayako; Ferrio Diaz, Juan Pedro; Hayashi, Mika; Nakatsuka, Takeshi; Sano, Masaki; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Nobori, Yoshihiro

    2017-04-01

    The 2011 Mega-Tsunami destroyed at different degrees the coastal forests in eastern Japan, which for decades have protected inland agriculture and livelihood of the inhabitants in this region. This study investigates the effect of the tsunami on coastal forests and the physiological processes involved by means of stable isotope (13C, 15N and 18O) analysis for the period 2002-2014. Based on the results, annual tree-ring width from 2011 to 2014 decreased approximately 80% compared to the period previous to the Tsunami (2002-2010). Considering that soil salt concentration drastically decreased in September 2011 after a typhoon that dumped 350 mm of rain, the impact appeared to be limited in time. Nevertheless soil electric conductivity showed that spatial variability was strongly correlated with tree mortality in the study plot. The multiple isotope analysis showed that the reduction in growth was associated with a reduction in 13C discrimination following stomatal closure caused by soil salinity in 2011. Two years after the tsunami photosynthetic recovery, implied from decreasing values of 13C in tree-rings, did not translate in tree-growth, indicating a shift in carbon allocation strategy as trees recovered from the strong disturbance caused by the Tsunami. Tree-ring 18O did not show the abrupt increase observed for 13C and could not be used as an indicator of soil salinity. No changes in tree-ring 18O compared to 13C should indicate an increase in assimilation rates but that was not supported by the limited tree-ring growth or by the subsequent recovery of 13C. Nitrogen availability did not change before and after the Tsunami as suggested by values of tree-ring 15N which agree with values found in previous studies. The lack of the effect of salinity on tree-ring 15N could be related to the lack of changes in soil layers where inorganic nitrogen is found and/or because of the salt resistant mycorrhizal fungi typical of Japanese forests.

  13. Improving a tree-ring reconstruction from west-central Scandinavia: 900 years of warm-season temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarson, Bjoern E. [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Umeaa (Sweden); Stockholm University, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm (Sweden); Linderholm, Hans W. [University of Gothenburg, Regional Climate Group, Department of Earth Sciences, Gothenburg (Sweden); Moberg, Anders [Stockholm University, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-01-15

    Dendroclimatological sampling of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) has been made in the province of Jaemtland, in the west-central Scandinavian mountains, since the 1970s. The tree-ring width (TRW) chronology spans several thousand years and has been used to reconstruct June-August temperatures back to 1632 bc. A maximum latewood density (MXD) dataset, covering the period ad 1107-1827 (with gap 1292-1315) was presented in the 1980s by Fritz Schweingruber. Here we combine these historical MXD data with recently collected MXD data covering ad 1292-2006 into a single reconstruction of April-September temperatures for the period ad 1107-2006. Regional curve standardization (RCS) provides more low-frequency variability than ''non-RCS'' and stronger correlation with local seasonal temperatures (51% variance explained). The MXD chronology shows a stronger relationship with temperatures than the TRW data, but the two chronologies show similar multi-decadal variations back to ad 1500. According to the MXD chronology, the period since ad 1930 and around ad 1150-1200 were the warmest during the last 900 years. Due to large uncertainties in the early part of the combined MXD chronology, it is not possible to conclude which period was the warmest. More sampling of trees growing near the tree-line is needed to further improve the MXD chronology. (orig.)

  14. Long-term tree growth rate, water use efficiency, and tree ring nitrogen isotope composition of Pinus massoniana L. in response to global climate change and local nitrogen deposition in Southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Fangfang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). South China Botanical Garden; Graduate Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Griffith Univ., Nathan, QLD (Australia). Environmental Future Centre; Kuang, Yuanwen; Wen, Dazhi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). South China Botanical Garden; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Pearl River Delta Research Centre of Environmental Pollution and Control; Xu, Zhihong [Griffith Univ., Nathan, QLD (Australia). Environmental Future Centre; Li, Jianli; Zuo, Weidong [Agriculture and Forestry Technology Extension Centre, Nanhai District, Guangdong (China); Hou, Enqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). South China Botanical Garden; Graduate Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2010-12-15

    We aimed to investigate long-term tree growth rates, water use efficiencies (WUE), and tree ring nitrogen (N) isotope compositions ({delta}{sup 15}N) of Masson pine (Pinus massoniana L.) in response to global climate change and local N deposition in Southern China. Tree annual growth rings of Masson pine were collected from four forest sites, viz. South China Botanical Garden (SBG), Xi Qiao Shan (XQS) Forest Park, Ding Hu Shan (DHS) Natural Reserve, and Nan Kun Shan (NKS) Natural Reserve in Southern China. The mean annual basal area increment (BAI), WUE, and {delta}{sup 15}N at every 5-year intervals of Masson pine during the last 50 years were determined. Regression analyses were used to quantify the relationships of BAI and WUE with atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO{sub 2}]), temperature, rainfall, and tree ring elemental concentrations at the four study sites. Tree BAI showed a quadratic relationship with rising [CO{sub 2}]. The tipping points of [CO{sub 2}] for BAI, the peaks of BAI when the critical [CO{sub 2}] was reached, occurred earlier at the sites of SBG, XQS, and DHS which were exposed to higher temperature, N deposition, and lower mineral nutrient availability, as compared with the tipping points of [CO{sub 2}] for BAI at the site of NKS which had higher rainfall, lower temperature, and better nutritional status. The average tipping point of [CO{sub 2}] at the four sites for the BAI response curves was 356 ppm, after which, the BAI would be expected to decrease quadratically with rising [CO{sub 2}]. The multiple regressions of BAI confirmed the relationships of long-term tree growth rate with rainfall, tree WUE, and nutrients and {delta}{sup 15}N in tree rings. Nonlinear relationships between BAI and tree ring {delta}{sup 15}N at DHS and negatively linear one at NKS reflected the fertilization effect of N deposition on tree growth rate initially, but this effect peaked or became negative once the forest approached or passed the N saturation

  15. Effect of tree-ring detrending method on apparent growth trends of black and white spruce in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patrick F.; Pattison, Robert R.; Brownlee, Annalis H.; Cahoon, Sean M. P.; Hollingsworth, Teresa N.

    2016-11-01

    Boreal forests are critical sinks in the global carbon cycle. However, recent studies have revealed increasing frequency and extent of wildfires, decreasing landscape greenness, increasing tree mortality and declining growth of black and white spruce in boreal North America. We measured ring widths from a large set of increment cores collected across a vast area of interior Alaska and examined implications of data processing decisions for apparent trends in black and white spruce growth. We found that choice of detrending method had important implications for apparent long-term growth trends and the strength of climate-growth correlations. Trends varied from strong increases in growth since the Industrial Revolution, when ring widths were detrended using single-curve regional curve standardization (RCS), to strong decreases in growth, when ring widths were normalized by fitting a horizontal line to each ring width series. All methods revealed a pronounced growth peak for black and white spruce centered near 1940. Most detrending methods showed a decline from the peak, leaving recent growth of both species near the long-term mean. Climate-growth analyses revealed negative correlations with growing season temperature and positive correlations with August precipitation for both species. Multiple-curve RCS detrending produced the strongest and/or greatest number of significant climate-growth correlations. Results provide important historical context for recent growth of black and white spruce. Growth of both species might decline with future warming, if not mitigated by increasing precipitation. However, widespread drought-induced mortality is probably not imminent, given that recent growth was near the long-term mean.

  16. [Interannual variation patterns of heavy metals concentrations in tree rings of Larix gmelinii near Xilin Lead-zinc Mine, Yichun of Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Wang, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Jin-Yan

    2013-06-01

    By using dendro-environmental methods, this paper measured and analyzed the variations of five heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and Mn) concentrations in the tree rings of Larix gmelinii near Xilin Lead-zinc Mine, Yichun of Northeast China. Among the test heavy metals, the Mn concentration in the tree rings was the highest, while the Cd concentration was the lowest. The Cd, Zn, and Cu concentrations in the tree rings near the ground (0.3 m high from the ground, D0.3) were significantly higher than those at breast height (1.3 m high from the ground, D1.3), while the Pb and Mn concentrations at the two heights had less difference. In 1987-2010, the Pb concentration in the tree rings had a slight increase, but the Cd, Zn, Cu, and Mn concentrations presented a decreasing trend. The Cd concentration decreased most obviously, while the Zn, Cu, and Mn concentrations decreased after an initial increase. With the increase of tree ring width, the Pb concentration decreased, while the Cd, Zn, Cu, and Mn concentrations were in adverse. The relationships between the Pb and other four heavy metals concentrations in the tree rings near the ground and at breast height had definite differences. Near the ground, the Pb concentration showed a significant positive correlation with the other four heavy metals concentrations, but at breast height, less correlation was observed, and even, the Cd concentration decreased significantly with increasing Pb concentration. The variations of the heavy metals concentrations in the L. gmelinii tree rings could be affected by the production and mining activities of Xilin Lead-zinc Mine, an thus, it would be possible to use the Pb concentration in the tree rings to reconstruct the mining his tory of the study area. At present, the Pb concentration in the tailing wastes has polluted the surrounding environments near Xilin Lead-zinc Mine. Therefore, countermeasures should be adopted to manage the heavy metals in tailing wastes if the Mine would be

  17. Virtual private network design: a proof of the tree routing conjecture on ring networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkens, C.A.J.; Keijsper, J.C.M.; Stougie, L.

    2005-01-01

    A basic question in Virtual Private Network (VPN) design is if the symmetric version of the problem always has an optimal solution which is a tree network. An affirmative answer would imply that the symmetric VPN problem is solvable in polynomial time. We give an affirmative answer in case the commu

  18. Tree-rings mirror management legacy: dramatic response of standard oaks to past coppicing in Central Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Altman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coppicing was one of the most important forest management systems in Europe documented in prehistory as well as in the Middle Ages. However, coppicing was gradually abandoned by the mid-20(th century, which has altered the ecosystem structure, diversity and function of coppice woods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our aim was to disentangle factors shaping the historical growth dynamics of oak standards (i.e. mature trees growing through several coppice cycles in a former coppice-with-standards in Central Europe. Specifically, we tried to detect historical coppicing events from tree-rings of oak standards, to link coppicing events with the recruitment of mature oaks, and to determine the effects of neighbouring trees on the stem increment of oak standards. Large peaks in radial growth found for the periods 1895-1899 and 1935-1939 matched with historical records of coppice harvests. After coppicing, the number of newly recruited oak standards markedly grew in comparison with the preceding or following periods. The last significant recruitment of oak standards was after the 1930s following the last regular coppicing event. The diameter increment of oak standards from 1953 to 2003 was negatively correlated with competition indices, suggesting that neighbouring trees (mainly resprouting coppiced Tilia platyphyllos partly suppressed the growth of oak standards. Our results showed that improved light conditions following historical coppicing events caused significant increase in pulses of radial growth and most probably maintained oak recruitment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our historical perspective carries important implications for oak management in Central Europe and elsewhere. Relatively intense cutting creating open canopy woodlands, either as in the coppicing system or in the form of selective cutting, is needed to achieve significant radial growth in mature oaks. It is also critical for the successful regeneration and long

  19. [Anatomic characterization of growth-rings in 80 potential tree species for dendrocronological studies in the Central Forest, Perú].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán Gutiérrez, Lizandro Adal; Valencia Ramos, Gina Mariela

    2013-09-01

    The knowledge about the existence of annual tree rings in tropical trees, which was already found at the beginning of the last century, was ignored by many scientists for a long time. Wood samples of 80 tree species from seven different sites belonging to Satipo and Chanchamayo provinces in Central Forest, Perú. Wood slices were taken at 1.30 m height, following the Peruvian Technical Norms (NTP) 251-008, COPANT norms 30:1-019 and IAWA (1989). Results showed that 24 of the 80 tree species analyzed showed a potential for dendrocronological studies, 25 had problems for growth-rings analysis, and 31 did not have potential. The problems most frequently found were: barely visible or irregular ring growth, parenchyma bands and multiseriate rays difficult to be identified in rings growth. The "T" Student test showed that the significant variation in vessel and fiber diameters between growth zones (Early-wood and late-wood) of species with potential for dendrocronology, do have a periodic cells production, so is possible to suggest the annual formation of each growth-ring. However, those species without potential to dendrocronology may be influenced by of a lot of factors, such as biotic and abiotic conditions of environment, as well as the genetic aspect of each species.

  20. Characterization of sulfur deposition over the period of industrialization in Japan using sulfur isotope ratio in Japanese cedar tree rings taken from stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takuya; Tayasu, Ichiro; Takenaka, Chisato

    2015-07-01

    We characterized the sulfur deposition history over the period of industrialization in Japan based on the sulfur isotope ratio (δ(34)S) in tree rings of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) stumps. We analyzed and compared δ(34)S values in the rings from two types of disk samples from 170-year-old stumps that had been cut 5 years earlier (older forest stand) and from 40-year-old living trees (younger forest stand) in order to confirm the validity of using stump disks for δ(34)S analysis. No differences in δ(34)S values by age were found between the sample types, indicating that stump disks can be used for δ(34)S analysis. The δ(34)S profile in tree rings was significantly correlated with anthropogenic SO2 emissions in Japan (r = -0.76, p tree rings serve as a record of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. In addition, the values did not change largely from pre-industrialization to the 1940s (+4.2 to +6.1‰). The values before the 1940s are expected to reflect the background sulfur conditions in Japan and, thus, disks containing rings formed before the 1940s contain information about the natural environmental sulfur, which is useful for biogeochemical studies.

  1. {sup 14}C AMS measurements in tree rings to estimate local fossil CO{sub 2} in Bosco Fontana forest (Mantova, Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capano, Manuela, E-mail: capanomanuela@tiscali.i [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita di Napoli, and INNOVA, Via Vivaldi, 43 81100 Caserta (Italy); Marzaioli, Fabio; Sirignano, Carmina; Altieri, Simona; Lubritto, Carmine; D' Onofrio, Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita di Napoli, and INNOVA, Via Vivaldi, 43 81100 Caserta (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Radiocarbon concentration in atmosphere changes overtime due to anthropogenic and natural factors. Species growth preserves the local atmospheric radiocarbon signature over their life span in the annual tree rings and make it possible to use tree rings for the monitoring of changes in fossil-fuel emissions due to an increase of traffic exhaust, during the last decades. In this paper, the CIRCE AMS system has been used to measure the {sup 14}C concentration in tree rings of plants grown near an industrial area and a very busy State Road, in a forest in north Italy. Preliminary results related to tree rings of several years of plants respectively near and far the emitting sources are displayed, in order to estimate the local pollution effect. It is possible to find a dilution in years 2000 and 2006 in both the trees analysed, but not enough data have been analysed yet in order to distinguish the fossil dilution derived from the street vehicular traffic or that from the industries.

  2. Using Tree-Ring Data, Research, and Expeditions as an Accessible, Hands-on "Bridge" into Climate Studies for Diverse Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davi, N. K.; Wattenberg, F.; Pringle, P. T.; Tanenbaum, J.; O'Brien, A.; Greidanus, I.; Perry, M.

    2012-12-01

    Tree-ring research provides an engaging, intuitive, and relevant entryway into understanding both climate-change and environmental research, as well as the process of science from inspiration, to fieldwork, to analysis, to publishing and communicating. The basic premise of dendrochronology is that annual rings reflect environmental conditions year-by-year and that by studying long-lived trees we can learn about past environments and climates for hundreds-to-thousands of years in the past. Conceptually, this makes tree-ring studies accessible to students and faculty for a number of reasons. First, in order to collect their data, dendrochronologists often launch expeditions to stunningly picturesque and remote places in search of long-lived, climate sensitive trees. Scientist exciting stories and images from the field can be leveraged to connect students to the study and the data. Second, tree-rings can be more easily explained as a proxy for climate than other methods (ice cores, carbon-isotope ratios, etc.), and most people have prior-knowledge about trees and annual growth rings. It is even possible, for example, for non-expert audiences to see climate variability through time with the naked eye by looking at climate sensitive tree cores. Third, tree-rings are interdisciplinary and illustrate the interplay between the mathematical sciences, the biological sciences, and the geosciences—that is, they show that the biosphere is a fundamental component of the Earth system. Here, we will present several projects have been initiated for a range of audiences, including; elementary school, where 5th graders visited a local forest to collect samples and apply their samples and what they learned to math and science classes. 5th grade students also leaned how to use Climate Explorer (KNMI), an online tool that allows scientist and students the opportunity to access and visualize global climate data within a few clicks. Geared to 2 and 4 year colleges, we are also

  3. Do centennial tree-ring and stable isotope trends of Larix gmelinii (Rupr.) Rupr. indicate increasing water shortage in the Siberian north?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorova, Olga Vladimirovna; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Saurer, Matthias; Shashkin, Alexander V; Knorre, Anastasia A; Prokushkin, Anatoliy S; Vaganov, Eugene A; Kirdyanov, Alexander V

    2009-10-01

    Tree-ring width of Larix gmelinii (Rupr.) Rupr., ratios of stable isotopes of C (delta(13)C) and O (delta(18)O) of whole wood and cellulose chronologies were obtained for the northern part of central Siberia (Tura, Russia) for the period 1864-2006. A strong decrease in the isotope ratios of O and C (after atmospheric delta(13)C corrections) and tree-ring width was observed for the period 1967-2005, while weather station data show a decrease in July precipitation, along with increasing July air temperature and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Temperature at the end of May and the whole month of June mainly determines tree radial growth and marks the beginning of the vegetation period in this region. A positive correlation between tree-ring width and July precipitation was found for the calibration period 1929-2005. Positive significant correlations between C isotope chronologies and temperatures of June and July were found for whole wood and cellulose and negative relationships with July precipitation. These relationships are strengthened when the likely physiological response of trees to increased CO(2) is taken into account (by applying a recently developed delta(13)C correction). For the O isotope ratios, positive relationships with annual temperature, VPD of July and a negative correlation with annual precipitation were observed. The delta(18)O in tree rings may reflect annual rather than summer temperatures, due to the late melting of the winter snow and its contribution to the tree water supply in summer. We observed a clear change in the isotope and climate trends after the 1960s, resulting in a drastic change in the relationship between C and O isotope ratios from a negative to a positive correlation. According to isotope fractionation models, this indicates reduced stomatal conductance at a relatively constant photosynthetic rate, as a response of trees to water deficit for the last half century in this permafrost region.

  4. Growth responses to climate in a multi-species tree-ring network in the western Carpathian Tatra Mountains, Poland and Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buntgen, U.; Frank, D.C.; Verstege, A.; Esper, J. [Swiss Federal Research Inst. WSL, Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Kaczka, R.J. [Univ. of Silesia, Sosnowiec (Poland). Faculty of Earth Science; Zwijacz-Kozica, T. [Tatra National Park, Zakopane (Poland)

    2007-05-15

    In order to properly assess future forest productivity, vegetation dynamics, plant diversity, and species richness, it is important to examine tree growth responses to climatic change and to evaluate tree-ring-based temperature reconstructions. Although physiological studies provide evidence on how trees react to forcing agents, physiological studies of the longer-term responses of tree suffering are limited. Tree-ring width (TRW) and maximum latewood density (MXD) measurements provide an alternative approach to information on past growth rates. Radial growth of trees from higher elevations typically reflect temperature variations, while radial growth of trees from lower elevations normally mirrors precipitation changes. However, efforts to define growth responses in terms of a single controlling factor often fail because of the co-variation of various climatic parameters and complex plant physiological reactions and processes. This article introduced a tree-ring network from the greater Tatra region within the western Carpathian arc and presented an analysis of this network to evaluate tree growth responses to climate patterns, considering the influences of species, elevation, parameter (TRW and MXD), frequency, site ecology and previous- and current-year climatic conditions. Two multi-centennial-long temperature reconstructions based on TRW and MXD were developed for the region and compared with findings from the Alps and Central Europe. Details on physiologically induced response variations in the network's growth-climate relationship were provided, as well as temporal deviations between the reconstructed temperature histories. It was concluded that positive correlations between TRW and previous-year autumn temperatures suggest that warm October and November conditions likely support carbon storage, promote mycorrhizal root growth by maintaining soils above freezing, and favour maturation of needles, shoots and buds against early winter stress. 70 refs., 2

  5. Isotope signals and anatomical features in tree rings suggest a role for hydraulic strategies in diffuse drought-induced die-back of Pinus nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucco, Laura; Nardini, Andrea; von Arx, Georg; Saurer, Matthias; Cherubini, Paolo

    2017-03-17

    The 2003 and 2012 summer seasons were among the warmest and driest of the last 200 years over southeastern Europe, and in particular in the Karst region (northeastern Italy). Starting from winter-spring 2013, several black pines (Pinus nigra J.F. Arnold) suffered crown die-back. Declining trees occurred nearby individuals with no signs of die-back, raising hypotheses about the occurrence of individual-specific hydraulic strategies underlying different responses to extreme drought. We investigated possible processes driving black pine decline by dendrochronological and wood anatomical measurements, coupled with analysis of tree-ring carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopic composition in healthy trees (H) and trees suffering die-back (D). Die-back trees showed higher growth rates than H trees at the beginning of the last century, but suffered important growth reduction following the dry summers in 2003 and 2012. After the 2012 drought, D trees produced tracheids with larger diameter and greater vulnerability to implosion than H ones. Healthy trees had significantly higher wood δ13C than D trees, reflecting higher water-use efficiency for the surviving trees, i.e., less water transpired per unit carbon gain, which could be related to lower stomatal conductance and a more conservative use of water. Relatively high δ18O for D trees indicates that they were strongly dependent on shallow water sources, or that they sustained higher transpiration rates than H trees. Our results suggest that H trees adopted a more conservative water-use strategy under drought stress compared with D trees. We speculate that this diversity might have a genotypic basis, but other possible explanations, like different rooting depth, cannot be ruled out.

  6. Floodplain ecohydrology: Discerning climatic v. anthropogenic controls from tree-ring δ18O, dendrochronology, and instrumental climate records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. B.; Piégay, H.; Stella, J. C.; Wilson, R.

    2012-12-01

    Vegetation of lowland riparian zones in temperate climates is largely determined by floodplain water availability during the growth season. Floodplain water reservoirs are replenished seasonally by lateral hyporheic water from streamflow, which primarily contributes to phreatic zone water and by infiltration of precipitation, which typically controls seasonal vadose zone soil moisture. Water availability to species rooted to particular depths in the floodplain is subject to interannual variability in climate (e.g., precipitation magnitude, timing, and phase). Co-occurring tree species in the riparian zone may express differential adaptation to water availability and shifting water sources, especially if they are rooted at contrasting depths. We have developed an ecohydrologic approach to assess how climatic variability impacts water availability at different depths in the floodplain and corresponding tree growth in the Rhône River basin, France. We combine dendrochronology, tree ring isotopes (δ18O), and instrumental climate records to discern relationships between tree growth and water sources for two contrasting, co-occurring riparian species—the shallowly rooting Fraxinus excelsior and the obligate phreatophyte, Populus nigra (poplar). We developed growth time series via basal area increment (BAI) and extracted alpha-cellulose from tree rings to assess relative responses to water stress via δ18O contained in each annual ring, and we analyzed these data alongside streamflow, precipitation, and groundwater data. Our initial work on a tributary of the Rhône showed that F. excelsior generally indicates water availability in the vadose zone, while P. nigra provides a window into the phreatic zone. However, the rooting depths and water sources for these species overlap on particularly low topographic surfaces, where phreatic water is abundant for both. In contrast to prior assumptions, we found that P. nigra exhibits more growth sensitivity to drought stress

  7. Two centuries temperature variations over subtropical southeast China inferred from Pinus taiwanensis Hayata tree-ring width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, QiuFang; Liu, Yu

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution long-term temperature reconstructions in subtropical southeast China (SSC) are very scarce, yet indispensable for the comprehensive understanding of climate change in China, even in East Asia. We reconstructed the first previous growth-season temperature in the Sanqingshan Mountains (SQS), southeast China since 1806 based on tree-ring width data. The reconstruction accounts for 56.4 % of the total variance in the instrumental record over 1954-2009. Unlike the Northern Hemispheric warming during recent two centuries, the reconstruction captured a slowly cooling trend from 1806 to 1980, followed by a rapid warming afterward. 2003-2009 was the warmest period in the reconstruction. 1970-2000 was colder than the last stage of the Little Ice Age (LIA). Most of the warm and cold periods in this reconstruction could be found in the tree-ring based temperature reconstructions of vicinity area, indicating that the temperature variations in SSC were almost synchronous at least at decadal scale. This regional coherence of temperature variation was further confirmed by the spatial correlation patterns with the CRU TS3.22 grid dataset. A strong positive relationship between the temperature over SQS region and sea surface temperature (SST) over the North Pacific Ocean (NP) has been noted, suggesting that SST variations over NP and the related Pacific Decadal Oscillation significantly influenced the temperature variability over SSC. To better understand the climate variability during the LIA and the regional differences in temperature variations over SQS and northern Hemisphere, long data sets from more diverse areas of southern China are needed.

  8. Two centuries temperature variations over subtropical southeast China inferred from Pinus taiwanensis Hayata tree-ring width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, QiuFang; Liu, Yu

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution long-term temperature reconstructions in subtropical southeast China (SSC) are very scarce, yet indispensable for the comprehensive understanding of climate change in China, even in East Asia. We reconstructed the first previous growth-season temperature in the Sanqingshan Mountains (SQS), southeast China since 1806 based on tree-ring width data. The reconstruction accounts for 56.4 % of the total variance in the instrumental record over 1954-2009. Unlike the Northern Hemispheric warming during recent two centuries, the reconstruction captured a slowly cooling trend from 1806 to 1980, followed by a rapid warming afterward. 2003-2009 was the warmest period in the reconstruction. 1970-2000 was colder than the last stage of the Little Ice Age (LIA). Most of the warm and cold periods in this reconstruction could be found in the tree-ring based temperature reconstructions of vicinity area, indicating that the temperature variations in SSC were almost synchronous at least at decadal scale. This regional coherence of temperature variation was further confirmed by the spatial correlation patterns with the CRU TS3.22 grid dataset. A strong positive relationship between the temperature over SQS region and sea surface temperature (SST) over the North Pacific Ocean (NP) has been noted, suggesting that SST variations over NP and the related Pacific Decadal Oscillation significantly influenced the temperature variability over SSC. To better understand the climate variability during the LIA and the regional differences in temperature variations over SQS and northern Hemisphere, long data sets from more diverse areas of southern China are needed.

  9. Temperature Signals in Tree-Ring Width Chronologies of Alpine Treeline Conifers from the Baishui River Nature Reserve, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous dendro-climatic reconstructions have been developed for China, but there are still regions with limited data of this type. One region is the Qinling Mountains which is characterized by complex interactions between the mountains and climate. Presently, the subalpine region of the Qinling Mountains is covered by widespread forests and has great potential for dendroclimatological studies. Here we developed tree-ring width chronologies from two fir (Abies faxoniana and one spruce (Picea brachytyla sites in the Baishui River Nature Reserve, the western region of the Qinling Mountains, China. Climate response analysis reveals that radial growth of the fir site (TLD is mainly controlled by temperature variations. The TLD chronology accounts for 32.7% of February - June temperature variance during the period 1959 - 2006. Using a linear regression approach, we reconstructed the February - June temperature of Wen County for the past 252 years. The cool periods are identified for AD 1795 - 1800, 1812 - 1827, 1881 - 1888, 1895 - 1902, 1916 - 1929, 1967 - 1972 and 1978 - 1995. Warm conditions prevailed during AD 1783 - 1794, 1801 - 1811, 1828 - 1856, 1867 - 1880, 1889 - 1894, 1903 - 1915 and 1930 - 1966. Wavelet analysis reveals the existence of some cycles (2.0 - 3.4, 5.7, 10.0 and 19.3 years. Spatial correlation analysis shows that the temperature reconstruction captures regional climatic variations over Central and Southwest China. The moving t-test indicated an abrupt warming change of our reconstruction occurred during the past 20 years. Overall, our study indicates the feasibility of combining tree-rings and the temperature to reconstruct large-scale temperature patterns over this area.

  10. Potential of tree-ring analysis in a wet tropical forest: A case study on 22 commercial tree species in Central Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, P.; Sass, U.G.W.; Bongers, F.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing sustainable forest management requires basic information on growth, ages, reproduction and survival of exploited tree species. This information is generally derived from permanent sample plots where individual trees are monitored. Accurately estimating growth rates and especially tree a

  11. Potential of tree-ring analysis in a wet tropical forest: A case study on 22 commercial tree species in Central Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, P.; Sass, U.G.W.; Bongers, F.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing sustainable forest management requires basic information on growth, ages, reproduction and survival of exploited tree species. This information is generally derived from permanent sample plots where individual trees are monitored. Accurately estimating growth rates and especially tree

  12. 400 years of summer climatic conditions in the N Carpathian Mts. (eastern Europe) based on O and C stable isotopes in Pinus Cembra L tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagavciuc, Viorica; Popa, Ionel; Kern, Zoltán; Persoiu, Aurel

    2016-04-01

    For a better understanding of how the climate is changing and how the environment responds to these changes, it is necessary to understand how the climate has varied in the past. Romania's virgin forests have a great potential to obtain long tree-ring chronologies with annual resolution; but so far, only a few studies resulted in quantitative paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this context, the aim of this study is 1) to calibrate the relationship between the stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon in tree rings and the main climatic parameters and determine the potential of Pinus cembra (Cǎlimani Mts., N Romania, Eastern Europe) for paleoclimatic reconstructions; 2) to provide the first palaeoclimatic reconstitution in Romania based on the isotopic composition of oxygen and carbon in tree ring cellulose, and 3) to test the hypothesis that nearby sulphur mines have not altered the climatic signal recorded by the stable isotopic composition of tree rings, contrary to the similar signal recorded by TRW. For this study, we have analysed wood samples of Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra L.) from living and dead trees from Cǎlimani Mts., NE Romania, aged between 1600 and 2012 AD. The isotopic composition of oxygen and carbon from the cellulose was analysed at the Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Budapest, Hungary, using a high-temperature pyrolysis system (Thermo Quest TC-EA) coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Thermo Finningan Delta V) following a ring by ring (i.e., non-pooled) approach. The average level of δ18O and δ13C in cellulose for the period 1600-2012 was 28.83‰ and -22.63 ‰. The tree ring cellulose δ18O and δ13C values showed a strong positive correlation with maximum air temperature (r = 0.6 for δ18O and r = 0.5 for δ13C), mean temperature (r = 0.6 for δ18O and r = 0.45 for δ13C), and sunshine duration (r = 0.69 for δ18O) and negatively correlated with precipitation amount (r = -0.5 for δ18O and r = 0.3 for δ13C) and

  13. Magnitude-frequency relationships of debris flows — A case study based on field surveys and tree-ring records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Markus

    2010-03-01

    Debris-flow activity in a watershed is usually defined in terms of magnitude and frequency. While magnitude-frequency (M-F) relations have long formed the basis for risk assessment and engineering design in hydrology and fluvial hydraulics, only fragmentary and insufficiently specified data for debris flows exists. This paper reconstructs M-F relationships of 62 debris flows for an aggradational cone of a small (Swiss Alps since A.D. 1863. The frequency of debris flows is obtained from tree-ring records. The magnitude of individual events is given as S, M, L, XL, and derived from volumetric data of deposits, grain size distributions of boulders, and a series of surrogates (snout elevations, tree survival, lateral spread of surges). Class S and M debris flows ( 50 mm) in August and September, when the active layer of the rock glacier in the source area of debris flows is largest. Over the past ˜ 150 years, climate has exerted control on material released from the source area and prevented triggering of class XL events before 1922. With the projected climatic change, permafrost degradation and the potential increase in storm intensity are likely to produce " class XXL" events in the future with volumes surpassing 5 × 10 4 m 3 at the level of the debris-flow cone.

  14. A technical perspective in modern tree-ring research--how to overcome dendroecological and wood anatomical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Holger; Cherubini, Paolo; Fonti, Patrick; von Arx, Georg; Schneider, Loïc; Nievergelt, Daniel; Verstege, Anne; Bast, Alexander; Schweingruber, Fritz H; Büntgen, Ulf

    2015-03-05

    Dendroecological research uses information stored in tree rings to understand how single trees and even entire forest ecosystems responded to environmental changes and to finally reconstruct such changes. This is done by analyzing growth variations back in time and correlating various plant-specific parameters to (for example) temperature records. Integrating wood anatomical parameters in these analyses would strengthen reconstructions, even down to intra-annual resolution. We therefore present a protocol on how to sample, prepare, and analyze wooden specimen for common macroscopic analyses, but also for subsequent microscopic analyses. Furthermore we introduce a potential solution for analyzing digital images generated from common small and large specimens to support time-series analyses. The protocol presents the basic steps as they currently can be used. Beyond this, there is an ongoing need for the improvement of existing techniques, and development of new techniques, to record and quantify past and ongoing environmental processes. Traditional wood anatomical research needs to be expanded to include ecological information to this field of research. This would support dendro-scientists who intend to analyze new parameters and develop new methodologies to understand the short and long term effects of specific environmental factors on the anatomy of woody plants.

  15. Climatic Influences on Wood Anatomy and Tree-Ring Features of Great Basin Conifers at a New Mountain Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Ziaco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A network of mountain observing stations has been installed in the Great Basin of North America. NevCAN (Nevada Climate-ecohydrological Assessment Network, which spans a latitudinal range of 2.5° and two elevation ranges of about 2000 m each, enabled us to investigate tree growth in relation to climate. Methods: We analyzed wood anatomy and tree-ring characteristics of four conifer species in response to different levels of water availability by comparing a low- and a high-elevation population. Chronologies of earlywood and latewood widths, as well as cellular parameters, were developed from the year 2000 to 2012. Results: At the southern (drier and warmer sites, Pinus monophylla had smaller cell lumen, tracheid diameter, and cell wall thickness. Pinus monophylla and P. flexilis showed bigger cellular elements at the higher elevations, whereas the opposite pattern was found in Picea engelmannii and Pinus longaeva. When all species and sites were pooled together, stem diameter was positively related with earlywood anatomical parameters. Discussion: We have provided a glimpse of the applications that NevCAN, as a new scientific tool, could allow in the general field of botany. In particular, we were able to investigate how differences in water stress related to elevation lead to changes in xylem anatomy.

  16. Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaja, Nawal

    2007-01-01

    This is a thematic lesson plan for young learners about palm trees and the importance of taking care of them. The two part lesson teaches listening, reading and speaking skills. The lesson includes parts of a tree; the modal auxiliary, can; dialogues and a role play activity.

  17. Drought history inferred from tree ring δ 13C and δ 18O in the central Tianshan Mountains of China and linkage with the North Atlantic Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guobao; Liu, Xiaohong; Qin, Dahe; Chen, Tuo; Sun, Weizhen; An, Wenling; Wang, Wenzhi; Wu, Guoju; Zeng, Xiaomin; Ren, Jiawen

    2014-05-01

    Annual tree ring δ 18O and δ 13C chronologies from 1790 to 2008 were established using Tianshan spruce ( Picea schrenkiana) in the central Tianshan Mountains of northwestern China. Temperature has a positive effect on tree ring δ 18O and δ 13C in the study area, while precipitation and relative humidity have negative effects. The standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration index (SPEI) considered all of these effects and was significantly negatively correlated with tree ring δ 18O and δ 13C. We combined the tree ring δ 18O and δ 13C series to reconstruct the past 192 years of SPEI, which accounted for about 46 % of the total variance of SPEI from 1950 to 2006. The reconstruction showed good spatial agreement with gridded data in Palmer Drought Severity Index and precipitation and an inverse relationship with temperature. Our SPEI reconstruction reveals several wet and dry periods over the past 192 years and has good agreement with other drought records. Wavelet analysis showed quasi-periodic 10-, 20-, 30-, and 70-year fluctuations in the reconstruction. The 10-, 20-, and 30-year periodicities may reflect the potential influence of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Overall, this study indicates that the SPEI is a potential drought index, and the winter NAO affects regional moisture conditions in the long term.

  18. Multi-century tree-ring precipitation record reveals increasing frequency of extreme dry events in the upper Blue Nile River catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokria, Mulugeta; Gebrekirstos, Aster; Abiyu, Abrham; Noordwijk, Van Meine; Bräuning, Achim

    2017-01-01

    Climate-related environmental and humanitarian crisis are important challenges in the Great Horn of Africa (GHA). In the absence of long-term past climate records in the region, tree-rings are valuable climate proxies, reflecting past climate variations and complementing climate records prior to

  19. Air mass origin signals in δ 18O of tree-ring cellulose revealed by back-trajectory modeling at the monsoonal Tibetan plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernicke, Jakob; Hochreuther, Philipp; Grießinger, Jussi; Zhu, Haifeng; Wang, Lily; Bräuning, Achim

    2016-12-01

    A profound consideration of stable oxygen isotope source water origins is a precondition for an unambiguous palaeoenvironmental interpretation of terrestrial δ 18O archives. To stress the influence of air mass origins on widely used δ 18O tree-ring chronologies, we conducted correlation analyses between six annually resolved δ 18O tree-ring cellulose ( δ ^{18}O_{TC}) chronologies and mean annual air package origins obtained from backward trajectory modeling. This novel approach has been tested for a transect at the southeastern Tibetan plateau (TP), where air masses with different isotopic composition overlap. Detailed examinations of daily precipitation amounts and monthly precipitation δ 18O values ( δ ^{18}OP) were conducted with the ERA Interim and Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique General Circulation Model (LMDZiso) data, respectively. Particularly the southernmost study sites are influenced by a distinct amount effect. Here, air package origin δ ^{18}O_{TC} relations are generally weaker in contrast to our northern located study sites. We found that tree-ring isotope signatures at dry sites with less rain days per year tend to be influenced stronger by air mass origin than tree-ring isotope values at semi-humid sites. That implies that the local hydroclimate history inferred from δ ^{18}O_{TC} archives is better recorded at semi-humid sites.