WorldWideScience

Sample records for cuny graduate school

  1. Doubling Graduation Rates: Three-Year Effects of CUNY's Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) for Developmental Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivener, Susan; Weiss, Michael J.; Ratledge, Alyssa; Rudd, Timothy; Sommo, Colleen; Fresques, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges offer a pathway to the middle class for low-income individuals. Although access to college has expanded, graduation rates at community colleges remain low, especially for students who need developmental (remedial) courses to build their math, reading, or writing skills. The City University of New York's (CUNY's) Accelerated…

  2. Sharing Our Teachers: The Required Graduate Class at the American Museum of Natural History for Lehman College (CUNY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Adriana E.; Kelly, Angela M.; Bayne, Gillian U.

    2010-01-01

    This reflective study explores the history and outcomes of a teacher education collaboration between the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) and Lehman College of The City University of New York (CUNY), in the Bronx, NY, USA. AMNH developed and teaches a Lehman course, Museum Resources for Teaching Science, for Master's degree candidates in…

  3. Graduate School and Fellowship Discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles Reed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    This was a presentation presented for the Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School. This is a set of slides about how to prepare for college, specifically graduate school. It gives instructions for succeeding and getting into a good school with financial aid through assistantships and scholarships, specifically applying to engineering backgrounds. Also, there are tips given for applying for fellowships and concludes with some general recommendations for graduate school.

  4. Teaching Writing in Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret; Hallett, Ronald; Tierney, William

    2011-01-01

    Graduate students are typically expected to know how to write. Those who write poorly are occasionally penalized, but little in-class attention is given to help students continue to develop and refine their writing skills. More often than not, writing courses at the graduate level are remedial programs designed for international students and…

  5. Building College Readiness before Matriculation: A Preview of a CUNY Start Evaluation. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivener, Susan; Logue, Alexandra W.

    2016-01-01

    Graduation rates from community colleges in the United States are quite low overall, but they are even lower for the many entering students who need some remediation. This brief provides a first look at an evaluation of CUNY Start, an innovative developmental education program at the City University of New York (CUNY) that was designed to improve…

  6. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  7. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  8. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  9. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  10. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  11. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  12. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  13. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  14. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  15. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  16. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  17. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  18. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  19. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  20. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  1. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  2. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  3. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  4. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  5. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  6. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  7. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  8. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  9. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  10. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  11. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  12. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  13. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  14. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  15. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  16. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  17. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  18. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  19. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  20. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  1. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  2. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  3. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  4. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  5. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  6. National High School Graduation Rate: Are Recent Birth Cohorts Taking More Time to Graduate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Myungkook; Kim, Jeounghee

    2016-01-01

    Debates about the national high school graduation rate have heated up as various national high school graduation estimates based on the Common Core of Data (CCD) and the Current Population Survey (CPS) do not coincide with one another partially due to different assumptions about graduation age. This study found that (a) while graduation rate by…

  7. The Impact of Different Graduate Programs on Evaluating Chinese Graduate Schools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hui-juan; WANG Hui-wen

    2001-01-01

    The traditional evaluation on Chinese graduate schools usually focus on the comprehensivefactors of master's and doctoral programs. This paper attempts to test a hypothesis on the relationshipbetween graduate programs and the ratings of Chinese graduate schools. The educational evaluation historyboth in the U.S. and in China is briefly reviewed and compared. A case study is performed by using part ofthe graduate schools' data from Chinese polytechnic universities in 1994. The comprehensive factors thataffect the graduate schools' scale are examined. The result indicates that different graduate programs doaffect graduate schools' ratings. Two comprehensive factors are obtained from several indicators representingmaster's scale and doctoral scale respectively. The paper also intends to help provide a new evaluationmethod in ranking graduate schools' scale.

  8. School Psychology Graduate Training: A Comprehensive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Douglas T.; Minke, Kathleen M.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of graduate training in school psychology is described. The article covers the following areas: (1) historical perspective; (2) current training trends; and (3) curriculum analysis of doctoral and special programs. Implications of the data are discussed and suggestions are made for change. (PS)

  9. An Analysis of Illinois High School Graduation Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferratier, Louis; Helmich, Edith

    On account of concern about declining achievement levels of high school graduates and proposed state legislation increasing graduation requirements to address this concern, this report analyzes current and proposed high school graduation requirements in Illinois, based on data compiled from local school documents, and compares the data to…

  10. Report on the Council of Graduate Schools-Graduate Record Examinations Board 1981-1982 Survey of Graduate Enrollment, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Virginia B.; Khoury, Bernard V.

    Information is presented on graduate student enrollments, applications for graduate study, availability of assistantships and fellowships, graduate degrees awarded, and stipends for teaching assistants, based on the 1981-1982 Survey of Graduate Enrollment of the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS)-Graduate Record Examinations Board. Of the survey…

  11. School Social Workers' Perceptions of Graduate Education Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Karen; Joseph, Alfred Louis, Jr.; Broussard, Anne

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of school social workers' (SSWers') graduate education training on contemporary issues facing students in schools as well as issues related to this host practice setting. SSWers who completed a specific school social work program were compared with those who did not on perceived graduate education preparation…

  12. The relationship of high school graduation exams to graduation rates and SAT scores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Marchant

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined the effect of high school graduation exams on states' graduation rates, states' aggregated SAT scores, and individual students' SAT scores. Three data sources were used: One source identified states requiring a standardized test for graduation; the NCES provided state aggregated data on graduation rates for the class of 2002; and the College Board provided its 2001 SAT database for all test-takers. After controlling for students' demographic characteristics (e.g., race, family education and income, GPA and class rank, regression analyses revealed that states requiring graduation exams had lower graduation rates and lower SAT scores. Individually, students from states requiring a graduation exam performed more poorly on the SAT than did students from states not requiring an exam. The impact of high stakes tests' on students' motivation to stay in school and on the teaching of critical thinking skills (tested by the SAT are discussed.

  13. Credits to Graduation: A Comparison of Transfer Graduates and Secondary School Graduates at BC Research Universities. Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Sham

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the number of credits earned at graduation for two groups: those who graduated with a baccalaureate degree and who were admitted as transfer students and those admitted as secondary school students to one of the four BC research universities [Simon Fraser University (SFU), University of British Columbia, Vancouver (UBC),…

  14. The Impact of Business Cycle Fluctuations on Graduate School Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper adds to the understanding of student decisions about graduate school attendance by studying the magnitude of the effect of business cycle fluctuations on enrollment. I use data on graduate school enrollment from the Current Population Survey and statewide variation in unemployment rates across time to proxy for changes in business cycle…

  15. Admission and Attrition of Women in Graduate School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranger, Elizabeth Urey

    Reasons behind the fact that there are fewer women scientists than men scientists are explored in this paper. Data on the number of women Ph.D.'s in each field of science for the years 1966 through 1974 are presented and analyzed. Graduate school admissions policies and the greater attrition rate for women in graduate school compared to men are…

  16. Report on the Council of Graduate Schools-Graduate Record Examinations Board 1981-82 Survey of Graduate Enrollment, Part II, June 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Virginia B.; Khoury, Bernard V.

    Results of the Council of Graduate Schools-Graduate Record Examinations Board 1981-1982 Survey of Graduate Enrollment, Part II are presented, based on usable responses from 299 institutions. The survey findings provide information about changes in the pattern of graduate school enrollment and allow comparisons between public and private…

  17. Teaching Photovoltaics: From Grammar School to Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrenkiel, Richard

    2009-05-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) has certainly become the topic of the times in economic and political circles. I have had the opportunity to teach some aspect of the subject at a wide range of educational levels. I taught a graduate course, as an Adjunct Professor at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), over the time period from 1990 to 2000. As a consequence of various outreach programs, like those sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, I have given presentations to audiences ranging from grammar school to high school. I have given another type of presentation to the service clubs like Rotary International and Kiwanis Clubs. Finally, in recent years and the rapid growth of the photovoltaic industry, I have been asked to give a basic presentation to business people with modest technical backgrounds. Each audience presents a different set of challenges and each requires a different type of presentation.

  18. Play Therapy Training among School Psychology, Social Work, and School Counseling Graduate Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Christina Bechle

    2012-01-01

    This study examined play therapy training across the nation among school psychology, social work, and school counseling graduate training programs. It also compared current training to previous training among school psychology and school counseling programs. A random sample of trainers was selected from lists of graduate programs provided by…

  19. A Study on Graduate School Common Education : the University of Tokyo as a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Graduate school common education’ means a program consisting of classes that are taught commonly among graduate schools in a university. It is practiced mainly at research universities in order to provide liberal arts education and career education at the graduate school level as well as the undergraduate level, and it is an important component of graduate education when a university plans to reform its graduate education. This article first reviews earlier studies about graduate school comm...

  20. Building a Conceptual Framework within a Diverse Graduate School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Zannini, Louis P.; Gallien, Louis B., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The School of Education of a mid-Atlantic region, graduate-only Christian institution sought to build a cohesive, indigenous conceptual framework to assure that school instruction and scholarship were aligned with university and school foundational documents, especially the mission and vision statements. A visiting professor was engaged to…

  1. Annual ADEA Survey of Dental School Seniors: 2016 Graduating Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchek, Tanya; Cook, Bryan J; Valachovic, Richard W

    2017-05-01

    This report examines the results of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Survey of Dental School Seniors graduating in 2016. Data were collected from 4,558 respondents at all 59 U.S. dental schools with graduating classes that year. This annual survey asks graduating students about a variety of topics in order to understand their motivation for attending dental school, educational experiences while in school, debt incurred, and plans following graduation. Motivations for choosing to attend dental school typically involved family or friends who were dentists or students' personal experiences. The timing of the decision to enter dentistry has been getting earlier over time. Similar to previous years, the average graduating student had above $200,000 in student debt. However, for the first time in two decades, inflation-adjusted debt decreased slightly. The reduction in debt was due to students from private schools reducing their average debt by $23,401. Immediately after graduation, most seniors planned to enter private practice (50.5%) or advanced dental education (33.8%). Approximately half of the respondents planned to work in underserved areas at some point in their careers. These findings underscore the continued value of the senior survey to offer a unique view of the diverse characteristics and career paths of the future dental workforce.

  2. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in the District of Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  3. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  4. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  5. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  6. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  7. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  8. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  9. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  10. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  11. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  12. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  13. Understanding High School Graduation Rates in New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Graduation rates are a fundamental indicator of whether or not the nation's public school system is doing what it is intended to do: enroll, engage, and educate youth to be productive members of society. Since almost 90 percent of the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs require some postsecondary education, having a high school diploma and the…

  14. Engineering Design Education Program for Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbuchi, Yoshifumi; Iida, Haruhiko

    The new educational methods of engineering design have attempted to improve mechanical engineering education for graduate students in a way of the collaboration in education of engineer and designer. The education program is based on the lecture and practical exercises concerning the product design, and has engineering themes and design process themes, i.e. project management, QFD, TRIZ, robust design (Taguchi method) , ergonomics, usability, marketing, conception etc. At final exercise, all students were able to design new product related to their own research theme by applying learned knowledge and techniques. By the method of engineering design education, we have confirmed that graduate students are able to experience technological and creative interest.

  15. Research Skills and Ethics--A Graduate Course Empowering Graduate Students for Productive Research Careers in Graduate School and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, Patricia Ann

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes a course for first-year graduate students that teaches the fundamental so-called "soft skills" required for success in graduate school and beyond. Topics covered are ethics, laboratory safety and waste management, chemical information retrieval and literacy, experimental design, scientific record keeping, statistics, career development, and communications, including technical writing and oral presentation. Whenever possible students are put in direct contact with local technical experts and available resources. The course, well regarded by both students and faculty, has now been taught at Northeastern University for five years in the summer academic quarter to graduate students in chemistry and related departments (pharmacy and chemical engineering) who have successfully completed their first-year course work.

  16. The Contribution of Graduation Research to School Development: Graduation Research as a Boundary Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Marco; Bekebrede, Judith; Hanna, Fadie; Creton, Theun; Edzes, Hester

    2017-01-01

    When teaching is considered as a collaborative activity, the aim of research projects in schools needs to exceed the individual and personal levels and aim to contribute to research-informed reflection of a team of teachers. Within this multiple case study, we adapted the graduation research project within a primary teacher education programme,…

  17. Antecedent Factors Affecting Academic Performance of Graduate Students at the Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbogo, Rosemary Wahu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a Master's level thesis work that was done in 1997 to assess the antecedent factors affecting the academic performance of graduate students at the Nairobi Evangelical School of Theology (N.E.G.S.T.), which is currently Africa International University (AIU). The paper reviews the effect of lack of finance on…

  18. Graduation Requirements: What Are the Trends? Bloomfield Hills Public Schools Graduation Requirements, 1976-Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieleke, Gene A.

    This document presents the graduation requirements of the Bloomfield Hills public schools. It includes the credits that must be earned in grades 10-12 and the minimum competencies that must be achieved in each of 14 areas, including measurement skills, speaking skills, communication skills, employment and career skills, and physical fitness.…

  19. The Perceived Relevance and Efficacy of a Graduate School Journal among Graduate Faculty and Training Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Jennifer M.; Antonius, Daniel; Brown, Adam D.; Kriss, Alexander; Lehr, Evangeline Y. C.; Evans, Jason; Steele, Howard

    2012-01-01

    A total of 35 psychology department members from 21 universities assessed the relevance and efficacy of the "New School Psychology Bulletin" ("NSPB"), a graduate student journal, to training in psychology. Overall, a small sample of psychology department members viewed "NSPB" as an effective vehicle for student training. Perceptions among faculty…

  20. Tracking the Careers of Graduates: A New Agenda for Graduate Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Debra W.

    2013-01-01

    As candidates in the 2012 election debated issues raised by the state of the US economy, unemployment statistics and job creation took center stage. The problems under discussion posed (and continue to pose) a particularly clear and pressing challenge to the nation's graduate schools. While the US enjoys a reputation for having the most dynamic…

  1. Graduating and Dropping Out of High School in the South Bronx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Patria V.

    This study evaluates the personal, academic, and social factors associated with high school graduation and non-graduation among Hispanics. Subjects for this study included 56 high school graduates, 58 high school equivalency (GED) students, and 50 dropouts from high schools in the South Bronx (New York). The following measurement instruments were…

  2. High School and Beyond. A Profile of Idaho's 1983 High School Graduates. Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesenberg, Lou E.; Stenberg, Laurie A.

    A follow-up of 1983 Idaho high school graduates who had participated in secondary vocational education sought to determine program effectiveness and efficiency. Idaho public school graduates of 1983 were the population. Data were collected from transcripts and two different mail questionnaires. The Idaho Student Followup questionnaire assessed…

  3. Who Can Help Working Students? The Impact of Graduate School Involvement and Social Support on School-Work Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyland, Rebecca L.; Winkel, Doan E.; Lester, Scott W.; Hanson-Rasmussen, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of employees attend graduate school, and the impact of the student role may be substantial and valuable to the work-life literature. In this study the authors examine whether psychological involvement in graduate school increases school-work facilitation. Further, they suggest that employers and graduate schools can provide…

  4. Assessing a Science Graduate School Recruitment Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Espada, Wilson; Díaz-Muñoz, Greetchen; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Flores-Otero, Jacqueline; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; López-Casillas, Marcos; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Fernández-Repollet, Emma

    2015-12-01

    Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting science, research and scientific education among Latinos, organized an educational symposium to provide college science majors the tools, opportunities and advice to pursue graduate degrees and succeed in the STEM disciplines. In this article we share our experiences and lessons learned, for others interested in developing large-scale events to recruit underrepresented minorities to STEM and in evaluating the effectiveness of these efforts.

  5. Assessing a Science Graduate School Recruitment Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Espada, Wilson; Díaz-Muñoz, Greetchen; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Flores-Otero, Jacqueline; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; López-Casillas, Marcos; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A.; Fernández-Repollet, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting science, research and scientific education among Latinos, organized an educational symposium to provide college science majors the tools, opportunities and advice to pursue graduate degrees and succeed in the STEM disciplines. In this article we share our experiences and lessons learned, for others interested in developing large-scale events to recruit underrepresented minorities to STEM and in evaluating the effectiveness of these efforts. PMID:26770074

  6. Using "Kaizen" to Improve Graduate Business School Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiliani, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the applicability of "kaizen" in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: "Kaizen" process was used for ten courses contained in a part-time executive MS degree program in management. Findings: "Kaizen" was found to be an effective process for improving graduate business school courses and the value proposition for…

  7. Intercultural Competence as a Competitive Advantage of Secondary School Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnyshev, A. D.; Kostin, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    Among the qualities of today's school graduate, the ones that are becoming more and more important are those that determine the ability to compete. These qualities include intercultural competence, which both researchers and practitioners all over the world acknowledge to be one of the most important characteristics of any citizen who engages in…

  8. Brain Development Parameters and Intelligence in Chilean High School Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Daniza M.; Leiva, Boris P.; Castro, Carmen G.; Olivares, Manuel G.; Jansana, Joan Manuel M.; Castro, Veronica G.; Almagia, Atilio Aldo F.; Toro, Triana D.; Urrutia, Maria Soledad C.; Miller, Patricio T.; Bosch, Enrique O.; Larrain, Cristian G.; Perez, Hernan T.

    2004-01-01

    The hypothesis that independently of sex, brain volume (BV) and head circumference (HC) are positively and significantly associated with intellectual quotient (IQ) was examined in a sample of 96 high school graduates of high [Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults--Revised (WAIS-R) is greater than 120] and low IQ (WAIS-R is less than 100) (1:1),…

  9. Intercultural Competence as a Competitive Advantage of Secondary School Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnyshev, A. D.; Kostin, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    Among the qualities of today's school graduate, the ones that are becoming more and more important are those that determine the ability to compete. These qualities include intercultural competence, which both researchers and practitioners all over the world acknowledge to be one of the most important characteristics of any citizen who engages in…

  10. Appreciative Inquiry: A Pilot Study of School Counselor Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rolla E.; Emil, Serap

    2010-01-01

    Counselor education programs are influenced by humanistic philosophy, including the strengths-based perspective. This article describes how appreciative inquiry, a strengths-based approach to systems change, informed the development of a pilot survey used to assess graduate perceptions of a school counselor education program. (Contains 1 table.)

  11. Using "Kaizen" to Improve Graduate Business School Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiliani, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the applicability of "kaizen" in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: "Kaizen" process was used for ten courses contained in a part-time executive MS degree program in management. Findings: "Kaizen" was found to be an effective process for improving graduate business school courses and the value proposition for…

  12. The Migration of High School Graduates to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Thomas J.; Boyle, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The National Center for Education Statistics reports that over 250,000 high school graduates moved across state lines to enroll in college in 2008. The choices made by these high ability individuals may have long-lasting implications for state economies; not only do they contribute to state and local economies through their tuition and daily…

  13. Rising to the Challenge: Are High School Graduates Prepared for College and Work? A Study of Recent High School Graduates, College Instructors, and Employers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achieve, Inc., 2005

    2005-01-01

    As many as two in five recent high school graduates say that there are gaps between the education they received in high school and the overall skills, abilities, and work habits that are expected of them today in college and in the work force. The majority of college students and high school graduates without a college degree say that they have…

  14. Break-Even Income Analysis of Pharmacy Graduates Compared to High School and College Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Gatwood, Justin; Spivey, Christina A; Dickey, Susan E

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To project the net cumulative income break-even point between practicing pharmacists and those who enter the workforce directly after high school graduation or after obtaining a bachelor's degree. Methods. Markov modeling and break-even analysis were conducted. Estimated costs of education were used in calculating net early career earnings of high school graduates, bachelor's degree holders, pharmacists without residency training, and pharmacists with residency training. Results. Models indicate that over the first 10 years of a pharmacist's career, they accumulate net earnings of $716 345 to $1 064 840, depending on cost of obtaining the PharmD degree and career path followed. In the break-even analysis, all pharmacy career tracks surpassed net cumulative earnings of high school graduates by age 33 and bachelor's degree holders by age 34. Conclusion. Regardless of the chosen pharmacy career track and the typical cost of obtaining a PharmD degree, the model under study assumptions demonstrates that pharmacy education has a positive financial return on investment, with a projected break-even point of less than 10 years upon career entry.

  15. Medical school graduates' self-evaluations of expected learning outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Arab

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Determined outcomes in education are based on the ultimate expectations from the medical graduates. Methods: One hundred and two medical school graduates of the last 4 years of universities located in a city were asked in 2015 to self-evaluate themselves according to 42 expected skill outcomes. These 42 procedures were approved in 2007, by expert panels of Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education. Results: Mean score of 42 procedures according to self-evaluation in overall respondents (n=102 was 11.5±2.1. Just in 31% (13 out of 42 procedures, the scores were in the acceptable range of above 15. Conclusions: Graduates evaluate themselves weak in 69% (29 out of 42 procedures. If their self-evaluation is real, clarifying the causes might be a key to educational improvement. Keywords: MEDICAL EDUCATION, OUTCOME- BASED EDUCATION, PROCEDURE LEARNING

  16. School-to-Work Transition of Career and Technical Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Becky Wai-Ling; Leach, Miki; Ruiz, Yedalis; Nelson, Consuelo; DiCocco, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the career development of career and technical education (CTE) high school graduates during their school-to-work transition, specifically their adaptability in the face of barriers. Forty graduates (22 men, 18 women) from working-class backgrounds participated in baseline surveys at graduation and phenomenological interviews 1…

  17. Quantifying School Officials' Exposure to Bacterial Pathogens at Graduation Ceremonies Using Repeated Observational Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishai, David; Liu, Liang; Shiau, Stephanie; Wang, Harrison; Tsai, Cindy; Liao, Margaret; Prakash, Shivaani; Howard, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of acquiring pathogenic bacteria as a result of shaking hands at graduation ceremonies. School officials participating in graduation ceremonies at elementary, secondary, and postsecondary schools were recruited. Specimens were collected before and immediately following graduation. Cultures…

  18. Closer to the Finish Line? Compulsory Attendance, Grade Attainment, and High School Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Wael S.

    2017-01-01

    High school graduation rates are a central policy topic in the United States and have been shown to be stagnant for the past three decades. Using student-level administrative data from New York City Public Schools, I examine the impact of compulsory school attendance on high school graduation rates and grade attainment, focusing the analysis on…

  19. Closer to the Finish Line? Compulsory Attendance, Grade Attainment, and High School Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Wael S.

    2017-01-01

    High school graduation rates are a central policy topic in the United States and have been shown to be stagnant for the past three decades. Using student-level administrative data from New York City Public Schools, I examine the impact of compulsory school attendance on high school graduation rates and grade attainment, focusing the analysis on…

  20. PENN PASS: a program for graduates of foreign dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, P; Lopez, N

    1994-01-01

    An increasing number of graduates of foreign dental schools who enroll in advanced standing programs to qualify for licensure calls for dental schools to be prepared to handle not only the curricular demands but also the growing cultural diversity among its student population. The "reeducation" of this student group not only meets the need of foreign dentists for an American degree but may also provide health professionals to service various ethnic populations whose language and culture they are able to understand and identify with. A survey of students and graduates of a two-year Program for Advanced Standing Students (PASS) for graduates of foreign dental schools representing 34 countries aimed to arrive at an understanding of this student group through characterization of the foreign dentists and identification of their attitudes and feelings toward various aspects of the program, the school and faculty and their experience of stress. This report includes description of the distinctive features of the program which cater to specific needs and concerns of this non-traditional group of dental students. PASS students are accepted on the basis of their grades in dental school in home country, scores in the National Dental Board Examination Part I, Test of English as Foreign Language (TOEFL), and ratings in personal interviews. They complete an intensive summer program consisting of didactic and laboratory courses which prepares them for integration with four-year students for the last two years of didactic and clinical curriculum. Cultural diversity seminars, a special English class, PASS class meetings and seminars are unique additions to their program and aim to assist them adjust to the educational, social and cultural systems in an American school. Results of the survey show a majority of the PASS students feel that they are part of the school and that there is someone in the school whom they can approach for problems. An understanding of their ethnic and

  1. Dual Enrollment Lessons and the Development of The New Community College at CUNY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    In March 2008, The City University of New York (CUNY) Chancellor Matthew Goldstein formally launched an initiative to create the university's seventh community college. The development of the concept for this new college is informed in part by the knowledge and practices acquired through working with high school and GED students. Specifically,…

  2. Number Theory : A Seminar held at the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York

    CERN Document Server

    Chudnovsky, Gregory; Cohn, Harvey; Nathanson, Melvyn

    1989-01-01

    The New York Number Theory Seminar was organized in 1982 to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of recent advances in higher arithmetic and its applications. Papers included in this volume are based on the lectures presented by their authors at the Seminar at the Graduate Center of C.U.N.Y. in 1985-88. Papers in the volume cover a wide spectrum of number theoretic topics ranging from additive number theory and diophantine approximations to algebraic number theory and relations with algebraic geometry and topology.

  3. Graduate School Cyber Portfolio: The Innovative Menu For Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ava Clare Marie O. Robles

    2011-01-01

    In today’s milieu, new demands and trends emerge in the field of Education giving teachers of HigherEducation Institutions (HEI’s) no choice but to be innovative to cope with the fast changing technology.To be naturally innovative, a graduate school teacher needs to be technologically and pedagogicallycompetent. One of the ways to be on this level is by creating his cyber portfolio to support students’ eportfoliofor lifelong learning. Cyber portfolio is an innovative menu for teachers who see...

  4. Current issues of preventing tobacco use in secondary school graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florova N.B.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Here is identified the tendency to reduce the effectiveness of anti-tobacco prevention work among graduating students of secondary school. This decline may be due to psychological and social reasons. It is shown that risk factors of involving in chemical dependency are meaningfully disclosed in longitudinal studies, whereas the dynamics of personal change during the formation of anti-addictive prevention skills are more fully disclosed in the comparative age sections. The typical phenomena, accompanying the downward trend in prevention, are the growth of problem behavior and the crisis of mass dropout. Such phenomena are so great that they are recognized as a crisis at a state level.

  5. Graduate Education Program of Design and Integration Capability at Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kikuo

    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University is now developing “Graduate Education Program of Design and Integration Capability” under the MEXT's scheme entitled “Initiatives for Attractive Education in Graduate Schools”. Maturation of society and life, globalization of manufacturing industry, latest demands of human's welfare have changed the meaning of design from functional ensureance to value creation. This requests graduate education of mechanical engineering to turn its definition over both synthesis and analysis and to learning and communication capabilities beyond knowledge itself. With recognizing such a background, the program aims to reform the education curriculum of mechanical engineering by introducing a product design subject which integrates design methodology education and project-based learning over industry- sponsored design problems, several graduate-level fundamental subjects, and the depth area system in which elective subjects are categorized into several areas based on their specialty. This paper describes the objectives, undertakings, promises, etc. of the program.

  6. The High Cost of South Carolina's Low Graduation Rate. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    Research has documented a crisis in South Carolina's high school graduation rate. While state officials report a graduation rate above 70 percent, researchers from South Carolina and elsewhere place the rate just above 50 percent, with rates among minority students lower than 50 percent. South Carolina's graduation rate is the worst of all 50…

  7. [Current states and future aspects of graduate schools for adult graduate students: experiences of the master's course as a medical technologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Takehiro; Suwabe, Akira

    2012-12-01

    The educational system for medical technologists (MTs) has gradually shifted from a three-year technical school system to a four-year university system. It is worthwhile for MTs to advance to a graduate school, in order to improve their routine-work skills, performances, and also to advance their own research as well as to learn how to direct younger MTs. Recently, MTs who advance to the graduate school as adult graduate students are increasing. In this article, the current states and future aspects of the graduate school of Iwate Medical University are reported. In our Department of Central Clinical Laboratory in Iwate Medical University Hospital, three of my colleagues have completed the master's course of the graduate school as adult graduate students, and three are currently attending the school. Nevertheless, none of them has advanced to the doctor's course yet. The primary reason why they do not advance is the heavy burden on any adult graduate students physically, mentally, and financially to study in the graduate school and carry out routine duties at the same time. Thus, in order to encourage MTs to go or to graduate school education, it is important to arrange systems which will enable MTs to advance to the graduate school as adult graduate students. I believe there are three key elements to make this possible. Firstly, prepare easier access to curriculums for MTs to study special fields and learn special skills. Secondly, arrange an increase in the salary scheme depending on the degree attained from the graduate school. Thirdly, provide financial support for graduate school expenses. In conclusion, it is expected that a large number of MTs will advance to the graduate school if these changes for a better educational environment are made.

  8. The Graduate School of Climate Sciences, University of Bern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Graduate School of Climate Sciences, University of Bern, offers a specialised M.Sc. and a Ph.D. study programme in climate sciences. The graduate school has a highly interdisciplinary profile involving not only natural sciences, but also humanities/history, economics and law. The ten participating institutes with a total of 45 academics provide expertise in long-term climate variability, climate modelling, climate reconstruction, predictability of the future climate and extreme events, the impact of climate change on ecosystems and climate risks for society and economy. The graduate school is fully compliant with the Bologna Accords and collaborates closely with the sister institution C2SM at ETH Zurich by, e.g., jointly organised lectures. There are currently 23 master and 37 doctoral students in the programme. These originate from the University of Bern (28 %), from other Swiss universities (30 %) and from foreign universities (42 %). Comprehensive information about the Graduate School of Climate Sciences is available at http://www.climatestudies.unibe.ch . The M.Sc. in Climate Sciences programme (120 ECTS credits) is designed to attract students from all disciplines in natural sciences and offers them a tailor-made curriculum to reach their career aspirations. The students make their own course selection according to their profile envisaged (specialised versus broad education) and ideally already guided by a job perspective. Selecting the courses and the topic of the master thesis they specialise in one of five fields: climate and earth system science; atmospheric science; economics; economic, social and environmental history; statistics. Several courses are organised jointly with public authorities and the private industry, e.g. from experts working in the insurance business, in weather forecasting or in environmental pollution control. This provides the students hands-on experience and contacts to future employers. The master thesis (60 ECTS) involves the

  9. Primary care careers among recent graduates of research-intensive private and public medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Phillip A; Xu, Shuai; Ayanian, John Z

    2013-06-01

    Despite a growing need for primary care physicians in the United States, the proportion of medical school graduates pursuing primary care careers has declined over the past decade. To assess the association of medical school research funding with graduates matching in family medicine residencies and practicing primary care. Observational study of United States medical schools. One hundred twenty-one allopathic medical schools. The primary outcomes included the proportion of each school's graduates from 1999 to 2001 who were primary care physicians in 2008, and the proportion of each school's graduates who entered family medicine residencies during 2007 through 2009. The 25 medical schools with the highest levels of research funding from the National Institutes of Health in 2010 were designated as "research-intensive." Among research-intensive medical schools, the 16 private medical schools produced significantly fewer practicing primary care physicians (median 24.1% vs. 33.4%, p private schools. In contrast, the nine research-intensive public medical schools produced comparable proportions of graduates pursuing primary care careers (median 36.1% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.87) and matching in family medicine residencies (median 7.4% vs. 10.0%, p = 0.37) relative to the other 66 public medical schools. To meet the health care needs of the US population, research-intensive private medical schools should play a more active role in promoting primary care careers for their students and graduates.

  10. Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

  11. Emotional intelligence assessment in a graduate entry medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Eva M; Cronin, Patricia A; Offiah, Gozie

    2013-03-07

    The management of emotions in the workplace is a skill related to the ability to demonstrate empathic behaviour towards patients; to manage emotional reactions in oneself and to lead others as part of a team. This ability has been defined as emotional intelligence (EI) and doctor's EI may be related to communication skills and to patient satisfaction levels. This study reports on the use of two assessments of EI as part of a course on Personal and Professional Development (PPD) in a graduate medical school curriculum. Fifty one graduate entry medical students completed an eight session course on PPD between December 2005 and January 2006. Students completed two measures of EI: self-report (EQ-i) and ability (MSCEIT V2.0) over a two year study period. The data gathered were used to explore the relationship between self-report and ability EI and between EI and student demographics, academic performance and change over time. Analysis of the EI data demonstrated that self-report EI did not change over time and was not related to ability EI. Females scored higher than males on a number of self-report and ability EI scores. Self-reported self-awareness was found to deteriorate in males and females over time. High self-reported EI was found to be associated with poor performance on clinical competency assessments but with good performance on a number of bio-medical knowledge based assessments. This report concludes that assessments of EI can be incorporated into a medical school curriculum as part of a PPD programme and that the concept of EI may be associated with performance in medical school.

  12. Graduate admissions essays write your way into the graduate school of your choice

    CERN Document Server

    Asher, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Based on thousands of interviews with successful grad students and graduate admissions officers, Graduate Admissions Essays deconstructs and demystifies the ever-challenging and seemingly more impersonal application process for getting into graduate and scholarship programs. The book presents 50 sample essays in a comprehensive range of subjects, detailed strategies that have proven successful for some of the most notoriously competitive graduate programs in the country, as well as sample letters of recommendation, essays for residencies and fellowships, and postgrad applications.

  13. An Analysis of a Plan to Improve Graduation Rates in Johnston County Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfrow, David Ross

    2015-01-01

    There have been limited qualitative case studies exploring effective strategies designed to improve graduation rates in rural school districts. Specifically, few studies have presented information based solely upon the voices of practitioners themselves in solving the graduation crisis in America's public schools. This study will add to the…

  14. Assessing Practical Intelligence in Business School Admissions: A Supplement to the Graduate Management Admissions Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Jennifer; Wilt, Jeanne M.; Nebel, Kristina L.; Ashford, Susan J.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is the most widely used measure of managerial potential in MBA admissions. GMAT scores, although predictive of grades in business school, leave much of the variance in graduate school performance unexplained. The GMAT also produces disparities in test scores between groups, generating the potential for…

  15. Assessing Practical Intelligence in Business School Admissions: A Supplement to the Graduate Management Admissions Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Jennifer; Wilt, Jeanne M.; Nebel, Kristina L.; Ashford, Susan J.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is the most widely used measure of managerial potential in MBA admissions. GMAT scores, although predictive of grades in business school, leave much of the variance in graduate school performance unexplained. The GMAT also produces disparities in test scores between groups, generating the potential for…

  16. Follow Up Study of Non College Bound Somerset County High School Graduates June 1990, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Charles R.

    A follow-up study sought to determine what happened to the 1990 noncollege-bound graduates of all the high schools in Somerset County, New Jersey. Data were gathered through a mailed survey and telephone follow-up (approximately 45 percent response) of the 408 graduates of the 12 of 13 high schools providing names. Some of the findings from…

  17. "Tracing" Europeanisation: School Leavers' and Graduates' Information Systems as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordósy, Rita

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the extent to which the process of Europeanisation can be observed within a specific policy area: that of school leaving and graduation. The paper investigates what is known about school leavers and graduates at the national and the European levels on the one hand, and how the data collections portray Europe and European policy…

  18. Growth and Development of Graduate School Functions in a College of Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Lisa L.; Gockel-Blessing, Elizabeth; James, Rhys H.

    2015-01-01

    Saint Louis University decentralized Graduate School functions in the fall of 2010. The primary goal of this initiative was to provide greater "academic flexibility and resources" to expand graduate programs and enhance research opportunities in colleges, schools, and centers on campus. This initiative allowed the Doisy College of Health…

  19. Social Networking in School Psychology Training Programs: A Survey of Faculty and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V.; Goforth, Anisa N.; Segool, Natasha; Burt, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of social networking sites has become an emerging focus in school psychology training, policy, and research. The purpose of the current study is to present data from a survey on social networking among faculty and graduate students in school psychology training programs. A total of 110 faculty and 112 graduate students in school…

  20. How Graduates Make the School-To-Work Transition : A Person-in-Context Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baay, P.E.

    2015-01-01

    After finishing school, some graduates quickly and easily find a suitable job, while others face periods of un(der)employment. The current dissertation investigated such individual differences in school-to-work transition success. Our focus was on Vocational Education and Training graduates (VET – m

  1. Chinese engineering students' cross-cultural adaptation in graduate school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinquan

    This study explores cross-cultural adaptation experience of Chinese engineering students in the U.S. I interact with 10 Chinese doctoral students in engineering from a public research university through in-depth interviews to describe (1) their perceptions of and responses to key challenges they encountered in graduate school, (2) their perspectives on the challenges that stem from cross-cultural differences, and (3) their conceptualization of cross-cultural adaptation in the context of graduate school. My findings reveal that the major challenges participants encounter during graduate school are academic issues related to cultural differences and difficulties of crossing cultural boundaries and integrating into the university community. These challenges include finding motivation for doctoral study, becoming an independent learner, building a close relationship with faculty, interacting and forming relationships with American people, and gaining social recognition and support. The engineering students in this study believe they are less successful in their social integration than they are in accomplishing academic goals, mainly because of their preoccupation with academics, language barriers and cultural differences. The presence of a large Chinese student community on campus has provided a sense of community and social support for these students, but it also contributes to diminishing their willingness and opportunities to interact with people of different cultural backgrounds. Depending on their needs and purposes, they have different insights into the meaning of cross-cultural adaptation and therefore, and choose different paths to establish themselves in a new environment. Overall, they agree that cross-cultural adaptation involves a process of re-establishing themselves in new academic, social, and cultural communities, and adaptation is necessary for their personal and professional advancement in the U.S. They also acknowledge that encountering and adjusting

  2. Correlation between Grades 4th, 8th, and 11th English Language Arts Scores and High School Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parese, Errin C.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this research was on students' low graduation rate in a New York State high school, investigating a possible correlation between students' longitudinal English Language Arts (ELA) exams and their graduation status. In the 2010-11 school year, 25% of the students at the high school of study failed to graduate, a rate which was 5% lower…

  3. AstroCom NYC: A Partnership Between Astronomers at CUNY, AMNH, and Columbia University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, Timothy; Ford, K. S.; Robbins, D.; Mac Low, M.; Agueros, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    AstroCom NYC is a new program designed to improve urban minority student access to opportunities in astrophysical research by greatly enhancing partnerships between research astronomers in New York City. The partners are minority serving institutions of the City University of New York, and the astrophysics research departments of the American Museum of Natural History and Columbia. AstroCom NYC provides centralized, personalized mentoring as well as financial and academic support, to CUNY undergraduates throughout their studies, plus the resources and opportunities to further CUNY faculty research with students. The goal is that students’ residency at AMNH helps them build a sense of belonging in the field, and inspires and prepares them for graduate study. AstroCom NYC prepares students for research with a rigorous Methods of Scientific Research course developed specifically to this purpose, a laptop, a research mentor, career mentor, involvement in Columbia outreach activities, scholarships and stipends, Metrocards, and regular assessment for maximum effectiveness. Stipends in part alleviate the burdens at home typical for CUNY students so they may concentrate on their academic success. AMNH serves as the central hub for our faculty and students, who are otherwise dispersed among all five boroughs of the City. With our first cohort we experienced the expected challenges from their diverse preparedness, but also far greater than anticipated challenges in scheduling, academic advisement, and molding their expectations. We review Year 1 operations and outcomes, as well as plans for Year 2, when our current students progress to be peer mentors.

  4. Improving Student Outcomes via Comprehensive Supports: Three-Year Outcomes from CUNY's Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenovic, Zineta; Linderman, Donna; Karp, Melinda Mechur

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges are grappling with low rates of degree completion and transfer. The City University of New York's (CUNY) Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) aims to improve graduation rates by providing a range of comprehensive support services to community college students in select majors. Using student-unit record data, we…

  5. A Comparative Study of Black Dropouts and Black High School Graduates in an Urban Public School System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Silvia Brooks

    1987-01-01

    Reports findings of a comparative study of Black high school dropouts and Black high school graduates in Houston, TX, in relation to five clusters of variables: demographic/personal characteristics; academic origin variables; family characteristics; feelings toward school; and feelings toward peers in school. The primary distinguishing…

  6. Navigating graduate school and beyond: A career guide for graduate students and a must read for every advisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-05-01

    Beginning his scientific career as an engineering student at PSG College of Technology, in Coimbatore, India, Sundar A. Christopher has negotiated and navigated the higher-education system to become the chairman of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Drawing on his own experiences and on insights gleaned from the students who have passed through his graduate-level professional development course, Christopher takes a lighthearted look at peer review, proposal writing, managing budgets, and making the most of conferences in the AGU bookNavigating Graduate School and Beyond: A Career Guide for Graduate Students and a Must Read for Every Advisor. In this interview, Eos speaks to Christopher about overcoming the bureaucratic, logistical, and personal hurdles that too often lead students to disillusionment and conflict.

  7. Influence of electronic structure on Compton scattering through comparing Cu-Ni alloys with Cu-Ni powder mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang LUO; Xianquan HU; Guangyu XIAO; Chunyang KONG

    2012-01-01

    The application fields of Compton scattering have been further broadened through the studies of theories and experiments as well as the electronic structure of the scatters.The relationship between the contents of binary alloys (also binary powder mixtures) and the number of Compton scattered photons has been thoroughly examined.The linear expression of the relationship has been obtained approximately according to the Compton scattering theory.And the relationship has been validated well through the Compton scattering experiments with the scatters of Cu-Ni binary alloys or Cu-Ni binary powder mixtures.Furthermore,it is found that the slope of Cu-Ni powder mixture series is steeper than that of Cu-Ni alloy series,and through the pseudopotential plane wave theory of DFT the microscopic principles of Compton scattering of Cu-Ni alloy and Cu-Ni powder mixture series have been discussed and compared with each other.The results show that the electronic structure is the main reason for the difference of the linear slopes,and the line slope of Cu-Ni powder mixtures series is steeper than that of Cu-Ni alloy series.

  8. A Marketing Plan for Recruiting Students into Pharmacy School-based Graduate Programs. A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdford, David A.; Stratton, Timothy P.

    2000-01-01

    Outlines a marketing plan for recruiting students into pharmacy school-based graduate programs, particularly into social and administrative sciences. Addresses challenges and opportunities when recruiting, the need to clearly define the "product" that graduate programs are trying to sell to potential students, types of students…

  9. The Intersection of Homophobic Bullying and Racism in Adulthood: A Graduate School Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Mitsunori

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how homophobic bullying and bullying based on racism intersect in graduate school through the personal narrative of a gay Japanese male graduate student. First, I will provide a critical incident that demonstrates when, where, and how bullying based on homophobia and racism occurred in a specific graduate…

  10. U.S. High School Graduation Rates: Patterns and Explanations. NBER Working Paper No. 18701

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnane, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    I survey the evidence on patterns in U.S. high school graduation rates over the period 1970-2010 and report the results of new research conducted to fill in holes in the evidence. I begin by pointing out the strengths and limitations of existing data sources. I then describe six striking patterns in graduation rates. They include stagnation over…

  11. Career Choices of the 1976 Graduates of U.S. Medical Schools. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, Janet Melei

    The interactions and influences of various sociodemographic, experiential, and other factors on the career decisions of medical students are described. Special emphasis is on students' characteristics and career preferences at application, their medical schools, their first graduate year programs, and the hospitals of their first graduate year…

  12. 1978 U.C. Medical School Graduates: Practice Setting Preferences, Other Career Plans, and Personal Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, Janet Melei

    1980-01-01

    The medical practice setting preferences, in terms of demography, of 1978 U.S. medical school graduates are reported along with their career plans and other individual characteristics. Characteristics of graduates preferring inner city, small city and town/rural settings are highlighted. (JMD)

  13. A Marketing Plan for Recruiting Students into Pharmacy School-based Graduate Programs. A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdford, David A.; Stratton, Timothy P.

    2000-01-01

    Outlines a marketing plan for recruiting students into pharmacy school-based graduate programs, particularly into social and administrative sciences. Addresses challenges and opportunities when recruiting, the need to clearly define the "product" that graduate programs are trying to sell to potential students, types of students appropriate for…

  14. Exploring Predictors of Graduate School and Career Success: A Case Study in Sport Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCrom, Carrie; Rufer, Lisa; Slavich, Mark; Dwyer, Brendan; Greenhalgh, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The following case study attempted to assess what factors contribute to graduate school and early-career success among sport management graduate students. As faculty members charged with admitting the next generation of leaders in the sport industry, how should admissions decisions be made and what factors should be considered? The authors…

  15. The High Cost of Low Graduation Rates in North Carolina. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    North Carolina has a dropout crisis--only two thirds of North Carolina high school students graduate. One reason this crisis has not received the attention it deserves is because the state was reporting badly inflated graduation rates (supposedly as high as 97 percent) until it finally adopted a more realistic reporting method earlier this year.…

  16. Post-Graduate Performance, an Academic Comparison Evaluating Situating Learning and Law School Acceptance Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverse, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Research on post-graduate performance, pertaining to law school graduates, indicates that success in the legal profession is attributable to more than the theoretical content or cognitive knowledge obtained through educational curricula. Research suggests that the combination of creative and analytic thinking skills contributes to a higher rate of…

  17. Exploring Predictors of Graduate School and Career Success: A Case Study in Sport Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCrom, Carrie; Rufer, Lisa; Slavich, Mark; Dwyer, Brendan; Greenhalgh, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The following case study attempted to assess what factors contribute to graduate school and early-career success among sport management graduate students. As faculty members charged with admitting the next generation of leaders in the sport industry, how should admissions decisions be made and what factors should be considered? The authors…

  18. The Intersection of Homophobic Bullying and Racism in Adulthood: A Graduate School Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Mitsunori

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how homophobic bullying and bullying based on racism intersect in graduate school through the personal narrative of a gay Japanese male graduate student. First, I will provide a critical incident that demonstrates when, where, and how bullying based on homophobia and racism occurred in a specific graduate…

  19. High School and Employment Experiences of Vocational and Nonvocational Concentrators of the Idaho High School Graduating Class of 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesenberg, Lou E.; Stenberg, Laurie A.

    1992-01-01

    Five years after graduation, responses from 519 nonvocational and 212 vocational Idaho graduates and 317 of their employers found no differences in satisfaction with curriculum; 40% nonvocational and 33% vocational jobs not related to high school plans; 89% nonvocational, 80% vocational concentrators satisfied with jobs; and no significant…

  20. Current Trends in High School Graduation and College Enrollment of Hearing-Impaired Students Attending Residential Schools for Deaf Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Corinne S.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Results of a telephone survey of administrators at all 53 public residential high schools serving hearing impaired students indicated that the size of the graduating clases for 1983 through 1985 will be substantially larger than recent classes and that approximately 30 percent of the graduates in each year's class are expected to enter academic…

  1. Baltic Graduate School for Social Sciences and Humanities founded in Tallinn / Maiki Voore

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Voore, Maiki, 1983-

    2009-01-01

    Oktoobris 2008 allkirjastasid Tallinna Ülikooli, Läti Ülikooli ja Kaunase Vytautas Magnuse Ülikooli rektorid Baltimaade sotsiaal- ja humanitaarteaduste doktorikooli (Baltic Graduate School) asutamislepingu

  2. Baltic Graduate School for Social Sciences and Humanities founded in Tallinn / Maiki Voore

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Voore, Maiki, 1983-

    2009-01-01

    Oktoobris 2008 allkirjastasid Tallinna Ülikooli, Läti Ülikooli ja Kaunase Vytautas Magnuse Ülikooli rektorid Baltimaade sotsiaal- ja humanitaarteaduste doktorikooli (Baltic Graduate School) asutamislepingu

  3. Outcome Measurement in Postgraduate Year One of Graduates from a Medical School with a Pass/Fail Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosti, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Charlotte D.

    1999-01-01

    A study investigated the clinical preparedness of 144 Stanford University (California) medical school graduates in 11 areas, comparing it with peers from graded medical schools and rating the accuracy of the dean's letter in representing graduates' capabilities. Results indicate that graduates from Stanford's two-interval, pass/fail system…

  4. Is Graduate School Really for You? The Whos, Whats, Hows, and Whys of Pursuing a Master's or Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Amanda I.

    2012-01-01

    Landing a job in today's academic job market is no easy feat. Is graduate school the answer? This informed and candid book provides anyone thinking about pursuing an advanced degree--and those who support them--with the inside scoop on what to expect in graduate school. Amanda I. Seligman helps potential students navigate graduate study--not just…

  5. High School Graduation, Completion, and Dropout (GCD) Indicators: A Primer and Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Christopher B.

    2004-01-01

    This catalog is concerned with the measurement of certain high school outcomes; specifically the progression of students through high school and the way in which students terminate their participation with the secondary education system. The catalog provides a basic inventory of the various methods for estimating high school graduation,…

  6. Teach for America, Relay Graduate School, and the Charter School Networks: The Making of a Parallel Education Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungal, Angus Shiva

    2016-01-01

    In New York City, a partnership between Teach For America (TFA), the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE), the Relay Graduate School of Education (Relay), and three charter school networks produced a "parallel education structure" within the public school system. Driving the partnership and the parallel education structure are…

  7. Writing for Publication While in Graduate School: An Accessible Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this Writer's Forum is to share eight tips about writing for publication as a graduate student. These tips demonstrate writing for publication as an accessible reality for students. This Writer's Forum advances ideas, advice, and anecdotes focused on helping graduate students to see themselves as valued experts who are…

  8. Competence assessment for vocational school students based on business and industry chamber to improve graduate entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudi, Widodo, Joko; Margunani

    2017-03-01

    Vocational school's skill competence assessment is an important phase to complete learning process at vocational school. For vocational school this phase should be designed and implemented not only to measure learning objective target, but also to provide entrepreneurship experience for the graduates. Therefore competence assessment implementation should be done comprehensively in cooperation with Business and Industry Chamber. The implementation of skill competence aspect covering materials, methods, strategies, tools and assessors, need to be designed and optimized with respect to vocational school together with Business and Industry Chamber. This aims to measure the learning objective target and produce improved entrepreneurship graduates. 4M-S strategy in students' skill competence assessment could be done to ensure that the material, method, tool and assessor have been well designed and implemented in both institutions: vocational school and Business and Industry Chamber to improve entrepreneurship graduates.

  9. Beyond the Classroom: Religious Stressors and Adjustment among Indonesian Muslim Graduate Students in an American Graduate School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirul Mukminin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper was to report some of findings from a larger phenomenological study on the lived experience of Indonesian graduate students in a US higher education. Particularly, this paper was to discuss the Indonesian Muslim graduate students’ religious life experiences attending an American graduate school. The primary data sources were a demographic survey and in-depth interviews. The demographic data were analyzed descriptively. The interviews were analyzed by using within-case and cross-case displays and analyses. The theoretical framework of acculturation stress model was used to guide this study. Utilizing the acculturation stress model to describe Indonesian Muslim graduate students’ cross-culture experiences, we organized our analysis and discussion around their perspectives and the contexts in which challenges they encountered emerge. An analysis of the text revealed that major themes related to religious beliefs and life experiences were unanticipated praying difficulties, longer fasting days, no holiday for Ramadan (the holy month of Muslims celebration, no taraweeh (Muslim prayer peculiar to the holy month of Ramadan prayers in mosque during Ramadan, and rare halal food, and decreasing religious stressors. Future higher education research and policy implications are also discussed

  10. Understanding of International Graduate Students' Academic Adaptation to a U.S. Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuchun; Frey, Christopher; Bang, Hyeyoung

    2011-01-01

    When moving to a new environment, international graduate students faced a series of transitional difficulties which impact their behaviors and psychological well-being in learning. However, few studies have specifically addressed their experiences with academic adaptation. To understand these students' academic needs, this study explored the…

  11. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in Water Chemistry From Elementary School to Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    I will present the accumulation of over 10 years of experience teaching STEM subjects to students ranging from 1st grade to graduate school. I was fortunate to gain a lot of valuable teaching experience while in graduate school in Boulder, CO and so many of my experiences center on opportunities for connecting with students in the field in CO. 3rd-5th grade field hikes - While helping at Jamestown Elementary School, I led hikes with a 3-5th grade class to an abandoned flourospar mine where the students were able to pick up beautiful purple fluorite crystals from the ground while discussing how mining works. During the hike back, we used field meters to measure the pH and conductivity of the stream and discussed the need to balance society's need for metals with the harmful effects of acid mine drainage. 9th, 10th grade STEM Academy at Skyline High School - During an NSF-sponsored fellowship, I had the opportunity to teach a STEM class to 9th and 10th graders where we used the engineering design process to a) design a tool to help a handicapped 3rd grader use the drinking fountain by herself and b) design a treatment system for cleaning up acid mine drainage. Undergraduate and Graduate Environmental Water Chemistry Field Trip - Students had the opportunity to tour two local mine sites to collect contaminated water that would be used in class for alkalinity titrations and pH, sulfate, and hardness measurements. They also collected water samples upstream and at multiple points downstream of a wastewater treatment plan and measured and graphed the dissolved oxygen "sag" in the river. My main teaching philosophy has two parts: 1) assume the students know nothing and 2) assume the students are even smarter than you think you are. This informs my approach to field trips by always starting from the beginning, but also not oversimplifying the topic. 1st graders on their best day can be very similar to graduate students on their worst.

  12. Effects of Perceived Discrimination on the School Satisfaction of Brazilian High School Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubia R. Valente

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the consequences of peer victimization for the satisfaction with schooling (“happiness” of college-bound high school graduates in Brazil.  Several types of victimization are explored including discrimination due to race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, and disability. We compare the satisfaction with their schooling of students planning to head to college straight from high school and older students applying for college later in life (“nontraditional students”. We conclude that students who perceived that they had been discriminated against were more dissatisfied with their school experience than those who did not, ceteris paribus, and we relate level of dissatisfaction to type of discrimination. The older student evidence reveals that this dissatisfaction wanes with time and age, however. Our conclusions are based upon ordered logistic analyses of data for 2.4 million current high school seniors and 78.7 thousand older students drawn from the Exame Nacional do Ensino Médio questionnaire (ENEM.

  13. Effects of Perceived Discrimination on the School Satisfaction of Brazilian High School Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubia R. Valente

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the consequences of peer victimization for the satisfaction with schooling (“happiness” of college-bound high school graduates in Brazil.  Several types of victimization are explored including discrimination due to race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, and disability. We compare the satisfaction with their schooling of students planning to head to college straight from high school and older students applying for college later in life (“nontraditional students”. We conclude that students who perceived that they had been discriminated against were more dissatisfied with their school experience than those who did not, ceteris paribus, and we relate level of dissatisfaction to type of discrimination. The older student evidence reveals that this dissatisfaction wanes with time and age, however. Our conclusions are based upon ordered logistic analyses of data for 2.4 million current high school seniors and 78.7 thousand older students drawn from the Exame Nacional do Ensino Médio questionnaire (ENEM.

  14. A Program Evaluation of a Credit Recovery Program to Improve Graduation Rates for At-Risk High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that low graduation rates are a problem in high schools across the United States. The problem is significant at a small, inner-city charter high school in a southwestern US state that had a 2008 graduation rate of 34%. After assessing the situation, educators at this school developed the Credit Retrieval Program (CRP) to help…

  15. Computer Science in High School Graduation Requirements. ECS Education Trends (Updated)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Allowing high school students to fulfill a math or science high school graduation requirement via a computer science credit may encourage more student to pursue computer science coursework. This Education Trends report is an update to the original report released in April 2015 and explores state policies that allow or require districts to apply…

  16. Best Practices in Student Recruitment: A Case Study of Eleven Practitioners at Seven Alternative Graduate Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sheri S. L.

    2012-01-01

    This research addresses best practices for recruiting students at small graduate schools. Best practice is a management term defined as the most efficient and effective way of accomplishing a task. While popular techniques can promote student enrollment, the actual practices and how they are carried out can be varied and unique at each school. For…

  17. Graduate Student Fellowship Program Effects on Attitude and Interest toward Science of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, James R.; Rayfield, John; Briers, Gary; Johnson, Larry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of a graduate student fellowship program on middle school students' attitude toward science and their interest in science. Using a descriptive and correlational research design, data were collected from 588 middle school students (grades 6, 7, and 8). Participants completed a pretest and a…

  18. Community Schools--Results that Turn around Failing Schools: Test Scores, Attendance, Graduation and College-Going Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coalition for Community Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Great strides have been made by community school initiatives across the nation in their efforts to impact student achievement, attendance, student engagement, graduation rates, parent involvement and more. Data on community schools is growing and the authors encourage readers to review research reports and syntheses on results. The results…

  19. Development of Professional Identity through Socialization in Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Debora L.; Wilson, Maureen E.; Pasquesi, Kira; Hirschy, Amy S.; Boyle, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Professional identity is one outcome of successful socialization. The purpose of this study was to understand how socialization in graduate programs contributes to the development of professional identity for new professionals in student affairs. Via survey, we found significant relationships between program qualities, standards, activities, and…

  20. Graduate Teacher Preparation for Rural Schools in Victoria and Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jodie; Walker-Gibbs, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Graduate teachers' preparedness for working in rural settings are mediated by the development of pedagogical expertise, professional engagement with parents and the community, and broader notions of preparation to teach in rural contexts. The Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (SETE) project is a four-year longitudinal study tracking…

  1. Entering Student Affairs: A Comparative Study of Graduate School Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Norma; Eckman, Ellen; Strayhorn, Terrell

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the college choice process of graduate students in College Student Personnel programs at a public university and a private religiously affiliated university. Despite differences in size, mission, and location of the two institutions studied, the research findings show that respondent populations were similar demographically…

  2. United States medical school graduate interest in radiology residency programs as depicted by online search tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Nora M; Kinsella, Stuart D; Morey, José M

    2014-02-01

    Recent media publications have indicated a tough job market in medical specialty positions for medical school graduates, specifically in the field of radiology. Internet search tools, such as Google Trends, have proved useful in the prediction of certain diseases on the basis of the search volume index for a specific term. The authors hypothesized that online search tools might be useful in the prediction of US medical school graduates' interest in residency positions in radiology. Google Trends indicated an increase over time in searches for "radiology salary" and a decrease over time in searches for "radiology residency." National Resident Matching Program results for diagnostic radiology showed an increase from 2004 to 2009 in the percentage of US graduates entering radiology but a dramatic drop from 2010 to 2013. This occurred even while the total number of US graduates active in the National Resident Matching Program increased. This finding might have been foretold on the basis of online query result trends. Online search data may be a useful insight into the interests of US medical school graduates and may be predictive of unfilled radiology residency positions and eventual increased shortages of community radiologists coming from US medical schools.

  3. CONDITIONS REQUIRED FOR CREATING SOCIETAL INTELLIGENCE IN STUDENTS OF A GRADUATE SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Vladimirovich GULYAKIN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considered both the outer circumstances globally shaped and the learning environment set at a graduate school of technologies being both conditions entailing creation of societal intelligence in students of the college. The outer circumstances globally shaped mean the general features of the modern society that enters into the era of information society, reflecting the course of information processing and supply, of global-ized standards and communication round the world.Learning preconditions represent the settled circum-stances manifesting the social humanism targets for the learning environment at a graduate school of technolo-gies.

  4. Comparative decline of professional school graduates' performance on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templer, Donald I; Stroup, Kathy; Mancuso, Leah J; Tangen, Kimberly

    2008-04-01

    The discrepancy between traditional (Boulder Model) and professional school (Vail Model) clinical psychology graduate programs on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP) was greater using 1997-2005 data than in an earlier study using 1988-1995 data. The relative decline of the performance of professional school graduates on the EPPP was attributed in part to the increase of 31.1% in number of listed professional schools over the last decade, in particular, because those schools have lower academic standards. It is recommended that professional programs accept fewer students and have more rigorous quality control mechanisms for the students who have been accepted. It is further recommended that no new professional schools be started and that marginal programs be phased out.

  5. Participation in Summer School and High School Graduation in the Sun Valley High School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a summer school credit recovery program in the Sun Valley High School District. Using logistic regression I assess the relationship between race, gender, course failure, school of origin and summer school participation for a sample of students that failed one or more classes in their first year of high…

  6. Emerging from the Cocoon of Romani Pride: The First Graduates of the Gandhi Secondary School in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Susan Roberta

    2005-01-01

    Despite recent educational reforms in Hungary, only 33% of Roma who enter primary school subsequently enroll in secondary school, and a mere 0.2% progress to higher education. To address this situation, in 1994 the Gandhi Secondary School opened its doors as the first college preparatory school for Roma in Europe. In 2000, the school graduated 18…

  7. Family Counseling in the Schools: A Graduate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Linda L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a one semester-unit course, entitled "Family Counseling in the Schools" to complement other training in family systems counseling for students interested in family-school intervention. Links literature on changes in the cultures of the social institutions of schools, families, and family counseling with the systemic conceptual framework…

  8. Professional School Counselor Graduates in Georgia: Findings Regarding Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Brent M.; Boes, Susan R.; Chibbaro, Julia S.; Sebera, Kerry E.

    2008-01-01

    As key players in the school, professional school counselors have many roles and tasks however not all are trained with the same curriculum. In the state of Georgia, school counselor training is becoming more similar than different because all university system programs are mandated by the Board of Regents (BOR) to become accredited by the Council…

  9. A Second Chance to Graduate on Time: High School Students' Perceptions on Participating in an Online Credit Recovery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    High schools in the United States are facing increased scrutiny to increase the number of students graduating with a diploma in four years. This pressure comes from many sources. First, the No Child Left Behind Act instituted graduation as a measure of a high school's success at the federal level. States soon followed by increasing accountability…

  10. Academic and Professional Career Outcomes of Medical School Graduates Who Failed USMLE Step 1 on the First Attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougle, Leon; Mavis, Brian E.; Jeffe, Donna B.; Roberts, Nicole K.; Ephgrave, Kimberly; Hageman, Heather L.; Lypson, Monica L.; Thomas, Lauree; Andriole, Dorothy A.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the academic and professional outcomes of medical school graduates who failed the United States Licensing Examination Step 1 on the first attempt. This retrospective cohort study was based on pooled data from 2,003 graduates of six Midwestern medical schools in the classes of 1997-2002. Demographic, academic, and…

  11. The Role of Christian Education in the Development of Spiritual Stamina in Young Adult Graduates of Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Violet E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to investigate the personal development of spiritual stamina in graduates of Christian high schools who attend secular universities or colleges. Participants are comprised of a theoretical sampling of 16 young adult graduates of one of four Christian schools in Southeastern United States.…

  12. The Connector Study: A Strategy for Collecting Post-Graduation Data about Low-Income High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Karen D.; Wartman, Katherine Lynk; Brown, Paul Gordon; Gismondi, Adam N.; Pesce, Jessica R.; Stanfield, David

    2016-01-01

    Tracking low-income students after high school graduation presents significant problems for data collection. The Connector Study is an attempt to increase and enrich outcomes data in a longitudinal study of low-income graduates of a national network of innovative high schools by gathering alumni updates through telephone interviews with high…

  13. Perceptions of business skill development by graduates of the University of Michigan Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Michael; Wiesen, Robert; Arnold, Sara; Taichman, Russell S; Taichman, Linda Susan

    2011-04-01

    Many graduating dentists leave dental school feeling that they are not prepared to start and run a dental practice. The aim of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge and perceptions dental graduates have in the area of practice management. A twenty-item survey was mailed in the fall of 2008 to nearly half of the University of Michigan dental school alumni who had graduated between the years of 1997 and 2007. Respondents were asked about their demographics, practice characteristics, and perceptions of knowledge/experience regarding practice management skills at the present time as well as at graduation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The majority of respondents were general practitioners (84 percent) aged thirty to thirty-nine practicing between six and ten years with practice incomes reported to be greater than $300,000 per year (79 percent). Most dentists reported being either an owner or co-owner of the practice (57 percent), and 33 percent reported being an associate in the practice. Upon graduation, 7 percent of the respondents felt that they had a strong knowledge of accounting or human resource issues; this perception increased to 47 percent at the present time. Similarly, less than 6 percent of respondents felt they understood issues pertaining to dental insurance upon graduation; this perception increased to 68 percent after having spent time in the workforce. In contrast to the large increase in knowledge/experience in business aspects of dentistry that had accrued since graduation, most alumni reported only a 7 percent increase in their knowledge of the legal aspects of dental practice. Results from this study indicate that interventions are needed to increase graduating dentists' knowledge of practice management and close the gap between their knowledge and its application in real life. The majority of alumni believed there is a need to improve the curriculum focused on these aspects of dental practice.

  14. Perceptions of medical graduates and their workplace supervisors towards a medical school clinical audit program

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ferrall, Ilse; Hoare, Samuel; Caroline, Bulsara; Mak, Donna B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study explores how medical graduates and their workplace supervisors perceive the value of a structured clinical audit program (CAP) undertaken during medical school. Methods Medical students at the University of Notre Dame Fremantle complete a structured clinical audit program in their final year of medical school.  Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 Notre Dame graduates (who had all completed the CAP), and seven workplace supervisors (quality and safety staff and clinical supervisors).  Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants and data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Both graduates and workplace supervisors perceived the CAP to be valuable. A major theme was that the CAP made a contribution to individual graduate’s medical practice, including improved knowledge in some areas of patient care as well as awareness of healthcare systems issues and preparedness to undertake scientifically rigorous quality improvement activities. Graduates perceived that as a result of the CAP, they were confident in undertaking a clinical audit after graduation.  Workplace supervisors perceived the value of the CAP beyond an educational experience and felt that the audits undertaken by students improved quality and safety of patient care. Conclusions It is vital that health professionals, including medical graduates, be able to carry out quality and safety activities in the workplace. This study provides evidence that completing a structured clinical audit during medical school prepares graduates to undertake quality and safety activities upon workplace entry. Other health professional faculties may be interested in incorporating a similar program in their curricula.  PMID:28692425

  15. Impact of Science Tutoring on African Americans' Science Scores on the High School Students' Graduation Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Edward

    This study investigated the relationship between an after-school tutorial program for African American high school students at a Title I school and scores on the science portion of the High School Graduation Examination (HSGE). Passing the examination was required for graduation. The target high school is 99% African American and the passing rate of the target high school was 42%---lower than the state average of 76%. The purpose of the study was to identify (a) the relationship between a science tutorial program and scores on the science portion of the HSGE, (b) the predictors of tutoring need by analyzing the relationship between biology grades and scores on the science portion of the HSGE, and (c) the findings between biology grades and scores on the science portion of the HSGE by analyzing the relationship between tutorial attendance and HSGE scores. The study was based on Piaget's cognitive constructivism, which implied the potential benefits of tutorials on high-stakes testing. This study used a 1-group pretest-posttest, quantitative methodology. Results showed a significant relationship between tutoring and scores on the biology portion of the HSGE. Results found no significant relationship between the tutorial attendance and the scores on the biology portion of the HSGE or between the biology grades and scores on the biology portion of the HSGE before tutoring. It has implications for positive social change by providing educational stakeholders with empirically-based guidance in determining the potential benefit of tutorial intervention strategies on high school graduation examination scores.

  16. The Effects of Academic Career Magnet Education on High Schools and Their Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Robert L.; Allen, Anna; Thaler, Robert; Sullivan, Debora; Zellman, Gail L.; Little, Judith Warren; Quigley, Denise D.

    This book contains eight papers on a study of the effects of academic career magnetic education on high schools and their graduates. "Introduction" (Robert L. Crain) explains the study's objectives and methodology, which included an analysis of data files on 9,176 students who applied to 59 different academic career magnet education and…

  17. Education, Employment and Income of High School Vocational Agriculture Graduates. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, R. M.; Seaver, S. K.

    In order to evaluate vocational agriculture education in 21 Connecticut high schools for the purposes of developing or updating curriculums, this study intended to: (1) determine employment rates of vocational agriculture graduates in agricultural areas, (2) determine post-secondary educational attainment levels, (3) determine variables affecting…

  18. Career Anchors and Career Paths: A Panel Study of Management School Graduates. Technical Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Edgar H.

    The first of a series, this report describes a 10-year followup study of a sample of 44 graduates of the Sloan School of Management, analyzing the interaction of personal values and career events in the lives of managers in organizations. All 44 participants were located, interviewed, and given the same attitude surveys as in the early 1960's.…

  19. Canadian Innovation: A Brief History of Canada's First Online School Psychology Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drefs, Michelle A.; Schroeder, Meadow; Hiebert, Bryan; Panayotidis, E. Lisa; Winters, Katherine; Kerr, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a brief historical review and survey of the current landscape of online graduate psychology programs within the Canadian context. Specific focus is given to outlining the establishment and evolution of the first Canadian online professional specialization program in school psychology. The article argues that given the virtual…

  20. Preparing School Counselors to Support LGBT Youth: The Roles of Graduate Education and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, Ryan M.; Kosciw, Joseph G.; Greytak, Emily A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined whether school counselors' LGBT-related graduate education and professional development predicted more frequent efforts to support LGBT students, and whether their LGBT-related self-efficacy mediated the relationship between their training experiences and supportive efforts. Results from ordinary least squares (OLS) regression…

  1. Canadian Innovation: A Brief History of Canada's First Online School Psychology Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drefs, Michelle A.; Schroeder, Meadow; Hiebert, Bryan; Panayotidis, E. Lisa; Winters, Katherine; Kerr, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a brief historical review and survey of the current landscape of online graduate psychology programs within the Canadian context. Specific focus is given to outlining the establishment and evolution of the first Canadian online professional specialization program in school psychology. The article argues that given the virtual…

  2. National- and State-Level High School Graduation Rates for English Learners. Fast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of English Language Acquisition, US Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) has synthesized key data on English learners (ELs) into two-page PDF sheets, by topic, with graphics, plus key contacts. The topic for this report on English Learners (ELs) are national- and state-level high school graduation rates for English Learners. The following data are presented: (1)…

  3. Education and the Economy: Boosting South Dakota's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  4. Education and the Economy: Boosting Georgia's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  5. Education and the Economy: Boosting Vermont's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  6. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Hampshire's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  7. Education and the Economy: Boosting South Carolina's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  8. Education and the Economy: Boosting the District of Columbia's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  9. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Jersey's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  10. Education and the Economy: Boosting Oregon's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  11. Education and the Economy: Boosting Missouri's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  12. Education and the Economy: Boosting the Nation's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  13. Education and the Economy: Boosting Wyoming's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  14. Education and the Economy: Boosting California's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  15. Education and the Economy: Boosting Hawaii's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  16. Education and the Economy: Boosting Texas's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  17. Education and the Economy: Boosting Ohio's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  18. Education and the Economy: Boosting Iowa's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  19. Education and the Economy: Boosting Alaska's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  20. Education and the Economy: Boosting Washington's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  1. Education and the Economy: Boosting Rhode Island's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  2. Education and the Economy: Boosting Utah's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  3. Education and the Economy: Boosting Colorado's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  4. Education and the Economy: Boosting Nevada's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  5. Education and the Economy: Boosting Virginia's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  6. Education and the Economy: Boosting Kansas' Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  7. Education and the Economy: Boosting Tennessee's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  8. Education and the Economy: Boosting Florida's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  9. Education and the Economy: Boosting West Virginia's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  10. Education and the Economy: Boosting Pennsylvania's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  11. Education and the Economy: Boosting Indiana's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  12. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Mexico's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  13. Education and the Economy: Boosting North Dakota's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  14. Education and the Economy: Boosting Oklahoma's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  15. Education and the Economy: Boosting Delaware's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  16. Education and the Economy: Boosting New York's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  17. Education and the Economy: Boosting North Carolina's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  18. Education and the Economy: Boosting Illinois's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  19. Education and the Economy: Boosting Idaho's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  20. Education and the Economy: Boosting Wisconsin's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  1. Education and the Economy: Boosting Arkansas' Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  2. Education and the Economy: Boosting Nebraska's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  3. Education and the Economy: Boosting Arizona's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  4. A History of Critical Thinking as an Educational Goal in Graduate Theological Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, D. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The development of critical thinking skills among learners is a common educational goal across graduate theological schools. The purpose of this article is to provide a survey of some of the primary historical influences of the critical thinking movement in higher education in the United States and the movement's impact on graduate…

  5. The Impact of Legalized Abortion on High School Graduation through Selection and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    This analysis examines whether the legalization of abortion changed high school graduation rates among the children selected into birth. Unless women in all socio-economic circumstances sought abortions to the same extent, increased use of abortion must have changed the distribution of child development inputs. I find that higher abortion ratios…

  6. Exploration of Holland's Theory of Vocational Choice in Graduate School Enviroments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Thomas T.; Walsh, E. Pierce

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to refine many of the constructs used in Holland's theory of vocational choice by investigating definitions and relationships that comprise the theory. As well, this study concerned itself with establishing usefulness of applying Holland's theory to students in a graduate school environment. (Author)

  7. College Seniors' Plans for Graduate School: Do Deep Approaches Learning and Holland Academic Environments Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocconi, Louis M.; Ribera, Amy K.; Nelson Laird, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which college seniors' plans for graduate school are related to their tendency to engage in deep approaches to learning (DAL) and their academic environments (majors) as classified by Holland type. Using data from the National Survey of Student Engagement, we analyzed responses from over 116,000 seniors attending…

  8. Exploration of Holland's Theory of Vocational Choice in Graduate School Enviroments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Thomas T.; Walsh, E. Pierce

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to refine many of the constructs used in Holland's theory of vocational choice by investigating definitions and relationships that comprise the theory. As well, this study concerned itself with establishing usefulness of applying Holland's theory to students in a graduate school environment. (Author)

  9. Experiences of Black Women Who Persist to Graduation at Predominantly White Schools of Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Francine Simms

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the experiences of Black women who attended predominantly White nursing schools. A phenomenological design was used to investigate eight nurses who persisted through to graduation from their nursing programs in the 21st century. The study examined persistence through the lens of academic involvement, alienation,…

  10. The Impact of Legalized Abortion on High School Graduation through Selection and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    This analysis examines whether the legalization of abortion changed high school graduation rates among the children selected into birth. Unless women in all socio-economic circumstances sought abortions to the same extent, increased use of abortion must have changed the distribution of child development inputs. I find that higher abortion ratios…

  11. Academic and professional career outcomes of medical school graduates who failed USMLE Step 1 on the first attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougle, Leon; Mavis, Brian E; Jeffe, Donna B; Roberts, Nicole K; Ephgrave, Kimberly; Hageman, Heather L; Lypson, Monica L; Thomas, Lauree; Andriole, Dorothy A

    2013-05-01

    This study sought to determine the academic and professional outcomes of medical school graduates who failed the United States Licensing Examination Step 1 on the first attempt. This retrospective cohort study was based on pooled data from 2,003 graduates of six Midwestern medical schools in the classes of 1997-2002. Demographic, academic, and career characteristics of graduates who failed Step 1 on the first attempt were compared to graduates who initially passed. Fifty medical school graduates (2.5 %) initially failed Step 1. Compared to graduates who initially passed Step 1, a higher proportion of graduates who initially failed Step 1 became primary care physicians (26/49 [53 %] vs. 766/1,870 [40.9 %]), were more likely at graduation to report intent to practice in underserved areas (28/50 [56 %] vs. 419/1,939 [ 21.6 %]), and more likely to take 5 or more years to graduate (11/50 [22.0 %] vs. 79/1,953 [4.0 %]). The relative risk of first attempt Step 1 failure for medical school graduates was 13.4 for African Americans, 7.4 for Latinos, 3.6 for matriculants >22 years of age, 3.2 for women, and 2.3 for first generation college graduates. The relative risk of not being specialty board certified for those graduates who initially failed Step 1 was 2.2. Our observations regarding characteristics of graduates in our study cohort who initially failed Step 1 can inform efforts by medical schools to identify and assist students who are at particular risk of failing Step 1.

  12. The Platinum Bullet: An Experimental Evaluation of CUNY's Accelerated Study in Associate Program (ASAP)--New Three-Year Impacts, Cost Analyses, and Implementation Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael; Scrivener, Susan; Fresques, Hannah; Ratledge, Alyssa; Rudd, Tim; Sommo, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    The City University of New York's (CUNY's) Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) combines many of the ideas from a range of programs into a comprehensive model that requires students to attend school full-time, and provides supports and incentives for three years. ASAP's financial aid reforms, enhanced student services, and scheduling…

  13. Is there a hard money future after graduate school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelso, Stephen T.

    As a relatively junior member of AGU, I wish to express a few opinions that are probably shared by many other junior AGU members. I am sure we are all familiar with the plight of many recent graduates as they struggle with a changing economy and shifting societal requirements on the sciences. I do not wish to merely join the chorus of those who complain that society has educated them only to see them forced to seek a living outside of their training. I hope, rather, to speak primarily to the senior members of AGU. I hope you will listen.

  14. CUNY Sun-Earth Research, Space Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, D. E.; Cheung, T. D.; Marchese, P. J.; Johnson, L. P.; Austin, S.; Tremberger, G.

    2007-05-01

    Faculty and students at Queensborough Community College and Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York (CUNY) have, over several years now, employed simple software familiar to most undergraduate students to perform useful calculations, including statistical analyses, regarding various geophysical phenomena. Topics have included Space Weather, Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) direction and strength fluctuations, geomagnetic and ionospheric responses to solar flares, and Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) events. Our statistical analyses have utilized second-order measures of fluctuation of the IMF strength, especially what we now call the Cheung number: the number of times that the value of Sigma-B, as provided by the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) data, has exceeded 0.5nT during a 6 hour interval. We have also utilized the Higuchi fractal dimension of various somewhat random fluctuations, including Sigma-B and the brightness or strength of adjacent pixels or data points in somewhat random data sequences in time or spatial dimension, including IMF fluctuations and SOHO (Solar Heliographic Observer) images of the Sun. These we have correlated with each other and with such variables as SEP (Solar Energetic Particle) peak flux, TEC (Total Electron Content) of the ionosphere, and Dst (Disturbance storm-time) in the geomagnetic field. Recent results indicate that the IMF fluctuation measures are well correlated with the SEP peak flux, the Dst, and TEC. Higuchi fractal analysis of SOHO photospheric ultraviolet brightness indicates, consistent with concomitant increased chaos or randomness of photospheric brightness, an increased likelihood of solar flare events or CME affecting interplanetary space and the earth's magnetosphere/ionosphere/atmosphere.

  15. Smartphones in Public Secondary Schools: Views of Matric Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavhunga, Francis Z.; Kibirige, Israel; Chigonga, Benard; Ramaboka, Manthiba

    2016-01-01

    Many schools in South Africa ban smartphones. The decision does not take into account the views of the learners. The purpose of this paper was to elicit learners' views regarding smartphones in schools. A survey design was used and data were collected from 93 learners using a questionnaire consisting of closed- and open-ended items. Data were…

  16. Smartphones in Public Secondary Schools: Views of Matric Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavhunga, Francis Z.; Kibirige, Israel; Chigonga, Benard; Ramaboka, Manthiba

    2016-01-01

    Many schools in South Africa ban smartphones. The decision does not take into account the views of the learners. The purpose of this paper was to elicit learners' views regarding smartphones in schools. A survey design was used and data were collected from 93 learners using a questionnaire consisting of closed- and open-ended items. Data were…

  17. The Development of Intercultural Competency in School Psychology Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.; Lewis, Abigail A.; Anderson, Amy E.; Bernstein, Elana R.

    2015-01-01

    School psychologists often have the opportunity to work with students and families from varied backgrounds and cultures. While this can be an exciting and enriching part of the job, it can also be daunting for some practitioners, particularly those who are inadequately prepared. A number of strategies have been implemented in school psychology…

  18. The Development of Intercultural Competency in School Psychology Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.; Lewis, Abigail A.; Anderson, Amy E.; Bernstein, Elana R.

    2015-01-01

    School psychologists often have the opportunity to work with students and families from varied backgrounds and cultures. While this can be an exciting and enriching part of the job, it can also be daunting for some practitioners, particularly those who are inadequately prepared. A number of strategies have been implemented in school psychology…

  19. High schools and labour market outcomes: Italian graduates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzoli, Dario

    2007-01-01

    To provide empirical evidence on differences across high school tracks in early occupational labour market outcome, I estimate how the employment probability, the time before the first job is taken up, and earnings depend on high school type, controlling for student characteristics by a propensit...

  20. Longitudinal Health Risks Among Graduates and Disenrollees from Diving School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    aftereffects of a school failure . Results of the present study suggest that failing to complete an occupational training program mey represent a greater...disenrollees experienced diltiti]lt-’ in effectively coping with the aftereffects of a school failure . To conclude, the expanded longitudinal study currently

  1. High schools and labour market outcomes: Italian graduates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzoli, Dario

    2007-01-01

    To provide empirical evidence on differences across high school tracks in early occupational labour market outcome, I estimate how the employment probability, the time before the first job is taken up, and earnings depend on high school type, controlling for student characteristics by a propensit...

  2. Methods for Analyzing the Attainment of Graduate School Milestones: A Case Study. GRE Board Professional Report No. 86-3P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Rebecca; Braun, Henry I.

    Using a data base compiled by the Graduate School of Northwestern University, a longitudinal study of the graduate school careers of 2,211 students in 14 programs was conducted. Among the most prominent findings was the increase in the enrollment of foreign students. The patterns of attainment of graduate school milestones, such as Ph. D.…

  3. The Impact of Personal and Program Characteristics on the Placement of School Leadership Preparation Program Graduates in School Leader Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Edward J.; Hollingworth, Liz; An, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of personal and program characteristics on the placement of graduates of principal preparation programs in assistant principal, principal, and school leadership positions. Research Design: This study relies on Texas principal production data from 1993 through 2007 matched to employment…

  4. Formal public health education and career outcomes of medical school graduates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Krousel-Wood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few data are available evaluating the associations of formal public health education with long-term career choice and professional outcomes among medical school graduates. The objective of this study was to determine if formal public health education via completion of a masters of public health (MPH degree among US medical school graduates was associated with early and long-term career choice, professional satisfaction, or research productivity. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in 1108 physicians (17.1% completed a MPH degree who had 10-20 years of follow-up post medical school graduation. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted. RESULTS: Compared to their counterparts with no MPH, medical school graduates with a MPH were more likely to have completed a generalist primary care residency only [relative risk (RR 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.35-2.29], obtain employment in an academic institution (RR 1.81; 95% CI 1.33-2.37 or government agency (RR 3.26; 95% CI 1.89-5.38, and practice public health (RR 39.84; 95% CI 12.13-107.38 or primary care (RR 1.59; 95% CI 1.18-2.05. Furthermore, medical school graduates with a MPH were more likely to conduct public health research (RR 8.79; 95% CI: 5.20-13.82, receive NIH or other federal funding (RR 3.11, 95% CI 1.74-5.33, have four or more peer-reviewed publications (RR 2.07; 95% CI 1.56-2.60, and have five or more scientific presentations (RR 2.31, 95% CI 1.70-2.98. CONCLUSION: Formal public health education via a MPH was associated with career choice and professional outcomes among physicians.

  5. Dermatology relevance to graduates from the Universidade Estadual de Campinas Medical School*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugão, Ariel Falbel; de Caldas, Tânia Alencar; de Castro, Eneida Lazzarini; Pereira, Elisabete Monteiro de Aguiar; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Some research indicates that physicians do not dominate the expected dermatological content for the proper exercise of the profession. This fact compromises their diagnostic and therapeutic performance, generating unnecessary costs. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the relevance of Dermatology and the knowledge acquired in the specialty during the undergraduate course in clinical practice of graduates at the State University of Campinas Medical School (FCM/UNICAMP). METHOD A questionnaire with 22 closed questions and two open ones was electronically sent to physicians who had graduated more than 10 years ago and others for less than 10 years. In the first group, physicians were trained by the same curriculum and in the second group there were subjects trained by the old and the new curriculum. RESULTS Of the 126 respondents, 83% had completed a specialization course. Among all, 82% did not study dermatology after graduation. The majority considered that Dermatology has high relevance in clinical practice, regardless of the group. There was a statistically significant difference between non-dermatologist doctors graduated for more than 10 years and those graduated for less than 10 years regarding confidence about lesion diagnosis, diagnostic investigation and treatment of skin diseases. Physicians who have graduated for a longer time feel more insecure in relation to patients with dermatoses. Concerning contributions offered by graduation program completion they prioritized outpatient care, ability to diagnose, knowledge of pathology, research and knowledge of lesions. CONCLUSION This study has shown that Dermatology is relevant in medical practice and more recent graduates from the FCM/UNICAMP feel less insecure when treating a patient with dermatoses. PMID:26560207

  6. Childhood and adolescent onset psychiatric disorders, substance use, and failure to graduate high school on time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslau, Joshua; Miller, Elizabeth; Joanie Chung, W-J; Schweitzer, Julie B

    2011-03-01

    We examined the joint predictive effects of childhood and adolescent onset psychiatric and substance use disorders on failure to graduate high school (HS) on time. Structured diagnostic interviews were conducted with a US national sample of adults (18 and over). The analysis sample included respondents with at least 8 years of education who were born in the US or arrived in the US prior to age 13 (N = 29,662). Psychiatric disorders, substance use and substance use disorders were examined as predictors of termination or interruption of educational progress prior to HS graduation, with statistical adjustment for demographic characteristics and childhood adversities. Failure to graduate HS on time was more common among respondents with any of the psychiatric and substance use disorders examined, ranging from 18.1% (specific phobia) to 33.2% (ADHD-combined type), compared with respondents with no disorder (15.2%). After adjustment for co-occurring disorders, significant associations with failure to graduate on time remained only for conduct disorder (OR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.57-2.26) and the three ADHD subtypes (Inattentive OR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.44-2.20, Hyperactive-Impulsive OR = 1.38, 95% CI 1.14-1.67, and Combined OR = 2.06, 95% CI 1.66-2.56). Adjusting for prior disorders, tobacco use was associated with failure to graduate on time (OR = 1.97, 95% CI 1.80-2.16). Among substance users, substance use disorders were not associated with on-time graduation. The findings suggest that the adverse impact of childhood and adolescent onset psychiatric disorders on HS graduation is largely accounted for by problems of conduct and inattention. Adjusting for these disorders, smoking remains strongly associated with failure to graduate HS on time.

  7. BUSINESS NEEDS AND GRADUATE BUSINESS SCHOOL OFFERINGS IN MARKETING

    OpenAIRE

    Thams, Meg; GLUECK, DEBORAH

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a gap exists in the skill and knowledge businesses require of marketing employees and what the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited schools actually provide. In this quantitative study, two set of data were collected and compared, and a gap analysis conducted. A questionnaire was used to obtain data from members of the Business Marketing Association (BMA) regarding course preferences that would best prepare stud...

  8. A Review of Greene (2002 High School Graduation Rates in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Phelps

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The - Greene Method- of calculating school - graduation rates- and the Manhattan Institute (MI criticisms of official graduation and completion statistics are outlined and scrutinized. The methodology fails to recognize the complexity of the issue and appears to ignore the considerable efforts that have been undertaken by education statisticians to remediate the problems inherent to these types of data. The Greene method for calculating completion ratios is simulated and found to have little to no reliability. It is recommended that anyone intent on reporting valid and reliable education indicators avoid use of the Greene Method.

  9. [The fate of graduates of the Medical Cadet Officers School, the first nine graduating classes (1922-2001): based on the archives of Dr Roman Jakubski].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, T

    2001-01-01

    In 1922 a Military Medical School was set up in Warsaw. Following several reorganisations from 1928 it was known as the Medical Cadet Officers' School. This academy trained physicians, pharmacists and dentists for the needs of the Armed Forces. Professional studies were conducted at the Medical or Pharmacy Faculty of Warsaw University. By 1939, 17 incoming classes had been admitted, amounting to 903 students all told. Diplomas and officer's ranks were awarded to 462 graduates. Another 99 senior students were made officers on the eve of the war. The school ceased to exist the moment World War Two broke out. The subject of this article is the fate of graduates of the Medical Cadet Officers School (admitted from 1922 to 1930) who completed their studies in the first nine graduating classes, spent the war in Poland or returned home after the war. It is based on an analysis of archival materials gathered by the late Dr Roman Jakubski in London, who died in 2000. In 1998, he donated his collections to the Main Medical Library in Warsaw. Many graduates of the Medical Cadet Officers School survived the war, and about 26% of them perished. Many of the latter were murdered by Stalin's NKVD (security police) in Katyn and Kharkov, whilst the remainder died at the hands of the Germans while fighting on all the fronts of World War Two. The overwhelming majority of graduates of the school's first nine graduating classes proved through their often complicated biographies that their Alma Mata had played an important role in their lives. It produced many well-trained and at times superbly skilled military physicians. Some of them went on to become outstanding specialists in various fields of medicine and pharmacy. Most of them courageously defended their homeland during the Second War World, providing to be distinguished officers ready to risk their lives when the situation waranted.

  10. Variation in passing standards for graduation-level knowledge items at UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Celia A; Gurnell, Mark; Melville, Colin R; Kluth, David C; Johnson, Neil; Wass, Val

    2017-06-01

    Given the absence of a common passing standard for students at UK medical schools, this paper compares independently set standards for common 'one from five' single-best-answer (multiple-choice) items used in graduation-level applied knowledge examinations and explores potential reasons for any differences. A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted. Participating schools were sent a common set of graduation-level items (55 in 2013-2014; 60 in 2014-2015). Items were selected against a blueprint and subjected to a quality review process. Each school employed its own standard-setting process for the common items. The primary outcome was the passing standard for the common items by each medical school set using the Angoff or Ebel methods. Of 31 invited medical schools, 22 participated in 2013-2014 (71%) and 30 (97%) in 2014-2015. Schools used a mean of 49 and 53 common items in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015, respectively, representing around one-third of the items in the examinations in which they were embedded. Data from 19 (61%) and 26 (84%) schools, respectively, met the inclusion criteria for comparison of standards. There were statistically significant differences in the passing standards set by schools in both years (effect sizes (f(2) ): 0.041 in 2013-2014 and 0.218 in 2014-2015; both p best-answer items used in graduation-level examinations vary across UK medical schools. Further work to examine standard-setting processes in more detail is needed to help explain this variability and develop methods to reduce it. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  11. BUSINESS NEEDS AND GRADUATE BUSINESS SCHOOL OFFERINGS IN MARKETING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thams, Meg; Glueck, Deborah

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a gap exists in the skill and knowledge businesses require of marketing employees and what the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited schools actually provide. In this quantitative study, two set of data were collected and compared, and a gap analysis conducted. A questionnaire was used to obtain data from members of the Business Marketing Association (BMA) regarding course preferences that would best prepare students for positions in marketing. Records analysis was then undertaken of the marketing course offerings of AACSB accredited MBA programs offering an emphasis in Marketing. Gap analysis was conducted by applying a test of difference to the results of the two data collection efforts. Results of the study suggest that some misalignment between school offerings and business needs exists.

  12. Cu-Ni nanoparticle-decorated graphene based photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Husale, Sudhir; Srivastava, A. K.; Dutta, P. K.; Dhar, Ajay

    2014-06-01

    We report a simple and straight forward approach for the synthesis of Cu-Ni graphene hybrid nano-composites. These nano-composites have been characterized using AFM, XRD, FTIR spectroscopy and HRTEM. The characterization data clearly shows uniform decoration of Cu-Ni nanoparticles on graphene layers. A thin film of these nano-composites was found to exhibit unique electrical and photoresponse properties, which may be attributed to photothermoelectric and photovoltaic effects. The photocurrent measurements indicate superior light absorption and long lifetime of this device.We report a simple and straight forward approach for the synthesis of Cu-Ni graphene hybrid nano-composites. These nano-composites have been characterized using AFM, XRD, FTIR spectroscopy and HRTEM. The characterization data clearly shows uniform decoration of Cu-Ni nanoparticles on graphene layers. A thin film of these nano-composites was found to exhibit unique electrical and photoresponse properties, which may be attributed to photothermoelectric and photovoltaic effects. The photocurrent measurements indicate superior light absorption and long lifetime of this device. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00916a

  13. College Enrollment Patterns for Rural Indiana High School Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mathew R.; Davis, Elizabeth; Stephan, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Postsecondary education is a fundamental tool for achieving upward mobility and economic growth. Students with an associate's or bachelor's degree earn substantially more in a lifetime and experience better working conditions and job benefits than students with only a high school diploma. This study examines differences in public college…

  14. Profile of graduates of Israeli medical schools in 1981--2000: educational background, demography and evaluation of medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Noemi; Shalev, Ilana

    2005-05-01

    In light of changes in the medical profession, the different requirements placed on physicians and the evolving needs of the healthcare system, the need arose to examine the medical education curriculum in Israel. This survey, conducted by the Samuel Neaman Institute for Science and Technology, summarizes 20 years of medical education in Israel's four medical schools, as the first stage in mapping the existing state of medical education in Israel and providing a basis for decision-making on future medical education programs. To characterize the academic background of graduates, evaluate their attitudes towards current and alternative medical education programs, and examine subgroups among graduates according to gender, medical school, high school education, etc. The survey included graduates from all four Israeli medical schools who graduated between the years 1981 and 2000 in a sample of 1:3. A questionnaire and stamped return envelope were sent to every third graduate; the questionnaire included open and quantitative questions graded on a scale of 1 to 5. The data were processed for the entire graduate population and further analyzed according to subgroups such as medical schools, gender, high school education, etc. The response rate was 41.3%. The survey provided a demographic profile of graduates over a 20 year period, their previous educational and academic background, additional academic degrees achieved, satisfaction, and suggestions for future medical education programs. The profile of the medical graduates in Israel is mostly homogenous in terms of demographics, with small differences among the four medical schools. In line with recommendations of the graduates, and as an expression of the changing requirements in the healthcare system and the medical profession, the medical schools should consider alternative medical education programs such as a bachelor's degree in life sciences followed by MD studies, or education programs that combine medicine with

  15. A Graduate Student's Perspective on Engaging High School Students in Research Outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, A. B.; Horton, R. A., Jr.; Andrews, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The southern San Joaquin basin is one of the United States' most prolific oil producing regions but also one facing numerous problems including low high school graduation rates, low college enrollments, high college dropout rates, low wages, and higher than average unemployment. Investment in STEM education experiences for high school students has been emphasized by California State University Bakersfield as a means to improving these metrics with programs such as the Research Experience Vitalizing Science-University Program (REVS-UP). Now in its seventh year, the REVS-UP (funded by Chevron) forms teams of high school students, a high school teacher, a CSUB graduate student, and a CSUB professor to work for four weeks on a research project. For the past two summers student-teacher teams investigated the diagenesis and mineralogy of the Temblor Formation sandstones in the subsurface of the San Joaquin basin oil fields that are potential CO2 sequestration sites. With a graduate student leading the teams in sample preparation and analysis by scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and cathode luminescence system (SEM-CL) data was gathered on diagenetic processes, detrital framework grains, and authigenic cements. Typically students are introduced to the project in a series of brief seminars by faculty and are then introduced to the techniques and samples. During the second week the students are usually capable of preparing samples and collecting data independently. The final week is focused on developing student-authored research posters which are independently presented by the students on the final day. This gives high school students the opportunity to learn advanced geologic topics and analytical techniques that they would otherwise not be exposed to as well as to gain research and presentation skills. These types of projects are equally important for the graduate students involved as it allows them the

  16. Reasons for Silence: A Case Study of Two Korean Students at a U.S. Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Yun

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the perception and reasons for Korean students' silence and low levels of oral participation in U.S. graduate programs. It analyzes a case study conducted with two Korean students currently attending graduate school in urban settings. The researcher conducted semi-structured interviews with the participants, using a constant…

  17. Reasons for Silence: A Case Study of Two Korean Students at a U.S. Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Yun

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the perception and reasons for Korean students' silence and low levels of oral participation in U.S. graduate programs. It analyzes a case study conducted with two Korean students currently attending graduate school in urban settings. The researcher conducted semi-structured interviews with the participants, using a constant…

  18. An Evaluation of the Jimma Agricultural Technical School Program, Jimma, Ethiopia, Based Upon a Study of Jimma Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Irvin Eldie

    To obtain descriptive evidence for an evaluation and to ascertain whether or not differences exist between graduates of several provinces and tribes in certain post-high school pursuits, this study utilized data collected from personal contact and a mailing survey. Criteria used included the graduates' cultural background, occupational…

  19. An Examination of Attendance, Sports or Club Involvement, Special Education Involvement, and Ethnicity as Predictors of High School Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Matthew G.

    2010-01-01

    Many students do not graduate from high school, which could lead to poorer quality of life, lower paying jobs, and increased crime. Previous researchers have indicated that Hispanic and African American students graduate at a significantly lower rate than White students. However, there remains an important gap in the current literature regarding…

  20. The Effects of Parenthood during Graduate School on PhD Recipients' Paths to the Professoriate: A Focus on Motherhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, Amanda M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on graduate students who are parents, the career-related resources they gather during graduate school, and the influence of those resources on PhD-earning mothers' attainment of tenure-track faculty jobs at U.S. higher-education institutions.

  1. Graduate Student and High School Teacher Partnerships Implementing Inquiry-Based Lessons in Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. A.; Preston, L.; Graham, K.

    2007-12-01

    Partnering science graduate students with high school teachers in their classroom is a mutually beneficial relationship. Graduate students who may become future university level faculty are exposed to teaching, classroom management, outreach scholarship, and managing time between teaching and research. Teachers benefit by having ready access to knowledgeable scientists, a link to university resources, and an additional adult in the classroom. Partnerships in Research Opportunities to Benefit Education (PROBE), a recent NSF funded GK-12 initiative, formed partnerships between science and math graduate students from the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and local high school science teachers. A primary goal of this program was to promote inquiry-based science lessons. The teacher-graduate student teams worked together approximately twenty hours per week on researching, preparing, and implementing new lessons and supervising student-led projects. Several new inquiry-based activities in Geology and Astronomy were developed as a result of collaboration between an Earth Science graduate student and high school teacher. For example, a "fishbowl" activity was very successful in sparking a classroom discussion about how minerals are used in industrial materials. The class then went on to research how to make their own paint using minerals. This activity provided a capstone project at the end of the unit about minerals, and made real world connections to the subject. A more involved geology lesson was developed focusing on the currently popular interest in forensics. Students were assigned with researching how geology can play an important part in solving a crime. When they understood the role of geologic concepts within the scope of the forensic world, they used techniques to solve their own "crime". Astronomy students were responsible for hosting and teaching middle school students about constellations, using a star- finder, and operating an interactive planetarium

  2. 34 CFR 600.55 - Additional criteria for determining whether a foreign graduate medical school is eligible to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... credentials required of faculty members teaching the same or similar courses at medical schools in the United... Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) (including the ECFMG English test) in the...

  3. Articulation between University and Public School: the case of the graduate course in sociology education at UFRJ

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anita Handfas; Julia Polessa Maçaira

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the continuing education of teachers, based on the experience of a graduate course with a specialization in sociology education at the School of Education...

  4. REPORT ON NEW YORK STATE DATA FROM A NATIONAL FOLLOW-UP STUDY OF HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL T AND I VOCATIONAL GRADUATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENINGER, MAX U.

    A NATIONAL FOLLOWUP STUDY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL VOCATIONAL GRADUATES FROM 100 SELECTED SCHOOLS WAS MADE TO (1) DESCRIBE THE POST-HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF A GROUP OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL VOCATIONAL COURSE GRADUATES FROM THE CLASSES OF 1953, 1958, AND 1962, (2) COMPARE VOCATIONAL COURSE GRADUATES FROM COMPREHENSIVE HIGH…

  5. An Evaluation of the English Achievement Test for Junior High School Graduation 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶译

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates the Achievement Test for Junior High School Graduation in reliability, validity and practicality, which is aimed to help junior English teachers to understand how to identify a useful test and develop their test writing skills as well as improve their teaching. The result suggests that the Achievement Test is a reasonably reliable and valid test though some of the listening items need to be improved. It is the ideal frame of evaluating language learning through language testing.

  6. College and Career Readiness Profiles of High School Graduates in American Samoa and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. REL 2017-229

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Phillip; Carreon, Daisy; Scanlan, Spencer; Dandapani, Nitara

    2017-01-01

    Many jurisdictions use data about college and career readiness to help stakeholders understand whether students are on track to succeed in college and careers after high school graduation. For example, Hawaii includes the percentage of high school graduates from a particular school who later attend college in school-level feedback reports for…

  7. Analysis of Workforce Skills in High School Graduates: Self Report of High School Seniors in Northwest Ohio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Hedrick

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of workforce competencies at the conclusion of high school graduation are discussed in this paper. Researchers sampled over 875 graduating seniors from 16 high schools within six counties throughout Northwestern Ohio. Results highlight future career and educational goals of these young people and a self-report of skills based on the SCANS competencies and basic foundation skills. When evaluating Foundation Skills of Personal Qualities, Basic Skills, and Thinking Skills, students indicated highest ratings in Personal Qualities and overall lowest ratings in Basic Skills. A series of five Workforce Competencies were also evaluated, including Using Resources, Using Information, Using Technology, Interpersonal Skills, and Working in Systems. Highest ratings for Competencies were reported in Interpersonal Skills and lowest in Using Resources.

  8. Job requirements compared to medical school education: differences between graduates from problem-based learning and conventional curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federkeil Gero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based Learning (PBL has been suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve medical education. We sought to evaluate the differences in medical school education between graduates from PBL-based and conventional curricula and to what extent these curricula fit job requirements. Methods Graduates from all German medical schools who graduated between 1996 and 2002 were eligible for this study. Graduates self-assessed nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in medical school on a 6-point Likert scale. Results were compared between graduates from a PBL-based curriculum (University Witten/Herdecke and conventional curricula. Results Three schools were excluded because of low response rates. Baseline demographics between graduates of the PBL-based curriculum (n = 101, 49% female and the conventional curricula (n = 4720, 49% female were similar. No major differences were observed regarding job requirements with priorities for "Independent learning/working" and "Practical medical skills". All competencies were rated to be better taught in PBL-based curriculum compared to the conventional curricula (all p Conclusion Among medical graduates in Germany, PBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of physicians. Research and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular development.

  9. Black and White Performance in Graduate School and Policy Implications of the Use of Graduate Record Examination Scores in Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Richard R.; Shaw, Marvin E.

    1985-01-01

    A significant number of Black graduate students enrolled at the University of Florida in 1982 had higher grades than White students who had performed better than they on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). This suggests that the GRE is insensitive to the factors that affect Blacks' academic performance. (KH)

  10. The business side of healthcare practice: retooling graduate medical students through medical school curriculum enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzoni, Mario A; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2012-01-01

    Practicing physicians often complain that medical schools failed to provide them with any substantive business training. And with the financial stress placed on today's medical practices, doctors feel unprepared for the rigors of managing a business and shortchanged when it comes to cashing-in on the fair value of their education. The University of South Florida piloted a three-credit course for nonbusiness-minded graduate students, aptly named "The Business Side of Medicine." The intent was to imprint aspiring, time-constrained graduate students, early in their biomedical education, with the need to develop a sound business acumen. Students, if made aware that the structure of healthcare practice is changing into a value-based and consumer-driven marketplace, will process in tandem with their graduate and medical schooling the notion that wellness and compensation are interdependent. The Business Side of Medicine addresses four core concepts that will logically germinate within the students' minds the desire to make practical, profitable career choices.

  11. Low temperature interdiffusion in Cu/Ni thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefakis, H.; Cain, J.F. (IBM General Technology Division, Endicott, NY (USA)); Ho, P.S. (IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (USA))

    1983-03-18

    Interdiffusion in Cu/Ni thin films was studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy in conjunction with Ar/sup +/ ion sputter profiling. The experimental conditions used aimed at simulating those of typical chip-packaging fabrication processes. The Cu/Ni couple (from 10 ..mu..m to 60 nm thick) was produced by sequential vapor deposition on fused-silica substrates at 360, 280 and 25/sup 0/C in 10/sup -6/ Torr vacuum. Diffusion anneals were performed between 280 and 405/sup 0/C for times up to 20 min. Such conditions define grain boundary diffusion in the regimes of B- and C-type kinetics. The data were analyzed according to the Whipple-Suzuoka model. Some deviations from the assumptions of this model, as occurred in the present study, are discussed but cannot fully account for the typical data scatter. The grain boundary diffusion coefficients were determined allowing calculation of respective permeation distances.

  12. Graduate and undergraduate geriatric dentistry education in a selected dental school in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, N; Sato, Y; Komabayashi, T

    2011-11-01

    Geriatric dentistry and its instruction are critical in a rapidly ageing population. Japan is the world's fastest-ageing society, and thus, geriatric dentistry education in Japan can serve as a global model for other countries that will soon encounter the issues that Japan has already confronted. This study aimed at evaluating geriatric dental education with respect to the overall dental education system, undergraduate geriatric dentistry curricula, mandatory internships, and graduate geriatric education of a selected dental school in Japan. Bibliographical data and local information were collected. Descriptive and statistical analyses (Fisher and chi-squared test) were conducted. Japanese dental schools teach geriatric dentistry in 10 geriatric dentistry departments as well as in prosthodontic departments. There were no significant differences found between the number of public and private dental schools with geriatric dentistry departments (P = 0.615). At Showa University School of Dentistry, there are more didactic hours than practical training hours; however, there is no significant didactic/practical hour distribution difference between the overall dental curriculum and fourth-year dental students' geriatric dental education curriculum (P = 0.077). Graduate geriatric education is unique because it is a 4-year PhD course of study; there is neither a master's degree programme nor a certificate programme in geriatric dentistry. Overall, both undergraduate and graduate geriatric dentistry curricula are multidisciplinary. This study contributes to a better understanding of geriatric dental education in Japan; the implications of this study include developing a clinical/didactic curriculum, designing new national/international dental public health policies, and calibrating the competency of dentists in geriatric dentistry. 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Proposal to introduce Disaster Risk Management topics in Master programs in ESAN Graduate School of Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CECILIA DEJO ESTEVES

    Full Text Available This paper aims to explain and present a proposal to introduce Disaster Risk Management (DRM topics into ESAN Graduate School of Business Master's programs. Although disasters have cost Peru more than USD 7,600 million in the past 2 decades the business sector, particularly Small and Medium Enterprises, have not developed preventive or continuity plans mainly because they are not familiar with DRM topics. Taking this into consideration, the paper presents a detailed academic/curricular proposal for DRM topics such as business continuity, business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainable management. Additionally, it introduces the idea of promoting Disaster Risk Management (DRM topics to the Peruvian business community as a strategy to enhance the graduate education.

  14. Effect of the Transcendental Meditation Program on Graduation, College Acceptance and Dropout Rates for Students Attending an Urban Public High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    High school graduation rates nationally have declined in recent years, despite public and private efforts. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether practice of the Quiet Time/Transcendental Meditation® program at a medium-size urban school results in higher school graduation rates compared to students who do not receive training…

  15. Graduation Outcomes of Students Who Entered New York City Public Schools in Grade 5 or 6 as English Learner Students. REL 2017-237

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Michael J.; Parker, Caroline E.

    2017-01-01

    This longitudinal study analyzes high school graduation outcomes of students who entered New York City public schools in grade 5 or 6 as English learner students. It extends the work of Kieffer and Parker (2016) by investigating the high school graduation rates and the types of diploma earned by the 1,734 students who entered New York City public…

  16. Effect of the Transcendental Meditation Program on Graduation, College Acceptance and Dropout Rates for Students Attending an Urban Public High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    High school graduation rates nationally have declined in recent years, despite public and private efforts. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether practice of the Quiet Time/Transcendental Meditation® program at a medium-size urban school results in higher school graduation rates compared to students who do not receive training…

  17. A Longitudinal Examination of Career Expectations and Outcomes of Academically Talented Students 10 and 20 Years Post-High School Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Tschopp, Molly K.; Snyder, Erin R.; Boo, Jenelle N.; Hyatt, Claudine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine career expectations and outcomes for individuals who were identified as academically talented high school students. Data for this study were collected at two different time periods: 10 years and 20 years after participants' high school graduation. A decade after graduation from high school, participants…

  18. Retrospective Perceptions of Graduates of a Self-Contained Program in Taiwan for High School Students Talented in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Enyi; Moon, Sidney M.

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective qualitative study was designed to investigate perceptions of the learning experiences of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics)-talented male students who were in a self-contained, single-gender, gifted program in a selective high school in Taiwan. Twenty-four graduates of the high school's gifted program…

  19. A Multilevel Framework for Recruiting and Supporting Graduate Students from Culturally Diverse Backgrounds in School Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapin, Sally L.; Lee, Erica T.; Jaafar, Dounia

    2015-01-01

    The lack of cultural diversity among practitioners and trainers in the field of school psychology has been recognized as a longstanding problem. In particular, individuals from racial, ethnic, and linguistic minority and international backgrounds often encounter a range of barriers to pursuing graduate study in school psychology. Given the urgent…

  20. Skills Needed by Secondary School Graduates for Breeding and Rearing of Giant African Land Snail (GALS) in Ebonyi State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogba, Ernest Ituma; Ndem, Joseph Uka

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify the skills required by secondary school Graduates for breeding and rearing Giant African Land Snail (GALS) in Ebonyi State. Three research questions guided the study. The design was descriptive survey. The total population was 254 agricultural science Teachers in junior and senior secondary schools in Ebonyi…

  1. How Secondary School Graduates Perform in the Labor Market. A Study of Indonesia. World Bank Staff Working Papers Number 615.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David H.

    The issue of whether senior secondary education should be expanded in Indonesia was explored. The analysis was based largely on data from a nationwide tracer study that followed a cohort of primary, lower-secondary, and upper-secondary school leavers for two years after graduation in 1976. The schooling, training, and job experiences of this…

  2. The Impact of a University-Based School Science Outreach Program on Graduate Student Participants' Career Paths and Professional Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Sandra L.; Thiry, Heather; Liston, Carrie S.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on professional socialization theory, this study examined how immersive experiences as science outreach educators in K-12 schools influenced the career paths and professional identities of science and engineering graduate students. Semi-structured interviews with 24 outreach program alumni revealed that school outreach experiences provided…

  3. Effects of the California High School Exit Exam on Student Persistence, Achievement, and Graduation. Policy Brief 09-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Sean F.; Kurlaender, Michal

    2009-01-01

    In this policy brief the authors summarize the findings from a study investigating the impact of the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) on California's lowest performing students. Utilizing longitudinal data from four large urban school districts, the authors compare students scheduled to graduate just before (2005) and after (2006-07) the…

  4. The Bremen International Graduate School for Marine Sciences (GLOMAR) - Postgraduate education with an interdisciplinary focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Christina

    2013-04-01

    The Bremen International Graduate School for Marine Sciences (GLOMAR) provides a dedicated research training programme for PhD students in all fields related the marine realm combined with an exceptional supervision and support programme in a stimulating research environment. The graduate school is part of MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences which is funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the frame of the Excellence Initiative by the German federal and state governments to promote top-level research at German universities. GLOMAR hosts approx. 75 PhD students from different research institutions in Bremen and Bremerhaven. 50% of them are German, 50% have an international background. All students are a member of one of the four GLOMAR research areas: (A) Ocean & Climate, (B) Ocean & Seafloor, (C) Ocean & Life and (D) Ocean & Society. Their academic background ranges from the classical natural sciences to law, social and political sciences. The research areas are supervised by research associates who share their experience and offer advice for their younger colleagues. GLOMAR students work in an interdisciplinary and international context. They spend several months at a foreign research institution and are encouraged to actively participate in international conferences and publish their research results in international scientific journals. The services GLOMAR offers for its PhD students include team supervision by a thesis committee, a comprehensive course programme, research seminars and retreats, a family support programme, a mentoring programme for women in science, an ombudsperson and a funding system for conference trips, research residencies and publication costs. The graduate school offers different formats for interdisciplinary exchange within the PhD student community. Monthly research seminars, which are conducted by the GLOMAR research associates, provide an opportunity to discuss research results, practice oral and poster

  5. [Construction of a healthcare-related information technology education praxis for graduate school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Jefferson Paixão; Rosa, Valéria Argolo; Lopes, Claudia Ribeiro Santos; Vilela, Alba Benemérita Alves; de Santana, Aurisan Souza; da Silva, Sandro Tonini

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an information technology education practice for healthcare practitioners in graduate school. Based on hands-on experience of the Information Technology Applied to Healthcare classes at the Jequié Campus of the Southeast Bahia State University (UESB) for the Nursing and Physiotherapy courses, an experience is reported that stresses the importance of teaching information technology by establishing links between Information and Communications Technologies and the praxis of the healthcare practitioners, enhancing the educational process and allowing students to 'visualize' how such technologies could be used for producing and qualifying impacts on their professional activities.

  6. Using immersive healthcare simulation for physiology education: initial experience in high school, college, and graduate school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Nancy E; Hayden, Emily M; Joyal-Mowschenson, Julie; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon; Faux, Russell; Gordon, James A

    2011-09-01

    In the natural world, learning emerges from the joy of play, experimentation, and inquiry as part of everyday life. However, this kind of informal learning is often difficult to integrate within structured educational curricula. This report describes an educational program that embeds naturalistic learning into formal high school, college, and graduate school science class work. Our experience is based on work with hundreds of high school, college, and graduate students enrolled in traditional science classes in which mannequin simulators were used to teach physiological principles. Specific case scenarios were integrated into the curriculum as problem-solving exercises chosen to accentuate the basic science objectives of the course. This report also highlights the historic and theoretical basis for the use of mannequin simulators as an important physiology education tool and outlines how the authors' experience in healthcare education has been effectively translated to nonclinical student populations. Particular areas of focus include critical-thinking and problem-solving behaviors and student reflections on the impact of the teaching approach.

  7. An Analysis of Graduate School Careers in Three Universities: Differences in Attainment Patterns across Academic Programs and Demographic Groups. GRE Board Professional Report No. 86-21P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Rebecca

    The graduate careers of nearly 5,000 Ph.D.-seeking students from 11 departments in each of 3 major universities were investigated with a special focus on minority students. Minorities and women were found to be underrepresented in graduate school, and to have generally lower candidacy and graduation rates than their white and male counterparts. In…

  8. Military medical graduates' perceptions of organizational culture in Turkish military medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Mustafa; Bakir, Bilal; Teke, Abdulkadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Bas, Turker; Atac, Adnan

    2008-08-01

    Organizational culture is the term used to describe the shared beliefs, perceptions, and expectations of individuals in organizations. In the healthcare environment, organizational culture has been associated with several elements of organizational experience that contribute to quality, such as nursing care, job satisfaction, and patient safety. A range of tools have been designed to measure organizational culture and applied in industrial, educational, and health care settings. This study has been conducted to investigate the perceptions of military medical graduates on organizational culture at Gülhane Military Medical School. A measurement of organizational culture, which was developed by the researchers from Akdeniz University, was applied to all military medical graduates in 2004. This was a Likert type scale that included 31 items. Designers of the measurement grouped all these items into five main dimensions in their previous study. The items were scored on a five-point scale anchored by 1: strongly agree and 5: strongly disagree. Study participants included all military physicians who were in clerkship training period at Gulhane Military Medical Academy in 2004. A total of 106 graduates were accepted to response the questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 25.2 +/- 1.1. At the time of study only 8 (7.5%) graduates were married. The study results have showed that the measurement tool with 31 items had a sufficient reliability with a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.91. Factor analysis has resulted a final measurement tool of 24 items with five factors. Total score and the scores of five subdimensions have been estimated and compared between groups based on living city and marital status. The study has shown the dimension of symbol received positive perceptions while the dimension of organizational structure and efficiency received the most negative perceptions. GMMS has a unique organizational culture with its weak and strong aspects. Conducting this kind

  9. Recruitment and retention of Native American graduate students in school psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Anisa N; Brown, Jacqueline A; Machek, Greg R; Swaney, Gyda

    2016-09-01

    There is a clear underrepresentation of Native Americans in the field of school psychology. There are a number of factors that have led to this underrepresentation, including cultural and historical variables, barriers to accessing higher educational opportunities, and lack of financial support. Given the importance of having diverse perspectives in the field, as well as the need for mental health services and academic supports for Native American children and their families, school psychology trainers should consider actively recruiting and retaining Native American graduate students to doctoral and specialist programs. This article provides specific research-based recommendations for recruiting Native American students and strategies for supporting their success and matriculation in the program. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Promoting Scientist Communications Through Graduate Summer School in Heliophysics and Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.; Schrijver, K.; Bagenal, F.; Sojka, J. J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    edagogical tools that promote student interaction can be applied successfully during graduate workshops to enhance community and communication among the participants and instructors. The NASA/LWS funded Heliophysics Summer School and the NSF funded Space Weather Summer School provide graduate students starting research in the field, and others who are involved in space physics, an opportunity to learn from and interact with leaders in the field and each other. These interactions can happen casually, but there are a number of programatic aspects that foster the interaction so that they can be as fruitful as possible during the short period. These include: specific "ice-breaker" activities, practicing "elevator speeches", embedded lecture questions, question cards, discussion questions, interactive lab activities, structured lab groups, and use of social media. We are continuing to develop new ways to foster profession interaction during these short courses. Along with enhancing their own learning, the inclusion of these strategies provides both the participants and the instructors with models of good pedagogical tools and builds community among the students. Our specific implementation of these strategies and evidence of success will be presented.

  11. James Cook University's rurally orientated medical school selection process: quality graduates and positive workforce outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Robin A; Woolley, Torres; Sen Gupta, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    The regionally based James Cook University (JCU) College of Medicine and Dentistry aims to meet its mission to address the health needs of the region by using a selection policy favouring rural origin applicants and providing students with early and repeated exposure to rural experiences during training. This study seeks to determine if the JCU medical school's policy of preferentially selecting rural and remote background students is associated with differing patterns of undergraduate performance or graduate practice location. Data at application to medical school and during the undergraduate years was retrieved from administrative databases held by the university and the medical school. Postgraduate location data were obtained either from personal contact via email, telephone or Facebook or electronically from the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Authority website. Practice location was described across Australian Standard Geographical Classification Remoteness Area (ASGC-RA) categories, with 1 being a major city and 5 being a very remote location. The 856 Australian-based students accepted into the JCU medical program between 2000 and 2008 came from all geographical regions across Australia: 20% metropolitan (ASGC-RA 1), 20% inner regional (ASGC-RA 2), 56% outer regional (ASGC-RA 3), and 5% from remote or very remote locations (ASGC-RA 4 and 5). Having a rural or remote hometown at application (ASGC-RA 3-5) was significantly associated with a lower tertiary entrance score (pScholarship (p=0.005), taking longer to complete the 6-year course (p=exams in the clinical years (years 4-6) and are much more likely to practise in rural and remote areas. These data suggest that JCU's selection process favouring rural origin applicants does not compromise academic standards, but does produce graduates whose patterns of practice accord with the mission of the school.

  12. Patterns and Consequences of Delay in Postsecondary Education: 1972, 1980, and 1982 High School Graduates. Survey Report. National Longitudinal Study 1972. High School and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Eva; Schmitt, Carl

    Patterns of delay in entering 4-year, 2-year, and less-than-2-year postsecondary institutions (PIs) for 1972, 1980, and 1982 high school graduates are described. Two types of delay were studied: (1) delay in beginning at a particular type of institution, and (2) stopping out for a period before returning (i.e., leaving school for over 2 months or…

  13. School-to-Work Transition of College Graduates in Korea: The Impact of High School Track on College Performance and Post-College Occupational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sung Youn

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at examining the impacts of high school track on college performance and subsequent occupational outcomes after college graduation. To this end, the Korean Education and Employment Panel (KEEP) data from 2004 through 2010, including 4,000 samples of 12th graders as of 2004 from vocational and general high schools, were analyzed.…

  14. How graduate business schools professors can assist in reducing todayÂ’s lack of ethics in business

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald Degen

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses how graduate business school professors can assist in reducing todayÂ’s lack of ethics in business by orienting future corporate leaders on how to behave and decide properly when confronted with the myriad ethical dilemmas of the corporate world. To accomplish this, graduate business school professors have to be able to make future leaders understand what is right and what is wrong from the ethical point of view. This requires that they engage these future leaders in phil...

  15. [Information Concerning Mean Test Scores for the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT), and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) for the National Commission on Excellence in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Robert J.

    Data are provided to the National Commission on Excellence in Education on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT), and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Statistics are provided on the following: yearly GMAT mean scores 1965-1966…

  16. Student Perspectives of the Graduation Coach's Ethic of Care on the Dropout Epidemic in a Middle Georgia Alternative High School of Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kimberly R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the influence of the graduation coach's ethic of care on potential dropouts (at risk high school seniors) in a Georgia alternative high school. Based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs, the objective of this research was to identify if the graduation coach's ethic of care had an influence on…

  17. Student Perspectives of the Graduation Coach's Ethic of Care on the Dropout Epidemic in a Middle Georgia Alternative High School of Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kimberly R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the influence of the graduation coach's ethic of care on potential dropouts (at risk high school seniors) in a Georgia alternative high school. Based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs, the objective of this research was to identify if the graduation coach's ethic of care had an influence on…

  18. Management of adaptation of graduates of medical schools to conditions of independent professional activity: research and optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erugina M.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Objective: research of regularities of adaptation of graduates of medical schools to conditions of independent professional activity and justification of the directions of optimization of management by this process. Material and Methods. Object of research included functioning of system of adaptation of graduates of medical schools to conditions of independent professional activity. Are carried out: The study of reports of the Saratov region for 2006-2012, documentation of 16 treatment-and-prophylactic medical organizations and 84 responses on graduates of Saratov State Medical University n.a. V. I. Razumovsky; anonymous retrospective questioning of 164 doctors after professional retraining at the faculty of professional development; expert questionnaire of 15 persons of the faculty of organizational chairs have been carried out. Results. In the work "complex adaptation factor"; dynamics of level of social and psychological, psychophysiological, organizational and professional indicators of adaptation of graduates to conditions of independent professional activity; the characteristic of "lagging behind" doctors; purposes of management of adaptation, importance of stages of its organizational support have been established. The ways to evaluate the success of individual adaptation and management of this process have been worked out, which are designed on the basis of the corresponding authorized optimization technology. Conclusion. Results of the conducted research allowed to expand idea of adaptation of graduates of medical schools to conditions of independent professional activity and to solve a number of applied problems of its optimization.

  19. Support Received During the Transition to Practice for the Secondary School Graduate-Assistant Athletic Trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Walker, Stacy E; Kirby, Jessica L

    2016-10-01

    Transitioning into clinical practice can be stressful for the newly credentialed athletic trainer (AT). The support provided by mentors, peers, and athletic training faculty can increase confidence and enhance the transition. To create specific initiatives for a smoother transition, the perspectives of those in the secondary school setting are needed. To examine the transition to practice and mentorship of newly credentialed ATs providing medical care in the secondary school setting. Qualitative study. Secondary school setting. A total of 14 ATs (2 men, 12 women; age = 23.0 ± 2.0 years) participated in our study. They were employed in the secondary school setting through graduate assistantships, had been credentialed for less than 1 year, and had completed professional bachelor's degree programs. We completed 14 semistructured phone interviews. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Two researchers independently following the stepwise progression of a general inductive approach completed the data analysis. Trustworthiness was established through multiple-analyst triangulation, peer review, and member checks. Two major themes emerged regarding the support received by our participants: past mentors and current networks of professionals. Past mentors provided autonomous learning opportunities during clinical education and then served as resources for guidance and advice. Current networks of professionals were defined by 2 subthemes: professional medical care providers and non-medical care providers within the secondary school setting (ie, athletic directors, coaches, parents). Former preceptors and faculty provided resources and support to help develop the newly credentialed AT's confidence and facilitate the transition. Preceptors should allow increased independence to help their students develop as clinicians. The creation of networks within the community, that is, the secondary school itself, is also critical in the transition as it provides the AT

  20. Academic-related stress among graduate students in nursing in a Jamaican school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kimarie; Anderson-Johnson, Pauline; McPherson, Andrea Norman

    2016-09-01

    Graduate students perceive their education as highly stressful, have consistently rated their stress levels as above average and have consistently scored above average on stress scales. The consequences of stress include negative academic outcomes, reduction in cognitive ability, impaired coping and incompletion of graduate studies. Stress is also associated with physical and psychological symptoms such as altered appetite, sleep pattern disturbances and headache. A descriptive correlational design was used to determine the perceived levels and sources of academic-related stress among students enrolled in a Master of Science in Nursing (MScN) degree programme at school of nursing in urban section of Jamaica. The Perceived Stress Scale-14 and Stress Survey were used to collect data from the 81 students enrolled in full or part time study in the MScN programme. Univariate and bivariate analyses were conducted using SPSS version 20. The majority (50.9%) were moderately stressed while 22.8% and 24.6% had high and low levels of stress respectively. Stress associated with the preparation for and prospect of final examinations received the highest overall mean stress rating, causing "a lot of stress". Attendances at classes and relationships with lecturers received the lowest mean stress rating. Research was not listed as a stressor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. TRAINING THE COMPETITIVE GRADUATES OF PEDAGOGICAL HIGHER SCHOOLS VIA THE SYSTEM OF ADDITIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Amirova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problem of professional selfdetermination, which involves selection of and enrolment in a particular educational institution, as well as preparation for a job placement after graduation in the fast changing labor market. Additionally, the authors point out the related complications, caused by deformations in the professional orientation system, and leading to a professional self-identification crisis. The aim of the research is to demonstrate that fostering the competitive university graduates -the priority task of the modern higher school - requires psycho-pedagogical facilitation, and flexible alternative application of available resources of time, content, organization, and technology. However, the necessity to follow the Federal State Educational Standards and other regulatory procedures slows down the higher school’s response to changing realities, and hinders the prompt development of mobile and adaptive educational programs. As an effective tool for solving the problem of professional selfidentification, the author recommends the variational programs of additional education, regarded as an option to the major specialization. The paper discusses the “SchoolofProfessional Success” project, approbated inBashkirskyStatePedagogicalUniversity, based on the competence and person-oriented approaches, and analytical monitoring of students’ requirements for additional skills and knowledge. The above experience can be further extrapolated to different fields of training.

  2. Social Justice Training in School Psychology: Applying Principles of Organizational Consultation to Facilitate Change in Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapin, Sally L.

    2017-01-01

    Scholars and professional organizations have called for an increased emphasis on social justice training in applied psychology graduate programs, including school psychology programs (SPPs). During the past decade, emerging research has identified some features of high-quality social justice education, including a clear program mission statement…

  3. Mental health curricula at schools of pharmacy in the United Kingdom and recent graduates' readiness to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Paul; Taylor, Denise; Branford, Dave

    2013-09-12

    To assess mental health education in the undergraduate pharmacy curricula in the United Kingdom and gauge how well prepared graduates are to manage mental health patients. The authors conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with pharmacy educators and administered an electronic self-administered survey instrument to pharmacy graduates. The mental health conditions of depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and Parkinson disease were taught, in detail, by all schools, but more specialized areas of mental health (eg, personality disorder, autism) were generally not taught. Just 5 of 19 schools attempted to teach the broader social aspects of mental health. A third of the schools provided experiential learning opportunities. Graduates and recently registered pharmacists stated that undergraduate education had prepared them adequately with regard to knowledge on conditions and treatment options, but that they were not as well prepared to talk with mental health patients and deal with practical drug management-related issues. The mental health portion of the undergraduate pharmacy curricula in colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United Kingdom is largely theoretical, and pharmacy students have little exposure to mental health patients. Graduates identified an inability to effectively communicate with these patients and manage common drug management-related issues.

  4. Learning: The Experiences of Adults Who Work Full-Time while Attending Graduate School Part-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Bridget N.; Cordova, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The experiences of students who are working full-time and going to graduate school part-time were the focus of this phenomenological investigation. Data analysis showed that these individuals, who reported high job involvement and strong career planning, were often stymied when they attempted to apply new ideas to the workplace. Those with strong…

  5. Subject Indicators to Present the Nature and Limit of Environmental Studies in U.S. Graduate Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. S.; Dixon, James P.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the lack of interdisciplinary communication in environmental education programs in U.S. graduate schools. Following comparative historical reviews of environmental protection activities, presents a computer-developed curriculum model base containing 15 subject areas: philosophy, politics, economics, architecture, sociology, biology,…

  6. My Sister's Keeper: A Qualitative Examination of Mentoring Experiences among African American Women in Graduate and Professional Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Lori D.

    2009-01-01

    Eight African American women's mentoring experiences in graduate school are examined pertaining to lessons learned, characteristics and behaviors of African American female mentors, challenges with White mentors (male and female), and stereotypical images of African American female mentors. The findings support mentoring as a method of empowerment…

  7. In Pursuit of Dignity: Education and Social Mobility in the Life Trajectories of Women Commercial School Graduates in Cairo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Elgeziri (Moushira)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis addresses the role of education in women’s social mobility, focusing on the case of female graduates of commercial schools in Egypt. Technical education, which encompasses the commercial variant along with two other streams, has been intriguing in both its beginnings and evol

  8. Analysis of the Postsecondary Educational Attainment of Agricultural Education Graduates of the High School Class of 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Agricultural education graduates' postsecondary educational attainment was investigated through a secondary analysis of data in the National Longitudinal Study, High School Class of 1971. Although participation in agricultural education had no substantive effect on postsecondary educational attainment, the effect of background variables should be…

  9. College Access and Success among High School Graduates Taking the SAT®: Latino Students. Research Note 2013-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKillip, Mary E. M.; Mackey, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    This report shows college enrollment and graduation trends among Latino SAT® takers who finished high school in 2004 and 2010 by various student characteristics including aspirations, self-perceived ability, and academic achievements. In every case, students in the top categories (high aspirations, high perceived ability, high assessed ability)…

  10. College Access and Success among High School Graduates Taking the SAT®: Native American Students. Research Note 2013-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKillip, Mary E. M.; Mackey, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    This report shows college enrollment and graduation trends among Native American SAT® takers who finished high school in 2004 and 2010 by various student characteristics, including aspirations, self-perceived ability, and academic achievements. In every case, students in the top categories (high aspirations, high perceived ability, high assessed…

  11. College Access and Success among High School Graduates Taking the SAT®: Asian American Students. Research Note 2013-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKillip, Mary E. M.; Mackey, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    This report shows college enrollment and graduation trends among Asian American SAT® takers who finished high school in 2004 and 2010 by student characteristics, including aspirations, self-perceived ability, and academic achievements. In every case, students in the top categories (high aspirations, high-perceived ability, high-assessed ability)…

  12. Factors Related to Increase in Women Graduates from Professional Schools in U.S., 1960-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler-Meehan, Linda; Hiatt, Diana Buell

    Changes in the percentage of women graduating from six male-intensive professions during 1960-1980 were analyzed, and the opinions of professional school deans about the causes of these changes were surveyed. The professions were medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, law, engineering, and architecture. Data were obtained from the National…

  13. Factors Influencing the Decision To Return to Graduate School in One Professional Group, Physical Therapy. ASHE 1988 Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Judith L.

    The factors influencing the decision to return to graduate school in an emerging professional group, physical therapy, are described, and a causal model incorporating the principal constructs of the status attainment and college impact model is proposed. The five variable sets included are background characteristics, college characteristics,…

  14. Scholars and Pre-Service Teachers: A Comparison of Opinions of Reading Required for High School Graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Mozelle P.

    A study compared the results of a 1986 survey on the opinions of preservice teachers with those of a survey conducted in 1984 by William Bennett (at that time chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities). Bennett's survey asked respondents to list 30 works that students should be expected to read before high school graduation. "Macbeth"…

  15. How to Graduate High-Risk Students: Lessons from Successful For-Profit Colleges and Schools in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frishberg, Ellen; Lee, John B.; Fletcher, Carla; Webster, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    This project studied four career college and school campuses in Texas that had higher than average graduation rates and lower than average student loan default rates to determine what they did to achieve these positive outcomes. The visits to the campuses found that a conscious, concerted effort to integrate students into the academic and social…

  16. Controlled growth of Cu-Ni nanowires and nanospheres for enhanced microwave absorption properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Dong, Lifeng; Zhang, Baoqin; Yu, Mingxun; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-03-01

    Copper is a good dielectric loss material but has low stability, whereas nickel is a good magnetic loss material and is corrosion resistant but with low conductivity, therefore Cu-Ni hybrid nanostructures have synergistic advantages as microwave absorption (MA) materials. Different Cu/Ni molar ratios of bimetallic nanowires (Cu13@Ni7, Cu5@Ni5 and Cu7@Ni13) and nanospheres (Cu13@Ni7, Cu5@Ni5 and Cu1@Ni3) have been successfully synthesized via facile reduction of hydrazine under similar reaction conditions, and the morphology can be easily tuned by varying the feed ratio or the complexing agent. Apart from the concentrations of Cu2+ and Ni2+, the reduction parameters are similar for all samples to confirm the effects of the Cu/Ni molar ratio and morphology on MA properties. Ni is incorporated into the Cu-Ni nanomaterials as a shell over the Cu core at low temperature, as proved by XRD, SEM, TEM and XPS. Through the complex relative permittivity and permeability, reflection loss was evaluated, which revealed that the MA capacity greatly depended on the Cu/Ni molar ratio and morphology. For Cu@Ni nanowires, as the molar ratio of Ni shell increased the MA properties decreased accordingly. However, for Cu@Ni nanospheres, the opposite trend was found, that is, as the molar ratio of the Ni shell increased the MA properties increased.

  17. George C. Comstock: Wisconsin Astronomer, Observatory Director, Graduate School Dean, and AAS Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    1996-05-01

    George C. Comstock, the third director of Washburn Observatory, had a long and interesting career at Wisconsin. Born in Madison, he did his undergraduate work at Michigan under James Watson. From him Comstock learned the classical astronomy of stellar positions and celestial mechanics. He had one year of graduate work at Michigan before going to Madison as Watson's assistant in 1880, and remained after the latter's death as E.S. Holden's assistant. At Wisconsin, Comstock also studied law at the UW Law School in his ``spare time", to have an alternate career path. He was admitted to the bar in 1883 but never practiced. From 1885-7 he was on the Ohio State faculty with a summer working at Lick Observatory; then in 1887 became associate director back at Washburn Observatory. Two years later he succeeded to the full directorship, and kept the post until he retired in 1922 at the age of 67. All Comstock's research was in positional astronomy, and he considered his most important work to be the measurement of stellar aberration and atmospheric refraction. He also measured double stars with the 15-inch Washburn refractor. His main duty at UW was teaching, mostly ``practical astronomy" for civil engineering students. Comstock wrote several text books on astronomy, surveying, and least squares. He was the first head of the UW Graduate School, set up by President Charles R. Van Hise in 1904. Comstock was a highly effective administrator, and did much to build up research at UW. His own most successful students were Sidney D. Townley, Joel Stebbins, and Sebastian Albrecht. Because of his legal training, Comstock was involved as an officer in many scientific societies. He was one of the organizers of the AAS, its first secretary, and later its vice president, then president. He retired in 1922, and was succeeded by Stebbins, whom he helped to bring back to Madison from Illinois. After his retirement, Comstock lived in Beloit until his death in 1934.

  18. Beach week: a high school graduation rite of passage for sun, sand, suds, and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R H; Milteer, R; Sheridan, M J; Horner, C P

    1999-02-01

    Every year, thousands of suburban high school graduates from mid Atlantic states flock to nearby coastal beaches for a long-anticipated rite of passage known as "beach week." Sand, sun, and sea, and also smoking, binge drinking, drugs, and sex, are reported to be dominant themes. To document risk-taking behaviors by girls during beach week. Fifty-nine female suburban high school graduates who attended beach week in 1996 volunteered to fill out a confidential printed survey. Twenty-five girls (42%) completed the survey during a typical beach week party. Their activities were verified on site by a peer, recommended by her grade advisor for her integrity and popularity. Breath alcohol values were obtained at entry and departure from the party. The remaining 34 girls completed the supervised survey 2 to 3 months later. Daily cigarette smoking (54%), daily drunkenness (75%), and sex (46%) were the norm among respondents of our survey. Few reported first-time sex (n = 4) or drug use (n = 2). Abstinence from drugs (67%) and sex (55%) was not unusual but only 12% abstained from getting drunk. Sixteen girls (64%) reported that they drank 8 or more beers/wine during a typical beach week party. By departure from the party, 15 girls had breath alcohol values of 0.017 mmol/L or greater (reference range, <21.7 mmol/L), and 8 additional girls had breath alcohol values of 0.01 mmol/L to 0.015 mmol/L. Fifteen percent of the 59 reported injuries or illness were related to alcohol or drugs. Most respondents enjoyed beach week but a large percentage engaged in serious risk-taking behaviors.

  19. From an e-Competent School to an e-Competent Secondary School Graduate?

    OpenAIRE

    Viktorija Florjancic

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts in introducing modern technologies in pre-university education, faculties have been noticing a lack of computer and internet usage skills. Beside the presentation of statistical data, the paper presents results of a research on basic software use upon enrolment in a higher education institution. Research has shown that students rate their computer skills higher if their secondary school has a dynamic web site and if they used an e-classroom at school. The survey presented no s...

  20. Low temperature growth of graphene on Cu-Ni alloy nanofibers for stable, flexible electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-Dong; Yin, Zong-You; Du, Ze-Hui; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Min-Min; Xie, Ling-Hai; Huang, Wei

    2014-04-01

    Here, we report a facile approach to grow graphene on Cu-Ni alloy NFs at a temperature as low as 450-500 °C, in which solid polystyrene (PS) carbon source and two-temperature-zone furnace were used to prepare graphene. The graphene coated Cu-Ni (designated as G-coated Cu-Ni) NFs were fully characterized by Raman spectra, XPS, FESEM and TEM. The G-coated Cu-Ni NFs exhibited excellent anti-oxidation, anti-corrosion and flexibility properties. The anti-corrosion of G-coated Cu-Ni NFs was examined through cyclic voltammetry measurements by using sea water as the electrolyte solution. Finally, using crossed arrays of G-coated Cu-Ni NF composite electrode thin films (sheet resistance is ~10 Ω sq-1) as the flexible electrode, an alternating current (AC) electroluminescent (EL) device with a configuration of G-coated Cu-Ni/active layer (ZnS : Cu phosphor)/dielectric layer (BaTiO3)/front electrode (CNT) has been fabricated. Under an AC voltage of 200 V and frequency of 1300 Hz, the ACEL device emitted blue light at 496 nm with a brightness of 103 cd m-2.Here, we report a facile approach to grow graphene on Cu-Ni alloy NFs at a temperature as low as 450-500 °C, in which solid polystyrene (PS) carbon source and two-temperature-zone furnace were used to prepare graphene. The graphene coated Cu-Ni (designated as G-coated Cu-Ni) NFs were fully characterized by Raman spectra, XPS, FESEM and TEM. The G-coated Cu-Ni NFs exhibited excellent anti-oxidation, anti-corrosion and flexibility properties. The anti-corrosion of G-coated Cu-Ni NFs was examined through cyclic voltammetry measurements by using sea water as the electrolyte solution. Finally, using crossed arrays of G-coated Cu-Ni NF composite electrode thin films (sheet resistance is ~10 Ω sq-1) as the flexible electrode, an alternating current (AC) electroluminescent (EL) device with a configuration of G-coated Cu-Ni/active layer (ZnS : Cu phosphor)/dielectric layer (BaTiO3)/front electrode (CNT) has been fabricated. Under

  1. Psychology Students' Interest in Graduate Training: A Need for Partnership among Undergraduate Psychology and Graduate School Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinnett, Terry A.; Solomon, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    An initial point of contact for recruitment of qualified persons into school psychology is undergraduate psychology degree programs. Unfortunately, the discipline of school psychology appears to receive at best only cursory coverage in undergraduate psychology texts, curriculum, and discussion by psychology department faculty even though school…

  2. Psychology Students' Interest in Graduate Training: A Need for Partnership among Undergraduate Psychology and Graduate School Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinnett, Terry A.; Solomon, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    An initial point of contact for recruitment of qualified persons into school psychology is undergraduate psychology degree programs. Unfortunately, the discipline of school psychology appears to receive at best only cursory coverage in undergraduate psychology texts, curriculum, and discussion by psychology department faculty even though school…

  3. Epidemiology as a liberal art: from graduate school to middle school, an unfulfilled agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Michael B

    2014-03-01

    Calls by Lilienfeld, Fraser, and others some three decades ago to introduce epidemiology into undergraduate college education remain largely unfulfilled. Consideration of epidemiology as a "liberal art" has also led to exploring possibilities for introducing epidemiology into early education: to high and even middle schools. Adding epidemiology to school curricula should help educate the public to understand science-based evidence concerning the causes and treatments of disease, help inoculate them against a tsunami of biased and fraudulent media messaging, and permit advancing postgraduate education in epidemiology to even higher levels of scholarship.

  4. The New York City Research Initiative: A Model for Undergraduate and High School Student Research in Earth and Space Sciences and Space Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, F.; Frost, J.; Carlson, B. E.; Marchese, P.; Rosenzweig, C.; Austin, S. A.; Peteet, D. M.; Druyan, L.; Fulakeza, M.; Gaffin, S.; Baruh, H.; Decker, S.; Thangam, S.; Miles, J.; Moshary, F.; Rossow, W.; Greenbaum, S.; Cheung, T. K.; Johnson, L. P.

    2010-12-01

    1 Frank Scalzo, 1 Barbara Carlson, 2 Leon Johnson, 3 Paul Marchese, 1 Cynthia Rosenzweig, 2 Shermane Austin, 1 Dorothy Peteet, 1 Len Druyan, 1 Matthew Fulakeza, 1 Stuart Gaffin, 4 Haim Baruh, 4 Steven Decker, 5 Siva Thangam, 5 Joe Miles, 6 James Frost, 7 Fred Moshary, 7 William Rossow, 7 Samir Ahmed, 8 Steven Greenbaum and 3 Tak Cheung 1 NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, USA 2 Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences, Medgar Evers College, CUNY, Brooklyn, NY, USA 3 Physics, Queensborough Community College, CUNY, Queens, NY, USA 4 Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, USA 5 Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, USA 6 Physics, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY, Queens, NY, USA 7 Electrical Engineering, City College of New York, CUNY, USA 8 Physics, Hunter College, CUNY, USA The New York City Research Initiative (NYCRI) is a research and academic program that involves high school, undergraduate and graduate students, and high school teachers in research teams under the mentorship of college/university principal investigator of NASA funded projects and/or NASA scientists. The principal investigators are at 7 colleges/universities within a 20-mile radius of New York City (NYC and Northern New Jersey), as well as the NASA Goddard Institute of Space Studies. The program supports research in Earth Science, Space Science, and Space Technology. Research investigations include: Sea Surface Temperature and Precipitation in the West African Monsoon, Urban Heat Island: Sun and Rain Effects, Decadal Changes in Aerosol and Asthma, Variations in Salinity and River Discharge in the Hudson River Estuary, Environmental Change in the Hudson Estuary Wetlands, Verification of Winter Storm Scale Developed for Nor’easters, Solar Weather and Tropical Cyclone Activity, Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone Investigation in Metropolitan NYC, Aerosol Optical Depth through use of a MFRSR, Detection of Concentration in the Atmosphere Using a Quantum Cascade Laser System

  5. Russian language and literature in bicultural context: results of the survey of school graduates of the Republic of Tatarstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhametshina R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of teaching and learning of Russian language and literature in schools with native (Tatar language of teaching related to the implementation of the principle of dialogue between cultures. The article draws on the results of the survey of graduates of the two high schools of Kazan: School #2 with teaching in Tatar language and school #37 with teaching in Russian-language. The results of the survey are associated with the problems of bilingualism, multiculturalism and bimentality. Graduates from Tatar language gymnasium are bilingual and fluent in Russian and Tatar languages. 97% of graduates of Tatar gymnasium speak, read and write free in their native language and 96% in Russian. Bilingualism acts in this case like one of the manifestations of inter-ethnic interaction, a particular manifestation of biculturalism. In the National School dialogue of cultures passes through a system of parallel study of both Russian and Tatar languages and literatures: the formation of a bicultural, bilingual, bimental personality able to perceive not only the native culture, but also other (Russian culture as the native is taking place.

  6. Public Health Genomics education in post-graduate schools of hygiene and preventive medicine: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianuale, Carolina; Leoncini, Emanuele; Mazzucco, Walter; Marzuillo, Carolina; Villari, Paolo; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-10-10

    The relevance of Public Health Genomics (PHG) education among public health specialists has been recently acknowledged by the Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region. The aim of this cross-sectional survey was to assess the prevalence of post-graduate public health schools for medical doctors which offer PHG training in Italy. The directors of the 33 Italian public health schools were interviewed for the presence of a PHG course in place. We stratified by geographical area (North, Centre and South) of the schools. We performed comparisons of categorical data using the chi-squared test. The response rate was 73% (24/33 schools). Among respondents, 15 schools (63%) reported to have at least one dedicated course in place, while nine (38%) did not, with a significant geographic difference. Results showed a good implementation of courses in PHG discipline in Italian post-graduate public health schools. However further harmonization of the training programs of schools in public health at EU level is needed.

  7. The Subjective Experience of Social Class and Upward Mobility Among African American Men in Graduate School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Francisco J; Liu, William Ming; Leathers, Leslie; Goins, Joyce; Vilain, Eric

    2011-10-01

    We used Consensual Qualitative Research Methodology to analyze responses from 14 African American men (Mdn(Age) = 25 years-old) in graduate school at a predominantly-White university in the Midwestern region of the United Sates regarding how they acquired awareness of their social-class status; how social class was related to their sense of masculinity; how social class was related to race and skin tone; and the role that education and a romantic partner could play in upward mobility. School peers were the main source for their early awareness of social class. Many believed that discrimination maintains social class stratification that disadvantages racial minorities and that one's race will always trump any personal characteristics-including having light-complected skin and an advanced degree. Finally many overcame several obstacles during their educational career, and most believed that a romantic relationship with a woman from a privileged background could facilitate upward mobility. Psychological scientists and practitioners are encouraged to consider the role that social class plays when examining men's well-being.

  8. Post-graduation migration intentions of students of Lebanese medical schools: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakr Mazen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The international migration of physicians is a global public health problem. Lebanon is a source country with the highest emigration factor in the Middle East and North Africa and the 7th highest in the World. Given that residency training abroad is a critical step in the migration of physicians, the objective of this study was to survey students of Lebanese medical schools about their intentions to train abroad and their post training plans. Methods Our target population consisted of all students of Lebanese medical schools in the pre-final and final years of medical school. We developed the survey questionnaire based on the results of a qualitative study assessing the intentions and motives for students of Lebanese medical schools to train abroad. The questionnaire inquired about student's demographic and educational characteristics, intention to train abroad, the chosen country of abroad training, and post-training intention of returning to Lebanon. Results Of 576 eligible students, 425 participated (73.8% response rate. 406 (95.5% respondents intended to travel abroad either for specialty training (330 (77.6% or subspecialty training (76 (17.9%. Intention to train abroad was associated with being single compared with being married. The top 4 destination countries were the US (301(74.1%, France (49 (12.1%, the United Kingdom (31 (7.6% and Canada (17 (4.2%. One hundred and two (25.1% respondents intended to return to Lebanon directly after finishing training abroad; 259 (63.8% intended to return to Lebanon after working abroad temporarily for a varying number or years; 43 (10.6% intended to never return to Lebanon. The intention to stay indefinitely abroad was associated male sex and having a 2nd citizenship. It was inversely associated with being a student of one of the French affiliated medical schools and a plan to train in a surgical specialty. Conclusion An alarming percentage of students of Lebanese medical schools

  9. Consequences of Delay in Postsecondary Education: Degree Attainment for 1972, 1980, and 1982 High School Graduates. E.D. TABS. National Longitudinal Study 1972. High School and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Eva; Schmitt, Carl

    This Department of Education (ED) Tabulation provides data in six tables on the effect of delay in entering postsecondary education (PE) on degree attainment for 1972, 1980, and 1982 high school graduates. The data compare the patterns of delay in PE among these three cohorts by pattern of enrollment, type of institution, and selected student…

  10. Patterns and Trends of Delayed Entry into Postsecondary Education: 1972, 1980, and 1982 High School Graduates. E.D. TABS. National Longitudinal Study 1972. High School and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Eva; Schmitt, Carl

    The data presented in this Department of Education (ED) Tabulation compare how the 1972, 1980, and 1982 high school graduate cohorts differ by type of program, type of institution, and time of entry into postsecondary education (PE). Three tables provide information for each cohort on enrollment in PE by type of postsecondary institution. Three…

  11. Patterns and Trends of Stopping Out from Postsecondary Education: 1972, 1980, and 1982 High School Graduates. E.D. TABS. National Longitudinal Study 1972. High School and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Eva; Schmitt, Carl

    This Department of Education (ED) Tabulation presents a wide range of data on patterns of stopping out and dropping out from postsecondary education (PE) that 1972, 1980, and 1982 high school graduates experienced. The data compare how these respective cohorts differ by examining the percentage who attend continuously; they also describe patterns…

  12. A Database Management System Application for the Graduate Programs Office of the School of Systems and Logistics. Volume 1. Development and User’s Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    processing procedures used by the Air Force Institute of Technology School of Systems and Logistics Graduate Programs Office. The author was able to create an...efficient DBMS application that met the needs of the Graduate Programs Office using the Ashton-Tate dBASE III Plus (TM) DBMS and the Concentric Data...successful in achieving his goal of solving the specific problem. Chapter IV describes the impact on Graduate Programs Office operations using the DBMS and

  13. [Medical pedagogy and special didactics in graduate courses at the medical school of the University of São Paulo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, E; Vanzolini, M E; Basile, M A; Fujimura, I; Pasqualucci, C A

    1992-01-01

    Graduate courses of medical pedagogy and special didactics at S. Paulo University Medical School are analysed. The authors present objectives, subject matters and methodologies of both courses, as well as their evaluation by the graduate students. After an initial rejection, the evaluation became very positive (67% in medical pedagogy and 82% in special didactics). Some future perspectives are discussed.

  14. A Comparison of the Performance of Graduate and Undergraduate School Applicants on the Test of Written English. TOEFL Research Reports Report 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    The performance of graduate and undergraduate school applicants on the Test of Written English (TWE) was compared for each of 66 data sets, dating from 1988 to 1993. The analyses compared the average TWE score for graduates and undergraduates after matching examinees on the total score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The main…

  15. Aspiration for Global Cultural Capital in the Stratified Realm of Global Higher Education: Why Do Korean Students Go to US Graduate Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongyoung

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to understand Korean students' motivations for studying in US graduate schools. For this purpose, I conducted in-depth interviews with 50 Korean graduate students who were enrolled in a research-centered US university at the time of the interview. In these interviews, I sought to understand how their motivations are connected not…

  16. Columbia's Bridge to the Ph.D. Program: A research-focused initiative facilitating the transition to graduate school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüeros, Marcel A.

    2015-01-01

    Columbia University's Bridge to the Ph.D. in the Natural Sciences Program aims to enhance the participation of students from underrepresented groups in Ph.D. programs. To achieve this, the Bridge Program provides an intensive research, coursework, and mentoring experience to post-baccalaureates seeking to strengthen their graduate school applications and to prepare for the transition into graduate school. To date, 20 Bridge Program alumni --- including four in astronomy --- have gone on to Ph.D. programs at Columbia, the University of Michigan, Johns Hopkins, the University of Washington, Albert Einstein, Yale, and SUNY-Albany, among others. In this talk, I will touch on some of the connections between Pre-MAP and the Bridge Program, and particularly how my involvement in the former prepared me to lead the latter.

  17. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL) of the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), University of Rhode Island is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  18. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) as a Predictor of Success at the Naval Postgraduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    the author and do not reflect the official policy or po- sition of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. 17 Cosati Codes IS Subject Terms...potential. Among these are the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). the Graduate Management Admission Test ( GMAT ), undergrad- uate grade point averages...performance." [Ref. 16: p. 141 Throughout the Guide Educational Testing Service cautions against using the Graduate Record Examination Scores as the only

  19. Application of Personal Drug (P-Drug) Seminar to Clinical Pharmacy Education in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The P-drug seminar, a novel method of teaching the process of rational pharmacotherapy, was introduced in 2000 into the practice program of the clinical pharmacy course in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University (TMPU). The P-drug concept is evidence-based drug selection according to criteria (i.e., efficacy, safety, suitability and cost) deter mined in advance and rational prescribing by each physician. The P-drug seminar originated from e...

  20. Learning about medical student mistreatment from responses to the medical school graduation questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavis, Brian; Sousa, Aron; Lipscomb, Wanda; Rappley, Marsha D

    2014-05-01

    Although evidence of medical student mistreatment has accumulated for more than 20 years, only recently have professional organizations like the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the American Medical Association truly acknowledged it as an issue. Since 1991, the AAMC's annual Medical School Graduation Questionnaire (GQ) has included questions about mistreatment. Responses to the GQ have become the major source of evidence of the prevalence and types of mistreatment. This article reviews national mistreatment data, using responses to the GQ from 2000 through 2012; examines how students' experiences have changed over time; and highlights the implications of this information for the broader medical education system. The authors discuss what mistreatment is, including the changing definitions from the GQ; the prevalence, types, and sources of mistreatment; and evidence of students reporting incidents. In addition, they discuss next steps, including better defining mistreatment, specifically public humiliation and belittling, taking into account students' subjective evaluations; understanding and addressing the influence of institutional culture and what institutions can learn from current approaches at other institutions; and developing better systems to report and respond to reports of mistreatment. They conclude with a discussion of how mistreatment currently is conceptualized within the medical education system and the implications of that conceptualization for eradicating mistreatment in the future.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF PHYSICAL HEALTH OF SCHOOLS GRADUATES GOING TO THE UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Klimov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The complex assessment of the level of physical health of schools graduates is presented in the article.Materials and methods. We studied the condition of the first-year students who were assigned to the main medical group. Their physical and psychofunctional condition was estimated using morphological, functional, psychophysiological parameters and the indicators of physical preparedness.Results. Morfofunctional level of the health of the youths who entered higher educational institution was at the average level according to the age-sex norms. At the same time physical preparedness of young men and girls corresponded to satisfactory level, but endurance, the major physical parameter reflecting the general level of working capasity of the person, was below an average. The psychophysiological status of the majority of surveyed was characterized by the optimum force and mobility of nervous processes, good level of social and psychological adaptation, resistance to stress, semantic and image memory. The indicator of anxiety was significantly lower and resistance to stress and adaptation higher in young men than those in girls. 

  2. 1978 U.S. Medical School Graduates: Practice Setting Preferences, Hometowns, and Spouses' Hometowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, Janet Melei

    1980-01-01

    National information about 1978 graduating medical students is reported that confirms a substantial relationship between their preferred practice settings and their hometowns and those of their spouses. (JMD)

  3. PhD-level education in Wageningen: the approach at graduate school Production Ecology and Resource Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Arnaud; van de Vijver, Claudius; Jetten, Theo; Suselbeek, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Wageningen University's PhD programme is organized by Graduate Schools that are defined based on topics. The C.T. de Wit Graduate School for Production Ecology and Resource Conservation (PE&RC) focussed on topics ranging from ecology and soil science to crop modelling. The Graduate School's offering of PhD courses comprises methodological courses, topical courses, skills courses and international on-site courses. All courses are characterized by a high degree of ownership by PhD candidates themselves. In many cases, candidates apply the skills that they learn on datasets from their own studies, during the course. This allows them to get hands-on experience while working towards their own results. The international on-site courses uniquely bring together Wageningen PhD candidates from a wide range of disciplines to jointly discuss and learn with local PhD candidates. Candidates also highly value the extensive attention for candidates' wellbeing during their time in Wageningen, for instance through PhD weekends.

  4. The 1978 U.S. Medical School Graduates: Career Plans by Racial/Ethnic Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, Janet Melei

    1980-01-01

    Career plans, based on responses to the Association of American Medical Colleges' first annual graduation questionnaire concerning the racial/ethnic identity of 1978 U.S. medical graduates, are reported. The data show that the six racial/ethnic groups follow similar general trends, though group differences do appear. (MLW)

  5. Racial Diversity, Legitimacy, and the Citizenry: The Impact of Affirmative Action Bans on Graduate School Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Liliana M.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses data from the CGS/GRE Survey of Graduate Enrollment and Degrees and a methodology that supports causal inference to examine the effects of affirmative action bans in Texas, California, Washington, and Florida on graduate student of color enrollment. The findings show that the bans have reduced by 12.2% the average proportion of…

  6. Spoke"tokenism": Black Women "Talking Back" about Graduate School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Subrina J.

    2013-01-01

    Black women still experience racial oppression in the academy. In this study, I draw on Black feminist theory and oral narrative research to examine the narratives of Black women graduate students discussing their educational experiences. Black female graduate students deal with acts of everyday racism and instances of structural and internalized…

  7. The present state and problems of graduate-entry programs (GEP) in national medical schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Nobuo; Suzuki, Toshiya; Nitta, Yoshio

    2011-07-04

    It is not certain whether graduate-entry program (GEP) or non-graduate-entry program (non-GEP) in medical education is desirable to foster excellent medical physicians in Japan. In order to clarify the present state and problems of GEP, we visited 27 national medical schools which have introduced limited term college graduate-entry program and discussed with the deans, the education committee and administration affairs.GEP students are elder and usually study harder than regular non-GEP course students. Therefore, they got the higher grades at 1-2 classes of GEP course than the regular non-GEP course students. However, some GEP students lost motivation to study medicine and got poor grades at higher class. There was no definite difference of the final grades at the graduation between GEP and non-GEP students. Most of GEP students became medical practitioners and few students chose physician scientist majoring in basic medicine.We did not find any advantage of GEP compared with regular non-GEP. The results show that the introduction of GEP throughout Japan should be discussed carefully.

  8. CO2 activation on bimetallic CuNi nanoparticles☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalie Austin; Brandon Butina; Giannis Mpourmpakis⁎

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, electronic, and CO2 adsorption properties of 55-atom bimetallic CuNi nanoparticles (NPs) in core-shell and decorated architectures, as well as of their monometallic counterparts. Our results revealed that with respect to the monometallic Cu55 and Ni55 parents, the formation of decorated Cu12Ni43 and core-shell Cu42Ni13 are energetically favorable. We found that CO2 chemisorbs on monometallic Ni55, core-shell Cu13Ni42, and decorated Cu12Ni43 and Cu43Ni12, whereas, it physisorbs on monometallic Cu55 and core-shell Cu42Ni13. The presence of surface Ni on the NPs is key in strongly adsorbing and activating the CO2 molecule (linear to bent transition and elongation of C˭O bonds). This activation occurs through a charge transfer from the NPs to the CO2 molecule, where the local metal d-orbital density localization on surface Ni plays a pivotal role. This work identifies insightful structure-property relationships for CO2 activation and highlights the importance of keeping a balance between NP stability and CO2 adsorption behavior in designing catalytic bimetallic NPs that activate CO2.

  9. CO2 activation on bimetallic CuNi nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Austin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, electronic, and CO2 adsorption properties of 55-atom bimetallic CuNi nanoparticles (NPs in core-shell and decorated architectures, as well as of their monometallic counterparts. Our results revealed that with respect to the monometallic Cu55 and Ni55 parents, the formation of decorated Cu12Ni43 and core-shell Cu42Ni13 are energetically favorable. We found that CO2 chemisorbs on monometallic Ni55, core-shell Cu13Ni42, and decorated Cu12Ni43 and Cu43Ni12, whereas, it physisorbs on monometallic Cu55 and core-shell Cu42Ni13. The presence of surface Ni on the NPs is key in strongly adsorbing and activating the CO2 molecule (linear to bent transition and elongation of C˭O bonds. This activation occurs through a charge transfer from the NPs to the CO2 molecule, where the local metal d-orbital density localization on surface Ni plays a pivotal role. This work identifies insightful structure-property relationships for CO2 activation and highlights the importance of keeping a balance between NP stability and CO2 adsorption behavior in designing catalytic bimetallic NPs that activate CO2.

  10. Who Is Unemployed, Employed or Admitted to Graduate School; An Investigation of the Employment Situation of College Graduates in China between 2003 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bao; Binglong, Li

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the employment of college graduates has become a focus of higher education policy and research in China. This article analyzes data from the National College Graduate Survey conducted by Peking University between 2003 and 2009, and examines the trends and factors influencing the path chosen by college graduates. Results show that…

  11. Perceptions of preparation for further training: how our medical schools prepare graduates and the perceived factors influencing access to training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Sarah J; Craig, Pippa L; Sefton, Ann J; Ryan, Greg L; Arnold, Stephanie J; Naganathan, Vasi

    2010-09-06

    To investigate the specific factors that graduates perceive to influence their success in obtaining primary training in a chosen field. The New South Wales Medical Registration Board provided data on doctors who were registered to practise between 1995 and 2006. A brief, paper-based survey was sent to a random selection of 2000 doctors. Doctors' self-reported perceptions on the impact of demographic details, specialty training applied for, university training and other factors on opportunities for further training after medical school. Of the 375/1915 doctors (19.6%) who responded, most had completed a 6-year undergraduate degree from the University of Sydney, University of NSW or University of Newcastle, and most were at registrar level. Of 242/321 doctors (76%) who had applied for a training position, 240 (99%) had been accepted. The support of a mentor was considered the most positive influence on meeting long-term career goals (255/318 [80%]). Learning how to communicate with patients was valued as the most helpful aspect of medical school (270/318 [85%]). The personal attributes of graduates were considered more influential in achieving career goals and accessing further training than perceived features of a medical program. This suggests that more emphasis and research should be devoted to selecting the most appropriate candidates, rather than restructuring medical curricula to meet a presumed need for more content knowledge before graduation.

  12. Graduates of different UK medical schools show substantial differences in performance on MRCP(UK Part 1, Part 2 and PACES examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollon Jennifer

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK General Medical Council has emphasized the lack of evidence on whether graduates from different UK medical schools perform differently in their clinical careers. Here we assess the performance of UK graduates who have taken MRCP(UK Part 1 and Part 2, which are multiple-choice assessments, and PACES, an assessment using real and simulated patients of clinical examination skills and communication skills, and we explore the reasons for the differences between medical schools. Method We perform a retrospective analysis of the performance of 5827 doctors graduating in UK medical schools taking the Part 1, Part 2 or PACES for the first time between 2003/2 and 2005/3, and 22453 candidates taking Part 1 from 1989/1 to 2005/3. Results Graduates of UK medical schools performed differently in the MRCP(UK examination between 2003/2 and 2005/3. Part 1 and 2 performance of Oxford, Cambridge and Newcastle-upon-Tyne graduates was significantly better than average, and the performance of Liverpool, Dundee, Belfast and Aberdeen graduates was significantly worse than average. In the PACES (clinical examination, Oxford graduates performed significantly above average, and Dundee, Liverpool and London graduates significantly below average. About 60% of medical school variance was explained by differences in pre-admission qualifications, although the remaining variance was still significant, with graduates from Leicester, Oxford, Birmingham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne and London overperforming at Part 1, and graduates from Southampton, Dundee, Aberdeen, Liverpool and Belfast underperforming relative to pre-admission qualifications. The ranking of schools at Part 1 in 2003/2 to 2005/3 correlated 0.723, 0.654, 0.618 and 0.493 with performance in 1999–2001, 1996–1998, 1993–1995 and 1989–1992, respectively. Conclusion Candidates from different UK medical schools perform differently in all three parts of the MRCP(UK examination, with the

  13. Prepared to practice? Perception of career preparation and guidance of recent medical graduates at two campuses of a transnational medical school: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Sameer S; McGowan, Yvonne; McGee, Hannah; Whitford, David L

    2016-02-09

    Graduating medical students enter the workforce with substantial medical knowledge and experience, yet little is known about how well they are prepared for the transition to medical practice in diverse settings. We set out to compare perceptions of medical school graduates' career guidance with their perceptions of preparedness to practice as interns. We also set out to compare perceptions of preparedness for hospital practice between graduates from two transnational medical schools. This was a cross-sectional study. A Preparedness for Hospital Practice (PHPQ) survey and career guidance questionnaire was sent to recent medical graduates, incorporating additional free text responses on career preparation. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and tests of association including Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests. Forty three percent (240/555) of graduates responded to the survey: 39 % of respondents were domestic (Dublin, Ireland or Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain) and interning locally; 15 % were overseas students interning locally; 42 % were overseas students interning internationally and 4 % had not started internship. Two variables explained 13 % of the variation in preparedness for hospital practice score: having planned postgraduate education prior to entering medical school and having helpful career guidance in medical school. Overseas graduates interning internationally were more likely to have planned their postgraduate career path prior to entering medical school. Dublin graduates found their career guidance more helpful than Bahrain counterparts. The most cited shortcomings were lack of structured career advice and lack of advice on the Irish and Bahraini postgraduate systems. This study has demonstrated that early consideration of postgraduate career preparation and helpful medical school career guidance has a strong association with perceptions of preparedness of medical graduates for hospital practice. In an era of increasing

  14. High School Five-Year Graduation Rates, Wake County Public School System (WCPSS): 2009-10. Measuring Up. E&R Report No. 11.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, Glenda

    2011-01-01

    In 2009-10, the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction was approved to include a five-year graduation rate as well as a four-year rate in determining if schools, districts, and the state made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) under the NCLB Act. This rate was based on the incoming 9th grade students of 2005-06. The denominator of the cohort…

  15. Geology, Mineral Deposit Model and Potential of the Suwar Cu-Ni Sulphide Prospect, Northwest Yemen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdulkarim M.; Al-Nagashi; Li Xujun

    2002-01-01

    The Suwar Cu-Ni sulphide prospect is very highly regarded for its potential to host a major nickel-copper sulphide deposit in Republic of Yemen, a mineral resource lacking country. The ore-hosting intrusion is a lopolith about 6km long and lkm wide and more than 300m deep. There are two types of Cu-Ni mineralizations in the prospect: primary massive chalcopyrite+ pyrrhotite+ pentlandite controlled by gravitational and structural traps while the secondary Cu-Ni mineralization is coarse grained and occur as veins, veinlets, fracture fill, blebs or associated with coarse, re-crystallized carbonate in shear zones and faults. The deposit type of the prospect is believed to be the one associated with the ultramafic component of a large, broadly differentiated noritic, gabbroid intrusive. It is suggested that the prospect and adjacent area possibly contain a similar world class Ni-Cu deposits as that in Jinchuan, China.

  16. The Role of Misfit Dislocations in Strength Enhancement of Cu/Ni Microlaminates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Dong; YAN Li; YAN Zhi-jun

    2004-01-01

    This paper simulated the nanoindentations of Cu/Ni thin films with 2D Molecular Dynamics Simulations (MDS) and examined the effects of the misfit dislocations on the mechanical properties of the microlaminates. The misfit dislocation network plays an important role in strength enhancement of Cu/Ni microlaminates because of its resistance to glide dislocations. But the strengthening also relies on the wavelength, which is defined as the thickness of adjacent two layers in microlaminates. When the wavelength is less than the critical value λc, the stress concentration caused by the movement of misfit dislocations will make Cu/Ni microlaminates weaken. Also, the critical wavelength should be more than the depth at which the dislocation nucleates in the homogeneous layer.

  17. REE Characteristics of the Kalatongke Cu-Ni Deposit, Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuwang; WANG Jingbin; WANG Lijuan; WANG Yong; TU Caineng

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of the study on the REE geochemistry of the ore minerals and host rocks of the Kalatongke Cu-Ni deposit, Xinjiang, it is indicated that the major ore minerals, sulfides, were sourced from the host mafic-ultramafic magma.Characterized by low REE content of sulfide, such a Cu-Ni sulfide deposit occurring in the orogen is obviously different from that on the margin of the craton. Because the mafic-ultramafic rocks from the Cu-Ni sulfide deposit occurring in the orogen is water-rich and the REEs of some sulfides show a particular "multiple-bending" pattern, which suggests coexistence of multiple liquid phases (fluid and melt), the sulfide melt possibly contains a great deal of hydrothermal fluids and increasingly developed gases and liquid-rich ore-forming fluids after the main metallogenic epoch (magmatic segregation stage).

  18. Mixing behaviors in Cu/Ni and Ni/V multilayers induced by cold rolling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1509 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Perepezko, J.H., E-mail: perepezk@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1509 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Larson, D.; Reinhard, D. [CAMECA Instruments Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The composition profiles of Cu/Ni and Ni/V multilayers were investigated. • A compositional oscillation was observed in the Cu/Ni composition profile. • The Ni/V composition profile varies smoothly and continuously between end members. • The effective diffusion coefficients were enhanced by about 30 order of magnitudes. • The effective temperature were estimated as 946 K for Cu/Ni and 936 K for Ni/V. - Abstract: Multilayers of Cu60/Ni40 and Ni70/V30 foil arrays were cold rolled in order to study the transformation reactions and mixing behaviors induced by deformation. Upon cold rolling, the layer thicknesses were refined to about 20 nm and solid solution phases were induced from pure end members (i.e. Cu, Ni and V) in both cases. The composition profiles for Cu/Ni and Ni/V multilayer samples at the deformation level where the solid solution phases coexist with end members were investigated by means of atom probe tomography and electron energy loss spectrum, respectively. An oscillation in the composition of Cu–Ni solid solution phase was observed, however the composition profile of Ni/V shows a smoothly varying curve between the end members. The effective diffusion coefficients were promoted by about 30 orders of magnitude for both Cu/Ni and Ni/V compared to room temperature diffusion. The effective temperature for Cu/Ni multilayers after 36 passes and Ni/V after 60 passes are estimated as 946 K and 936 K respectively.

  19. Inequalities in Educational Access in Mexico: A Study with Graduates Students of a High Performance Technical High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pérez-Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Access to the higher education system in Mexico has been characterized by educational inequalities explained by social and reproductionist currents. The phenomenon occurs in graduate students with a high school diploma and coming from different contexts (social, cultural, economic, institutional and academic ones that create a process of transition far away from equal opportunities. Therefore, the differences due to cultural diversity do not generate equitable access to higher education institutions. The aim of this study was to identify the social, cultural and academic factors affecting the access to or the abandonment of the academic education of students with expectations of entering the higher education system. The research was based on the results obtained from forty technicians who studied at a vocational high school with high academic performance in Mexico, and were supposed to enter the higher level. It was an exploratory descriptive investigation with qualitative approach, using two multiple-choice item questionnaires whose results were analyzed interpretively. The sampling was non-probability, with the technique of “snowball” and “convenience”. The results showed that the level of parents’ schooling, social relations, and academic career of graduates were decisive to enter the higher education; so it can be concluded that the students’ origin generate inequality in educational achievement.

  20. Need to reform education in graduate schools of public health in Japan: Toward outcome-based education to cultivate competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Mariko; Yano, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Japan, known for its good healthcare access via universal health insurance, leads the world in terms of life expectancy, and possesses a public health system that has improved health standards markedly in the 20th century. However, we currently face major challenges to maintain and promote people's health. Although these complicated problems pose numerous threats to public welfare, education of public health for health professionals still retains 20th-century standards. This also means that graduate education of public health in Japan is traditionally based on obtaining licensure as a medical professional, conducting research and writing papers, and on-the-job training. Since graduate school education is expected to produce competent public health leaders, Japan requires a reform toward a new education design that caters to the current societal needs. The current global trend in the education of health professionals leans toward outcome-based education to meet core competencies. Here, "competency" refers to a set of features or particular behavioral patterns possessed by highly qualified persons. In 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO) established a general health professional competency standard that includes both management and leadership competencies. Moreover, the Lancet Commission concluded that there was a need for transformative education based on a "health system approach." In brief, this means that our education should correspond to the needs of the health system to allow for the resolution of problems by educated professionals with satisfactory levels of competencies. In addition, as "change agents," these competent professionals are expected to promote societal change toward the realization of better public health. In Japan, the Central Education Council has produced several reports on professional graduate school reform since 2000. These reports indicate that graduate school curricula require reform to allow the health professionals to work

  1. Characterization of Pollution Transport into Texas Using OMI and TES Satellite and In Situ data, and HYSPLIT Back Trajectory Analyses: implications for TCEQ State Implementation Plans and High School/Undergraduate STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxe, C.; Bella, D.; Khaimova, J.; Culpepper, J.; Ahmed, N.; Belkalai, A.; Ealy, J.; Arroyo, I.; Lahoumh, M.; Jenkins, O.; Emmanuel, S.; Andrews, J.; Fu, D.; Wu, L.; Choi, Y.; Morris, G.; Osterman, G. B.; Johnson, L. P.; Austin, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Using an online trajectory analysis tool NASA, ArcGIS, Satellite and EPA in situ data, we assess whether high pollution events in Texas are primarily sourced locally or remotely. We focus satellite data that exemplify high O3 and NO2 over Texas's lower troposphere. Four day back trajectory analyses of all dates show that upper-, mid-, and lower-tropospheric air over Texas, containing high O3, is transported from the Gulf of Mexico, Southeast USA, Midwest USA, Northeast USA, the Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Mexico, etc. Only day showed air at 1 km is sourced within Texas. Satellite data show O3 enhancements in the boundary layer and O3 and NO2 enhancements via tropospheric column profiles. These enhancements complement four-day trajectory analysis. This study provides a viable basis for more quantifiable and accurate information for developing effective air quality State Implementation Plans. STEM Impact: (i) D. Bella was an NSF-LSAMP undergraduate research mentee with me at Medgar Evers College-CUNY; she received a B.S. in Environmental Science (and a Chemistry Minor) and is now a Ph.D. graduate student at University at Albany's School of Public Health. (ii) J. Khaimova is an undergraduate Geology and Planetary Science B.S. major at Brooklyn College-CUNY. I have supported Jessica's summer internship in summer 2013 as a CUNY Summer Research Fellow, where she is currently an NSF-REU research mentee at Pennsylvania State University's Meteorology Department. (iii) J. Culpepper received his B.S. in Environmental Science from MEC-CUNY and will be a Ph.D. student, Fall 2014 at University of Iowa's Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. (iv) S. Gentle was a high school researcher with me within ACS's Project SEED Program for high school students. S. Gentle will start her undergraduate career Fall 2014 at Pennsylvania State University and seeks to attain a B.S. in Chemistry. (v). All parties, including high school and undergraduate researchers seek to attend

  2. REU Site: CUNY/GISS CGCR - Increasing Diversity in Earth and Space Science and Space Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. P.; Marchese, P.; Carlson, B. E.; Howard, A. M.; Damas, M. C.; Boxe, C.; Sohl, L. E.; Cheung, T. D.; Zavala-Gutierrez, R.; Jiang, M.

    2016-12-01

    This presentation describes student projects and accomplishments of the NSF REU Site: The City University of New York / NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Center for Global Climate Research. These student experiences contribute to the preparation of a diverse workforce in the areas of ocean modeling, planetary atmospheres, atmospheric science, climate change, heliophysics and space technology. It is important to motivate students to continue their studies towards advanced degrees and pursue careers related to these fields of study. This is best accomplished by involving undergraduates in research. For the past three years, this REU Site has supported research for more than 35 students, approximately 60 percent from underrepresented minorities and 35 percent female. All the students have progressed towards their degrees and some have advanced to graduate study. This program is supported by NSF award AGS-1359293 REU Site: CUNY/GISS Center for Global Climate Research and the NASA New York State Space Grant Consortium and in collaboration with the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS).

  3. IMPLEMENTING SELF-ORGANIZED LEARNING FOR THE CADETS OF GRADUATE MILITARY SCHOOLS (The subject Foreign Language Learning taken for instance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. PENNO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considered the issues of putting into practice a self-organized learning for the cadets in learning foreign languages at the graduate military school. The requirement to get knowledge with ease that the contemporary society sets and social awareness of the channels to get knowledge by specialists has urged consideration of the above issue, in particular, for the domain of aviation, with emphasis put on learning selves along with career‟ development. The paper specified the teacher‟s task for this case that is creating the favorable environment for the efficient self-organized learning, in particular, with application of multimedia training facilities (CAL = computerassisted learning ones into the training and upgrading procedures. The survey gave consideration to the Tmaker set of tests describing the ways the cadets at the Air Force Academy shall apply the test‟ assignments for the purpose of improving self-scheduled learning skills and testing selves. In addition, the paper specified several characteristics of arranging the self-scheduled learning at the Graduate Military School. To complete the author submitted the data to confirm shaping of an affirmative attitude in the cadets to self-organized learning while a recurrent use of the mentioned set of tests.

  4. The effect of GK-12 graduate fellow interactions on high school student attitudes toward science and career path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Rachel Renee

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of biology graduate student interactions on high school student attitudes toward science and career choice. Through the National Science Foundation GK-12 program at Middle Tennessee State University, Graduate Fellows (GFs) partnered with a science teacher (PT) ten hours a week during the school year to serve as a scientist-in-residence, engage students in inquiry-based laboratory experiences, and mentor research projects. A multi-method design compared PT classes with and without a GF using the Student Attitude Inventory- II (SAI-II), interviews, and student artifacts. Although small positive differences were present in GF classes, repeated measures MANOVA found no significant differences between SAI-II categories. Both groups decreased in STEM career interest; however, student interviews with GF classes conveyed increased understanding of the scientific process and a desire to continue practicing science. Although GF classes actively participated in documented STEM experiences, this study supports the challenges in changing student attitude about science and increased pursuance of STEM careers.

  5. Outcomes mapping: a method for dental schools to coordinate learning and assessment based on desired characteristics of a graduate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Galen B; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Johnsen, David C; Eckert, Mary Lynn; Mulder, Michael

    2014-09-01

    This project, utilizing a seldom-used approach to dental education, was designed to define the desired characteristics of a graduating dental student; convert those characteristics to educational outcomes; and use those outcomes to map a dental school's learning and assessment programs, based on outcomes rather than courses and disciplines. A detailed rubric of the outcomes expected of a graduating dental student from this school was developed, building on Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) standards and the school's competencies. The presence of each characteristic in the rubric was mapped within and across courses and disciplines. To assess implementation of the rubric, members of two faculty committees and all fourth-year students were asked to use it to rate 1) the importance of each characteristic, 2) the extent to which the school teaches and assesses each, and 3) the extent to which each counts toward overall assessment of competence. All thirty-three faculty members (100 percent) on the committees participated, as did forty-six of the fifty-five students (84 percent). The groups gave high scores to the importance of each characteristic, especially for knowledge and technical competence (then separate categories but merged in the final rubric) and for self-assessment, as well as the extent to which they are being taught and assessed. Respondents most commonly named critical thinking as the area that should be emphasized more. Mapping the curriculum and creating its related database allow the faculty and administration to more systematically coordinate learning and assessment than was possible with a course-based approach.

  6. Extracurricular activities: Investigating the affects of participation-nonparticipation on the Georgia High School Science Graduation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Ray A.

    Student achievement research suggests that participation in extracurricular activities has a positive impact on the academic and developmental outcomes for adolescents. Specifically, several studies reported that adolescents who participate in extra-curricular activities are more likely to experience increases in academic achievement, self-esteem, high school graduation rates, and pro-social behaviors. On the other hand, there is research suggesting that participation in extracurricular activities may distract students from their academic pursuits. The state of Georgia requires all eleventh grade students to participate in the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT). The GHSGT consists of five separate tests that include (a) English/language arts, (b) math, (c) writing, (d) social studies, and (e) science. Each comprehensive exam is worth 600 points. A high school diploma will be awarded if the student scores at least 500 points on each individual exam. Further, review of student outcomes on the GHSGT revealed that first-time test takers were failing the science portion of the test at a greater percentage than any other subject on the GHSGT. Specifically, the Governor's Office of Student Achievement (GOSA) reported that from 2002 through 2004, a total of 70,451 students or 30.3% of students that were first-time test takers failed the science portion of the GHSGT. As a result, investigating factors that potentially could increase student achievement in science became the impetus for this study. In particular, this study examined the relationships between the levels of student participation in school sponsored extracurricular activities in relation to the level of student achievement in the area of science.

  7. Academic Feedback in Veterinary Medicine: A comparison of School Leaver and Graduate Entry cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kirsty Jean; McCune, Velda; Rhind, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed the expectations and experiences of students on a five-year undergraduate ("n"?=?91) and four-year graduate entry ("n"?=?47) veterinary medicine degree programme relating to academic feedback. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used to explore new students' expectations and prior experiences of…

  8. Where Students Are Pursuing Graduate Business School and Why. 2014 Data to Go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Tracey

    2014-01-01

    This latest report in the GMAC® Data-to-Go Series looks at regional differences in demographics, motivations, and preferred study destinations of individuals pursuing graduate management education around the world. Key themes of student demographics, GMAT score-sending destinations, program preferences, and career intentions appear in data…

  9. Academic Feedback in Veterinary Medicine: A comparison of School Leaver and Graduate Entry cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kirsty Jean; McCune, Velda; Rhind, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed the expectations and experiences of students on a five-year undergraduate ("n"?=?91) and four-year graduate entry ("n"?=?47) veterinary medicine degree programme relating to academic feedback. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used to explore new students' expectations and prior experiences of…

  10. Intersectionality and Social Work: Omissions of Race, Class, and Sexuality in Graduate School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubar, Roe; Cespedes, Karina; Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    In 2008 EPAS Standards on "Engaging Diversity and Difference in Practice" (2.1.4) added intersectionality (a theory developed by feminist of color) as one aspect to understand diversity, difference, and power in social work curriculum. We consider how intersectionality is omitted in graduate student learning even when class assignments…

  11. Teaching the Truth: Social Justice and Social Class in Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Leona M.; Roy, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, anyone who wishes to combat lies and ignorance and to write the truth must overcome at least five difficulties. In the same way that writing the truth entails five difficulties, teaching the truth or teaching social justice in graduate education entails more than five difficulties. Some of these difficulties are inimical to the act of…

  12. Teaching the Truth: Social Justice and Social Class in Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Leona M.; Roy, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, anyone who wishes to combat lies and ignorance and to write the truth must overcome at least five difficulties. In the same way that writing the truth entails five difficulties, teaching the truth or teaching social justice in graduate education entails more than five difficulties. Some of these difficulties are inimical to the act of…

  13. Academic Feedback in Veterinary Medicine: A comparison of School Leaver and Graduate Entry cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kirsty Jean; McCune, Velda; Rhind, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed the expectations and experiences of students on a five-year undergraduate ("n"?=?91) and four-year graduate entry ("n"?=?47) veterinary medicine degree programme relating to academic feedback. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used to explore new students' expectations and prior experiences of feedback and capture…

  14. STEM Enrichment Programs and Graduate School Matriculation: The Role of Science Identity Salience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, David M.; Serpe, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Improving the state of science education in the United States has become a national priority. One response to this problem has been the implementation of STEM enrichment programs designed to increase the number of students that enter graduate programs in science. Current research indicates enrichment programs have positive effects for student…

  15. Ten Year Projections for US Residency Positions: Will There be Enough Positions to Accommodate the Growing Number of U.S. Medical School Graduates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Sarah; Lane, Samantha; Fluck, Marcus; Hunsinger, Marie; Blansfield, Joseph; Shabahang, Mohsen

    2017-09-14

    Recently, a multitude of new U.S. medical schools have been established and existing medical schools have expanded their enrollments. The National Residency Match Program (NRMP) reports that in 2016 there were 23,339 categorical residency positions offered in the match and 26,836 overall applicants with 17,789 (66.29%) of the total candidates being U.S. allopathic graduates. In view of the rapid growth of medical school graduates, the aim of this study is to determine if current trends suggest a shortage of residency positions within the next ten years. The total number of graduates from U.S. medical schools was obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) for 2005-2014 academic years and was trended linearly for a 10-year prediction for the number of graduates. The yearly number of categorical positions filled by U.S. graduates for calendar years 2006-2015 was obtained from the NRMP and was trended longitudinally 10 years into the future. Analysis of subspecialty data focused on the comparison of differences in growth rates and potential foreseeable deficits in available categorical positions in U.S. residency programs. According to trended data from AAMC, the total number of graduates from U.S. medical schools has increased 1.52 percent annually (15,927 in 2005 to 18,705 in 2014); with a forecast of 22,280 U.S. medical school graduates in 2026. The growth rate of all categorical positions available in U.S. residency programs was 2.55 percent annually, predicting 29,880 positions available in 2026. In view of these results, an analysis of specific residencies was done to determine potential shortages in specific residencies. With 17.4 percent of all U.S. graduates matching into internal medicine and a 3.17 percent growth rate in residency positions, in 2026 the number of internal medicine residency positions will be 9,026 with 3,874 U.S. graduates predicted to match into these positions. In general surgery, residency positions note a growth

  16. Usability Evaluation of the City University of New York CUNY+ Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulanov, Alexei; Pajarillo, Edmund J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a usability evaluation of the wide area networked database used in the library system of the City University of New York (CUNY). Describes use of the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI) criteria in student surveys and interviews that considered affect, efficiency, learnability, control, and helpfulness. Survey is appended.…

  17. Fatigue of thin walled tubes in copper alloy CuNi10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Søren Heide; Damkilde, Lars; Jepsen, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The current work concerns the investigation of the fatigue resistance of CuNi10 tubes, which are frequently used in heat exchangers of large ship engines. The lifetime performances of the exchanger tubes are greatly affected by the environmental conditions, where especially the temperature fluctu...

  18. Standard Setting for Clinical Competence at Graduation from Medical School: A Comparison of Passing Scores across Five Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursicot, Katharine A. M.; Roberts, Trudie E.; Pell, Godfrey

    2006-01-01

    While Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) have become widely used to assess clinical competence at the end of undergraduate medical courses, the method of setting the passing score varies greatly, and there is no agreed best methodology. While there is an assumption that the passing standard at graduation is the same at all medical…

  19. The bench vs. the blackboard: learning to teach during graduate school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccia, Laura

    2011-09-01

    Many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate students travel through the academic career pipeline without ever learning how to teach effectively, an oversight that negatively affects the quality of undergraduate science education and cheats trainees of valuable professional development. This article argues that all STEM graduate students and postdoctoral fellows should undergo training in teaching to strengthen their resumes, polish their oral presentation skills, and improve STEM teaching at the undergraduate level. Though this may seem like a large undertaking, the author outlines a three-step process that allows busy scientists to fit pedagogical training into their research schedules in order to make a significant investment both in their academic career and in the continuing improvement of science education. Copyright © 2011.

  20. "¿Qué Estoy Haciendo Aquí? (What Am I Doing Here?)": Chicanos/Latinos(as) Navigating Challenges and Inequalities During Their First Year of Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Elvia

    2014-01-01

    Based on in-depth qualitative interviews, this study analyzed the challenges and structural inequities that Chicanos/Latinos(as) encountered and resisted during their first year of graduate school. Grounded in intersectionality theory, this study analyzed how race, class, and gender inequalities that are embedded in the graduate schooling process…

  1. [Anthropometric characteristics of school children graduated from basic and secondary education in the Metropolitan area of Santiago de Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanović, D; Barrera, G; Alvarez, M L; Muzzo, S

    1985-09-01

    An anthropometric assessment of the nutritional status and growth of students graduating from Basic (8th grade) and Secondary (4th grade) Education was carried out. A group sample of 522 students from the Metropolitan Area of Santiago, Chile, was randomly selected. The same number of students by sex, dependency (public and private schools) from high, medium and low socioeconomic levels (SEL) was chosen. SEL was measured through the Graffar Modified Scale, and the percentage of weight for age (% W/A), height/age (% H/A) and weight/height (% W/H) were evaluated in accordance with the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) reference pattern. The % adequacy of head circumference/age (% HC/A) was determined by the Tanner Tables, and the % of upper to lower segment ratio (% US/LS), by the Tables of Muzzo et al. Results revealed that the % of W/A and of H/A were diminished in students of both sexes, while the % of UP/LS, was increased in males of low SEL, from Basic Education; this impact is lost in males graduating from Secondary Education and persists only in the LSE females. No differences in the nutritional status (% W/H) of students according to SEL, were found. Females registered values over 110% of the WHO standard, a finding suggesting a high prevalence of overweight and obesity. We conclude that there is a growth retardation in students graduating from 8th Basic Grade, which persists only in females from 4th grade of Secondary Education. This finding indicates that, in addition to possible environmental factors, other factors, probably of genetic order, also influence the latter. Overweight and obesity, therefore, constitute an important problem that merits measures of preventive nature directed to avoid future consequences.

  2. The Leadership Efficacy of Graduates of North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Letita Renee

    This study examines the leadership efficacy amongst graduates of NCSSM from the classes of 2000--07 as the unit of analysis. How do NCSSM graduates' perceptions of their leadership efficacy align with research on non-cognitive variables as indicators of academic performance using the unit of analysis as a performance outcome? This study is based on the theoretical construct that non-cognitive psychological (also called motivational) factors are core components of leadership self-efficacy, indicative of NCSSM graduates (who had high academic performance and attained STEM degrees). It holds promise for increasing both student interest and diversity in the race to strengthen the STEM pipeline. In this study the Hannah and Avolio (2013) Mind Garden Leadership Efficacy Questionnaire (LEQ) is used. The LEQ is a battery of three instruments designed to assess individual perceptions of personal leadership efficacy across three constructs, via one survey tool. In this mixed-methods analysis, a quantitative phase was conducted to collect the data captured by the Mind Garden Leadership Efficacy Questionnaire. A Post Hoc qualitative analysis was conducted in the second phase of the data analysis, using the Trichotomous-Square Test methodology (with an associated qualitative researcher-designed Inventive Investigative Instrument). The results from the study validated the alternative hypothesis [H1], which proposed that there no are significant differences in the perception of the Leadership Efficacy by the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Alumni from the classes of 2000-07 in terms of their overall "Leadership Efficacy" in regards to: Execution or "Leadership Action Efficacy"; Capacity or "Leader Means Efficacy"; and Environment or "Leader Self-Regulation Efficacy" was accepted. The results also led to the development of a new assessment tool called the Mason Leadership Efficacy Model.

  3. In situ observation of Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticle formation by X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy: Influence of Cu/Ni ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    Silica-supported, bimetallic Cu-Ni nanomaterials were prepared with different ratios of Cu to Ni by incipient wetness impregnation without a specific calcination step before reduction. Different in situ characterization techniques, in particular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffr......Silica-supported, bimetallic Cu-Ni nanomaterials were prepared with different ratios of Cu to Ni by incipient wetness impregnation without a specific calcination step before reduction. Different in situ characterization techniques, in particular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X...

  4. Psychometric Features of the General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part (GAT-V): A Large-Scale Assessment of High School Graduates in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimiter M.; Shamrani, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric features of a General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part, which is used with assessments of high school graduates in Saudi Arabia. The data supported a bifactor model, with one general factor and three content domains (Analogy, Sentence Completion, and Reading Comprehension) as latent aspects of verbal aptitude.

  5. A Survey of the Aircraft Maintenance Industry to Solicit Perceptions Regarding the Effectiveness of Recent Graduates of F.A.A. Approved Maintenance Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brian, Benjamin H.

    A study examined the perceptions of employers in the aircraft maintenance industry regarding the effectiveness of recent graduates of Federal Aeronautics Administration (FAA)-approved maintenance schools. Of the 100 employers who were contacted, 68 returned usable surveys. Based on responses, it was concluded that the views of employers in the…

  6. A Case Study Exploring Whether Undergraduate GPA Is Predictive of First-Time Score on the School Leaders Licensure Assessment Examination for Nontraditional Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatek, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    This case study focused on nontraditional students in a graduate higher education program at a private Midwestern university to determine whether or not undergraduate grade point average (GPA) was a predictor of success. Success was defined as the first score earned on the School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA) examination. A linear regression…

  7. A Survey of the Aircraft Maintenance Industry to Solicit Perceptions Regarding the Effectiveness of Recent Graduates of F.A.A. Approved Maintenance Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brian, Benjamin H.

    A study examined the perceptions of employers in the aircraft maintenance industry regarding the effectiveness of recent graduates of Federal Aeronautics Administration (FAA)-approved maintenance schools. Of the 100 employers who were contacted, 68 returned usable surveys. Based on responses, it was concluded that the views of employers in the…

  8. Training Master's-Level Graduate Students to Use Inquiry Instruction to Teach Middle-Level and High-School Science Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Sharon Larimer; Hitt, Austin M.; Gilman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Through the GK-12 program of the National Science Foundation, graduate student fellows in a coastal marine and wetland studies program were trained to present targeted science concepts to middle- and high-school classes through their own research-based lessons. Initially, they were taught to follow the 5-E learning cycle in lesson plan…

  9. Psychometric Features of the General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part (GAT-V): A Large-Scale Assessment of High School Graduates in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimiter M.; Shamrani, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric features of a General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part, which is used with assessments of high school graduates in Saudi Arabia. The data supported a bifactor model, with one general factor and three content domains (Analogy, Sentence Completion, and Reading Comprehension) as latent aspects of verbal aptitude.

  10. A Comparison of the Success of Community College Graduates Who Entered College with a GED, a High School Diploma, or an Alternative Diploma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, April Danielle

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the researcher compared the success of community college graduates who entered college with a GED, a high school diploma, or an alternative diploma. The researcher used a quantitative analysis method with the existing data of students for three years within a single community college system to answer research questions to determine…

  11. Artful Teaching and Learning: The Bank Street Developmental-Interaction Approach at Midtown West School. Teaching for a Changing World: The Graduates of Bank Street College of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Sam; Park, Soyoung; Lit, Ira

    2015-01-01

    This case study is one of five publications from the larger study, "Teaching for a Changing World: The Graduates of Bank Street College of Education." Established in 1989, Midtown West is a New York City public elementary school serving approximately 350 students from kindergarten through grade five. With the support of Tony Alvarado,…

  12. Importance of public health informatics: a survey of public health schools and graduate programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Janise

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of data, information, and informatics to public health practice. Forty public health academicians from 40 schools and graduate programs of public health were interviewed. All agreed that informatics was important to public health practice. A qualitative analysis of their comments revealed their beliefs on the importance of informatics skills and knowledge to the practice of public health. The resulting comment groups varied from "some skills are more important than others" to "need all the skills." Eight "importance" comment groups were formed: 1) skills for all professionals; 2) some skills more than others; 3) yes, they need all the skills; 4) skills to become better practitioners; 5) usefulness to practitioners; 6) communication with public; 7) they're [the public] are depending on us; and 8) the future.

  13. Passing the Totem: Successful High School Graduation of Native American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Cherie T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine obstacles Native American students, of American Indian ancestry, faced while they were attending high school and how they were able to overcome those obstacles. Eight Native American students, four male and four female, who attended schools on or near a Native American tribal reservation in Washington…

  14. Preparation for meaningful work and life: Urban high school youth’s reflections on work-based learning one year post-graduation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen E Kenny

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The challenges confronted by low-income high school students throughout school and across the transition to higher education and employment are well-documented in the United States and many other nations. Adopting a positive youth development (PYD perspective (Lerner, Almerigi, Theokas, and Lerner, 2005, this study reports findings from interviews with 18 low-income, racially and ethnically diverse graduates of an urban Catholic high school in the U.S. The interviews were designed to shed light on the post-high school experiences of urban high school graduates and to understand how students construct meaning about the value of school and work-based learning (WBL in their preparation for meaningful work and life. The interviews highlight the perceived value of the academic and noncognitive preparation students experienced through high school and WBL in relation to the challenges they encountered along the pathway to post-high school success and decent work. Overall, the findings suggest the potential of WBL for low-income youth in facilitating access to resources that build academic and psychological/noncognitive assets, while also illustrating the role of structural and contextual factors in shaping post-high school transitions and access to meaningful work and life opportunities.

  15. What Is The Role of Thesis In Dentistry? Evaluation of the View Point of Senior and Graduated Students and Supervisor Teachers of Mashhad Dental School in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samane Habibi

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the education system in the country, thesis works as a way to solve research problems and thesis presentation is based as part of the research. To improve the quality of dissertations, it is essential to have an accurate evaluation of the objectives, practical process, process and efficiency of the course by supervisors, graduates and students. The purpose of this study was evaluation of the view point of senior and graduated students and supervisor teachers of Mashhad dental school about thesis.Materials & Methods: Forty eight supervisors, 40 students and 50 graduates from Mashhad dental school participated in this cross sectional descriptive study in the year 2010. Three questionnaires, which proved to be valid and reliable, were used for data collection. Results were analyzed according to the frequency distribution of variable and average of description. Common questions were compared by Kruskal-Wallis test at a significance level of 95%.Results: The data indicated that the effect of thesis presentation on the activities leading to production and basic science and increase in professional knowledge and skills were average while it was very effective in teaching research methods. Students, graduates and supervisors together agreed on the completion of a joint research project in the early years of school and covering an education subject about thesis goals. Supervisors estimated the effect of thesis result in community to be more than that of the graduates (P=0.03. In addition, supervisors had less agreement on thesis as a voluntary course compared to students and graduates (P=0.01.Conclusion: Based on findings of this study, because of the great amount of budget and time spent on thesis, it is better to optimize the presented results and recommendations in this regard. It also seems that the greatest impact on improving the process would be created through revising the rules, creating supportive organizations actively and

  16. A study of the annealing and mechanical behaviour of electrodeposited Cu-Ni multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickup, C.J.

    1997-08-01

    The mechanical strength of electrodeposited Cu-Ni multilayers is known to vary with deposition wavelength. Since layered coatings are harder and more resistant to wear and abrasion than non-layered coatings, this technique is of industrial interest. Optimisation of the process requires a better understanding of the strengthening mechanisms and the microstructural changes which affect such mechanisms. The work presented in this thesis presents the characterisation a series of Cu-Ni multilayers, covering a wide range of thicknesses of the individual layers in the multilayer, using X-ray diffraction, cross-section TEM, hardness testing and tensile testing. Further, the effects of high temperature annealing on interdiffusion and on changes in internal stresses are documented. (au). 176 refs.

  17. An optimized interatomic potential for Cu-Ni alloys with the embedded-atom method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, Berk; Durukanoğlu, Sondan

    2014-01-22

    We have developed a semi-empirical and many-body type model potential using a modified charge density profile for Cu-Ni alloys based on the embedded-atom method (EAM) formalism with an improved optimization technique. The potential is determined by fitting to experimental and first-principles data for Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni binary compounds, such as lattice constants, cohesive energies, bulk modulus, elastic constants, diatomic bond lengths and bond energies. The generated potentials were tested by computing a variety of properties of pure elements and the alloy of Cu, Ni: the melting points, alloy mixing enthalpy, lattice specific heat, equilibrium lattice structures, vacancy formation and interstitial formation energies, and various diffusion barriers on the (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni.

  18. Differences in Graduate School Attainment Patterns across Academic Programs and Demographic Groups. A Research Report of the Minority Graduate Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Rebecca

    To identify differences in doctoral student achievement across programs, demographic groups and gender, the graduate careers of nearly 5,000 doctoral students from 11 departments at each of 3 major universities were investigated. Three types of data analysis examined numbers of students entering each department and the proportions of various…

  19. Microstructure, magnetic and elastic properties of electrodeposited Cu+Ni nanocomposites coatings

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chrobak; M. Kubisztal; J. Kubisztal; E. Chrobak; Haneczok, G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents systematic studies of fabrication and properties of Cu+Ni nanocomposite coatings obtained by electrodeposition technique. Special attention is paid to establish the influence of fabrication conditions and microstructure of the coating material on its magnetic and elastic properties. Design/methodology/approach: The results were obtained by applying electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, PARSTAT 2273, roughness factor), magnetization versus temperature measure...

  20. Atomistic study of crack propagation and dislocation emission in Cu-Ni multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clinedinst, J.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-09-01

    The authors present atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration in multilayered Cu-Ni materials. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and EAM potentials. The atomistic structure of the interface was studied first for a totally coherent structure. Cracks were simulated near a Griffith condition in different possible configurations of the crack plane and front with respect to the axis of the layers. Results show that interface effects predominantly control the mechanical behavior of the system studied.

  1. Graduate Deans and Graduate Education: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David M.; Bowker, Lee H.

    The responsibility for graduate education and the power and authority structure among graduate deans, college or school deans, departments, and faculty were studied using a sample of 338 schools. Attention was directed to the following concerns: institutional characteristics that are related to the organization and administration of graduate…

  2. Entering the (Postgraduate) Field: Underrepresented Students' Acquisition of Cultural and Social Capital in Graduate School Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle; McCoy, Dorian L.

    2016-01-01

    Examining the role of humanities graduate preparation programs in facilitating underrepresented undergraduate students' socialization to the field (social context) of graduate education, this critical multisite case study finds that these programs are crucial to bidirectional anticipatory socialization for graduate education, where one gains new…

  3. Magnetic mineralogy of the Hongqiling Cu-Ni sulphide deposit:Implications for ore genesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pyrrhotite is one of the common ore minerals in Cu-Ni sulphide deposits, but only monoclinic pyrrhotite is ferromagnetic at room temperature. X-ray and EPA analyses reveal that most pyrrhotite forming sideronitic texture in the Hongqiling Cu-Ni sulphide deposit is monoclinic, but that in the massive ore is a mixture of monoclinic and hexagonal pyrrhotites. Differential thermal and magneticthermogravimetric analyses of massive ore indicate a magnetic transition and heat absorption at 323℃, suggesting that this temperature is the thermomagnetic and phase transition point of pyrrhotite. For massive pyrrhotite ores heated at 400℃ for 30 h and then quenched by cool water, the monoclinic pyrrhotite (mpo) transforms completely into the hexagonal pyrrhotite (hpo). However, all the pyrrhotites resulting from slow cooling of the sample in air are mpo. These results indicate that transformation between hpo and mpo depends upon the cooling rate. Therefore, massive ores in this deposit might have been formed via rapid cooling of ore melts. On the other hand, it is significant to study the effect of the ratio of the magnetite in total ores on the genesis of magmatic Cu-Ni suphide deposits.

  4. Queensborough Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY) Solar and Atmospheric Research and Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantale Damas, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Queensborough Community College (QCC) of the City University of New York (CUNY), a Hispanic and minority-serving institution, is the recipient of a 2-year NSF EAGER (Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research) grant to design and implement a high-impact practice integrated research and education program in solar, geospace and atmospheric physics. Proposed is a year-long research experience with two components: 1) during the academic year, students are enrolled in a course-based introductory research (CURE) where they conduct research on real-world problems; and 2) during the summer, students are placed in research internships at partner institutions. Specific objectives include: 1) provide QCC students with research opportunities in solar and atmospheric physics as early as their first year; 2) develop educational materials in solar and atmospheric physics; 3) increase the number of students, especially underrepresented minorities, that transfer to 4-year STEM programs. A modular, interdisciplinary concept approach is used to integrate educational materials into the research experience. The project also uses evidence-based best practices (i.e., Research experience, Mentoring, Outreach, Recruitment, Enrichment and Partnership with 4-year colleges and institutions) that have proven successful at increasing the retention, transfer and graduation rates of community college students. Through a strong collaboration with CUNY’s 4-year colleges (Medgar Evers College and the City College of New York’s NOAA CREST program); Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR) at the University of Colorado, Boulder; and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), the project trains and retains underrepresented community college students in geosciences-related STEM fields. Preliminary results will be presented at this meeting.*This project is supported by the National Science Foundation Geosciences Directorate under NSF Award

  5. Reforming the 4th-Year Curriculum as a Springboard to Graduate Medical Training: One School's Experiences and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackett, Andrew; Daroowalla, Feroza; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Chandran, Latha

    2016-01-01

    Concerns regarding the quality of training in the 4th year of medical school and preparation of graduates to enter residency education persist and are borne out in the literature. We reviewed the published literature regarding Year 4 concerns as well as institutional efforts to improve the 4th-year curriculum from several schools. Based on input from key stakeholders, we established 4 goals for our Year 4 curriculum reform: (a) standardize the curricular structure, (b) allow flexibility and individualization, (c) improve the preparation for residency, and (d) improve student satisfaction. After the reform, we evaluated the outcomes using results from the Association of American Medical Colleges Questionnaire, student focus groups, and program director surveys. This article describes the context, process, and outcomes of the reform of the Year 4 curriculum at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. We were able to achieve all four stated goals for the reform. The significant components of the change included a flexible adaptable curriculum based on individual needs and preferences, standardized learning objectives across the year, standardized competency-based evaluations regardless of discipline, reinforcement of clinical skills, and training for the transition to the workplace as an intern. The reform resulted in increased student satisfaction, increased elective time, and increased preparedness for residency training as perceived by the graduates. The Program Director survey showed significant changes in ability to perform a medical history and exam, management of common medical conditions and emergencies, clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills, working and communication with the healthcare team, and overall professionalism in meeting obligations inherent in the practice of medicine. Lessons learned from our 4th-year reform process are discussed. Listening to the needs of the stakeholders was an important step in ensuring buy-in, having an institutional

  6. Evaluation of student outcomes in online vs. campus biostatistics education in a graduate school of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGready, John; Brookmeyer, Ron

    2013-02-01

    To compare student outcomes between concurrent online and on-campus sections of an introductory biostatistics course offered at a United States school of public health in 2005. Enrolled students (95 online, 92 on-campus) were invited to participate in a confidential online survey. The course outcomes were compared between the two sections adjusting for differences in student characteristics. Seventy-two online (76%) and 66 (72%) on-campus enrollees participated. Unadjusted final exam scores for the online and on-campus sections were respectively 85.1 and 86.3 (p=0.50) in term 1, and 87.8 and 86.8 (p=0.51) in term 2. After adjustment for student characteristics, the average difference in scores between the two sections was -1.5 (95% CI: -5.4, 2.5) in term 1, and 0.8 (95% CI: -2.7, 4.3) in term 2. The results demonstrate that online and on-campus course formats of an introductory biostatistics course in a graduate school of public health can achieve similar student outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dissolution and Interfacial Reactions of (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 Intermetallic Compound in Molten Sn-Cu-Ni Solders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-hong; Lai, Wei-han; Chen, Sinn-wen

    2014-01-01

    (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 is an important intermetallic compound (IMC) in lead-free Sn-Ag-Cu solder joints on Ni substrate. The formation, growth, and microstructural evolution of (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 are closely correlated with the concentrations of Cu and Ni in the solder. This study reports the interfacial behaviors of (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 IMC (Sn-31 at.%Cu-24 at.%Ni) with various Sn-Cu, Sn-Ni, and Sn-Cu-Ni solders at 250°C. The (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 substrate remained intact for Sn-0.7 wt.%Cu solder. When the Cu concentration was decreased to 0.3 wt.%, (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 significantly dissolved into the molten solder. Moreover, (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 dissolution and (Ni,Cu)3Sn4 formation occurred simultaneously for the Sn-0.1 wt.%Ni solder. In Sn-0.5 wt.%Cu-0.2 wt.%Ni solder, many tiny (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 particulates were formed and dispersed in the solder matrix, while in Sn-0.3 wt.%Cu-0.2 wt.%Ni a lot of (Ni,Cu)3Sn4 grains were produced. Based on the local equilibrium hypothesis, these results are further discussed based on the liquid-(Cu, Ni)6Sn5-(Ni,Cu)3Sn4 tie-triangle, and the liquid apex is suggested to be very close to Sn-0.4 wt.%Cu-0.2 wt.%Ni.

  8. Observed Emotional and Behavioral Indicators of Motivation Predict School Readiness in Head Start Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhenke, Amanda; Miller, Alison L.; Brown, Eleanor; Seifer, Ronald; Dickstein, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Emotions and behaviors observed during challenging tasks are hypothesized to be valuable indicators of young children's motivation, the assessment of which may be particularly important for children at risk for school failure. The current study demonstrated reliability and concurrent validity of a new observational assessment of motivation in…

  9. Undergraduate Student Preferences for Graduate Training in Psychology: Implications for School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinnett, Terry A.; Bui, Levita; Capaccioli, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    There continues to be a critical shortage of school psychologist practitioners and academicians. Undergraduate students in psychology, education, and other majors (N = 674) from a large comprehensive university in the southwest completed an examiner-made web-based questionnaire designed to assess their attitudes and preferences for choosing…

  10. A Public Relations Nightmare: ACLU Class Action Lawsuit Exposes Inaccurate and Inequitable High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Terri N.; Brown, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Florida's decision to equate a GED to a high school diploma undermines the attempt of No Child Left Behind to close the achievement gap, while infringing on the public's trust. Public trust fosters a culture of systemic equity and social justice, which are necessary for academic excellence (Byrk & Schneider, 2003). Florida's code of ethics for…

  11. Who Knows What School Leavers and Graduates Are Doing? Comparing Information Systems within Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordosy, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Many current national and institutional education policies address the issue of raising participation amongst young people and enhancing employability after leaving school or university. What sort of information are these policies built on? This paper compares national information systems from the last three decades across Europe that gather…

  12. Building Bonds to High School Graduation: Dropout Intervention with Seventh and Eighth Graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A principal at a Lowell (Massachusetts) school collaborated with the University of Massachusetts-Lowell to develop a dropout intervention program for seventh and eighth grade students. Small classes met alternate Saturday mornings at the university. Additional field trips and two overnight weekends helped strengthen the bond between students and…

  13. Evaluating the spoken English proficiency of graduates of foreign medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, J R; van Zanten, M; McKinley, D W; Gary, N E

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather additional evidence for the validity and reliability of spoken English proficiency ratings provided by trained standardized patients (SPs) in high-stakes clinical skills examination. Over 2500 candidates who took the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates' (ECFMG) Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA) were studied. The CSA consists of 10 or 11 timed clinical encounters. Standardized patients evaluate spoken English proficiency and interpersonal skills in every encounter. Generalizability theory was used to estimate the consistency of spoken English ratings. Validity coefficients were calculated by correlating summary English ratings with CSA scores and other external criterion measures. Mean spoken English ratings were also compared by various candidate background variables. The reliability of the spoken English ratings, based on 10 independent evaluations, was high. The magnitudes of the associated variance components indicated that the evaluation of a candidate's spoken English proficiency is unlikely to be affected by the choice of cases or SPs used in a given assessment. Proficiency in spoken English was related to native language (English versus other) and scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The pattern of the relationships, both within assessment components and with external criterion measures, suggests that valid measures of spoken English proficiency are obtained. This result, combined with the high reproducibility of the ratings over encounters and SPs, supports the use of trained SPs to measure spoken English skills in a simulated medical environment.

  14. The Graduates 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Armstrong, David F.

    A followup survey to determine the present circumstances of 1976 graduates and their attitudes toward their educational experiences resulted in the following findings: (1) almost equal numbers were employed as were in school; (2) of those in school, the majority were enrolled at the University of Maryland; (3) of those employed, most were earning…

  15. Problems and Countermeasures of Graduates Employment in Technical Schools%技工院校毕业生就业的问题及其对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭伟才

    2011-01-01

    In the beginning, this article analyzes the status of graduate-settlement and the problem of job-hunter guide in technical school, it presents the conflict between high studentdisposable employment-rate and low matching-rate of graduate to job-vacancy, and then it discusses how to guide graduates to match job-vacancy, finally, it shows us the method how to solve problem about jobhunter and market-vacancy, issues job-hunter countermeasure of "four-ruler" to the job-hunter guide. In fact, it will do a good job to the job-hunter department of technical school and graduates in the future.%本文就目前技工院校的毕业生就业现状和毕业指导工作存在的问题进行了研究,指出了高就业率和低人-岗适配性的市场矛盾,并对就业指导工作深入展开讨论,给出解决市场矛盾的方式和方法,提出了就业指导工作的"四化"原则,为今后技工院校进一步做好毕业生就业指导工作有一定的指导意义。

  16. Professionalism perspectives among medical students of a novel medical graduate school in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Haque M; Zulkifli Z; Haque SZ; Kamal ZM; Salam A; Bhagat V; Alattraqchi AG; Rahman NIA

    2016-01-01

    Mainul Haque,1 Zainal Zulkifli,2 Seraj Zohurul Haque,3 Zubair M Kamal,4 Abdus Salam,5 Vidya Bhagat,2 Ahmed Ghazi Alattraqchi,2 Nor Iza A Rahman2 1Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Jalan Sultan Mahmud, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia; 3School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Ninewells H...

  17. Remaking of an American icon: an NPS Graduate School case competition

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Kyle B.; Burkett, Rex D.; Margolies, Joseph; Smith, Wade; Wolf, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    MBA Professional Report The purpose of this MBA Project was to provide a creative marketing overview of ideas for launching the 2008 Cadillac CTS Sedan into a non-traditional target market, e.g., perpetual strivers and move-ups. The project included a national case competition among business school student teams, including compressing a communications plan into a 30-slide deliverable. Data collection included comparison literature reviews, male and female focus groups, a researchers-d...

  18. Influence of preparation method on supported Cu-Ni alloys and their catalytic properties in high pressure CO hydrogenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Eriksen, Winnie L.; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard

    2014-01-01

    to impregnation, the coprecipitation and deposition-coprecipitation methods are more efficient for preparation of small and homogeneous Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticles. In order to examine the stability of Cu-Ni alloys in high pressure synthesis gas conversion, they have been tested for high pressure CO hydrogenation......Silica supported Cu-Ni (20 wt% Cu + Ni on silica, molar ratio of Cu/Ni = 2) alloys are prepared via impregnation, coprecipitation, and deposition- coprecipitation methods. The approach to co-precipitate the SiO2 from Na2SiO3 together with metal precursors is found to be an efficient way to prepare...... high surface area silica supported catalysts (BET surface area up to 322 m2 g-1, and metal area calculated from X-ray diffraction particle size up to 29 m2 g-1). The formation of bimetallic Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticles has been studied during reduction using in situ X-ray diffraction. Compared...

  19. A guide to writing a scientific paper: a focus on high school through graduate level student research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbach, Renee A; Petering, David H; Berg, Craig A; Tomasiewicz, Henry; Weber, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    This article presents a detailed guide for high school through graduate level instructors that leads students to write effective and well-organized scientific papers. Interesting research emerges from the ability to ask questions, define problems, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and make critical connections. This process is incomplete, unless new results are communicated to others because science fundamentally requires peer review and criticism to validate or discard proposed new knowledge. Thus, a concise and clearly written research paper is a critical step in the scientific process and is important for young researchers as they are mastering how to express scientific concepts and understanding. Moreover, learning to write a research paper provides a tool to improve science literacy as indicated in the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards (1996), and A Framework for K-12 Science Education (2011), the underlying foundation for the Next Generation Science Standards currently being developed. Background information explains the importance of peer review and communicating results, along with details of each critical component, the Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion. Specific steps essential to helping students write clear and coherent research papers that follow a logical format, use effective communication, and develop scientific inquiry are described.

  20. Adolescent cannabis use, change in neurocognitive function, and high-school graduation: A longitudinal study from early adolescence to young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Parent, Sophie; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E; Séguin, Jean R

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of this prospective longitudinal study was to investigate bidirectional associations between adolescent cannabis use (CU) and neurocognitive performance in a community sample of 294 young men from ages 13 to 20 years. The results showed that in early adolescence, and prior to initiation to CU, poor short-term and working memory, but high verbal IQ, were associated with earlier age of onset of CU. In turn, age of CU onset and CU frequency across adolescence were associated with (a) specific neurocognitive decline in verbal IQ and executive function tasks tapping trial and error learning and reward processing by early adulthood and (b) lower rates of high-school graduation. The association between CU onset and change in neurocognitive function, however, was found to be accounted for by CU frequency. Whereas the link between CU frequency across adolescence and change in verbal IQ was explained (mediated) by high school graduation, the link between CU frequency and tasks tapping trial and error learning were independent from high school graduation, concurrent cannabis and other substance use, adolescent alcohol use, and externalizing behaviors. Findings support prevention efforts aimed at delaying onset and reducing frequency of CU.

  1. An Analysis of Marine Corps Delayed Entry Program (DEP) Attrition by High School Graduates and High School Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Turkey 12. Jandarma Genel Komutanlığı Personel Başkanlığı Bakanlıklar Ankara Turkey 90 13. Jandarma Okullar Komutanlığı Beytepe Ankara ...California 8. Kathryn Kocher Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 9. Genelkurmay Personel Başkanlığı Bakanklıklar Ankara Turkey 10...Milli Savunma Bakanligi ASAL Daire Başkanlığı Bakanlıklar Ankara Turkey 11. Jandarma Genel Komutanlığı Harekat Başkanlığı Bakanlıklar Ankara

  2. [Evaluations and examinations at the Tromsø medical school. Evaluation by students after graduation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollan, A; Magnus, J H

    1993-01-10

    The medical curriculum at the University of Tromsø is based on an organ-system model with full integration of the three main disciplines (basic science, clinical and community medicine). There are only three examinations during the six-year course. We present the results of a survey among the first 417 physicians educated at the Medical School in Tromsø. A mailed questionnaire was answered by 84.2%. More than 80% stated that it was of great importance to evaluate the form and contents of the lectures and their supervisors' teaching abilities. More than 96% found that integration of the examinations was achieved in accordance with the intention. Furthermore, the examinations were also relevant for them as physicians.

  3. Evidence Suggesting We Should Admit Students Who Score Extremely Low on GRE Subtests or the GMAT to Graduate School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micceri, Ted

    2002-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether GRE subscores (or GMAT) could predict graduation rates in related areas (math-oriented majors for GRE quantitative, etc.) in a sample of over 9,000 graduate students at a major public research university. Because few low quantitative scores were present in math-oriented majors, an attempt was made to…

  4. Relationships between Geographic Origins, Externship Placement, and Practice Location Subsequent to Graduation of UMKC School of Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Daniel U.; Mares, Kenneth R.

    The relationships among geographic origins, externship placement, and post-graduation practice location of University of Missouri Kansas City (UMKC) 1977-79 pharmacy graduates were studied. The aim was to help select, prepare, and encourage students to locate in underserved communities. It is assumed the data can help decide whether to retain,…

  5. Cu-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: structure, stability, electronic, and magnetic properties: a spin-polarized density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wang, Xinyan; Liu, Jianlan; Yang, Yanhui

    2017-02-01

    Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) have attracted great interest not only because of their superior stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity but also due to their tunable properties achieved by changing the morphology, sequence, and sizes of both core and shell. In this study, the structure, stability, charge transfer, electronic, and magnetic properties of 13-atom and 55-atom Cu and Cu-Ni CSNPs were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that Ni@Cu CSNPs with a Cu surface shell are more energetically favorable than Cu@Ni CSNPs with a Ni surface shell. Interestingly, three-shell Ni@Cu12@Ni42 is more stable than two-shell Cu13@Ni42, while two-shell Ni13@Cu42 is more stable than three-shell Cu@Ni12@Cu42. Analysis of Bader charge illustrates that the charge transfer increases from Cu core to Ni shell in Cu@Ni NPs, while it decreases from Ni core to Cu shell in Ni@Cu NPs. Furthermore, the charge transfer results that d-band states have larger shift toward the Fermi level for the Ni@Cu CSNPs with Cu surface shell, while the Cu@Ni CSNPs with Ni surface shell have similar d-band state curves and d-band centers with the monometallic Ni NPs. In addition, the Cu-Ni CSNPs possess higher magnetic moment when the Ni atoms aggregated at core region of CSNPs, while having lower magnetic moment when the Ni atoms segregate on surface region. The change of the Cu atom location in CSNPs has a weak effect on the total magnetic moment. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic core-shell catalysts.

  6. Magmatic Conduit Metallogenic System in Jinchuan Cu-Ni (PGE) Sulfide Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, S.; Tang, Z.; Zhou, M.; Song, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Jinchuan Cu-Ni (PGE) sulfide deposit is located in the southwestern margin of North China Craton. Jinchuan ultramafic intrusion hosts the third largest magmatic Cu-Ni deposit in the world. There are mainly four orebodies, namely, orebody-58, orebody-24, orebody-1, and orebody-2, respectively from west to east in the deposit. The primary characteristics of Jinchuan Cu-Ni sulfide deposit are the following: (1) There is an obvious boundary between orebodys and country rocks, usually orebodys intruded into country rocks. (2) "sulfide melts" migrate and settle in the later stage of magma evolution. (3) Fluid Minerals Assemblages are found in the sulfide ores, there is Phl+Cc+Pn+Ccp+Po in orebody-2; Phl+Dol+AP+Pn+Ccp+Po in orebody-24; Q+Mag+AP+Pn+Ccp+Po in orebody-58. (4) Massive sulfides mainly occur in orebody-2, and its PGE content is very rare. Pt-Pd enrichment zones mainly occur in orebody-1; orebody-24 and orebody-58. Ir vs. Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd show positive relationship in orebody-2, but Ir vs. Ru, Rh show positive relationship, Ir vs. Pt, Pd exhibit negative relationship in orebody-1, orebody-24 and orebody-58. The modeling of Ir-Pd shows that the massive sulfide in orebody-2 maybe the origin of MSS. Pt-Pd enrichment zones in orebody-1 orebody-24 and orebody-58 are the relic liquid of monosulfide solid solution segregation; (5) Cu/Ni value is 1.24 in orebody-58, 1.56 in orebody-24, 1.83 in orebody-1, and 2.06 in orebody-2. These features imply that (1) "ore magma" or "melt-fluid bearing metal" formed in the staging chamber in depth; (2) "ore magma" might contain a lot of fluids; (3) "melt-fluid bearing metal" flow moves as a whole; (4) The moving direction of melt-fluid bearing metal flow is form west to east. The ores are enriched in Ni in the front, and enriched in Cu, Pt, Pd in the back of Jinchuan Magmatic Conduit Metallogenic System.

  7. Local radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia using CuNi nanoparticles with therapeutically suitable Curie temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Leontiev, Vladimir G. [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Brukvin, Vladimir A. [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Vorozhtsov, Georgy N. [NIOPIK Organic Intermediates and Dyes Institute, Moscow 103787 (Russian Federation); Kogan, Boris Ya. [NIOPIK Organic Intermediates and Dyes Institute, Moscow 103787 (Russian Federation); Shlyakhtin, Oleg A. [Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Yunin, Alexander M. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Tsybin, Oleg I. [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Oleg A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: kuznetsov_oa@yahoo.com

    2007-04-15

    Copper-nickel (CuNi) alloy nanoparticles with Curie temperatures (T{sub c}) from 40 to 60{sup o}C were synthesized by several techniques. Varying the synthesis parameters and post-treatment, as well as separations by size and T{sub c}, allow producing mediator nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia with parametric feedback temperature control with desired parameters. In vitro and in vivo animal experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of the temperature-controlled heating of the tissue, laden with the particles, by an external alternating magnetic field.

  8. Vocational Indecision in College Graduates. Educational Assessment Center Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunneborg, Patricia W.

    This study compared 127 vocationally undecided college graduates matched by sex, age, and major with graduates who had selected an occupation on a Survey of Graduating Seniors. Undecideds had a significantly lower GPA than decideds, intended noncareer activities following graduation, less often were going to graduate school, and were far less…

  9. Professionalism perspectives among medical students of a novel medical graduate school in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mainul Haque,1 Zainal Zulkifli,2 Seraj Zohurul Haque,3 Zubair M Kamal,4 Abdus Salam,5 Vidya Bhagat,2 Ahmed Ghazi Alattraqchi,2 Nor Iza A Rahman2 1Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Jalan Sultan Mahmud, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia; 3School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, Dundee, UK; 4Sleep Research Unit, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Department of Medical Education, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: Defining professionalism in this constantly evolving world is not easy. How do you measure degrees of benevolence and compassion? If it is so obvious to our profession, what professionalism is, then why is it so difficult to teach it to medical students and residents? Today’s definition of medical professionalism is evolving – from autonomy to accountability, from expert opinion to evidence-based medicine, and from self-interest to teamwork and shared responsibility. However, medical professionalism is defined as the basis for the trust in the patient–physician relationship, caring and compassion, insight, openness, respect for patient dignity, confidentiality, autonomy, presence, altruism, and those qualities that lead to trust-competence, integrity, honesty, morality, and ethical conduct. The purpose of this study is to explore professionalism in terms of its fundamental elements among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA. This was a cross-sectional study carried out on medical students of UniSZA. The study population included preclinical and clinical medical students of UniSZA from Year I to Year V of academic session 2014/2015. The simple random sampling technique was used to select the sample. Data were

  10. Factors associated with physicians' choice of a career in research: a retrospective report 15 years after medical school graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupat, Edward; Camargo, Carlos A; Strewler, Gordon J; Espinola, Janice A; Fleenor, Thomas J; Dienstag, Jules L

    2017-03-01

    Relatively little is known regarding factors associated with the choice of a research career among practicing physicians, and most investigations of this issue have been conducted in the absence of a theoretical/conceptual model. Therefore we designed a survey to identify the determinants of decisions to pursue a biomedical research career based upon the Theory of Planned Behavior and the concept of stereotype threat. From October 2012 through January 2014 electronic surveys were sent to four consecutive Harvard Medical School graduating classes, 1996-1999. Respondents provided demographic information, indicated their current research involvement, and provided retrospective reports of their experiences and attitudes when they were making career choices as they completed medical school. Multivariable ordinal regression was used to identify factors independently associated with current research involvement. Completed questionnaires were received from 358 respondents (response rate 65 %). In unadjusted analyses, variables associated with more extensive research involvement included non-minority status, male gender, lower debt at graduation, strong attitudes toward research at time of graduation, and greater social pressures to pursue research (all P career for women (OR 2.53, 95 % CI 1.00-6.40; P = 0.05). Most of the factors predicting research career choice involve factors that are potentially modifiable, suggesting that appropriately designed behavioral interventions may help to expand the size and diversity of the biomedical research community.

  11. [Internet addiction among graduates of general secondary schools in Cracow and its correlation with body mass index and other health problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Średniawa, Anna; Jarczewska, Dorota Łucja; Żabicka, Katarzyna; Ulman, Magdalena; Pilarska, Anna; Tomasik, Tomasz; Windak, Adam

    2015-07-01

    Studies find increasing trend among children, adolescents and young adults to spend excessive amounts of time surfing in the Internet. Another serious problem is the increasing proportion of young people who are overweight and obese. There are only few papers trying to correlate these two trends. The aims of the study were as follows: identification the extent of Internet addiction among students of Krakow's secondary schools and its correlation with BMI and other health problems. Cross-sectional study among 200 pupils of randomly selected Krakow's high schools was conducted. Internet addiction was evaluated by using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) by Kimberly Young. Each participant filled in an authors' questionnaire about his/her basic social and medical information. For each participant BMI was calculated. It was found that 7% of study group was addicted to the Internet (above 49 points in the IAT questionnaire). Internet addicts had higher BMI. The study revealed also several statistically significant relationships between the level of Internet addiction and the time spent online, BMI, back pain, headache. There is a modest percentage of people addicted to the Internet in the population of high school graduates, but these people often complain of back pain and headaches. BMI is higher among addicted youths. The time spent by high school graduates on online activity is far beyond the time devoted to physical activity. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  12. A synergistic effort among geoscience, physics, computer science and mathematics at Hunter College of CUNY as a Catalyst for educating Earth scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmun, H.; Buonaiuto, F. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Catalyst Scholarship Program at Hunter College of The City University of New York (CUNY) was established with a four-year award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund scholarships for academically talented but financially disadvantaged students majoring in four disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Led by Earth scientists the Program awarded scholarships to students in their junior or senior years majoring in computer science, geosciences, mathematics and physics to create two cohorts of students that spent a total of four semesters in an interdisciplinary community. The program included mentoring of undergraduate students by faculty and graduate students (peer-mentoring), a sequence of three semesters of a one-credit seminar course and opportunities to engage in research activities, research seminars and other enriching academic experiences. Faculty and peer-mentoring were integrated into all parts of the scholarship activities. The one-credit seminar course, although designed to expose scholars to the diversity STEM disciplines and to highlight research options and careers in these disciplines, was thematically focused on geoscience, specifically on ocean and atmospheric science. The program resulted in increased retention rates relative to institutional averages. In this presentation we will discuss the process of establishing the program, from the original plans to its implementation, as well as the impact of this multidisciplinary approach to geoscience education at our institution and beyond. An overview of accomplishments, lessons learned and potential for best practices will be presented.

  13. Effect of Microstructure and Sulfide on Corrosion of Cu-Ni Alloys in Seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The microstructure and the corrosion product films have been investigated on Cu-Ni alloys by TEM, SEM, AES and electrochemical technique as well as natural seawater exposure tests. Experimental results showed that the alloys had two kinds of microstructure, I.e. Recrystallization and incomplete recrystallization. In synthetic seawater containing 2×10-6 S2-, the stability of the alloy increased with the increase of deformation and annealing temperature, I.e., the degree of recrystallization. After exposure to natural seawater for different periods of time, the corrosion product films of the recrystallized alloy were rich in Ni and compact, and there were cracks in the outer layer which contained a small amount of S; the films of the alloy of incomplete recrystallization became thick, loose and porous, and obviously of layered structure. And the intergranular corrosion took place in the underlying substrate. Besides, a great amount of seawater substance existed in the outer layer and some sulfur was found within the grain boundaries that prefer to corrode. The accelerating effect of sulfides in corrosion of Cu-Ni alloys in seawater is attributed to the coexistence and absorption of sulfides and carbides promoting the preference of corrosion where they absorb, and the formation of dissolvable Cu2S results in keeping the surface of the alloys in the active state.

  14. Solution-Based Epitaxial Growth of Magnetically Responsive Cu@Ni Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Shengmao

    2010-02-23

    An experiment was conducted to show the solution-based epitaxial growth of magnetically responsive Cu@Ni nanowires. The Ni-sheathed Cu nanowires were synthesized with a one-pot approach. 30 mL of high concentration NaOH, Cu(NO3)2. 3H2O, Cu(NO3)2. 3H2O and 0.07-0.30 mL of Ni(NO3)2. 6H 2O aqueous solutions were added into a plastic reactor with a capacity of 50.0 mL. A varying amount of ethylenediamine (EDA) and hydrazine were also added sequentially, followed by thorough mixing of all reagents. The dimension, morphology, and chemical composition of the products were examined with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The XPS analysis on the as formed Cu nanowires confirms that there is indeed no nickel inclusion in the nanowires prior to the formation of nickel overcoat, which rules out the possibility of Cu-Ni alloy formation.

  15. Two-phase equilibrium states in individual Cu-Ni nanoparticles: size, depletion and hysteresis effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirinyan, Aram S

    2015-01-01

    In isolated bimetallic nanoscale systems the limit amount of matter and surface-induced size effects can change the thermodynamics of first-order phase transformation. In this paper we present theoretical modification of Gibbs free energy concept describing first-order phase transformation of binary alloyed nanoparticles taking into account size effects as well as depletion and hysteresis effects. In such a way the hysteresis in a form of nonsymmetry for forth and back transforming paths takes place; compositional splitting and the loops-like splitted path on the size dependent temperature-composition phase diagram occur. Our calculations for individual Cu-Ni nanoparticle show that one must differentiate the solubility curves and the equilibrium loops (discussed here in term of solidification and melting loops). For the first time we have calculated and present here on the temperature-composition phase diagram the nanomelting loop at the size of 80 nm and the nanosolidification loop at the size of 25 nm for an individual Cu-Ni nanoparticle. So we observe the difference between the size-dependent phase diagram and solubility diagram, between two-phase equilibrium curves and solubility curves; also intersection of nanoliquidus and nanosolidus is available. These findings lead to the necessity to reconsider such basic concepts in materials science as phase diagram and solubility diagram.

  16. Graduate Opportunities for Black Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Julie, Ed.

    This document catalogues graduate opportunities specifically for black students in 1969-70 at 42 universities, 96 additional graduate departments (social sciences, natural sciences, mathematics, and humanities), and 111 additional professional schools (particularly social work, education, law, medicine, theology, business, and library science).…

  17. Factors Influencing Medical School Graduates Toward a Career in Psychiatry: Analysis from the 2011-2013 Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbanks, Lindsey; Spollen, John; Messias, Erick

    2016-04-01

    Various factors influence choice of medical specialty. Previous research grouped specialties into controllable lifestyle, primary care, and surgical. This study compared factors influencing individuals to choose psychiatry versus other specialties. Data came from the 2011-2013 Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire. The authors grouped responses, ranging from no influence to minor, moderate, and strong influence, into psychiatry and controllable lifestyle, primary care, and surgical specialties and analyzed the data using one-way analysis of variance. The analyses included 29,227 students, of which 1329 (4.5%) elected psychiatry; 10,998 (37.6%), controllable lifestyle specialties; 12,320 (42.2%), primary care specialties; and 4580 (15.7%), surgical specialties. Students choosing psychiatry reported less influence of competitiveness, student debt, and salary expectations than those choosing controllable lifestyle and surgical specialties (p personality than controllable lifestyle, primary care, and surgical specialties (p < 0.004). Students entering psychiatry do not fit the traditional categories of controllable lifestyle, primary care, and surgical profiles, but fall between controllable lifestyle and primary care specialties. Recruitment efforts may need to address this different pattern of influences.

  18. The Impact of Low, Moderate, and High Military Family Mobility School District Transfer Rates on Graduating Senior High School Dependents' Achievement and School Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, Jeffrey K.

    2012-01-01

    The results of this study suggest that there were no significant differences in the academic performance of military dependents' with low (n = 20), moderate (n = 20), and high (n = 20) mobility school district transfer rates compared to non-military control students (n = 20) before completing high school. The findings were not consistent with…

  19. Wetting Behavior and Interfacial Reactions in (Sn-9Zn)-2Cu/Ni Joints during Soldering and Isothermal Aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhao; Haitao Ma; Haiping Xie; Lai Wang

    2009-01-01

    The wetting property of (Sn-9Zn)-2Cu (wt pct) on Ni substrate and the evolution of interfacial microstructure in (Sn-9Zn)-2Cu/Ni joints during soldering as well as isothermal aging were studied.The wetting ability of eutectic Sn-9Zn solder on Ni substrate was markedly improved by adding 2 wt pct Cu into this solder alloy.Plate-like Cu5Zn8 intermetallic compounds (IMCs) were detected in (Sn-9Zn)-2Cu solder matrix.A continuous Ni5Zn21 IMC layer was formed at (Sn-9Zn)-2Cu/Ni interface after soldering.This IMC layer kept its type and integrality even after aging at 170℃ for up to 1000 h.At the early aging stage (before 500 h), the IMC layer grew fast and its thickness followed a linear relationship with the square root of aging time.Thereafter,however, the thickness increased very slowly with longer aging time.When the joints were aged for 1000 h,a new IMC phase, (Cu,Ni)5Zn8, was found in the matrix near the interface.The formation of (Cu,Ni)5Zn8phase can be attributed to the diffusion of Ni atoms into the solder matrix from the substrate.

  20. Graduate Education's Trying Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As more and more people in China attend graduate schools, experts are raising questions about the quality of the education students receive, and some view the outlook as relatively bleak unless major changes are made. At the National Association for the Study of Higher Education's 2005 annual meeting in November at Shanghai Jiao Tong University (Xuhui campus), a task force led by Yang Jie,

  1. 38 CFR 21.4273 - Collegiate graduate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the provisions of § 21.4272 or the graduate school's assessment of training time, whichever will... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Collegiate graduate. 21... Pursuit of Courses § 21.4273 Collegiate graduate. (a) In residence. (1) The Department of Veterans...

  2. Undergraduate Psychology Courses Preferred by Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Timothy J.; Reisinger, Debra L.; Jordan-Fleming, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    Information about the undergraduate psychology courses preferred by graduate programs is useful for a number of purposes, including (a) advising psychology majors who are interested in graduate school, (b) undergraduate curriculum planning, and (c) examining whether graduate programs' preferences reflect national guidelines for the undergraduate…

  3. An investigation on supercooling directional solidification process of Cu-Ni single phase alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Supercooling directional solidification (SDS) is put forward by combination of melt supercooling and conventional solidification by application of supercooling inheritance. On the self-designed SDS equipment, SDS of Cu-Ni alloy was achieved successfully. The results are as follows: (ⅰ) The primary arm spacing is about 30 m m, the growth of secondary arms are strongly suppressed. The primary arm spacing is nearly the same as LMC method (GL=25 K/mm, V=500 m m/s), the primary stems are straight, fine and completed, with an inclination angle of about 5.8o. (ⅱ) A semi-quantitative T-T model is brought forward to describe the dendrite growth rate V vs. undercooling D T. The prediction of T-T model agrees well with experimental results. The formation of fine equiaxed dendrites, transition region and dendrite region can be explained successfully by D T-V-x relation of T-T model.

  4. The Effectiveness of the Community Medicine Undergraduate Program in Medical Schools on Enabling Medical Graduates to Work in the Health Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jabbari Bayrami

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The main mission of medical schools is to train competent medical trainees for providing primary health care services, management of health care team and improving the health status of the population. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the undergraduate program of community medicine department among the graduates as general (family physicians in health system of East Azerbaijan, North-West of` Iran. Methods: In this cross- sectional study all family physicians of East Azerbaijan province were included. A questionnaire on the views of graduates about the effectiveness of community medicine undergraduate program was used for gathering data. Data were analyzed by T-test, ANOVA, and Pearson correlation. Results: Performance of community medicine department in creating competency for providing effective health services among physicians was 2.13 and management competency was 1.96 out of 4. To teach the necessary skills to meet the professional needs in Primary Health Care (PHC, Tabriz Community Medicine Department was better compared to Azad and other medical schools (p<0.001. Conclusions: The results of the study showed that the community medicine program in undergraduate medical education was effective for future career of physicians in the health system. There is a need to revise the health management courses in community medicine program.

  5. A Checklist to Guide Graduate Students' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Janet S.; Range, Lillian M.; Ross, Melynda Burck

    2012-01-01

    Many graduate students are poor writers because graduate school demands higher quality and more variety of writing skills than undergraduate school, most students write without revision under heavy time pressures, and instructors often lack the time to guide them toward good writing. Helping students improve could happen in different ways. A…

  6. The Impact of Motivational Interviewing Feedback and Coaching on School Counseling Graduate Students' Motivational Interviewing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Donaldson, Carla

    2012-01-01

    School counselors have potential to make significant gains in closing the achievement gap for all students as advocated for by the American School Counseling Association. School counseling is moving away from the no-model model of services delivery that places counselors at the whim of principals, parents and teachers who traditionally define…

  7. Where You Come from or Where You Go? Distinguishing between School Quality and the Effectiveness of Teacher Preparation Program Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaly, Kata; McCaffrey, Daniel; Sass, Tim R.; Lockwood, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the challenges and implications of controlling for school contextual bias when modeling teacher preparation program effects. Because teachers are not randomly distributed across schools, failing to account for contextual factors in achievement models could bias preparation program estimates. Including school fixed effects controls for…

  8. Molecular Dynamics Study on Interfacial Energy and Atomic Structure of Ag/Ni and Cu/Ni Heterophase System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haijiang LIU; Shaoqing WANG; An DU; Caibei ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the interfacial energies and atomic structures of Ag/Ni and Cu/Ni interaces are presented. Calculation on Ag/Ni interfaces with low-index planes shows that those containing the (111) plane have the lowest energies, which is in agreement with the experiments. Comparing surface energy with interracial energy, it is found the order of the interfacial energies of Ag/Ni and Cu/Ni containing the planes fall in the same order as solid-vapor surface energies of Ag, Cu and Ni. In this MD simulation, the relaxed atomic structure and dislocation network of (110)Ag||(110)Ni interface are coincident to HREM observations.

  9. [Graduate Program on Physiological Sciences of the School of Medicine of the Central University of Venezuela: XXV years of history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte-Sucre, A; Torrealba, A T; González, E

    1999-01-01

    The Graduate Program of Physiological Sciences, the first Master's and Doctor degrees of the Faculty of Medicine from the Central University of Venezuela reached its XXV anniversary in 1998. These pages are devoted to describe and analyze the main subjects related to its growth and its pioneer role on the development of the 4th level studies in the Faculty of Medicine. Also, we discuss in these pages the plans for the future of this program.

  10. Online Teaching and Learning at the Graduate School Level: Student Perceptions on Discussion Boards v. Synchronous Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N. Amos Sr.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a group of graduate students and their previous experiences with online education, various teaching and learning online tools, and their perceptions on the effectiveness of these tools as it relates to their learning, interpersonal skills and communication. This paper presents the graduate student's self-reported educational experience at a regional state university in the southeast United States in a 100% online Master's Degree program. The data was collected through the use of a 28 open-ended question survey, which was completed by a group of 127 graduate students and the findings produced six main findings, which were: 1 The respondents indicated at a high percentage (85% a high level (level 4, 5 and 6 of technology use and understanding. 2 The majority of the respondents (97% indicated they preferred live synchronous sessions rather than discussion boards for learning content and communication. 3 The majority of the respondents (72% indicated that when choosing future courses, the inclusion of discussion boards in a course was not important (34% or somewhat unimportant (38%. 4 100% of the respondents indicated that Live Elluminate Sessions were Highly Effective (65% or Somewhat Effective (35%, as it pertained to understanding the content. 5 Respondents indicated that 59% (12% Highly Effective, 47% Somewhat Effective of the respondents indicated discussion boards as an impactful way of learning content at the graduate level. It also shows that 41% (22% Somewhat Ineffective, 19% Not Effective. This study helps universities identify the importance of synchronous learning in a digital format when delivering online teaching and learning. There is a clear change in the needs of students enrolled in 100% online courses, which will force university faculty to increase the synchronous interaction between them and their students and between the students and their peers. Keywords: Synchronous learning, discussion boards, Blackboard

  11. Self-consistent electronic structure and segregation profiles of the Cu-Ni (001) random-alloy surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Abrikosov, I. A.; Kats, D. Ya.

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the electronic structure and segregation profiles of the (001) surface of random Cu-Ni alloys with varying bulk concentrations by means of the coherent potential approximation and the linear muffin-tin-orbitals method. Exchange and correlation were included within the local-den...... to be oscillatory with a strong preference for Cu to segregate towards the surface of the alloy....

  12. Typical failures of CuNi 90/10 seawater tubing systems and how to avoid them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, Wilhelm [Technical Advisory Service, KM Europa Metal AG, Klosterstr. 29, 49074 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    For many decades, copper-nickel alloy CuNi 90/10 (UNS C70600) has extensively been used as a piping material for seawater systems in shipbuilding, offshore, and desalination industries. Attractive characteristics of this alloy combine excellent resistance to uniform corrosion, remarkable resistance to localised corrosion in chlorinated seawater, and higher erosion resistance than other copper alloys and steel. Furthermore, CuNi 90/10 is resistant to biofouling providing various economic benefits. In spite of the appropriate properties of the alloy, instances of failure have been experienced in practice. The reasons are mostly attributed to the composition and production of CuNi 90/10 products compounds, occurrence of erosion-corrosion and corrosion damage in polluted waters. This paper covers important areas which have to be considered to ensure successful application of the alloy for seawater tubing. For this purpose, the optimum and critical operating conditions are evaluated. It includes metallurgical, design and fabrication considerations. For the prevention of erosion-corrosion, the importance of hydrodynamics is demonstrated. In addition, commissioning, shut-down and start-up measures are compiled that are necessary for the establishment and re-establishment of the protective layer. (author)

  13. Global Management Education Graduate Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    Each year for the past 12 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. This Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating business schools. The survey allows students to express their…

  14. 2012 Global Management Education Graduate Survey. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Each year for the past 13 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. The Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating schools. The survey allows students to express their opinions about…

  15. Social Class and Belonging: Implications for Graduate Students' Career Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrove, Joan M.; Stewart, Abigail J.; Curtin, Nicola L.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role that social class background plays in graduate students' career goals. Class background was significantly related to the extent to which students struggled financially in graduate school, which related to their sense of belonging in graduate school. Sense of belonging related to academic self-concept, which predicted students'…

  16. Sample views of African post-graduate students regarding English and the African languages as media of education in African schools in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram L. Mawasha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although African post-graduates recognise the importance of African languages in the education of African children in South Africa, most of them are of the opinion that English should not only be taught as a language from grade 1, but should also be preferred as the main language of instruction for African children from the outset of schooling. In the ensuing pilot study which involved 50 post-graduates, 68% expressed this opinion as against the rest who preferred a variety of other options. The study comments on the implications of these findings for the new democratic language in education policy. Hoewel die belangrikheid van Afrikatale in die onderwys van leerlinge wie se huistale dit is, deur nagraadse studente wat ook Afrikatale praat, er ken word, me en die meeste van hulle dat Engels nie slegs as 'n taal onderrig moet word van graad 1 af nie, maar ook verkies behoort te word as die hooftaa/ van onderrig vir sulke leerlinge van die begin van hul skoolloopbaan af In die /oodsstudie wat onderneem is onder 50 nagraadse studente, het 68% hierdie mening uitgespreek Hierdie studie behandel die implikasies van hierdie bevindinge vir die nuwe demokratiese taal-in-onderwysbeleid

  17. A Study of Issues Affecting International Students at the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy in the Naval Postgraduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    TOEFL scores before coming to NPS ........................58 Table 28. Students’ level of English proficiency in four communication skills (Speaking...Environment Social Activity Other Demographics Service Country Rank Curriculum Age Marital Status Quarter TOEFL Grade Native...quarter status, the number of children, TOEFL score, expected date of graduation, native language, undergraduate area, and postgraduate area. After

  18. The evolution of the ideas of graduated and still studying students about preferences and the education system of Sport Management Department in Akdeniz University Physical Education and Sport School with concept of sector centered education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faik Ardahan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to determine the level of satisfaction from curriculum and education, relationship level with the industry, qualified employment level, expectations of graduated and undergraduate students about their professional life, job choice of graduated students from Akdeniz University, Physical Education and Sport School, Sport Management Department. And the results are meaningful and must be seriously taken for designing new curriculum and for customer centered education. This research is one of the first survey in this concept for defining expectations of graduated and undergraduate sport management students and can give many ideas for designer. Sampling group occurs 156 graduated and 130 currently students. Research is due diligence and descriptive statistic methods are used for evaluations and representation of data.  As a result; graduated and still studying students want to work in the private sector. Awareness of Sport Management is higher in still studying students. Both graduated and still studying students didn’t prefer the school not in priority, they wanted to attend some other  department but they couldn’t get enough score so they are in Sport Management Department. They think that school management do not help them for their employment and they believe that communications between sport management department and the sport sector and marketing strategies of the school is not sufficient enough. When sector centered education system apply in the Sport Management, many of the problem concerning with education and the curriculum is going to solve easily and the organic link between sector and the sport management department is going to get strong.

  19. An Exploration of How U.S. Army Officers Attending the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College Decide Whether or Not to Attend Graduate School: A Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Charles David

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored how U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC) students decided whether or not to attend graduate school. The focus was on how U.S. Army students made their decision. The purpose of the study was to illuminate the issues related to this decision in adult development, adult learning, career decision…

  20. About to Graduate from High School? Consider Career Education Opportunities. EdSource Student/Parent Guide = Estas por graduarte de la escuela preparatoria? Considera oportunidades para seguir tu educacion de carrera. EdSource guia de estudiantes y padres

    Science.gov (United States)

    EdSource, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Getting a sound education is important to a student's ability to make a good living in a field they will enjoy. For many students graduating from high school, that includes high quality career technical (or vocational) education tailored to a specific job. In California, such programs are available in a wide range of fields, from healthcare to the…

  1. Medical School Factors Associated with Changes in Implicit and Explicit Bias Against Gay and Lesbian People among 3492 Graduating Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Sean M; Burke, Sara E; Hardeman, Rachel R; White, Richard O; Przedworski, Julia; Dovidio, John F; Perry, Sylvia P; Plankey, Michael; A Cunningham, Brooke; Finstad, Deborah; W Yeazel, Mark; van Ryn, Michelle

    2017-08-01

    Implicit and explicit bias among providers can influence the quality of healthcare. Efforts to address sexual orientation bias in new physicians are hampered by a lack of knowledge of school factors that influence bias among students. To determine whether medical school curriculum, role modeling, diversity climate, and contact with sexual minorities predict bias among graduating students against gay and lesbian people. Prospective cohort study. A sample of 4732 first-year medical students was recruited from a stratified random sample of 49 US medical schools in the fall of 2010 (81% response; 55% of eligible), of which 94.5% (4473) identified as heterosexual. Seventy-eight percent of baseline respondents (3492) completed a follow-up survey in their final semester (spring 2014). Medical school predictors included formal curriculum, role modeling, diversity climate, and contact with sexual minorities. Outcomes were year 4 implicit and explicit bias against gay men and lesbian women, adjusted for bias at year 1. In multivariate models, lower explicit bias against gay men and lesbian women was associated with more favorable contact with LGBT faculty, residents, students, and patients, and perceived skill and preparedness for providing care to LGBT patients. Greater explicit bias against lesbian women was associated with discrimination reported by sexual minority students (b = 1.43 [0.16, 2.71]; p = 0.03). Lower implicit sexual orientation bias was associated with more frequent contact with LGBT faculty, residents, students, and patients (b = -0.04 [-0.07, -0.01); p = 0.008). Greater implicit bias was associated with more faculty role modeling of discriminatory behavior (b = 0.34 [0.11, 0.57); p = 0.004). Medical schools may reduce bias against sexual minority patients by reducing negative role modeling, improving the diversity climate, and improving student preparedness to care for this population.

  2. Catalog of Authorized Subjects for Community Adult Schools and Occupational Centers: Graduation Requirements and Curricula. Publication No. AC-100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA. Div. of Career and Continuing Education.

    The catalog contains descriptions of approved courses in the Los Angeles City Schools, course numbers, and amounts of high school credit that may be earned. These courses are classified into nine areas: academic, business, civic and public services, elementary and citizenship, fine arts and crafts, health, homemaking, industrial (subdivided into…

  3. Building On-Track Indicators for High School Graduation and College Readiness: Evidence from New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemple, James J.; Segeritz, Micha D.; Stephenson, Nickisha

    2013-01-01

    Students' engagement and performance in their first year of high school offer strong signals about their prospects for earning a diploma 4 years later. These performance measures can be used to construct "on-track" indicators to measure a school's performance and to identify needs of specific students who are at risk of dropping out.…

  4. Graduates of the New Learning Environment: A Follow-Up Study of High School Distance e-Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Dale; Sharpe, Dennis; Bourgeois, Monique; Greene, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    While web-based courses have had a growing presence in Canadian secondary schools since the mid-1990s, there has been very little study of the transition of high school distance e learners to further study at the post-secondary level. To address this area of deficit in distance education research this article reports on a study designed to examine…

  5. Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Howard S.

    1987-01-01

    Maintains that graduate training in sociology is an uneasy compromise between teaching new sociologists practical knowledge and doing what a department's various constituencies demand. Suggests that faculty should develop a continuing dialogue with students and incorporate them, formally and informally, in their work. (Author/DH)

  6. Control of equiaxed grains in a complicated Cu-Ni based alloy prepared by centrifugal casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Zongqiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A complicated Cu-Ni based alloy was developed to fabricate wear-resisting bush for high temperature application. The concern focuses on the control of equiaxed grains in the developed alloy ingot prepared by centrifugal casting. The results show that the equiaxed grains are determined by the pouring temperature of the melt, the cooling rate and the rotation speed of the mold. With the decrease in pouring temperature, the fraction of the equiaxed grains in the transverse section of the ingot increases and the average length of columnar grain decreases. When the pouring temperature is confined below 1,250℃, complete equiaxed grains can be obtained. Based on the optimal centrifugal casting processing, the tensile strength of the developed alloy ingot with complete equiaxed grains reaches to 810 MPa and 435 MPa at room temperature and 500℃, respectively, which is 14% and 110% higher than that of common commercial QAl10-4-4 alloy. The wear rate of the developed alloy is 7.0 × 10-8 and 3.8 × 10-7 mm3•N-1•mm-1 at room temperature and 500℃, respectively, which is 5 times and 39 times lower than that of QAl10-4-4 alloy.

  7. Correlation of seawater corrosion and processing of Cu-Ni alloy tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The investigetions on the effect of the initial surface and microstructure on the seawater corrosion of Cu-Ni al-loy tubes were carried out by processing, electrochemical methods and natural seawater exposure as well as SEM. Defor-mation had more impact on the final microstructure of the tubes than the annealing time did, and at the deformation of32% and annealing temperature 550~ 600 ℃ for 1 h the tubes was completely recrystallized microstructure. As increasingthe volume fraction of recrystallization, the homogeneity of microstructure and the corrosion resistance increased. Theresidual carbon film produced on the inner surface of the tubes during the processing, had higher corrosion potential thanthe alloy subatrate and good electronic conductivity, so accelerating the dissolution of the substrate in seawater, and thenon-protective and loose corrosion product film formed. Immersed in natural seawater, the tubes of incomplete recrystal-lization, consisting of deformed and recrystallized grains, displayed intergranular corrosion, which resulted from corrosionmicro-cells built between deformed and recrystallized grains and the preferable transportation of electrons on the boundariesof both the grains. In contrast, the recrystallized alloy tubes formed the uniform and compact corrosion product film underwhich no corrosion was found

  8. Equilibrium segregation patterns and alloying in Cu/Ni nanoparticles: Experiments versus modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennes, M.; Buchwald, J.; Ross, U.; Lotnyk, A.; Mayr, S. G.

    2015-06-01

    We analyze the segregation behavior of bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with moderate miscibility gap by applying a combined experimental/simulation approach to Cu/Ni as a model system. Using a hybrid molecular dynamics/Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm (MD/MMC) based on the embedded atom method (EAM), we derive the equilibrium distribution of atomic species in the clusters for varying concentrations and particle structures. To cross-check the predictive power of our approach, we compare these results with modified EAM (MEAM) and density functional theory based ab initio calculations. This permits to identify possible shortcomings of the EAM when used to describe bimetallic NPs. Additionally, we isolate vibrational entropy contributions to the free energy of the NPs and special focus is put on the possibility of entropic stabilization of segregated versus solid solution NPs. Finally, we complement our simulations by experimental results, which are obtained by studying the behavior of plasma gas condensation synthesized Ni@Cu core-shell (CS) particles upon annealing.

  9. Electrical conductivity and microstructure by Rietveld refinement of doped Cu-Ni powder alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fambrini, A.S.; Monteiro, W.A.; Orrego, R.M.M.; Marques, I.M.; Carrio, Juan A.G., E-mail: jgcarrio@mackenzie.br, E-mail: iara_m_@hotmail.com [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie (UPM/CCH), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Humanidades. Dept. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    This work presents a comparative study of microstructural and electrical properties of polycrystalline material from two different Cu-Ni alloys: Cu-Ni-Pt and Cu-Ni-Al. The first one of them was produced in electric furnace with voltaic arc and the other was produced by powder metallurgy. The microstructure of the samples was studied by optical microscopy, Vickers micro hardness and x rays powder diffraction. Their electrical conductivity was measured with a milliohmmeter Agilent (HP) 4338B. Refinements of the crystalline structure of the samples were performed by the Rietveld method, using the refinement program GSAS. The refinement results and Fourier differences calculations indicate that the copper matrix structure presents not significant distortions by the used amounts of the other metal atoms. In both cases a sequence of thermo mechanical treatments was developed with the intention of increasing the hardness maintaining the electrical conductivity of the alloys. The refinements also allowed a study of the dependence of the micro-structure and the thermo mechanical treatments of the samples. (author)

  10. Pure silica SBA-15 supported Cu-Ni catalysts for hydrogen production by ethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizcayno, A.J.; Carrero, A.; Calles, J.A. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, Rey Juan Carlos University, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologya (ESCET), c/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Cu-Ni/SBA-15 supported catalysts prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method were tested in the ethanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. The effect of reaction temperature and metal loading was studied in order to maximize the hydrogen selectivity and the CO{sub 2}/CO{sub x} molar ratio. The best catalytic performance was achieved at 600 C with a catalyst containing 2 and 7 wt% of copper and nickel, respectively. In addition, two catalysts were prepared by the method of direct insertion of Ni and Cu ions as precursors in the initial stage of the synthesis. XRD, TEM, N{sub 2} adsorption and ICP-AES results evidenced that SBA-15 materials with long range hexagonal ordering could be successfully synthesized in the presence of copper and nickel salts with the (Cu+Ni) contents around 4-6 wt%. However, lower hydrogen selectivity and together with ethanol and water conversions were observed with catalysts prepared by direct synthesis in comparison with those prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method. (authors)

  11. Hydrogen production by ethanol steam reforming over Cu-Ni supported catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizcaino, A.J.; Carrero, A.; Calles, J.A. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, Rey Juan Carlos University, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia (ESCET), c/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles (Spain)

    2007-07-15

    In the present work, Cu-Ni supported catalysts were tested in ethanol steam reforming reaction. Two commercial amorphous solids (SiO{sub 2} and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and three synthesized materials (MCM-41, SBA-15 and ZSM-5 nanocrystalline) were used as support. A series of Cu-Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts with different Cu and Ni content were also prepared. It was found that aluminium containing supports favour ethanol dehydration to ethylene in the acid sites, which in turn, promotes the coke deactivation process. The highest hydrogen selectivity is achieved with the Cu-Ni/SBA-15 catalyst, due to a smaller metallic crystallite size. Nevertheless, the Cu-Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalyst showed the best catalytic performance, since a better equilibrium between high hydrogen selectivity and CO{sub 2}/CO{sub x} ratio is obtained. It was seen that nickel is the phase responsible for hydrogen production in a greater grade, although both CO production and coke deposition are decreased when copper is added to the catalyst. (author)

  12. Cancer Screening Knowledge and Attitudes of Under- and Post-Graduate Students at Kasr Al Ainy School of Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrak, Amal Samir; Galal, Yasmine Samir; Amin, Tarek Tawfik

    2016-01-01

    Increasing knowledge and awareness of cancer screening significantly influence health promotion behavior which could markedly reduce incidence rates. In many countries, health care providers are the principal source of information concerning cancer screening. This study was carried out to assess the level of knowledge concerning cancer screening among medical students, house officers and residents and to explore their attitude towards cancer screening practices. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Kasr Al Ainy Medical School at Cairo University in Egypt, with 300 undergraduate medical students and 150 postgraduates (interns and residents) enrolled. A pre-tested self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from the study participants regarding personal and education-related information, knowledge about cancer screening and its sources, and attitude towards cancer screening. More than 64% of participants had knowledge scores of ≤ 10 points (out of 24). The total knowledge score (out of 6 points) for breast cancer screening increased from 1.9±1.0 to 2.3±1.2 and 2.4±1.1 for 4th, 5th and 6th year respectively, interns showed the highest score of 2.6 ±1.1, P= 0.001. Year of enrollment at medical school was a significant positive predictor of acquiring knowledge about cancer screening (post graduate vs. undergraduate students) (OR= 1.30, C.I =1.01-1.63), lack of or none receiving of orientation/training about cancer screening was the sole negative significant predictor for proper knowledge about cancer screening (OR=0.50, C.I=0.31-0.82). Over 92% of students agreed that they had insufficient knowledge about cancer screening, 88.2% appraised the need to have enough knowledge in order to direct/advice patients, relatives and friends, and 93.7% required that the faculty should emphasize the importance of cancer screening in the delivered curricula at medical school. A relatively low to moderate level of knowledge about cancer screening was detected

  13. An Analysis of Trends and Problems in International Collaboration in China's Graduate Schools- Based on a Survey of 57 Deans of Graduate Schools in China%我国部分研究生院国际合作的趋势及问题分析--基于对57位研究生院院长的问卷调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海生

    2014-01-01

    International collaborative programs have become an important task of graduate schools in China .The main objectives of the collaborations are to increase the internationalization and quality of graduate education .At present ,such cooperation is mostly in engineering and newly emerging disciplines at the doctoral level in the form of joint training .Importance is attached to the quality of a foreign partner institution when a choice is made .Main problems in international cooperation include incomplete legislation and policy ,the subordinate position of our graduate schools ,overemphasis on the administrative side of project operation and management ,inadequate internal management regulations ,and insufficient accreditation and quality assessment in international cooperation .%研究生教育国际合作已成为国内研究生院重要工作。国际合作目标在于提升学校国际化水平以及教育质量,合作层次倾向博士层面,合作领域主要集中在工程技术和新兴学科,合作类型更愿意选择联合学位,选择合作伙伴看重外方教育质量。目前研究生院开展国际合作面临的主要问题包括法律政策不完备,中方高校主导作用不明显,项目运作及管理过度强调行政主导,校内管理规章不完善以及国际合作项目质量评估机制不健全等。

  14. On the Impact of Illustrated Assessment Tool on Paragraph Writing of High School Graduates of Qom, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheridoust, Esmaeil; Husseini, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    Writing as one important skill in language proficiency demands validity, hence high schools are real places in which valid results are needed for high-stake decisions. Unrealistic and non-viable tests result in improper and invalid interpretation and use. Illustrations without any written research have proved their effectiveness in whatsoever…

  15. A Multi-Level, Ordinal, Logistic Regression Analysis of Rural High School Graduates' Postsecondary Enrollment Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasemann, Cory

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between rural students' personal characteristics and experiences, high school experiences, and postsecondary enrollment patterns. By focusing on factors that differentiate among the educational experiences of rural and metropolitan (urban and suburban) students, this research adds to…

  16. Education and Health in Late-Life among High School Graduates: Cognitive versus Psychological Aspects of Human Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Just as postsecondary schooling serves as a dividing line between the advantaged and disadvantaged on outcomes like income and marital status, it also serves as a dividing line between the healthy and unhealthy. Why are the better educated healthier? Human capital theory posits that education makes one healthier via cognitive (skill improvements)…

  17. Web 2.0 Integration into the Graduate Classroom: An Appreciative Inquiry into Prospective School Administrator Strengths and Leadership Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to advance the preparation of prospective school administrator students by extending the Web 2.0 application of blogging to discover students' strengths and successful leadership experiences. During the blogging process, students reflected on and responded to appreciative inquiry (AI) blog posts that…

  18. Education and Health in Late-Life among High School Graduates: Cognitive versus Psychological Aspects of Human Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Just as postsecondary schooling serves as a dividing line between the advantaged and disadvantaged on outcomes like income and marital status, it also serves as a dividing line between the healthy and unhealthy. Why are the better educated healthier? Human capital theory posits that education makes one healthier via cognitive (skill improvements)…

  19. Meeting the Needs of Career and Technical Education: Observations from Graduates of a High School Health Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avey, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Career and Technical education has been around for some time, and has often been shaped by the current economic landscape of the country. While current evolving trends focus on relevance for students in the school setting, a coexistence with college preparation curriculum is now the new trend in modern technical education. New programs have…

  20. Analysis of the nutritional status of middle school graduates in Huangmei county%黄梅县初中毕业生营养状况分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔心尧; 叶珍珍; 商开国

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the nutritional status of graduates in middle school of Huangmei county ,then find problems and propose effective measures, to promote the healthy development of students and the carry out of school sports health work. Methods Collected all the physical examination data of the graduates in 2014 ,use the relevant criteria in the essay of Ji chengye and health check-up specification of students to screen the status of malnutrition, overweight and obesity. Results The prevalence of malnutrition in boys and girls are 10.68%and 6.70%, among them, the prevalence of stunting and underweight are 6.04%,4.65%, 4.36%,2.34%respectively;the rate of overweight and obesity in boys is 11.69%and 5.63%, as 9.56%and 2.24%in girls; the prevalence of malnutrition, overweight and obesity in boys is higher than girls (P<0.05); the distribution of malnutrition and obesity status have difference in age, while the overweight has no obvious difference. Conclusion The overweight problem in middle school graduates of Huagmei county is severest, and the next is malnutrition, while the boys are the main prevention groups of malnutrition , overweight and obesity.%目的:掌握黄梅县初中毕业生营养状况,发现问题,提出有效措施以促进初中学生健康成长及学校体育卫生工作地开展。方法收录黄梅县2014年初三学生毕业健康体检资料,参考季成叶文中营养不良筛查标准及学生健康体检技术规范相关标准,筛查资料中营养不良、超重及肥胖状况。结果男、女生总的营养不良检出率分别为10.68%、6.70%,其中生长迟缓、消瘦检出率分别为6.04%、4.65%、4.36%、2.34%;男生超重及肥胖检出率分别为11.69%、5.63%,女生超重及肥胖检出率分别为9.56%、2.24%;男生营养不良、超重及肥胖检出率均高于女生(P<0.05);营养不良、肥胖在年龄间分布存在差异,而肥胖超重在年龄间差异不明显;结论黄梅县初中

  1. 6 mln Graduates,Tough Job Hunting?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maggie Zang

    2009-01-01

    @@ It is never easy for graduates to hunt their first jobs, and it becomes even harder for them due to the ongoing financial crisis, which spread over the whole world and made enterprises and various institutes cut their employment numbers. According to the incomplete statistics, over 6 million Chinese students graduate from school, are seeking a suitable position for living in 2009.

  2. Historiography in Graduate Technology Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jim; Hunt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A proposal is made suggesting the inclusion of historiography (i.e., historical research and the writing of history) into graduate technology teacher education. In particular, a strategy is forwarded to have graduate students in technology teacher education, who are working at schools in different locations, conduct historical research and write…

  3. Business Graduate Skill Sets - Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise; Chapman, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the competencies required by industry in business graduates and the relative importance and current graduate proficiency levels in each skill area. A secondary purpose was to examine and compare the perceived role of contemporary business schools across different samples. The study was conducted during…

  4. The Philosophy and Future of Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankena, William K., Ed.

    Focusing on critical issues facing graduate education, these papers presented at a conference sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) examine areas such as declining enrollments, job shortage among college teachers, and the role of graduate schools in relation to the various intellectual disciplines. The overview paper,…

  5. Graduate Student Project: Employer Operations Management Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Lynn A.

    2008-01-01

    Part-time graduate students at an Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-accredited college complete a unique project by applying operations management concepts to their current employer. More than 92% of 368 graduates indicated that this experiential project was a positive learning experience, and results show a positive impact on…

  6. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of copper, nickel and bimetallic Cu-Ni nanoparticles for potential use in dental materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liliana Argueta-Figueroa; Raúl A. Morales-Luckie; Rogelio J. Scougall-Vilchis; Oscar F. Olea-Mejía

    2014-01-01

    The antibacterial effect is a desirable property in dental materials. Development of simple methods for the preparation of nanosized metal particles has attracted significant attention because of their future applications due to unusual size-dependent antibacterial properties. Copper (Cu), Nickel (Ni) and bimetallic Cu-Ni nanoparticles were prepared by a simple chemical method and their antibacterial activity was tested against the widely used standard human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (gram-negative) and Escherichia coli (gram-positive). Additionally, these nanoparticles were tested against the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Our results are promising for potential use in dental materials science.

  7. Effect of Temperature on the Galvanic Corrosion of Cu-Ni Alloy/High Strength Steel in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The galvanic corrosion behavior of Cu-Ni Alloy(B10/high strength steel (921A has been studied using a zero-resistance ammeter (ZRA in seawater at different temperatures. As well as it was systemically investigated by weight loss measurements, electrochemical methods and scanning electron microscope.Results showed 921A acts as the anode and B10 act as the cathodes. The effect of temperature on the galvanic corrosion is important, the corrosion rate became higher with the temperature increased.

  8. Giant Peltier Effect in Self-Organized Quasi-One-Dimensional Nano-Structure in Cu-Ni Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang Vu, Nguyen; Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Based upon ab initio electronic structure calculations by the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation and Monte Carlo simulation of the two-dimensional spinodal nano-decomposition, we simulate the formation of a self-organized quasi-one-dimensional nano-structure (Konbu-Phase) under a layer-by-layer crystal growth condition of Cu-Ni alloy. We propose a new mechanism of the giant Peltier coefficient dramatically enhanced by the one-dimensional singular density of states in the Konbu-Phase in addition to the conventional Peltier cooling and the spin-entropy expansion cooling.

  9. Giant Peltier Effect in Self-Organized Quasi-One-Dimensional Nano-Structure in Cu--Ni Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Nguyen Dang; Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Based upon ab initio electronic structure calculations by the Korringa--Kohn--Rostoker coherent potential approximation and Monte Carlo simulation of the two-dimensional spinodal nano-decomposition, we simulate the formation of a self-organized quasi-one-dimensional nano-structure (Konbu-Phase) under a layer-by-layer crystal growth condition of Cu--Ni alloy. We propose a new mechanism of the giant Peltier coefficient dramatically enhanced by the one-dimensional singular density of states in the Konbu-Phase in addition to the conventional Peltier cooling and the spin-entropy expansion cooling.

  10. Common mental disorders and related factors in undergraduate and graduate students from three dental schools in Cartagena, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Simancas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the growing incidence of mental disorders in young population worldwide, the aim of this research is to estimate the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMD and related factors in dental students from Cartagena, Colombia. Methodology: A cross sectional study will be performed on all undergraduate and graduate students of Dentistry in Cartagena, Colombia. A population of 1.072 students will be completed by taking a census. The measurement of CMD will be made through Goldberg’s 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 using a self-administered survey about the presence of sociodemographic, personal and academic factors. It will be requested a full list of the participating dental students from each center and codes will be assigned to maintain data confiden-tiality. Once the information is collected, it will be tabulated and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics through X2, student’s t-test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Additionally, CMD found in the final sample will be described: anxiety and depression, social dysfunction and loss of confidence and self-esteem. The statistical analysis will be done using STATA™ for Windows. Expected outcomes: it aims to study presence and distribution of CMD among dental students and their relationship with other variables of interest. Then, taking that information into account, to suggest possible intervention strategies targeted according to risk type.

  11. The Analysis of iSchools Graduates' Employment Features in Recent Five Years%近5年来iSchools毕业生就业特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司莉; 潘秋玉

    2015-01-01

    The paper used web site survey and content analysis methods to collect facts and ifgures in recent 5 years about employment status of graduates of iSchools members by logging on their homepages, and then analyzes the iSchools Graduates' employment situation, involving employment rate,job sector,job title,salary,the methods and timing of ifnding jobs,career satisfaction.Some features are concluded as follows: better job prospect for iSchools Graduates, wide ifled of employment, the inlfuence of classiifcation of iSchools, high career satisfaction and major-career relevance .%采用网站调查法和内容分析法,通过登录iSchools院校主页,搜集近5年来其毕业生就业情况的相关数据,分析iSchools毕业生的就业情况,涉及就业率、就业领域及职位、薪资待遇、求职方法和时长、工作满意度等方面,并指出iSchools院校的就业特点.

  12. 深化落实国家公派研究生项目推动研究生教育国际化进程%Deepening the Implementation of the National Public School Graduate Programs to Promote the Internationalization of Graduate Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢叶

    2014-01-01

    "State building high-Graduate Students Project"as China's implementation of this strategy, building a world-class uni-versity, is committed to developing a major initiative group"toward modernization, the world and the future,"the top creative talent, a graduate education important part of the internationalization strategy. In this paper, the national public school graduate project of Zhejiang University, for example, proposed should attach great importance to organize publicity, rigorous evaluation, strengthening education, improving management, and further deepen the implementation of the public school graduate programs, and promote the process of internationalization of graduate education, and thus create a world-class university.%“国家建设高水平大学公派研究生项目”作为我国实施人才强国战略,建设世界一流大学,致力于培养一批“面向现代化、面向世界、面向未来”的拔尖创新人才的一项重大举措,是研究生教育国际化战略的重要组成部分。本文以浙江大学国家公派研究生项目为例,提出应高度重视、组织宣传、严格评审、加强教育、狠抓管理,进一步深化落实公派研究生项目,推动研究生教育国际化进程,进而创建世界一流大学。

  13. Od e-kompetentne šole do e-kompetentnega maturanta? = From an e-Competent School to an e-Competent Secondary School Graduate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktorija Florjancic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts in introducing modern technologies in pre-universityeducation, faculties have been noticing a lack of computer and internetusage skills. Beside the presentation of statistical data, the paperpresents results of a research on basic software use upon enrolment ina higher education institution. Research has shown that students ratetheir computer skills higher if their secondary school has a dynamicweb site and if they used an e-classroom at school. The survey presentedno statistically significant differences in literacy related to gender.Similarly, we found no regional statistically significant differencesrelated to effective ict usage in secondary schools.

  14. Graduate Quantum Mechanics Reform

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, L D

    2008-01-01

    We address four main areas in which graduate quantum mechanics education in the U.S. can be improved: course content; textbook; teaching methods; and assessment tools. We report on a three year longitudinal study at the Colorado School of Mines using innovations in all four of these areas. In particular, we have modified the content of the course to reflect progress in the field in the last 50 years, use modern textbooks that include such content, incorporate a variety of teaching techniques based on physics education research, and used a variety of assessment tools to study the effectiveness of these reforms. We present a new assessment tool, the Graduate Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey, and further testing of a previously developed assessment tool, the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey (QMCS). We find that graduate students respond well to research-based techniques that have previously been tested mainly in introductory courses, and that they learn a great deal of the new content introduced in each ve...

  15. Vocational High School Effectiveness Standard ISO 9001: 2008 for Achievement Content Standards, Standard Process and Competency Standards Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeni Ratih Pratiwi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Efektivitas Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan Berstandar ISO 9001:2008 terhadap Pencapaian Standar Isi, Standar Proses dan Standar Kompetensi Lulusan Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine differences in the effectiveness of the achievement of the content standards, process standards, and competency standards in vocational already standard ISO 9001: 2008 with CMS that has not been standardized ISO 9001: 2008 both in public schools and private schools. Data collection using the questionnaire enclosed Likert scale models. Analysis of data using one-way ANOVA using SPSS. The results showed: (1 there is no difference in effectiveness between public SMK ISO standard ISO standards with private SMK (P = 0.001; (2 there are differences in the effectiveness of public SMK SMK ISO standards with ISO standards have not (P = 0.000; (3 there are differences in the effectiveness of public SMK ISO standards with private vocational yet ISO standards (P = 0.000; (4 there are differences in the effectiveness of the private vocational school with vocational standard ISO standard ISO country has not (P = 0.015; (5 there are differences in the effectiveness of the private vocational bertandar ISO with private vocational yet standardized ISO (P = 0.000; (6 there was no difference in the effectiveness of public SMK has not been standardized by the ISO standard ISO private SMK yet. Key Words: vocational high school standards ISO 9001: 2008, the standard content, process standards, competency standards Abstrak: Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui perbedaan efektivitas pencapaian standar isi, standar proses, dan standar kompetensi lulusan pada SMK yang sudah berstandar ISO 9001:2008 dengan SMK yang belum berstandar ISO 9001:2008 baik pada sekolah negeri maupun sekolah swasta. Pengumpulan data menggunakan kuisioner tertutup model skala likert. Analisis data menggunakan ANOVA one way menggunakan program SPSS. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan: (1 ada perbedaan

  16. Effect of surface oxidation layer on tensile strength of Cu-Ni alloy in friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Taejin; Park, Sangwon; Chung, Sungwook; Noh, Joongsuk; Kim, Kwangho; Kang, Chungyun

    2016-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of thick Cu-Ni plate was successfully completed. The fracture position after tensile testing was located at the weld nugget zone (WNZ), where surface oxidation occurred. The oxidation morphologies on the surface of the base metal were analyzed by SEM, EPMA and XRD, with the oxide layer being obtained by simple and useful way to analyze the oxide products, namely, collecting oxide powders after immersing of the oxidized specimen into HNO3 solution. The results highlighted that an oxide layer of 30 μm thickness consists of a mixture of two phases, Cu2O and NiO, on the surface of the base metal. After FSW, the thickness of the oxide layer on the surface was decreased to approximately 5 μm, and broken oxide particles, which is NiO, penetrated into the WNZ by the rotating tool. NiO was preferentially formed at the surface after FSW because it has a lower Gibbs free energy value at 950 °C, which is the peak temperature measured during FSW. Oxide layer of Cu-Ni plate was clearly only removed by mechanical method grinding with 1200-grit SiC paper. The removal of oxide layer results in improved mechanical strength.

  17. Preparation and Magnetic Properties of Cu-Ni Core-shell Nanowires in Ion-track Templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yonghui; DUAN Jinglai; YAO Huijun; MO Dan; WANG Tieshan; SUN Youmei; LIU Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cu-Ni core-shell nanowires, with an inner Cu core diameter of about 60 nm and varying Ni shell thicknesses (10, 30, 50, 60, and 80 nm), were successfully fabricated in porous polycarbonate (PC) ion-track templates by a two-step etching and electrodeposition method. In our experiment, the thickness of Ni shell can be effectively tuned through the etching time of templates. The core-shell structure was conifrmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern elucidates the co-existence of characteristic peaks for both Cu and Ni, indicating no other phases were formed during preparation. Magnetic hysteresis loops measured via vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) revealed that Cu-Ni core-shell nanowires with thinner Ni shell exhibited obviously diamagnetic character and together with a weak ferromagnetic activity, whereas ferromagnetic behavior was primarily measured for the wires with thicker Ni shell. With increasing Ni shell thickness, the squareness and coercivity value became smaller due to the shape anisotropy and the formation of multi-domain structure.

  18. Faith-based partnerships in graduate medical education: the experience of the Morehouse School of Medicine Public Health/Preventive Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Beverly D; Buckner, Ayanna V; Walker, Carla Durham; Blumenthal, Daniel S

    2011-10-01

    Faith-based organizations can be strategic partners in addressing the needs of low-income and underserved individuals and communities. The Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) Public Health/Preventive Medicine Residency Program (PH/PMR) collaborates with faith-based organizations for the purpose of resident education, community engagement, and service. These partners provide guidance for the program's community initiatives and health promotion activities designed to address health inequities. Residents complete a longitudinal community practicum experience with a faith-based organization over the 2-year training period. Residents conduct a community health needs assessment at the organization and design a health intervention that addresses the identified needs. The faith-based community practicum also serves as a vehicle for achieving skills in all eight domains of the Public Health Competencies developed by the Council on Linkages and all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Core Competencies. The MSM PH/PMR Program has engaged in faith-based partnerships for 7 years. This article discusses the structure of these partnerships, how partners are identified, funding sources for supporting resident projects, and examples of resident health needs assessment and intervention activities. The MSM PH/PMR Program may serve as a model to other residency and fellowship programs that may have an interest in developing partnerships with faith-based organizations.

  19. Thinking about the Education on Leaving School Politely of the Graduates%关于高校毕业生文明离校教育的几点思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷阿爽

    2011-01-01

    近几年,毕业生文明离校工作已经被教育部门和高等院校列为学生教育管理中的重要部分,毕业生的不文明离校行为困扰着很多高校,毕业生的不文明离校行为给高校学生管理工作带来了很大的社会负面影响.毕业生文明离校教育工作开展的顺利与否,直接关系到高校乃至社会的稳定与发展,不文明离校行为是当前各高校亟待解决的问题.%In recent years, leaving school politely of the graduates has become one of the important works for universities and the related educational departments. However, it has been tormenting many universities that the graduates leave school impolitely, which has brought about the negative effects to the administrative regulations of universities in society. Whether the educational activities for graduates can be carried out smoothly are directly related to the stability and development of universities and even the whole society. Therefore, leaving school impolitely is a problem that needs urgent solution for all the universities at present.

  20. iUTAH Summer Research Institutes: Supporting the STEM Pipeline Through Engagement of High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students, Secondary Teachers, and University Faculty in Authentic, Joint Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, L. A.; Malone, M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple types of programs are needed to support the STEM workforce pipeline from pre-college through graduate school and beyond. Short-term, intensive programs provide opportunities to participate in authentic scientific research for students who may not be sure of their interest in science and for teachers who may be unable to devote an entire summer to a research experience. The iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydro-Systainability) Summer Research Institute utilizes an innovative approach for a 5-day program that engages high school and undergraduate students as well as middle and high school teachers in conducting research projects led by graduate students and faculty members. Each Institute involves 3-4 half to full-day research projects. Participants collect (usually in the field) and analyze data for use in on-going research or that is related to a current research project. The participants work in groups with the graduate students to create a poster about each research project. They present their posters on the last day of the Institute at the state-wide meeting of all researchers and involved in this EPSCoR-funded program. In addition to introducing participants to research, one of the Institute's goals is to provide opportunities for meaningful near-peer interactions with students along the STEM pipeline from high school to undergraduate to graduate school. On the end-of-Institute evaluations, almost all students have reported that their discussions with other participants and with graduate students and faculty were a "Highly effective" or "Effective" part of the Institute. In response to a question about how the Institute will impact their course choices or their plans to pursue a career in science, many high school and undergraduate students have noted that they plan to take more science courses. Each year several undergraduates who were previously unsure about a career in science have indicated that they now intend to pursue a