WorldWideScience

Sample records for cumulative glucocorticoid dose

  1. Negative impact of high cumulative glucocorticoid dose on bone metabolism of patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Nayara Felicidade Tomaz; Rocha, Natalia Pessoa; Vieira, Érica Leandro Marciano; Gomez, Rodrigo Santiago; Barbosa, Izabela Guimarães; Malheiro, Olívio Brito; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2017-08-01

    This current study aimed to evaluate the frequency of low bone mass, osteopenia, and osteoporosis in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and to investigate the possible association between bone mineral density (BMD) and plasma levels of bone metabolism markers. Eighty patients with MG and 62 controls BMD were measured in the right femoral neck and lumbar spine by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Plasma concentrations of osteocalcin, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, dickkopf (DKK-1), sclerostin, insulin, leptin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblast growth factor (FGF-23) were analyzed by Luminex®. The mean age of patients was 41.9 years, with 13.5 years of length of illness, and a mean cumulative dose of glucocorticoids 38,123 mg. Patients had significant reduction in BMD of the lumbar, the femoral neck, and in the whole body when compared with controls. Fourteen percent MG patients had osteoporosis at the lumbar spine and 2.5% at the femoral neck. In comparison with controls, patients with MG presented lower levels of osteocalcin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, parathyroid hormone, sclerostin, TNF-α, and DKK-1 and higher levels of FGF-23, leptin, and IL-6. There was a significant negative correlation between cumulative glucocorticoid dose and serum calcium, lumbar spine T-score, femoral neck BMD, T-score, and Z-score. After multivariate analysis, higher TNF-α levels increased the likelihood of presenting low bone mass by 2.62. MG patients under corticotherapy presented low BMD and altered levels of bone markers.

  2. Quadrupling Inhaled Glucocorticoid Dose to Abort Asthma Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, Tricia; Mortimer, Kevin; Wilson, Andrew; Walker, Samantha; Brightling, Christopher; Skeggs, Andrew; Pavord, Ian; Price, David; Duley, Lelia; Thomas, Mike; Bradshaw, Lucy; Higgins, Bernard; Haydock, Rebecca; Mitchell, Eleanor; Devereux, Graham; Harrison, Timothy

    2018-03-08

    Asthma exacerbations are frightening for patients and are occasionally fatal. We tested the concept that a plan for patients to manage their asthma (self-management plan), which included a temporary quadrupling of the dose of inhaled glucocorticoids when asthma control started to deteriorate, would reduce the incidence of severe asthma exacerbations among adults and adolescents with asthma. We conducted a pragmatic, unblinded, randomized trial involving adults and adolescents with asthma who were receiving inhaled glucocorticoids, with or without add-on therapy, and who had had at least one exacerbation in the previous 12 months. We compared a self-management plan that included an increase in the dose of inhaled glucocorticoids by a factor of 4 (quadrupling group) with the same plan without such an increase (non-quadrupling group), over a period of 12 months. The primary outcome was the time to a first severe asthma exacerbation, defined as treatment with systemic glucocorticoids or an unscheduled health care consultation for asthma. A total of 1922 participants underwent randomization, of whom 1871 were included in the primary analysis. The number of participants who had a severe asthma exacerbation in the year after randomization was 420 (45%) in the quadrupling group as compared with 484 (52%) in the non-quadrupling group, with an adjusted hazard ratio for the time to a first severe exacerbation of 0.81 (95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 0.92; P=0.002). The rate of adverse effects, which were related primarily to local effects of inhaled glucocorticoids, was higher in the quadrupling group than in the non-quadrupling group. In this trial involving adults and adolescents with asthma, a personalized self-management plan that included a temporary quadrupling of the dose of inhaled glucocorticoids when asthma control started to deteriorate resulted in fewer severe asthma exacerbations than a plan in which the dose was not increased. (Funded by the Health Technology

  3. Cumulative radiation dose of multiple trauma patients during their hospitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhikang; Sun Jianzhong; Zhao Zudan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the cumulative radiation dose of multiple trauma patients during their hospitalization and to analyze the dose influence factors. Methods: The DLP for CT and DR were retrospectively collected from the patients during June, 2009 and April, 2011 at a university affiliated hospital. The cumulative radiation doses were calculated by summing typical effective doses of the anatomic regions scanned. Results: The cumulative radiation doses of 113 patients were collected. The maximum,minimum and the mean values of cumulative effective doses were 153.3, 16.48 mSv and (52.3 ± 26.6) mSv. Conclusions: Multiple trauma patients have high cumulative radiation exposure. Therefore, the management of cumulative radiation doses should be enhanced. To establish the individualized radiation exposure archives will be helpful for the clinicians and technicians to make decision whether to image again and how to select the imaging parameters. (authors)

  4. Safety and tolerability of high doses of glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakić Branislava D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia includes the use of high doses of glucocorticoides (prednisone and dexamethasone, which significantly increase the success of therapy due to lymphocytolitic effect. The aim: The aim of the study was to determine tolerability of high doses of prednisone and dexamethasone in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the structure and the intensity of adverse effects, occurred after application of these medicines. Subjects and methods: In a prospective study, we analyzed adverse effects of high doses of glucocorticoides in children suffering acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated in the Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina, since December 2010. until October 2014, were analyzed. This study included 18 patients, aged from 2 to 15 years. Results: Hyperglycemia appeared in 89% of patients treated with prednisone and in 61% of patients treated with dexamethasone. In order to control the high blood glucose level (above 10 mmol /L, in 11% of patients insulin was used. Hypertension appeared in 28% patients treated with prednisone and dexamethasone. Antihypertensives were needed for regulation in 17% patients. Hypopotassemia and hypocalcaemia were significantly more expressed after the use of prednisone in comparison to dexamethasone. In 11% of patients, the treatment with dexamethasone caused depressive behavior, followed by agitation. Conclusion: Adverse effects of dexamethasone and prednisone, administered in high doses in children with ALL were known, expected and reversible. Adverse reactions usually disappeared spontaneously or after short-term symptomatic therapy.

  5. Low-dose glucocorticoids in hyperandrogenism Efecto de bajas dosis de glucocorticoides en el hiperandrogenismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rizzo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of low-doses of glucocorticoids on androgen and cortisol secretion during the course of the day, we evaluated clinical signs of hyperandrogenism and total, free and bioavailable testosterone, SHBG, and cortisol following two different protocols: A fourteen patients received betamethasone 0.6 mg/day (n=8 or methylprednisolone 4 mg/day (n=6, as single daily oral dose at 11.00 PM, during 30 days, B fourteen patients were evaluated under betamethasone 0.3 mg in a single daily dose at 11.00 PM during six months, 11 out of whom were re-evaluated six months later. Twenty eight women with hyperandrogenism were included and seven normal females were used as control. Blood samples were taken in follicular phase at 8 AM and 7 PM to determine SHBG, cortisol, total, free and bioavailable testosterone. In both protocols, a significant morning and evening decrease in cortisol and testosterone (pCon el objetivo de investigar el efecto de bajas dosis de glucocorticoides sobre la secreción de andrógenos y cortisol en el curso del día, evaluamos signos de hiperandrogenismo, testosterona total, libre y biodisponible y cortisol según dos protocolos diferentes: A catorce pacientes recibieron betametasona 0.6 mg/día (n= 8 o metilprednisolona 4 mg/día (n= 6 en dosis única cotidiana, a las 23 h, durante 30 días, B catorce pacientes fueron evaluadas bajo betametasona 0.3 mg en dosis única cotidiana a la 23 h, administrada durante 6 meses; de ellas, 11 pacientes fueron re-evaluadas 6 meses más tarde. Se incluyeron 28 mujeres con hiperandrogenismo y 7 controles normales. Se obtuvieron muestras de sangre en fase folicular a las 08:00 y 9:00 h para determinar SHBG, cortisol, testosterona total, libre y biodisponible. En ambos protocolos se observó una disminución significativa de cortisol y testosterona (p<0.05 a <0.01, más importante con betametasona (p<0.05. En el protocolo B, los niveles matutinos de SHBG aumentaron

  6. Patterns of prednisone use during pregnancy in women with rheumatoid arthritis: Daily and cumulative dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmsten, Kristin; Rolland, Matthieu; Hebert, Mary F; Clowse, Megan E B; Schatz, Michael; Xu, Ronghui; Chambers, Christina D

    2018-04-01

    To characterize prednisone use in pregnant women with rheumatoid arthritis using individual-level heat-maps and clustering individual trajectories of prednisone dose, and to evaluate the association between prednisone dose trajectory groups and gestational length. This study included pregnant women with rheumatoid arthritis who enrolled in the MotherToBaby Autoimmune Diseases in Pregnancy Study (2003-2014) before gestational week 20 and reported prednisone use without another oral glucocorticoid during pregnancy (n = 254). Information on medication use and pregnancy outcomes was collected by telephone interview plus by medical record review. Prednisone daily dose and cumulative dose were plotted by gestational day using a heat map for each individual. K-means clustering was used to cluster individual trajectories of prednisone dose into groups. The associations between trajectory group and demographics, disease severity measured by the Health Assessment Questionnaire at enrollment, and gestational length were evaluated. Women used prednisone 3 to 292 days during pregnancy, with daily doses ranging from <1 to 60 mg. Total cumulative dose ranged from 8 to 6225 mg. Disease severity, non-biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug use, and gestational length varied significantly by trajectory group. After adjusting for disease severity, non-biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug use, and other covariates, the highest vs lowest daily dose trajectory group was associated with reduced gestational age at delivery (β: -2.3 weeks (95%: -3.4, -1.3)), as was the highest vs lowest cumulative dose trajectory group (β: -2.6 weeks (95%: -3.6, -1.5)). In pregnant women with rheumatoid arthritis, patterns of higher prednisone dose were associated with shorter gestational length compared with lower dose. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The effects of glucocorticoids on the inhibition of emotional information: A dose-response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Véronique A; Ellenbogen, Mark A; Washburn, Dustin; Joober, Ridha

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that cortisol influences cognitive and affective processes such as selective attention and memory for emotional events, yet the effects of glucocorticoids on attentional inhibition in humans remain unknown. Consequently, this double-blind study examined dose-dependent effects of exogenous glucocorticoids on the inhibition of emotional information. Sixty-three university students (14 male, 49 female) ingested either a placebo pill or hydrocortisone (10mg or 40mg), and completed a negative priming task assessing the inhibition of pictures depicting angry, sad, and happy faces. The 10mg, but not the 40mg hydrocortisone dose elicited increased inhibition for angry faces relative to placebo. Thus, moderate glucocorticoid elevations may have adaptive effects on emotional information processing, whereas high glucocorticoid elevations appear to attenuate this effect, consistent with the view that there are dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoids on cognition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Safety aspects of preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid in primary total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C C; Pitter, F T; Kehlet, H

    2017-01-01

    Background: Preoperative single high-dose glucocorticoid may have early outcome benefits in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA), but long-term safety aspects have not been evaluated. Methods: From October 2013, the departments reporting to the prospective Lundbeck Foundation....... Conclusions: In this detailed prospective cohort study, preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid administration was not associated with LOS >4 days, readmissions or infectious complications in TKA patients without contraindications....

  9. Glucocorticoid management in rheumatoid arthritis: morning or night low dose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Paolino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Morning symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA are linked to circadian increase of night inflammation, supported by inadequate cortisol secretion in active disease. Therefore, exogenous glucocorticoid administration in RA is recommended by EULAR and ACR from the beginning of the diagnosis, since may partially act like a “replacement therapy”. In addition, the prevention/treatment of the night up-regulation of the immune/inflammatory reaction has been shown more effective when exogenous glucocorticoid administration is managed with a night-time-release formulation. Despite a considerably higher cost than conventional prednisone (immediate release, chronotherapy with night-time-release prednisone has been recognized a cost-effective option for RA patients not on glucocorticoids who are eligible for therapy with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Interestingly, since different cell populations involved in the inflammatory process are particularly activated during the night (i.e. monocytes, macrophages, other therapeutical approaches used in RA, such as conventional DMARDs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs should follow the same concepts of glucocorticoid chronotherapy. Therefore, bedtime methotrexate chronotherapy was found to better manage RA symptoms, and several available NSAIDs (i.e. indomethacin, aceclofenac, ketoprofen, flurbiprofen, lornoxicam have been recently modified in their formulation, in order to obtain more focused night action.

  10. Technical Note: SCUDA: A software platform for cumulative dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seyoun; McNutt, Todd; Quon, Harry; Wong, John; Lee, Junghoon, E-mail: rshekhar@childrensnational.org, E-mail: junghoon@jhu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Plishker, William [IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Shekhar, Raj, E-mail: rshekhar@childrensnational.org, E-mail: junghoon@jhu.edu [IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, Maryland 20742 and Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC 20010 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate tracking of anatomical changes and computation of actually delivered dose to the patient are critical for successful adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Additionally, efficient data management and fast processing are practically important for the adoption in clinic as ART involves a large amount of image and treatment data. The purpose of this study was to develop an accurate and efficient Software platform for CUmulative Dose Assessment (SCUDA) that can be seamlessly integrated into the clinical workflow. Methods: SCUDA consists of deformable image registration (DIR), segmentation, dose computation modules, and a graphical user interface. It is connected to our image PACS and radiotherapy informatics databases from which it automatically queries/retrieves patient images, radiotherapy plan, beam data, and daily treatment information, thus providing an efficient and unified workflow. For accurate registration of the planning CT and daily CBCTs, the authors iteratively correct CBCT intensities by matching local intensity histograms during the DIR process. Contours of the target tumor and critical structures are then propagated from the planning CT to daily CBCTs using the computed deformations. The actual delivered daily dose is computed using the registered CT and patient setup information by a superposition/convolution algorithm, and accumulated using the computed deformation fields. Both DIR and dose computation modules are accelerated by a graphics processing unit. Results: The cumulative dose computation process has been validated on 30 head and neck (HN) cancer cases, showing 3.5 ± 5.0 Gy (mean±STD) absolute mean dose differences between the planned and the actually delivered doses in the parotid glands. On average, DIR, dose computation, and segmentation take 20 s/fraction and 17 min for a 35-fraction treatment including additional computation for dose accumulation. Conclusions: The authors developed a unified software platform that provides

  11. Lead in teeth from lead-dosed goats: Microdistribution and relationship to the cumulative lead dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellis, David J.; Hetter, Katherine M.; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Teeth are commonly used as a biomarker of long-term lead exposure. There appear to be few data, however, on the content or distribution of lead in teeth where data on specific lead intake (dose) are also available. This study describes the analysis of a convenience sample of teeth from animals that were dosed with lead for other purposes, i.e., a proficiency testing program for blood lead. Lead concentration of whole teeth obtained from 23 animals, as determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, varied from 0.6 to 80 μg g -1 . Linear regression of whole tooth lead (μg g -1 ) on the cumulative lead dose received by the animal (g) yielded a slope of 1.2, with r 2 =0.647 (p -1 , were found in circumpulpal dentine. Linear regression of circumpulpal lead (μg g -1 ) on cumulative lead dose (g) yielded a slope of 23 with r 2 =0.961 (p=0.0001). The data indicated that whole tooth lead, and especially circumpulpal lead, of dosed goats increased linearly with cumulative lead exposure. These data suggest that circumpulpal dentine is a better biomarker of cumulative lead exposure than is whole tooth lead, at least for lead-dosed goats

  12. Impact of HSCT conditioning and glucocorticoid dose on exercise adherence and response

    OpenAIRE

    Wiskemann, Joachim; Herzog, Benedikt; Kuehl, Rea; Schmidt, Martina E.; Steindorf, Karen; Schwerdtfeger, Rainer; Dreger, Peter; Bohus, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose: Evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCT) that exercise interventions have beneficial effects in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is growing. However, intensive chemotherapy conditioning and glucocorticoid (GC) treatment is always part of an allo-HSCT and possibly affect exercise adherence and training response. Therefore, we aimed to examine whether various conditioning protocols or different doses of GC treatment af...

  13. Cumulative effective dose associated with radiography and CT of adolescents with spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemburg, Stefan P; Peters, Soeren A; Roggenland, Daniela; Nicolas, Volkmar; Heyer, Christoph M

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the quantity and distribution of cumulative effective doses in diagnostic imaging of adolescents with spinal injuries. At a level 1 trauma center from July 2003 through June 2009, imaging procedures during initial evaluation and hospitalization and after discharge of all patients 10-20 years old with spinal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. The cumulative effective doses for all imaging studies were calculated, and the doses to patients with spinal injuries who had multiple traumatic injuries were compared with the doses to patients with spinal injuries but without multiple injuries. The significance level was set at 5%. Imaging studies of 72 patients (32 with multiple injuries; average age, 17.5 years) entailed a median cumulative effective dose of 18.89 mSv. Patients with multiple injuries had a significantly higher total cumulative effective dose (29.70 versus 10.86 mSv, p cumulative effective dose to multiple injury patients during the initial evaluation (18.39 versus 2.83 mSv, p cumulative effective dose. Adolescents with spinal injuries receive a cumulative effective dose equal to that of adult trauma patients and nearly three times that of pediatric trauma patients. Areas of focus in lowering cumulative effective dose should be appropriate initial estimation of trauma severity and careful selection of CT scan parameters.

  14. Independent association of glucocorticoids with damage accrual in SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Diane; Kandane-Rathnayake, Rangi; Raghunath, Sudha; Hoi, Alberta; Nikpour, Mandana; Morand, Eric F

    2016-01-01

    To determine factors associated with damage accrual in a prospective cohort of patients with SLE. Patients with SLE who attended the Lupus Clinic at Monash Health, Australia, between 2007 and 2013 were studied. Clinical variables included disease activity (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index-2K, SLEDAI-2K), time-adjusted mean SLEDAI, cumulative glucocorticoid dose and organ damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index (SDI)). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with damage accrual. A total of 162 patients were observed over a median (IQR) 3.6 (2.0-4.7) years. Seventy-five per cent (n=121) of patients received glucocorticoids. Damage accrual was significantly more frequent in glucocorticoid-exposed patients (42% vs 15%, p<0.01). Higher glucocorticoid exposure was independently associated with overall damage accrual after controlling for factors including ethnicity and disease activity and was significant at time-adjusted mean doses above 4.42 mg prednisolone/day; the OR of damage accrual in patients in the highest quartile of cumulative glucocorticoid exposure was over 10. Glucocorticoid exposure was independently associated with damage accrual in glucocorticoid-related and non-glucocorticoid related domains of the SDI. Glucocorticoid use is independently associated with the accrual of damage in SLE, including in non-glucocorticoid related domains.

  15. Radiologic imaging in cystic fibrosis: cumulative effective dose and changing trends over 2 decades.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, Oisin J

    2012-06-01

    With the increasing life expectancy for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and a known predisposition to certain cancers, cumulative radiation exposure from radiologic imaging is of increasing significance. This study explores the estimated cumulative effective radiation dose over a 17-year period from radiologic procedures and changing trends of imaging modalities over this period.

  16. Cumulative cisplatin dose in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strojan, Primoz; Vermorken, Jan B.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Saba, Nabil F.; Haigentz, Missak; Bossi, Paolo; Worden, Francis P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Mendenhall, William M.; Lee, Anne W. M.; Harrison, Louis B.; Bradford, Carol R.; Smee, Robert; Silver, Carl E.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    Background. The optimal cumulative dose and timing of cisplatin administration in various concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols for nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not been determined. Methods. The absolute survival benefit at 5 years of concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  17. Evaluation of a post-analysis method for cumulative dose distribution in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Saotome, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a post-analysis method for cumulative dose distribution in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). VMAT is capable of acquiring respiratory signals derived from projection images and machine parameters based on machine logs during VMAT delivery. Dose distributions were reconstructed from the respiratory signals and machine parameters in the condition where respiratory signals were without division, divided into 4 and 10 phases. The dose distribution of each respiratory phase was calculated on the planned four-dimensional CT (4DCT). Summation of the dose distributions was carried out using deformable image registration (DIR), and cumulative dose distributions were compared with those of the corresponding plans. Without division, dose differences between cumulative distribution and plan were not significant. In the condition Where respiratory signals were divided, dose differences were observed over dose in cranial region and under dose in caudal region of planning target volume (PTV). Differences between 4 and 10 phases were not significant. The present method Was feasible for evaluating cumulative dose distribution in VMAT-SBRT using 4DCT and DIR. (author)

  18. Higher glucocorticoid replacement doses are associated with increased mortality in patients with pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrand, Casper; Ragnarsson, Oskar; Hallén, Tobias; Andersson, Eva; Skoglund, Thomas; Nilsson, Anna G; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Olsson, Daniel S

    2017-09-01

    Patients with secondary adrenal insufficiency (AI) have an excess mortality. The objective was to investigate the impact of the daily glucocorticoid replacement dose on mortality in patients with hypopituitarism due to non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA). Patients with NFPA were followed between years 1997 and 2014 and cross-referenced with the National Swedish Death Register. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated with the general population as reference and Cox-regression was used to analyse the mortality. The analysis included 392 patients (140 women) with NFPA. Mean ± s.d. age at diagnosis was 58.7 ± 14.6 years and mean follow-up was 12.7 ± 7.2 years. AI was present in 193 patients, receiving a mean daily hydrocortisone equivalent (HCeq) dose of 20 ± 6 mg. SMR (95% confidence interval (CI)) for patients with AI was similar to that for patients without, 0.88 (0.68-1.12) and 0.87 (0.63-1.18) respectively. SMR was higher for patients with a daily HCeq dose of >20 mg (1.42 (0.88-2.17)) than that in patients with a daily HCeq dose of 20 mg (0.71 (0.49-0.99)), P  = 0.017. In a Cox-regression analysis, a daily HCeq dose of >20 mg was independently associated with a higher mortality (HR: 1.88 (1.06-3.33)). Patients with daily HCeq doses of ≤20 mg had a mortality risk comparable to patients without glucocorticoid replacement and to the general population. Patients with NFPA and AI receiving more than 20 mg HCeq per day have an increased mortality. Our data also show that mortality in patients substituted with 20 mg HCeq per day or less is not increased. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  19. Switching From Age-Based Stimulus Dosing to Dose Titration Protocols in Electroconvulsive Therapy: Empirical Evidence for Better Patient Outcomes With Lower Peak and Cumulative Energy Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill-Kerr, Alex; Yassin, Anhar; Rogers, Stephen; Cornish, Janie

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the proposition that adoption of a dose titration protocol may be associated with better patient outcomes, at lower treatment dose, and with comparable cumulative dose to that in patients treated using an age-based stimulus dosing protocol. This was an analysis of data assembled from archived records and based on cohorts of patients treated respectively on an age-based stimulus dosing protocol and on a dose titration protocol in the National Health Service in England. We demonstrated a significantly better response in the patient cohort treated with dose titration than with age-based stimulus dosing. Peak doses were less and the total cumulative dose was less in the dose titration group than in the age-based stimulus dosing group. Our findings are consistent with superior outcomes in patients treated using a dose titration protocol when compared with age-based stimulus dosing in a similar cohort of patients.

  20. Cumulative doses analysis in young trauma patients: a single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Sergio; Marrale, Maurizio; Geraci, Claudia; Caruso, Giuseppe; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Lo Casto, Antonio; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) represents the main source of radiation exposure in trauma patients. The radiation exposure of young patients is a matter of considerable medical concern due to possible long-term effects. Multiple MDCT studies have been observed in the young trauma population with an increase in radiation exposure. We have identified 249 young adult patients (178 men and 71 women; age range 14-40 years) who had received more than one MDCT study between June 2010 and June 2014. According to the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication, we have calculated the cumulative organ dose tissue-weighting factors by using CT-EXPO software(®). We have observed a mean cumulative dose of about 27 mSv (range from 3 to 297 mSv). The distribution analysis is characterised by low effective dose, below 20 mSv, in the majority of the patients. However, in 29 patients, the effective dose was found to be higher than 20 mSv. Dose distribution for the various organs analysed (breasts, ovaries, testicles, heart and eye lenses) shows an intense peak for lower doses, but in some cases high doses were recorded. Even though cumulative doses may have long-term effects, which are still under debate, high doses are observed in this specific group of young patients.

  1. Application of the ELDO approach to assess cumulative eye lens doses for interventional cardiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, J.; Jacob, S.; Clairand, I.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.; Auvinen, A.; Koukorava, C.; Schnelzer, M.

    2015-01-01

    In preparation of a large European epidemiological study on the relation between eye lens dose and the occurrence of lens opacities, the European ELDO project focused on the development of practical methods to estimate retrospectively cumulative eye lens dose for interventional medical professionals exposed to radiation. The present paper applies one of the ELDO approaches, correlating eye lens dose to whole-body doses, to assess cumulative eye lens dose for 14 different Finnish interventional cardiologists for whom annual whole-body dose records were available for their entire working period. The estimated cumulative left and right eye lens dose ranged from 8 to 264 mSv and 6 to 225 mSv, respectively. In addition, calculations showed annual eye lens doses sometimes exceeding the new ICRP annual limit of 20 mSv. The work also highlights the large uncertainties associated with the application of such an approach proving the need for dedicated dosimetry systems in the routine monitoring of the eye lens dose. (authors)

  2. The association between cumulative adversity and mental health: considering dose and primary focus of adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinan, Giora; Shrira, Amit; Shmotkin, Dov

    2012-09-01

    The study addressed the dose-response model in the association of cumulative adversity with mental health. Data of 1,725 participants aged 50+ were drawn from the Israeli component of the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe. Measures included an inventory of potentially traumatic events, distress (lifetime depression, depressive symptoms), and well-being (quality of life, optimism/hope). The maximal effect of cumulative trauma emerged in the contrast between 0-2 and 3+ events, where the higher number of events related to higher distress but also to higher well-being. While self-oriented adversity revealed no, or negative, association with well-being, other-oriented adversity revealed a positive association. The study suggests an experiential dose of cumulative adversity leading to a co-activation of distress and well-being. The source of this co-activation seems to be other-oriented adversity.

  3. TH-AB-207A-04: Assessment of Patients’ Cumulative Effective Dose From CT Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; Sepahdari, A; Beckett, K; Oshiro, T; McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Joint Commission requires institutions to consider patient’s age and recent imaging exams when deciding on the most appropriate type of imaging exam. Additionally, knowing patient’s imaging history can help prevent duplicate scans. Radiation dose management software affords new opportunities to identify and utilize patients with high cumulative doses as one proxy for subsequent review of imaging history and opportunities in avoiding redundant exams. Methods: Using dose management software (Radimetrics, Bayer Healthcare) a total of 72073 CT examinations performed from Jan 2015 to Jan 2016 were examined to categorize patients with a cumulative effective dose of 100 mSv and above. This threshold was selected based on epidemiological studies on populations exposed to radiation, which demonstrate a statistical increase of cancer risk at doses above 100 mSv. Histories of patients with highest cumulative dose and highest number of exams were further investigated by a Radiologist for appropriateness of recurrent studies and potential opportunities for reduction. Results: Out of 34762 patients, 927 (2.7%) were identified with a cumulative dose of 100 mSv and above. The highest cumulative dose (842 mSv) belonged to an oncology patient who underwent 2 diagnostic exams and 9 interventional ablative CT guided procedures. The patient with highest number of exams (56 counts) and cumulative dose of 170 mSv was a 17 year old trauma patient. An imaging history review of these two patients did not suggest any superfluous scans. Conclusion: Our limited pilot study suggests that recurrent CT exams for patients with oncologic or severe trauma history may be warranted and appropriate. As a result, for future studies we will be focusing on high dose patient cohorts not associated with oncology or severe trauma. Additionally, the review process itself has suggested areas for potential improvement in patient care, including improved documentation and Radiologist involvement

  4. TH-AB-207A-04: Assessment of Patients’ Cumulative Effective Dose From CT Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; Sepahdari, A; Beckett, K; Oshiro, T; McNitt-Gray, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Joint Commission requires institutions to consider patient’s age and recent imaging exams when deciding on the most appropriate type of imaging exam. Additionally, knowing patient’s imaging history can help prevent duplicate scans. Radiation dose management software affords new opportunities to identify and utilize patients with high cumulative doses as one proxy for subsequent review of imaging history and opportunities in avoiding redundant exams. Methods: Using dose management software (Radimetrics, Bayer Healthcare) a total of 72073 CT examinations performed from Jan 2015 to Jan 2016 were examined to categorize patients with a cumulative effective dose of 100 mSv and above. This threshold was selected based on epidemiological studies on populations exposed to radiation, which demonstrate a statistical increase of cancer risk at doses above 100 mSv. Histories of patients with highest cumulative dose and highest number of exams were further investigated by a Radiologist for appropriateness of recurrent studies and potential opportunities for reduction. Results: Out of 34762 patients, 927 (2.7%) were identified with a cumulative dose of 100 mSv and above. The highest cumulative dose (842 mSv) belonged to an oncology patient who underwent 2 diagnostic exams and 9 interventional ablative CT guided procedures. The patient with highest number of exams (56 counts) and cumulative dose of 170 mSv was a 17 year old trauma patient. An imaging history review of these two patients did not suggest any superfluous scans. Conclusion: Our limited pilot study suggests that recurrent CT exams for patients with oncologic or severe trauma history may be warranted and appropriate. As a result, for future studies we will be focusing on high dose patient cohorts not associated with oncology or severe trauma. Additionally, the review process itself has suggested areas for potential improvement in patient care, including improved documentation and Radiologist involvement

  5. Cumulative effective and individual organ dose levels in paediatric patients undergoing multiple catheterizations for congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.P.; Brennan, P.C.; Ryan, E.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the cumulative radiation dose levels received by a group of children who underwent multiple cardiac catheterisation procedures during the investigation and management of congenital heart disease (CHD). The purpose is to calculate cumulative doses, identify higher dose individuals, outline the inconsistencies with risk assessment and encourage the establishment of dose databases in order to facilitate the longitudinal research necessary to better understand health risks. A retrospective review of patient records for 117 paediatric patients who have undergone two or more cardiac catheterizations for the investigation of CHD was undertaken. This cohort consisted of patients who were catheterised over a period from September 2002 to August 2014. The age distribution was from newborn to 17 y. Archived kerma-area product (P KA ) and fluoroscopy time (T) readings were retrieved and analysed. Cumulative effective and individual organ doses were determined. The cumulative P KA levels ranged from 1.8 to 651.2 Gycm 2 , whilst cumulative effective dose levels varied from 2 to 259 mSv. The cumulative fluoroscopy time was shown to vary from 8.1 to 193.5 min. Median cumulative organ doses ranged from 3 to 94 mGy. Cumulative effective dose levels are highly variable but may exceed 250 mSv. Individual organ and effective dose measurements remain useful for comparison purposes between institutions although current methodologies used for determining lifetime risks are inadequate. (authors)

  6. Reduced peripheral expression of the glucocorticoid receptor α isoform in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder: a cumulative effect of trauma burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Hannah; Engler, Andrea; Morath, Julia; Adenauer, Hannah; Elbert, Thomas; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Engler, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious psychiatric condition that was found to be associated with altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and changes in glucocorticoid (GC) responsiveness. The physiological actions of GCs are primarily mediated through GC receptors (GR) of which isoforms with different biological activities exist. This study aimed to investigate whether trauma-experience and/or PTSD are associated with altered expression of GR splice variants. GRα and GRβ mRNA expression levels were determined by real-time quantitative PCR in whole blood samples of individuals with chronic and severe forms of PTSD (n = 42) as well as in ethnically matched reference subjects (non-PTSD, n = 35). Individuals suffering from PTSD exhibited significantly lower expression of the predominant and functionally active GRα isoform compared to non-PTSD subjects. This effect remained significant when accounting for gender, smoking, psychotropic medication or comorbid depression. Moreover, the GRα expression level was significantly negatively correlated with the number of traumatic event types experienced, both in the whole sample and within the PTSD patient group. Expression of the less abundant and non-ligand binding GRβ isoform was comparable between patient and reference groups. Reduced expression of the functionally active GRα isoform in peripheral blood cells of individuals with PTSD seems to be a cumulative effect of trauma burden rather than a specific feature of PTSD since non-PTSD subjects with high trauma load showed an intermediate phenotype between PTSD patients and individuals with no or few traumatic experiences.

  7. Reduced peripheral expression of the glucocorticoid receptor α isoform in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder: a cumulative effect of trauma burden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Gola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a serious psychiatric condition that was found to be associated with altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and changes in glucocorticoid (GC responsiveness. The physiological actions of GCs are primarily mediated through GC receptors (GR of which isoforms with different biological activities exist. This study aimed to investigate whether trauma-experience and/or PTSD are associated with altered expression of GR splice variants. METHODS: GRα and GRβ mRNA expression levels were determined by real-time quantitative PCR in whole blood samples of individuals with chronic and severe forms of PTSD (n = 42 as well as in ethnically matched reference subjects (non-PTSD, n = 35. RESULTS: Individuals suffering from PTSD exhibited significantly lower expression of the predominant and functionally active GRα isoform compared to non-PTSD subjects. This effect remained significant when accounting for gender, smoking, psychotropic medication or comorbid depression. Moreover, the GRα expression level was significantly negatively correlated with the number of traumatic event types experienced, both in the whole sample and within the PTSD patient group. Expression of the less abundant and non-ligand binding GRβ isoform was comparable between patient and reference groups. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced expression of the functionally active GRα isoform in peripheral blood cells of individuals with PTSD seems to be a cumulative effect of trauma burden rather than a specific feature of PTSD since non-PTSD subjects with high trauma load showed an intermediate phenotype between PTSD patients and individuals with no or few traumatic experiences.

  8. Accurate convolution/superposition for multi-resolution dose calculation using cumulative tabulated kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H; Chen Mingli; Reckwerdt, Paul J; Mackie, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Convolution/superposition (C/S) is regarded as the standard dose calculation method in most modern radiotherapy treatment planning systems. Different implementations of C/S could result in significantly different dose distributions. This paper addresses two major implementation issues associated with collapsed cone C/S: one is how to utilize the tabulated kernels instead of analytical parametrizations and the other is how to deal with voxel size effects. Three methods that utilize the tabulated kernels are presented in this paper. These methods differ in the effective kernels used: the differential kernel (DK), the cumulative kernel (CK) or the cumulative-cumulative kernel (CCK). They result in slightly different computation times but significantly different voxel size effects. Both simulated and real multi-resolution dose calculations are presented. For simulation tests, we use arbitrary kernels and various voxel sizes with a homogeneous phantom, and assume forward energy transportation only. Simulations with voxel size up to 1 cm show that the CCK algorithm has errors within 0.1% of the maximum gold standard dose. Real dose calculations use a heterogeneous slab phantom, both the 'broad' (5 x 5 cm 2 ) and the 'narrow' (1.2 x 1.2 cm 2 ) tomotherapy beams. Various voxel sizes (0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm) are used for dose calculations. The results show that all three algorithms have negligible difference (0.1%) for the dose calculation in the fine resolution (0.5 mm voxels). But differences become significant when the voxel size increases. As for the DK or CK algorithm in the broad (narrow) beam dose calculation, the dose differences between the 0.5 mm voxels and the voxels up to 8 mm (4 mm) are around 10% (7%) of the maximum dose. As for the broad (narrow) beam dose calculation using the CCK algorithm, the dose differences between the 0.5 mm voxels and the voxels up to 8 mm (4 mm) are around 1% of the maximum dose. Among all three methods, the CCK algorithm

  9. Cumulative high doses of inhaled formoterol have less systemic effects in asthmatic children 6-11 years-old than cumulative high doses of inhaled terbutaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaae, Rikke; Agertoft, Lone; Pedersen, Sören; Nordvall, S Lennart; Pedroletti, Christophe; Bengtsson, Thomas; Johannes-Hellberg, Ingegerd; Rosenborg, Johan

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate high dose tolerability and relative systemic dose potency between inhaled clinically equipotent dose increments of formoterol and terbutaline in children. Twenty boys and girls (6-11 years-old) with asthma and normal ECGs were studied. Ten doses of formoterol (Oxis) 4.5 microg (F4.5) or terbutaline (Bricanyl) 500 microg (T500) were inhaled cumulatively via a dry powder inhaler (Turbuhaler) over 1 h (three patients) or 2.5 h (17 patients) and compared to a day of no treatment, in a randomised, double-blind (active treatments only), crossover trial. Blood pressure (BP), ECG, plasma potassium, glucose, lactate, and adverse events were monitored up to 10 h to assess tolerability and relative systemic dose potency. Formoterol and terbutaline had significant beta2-adrenergic effects on most outcomes. Apart from the effect on systolic BP, QRS duration and PR interval, the systemic effects were significantly more pronounced with terbutaline than with formoterol. Thus, mean minimum plasma potassium, was suppressed from 3.56 (95% confidence interval, CI: 3.48-3.65) mmol l(-1) on the day of no treatment to 2.98 (CI: 2.90-3.08) after 10 x F4.5 and 2.70 (CI: 2.61-2.78) mmol l(-1) after 10 x T500, and maximum Q-Tc (heart rate corrected Q-T interval [Bazett's formula]) was prolonged from 429 (CI: 422-435) ms on the day of no treatment, to 455 (CI: 448-462) ms after 10 x F4.5 and 470 (CI: 463-476) ms after 10 x T500. Estimates of relative dose potency indicated that F4.5 microg had the same systemic activity as the clinically less effective dose of 250 microg terbutaline. The duration of systemic effects differed marginally between treatments. Spontaneously reported adverse events (most frequently tremor) were fewer with formoterol (78% of the children) than with terbutaline (95%). A serious adverse event occurred after inhalation of 45 microg formoterol over the 1 h dosing time, that prompted the extension of dosing time to 2.5 h. Multiple inhalations over 2.5 h of

  10. Cumulative high doses of inhaled formoterol have less systemic effects in asthmatic children 6–11 years-old than cumulative high doses of inhaled terbutaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaae, Rikke; Agertoft, Lone; Pedersen, Sören; Nordvall, S Lennart; Pedroletti, Christophe; Bengtsson, Thomas; Johannes-Hellberg, Ingegerd; Rosenborg, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate high dose tolerability and relative systemic dose potency between inhaled clinically equipotent dose increments of formoterol and terbutaline in children. Methods Twenty boys and girls (6–11 years-old) with asthma and normal ECGs were studied. Ten doses of formoterol (Oxis®) 4.5 µg (F4.5) or terbutaline (Bricanyl®) 500 µg (T500) were inhaled cumulatively via a dry powder inhaler (Turbuhaler®) over 1 h (three patients) or 2.5 h (17 patients) and compared to a day of no treatment, in a randomised, double-blind (active treatments only), crossover trial. Blood pressure (BP), ECG, plasma potassium, glucose, lactate, and adverse events were monitored up to 10 h to assess tolerability and relative systemic dose potency. Results Formoterol and terbutaline had significant β2-adrenergic effects on most outcomes. Apart from the effect on systolic BP, QRS duration and PR interval, the systemic effects were significantly more pronounced with terbutaline than with formoterol. Thus, mean minimum plasma potassium, was suppressed from 3.56 (95% confidence interval, CI: 3.48–3.65) mmol l−1 on the day of no treatment to 2.98 (CI: 2.90–3.08) after 10 × F4.5 and 2.70 (CI: 2.61–2.78) mmol l−1 after 10 × T500, and maximum Q-Tc (heart rate corrected Q-T interval [Bazett's formula]) was prolonged from 429 (CI: 422–435) ms on the day of no treatment, to 455 (CI: 448–462) ms after 10 × F4.5 and 470 (CI: 463–476) ms after 10 × T500. Estimates of relative dose potency indicated that F4.5 µg had the same systemic activity as the clinically less effective dose of 250 µg terbutaline. The duration of systemic effects differed marginally between treatments. Spontaneously reported adverse events (most frequently tremor) were fewer with formoterol (78% of the children) than with terbutaline (95%). A serious adverse event occurred after inhalation of 45 µg formoterol over the 1 h dosing time, that prompted the extension of dosing time to 2.5 h

  11. Low Birth Weight, Cumulative Obesity Dose, and the Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Cindy; Osgood, Nathaniel D.; Dyck, Roland F.

    2018-01-01

    Background. Obesity history may provide a better understanding of the contribution of obesity to T2DM risk. Methods. 17,634 participants from the 1958 National Child Development Study were followed from birth to 50 years. Cumulative obesity dose, a measure of obesity history, was calculated by subtracting the upper cut-off of the normal BMI from the actual BMI at each follow-up and summing the areas under the obesity dose curve. Hazard ratios (HRs) for diabetes were calculated using Cox regre...

  12. Cumulative Training Dose's Effects on Interrelationships Between Common Training-Load Models During Basketball Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T; Fox, Jordan L; Borges, Nattai R; Dascombe, Ben J; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2017-02-01

    The influence of various factors on training-load (TL) responses in basketball has received limited attention. This study aimed to examine the temporal changes and influence of cumulative training dose on TL responses and interrelationships during basketball activity. Ten state-level Australian male junior basketball players completed 4 × 10-min standardized bouts of simulated basketball activity using a circuit-based protocol. Internal TL was quantified using the session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE), summated heart-rate zones (SHRZ), Banister training impulse (TRIMP), and Lucia TRIMP models. External TL was assessed via measurement of mean sprint and circuit speeds. Temporal TL comparisons were performed between 10-min bouts, while Pearson correlation analyses were conducted across cumulative training doses (0-10, 0-20, 0-30, and 0-40 min). sRPE TL increased (P basketball activity. sRPE TL was only significantly related to Lucia TRIMP (r = .66-.69; P basketball training doses lasting beyond 20 min. Thus, the interchangeability of commonly used internal and external TL approaches appears dose-dependent during basketball activity, with various psychophysiological mediators likely underpinning temporal changes.

  13. Association of cumulative dose of haloperidol with next-day delirium in older medical ICU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Margaret A; Araujo, Katy L B; Murphy, Terrence E

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the association between cumulative dose of haloperidol and next-day diagnosis of delirium in a cohort of older medical ICU patients, with adjustment for its time-dependent confounding with fentanyl and intubation. Prospective, observational study. Medical ICU at an urban, academic medical center. Age 60 years and older admitted to the medical ICU who received at least one dose of haloperidol (n = 93). Of these, 72 patients were intubated at some point in their medical ICU stay, whereas 21 were never intubated. None. Detailed data were collected concerning time, dosage, route of administration of all medications, as well as for important clinical covariates, and daily status of intubation and delirium using the confusion assessment method for the ICU and a chart-based algorithm. Among nonintubated patients, and after adjustment for time-dependent confounding and important covariates, each additional cumulative milligram of haloperidol was associated with 5% higher odds of next-day delirium with odds ratio of 1.05 (credible interval [CI], 1.02-1.09). After adjustment for time-dependent confounding and covariates, intubation was associated with a five-fold increase in odds of next-day delirium with odds ratio of 5.66 (CI, 2.70-12.02). Cumulative dose of haloperidol among intubated patients did not change their already high likelihood of next-day delirium. After adjustment for time-dependent confounding, the positive associations between indicators of intubation and of cognitive impairment and next-day delirium became stronger. These results emphasize the need for more studies regarding the efficacy of haloperidol for treatment of delirium among older medical ICU patients and demonstrate the value of assessing nonintubated patients.

  14. Method for calculating individual equivalent doses and cumulative dose of population in the vicinity of nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namestek, L.; Khorvat, D; Shvets, J.; Kunz, Eh.

    1976-01-01

    A method of calculating the doses of external and internal person irradiation in the nuclear power plant vicinity under conditions of normal operation and accident situations has been described. The main difference between the above method and methods used up to now is the use of a new antropomorphous representation of a human body model together with all the organs. The antropomorphous model of human body and its organs is determined as a set of simple solids, coordinates of disposistion of the solids, sizes, masses, densities and composition corresponding the genuine organs. The use of the Monte-Carlo method is the second difference. The results of the calculations according to the model suggested can be used for determination: a critical group of inhabitans under conditions of normal plant operation; groups of inhabitants most subjected to irradiation in the case of possible accident; a critical sector with a maximum collective dose in the case of an accident; a critical radioisotope favouring the greatest contribution to an individual equivalent dose; critical irradiation ways promoting a maximum contribution to individual equivalent doses; cumulative collective doses for the whole region or for a chosen part of the region permitting to estimate a population dose. The consequent method evoluation suggests the development of separate units of the calculationg program, critical application and the selection of input data of physical, plysiological and ecological character and improvement of the calculated program for the separate concrete events [ru

  15. Pharmacoepidemiology of opiate use in the neonatal ICU: Increasing cumulative doses and iatrogenic opiate withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tamorah; Erfe, Betty Luan; Ezell, Tarrah; Gauda, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care unit (ICU) care involves use of opiates to treat postoperative, ventilated, or chronically ill infants. Opiates provide necessary analgesia and sedation, but the morbidities include prolonged neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and extended length of stay for dose tapering. Our objective was to quantify trends in opiate exposure in a tertiary care NICU. The authors hypothesize that medical opiate exposure and resultant ICU-acquired NAS would increase over time. Retrospective cross-sectional cohort study. Tertiary care NICU. High-risk inborn infants admitted in fiscal years 2003-2004, 2007-2008, and 2010-2011. Average cumulative morphine exposure (all opiate doses converted to morphine equivalents) per time epoch was compared in cohorts of clinically similar infants. Linear regression was used to assess the primary outcome, assessing changes in opiate exposure over time. Sixty-three infants were included in the final analysis. The primary analysis assessing cumulative opiate exposure per infant showed an increase of 134 mg per time epoch (95% CI-12, 279 mg, p-value 0.071). There was a statistically significant increase in the percent of infants with a diagnosis of iatrogenic NAS, increasing from 9 to 35 to 50 percent (p-value 0.012).

  16. Cumulative radiation dose caused by radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Patrick K; Gracias, Vicente H; Maidment, Andrew D A; O'Shea, Michael; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William

    2004-09-01

    Critically ill trauma patients undergo many radiologic studies, but the cumulative radiation dose is unknown. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation resulting from radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients. The study group was composed of trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center with surgical intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) greater than 30 days. The radiology records were reviewed. A typical effective dose per study for each type of plain film radiograph, computed tomographic scan, fluoroscopic study, and nuclear medicine study was used to calculate CED. Forty-six patients met criteria. The mean surgical intensive care unit and hospital LOS were 42.7 +/- 14.0 and 59.5 +/- 28.5 days, respectively. The mean Injury Severity Score was 32.2 +/- 15.0. The mean number of studies per patient was 70.1 +/- 29.0 plain film radiographs, 7.8 +/- 4.1 computed tomographic scans, 2.5 +/- 2.6 fluoroscopic studies, and 0.065 +/- 0.33 nuclear medicine study. The mean CED was 106 +/- 59 mSv per patient (range, 11-289 mSv; median, 104 mSv). Among age, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, and LOS, there was no statistically significant predictor of high CED. The mean CED in the study group was 30 times higher than the average yearly radiation dose from all sources for individuals in the United States. The theoretical additional morbidity attributable to radiologic studies was 0.78%. From a radiobiologic perspective, risk-to-benefit ratios of radiologic studies are favorable, given the importance of medical information obtained. Current practice patterns regarding use of radiologic studies appear to be acceptable.

  17. Age- and gender-specific estimates of cumulative CT dose over 5 years using real radiation dose tracking data in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eunsol; Goo, Hyun Woo; Lee, Jae-Yeong

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to develop a mechanism to estimate and analyze cumulative radiation risks from multiple CT exams in various clinical scenarios in children. To identify major contributors to high cumulative CT dose estimates using actual dose-length product values collected for 5 years in children. Between August 2006 and July 2011 we reviewed 26,937 CT exams in 13,803 children. Among them, we included 931 children (median age 3.5 years, age range 0 days-15 years; M:F = 533:398) who had 5,339 CT exams. Each child underwent at least three CT scans and had accessible radiation dose reports. Dose-length product values were automatically extracted from DICOM files and we used recently updated conversion factors for age, gender, anatomical region and tube voltage to estimate CT radiation dose. We tracked the calculated CT dose estimates to obtain a 5-year cumulative value for each child. The study population was divided into three groups according to the cumulative CT dose estimates: high, ≥30 mSv; moderate, 10-30 mSv; and low, <10 mSv. We reviewed clinical data and CT protocols to identify major contributors to high and moderate cumulative CT dose estimates. Median cumulative CT dose estimate was 5.4 mSv (range 0.5-71.1 mSv), and median number of CT scans was 4 (range 3-36). High cumulative CT dose estimates were most common in children with malignant tumors (57.9%, 11/19). High frequency of CT scans was attributed to high cumulative CT dose estimates in children with ventriculoperitoneal shunt (35 in 1 child) and malignant tumors (range 18-49). Moreover, high-dose CT protocols, such as multiphase abdomen CT (median 4.7 mSv) contributed to high cumulative CT dose estimates even in children with a low number of CT scans. Disease group, number of CT scans, and high-dose CT protocols are major contributors to higher cumulative CT dose estimates in children. (orig.)

  18. Analysis of Cumulative Dose to Implanted Pacemaker According to Various IMRT Delivery Methods: Optimal Dose Delivery Versus Dose Reduction Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Hong, Se Mie [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Cancer patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker occasionally require radiotherapy. Pacemaker may be damaged or malfunction during radiotherapy due to ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Although radiotherapy should be planned to keep the dose to pacemaker as low as possible not to malfunction ideally, current radiation treatment planning (RTP) system does not accurately calculate deposited dose to adjacent field border or area beyond irradiated fields. In terms of beam delivery techniques using multiple intensity modulated fields, dosimetric effect of scattered radiation in high energy photon beams is required to be detailed analyzed based on measurement data. The aim of this study is to evaluate dose discrepancies of pacemaker in a RTP system as compared to measured doses. We also designed dose reduction strategy limited value of 2 Gy for radiation treatment patients with cardiac implanted pacemaker. Total accumulated dose of 145 cGy based on in-vivo dosimetry was satisfied with the recommendation criteria to prevent malfunction of pacemaker in SS technique. However, the 2 mm lead shielder enabled the scattered doses to reduce up to 60% and 40% in the patient and the phantom, respectively. The SS technique with the lead shielding could reduce the accumulated scattered doses less than 100 cGy. Calculated and measured doses were not greatly affected by the beam delivery techniques. In-vivo and measured doses on pacemaker position showed critical dose discrepancies reaching up to 4 times as compared to planned doses in RTP. The current SS technique could deliver lower scattered doses than recommendation criteria, but use of 2 mm lead shielder contributed to reduce scattered doses by 60%. The tertiary lead shielder can be useful to prevent malfunction or electrical damage of implanted pacemakers during radiotherapy. It is required to estimate more accurate scattered doses of the patient or medical device in RTP to design proper dose reduction strategy.

  19. Analysis of Cumulative Dose to Implanted Pacemaker According to Various IMRT Delivery Methods: Optimal Dose Delivery Versus Dose Reduction Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Hong, Se Mie

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker occasionally require radiotherapy. Pacemaker may be damaged or malfunction during radiotherapy due to ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Although radiotherapy should be planned to keep the dose to pacemaker as low as possible not to malfunction ideally, current radiation treatment planning (RTP) system does not accurately calculate deposited dose to adjacent field border or area beyond irradiated fields. In terms of beam delivery techniques using multiple intensity modulated fields, dosimetric effect of scattered radiation in high energy photon beams is required to be detailed analyzed based on measurement data. The aim of this study is to evaluate dose discrepancies of pacemaker in a RTP system as compared to measured doses. We also designed dose reduction strategy limited value of 2 Gy for radiation treatment patients with cardiac implanted pacemaker. Total accumulated dose of 145 cGy based on in-vivo dosimetry was satisfied with the recommendation criteria to prevent malfunction of pacemaker in SS technique. However, the 2 mm lead shielder enabled the scattered doses to reduce up to 60% and 40% in the patient and the phantom, respectively. The SS technique with the lead shielding could reduce the accumulated scattered doses less than 100 cGy. Calculated and measured doses were not greatly affected by the beam delivery techniques. In-vivo and measured doses on pacemaker position showed critical dose discrepancies reaching up to 4 times as compared to planned doses in RTP. The current SS technique could deliver lower scattered doses than recommendation criteria, but use of 2 mm lead shielder contributed to reduce scattered doses by 60%. The tertiary lead shielder can be useful to prevent malfunction or electrical damage of implanted pacemakers during radiotherapy. It is required to estimate more accurate scattered doses of the patient or medical device in RTP to design proper dose reduction strategy.

  20. Glucocorticoid-Induced Avascular Bone Necrosis: Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, KL; Mok, CC

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid use is one of the most important causes of avascular bone necrosis (AVN). The pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced AVN is not fully understood but postulated mechanisms include fat hypertrophy, fat emboli and intravascular coagulation that cause impedance of blood supply to the bones. Data regarding the relationship between AVN and dosage, route of administration and treatment duration of glucocorticoids are conflicting, with some studies demonstrating the cumulative dose of glucocorticoid being the most important determining factor. Early recognition of this complication is essential as the prognosis is affected by the stage of the disease. Currently, there is no consensus on whether universal screening of asymptomatic AVN should be performed for long-term glucocorticoid users. A high index of suspicion should be exhibited for bone and joint pain at typical sites. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bone scintigraphy is more sensitive than plain radiograph for diagnosing early-stage AVN. Conservative management of AVN includes rest and reduction of weight bearing. Minimization of glucocorticoid dose or a complete withdrawal of the drug should be considered if the underlying conditions allow. The efficacy of bisphosphonates in reducing the rate of collapse of femoral head in AVN is controversial. Surgical therapy of AVN includes core decompression, osteotomy, bone grafting and joint replacement. Recent advances in the treatment of AVN include the use of tantalum rod and the development of more wear resistant bearing surface in hip arthroplasty. PMID:23115605

  1. Glucocorticoid-induced avascular bone necrosis: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L; Mok, C C

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid use is one of the most important causes of avascular bone necrosis (AVN). The pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced AVN is not fully understood but postulated mechanisms include fat hypertrophy, fat emboli and intravascular coagulation that cause impedance of blood supply to the bones. Data regarding the relationship between AVN and dosage, route of administration and treatment duration of glucocorticoids are conflicting, with some studies demonstrating the cumulative dose of glucocorticoid being the most important determining factor. Early recognition of this complication is essential as the prognosis is affected by the stage of the disease. Currently, there is no consensus on whether universal screening of asymptomatic AVN should be performed for long-term glucocorticoid users. A high index of suspicion should be exhibited for bone and joint pain at typical sites. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bone scintigraphy is more sensitive than plain radiograph for diagnosing early-stage AVN. Conservative management of AVN includes rest and reduction of weight bearing. Minimization of glucocorticoid dose or a complete withdrawal of the drug should be considered if the underlying conditions allow. The efficacy of bisphosphonates in reducing the rate of collapse of femoral head in AVN is controversial. Surgical therapy of AVN includes core decompression, osteotomy, bone grafting and joint replacement. Recent advances in the treatment of AVN include the use of tantalum rod and the development of more wear resistant bearing surface in hip arthroplasty.

  2. Cumulative total effective whole-body radiation dose in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Deborah J; Bennett, Suzanne; Samaratunga, Chandrasiri; Jewell, Elizabeth S; Smith, Jeffrey P; Gaskill-Shipley, Mary; Lisco, Steven J

    2013-11-01

    Uncertainty exists about a safe dose limit to minimize radiation-induced cancer. Maximum occupational exposure is 20 mSv/y averaged over 5 years with no more than 50 mSv in any single year. Radiation exposure to the general population is less, but the average dose in the United States has doubled in the past 30 years, largely from medical radiation exposure. We hypothesized that patients in a mixed-use surgical ICU (SICU) approach or exceed this limit and that trauma patients were more likely to exceed 50 mSv because of frequent diagnostic imaging. Patients admitted into 15 predesignated SICU beds in a level I trauma center during a 30-day consecutive period were prospectively observed. Effective dose was determined using Huda's method for all radiography, CT imaging, and fluoroscopic examinations. Univariate and multivariable linear regressions were used to analyze the relationships between observed values and outcomes. Five of 74 patients (6.8%) exceeded exposures of 50 mSv. Univariate analysis showed trauma designation, length of stay, number of CT scans, fluoroscopy minutes, and number of general radiographs were all associated with increased doses, leading to exceeding occupational exposure limits. In a multivariable analysis, only the number of CT scans and fluoroscopy minutes remained significantly associated with increased whole-body radiation dose. Radiation levels frequently exceeded occupational exposure standards. CT imaging contributed the most exposure. Health-care providers must practice efficient stewardship of radiologic imaging in all critically ill and injured patients. Diagnostic benefit must always be weighed against the risk of cumulative radiation dose.

  3. Cumulative Lung Dose for Several Motion Management Strategies as a Function of Pretreatment Patient Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Campbell, Jonathon; Zhang Tiezhi; Yan Di

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patient parameters that may predict for relative differences in cumulative four-dimensional (4D) lung dose among several motion management strategies. Methods and Materials: Deformable image registration and dose accumulation were used to generate 4D treatment plans for 18 patients with 4D computed tomography scans. Three plans were generated to simulate breath hold at normal inspiration, target tracking with the beam aperture, and mid-ventilation aperture (control of the target at the mean daily position and application of an iteratively computed margin to compensate for respiration). The relative reduction in mean lung dose (MLD) between breath hold and mid-ventilation aperture (ΔMLD BH ) and between target tracking and mid-ventilation aperture (ΔMLD TT ) was calculated. Associations between these two variables and parameters of the lesion (excursion, size, location, and deformation) and dose distribution (local dose gradient near the target) were also calculated. Results: The largest absolute and percentage differences in MLD were 1.0 Gy and 21.5% between breath hold and mid-ventilation aperture. ΔMLD BH was significantly associated (p TT was significantly associated with excursion, deformation, and local dose gradient. A linear model was constructed to represent ΔMLD vs. excursion. For each 5 mm of excursion, target tracking reduced the MLD by 4% compared with the results of a mid-ventilation aperture plan. For breath hold, the reduction was 5% per 5 mm of excursion. Conclusions: The relative difference in MLD among different motion management strategies varied with patient and tumor characteristics for a given dosimetric target coverage. Tumor excursion is useful to aid in stratifying patients according to appropriate motion management strategies.

  4. [Glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anić, Branimir; Mayer, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Secondary osteoporosis most often develops due to glucocorticoid therapy. Glucocorticoids affect all stages of the bone remodeling cycle, its formation and resorption. Osteoblasts are primarily affected, decreasing their activity and enhancing apoptosis. Patients treated with glucocorticoids have lower bone mineral density and increased fracture risk. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis can be prevented by administering the minimal effective dose of glucocorticoids, calcium and vitamin D supplementation or, if possible, by hormone replace- ment therapy. Moreover, appropriate physical activity should be encouraged. Patients who are at higher risk for low-energy fractures (for example post-menopausal women) have to be actively treated, usually with antiresorptive drugs among which bisphosphonates are currently the first line therapy.

  5. Prediction of the cumulated dose for external beam irradiation of prostate cancer patients with 3D-CRT technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giżyńska Marta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays in radiotherapy, much effort is taken to minimize the irradiated volume and consequently minimize doses to healthy tissues. In our work, we tested the hypothesis that the mean dose distribution calculated from a few first fractions can serve as prediction of the cumulated dose distribution, representing the whole treatment. We made our tests for 25 prostate cancer patients treated with three orthogonal fields technique. We did a comparison of dose distribution calculated as a sum of dose distribution from each fraction with a dose distribution calculated with isocenter shifted for a mean setup error from a few first fractions. The cumulative dose distribution and predicted dose distributions are similar in terms of gamma (3 mm 3% analysis, under condition that we know setup error from seven first fractions. We showed that the dose distribution calculated for the original plan with the isocenter shifted to the point, defined as the original isocenter corrected of the mean setup error estimated from the first seven fractions supports our hypothesis, i.e. can serve as a prediction for cumulative dose distribution.

  6. Cumulative high doses of inhaled formoterol have less systemic effects in asthmatic children 6-11 years-old than cumulative high doses of inhaled terbutaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Rikke; Agertoft, Lone; Pedersen, Sören

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate high dose tolerability and relative systemic dose potency between inhaled clinically equipotent dose increments of formoterol and terbutaline in children. METHODS: Twenty boys and girls (6-11 years-old) with asthma and normal ECGs were studied. Ten doses of formoterol (Oxi...

  7. A personal radio-frequency dosimeter with cumulative-dose recording capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochelle, R.W.; Moore, M.R.; Thomas, R.S.; Ewing, P.D.; Hess, R.A.; Hoffheins, B.S.

    1990-01-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) dosimeter developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a portable, pocket-sized cumulative-dose recording device designed to detect and record the strengths and durations of electric fields present in the work areas of naval vessels. The device measures an integrated dose and records the electric fields that exceed the permissible levels set by the American National Standards Institute. Features of the rf dosimeter include a frequency range of 30 MHz to 10 GHz and a three-dimensional sensor. Data obtained with the rf dosimeter will be used to determine the ambient field-strength profile for shipboard personnel over an extended time. Readings are acquired and averaged over a 6-min period corresponding to the rise time of the core body temperature. These values are stored for up to 6 months, after which the data are transferred to a computer via the dosimeter's serial port. The rf dosimeter should increase knowledge of the levels of electric fields to which individuals are exposed. 13 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Cumulative effective dose associated with computed tomography examinations in adolescent trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Hyung Sik; Choi, Hye-Young; Cho, Jinseong; Yang, Hyuk Jun; Chung, Yong Eun

    2014-07-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze cumulative effective dose (cED) and to assess lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer due to radiation exposure during computed tomography (CT) examinations in adolescent trauma patients. Between January 2010 and May 2011, the adolescent patients with trauma were enrolled in this study. Numbers of CT examinations and body regions examined were collated, and cEDs were calculated using dose-length product values and conversion factors. Lifetime attributable risk for cancer incidence and cancer-associated mortality were quantified based on the studies of survivors of the atomic bombs on Japan. Data were stratified according to severity of trauma: minor trauma, injury severity score of less than 16; and major trauma, injury severity score of 16 or greater. A total of 698 CT scans were obtained on the following regions of 484 adolescent patients: head CT, n = 647; rest of the body, n = 41; and thorax, n = 10. Mean cED per patient was 3.4 mSv, and mean LARs for cancer incidence and mortality were 0.05% and 0.02%, respectively. The majority of patients (98.4%) experienced minor trauma, and their mean cED and LARs for cancer incidence and mortality (3.0 mSv and 0.04% and 0.02%, respectively) were significantly lower than those of patients with major trauma (24.3 mSv and 0.31% and 0.15%, respectively, all P values trauma was found to be relatively low in adolescent patients. However, adolescent patients with major trauma were exposed to a substantial amount of radiation during multiple CT examinations.

  9. Re-irradiation: Outcome, cumulative dose and toxicity in patients retreated with stereotactic radiotherapy in the abdominal or pelvic region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Abusaris (Huda); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa); J.J.M.E. Nuyttens (Joost)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the present study was to explore the outcome, cumulative dose in tumor and organs at risk and toxicity after extra-cranial stereotactic re-irradiation. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated who had been re-irradiated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) after

  10. Estimated cumulative radiation dose received by diagnostic imaging during staging and treatment of operable Ewing sarcoma 2005-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Boel [Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 1400, Bergen (Norway); Fasmer, Kristine Eldevik [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Section, Bergen (Norway); Boye, Kjetil [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Oslo (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen; Aukland, Stein Magnus [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paediatric Section, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway); Trovik, Clement [University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Section, Bergen (Norway); Biermann, Martin [Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 1400, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2017-01-15

    Patients with Ewing sarcoma are subject to various diagnostic procedures that incur exposure to ionising radiation. To estimate the radiation doses received from all radiologic and nuclear imaging episodes during diagnosis and treatment, and to determine whether {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography - computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT) is a major contributor of radiation. Twenty Ewing sarcoma patients diagnosed in Norway in 2005-2012 met the inclusion criteria (age <30 years, operable disease, uncomplicated chemotherapy and surgery, no metastasis or residual disease within a year of diagnosis). Radiation doses from all imaging during the first year were calculated for each patient. The mean estimated cumulative radiation dose for all patients was 34 mSv (range: 6-70), radiography accounting for 3 mSv (range: 0.2-12), CT for 13 mSv (range: 2-28) and nuclear medicine for 18 mSv (range: 2-47). For the patients examined with PET-CT, the mean estimated cumulative effective dose was 38 mSv, of which PET-CT accounted for 14 mSv (37%). There was large variation in number and type of examinations performed and also in estimated cumulative radiation dose. The mean radiation dose for patients examined with PET-CT was 23% higher than for patients not examined with PET-CT. (orig.)

  11. Estimated cumulative radiation dose received by diagnostic imaging during staging and treatment of operable Ewing sarcoma 2005-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, Boel; Fasmer, Kristine Eldevik; Boye, Kjetil; Rosendahl, Karen; Aukland, Stein Magnus; Trovik, Clement; Biermann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Ewing sarcoma are subject to various diagnostic procedures that incur exposure to ionising radiation. To estimate the radiation doses received from all radiologic and nuclear imaging episodes during diagnosis and treatment, and to determine whether 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography - computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET-CT) is a major contributor of radiation. Twenty Ewing sarcoma patients diagnosed in Norway in 2005-2012 met the inclusion criteria (age <30 years, operable disease, uncomplicated chemotherapy and surgery, no metastasis or residual disease within a year of diagnosis). Radiation doses from all imaging during the first year were calculated for each patient. The mean estimated cumulative radiation dose for all patients was 34 mSv (range: 6-70), radiography accounting for 3 mSv (range: 0.2-12), CT for 13 mSv (range: 2-28) and nuclear medicine for 18 mSv (range: 2-47). For the patients examined with PET-CT, the mean estimated cumulative effective dose was 38 mSv, of which PET-CT accounted for 14 mSv (37%). There was large variation in number and type of examinations performed and also in estimated cumulative radiation dose. The mean radiation dose for patients examined with PET-CT was 23% higher than for patients not examined with PET-CT. (orig.)

  12. Relationship between mutation frequency of GPA locus and cumulative dose among medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Yu Wenru; Li Benxiao; Fan Tiqiang; Li Zhen; Gao Zhiwei; Chen Zhenjun; Zhao Yongcheng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of using GPA locus mutation assay as a bio-dosimeter for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Methods: An improved technique of GPA locus mutation assay was used in th study. The frequencies of mutant RBC in peripheral blood of 55 medical X-ray workers and 50 controls employed in different calendar-year periods were detected. The relationship between mutation frequencies (MFs) and period of entry, working years and cumulative doses were analyzed. Results: The MFs were significantly elevated among X-ray workers employed before 1970. This finding is similar to the result of cancer epidemiological study among medical X-ray workers , in which the cancer risk was significantly increased only X-ray workers employed before 1970. The MFs of GPA increased with increasing cumulative dose. The dose-effect relationship of Nφ MF with cumulative dose was closer than that of NN MF. Conclusion: There are many problems to be solved for using GPA MF assay as a bio-dosimeter such as individual variation, specificity and calibration curve of dose-effect relationship

  13. Applicability of the tissue stem cell turnover concept on the validity of cumulative dose based radiation risk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    The radiation protection system adopts the linear no-threshold model to achieve proper radiation protection for considering cancer risks resulting from radiation exposure. This model uses cumulative dose to a tissue for risk evaluation in which cumulative dose is related to the amount of DNA damage and consequential induction of gene mutation. In this concept, gene mutation accumulates in tissue stem cells, the putative target of carcinogenesis, with total dose given to the tissue. Unlike high-dose-rate exposure, epidemiological studies in high radiation background areas, such as Kerala in India, revealed that cancer risks is not elevated by the dose to the inhabitants, suggesting that there exists some mechanisms to eliminate the damage/mutation in the exposed tissue under extremely low-dose-rate exposure situations. In this report, the dynamics of tissue stem cell turnover is evaluated as a possible mechanism under extremely low-dose-rate exposure situations. To this end, we reviewed recent literatures studying tissue stem cell turnover, and found that great advances in stem cell research have made it possible to trace a fate of stem cells in tissues. Furthermore, turnover of tissue stem cells is found to occur after irradiation, due to competition of stem cells within tissues. This raises a possibility that radiation effects may not accumulate in a tissue depending on the dose-rate and duration of exposure period. (author)

  14. Efficacy between high and medium doses of glucocorticoid therapy in remission induction of IgG4-related diseases: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingjun; Chang, Jie; Chen, Hua; Chen, Yu; Yang, Hongxian; Fei, Yunyun; Zhang, Panpan; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Zhang, Wen

    2017-05-01

    In order to evaluate the efficacy and safety of high versus medium doses of glucocorticoid therapy in remission induction of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD), we set up a randomized controlled study. Newly diagnosed IgG4-RD patients were randomly assigned to two groups: high doses of prednisone (0.8-1.0 mg/kg/day) and medium doses (0.5-0.6 mg/kg/day). Patients were assessed at weeks 0, 4, 12 and 24. The primary outcome was the remission rate at week 24. The secondary endpoints included IgG4-RD responder index (IgG4-RD RI), IgG and IgG4 levels. Twenty cases in each group finished the study. At week 24, the total response rates were 95% and 80% in high and medium dose groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups. IgG4-RD RI reduced from 14.9 to 3.0 in the high dose group, while in the medium dose group it was from 13.1 to 3.2. At week 24, the average level of IgG4 reduced from 1576 to 324 mg/dL and from 1445 to 684 mg/dL in the two groups, respectively. Relapsed patients had higher baseline IgG4-RD RI. There was no severe adverse effect shown in both groups. The effect of remission induction was similar in high and medium glucocorticoid groups. However, patients with more organs involved and higher IgG4-RD RI score at baseline might get more benefit with high dose glucocorticoid for remission induction. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. The dose-response relationship between cumulative lifting load and lumbar disk degeneration based on magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Ju; Shih, Tiffany T-F; Chen, Bang-Bin; Hwang, Yaw-Huei; Ma, Li-Ping; Huang, Wen-Chuan; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Ho, Ing-Kang; Guo, Yue L

    2014-11-01

    Lumbar disk degeneration (LDD) has been related to heavy physical loading. However, the quantification of the exposure has been controversial, and the dose-response relationship with the LDD has not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-response relationship between lifetime cumulative lifting load and LDD. This was a cross-sectional study. Every participant received assessments with a questionnaire, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine, and estimation of lumbar disk compression load. The MRI assessments included assessment of disk dehydration, annulus tear, disk height narrowing, bulging, protrusion, extrusion, sequestration, degenerative and spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, foramina narrowing, and nerve root compression on each lumbar disk level. The compression load was predicted using a biomechanical software system. A total of 553 participants were recruited in this study and categorized into tertiles by cumulative lifting load (ie, lifting load. The best dose-response relationships were found at the L5-S1 disk level, in which high cumulative lifting load was associated with elevated odds ratios of 2.5 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]=1.5, 4.1) for dehydration and 4.1 (95% CI=1.9, 10.1) for disk height narrowing compared with low lifting load. Participants exposed to intermediate lifting load had an increased odds ratio of 2.1 (95% CI=1.3, 3.3) for bulging compared with low lifting load. The tests for trend were significant. There is no "gold standard" assessment tool for measuring the lumbar compression load. The results suggest a dose-response relationship between cumulative lifting load and LDD. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  16. Relationship of cumulative low-level dose of ionizing radiation on human eye lens and occurrence of cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deolalikar, Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), issued a statement on Tissue Reaction, lowering the equivalent dose limit for eye lens for occupational exposure to 20 mSv per year. With a view to determine presence of any relationship between the cumulative low-level occupational radiation dose to the eye lens and occurrence of cataract, departmental records of the annual medical examination of employees of Narora Atomic Power Plant were examined along with the NAPS eye camps and surgical records of the employees. Analysis of the data showed no demonstrable definite relationship between the two. The analysis of the data and the observations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  17. Quantitative assessment of cumulative damage from repetitive exposures to suberythemogenic doses of UVA in human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavker, R.M.; Kaidbey, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    Daily exposures to relatively small suberythemogenic fluences of UVA (50-200 kJ/m 2 ) for 8 days resulted in cumulative morphological skin alterations indicative of early tissue injury. Histologically, irradiated skin revealed epidermal hyperplasia, inflammation and deposition of lysozyme along the dermal elastic fiber network. Sunburn cells were also present within the epidermis. These changes were quantified by image analysis and were found to be related to the cumulative UVA fluence. A long UVA waveband (UVAI, 340-400 nm) was as effective as a broad UVA band (320-400 nm), suggesting that these changes are induced by longer UVA wavelengths. (author)

  18. A study of the relationship between peak skin dose and cumulative air kerma in interventional neuroradiology and cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, S; Padgham, C; Martin, C J

    2010-01-01

    A study of peak skin doses (PSDs) during neuroradiology and cardiology interventional procedures has been carried out using Gafchromic XR-RV2 film. Use of mosaics made from squares held in cling film has allowed doses to the head to be mapped successfully. The displayed cumulative air kerma (CAK) has been calibrated in terms of cumulative entrance surface dose (CESD) and results indicate that this can provide a reliable indicator of the PSD in neuroradiology. Results linking PSD to CESD for interventional cardiology were variable, but CAK is still considered to provide the best option for use as an indicator of potential radiation-induced effects. A CESD exceeding 3 Gy is considered a suitable action level for triggering follow-up of patients in neuroradiology and cardiology for possible skin effects. Application of dose action levels defined in this way would affect 8% of neurological embolisation procedures and 5% of cardiology ablation and multiple stent procedures at the hospitals where the investigations were carried out. A close relationship was observed between CESD and dose-area product (DAP) for particular types of procedure, and DAPs of 200-300 Gy cm 2 could be used as trigger levels where CAK readings were not available. The DAP value would depend on the mean field size and would need to be determined for each application.

  19. Cumulative effective dose and cancer risk for pediatric population in repetitive full spine follow-up imaging: How micro dose is the EOS microdose protocol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Martin; Ma, Wang-Kei; Lau, Damian; Cheung, Kenneth; Ip, Janice; Yip, Lawrance; Lam, Wendy

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate and to obtain analytic formulation for the calculation of the effective dose and associated cancer risk using the EOS microdose protocol for scoliotic pediatric patients undergoing full spine imaging at different age of exposure; to demonstrate the microdose protocol capable of delivering lesser radiation dose and hence of further reducing cancer risk induction when compared with the EOS low dose protocol; to obtain cumulative effective dose and cancer risk for both genders scoliotic pediatrics of US and Hong Kong population using the microdose protocol. Organ absorbed doses of full spine exposed scoliotic pediatric patients have been simulated with the use of EOS microdose protocol imaging parameters input to the Monte Carlo software PCXMC. Gender and age specific effective dose has been calculated with the simulated organ absorbed dose using the ICRP-103 approach. The associated radiation induced cancer risk, expressed as lifetime attributable risk (LAR), has been estimated according to the method introduced in the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report. Values of LAR have been estimated for scoliotic patients exposed repetitively during their follow up period at different age for US and Hong Kong population. The effective doses of full spine imaging with simultaneous posteroanterior and lateral projection for patients exposed at the age between 5 and 18 years using the EOS microdose protocol have been calculated within the range of 2.54-14.75 μSv. The corresponding LAR for US and Hong Kong population was ranged between 0.04 × 10 -6 and 0.84 × 10 -6 . Cumulative effective dose and cancer risk during follow-up period can be estimated using the results and are of information to patients and their parents. With the use of computer simulation and analytic formulation, we obtained the cumulative effective dose and cancer risk at any age of exposure for pediatric patients of US and Hong Kong population undergoing repetitive

  20. Perioperative glucocorticoids in hip and knee surgery - benefit vs. harm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, T H; Kehlet, H

    2013-01-01

    with systemic glucocorticoid. Pain was reduced with high-dose systemic and local glucocorticoid, but not with low-dose systemic glucocorticoid. Systemic inflammatory markers were reduced with low-dose and high-dose systemic glucocorticoid, and with local glucocorticoid. Functional recovery was improved...... with local glucocorticoid. All studies were small-sized and none sufficiently powered to meaningfully evaluate uncommon adverse events. Most of the local administration studies had poor scientific quality (high risk of bias). Due to clinical heterogeneity and poor scientific quality, no meta......-analysis was performed. In conclusion, in addition to PONV reduction with low-dose systemic glucocorticoid, this review supports high-dose systemic glucocorticoid to ameliorate post-operative pain after hip and knee surgery. However, large-scale safety and dose-finding studies are warranted before final recommendations....

  1. Synergistic effect of cumulative corticosteroid dose and immunosuppressants on avascular necrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, H H; Bang, S Y; Won, S; Park, Y; Yi, J H; Joo, Y B; Lee, H S; Bae, S C

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Avascular necrosis (AVN) is one of the most common causes of organ damage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and often causes serious physical disability. The aims of this study were to investigate clinical risk factors associated with symptomatic AVN and to analyze their synergistic effects in a large SLE cohort in Korea. Methods Patients with SLE were enrolled and followed from 1998 to 2014 in the Hanyang BAE Lupus cohort, and damage was measured annually according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI). AVN was confirmed by imaging study if patients had symptoms. To determine risk factors for AVN, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic variables were analyzed by logistic regression. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI), attributable proportion (AP), and synergy index (S) were calculated to measure interactions between significant variables. Results Among 1219 SLE patients, symptomatic AVN was the most common type of musculoskeletal damage (10.8%, n = 132). SLE patients with AVN showed an earlier onset age, demonstrated AVN more commonly in conjunction with certain other clinical manifestations such as renal and neuropsychiatric disorders, and received significantly higher total cumulative corticosteroid dose and immunosuppressive agents than did patients without AVN. However, in multivariable analysis, only two variables including use of a cumulative corticosteroid dose greater than 20 g (odds ratio (OR) 3.62, p = 0.015) and use of immunosuppressants including cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate mofetil (OR 4.51, p AVN. Patients with cumulative corticosteroid dose > 20 g and immunosuppressant use had a 15.44-fold increased risk for AVN, compared with patients without these risk factors ( p AVN in our Korean lupus cohort. Conclusions An individual risk assessment for AVN development should be made prior to and during treatment for SLE

  2. Short-term, high-dose glucocorticoid treatment does not contribute to reduced bone mineral density in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, A.; Oturai, D B; Sørensen, P S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are at increased risk of reduced bone mineral density (BMD). A contributing factor might be treatment with high-dose glucocorticoids (GCs). OBJECTIVES: The objective of this paper is to assess bone mass in patients with MS and evaluate...... the importance of short-term, high-dose GC treatment and other risk factors that affect BMD in patients with MS. METHODS: A total of 260 patients with MS received short-term high-dose GC treatment and had their BMD measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry. BMD was compared to a healthy age-matched reference...... population (Z-scores). Data regarding GCs, age, body mass index (BMI), serum 25(OH)D, disease duration and severity were collected retrospectively and analysed in a multiple linear regression analysis to evaluate the association between each risk factor and BMD. RESULTS: Osteopenia was present in 38...

  3. Estimated cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies: a 5-year retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Soni C.; Federman, Noah; Zhang, Di; Nagata, Kristen; Nuthakki, Soujanya; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Boechat, M.I.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing use of serial PET/CT scans in the management of pediatric malignancies raises the important consideration of radiation exposure in children. To estimate the cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT studies to children with malignancy and to compare with the data in literature. Two hundred forty-eight clinical PET/CT studies performed on 78 patients (50 boys/28 girls, 1.3 to 18 years old from December 2002 to October 2007) were retrospectively reviewed under IRB approval. The whole-body effective dose (ED) estimates for each child were obtained by estimating the effective dose from each PET/CT exam performed using the ImPACT Patient Dosimetry Calculator for CT and OLINDA for PET. The average number of PET/CT studies was 3.2 per child (range: 1 to 14 studies). The average ED of an individual CT study was 20.3 mSv (range: 2.7 to 54.2), of PET study was 4.6 mSv (range: 0.4 to 7.7) and of PET/CT study was 24.8 mSv (range: 6.2 to 60.7). The average cumulative radiation dose per patient from CT studies was 64.4 mSv (range: 2.7 to 326), from PET studies was 14.5 mSv (range: 2.8 to 73) and from PET/CT studies was 78.9 mSv (range: 6.2 to 399). The radiation exposure from serial PET/CT studies performed in pediatric malignancies was considerable; however, lower doses can be used for both PET and CT studies. The ALARA principle must be applied without sacrificing diagnostic information. (orig.)

  4. Cumulative dose 60Co gamma irradiation effects on AlGaN/GaN Schottky diodes and its area dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chandan; Laishram, Robert; Rawal, Dipendra Singh; Vinayak, Seema; Singh, Rajendra

    2018-04-01

    Cumulative dose gamma radiation effects on current-voltage characteristics of GaN Schottky diodes have been investigated. The different area diodes have been fabricated on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) epi-layer structure grown over SiC substrate and irradiated with a dose up to the order of 104 Gray (Gy). Post irradiation characterization shows a shift in the turn-on voltage and improvement in reverse leakage current. Other calculated parameters include Schottky barrier height, ideality factor and reverse saturation current. Schottky barrier height has been decreased whereas reverse saturation current shows an increase in the value post irradiation with improvement in the ideality factor. Transfer length measurement (TLM) characterization shows an improvement in the contact resistance. Finally, diodes with larger area have more variation in the calculated parameters due to the induced local heating effect.

  5. Unmasking of Partial Diabetes Insipidus during Stress but Not Maintenance Dosing of Glucocorticoids in an Infant with Septo-Optic Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loechner KarenJ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is well acknowledged that glucocorticoid (GC replacement can unmask diabetes insipidus (DI in subjects with hypopituitarism. Objective. To increase the awareness and monitoring for transient and symptomatic DI in children with partial hypopituitarism during periods in which increased GC needs are required. Methods/Case. A 2-month-old female infant with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD; on thyroid and maintenance GC replacement therapy at 8 mg/m2/day developed transient DI during 2 separate episodes of stress (one hypothermia, one febrile when stress dosing of GC (25 mg/m2/day was instituted. Conclusion. Children not diagnosed with DI during initial evaluation for hypopituitarism may benefit from rescreening of serum sodium levels during acute periods of stress that demand "stress" GC dosing. This will permit treatment and/or increased vigilance for ensuing permanent DI.

  6. Islet-cell dysfunction induced by glucocorticoid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Kwa, Kelly A A; van Genugten, Renate E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system.......Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system....

  7. Risk of therapy-related leukaemia and preleukaemia after Hodgkin's disease. Relation to age, cumulative dose of alkylating agents, and time from chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.; Specht, L.; Larsen, S.O.

    1987-01-01

    391 patients treated intensively for Hodgkin's disease were followed for up to 15 years to evaluate the risk of therapy-related acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (t-ANLL) and preleukaemia. Only two independent factors, patient age and cumulative dose of alkylating agents, were related to the risk...... of t-ANLL. The hazard rate of t-ANLL was roughly proportional to the square of patient age and to the total cumulative dose of alkylating agents. In 320 patients treated with alkylating agents the cumulative risk of t-ANLL increased steadily from 1 year after the start of treatment and reached 13.......0% (SE 3.0) at 10 years after which time there were no further cases. Calculated from cessation of therapy with alkylating agents, however, the cumulative risk curve increased steeply during the first 1-2 years then gradually levelled out and no new cases were observed beyond 7 years. With a 15-year...

  8. Clinical significance of cumulative biological effective dose and overall treatment time in the treatment of carcinoma cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Abhijit

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study is to report the radiotherapy treatment response of, and complications in, patients with cervical cancer on the basis of cumulative biologic effective dose (BED and overall treatment time (OTT. Sixty-four (stage II - 35/64; stage III - 29/64 patients of cervical cancer were treated with combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and low dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT. The cumulative BED was calculated at Point A (BED 10 ; and bladder, rectal reference points (BED 2.5 using the linear-quadratic BED equations. The local control (LC rate and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS rate in patients of stage II were comparable for BED 10 < 84.5 and BED 10 > 84.5 but were much higher for BED 10 > 84.5 than BED 10 < 84.5 ( P < 0.01 in stage III patients. In the stage II patients, The LC rate and 5-year DFS rate were comparable for OTT < 50 days and for OTT> 50 days but were much higher in stage III patients with OTT < 50 than OTT> 50 days ( P < 0.001. It was also observed that patients who received BED 2.5 < 105 had lesser rectal ( P < 0.001 and bladder complications than BED 2.5 > 105. Higher rectal complication-free survival (CFS R rate, bladder complication-free survival (CFS B rate and all-type late complication-free survival rate were observed in patients who received BED 2.5 < 105 than BED 2.5 > 105. A balanced, optimal and justified radiotherapy treatment schedule to deliver higher BED 10 (>84.5 and lower BED 2.5 (< 105 in lesser OTT (< 50 days is essential in carcinoma cervix to expect a better treatment outcome in all respects.

  9. Measurement of soil contamination by radionuclides due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and associated estimated cumulative external dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, S.; Kimura, S.; Takatsuji, T.; Nanasawa, K.; Imanaka, T.; Shizuma, K.

    2012-01-01

    Soil sampling was carried out at an early stage of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Samples were taken from areas around FDNPP, at four locations northwest of FDNPP, at four schools and in four cities, including Fukushima City. Radioactive contaminants in soil samples were identified and measured by using a Ge detector and included 129m Te, 129 Te, 131 I, 132 Te, 132 I, 134 Cs, 136 Cs, 137 Cs, 140 Ba and 140 La. The highest soil depositions were measured to the northwest of FDNPP. From this soil deposition data, variations in dose rates over time and the cumulative external doses at the locations for 3 months and 1 y after deposition were estimated. At locations northwest of FDNPP, the external dose rate at 3 months after deposition was 4.8–98 μSv/h and the cumulative dose for 1 y was 51 to 1.0 × 10 3 mSv; the highest values were at Futaba Yamada. At the four schools, which were used as evacuation shelters, and in the four urban cities, the external dose rate at 3 months after deposition ranged from 0.03 to 3.8 μSv/h and the cumulative doses for 1 y ranged from 3 to 40 mSv. The cumulative dose at Fukushima Niihama Park was estimated as the highest in the four cities. The estimated external dose rates and cumulative doses show that careful countermeasures and remediation will be needed as a result of the accident, and detailed measurements of radionuclide deposition densities in soil will be important input data to conduct these activities.

  10. Fitness costs of increased cataract frequency and cumulative radiation dose in natural mammalian populations from Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Philipp; Boratyński, Zbyszek; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders P

    2016-01-27

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens that reduces light transmission to the retina, and it decreases the visual acuity of the bearer. The prevalence of cataracts in natural populations of mammals, and their potential ecological significance, is poorly known. Cataracts have been reported to arise from high levels of oxidative stress and a major cause of oxidative stress is ionizing radiation. We investigated whether elevated frequencies of cataracts are found in eyes of bank voles Myodes glareolus collected from natural populations in areas with varying levels of background radiation in Chernobyl. We found high frequencies of cataracts in voles collected from different areas in Chernobyl. The frequency of cataracts was positively correlated with age, and in females also with the accumulated radiation dose. Furthermore, the number of offspring in female voles was negatively correlated with cataract severity. The results suggest that cataracts primarily develop as a function of ionizing background radiation, most likely as a plastic response to high levels of oxidative stress. It is therefore possible that the elevated levels of background radiation in Chernobyl affect the ecology and fitness of local mammals both directly through, for instance, reduced fertility and indirectly, through increased cataractogenesis.

  11. Cumulative inhibitory effect of low-dose aspirin on vascular prostacyclin and platelet thromboxane production in patients with atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weksler, B B; Tack-Goldman, K; Subramanian, V A; Gay, W A

    1985-02-01

    The relationship between the antithrombotic and antiplatelet effects of aspirin is complex, since aspirin influences other systems that protect against thrombosis as well as inhibiting platelet function. We investigated possible cumulative effects of low-dose aspirin on vascular production of prostacyclin in patients with documented atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Candidates for coronary artery vein graft bypass ingested 20 mg of aspirin daily during the week before surgery, and platelet aggregation, platelet formation of thromboxane A2 (TXA2), aortic and saphenous vein production of prostacyclin (PGI2), and hemostatic status were measured at the time of the bypass surgery. Low-dose aspirin markedly inhibited platelet aggregation responses and reduced TXA2 generation by greater than 90%, effects similar to those observed with much higher doses of aspirin. Both aortic and saphenous vein production of PGI2 were inhibited by 50% compared with PGI2 produced by vascular tissues of control subjects who received no aspirin preoperatively (51 +/- 10 pg 6-keto-PGF1 alpha/mg aortic wet weight [mean +/- SEM] in aspirin-treated subjects vs 130 +/- 16 pg/mg in control subjects, and 71 +/- 8 pg/mg saphenous vein wet weight vs 131 +/- 17 pg/mg). Blood loss at surgery was not significantly increased by preoperative low-dose aspirin as measured by chest tube drainage (754 +/- 229 ml in aspirin-treated subjects vs 645 +/- 271 ml in control subjects), hematocrit nadir (31.2 +/- 1.9% vs 31.8 +/- 1.7%), or transfusions (2.2 +/- 1.3 units of red blood cells vs 2.2 +/- 1.7 units).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Short-term, high-dose glucocorticoid treatment does not contribute to reduced bone mineral density in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, A; Oturai, D B; Sørensen, P S; Oturai, P S; Oturai, A B

    2015-10-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are at increased risk of reduced bone mineral density (BMD). A contributing factor might be treatment with high-dose glucocorticoids (GCs). The objective of this paper is to assess bone mass in patients with MS and evaluate the importance of short-term, high-dose GC treatment and other risk factors that affect BMD in patients with MS. A total of 260 patients with MS received short-term high-dose GC treatment and had their BMD measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry. BMD was compared to a healthy age-matched reference population (Z-scores). Data regarding GCs, age, body mass index (BMI), serum 25(OH)D, disease duration and severity were collected retrospectively and analysed in a multiple linear regression analysis to evaluate the association between each risk factor and BMD. Osteopenia was present in 38% and osteoporosis in 7% of the study population. Mean Z-score was significantly below zero, indicating a decreased BMD in our MS patients. Multiple linear regression analysis showed no significant association between GCs and BMD. In contrast, age, BMI and disease severity were independently associated with both lumbar and femoral BMD. Reduced BMD was prevalent in patients with MS. GC treatment appears not to be the primary underlying cause of secondary osteoporosis in MS patients. © The Author(s), 2015.

  13. Physiological and immunological changes following exposure to low versus high-dose ionizing irradiation; comparative analysis with dose rate and cumulative dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesun, Kim; Heewon, Jang; Soungyeon, Song; Shinhye, Oh; Cukcheul, Shin; Meeseon, Jeong; Chasoon, Kim; Kwnaghee, Yang; Seonyoung, Nam; Jiyoung, Kim; Youngwoo, Jin; Changyoung, Cha

    2008-01-01

    Full text: While high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms some reports suggest low-dose of radiation may not be as damaging as previously thought. Despite increasing evidence regarding the protective effect of low-dose radiation, no studies have directly compared the exact dose-response pattern by high- and low-dose of radiation exposed at high-and low-dose rate. This study aims to explore the cellular and molecular changes in mice exposed to low- and high-dose of radiation exposed at low- and high-dose rate. When C57BL/6 mice (Female, 6 weeks) were exposed at high-dose rate, 0.8 Gy/min, no significant change on the level of WBC, RBC, or platelets was observed up to total dose of 0.5 Gy. However, 2 Gy of radiation caused dramatic reduction in the level of white blood cells (WBC) and platelets. This reduction was accompanied by increased DNA damage in hematopoietic environments. The reduction of WBC was mainly due to the reduction in the number of CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells. CD8+ T cells and NK cells appeared to be relatively resistant to high-dose of radiation. This change was also accompanied by the reduction of T- and B- progenitor cells in the bone marrow. In contrast, no significant changes of the number of CD4+ T, CD8+ T, NK, and B cells were observed in the spleen of mice exposed at low-dose-rate (0.7 m Gy/h or 3.95 mGy/h) for up to 2 Gy, suggesting that low-dose radiation does not alter cellular distribution in the spleen. Nevertheless, mice exposed to low-dose radiation exhibited elevation of VEGF, MCP-1, IL-4, Leptin, IL-3, and Tpo in the peripheral blood and slight increases in MIP-2, RANTES, and IL-2 in the spleen. This suggests that chronic γ-radiation can stimulate immune function without causing damage to the immune components of the body. Taken together, these data indicate hormesis of low-dose radiation, which could be attributed to the stimulation of immune function. Dose rate rather than total

  14. Dose-Response Relationship between Cumulative Occupational Lead Exposure and the Associated Health Damages: A 20-Year Cohort Study of a Smelter in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Gu, Jun-Ming; Huang, Yun; Duan, Yan-Ying; Huang, Rui-Xue; Hu, Jian-An

    2016-03-16

    Long-term airborne lead exposure, even below official occupational limits, has been found to cause lead poisoning at higher frequencies than expected, which suggests that China's existing occupational exposure limits should be reexamined. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1832 smelting workers from 1988 to 2008 in China. These were individuals who entered the plant and came into continuous contact with lead at work for longer than 3 months. The dose-response relationship between occupational cumulative lead exposure and lead poisoning, abnormal blood lead, urinary lead and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) were analyzed and the benchmark dose lower bound confidence limits (BMDLs) were calculated. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between cumulative lead dust and lead fumes exposures and workplace seniority, blood lead, urinary lead and ZPP values. A dose-response relationship was observed between cumulative lead dust or lead fumes exposure and lead poisoning (p lead dust and fumes doses were 0.68 mg-year/m³ and 0.30 mg-year/m³ for lead poisoning, respectively. The BMDLs of workplace airborne lead concentrations associated with lead poisoning were 0.02 mg/m³ and 0.01 mg/m³ for occupational exposure lead dust and lead fume, respectively. In conclusion, BMDLs for airborne lead were lower than occupational exposure limits, suggesting that the occupational lead exposure limits need re-examination and adjustment. Occupational cumulative exposure limits (OCELs) should be established to better prevent occupational lead poisoning.

  15. Estimation of organ cumulated activities and absorbed doses on intakes of several 11C labelled radiopharmaceuticals from external measurement with thermoluminescent dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T; Hayashi, Y; Watabe, H; Matsumoto, M; Horikawa, T; Fujiwara, T; Ito, M; Yanai, K

    1998-02-01

    We have developed a method for obtaining the cumulated activities in organs from radionuclides, which are injected into the patient in nuclear medicine procedures, by external exposure measurement with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) which are attached to the patient's body surface close to source organs to obtain information on body-surface doses. As the surface dose is connected to the cumulated activities in source organs through radiation transmission in the human body which can be estimated with the aid of a mathematical phantom, the organ cumulated activities can be obtained by the inverse transform method. The accuracy of this method was investigated by using a water phantom in which several gamma-ray volume sources of known activity were placed to simulate source organs. We then estimated by external measurements the organ cumulated activities and absorbed doses in subjects to whom the radiopharmaceuticals 11C-labelled Doxepin, 11C-labelled YM09151-2 and 11C-labelled Benzotropin were administered in clinical nuclear medicine procedures. The cumulated activities in the brain obtained with TLDs for Doxepin and YM09151-2 are 63.6 +/- 6.2 and 32.1 +/- 12.0 kBq h MBq-1 respectively, which are compared with the respective values of 33.3 +/- 9.9 and 23.9 +/- 6.2 kBq h MBq-1 with direct PET (positron emission tomography) measurements. The agreement between the two methods is within a factor of two. The effective doses of Doxepin, YM09151-2 and Benzotropin are determined as 6.92 x 10(-3), 7.08 x 10(-3) and 7.65 x 10(-3) mSv MBq-1 respectively with the TLD method. This method has great advantages, in that cumulated activities in several organs can be obtained easily with a single procedure, and the measurements of body surface doses are performed simultaneously with the nuclear medicine procedure, as TLDs are too small to interfere with other medical measurements.

  16. Estimation of organ cumulated activities and absorbed doses on intakes of several {sup 11}C labelled radiopharmaceuticals from external measurement with thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Hayashi, Yoshiharu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Masaki; Horikawa, Tohru; Fujiwara, Takehiko; Ito, Masatoshi; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-77 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    We have developed a method for obtaining the cumulated activities in organs from radionuclides, which are injected into the patient in nuclear medicine procedures, by external exposure measurement with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) which are attached to the patient's body surface close to source organs to obtain information on body-surface doses. As the surface dose is connected to the cumulated activities in source organs through radiation transmission in the human body which can be estimated with the aid of a mathematical phantom, the organ cumulated activities can be obtained by the inverse transform method. The accuracy of this method was investigated by using a water phantom in which several gamma-ray volume sources of known activity were placed to simulate source organs. We then estimated by external measurements the organ cumulated activities and absorbed doses in subjects to whom the radiopharmaceuticals {sup 11}C-labelled Doxepin, {sup 11}C-labelled YM09151-2 and {sup 11}C-labelled Benzotropin were administered in clinical nuclear medicine procedures. The cumulated activities in the brain obtained with TLDs for Doxepin and YM09151-2 are 63.6{+-}6.2 and 32.1{+-}12.0 kBq h MBq{sup -1} respectively, which are compared with the respective values of 33.3{+-}9.9 and 23.9{+-}6.2 kBq h MBq{sup -1} with direct PET (positron emission tomography) measurements. The agreement between the two methods is within a factor of two. The effective doses of Doxepin, YM09151-2 and Benzotropin are determined as 6.92x10{sup -3}, 7.08x10{sup -3} and 7.65x10{sup -3} mSv MBq{sup -1} respectively with the TLD method. This method has great advantages, in that cumulated activities in several organs can be obtained easily with a single procedure, and the measurements of body surface doses are performed simultaneously with the nuclear medicine procedure, as TLDs are too small to interfere with other medical measurements. (author)

  17. SU-E-J-106: The Use of Deformable Image Registration with Cone-Beam CT for a Better Evaluation of Cumulative Dose to Organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillion, O; Gingras, L; Archambault, L [Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Centre de recherche du CHU de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Centre de recherche sur le cancer, Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The knowledge of dose accumulation in the patient tissues in radiotherapy helps in determining the treatment outcomes. This project aims at providing a workflow to map cumulative doses that takes into account interfraction organ motion without the need for manual re-contouring. Methods: Five prostate cancer patients were studied. Each patient had a planning CT (pCT) and 5 to 13 CBCT scans. On each series, a physician contoured the prostate, rectum, bladder, seminal vesicles and the intestine. First, a deformable image registration (DIR) of the pCTs onto the daily CBCTs yielded registered CTs (rCT) . This rCT combined the accurate CT numbers of the pCT with the daily anatomy of the CBCT. Second, the original plans (220 cGy per fraction for 25 fractions) were copied on the rCT for dose re-calculation. Third, the DIR software Elastix was used to find the inverse transform from the rCT to the pCT. This transformation was then applied to the rCT dose grid to map the dose voxels back to their pCT location. Finally, the sum of these deformed dose grids for each patient was applied on the pCT to calculate the actual dose delivered to organs. Results: The discrepancy between the planned D98 and D2 and these indices re-calculated on the rCT, are, on average, of −1 ± 1 cGy and 1 ± 2 cGy per fraction, respectively. For fractions with large anatomical motion, the D98 discrepancy on the re-calculated dose grid mapped onto the pCT can raise to −17 ± 4 cGy. The obtained cumulative dose distributions illustrate the same behavior. Conclusion: This approach allowed the evaluation of cumulative doses to organs with the help of uncontoured daily CBCT scans. With this workflow, the easy evaluation of doses delivered for EBRT treatments could ultimately lead to a better follow-up of prostate cancer patients.

  18. SU-E-J-106: The Use of Deformable Image Registration with Cone-Beam CT for a Better Evaluation of Cumulative Dose to Organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillion, O; Gingras, L; Archambault, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The knowledge of dose accumulation in the patient tissues in radiotherapy helps in determining the treatment outcomes. This project aims at providing a workflow to map cumulative doses that takes into account interfraction organ motion without the need for manual re-contouring. Methods: Five prostate cancer patients were studied. Each patient had a planning CT (pCT) and 5 to 13 CBCT scans. On each series, a physician contoured the prostate, rectum, bladder, seminal vesicles and the intestine. First, a deformable image registration (DIR) of the pCTs onto the daily CBCTs yielded registered CTs (rCT) . This rCT combined the accurate CT numbers of the pCT with the daily anatomy of the CBCT. Second, the original plans (220 cGy per fraction for 25 fractions) were copied on the rCT for dose re-calculation. Third, the DIR software Elastix was used to find the inverse transform from the rCT to the pCT. This transformation was then applied to the rCT dose grid to map the dose voxels back to their pCT location. Finally, the sum of these deformed dose grids for each patient was applied on the pCT to calculate the actual dose delivered to organs. Results: The discrepancy between the planned D98 and D2 and these indices re-calculated on the rCT, are, on average, of −1 ± 1 cGy and 1 ± 2 cGy per fraction, respectively. For fractions with large anatomical motion, the D98 discrepancy on the re-calculated dose grid mapped onto the pCT can raise to −17 ± 4 cGy. The obtained cumulative dose distributions illustrate the same behavior. Conclusion: This approach allowed the evaluation of cumulative doses to organs with the help of uncontoured daily CBCT scans. With this workflow, the easy evaluation of doses delivered for EBRT treatments could ultimately lead to a better follow-up of prostate cancer patients

  19. Glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, M.C.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis contains studies on current practice, clinical implications and treatment of excess glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) stimulation, with a focus on glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycaemia (GCIH). Chapter 1 is a general introduction to the glucocorticoid hormone. In chapter 2 , we have

  20. Current and historical individual data about exposure of workers in the rayon industry to carbon disulfide and their validity in calculating the cumulative dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göen, Thomas; Schramm, Axel; Baumeister, Thomas; Uter, Wolfgang; Drexler, Hans

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate how exposure to carbon disulfide (CS2) in a rayon-manufacturing plant has changed within two decades and whether it is possible to calculate valid data for the individual cumulative exposure. The data for CS2 concentration in air and biological exposure monitoring (2-thio-1,3-thiaxolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TTCA) in urine) from two cross-sectional studies, performed in 1992 (n = 362) and 2009 (n = 212) in a German rayon-manufacturing plant, were compared to data obtained from company-internal measurements between the studies. Using the data from the cross-sectional studies and company-internal data, cumulative external exposure and the cumulative internal exposure were calculated for each worker. External and internal CS2 exposure of the employees decreased from 1992 (medians 4.0 ppm and 1.63 mgTTCA/g creatinine) to 2009 (medians 2.5 ppm and 0.86 mg/g). However, company-internal CS2 data do not show a straight trend for this period. The annual medians of the company-internal measurement of external exposure to CS2 have varied between 2.7 and 8.4 ppm, in which median values exceeded 5 ppm generally since 2000. The annual medians for the company-internal biomonitoring assessment ranged between 1.2 and 2.8 mg/g creatinine. The cumulative CS2 exposure ranged from 8.5 to 869.5 ppm years for external exposure and between 1.30 and 176.2 mg/g creatinine years for the internal exposure. Significant correlations were found between the current air pollution and the internal exposure in 2009 but also between the cumulative external and internal CS2 exposure. Current exposure data, usually collected in cross-sectional studies, rarely allow a reliable statement on the cumulative dose, because of higher exposure in the past and of fluctuating courses of exposure. On the other hand, company-internal exposure data may be affected by non-representative measurement strategies. Some verification of the reliability of

  1. An assessment of cumulative external doses from Chernobyl fallout for a forested area in Russia using the optically stimulated luminescence from quartz inclusions in bricks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramzaev, V.; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2008-01-01

    . The area was significantly contaminated by Chernobyl fallout with initial (CS)-C-137 ground deposition level of similar to 1.1 MBq m(-2). The accumulated OSL doses in sections of the bricks varied from 141 to 207 mGy, of which between 76 and 146 mGy are attributable to Chernobyl fallout. Using the OSL...... depth-dose profiles obtained from the exposed bricks and the results from a gamma-ray-survey of the area, the Chernobyl-related cumulative gamma-ray dose for a point detector located in free air at a height of 1 m above the ground in the study area was estimated to be ca. 240 mGy for the time period...... starting on 27 April 1986 and ending on 31 July 2004. This result is in good agreement with the result of deterministic modelling of the cumulative gamma-ray dose in free air above undisturbed ground from the Chernobyl source in the Bryansk Region. Over the same time period, the external Chernobyl...

  2. Glucocorticoids and hemopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romashko, O.O.; Berin, G.I.

    1978-01-01

    Analyzing the data of home and foreign investigators the problems of the glucocorticoid effect on blood and bone marrow of experimental (including irradiated ones) animals are discussed. Considered are a character and mechanism of the adrenal cortex hormones effect on blood formation, as well as the effect of pharmacological doses of corticosteroids on CFU, their erythropoietic effect in physiological doses on a morphological picture of bone marrow after irradiation and subsequent introduction of hormones and the hormone effect on intensity of erythropoiesis recovery in irradiated mice. Presented are the experimental data on studying the effect of endogenic hypercorticoidism and a reduced level of endogenic corticosteroids on blood-forming stem cells in the irradiated mice and the data on the ACTH injection effect on CFU migration after irradiation. Evaluated are already available data and further investigations to ground advisability and conditions of using corticosteroids as well as determining rational therapeutic effects on secretion of endogenic glucocorticoids when treating blood system diseases

  3. Adrenal Insufficiency Caused by Locally Applied Glucocorticoids-Myth or Fact?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinsen, Stina; Klose, Marianne; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Case-reports have made it evident that both inhaled, percutaneous, intranasal, intraarticular and ophthalmic administered glucocorticoids have the potential to cause life threatening adrenal insufficiency. With few and sometimes conflicting data and study methodology the prevalence of adrenal...... insufficiency secondary to locally applied glucocorticoids is not clear. Adrenal insufficiency can only be correctly evaluated by a stimulation test, and has by this procedure been reported in up to 40-50% of patients treated with high-dose inhaled glucocorticoids. Medium- to low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids...... have been shown to cause adrenal suppression in 0-16% of patients. Glucocorticoid creams and nasal glucocorticoids can cause adrenal insufficiency, also when used within prescribed doses, but the frequency seems to be less than with inhaled glucocorticoids. Intraarticularly administered glucocorticoids...

  4. Double dose: the cumulative effect of TV viewing at home and in preschool on children's activity patterns and weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverno Ross, Sharon; Dowda, Marsha; Saunders, Ruth; Pate, Russell

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about how screen-based sedentary behavior at home and in preschool influences children's health and activity patterns. The current study examined the individual and cumulative influence of TV viewing at home and in preschool on children's physical activity (PA) and weight status. Children (n = 339) attending 16 preschools in South Carolina were grouped into high and low TV groups based on parent report of children's TV viewing at home and director report of TV use/rules in preschool. T-tests and mixed model ANOVAs examined differences in weight status and PA (min/hr) by high and low TV groups. Results revealed that children who were classified as High TV both at home and in pre- school had significantly lower levels of moderate-to-vigorous PA compared with their Low TV counterparts (8.3 (0.3) min/hr vs. 7.6 (0.2) min/hr, p TV groups at home or in preschool when examined individually. These findings demonstrate the importance of total environmental TV exposure on preschooler's PA. Longitudinal and observational research to assess preschoolers' cumulative screen-based sedentary behavior and its relationship with PA and weight status is needed.

  5. Systematic review of the clinical effect of glucocorticoids on nonhematologic malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Bruce D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids are often used in the treatment of nonhematologic malignancy. This review summarizes the clinical evidence of the effect of glucocorticoid therapy on nonhematologic malignancy. Methods A systematic review of clinical studies of glucocorticoid therapy in patients with nonhematologic malignancy was undertaken. Only studies having endpoints of tumor response or tumor control or survival were included. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Register/Databases, conference proceedings (ASCO, AACR, ASTRO/ASTR, ESMO, ECCO and other resources were used. Data was extracted using a standard form. There was quality assessment of each study. There was a narrative synthesis of information, with presentation of results in tables. Where appropriate, meta-analyses were performed using data from published reports and a fixed effect model. Results Fifty four randomized controlled trials (RCTs, one meta-analysis, four phase l/ll trials and four case series met the eligibility criteria. Clinical trials of glucocorticoid monotherapy in breast and prostate cancer showed modest response rates. In advanced breast cancer meta-analyses, the addition of glucocorticoids to either chemotherapy or other endocrine therapy resulted in increased response rate, but not increased survival. In GI cancer, there was one RCT each of glucocorticoids vs. supportive care and chemotherapy +/- glucocorticoids; glucocorticoid effect was neutral. The only RCT found of chemotherapy +/- glucocorticoids, in which the glucocorticoid arm did worse, was in lung cancer. In glucocorticoid monotherapy, meta-analysis found that continuous high dose glucocorticoids had a detrimental effect on survival. The only other evidence, for a detrimental effect of glucocorticoid monotherapy, was in one of the two trials in lung cancer. Conclusion Glucocorticoid monotherapy has some benefit in breast and prostate cancer. In advanced breast cancer, the addition of glucocorticoids to other

  6. Association between cumulative radiation dose, adverse skin reactions, and changes in surface hemoglobin among women undergoing breast conserving therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Chin

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: HSI demonstrates promise in the assessment of skin dose as well as an objective measure of skin reaction. The ability to easily identify adverse skin reactions and to modify the treatment plan may circumvent the need for detrimental treatment breaks.

  7. Preliminary mortality survey from 1973 to 1977 of Japanese radiological technologists and analyses of the association of mortality with cumulative doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Ishizaka, Masatsuna; Yamamoto, Yoichi; Kano, Eiichi; Nikaido, Osamu.

    1981-01-01

    The Japan Association of Radiologic Technologists reported that, from 1941 to 1978, 395 deaths occurred among Japanese radiological technologists who belong to the association. Using these data, Sakka, Kitabatake and colleagues, and the present authors studied mortality and cause of death among these technologists for 11 years from 1955 to 1965, for 7 years from 1966 to 1972, and for 5 years from 1973 to 1977, respectively. In general, the number of cancer deaths in the three studies was less than expected. However, Kitabatake et al. and the present authors found that deaths from skin cancer were significantly more frequent than expected. The present authors recently estimated the cumulative doses of radiation exposure for the majority of deaths (268 out of 395). The mean dose of radiation related to cancer deaths was then compared with that for non-cancer deaths. Also the proportional mortality ratios for cancers were observed in relation to the estimated dose level. In the present study, however, statistical tests to assess for the relationship between mortality and dose of radiation exposure showed no correlation, for the majority of deaths from cancer. (author)

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Onno C; Koorneef, Lisa L; Kroon, Jan

    2018-06-01

    The glucocorticoid hormone cortisol acts throughout the body to support circadian processes and adaptation to stress. The glucocorticoid receptor is the target of cortisol and of synthetic glucocorticoids, which are used widely in the clinic. Both agonism and antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor may be beneficial in disease, but given the wide expression of the receptor and involvement in various processes, beneficial effects are often accompanied by unwanted side effects. Selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators are ligands that induce a receptor conformation that allows activation of only a subset of downstream signaling pathways. Such molecules thereby combine agonistic and antagonistic properties. Here we discuss the mechanisms underlying selective receptor modulation and their promise in treating diseases in several organ systems where cortisol signaling plays a role. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Dose monitoring using the DICOM structured report: assessment of the relationship between cumulative radiation exposure and BMI in abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boos, J.; Lanzman, R.S.; Meineke, A.; Heusch, P.; Sawicki, L.M.; Antoch, G.; Kröpil, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To perform a systematic, large-scale analysis using the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine structured report (DICOM-SR) to assess the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and radiation exposure in abdominal CT. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of DICOM-SR of 3121 abdominal CT examinations between April 2013 and March 2014 was performed. All examinations were conducted using a 128 row CT system. Patients (mean age 61 ± 15 years) were divided into five groups according to their BMI: group A <20 kg/m 2 (underweight), group B 20–25 kg/m 2 (normal weight), group C 25–30 kg/m 2 (overweight), group D 30–35 kg/m 2 (obese), and group E > 35 kg/m 2 (extremely obese). CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose–length product (DLP) were compared between all groups and matched to national diagnostic reference values. Results: The mean CTDI vol and DLP were 5.4 ± 2.9 mGy and 243 ± 153 mGy·cm in group A, 6 ± 3.6 mGy and 264 ± 179 mGy• cm in group B, 7 ± 3.6 mGy and 320 ± 180 mGy• cm in group C, 8.1 ± 5.2 mGy and 375 ± 306 mGy• cm in group D, and 10 ± 8 mGy and 476 ± 403 mGy• cm in group E, respectively. Except for group A versus group B, CTDI vol and DLP differed significantly between all groups (p<0.05). Significantly more CTDI vol values exceeded national diagnostic reference values in groups D and E (2.1% and 6.3%) compared to group B (0.5%, p<0.05). Conclusion: DICOM-SR is a comprehensive, fast, and reproducible way to analyse dose-related data at CT. It allows for automated evaluation of radiation dose in a large study population. Dose exposition is related to the patient's BMI and is increased by up to 96% for extremely obese patients undergoing abdominal CT. - Highlights: • DICOM-SR was used to implement automatic CT-dose monitoring. • DICOM-SR allowed for a fast and comprehensive analysis of CT dose data. • Radiation exposure for abdominal CT was increased by up to 96% for

  10. Investigation of practical approaches to evaluating cumulative dose for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) from standard CT dosimetry measurements: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Martin, Colin J; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Gentle, David J

    2015-07-21

    A function called Gx(L) was introduced by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Report-87 to facilitate measurement of cumulative dose for CT scans within long phantoms as recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) TG-111. The Gx(L) function is equal to the ratio of the cumulative dose at the middle of a CT scan to the volume weighted CTDI (CTDIvol), and was investigated for conventional multi-slice CT scanners operating with a moving table. As the stationary table mode, which is the basis for cone beam CT (CBCT) scans, differs from that used for conventional CT scans, the aim of this study was to investigate the extension of the Gx(L) function to CBCT scans. An On-Board Imager (OBI) system integrated with a TrueBeam linac was simulated with Monte Carlo EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, and the absorbed dose was calculated within PMMA, polyethylene (PE), and water head and body phantoms using EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, where the body PE body phantom emulated the ICRU/AAPM phantom. Beams of width 40-500 mm and beam qualities at tube potentials of 80-140 kV were studied. Application of a modified function of beam width (W) termed Gx(W), for which the cumulative dose for CBCT scans f (0) is normalized to the weighted CTDI (CTDIw) for a reference beam of width 40 mm, was investigated as a possible option. However, differences were found in Gx(W) with tube potential, especially for body phantoms, and these were considered to be due to differences in geometry between wide beams used for CBCT scans and those for conventional CT. Therefore, a modified function Gx(W)100 has been proposed, taking the form of values of f (0) at each position in a long phantom, normalized with respect to dose indices f 100(150)x measured with a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within standard 150 mm PMMA phantoms, using the same scanning parameters, beam widths and positions within the phantom. f 100(150)x averages the dose resulting from

  11. Measurement of radiocesium concentration in trees using cumulative gamma radiation dose rate detection systems - A simple presumption for radiocesium concentration in living woods using glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihara, T.; Hashida, S.N. [Plant Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Environmental Science, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 1646 Abiko, Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Kawachi, N.; Suzui, N.; Yin, Y.G.; Fujimaki, S. [Radiotracer Imaging Gr., Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nagao, Y.; Yamaguchi, M. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Radiocesium from the severe accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant on 11 March 2011 contaminates large areas. After this, a doubt for forest products, especially of mushroom, is indelible at the areas. Pruned woody parts and litters are containing a considerable amount of radiocesium, and generates a problem at incineration and composting. These mean that more attentive survey for each subject is expected; however, the present survey system is highly laborious/expensive and/or non-effective for this purpose. On the other hand, we can see a glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system. This system always utilized to detect a personal cumulative radiation dose, and thus, it is not suitable to separate a radiation from a specific object. However, if we can separate a radiation from a specific object and relate it with the own radiocesium concentration, it would enable us to presume the specific concentration with just an easy monitoring but without a destruction of the target nature and a complicated process including sampling, pre-treatment, and detection. Here, we present the concept of the measurement and results of the trials. First, we set glass-badges (type FS, Chiyoda Technol Corp., Japan) on a part of bough (approximately 10 cm in diameter) of Japanese flowering cherry trees (Prunus x yedoensis cv. Somei-Yoshino) with four different settings: A, a direct setting without any shield; B, a setting with an aluminum shield between bough and the glass-badge; C, a setting with a lead shield between bough and the glass-badge; D, a setting with a lead shield covering the glass-badge to shut the radiation from the surrounding but from bough. The deduction between the amount of each setting should separate a specific radiation of the bough from unlimited radiation from the surrounding. Even if the hourly dose rate is not enough to count the difference, a moderate cumulative dose would clear the difference. In fact, results demonstrated a

  12. Cumulative effective radiation dose received by blunt trauma patients arriving to a military level I trauma center from point of injury and interhospital transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Arnem, Kerri A; Supinski, David P; Tucker, Jonathan E; Varney, Shawn

    2016-12-01

    Trauma patients sustaining blunt injuries are exposed to multiple radiologic studies. Evidence indicates that the risk of cancer from exposure to ionizing radiation rises in direct proportion to the cumulative effective dose (CED) received. The purpose of this study is to quantify the amount of ionizing radiation accumulated when arriving directly from point of injury to San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC), a level I trauma center, compared with those transferred from other facilities. A retrospective record review was conducted from 1st January 2010 through 31st December 2012. The SAMMC trauma registry, electronic medical records, and the digital radiology imaging system were searched for possible candidates. The medical records were then analyzed for sex, age, mechanism of injury, received directly from point of injury (direct group), transfer from another medical facility (transfer group), computed tomographic scans received, dose-length product, CED of radiation, and injury severity score. A diagnostic imaging physicist then calculated the estimated CED each subject received based on the dose-length product of each computed tomographic scan. A total of 300 patients were analyzed, with 150 patients in the direct group and 150 patients in the transfer group. Both groups were similar in age and sex. Patients in the transfer group received a significantly greater CED of radiation compared with the direct group (mean, 37.6 mSv vs 28 mSv; P=.001). The radiation received in the direct group correlates with a lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of 1 in 357 compared with the transfer group with an increase in LAR to 1 in 266. Patients transferred to our facility received a 34% increase in ionizing radiation compared with patients brought directly from the injury scene. This increased dose of ionizing radiation contributes to the LAR of cancer and needs to be considered before repeating imaging studies. III. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Chronic Glucocorticoid Hypersecretion in Cushing's Syndrome Exacerbates Cognitive Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Kathy; Forget, Helene; Cohen, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Cumulative exposure to glucocorticoid hormones (GC) over the lifespan has been associated with cognitive impairment and may contribute to physical and cognitive degeneration in aging. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the pattern of cognitive deficits in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS), a disorder characterized by…

  14. Why glucocorticoid withdrawal may sometimes be as dangerous as the treatment itself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinsen, Stina; Baslund, Bo; Klose, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid therapy is widely used, but withdrawal from glucocorticoids comes with a potential life-threatening risk of adrenal insufficiency. Recent case reports document that adrenal crisis after glucocorticoid withdrawal remains a serious problem in clinical practice. Partly due...... to difficulties in inter-study comparison the true prevalence of glucocorticoid-induced adrenal insufficiency is unknown, but it might be somewhere between 46 and 100% 24h after glucocorticoid withdrawal, 26-49% after approximately one week, and some patients show prolonged suppression lasting months to years....... Adrenal insufficiency might therefore be underdiagnosed in clinical practice. Clinical data do not permit accurate estimates of a lower limit of glucocorticoid dose and duration of treatment, where adrenal insufficiency will not occur. Due to individual variation, neither the glucocorticoid dose nor...

  15. The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, Hans P A.; Maislin, Greg; Mullington, Janet M.; Dinges, David F.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To inform the debate over whether human sleep can be chronically reduced without consequences, we conducted a dose-response chronic sleep restriction experiment in which waking neurobehavioral and sleep physiological functions were monitored and compared to those for total sleep deprivation. DESIGN: The chronic sleep restriction experiment involved randomization to one of three sleep doses (4 h, 6 h, or 8 h time in bed per night), which were maintained for 14 consecutive days. The total sleep deprivation experiment involved 3 nights without sleep (0 h time in bed). Each study also involved 3 baseline (pre-deprivation) days and 3 recovery days. SETTING: Both experiments were conducted under standardized laboratory conditions with continuous behavioral, physiological and medical monitoring. PARTICIPANTS: A total of n = 48 healthy adults (ages 21-38) participated in the experiments. INTERVENTIONS: Noctumal sleep periods were restricted to 8 h, 6 h or 4 h per day for 14 days, or to 0 h for 3 days. All other sleep was prohibited. RESULTS: Chronic restriction of sleep periods to 4 h or 6 h per night over 14 consecutive days resulted in significant cumulative, dose-dependent deficits in cognitive performance on all tasks. Subjective sleepiness ratings showed an acute response to sleep restriction but only small further increases on subsequent days, and did not significantly differentiate the 6 h and 4 h conditions. Polysomnographic variables and delta power in the non-REM sleep EEG-a putative marker of sleep homeostasis--displayed an acute response to sleep restriction with negligible further changes across the 14 restricted nights. Comparison of chronic sleep restriction to total sleep deprivation showed that the latter resulted in disproportionately large waking neurobehavioral and sleep delta power responses relative to how much sleep was lost. A statistical model revealed that, regardless of the mode of sleep deprivation, lapses in behavioral alertness

  16. Using fecal glucocorticoids for stress assessment in Mourning Doves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Brian E.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Schulz, John H.; Jones, Susan B.; Mong, T.

    2003-01-01

    Fecal glucocorticoid assays provide a potentially useful, noninvasive means to study physiological responses of wildlife to various stressors. The objective of our study was to validate a method for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) feces. We validated the assay using standard procedures (e.g., parallelism, recovery of exogenous corticosterone) to demonstrate that the assay accurately and precisely measured glucocorticoid metabolites in Mourning Dove fecal extracts. We conducted adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) challenge experiments to validate the assay's ability to determine biologically important changes in fecal glucocorticoids. Fecal glucocorticoid levels increased significantly approximately 2-3 hr after administration of ACTH at 50 IU per kg body mass to wild Mourning Doves held in captivity. In contrast, fecal glucocorticoid metabolites did not increase in control birds, birds that received saline injections, or a lower dose of ACTH (1 IU per kg body mass). Variation in overall fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels may have been influenced by season and the length of time birds were held in captivity. Non-invasive fecal glucocorticoid metabolite analyses, in combination with demographic information, may have considerable utility for monitoring the effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on Mourning Dove populations.

  17. The Effect of Total Cumulative Dose, Number of Treatment Cycles, Interval between Injections, and Length of Treatment on the Frequency of Occurrence of Antibodies to Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Treatment of Muscle Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid O.; Liptrot, Anthea; Newton, Rachel; Pickett, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    A large cumulative dose of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A), frequent injections, a short interval between treatment cycles, and a long duration of treatment have all been suggested, but not confirmed, to be associated with a high incidence of neutralizing antibodies to the neurotoxin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these…

  18. Quintupling Inhaled Glucocorticoids to Prevent Childhood Asthma Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel J; Bacharier, Leonard B; Mauger, David T; Boehmer, Susan; Beigelman, Avraham; Chmiel, James F; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Morgan, Wayne J; Peters, Stephen P; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Sheehan, William J; Cabana, Michael D; Holguin, Fernando; Martinez, Fernando D; Pongracic, Jacqueline A; Baxi, Sachin N; Benson, Mindy; Blake, Kathryn; Covar, Ronina; Gentile, Deborah A; Israel, Elliot; Krishnan, Jerry A; Kumar, Harsha V; Lang, Jason E; Lazarus, Stephen C; Lima, John J; Long, Dayna; Ly, Ngoc; Marbin, Jyothi; Moy, James N; Myers, Ross E; Olin, J Tod; Raissy, Hengameh H; Robison, Rachel G; Ross, Kristie; Sorkness, Christine A; Lemanske, Robert F

    2018-03-08

    Asthma exacerbations occur frequently despite the regular use of asthma-controller therapies, such as inhaled glucocorticoids. Clinicians commonly increase the doses of inhaled glucocorticoids at early signs of loss of asthma control. However, data on the safety and efficacy of this strategy in children are limited. We studied 254 children, 5 to 11 years of age, who had mild-to-moderate persistent asthma and had had at least one asthma exacerbation treated with systemic glucocorticoids in the previous year. Children were treated for 48 weeks with maintenance low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids (fluticasone propionate at a dose of 44 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) and were randomly assigned to either continue the same dose (low-dose group) or use a quintupled dose (high-dose group; fluticasone at a dose of 220 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) for 7 days at the early signs of loss of asthma control ("yellow zone"). Treatment was provided in a double-blind fashion. The primary outcome was the rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids. The rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids did not differ significantly between groups (0.48 exacerbations per year in the high-dose group and 0.37 exacerbations per year in the low-dose group; relative rate, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 2.1; P=0.30). The time to the first exacerbation, the rate of treatment failure, symptom scores, and albuterol use during yellow-zone episodes did not differ significantly between groups. The total glucocorticoid exposure was 16% higher in the high-dose group than in the low-dose group. The difference in linear growth between the high-dose group and the low-dose group was -0.23 cm per year (P=0.06). In children with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma treated with daily inhaled glucocorticoids, quintupling the dose at the early signs of loss of asthma control did not reduce the rate of severe asthma

  19. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nervosa Cigarette smoking Alcohol abuse Low calcium and vitamin D, by low dietary intake or poor absorption in your gut Sedentary (inactive) lifestyle or immobility Certain medications besides glucocorticoids, including the following: excess thyroid hormone replacement the blood thinner heparin some ...

  20. Glucocorticoid-related bone changes from endogenous or exogenous glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, Amy H; Saag, Kenneth G

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoids have a negative impact on bone through direct effects on bone cells and indirect effects on calcium absorption. Here, recent findings regarding glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, bone changes in patients with endogenous glucocorticoid derangements, and treatment of steroid-induced bone disease are reviewed. Although the majority of our understanding arises from the outcomes of patients treated with exogenous steroids, endogenous overproduction appears to be similarly destructive to bone, but these effects are reversible with cure of the underlying disease process. Additionally, there are bone changes that occur in diseases that interrupt adrenal glucocorticoid production, both in response to our inability to perfectly match glucocorticoid replacement and also related to the underlying disease process. More investigation is required to understand which patients with endogenous overproduction or underproduction of glucocorticoid would benefit from osteoporosis treatment. Better understood is the benefit that can be achieved with currently approved treatments for glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis from exogenous steroids. With growing concern of long-term use of bisphosphonates, however, further investigation into the duration of use and use in certain populations, such as children and premenopausal women, is essential. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is a complex disease that is becoming better understood through advances in the study of exogenous and endogenous glucocorticoid exposure. Further advancement of proper treatment and prevention is on the horizon.

  1. Pathophysiology of Glucocorticoid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitellius, Géraldine; Trabado, Séverine; Bouligand, Jérôme; Delemer, Brigitte; Lombès, Marc

    2018-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC), such as cortisol or dexamethasone, control various physiological functions, notably those involved in development, metabolism, inflammatory processes and stress, and exert most of their effects upon binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by NR3C1 gene). GC signaling follows several consecutive steps leading to target gene transactivation, including ligand binding, nuclear translocation of ligand-activated GR complexes, DNA binding, coactivator interaction and recruitment of functional transcriptional machinery. Any step may be impaired and may account for altered GC signaling. Partial or generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome may result in a reduced level of functional GR, a decreased hormone affinity and binding, a defect in nuclear GR translocation, a decrease or lack of DNA binding and/or post-transcriptional GR modifications. To date, 26 loss-of-function NR3C1 mutations have been reported in the context of hypertension, hirsutism, adrenal hyperplasia or metabolic disorders. These clinical signs are generally associated with biological features including hypercortisolism without negative regulatory feedback loop on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Patients had often low plasma aldosterone and renin levels despite hypertension. Only one GR gain-of-function mutation has been described associating Cushing's syndrome phenotype with normal urinary-free cortisol. Some GR polymorphisms (ER22/23EK, GR-9β) have been linked to glucocorticoid resistance and a healthier metabolic profile whereas some others seemed to be associated with GC hypersensitivity (N363S, BclI), increasing cardiovascular risk (diabetes type 2, visceral obesity). This review focuses on the earlier findings on the pathophysiology of GR signaling and presents criteria facilitating identification of novel NR3C1 mutations in selected patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Glucocorticoid Signaling and Bone Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, T

    2016-11-01

    Since glucocorticoids remain an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis. Fractures may occur in as many as 30-50% of patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Under physiological conditions, glucocorticoids are required for normal bone development due to their regulation of osteoblast differentiation, possibly via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and TSC22D3. However, serum levels of endogenous corticosterone are elevated in aged mice and glucocorticoids exert negative effects on the survival of osteoblasts and osteocytes as well as angiogenesis. Glucocorticoid treatments impair bone formation and enhance bone resorption. Excess glucocorticoids induce osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis by increasing pro-apoptotic molecules, reactive oxygen species, and endoplasmic reticulum stress and suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Autophagy protects osteocytes from glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, but passed some threshold, the process of autophagy leads the cells to apoptosis. Excess glucocorticoids impair osteoblastogenesis by inducing Wnt antagonists, including Dkk1, Sost, and sFRP-1. However, the findings are controversial and the involvement of Wnt antagonists requires further study. Excess glucocorticoids reduce the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β, which enhances the degradation of β-catenin. Excess glucocorticoids have been shown to modulate the expression of miRNAs, including miR-29a, miR-34a-5p, and miR-199a-5p, which regulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast lineage cells. Excess glucocorticoids also enhance bone resorption by reducing OPG expression, increasing Rankl expression and reactive oxygen species, and prolonging the life span of osteoclasts; however, they also suppress the bone-degrading capacity of osteoclasts by disturbing the organization of the cytoskeleton. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG

  3. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Diego M; Ogara, M Florencia; Stortz, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation wi...

  4. Harm, benefit and costs associated with low-dose glucocorticoids added to the treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis in elderly patients (GLORIA trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartman, Linda; Rasch, Linda A; Klausch, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    experience, there is a lack of studies large enough to adequately document the benefit/harm balance. The result is inappropriate treatment strategies, i.e. both under-use and over-use of GCs, and consequently suboptimal treatment of RA. METHODS: The GLORIA study is a pragmatic multicentre, 2-year, randomised......, double-blind, clinical trial to assess the safety and effectiveness of a daily dose of 5 mg prednisolone or matching placebo added to standard of care in elderly patients with RA. Eligible participants are diagnosed with RA, have inadequate disease control (disease activity score, DAS28 ≥ 2...... on daily practice and maximise clinical relevance of the results, but analysis and interpretation of the results is challenging. We expect that the results of this trial are of importance for all rheumatologists who treat elderly patients with RA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02585258...

  5. The Pro-inflammatory Effects of Glucocorticoids in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Erica de Almeida; Munhoz, Carolina Demarchi

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a class of steroid hormones derived from cholesterol. Their actions are mediated by the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors, which, once bound to their ligands, act as transcription factors that can directly modulate gene expression. Through protein–protein interactions with other transcription factors, they can also regulate the activity of many genes in a composite or tethering way. Rapid non-genomic signaling was also demonstrated since glucocorticoids can act through membrane receptors and activate signal transduction pathways, such as protein kinases cascades, to modulate other transcriptions factors and activate or repress various target genes. By all these different mechanisms, glucocorticoids regulate numerous important functions in a large variety of cells, not only in the peripheral organs but also in the central nervous system during development and adulthood. In general, glucocorticoids are considered anti-inflammatory and protective agents due to their ability to inhibit gene expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and other possible damaging molecules. Nonetheless, recent studies have uncovered situations in which these hormones can act as pro-inflammatory agents depending on the dose, chronicity of exposure, and the structure/organ analyzed. In this review, we will provide an overview of the conditions under which these phenomena occur, a discussion that will serve as a basis for exploring the mechanistic foundation of glucocorticoids pro-inflammatory gene regulation in the brain. PMID:27445981

  6. Glucocorticoids, chronic stress, and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallman, Mary F.; Pecoraro, Norman C.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Warne, James P.; Ginsberg, Abigail B.; Akana, Susan F.; Laugero, Kevin C.; Houshyar, Hani; Strack, Alison M.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Bell, Mary E.

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids either inhibit or sensitize stress-induced activity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, depending on time after their administration, the concentration of the steroids, and whether there is a concurrent stressor input. When there are high glucocorticoids together with a

  7. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliver, Linda S M

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  8. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliver, Linda S M, E-mail: linda.gulliver@otago.ac.nz

    2017-03-15

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  9. Relation between treatment efficacy and cumulative dose of alpha interferon in chronic hepatitis B. European Concerted Action on Viral Hepatitis (Eurohep)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Christensen, E; Bindslev, N

    1996-01-01

    Alpha interferon (IFN) is an established treatment of chronic hepatitis B. The effect has been shown to be dose related, recommended dose regimens being associated with a doubling of the spontaneous, baseline HBeAg to anti-HBe seroconversion rate. However, the efficacy of IFN treatment in relation...

  10. SU-C-207A-07: Cumulative 18F-FDG Uptake Histogram Relative to Radiation Dose Volume Histogram of Lung After IMRT Or PSPT and Their Association with Radiation Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shusharina, N; Choi, N; Bortfeld, T; Liao, Z; Mohan, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the difference in cumulative 18F-FDG uptake histogram of lung treated with either IMRT or PSPT is associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with inoperable stage II and III NSCLC. Methods: We analyzed 24 patients from a prospective randomized trial to compare IMRT (n=12) with vs. PSPT (n=12) for inoperable NSCLC. All patients underwent PET-CT imaging between 35 and 88 days post-therapy. Post-treatment PET-CT was aligned with planning 4D CT to establish a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between post-treatment PET and planning dose images. 18F-FDG uptake as a function of radiation dose to normal lung was obtained for each patient. Distribution of the standard uptake value (SUV) was analyzed using a volume histogram method. The image quantitative characteristics and DVH measures were correlated with clinical symptoms of pneumonitis. Results: Patients with RP were present in both groups: 5 in the IMRT and 6 in the PSPT. The analysis of cumulative SUV histograms showed significantly higher relative volumes of the normal lung having higher SUV uptake in the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases (VSUV=2: 10% for IMRT vs 16% for proton RT and VSUV=1: 10% for IMRT vs 23% for proton RT). In addition, the SUV histograms for symptomatic cases in PSPT patients exhibited a significantly longer tail at the highest SUV. The absolute volume of the lung receiving the dose >70 Gy was larger in the PSPT patients. Conclusion: 18F-FDG uptake – radiation dose response correlates with RP in both groups of patients by means of the linear regression slope. SUV is higher for the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases. Higher uptake after PSPT patients is explained by larger volumes of the lung receiving high radiation dose.

  11. Double Dose: The cumulative effect of TV viewing at home and in preschool on children’s activity patterns and weight status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sharon Taverno; Dowda, Marsha; Saunders, Ruth P.; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how screen-based sedentary behavior at home and in preschool influences children’s health and activity patterns. The current study examined the individual and cumulative influence of TV viewing at home and in preschool on children’s physical activity (PA) and weight status. Children (n=339) attending 16 preschools in South Carolina were grouped into high and low TV groups based on parent report of children’s TV viewing at home and director report of TV use/rules in preschool. T-tests and mixed model ANOVAs examined differences in weight status and PA (min/hr) by high and low TV groups. Results revealed that children who were classified as High TV both at home and in preschool had significantly lower levels of moderate-to-vigorous PA compared with their Low TV counterparts. These findings demonstrate the importance of total environmental TV exposure on preschooler’s PA. Longitudinal and observational research to assess preschoolers’ cumulative screen-based sedentary behavior and its relationship with PA and weight status is needed. PMID:23502043

  12. Impact of glucocorticoid on neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Odaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is currently an area of great interest in neuroscience. It is closely linked to brain diseases, including mental disorders and neurodevelopmental disease. Both embryonic and adult neurogeneses are influenced by glucocorticoids secreted from the adrenal glands in response to a variety of stressors. Moreover, proliferation/differentiation of the neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs is affected by glucocorticoids through intracellular signaling pathways such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt, hedgehog, and Wnt. Our review presents recent evidence of the impact of glucocorticoids on NSPC behaviors and the underlying molecular mechanisms; this provides important information for understanding the pathological role of glucocorticoids on neurogenesis-associated brain diseases.

  13. Harm, benefit and costs associated with low-dose glucocorticoids added to the treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis in elderly patients (GLORIA trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Linda; Rasch, Linda A; Klausch, Thomas; Bijlsma, Hans W J; Christensen, Robin; Smulders, Yvo M; Ralston, Stuart H; Buttgereit, Frank; Cutolo, Maurizio; Da Silva, Jose A P; Opris, Daniela; Rovenský, Jozef; Szamosi, Szilvia; Middelink, Leonie M; Lems, Willem F; Boers, Maarten

    2018-01-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints affecting 1% of the world population. It has major impact on patients through disability and associated comorbidities. Current treatment strategies have considerably improved the prognosis, but recent innovations (especially biologic drugs and the new class of so-called "JAK/STAT inhibitors") have important safety issues and are very costly. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are highly effective in RA, and could reduce the need for expensive treatment with biologic agents. However, despite more than 65 years of clinical experience, there is a lack of studies large enough to adequately document the benefit/harm balance. The result is inappropriate treatment strategies, i.e. both under-use and over-use of GCs, and consequently suboptimal treatment of RA. The GLORIA study is a pragmatic multicentre, 2-year, randomised, double-blind, clinical trial to assess the safety and effectiveness of a daily dose of 5 mg prednisolone or matching placebo added to standard of care in elderly patients with RA. Eligible participants are diagnosed with RA, have inadequate disease control (disease activity score, DAS28 ≥ 2.6), and are ≥ 65 years. The primary outcome measures are the time-averaged mean value of the DAS28 and the occurrence of serious adverse events or adverse events of special interest. During the trial, change in antirheumatic therapy is permitted as clinically indicated, except for GCs. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility are secondary outcomes. The main challenge is the interpretation of the trial result with two primary endpoints and the pragmatic trial design that allows co-interventions. Another challenge is the definition of safety and the relative lack of power to detect differences between treatment groups. We have chosen to define safety as the number of patients experiencing at least one serious adverse event. We also specify a decision tree to guide our conclusion on the balance of

  14. Instructions for producing a mouse model of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, S.; Baschant, U.; Rauch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are effective drugs used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or asthma. Furthermore, they regulate various physiological processes, including bone remodeling. However, long-term high- and even low-dose glucocorticoid use is associated...... with a compromised bone quality and an increased fracture risk. At the cellular level, glucocorticoids suppress bone formation and stimulate bone resorption, which leads to loss of bone mass. To investigate the underlying mechanisms and new therapeutic strategies, the in vivo model for glucocorticoid-induced bone...... loss is widely used. This protocol outlines the common procedure that is currently used for the induction of bone loss in mice using glucocorticoids. It further provides useful hints and highlights possible pitfalls to take into account before starting an experiment....

  15. Optimal glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Miguel; Ross, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    The rhythmic regulation of human physiology and behaviour is controlled by a central endogenous clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Most tissues have peripheral clocks that oscillate in time with this central clock. How the central time keeper controls peripheral clocks is not established, however there is evidence to suggest that the cortisol rhythm is one important secondary messenger. Loss of the endogenous cortisol rhythm is associated with sleep disturbance, depression, and metabolic abnormalities. In adrenal insufficiency, current glucocorticoid replacement regimens cannot replace the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol, and patients have an increased mortality and impaired quality of life. We propose that reproducing circadian cortisol levels may improve quality of life in patients with adrenal insufficiency and we have been investigating the impact of circadian hydrocortisone replacement. Using Chronocort, a modified release preparation of hydrocortisone, we have demonstrated that it is possible to simulate the overnight rise in cortisol release and, in preliminary studies in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, control morning androgen levels. Future studies are now required to determine whether Chronocort can improve quality of life in patients with adrenal insufficiency. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David J; Spencer, Karen A

    2018-01-15

    Throughout life physiological systems strive to maintain homeostasis and these systems are susceptible to exposure to maternal or environmental perturbations, particularly during embryonic development. In some cases, these perturbations may influence genetic and physiological processes that permanently alter the functioning of these physiological systems; a process known as developmental programming. In recent years, the neuroimmune system has garnered attention for its fundamental interactions with key hormonal systems, such as the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The ultimate product of this axis, the glucocorticoid hormones, play a key role in modulating immune responses within the periphery and the CNS as part of the physiological stress response. It is well-established that elevated glucocorticoids induced by developmental stress exert profound short and long-term physiological effects, yet there is relatively little information of how these effects are manifested within the neuroimmune system. Pre and post-natal periods are prime candidates for manipulation in order to uncover the physiological mechanisms that underlie glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune responses. Understanding the potential programming role of glucocorticoids may be key in uncovering vulnerable windows of CNS susceptibility to stressful experiences during embryonic development and improve our use of glucocorticoids as therapeutics in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dose-Response Relationship between Cumulative Occupational Lead Exposure and the Associated Health Damages: A 20-Year Cohort Study of a Smelter in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yue Wu; Jun-Ming Gu; Yun Huang; Yan-Ying Duan; Rui-Xue Huang; Jian-An Hu

    2016-01-01

    Long-term airborne lead exposure, even below official occupational limits, has been found to cause lead poisoning at higher frequencies than expected, which suggests that China’s existing occupational exposure limits should be reexamined. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1832 smelting workers from 1988 to 2008 in China. These were individuals who entered the plant and came into continuous contact with lead at work for longer than 3 months. The dose-response relationship between o...

  18. Cumulative Poisson Distribution Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, Paul N.; Scheuer, Ernest M.; Nolty, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Overflow and underflow in sums prevented. Cumulative Poisson Distribution Program, CUMPOIS, one of two computer programs that make calculations involving cumulative Poisson distributions. Both programs, CUMPOIS (NPO-17714) and NEWTPOIS (NPO-17715), used independently of one another. CUMPOIS determines cumulative Poisson distribution, used to evaluate cumulative distribution function (cdf) for gamma distributions with integer shape parameters and cdf for X (sup2) distributions with even degrees of freedom. Used by statisticians and others concerned with probabilities of independent events occurring over specific units of time, area, or volume. Written in C.

  19. Cumulative dose of hydroxychloroquine is associated with a decrease of resting heart rate in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairoli, E; Danese, N; Teliz, M; Bruzzone, M J; Ferreira, J; Rebella, M; Cayota, A

    2015-10-01

    The use of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) offers a wide range of benefits. However, there are evidence in favour of cardiotoxicity, including heart conduction disturbances and congestive heart failure. To determine the effects of HCQ in the resting heart rate (RHR) of SLE patients. Included were patients with non active SLE, with a sedentary lifestyle and treated with HCQ. Excluded were patients on beta blocker treatment, trained patients, pacemaker's users and patients with clinical or analytical evidence of anemia, renal disease, obstructive pulmonary disease, obesity, uncontrolled thyroid disease, fever or current infection. Standard 12-lead electrocardiogram was performed in the resting condition (supine decubitus and orthostatic position). Comparison between groups was performed using Mann-Whitney U test. A multiple linear regression was performed. A p value 365 g). Non significant differences were found in age, sex, prednisone dose or SLEDAI. The mean RHR was 73 ± 6 beats/min in the low-HCQ and 65 ± 7 beats/min in the high-HCQ, with a significant decrease of 11% (p = 0.003). In multiple linear regressions, there were non significant association between the decrease of RHR and prednisone dose, age, SLEDAI or TSH, but there was significant association between RHR and CD-HCQ (p = 0.024) and RHR and time of exposure to HCQ (p = 0.029). CD-HCQ higher than 365 g was associated with a significant decrease (11%) in RHR in non-active SLE patients, although a larger prospective study is required to allow more definitive conclusions. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Histology and Gadolinium Distribution in the Rodent Brain After the Administration of Cumulative High Doses of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrke, Jessica; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Frenzel, Thomas; Schöckel, Laura; Rosenbruch, Martin; Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin A.; Nischwitz, Volker; Küppers, Astrid; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Retrospective studies in patients with primary brain tumors or other central nervous system pathologies as well as postmortem studies have suggested that gadolinium (Gd) deposition occurs in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) after multiple administrations of primarily linear Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). However, this deposition has not been associated with any adverse effects or histopathological alterations. The aim of this preclinical study was to systematically examine differences between linear and macrocyclic GBCAs in their potential to induce changes in brain and skin histology including Gd distribution in high spatial resolution. Materials and Methods Fifty male Wistar-Han rats were randomly allocated into control (saline, n = 10 rats) and 4 GBCA groups (linear GBCAs: gadodiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine, macrocyclic GBCAs: gadobutrol and gadoteridol; n = 10 rats per group). The animals received 20 daily intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight. Eight weeks after the last GBCA administration, the animals were killed, and the brain and skin samples were histopathologically assessed (hematoxylin and eosin; cresyl violet [Nissl]) and by immunohistochemistry. The Gd concentration in the skin, bone, brain, and skeletal muscle samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, n = 4). The spatial Gd distribution in the brain and skin samples was analyzed in cryosections using laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS, n = 3). For the ultra-high resolution of Gd distribution, brain sections of rats injected with gadodiamide or saline (n = 1) were assessed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Results No histological changes were observed in the brain. In contrast, 4 of 10 animals in the gadodiamide group but none of the animals in other groups showed macroscopic and histological

  1. Histology and Gadolinium Distribution in the Rodent Brain After the Administration of Cumulative High Doses of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrke, Jessica; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Frenzel, Thomas; Schöckel, Laura; Rosenbruch, Martin; Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin A; Nischwitz, Volker; Küppers, Astrid; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective studies in patients with primary brain tumors or other central nervous system pathologies as well as postmortem studies have suggested that gadolinium (Gd) deposition occurs in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) after multiple administrations of primarily linear Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). However, this deposition has not been associated with any adverse effects or histopathological alterations. The aim of this preclinical study was to systematically examine differences between linear and macrocyclic GBCAs in their potential to induce changes in brain and skin histology including Gd distribution in high spatial resolution. Fifty male Wistar-Han rats were randomly allocated into control (saline, n = 10 rats) and 4 GBCA groups (linear GBCAs: gadodiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine, macrocyclic GBCAs: gadobutrol and gadoteridol; n = 10 rats per group). The animals received 20 daily intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight. Eight weeks after the last GBCA administration, the animals were killed, and the brain and skin samples were histopathologically assessed (hematoxylin and eosin; cresyl violet [Nissl]) and by immunohistochemistry. The Gd concentration in the skin, bone, brain, and skeletal muscle samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, n = 4). The spatial Gd distribution in the brain and skin samples was analyzed in cryosections using laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS, n = 3). For the ultra-high resolution of Gd distribution, brain sections of rats injected with gadodiamide or saline (n = 1) were assessed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. No histological changes were observed in the brain. In contrast, 4 of 10 animals in the gadodiamide group but none of the animals in other groups showed macroscopic and histological nephrogenic systemic fibrosis-like skin

  2. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  3. Glucocorticoid programming of intrauterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowden, A L; Valenzuela, O A; Vaughan, O R; Jellyman, J K; Forhead, A J

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important environmental and maturational signals during intrauterine development. Toward term, the maturational rise in fetal glucocorticoid receptor concentrations decreases fetal growth and induces differentiation of key tissues essential for neonatal survival. When cortisol levels rise earlier in gestation as a result of suboptimal conditions for fetal growth, the switch from tissue accretion to differentiation is initiated prematurely, which alters the phenotype that develops from the genotype inherited at conception. Although this improves the chances of survival should delivery occur, it also has functional consequences for the offspring long after birth. Glucocorticoids are, therefore, also programming signals that permanently alter tissue structure and function during intrauterine development to optimize offspring fitness. However, if the postnatal environmental conditions differ from those signaled in utero, the phenotypical outcome of early-life glucocorticoid receptor overexposure may become maladaptive and lead to physiological dysfunction in the adult. This review focuses on the role of GCs in developmental programming, primarily in farm species. It examines the factors influencing GC bioavailability in utero and the effects that GCs have on the development of fetal tissues and organ systems, both at term and earlier in gestation. It also discusses the windows of susceptibility to GC overexposure in early life together with the molecular mechanisms and long-term consequences of GC programming with particular emphasis on the cardiovascular, metabolic, and endocrine phenotype of the offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Secreting Pheochromocytoma Underlying Glucocorticoid Induced Pheochromocytoma Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil A. Geva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Pheochromocytomas are hormone secreting tumors of the medulla of the adrenal glands found in 0.1–0.5% of patients with hypertension. The vast majority of pheochromocytomas secrete catecholamines, but they have been occasionally shown to also secrete interleukins, calcitonin, testosterone, and in rare cases adrenocorticotropic hormone. Pheochromocytoma crisis is a life threatening event in which high levels of catecholamines cause a systemic reaction leading to organ failure. Case Description. A 70-year-old man was admitted with acute myocardial ischemia following glucocorticoid administration as part of an endocrine workup for an adrenal mass. Cardiac catheterization disclosed patent coronary arteries and he was discharged. A year later he returned with similar angina-like chest pain. During hospitalization, he suffered additional events of chest pain, shortness of breath, and palpitations following administration of glucocorticoids as preparation for intravenous contrast administration. Throughout his admission, the patient demonstrated both signs of Cushing’s syndrome and high catecholamine levels. Following stabilization of vital parameters and serum electrolytes, the adrenal mass was resected surgically and was found to harbor an adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting pheochromocytoma. This is the first documented case of adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting pheochromocytoma complicated by glucocorticoid induced pheochromocytoma crisis. Conclusion. Care should be taken when administering high doses of glucocorticoids to patients with suspected pheochromocytoma, even in a patient with concomitant Cushing’s syndrome.

  5. Cumulative radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, J.; Cain, O.; Gray, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) represents a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Computer calculations have been used to simplify the evaluation of problems associated with the applications of the CRE-system in radiotherapy. In a general appraisal of the applications of computers to the CRE-system, the various problems encountered in clinical radiotherapy have been categorised into those involving the evaluation of a CRE at a point in tissue and those involving the calculation of CRE distributions. As a general guide, the computer techniques adopted at the Glasgow Institute of Radiotherapeutics for the solution of CRE problems are presented, and consist basically of a package of three interactive programs for point CRE calculations and a Fortran program which calculates CRE distributions for iso-effect treatment planning. Many examples are given to demonstrate the applications of these programs, and special emphasis has been laid on the problem of treating a point in tissue with different doses per fraction on alternate treatment days. The wide range of possible clinical applications of the CRE-system has been outlined and described under the categories of routine clinical applications, retrospective and prospective surveys of patient treatment, and experimental and theoretical research. Some of these applications such as the results of surveys and studies of time optimisation of treatment schedules could have far-reaching consequences and lead to significant improvements in treatment and cure rates with the minimum damage to normal tissue. (author)

  6. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptor β Enhances Myogenesis and Reduces Catabolic Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Terry D; Peck, Bailey; Shek, Evan; Stroup, Steven; Hinson, Jennifer; Arthur, Susan; Marino, Joseph S

    2016-02-11

    Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα), GR β (GRβ) has a truncated ligand-binding domain that prevents glucocorticoid binding, implicating GRα as the mediator of glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle loss. Because GRβ causes glucocorticoid resistance, targeting GRβ may be beneficial in impairing muscle loss as a result of GRα activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how the overexpression of GRβ affects myotube formation and dexamethasone (Dex) responsiveness. We measured GR isoform expression in C₂C12 muscle cells in response to Dex and insulin, and through four days of myotube formation. Next, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of GRβ in C₂C12 was performed, and these cells were characterized for cell fusion and myotube formation, as well as sensitivity to Dex via the expression of ubiquitin ligases. GRβ overexpression increased mRNA levels of muscle regulatory factors and enhanced proliferation in myoblasts. GRβ overexpressing myotubes had an increased fusion index. Myotubes overexpressing GRβ had lower forkhead box O3 (Foxo3a) mRNA levels and a blunted muscle atrophy F-box/Atrogen-1 (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) response to Dex. We showed that GRβ may serve as a pharmacological target for skeletal muscle growth and protection from glucocorticoid-induced catabolic signaling. Increasing GRβ levels in skeletal muscle may cause a state of glucocorticoid resistance, stabilizing muscle mass during exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids.

  7. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptor β Enhances Myogenesis and Reduces Catabolic Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry D. Hinds

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα, GR β (GRβ has a truncated ligand-binding domain that prevents glucocorticoid binding, implicating GRα as the mediator of glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle loss. Because GRβ causes glucocorticoid resistance, targeting GRβ may be beneficial in impairing muscle loss as a result of GRα activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how the overexpression of GRβ affects myotube formation and dexamethasone (Dex responsiveness. We measured GR isoform expression in C2C12 muscle cells in response to Dex and insulin, and through four days of myotube formation. Next, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of GRβ in C2C12 was performed, and these cells were characterized for cell fusion and myotube formation, as well as sensitivity to Dex via the expression of ubiquitin ligases. GRβ overexpression increased mRNA levels of muscle regulatory factors and enhanced proliferation in myoblasts. GRβ overexpressing myotubes had an increased fusion index. Myotubes overexpressing GRβ had lower forkhead box O3 (Foxo3a mRNA levels and a blunted muscle atrophy F-box/Atrogen-1 (MAFbx and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1 response to Dex. We showed that GRβ may serve as a pharmacological target for skeletal muscle growth and protection from glucocorticoid-induced catabolic signaling. Increasing GRβ levels in skeletal muscle may cause a state of glucocorticoid resistance, stabilizing muscle mass during exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids.

  8. Suppressive effect of glucocorticoids on TNF-alpha production is associated with their clinical effect in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winsen, L.M.L.; Polman, C.H.; Dijkstra, C.D.; Tilders, F.J.H.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    A reduced sensitivity to glucocorticoids can affect the clinical effect of treatment with high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone in multiple sclerosis. We prospectively studied 27 multiple sclerosis patients who were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone. Before and after treatment in vitro

  9. Divergent Cumulative Cultural Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Marriott, Chris; Chebib, Jobran

    2016-01-01

    Divergent cumulative cultural evolution occurs when the cultural evolutionary trajectory diverges from the biological evolutionary trajectory. We consider the conditions under which divergent cumulative cultural evolution can occur. We hypothesize that two conditions are necessary. First that genetic and cultural information are stored separately in the agent. Second cultural information must be transferred horizontally between agents of different generations. We implement a model with these ...

  10. Bone and glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briot, Karine

    2018-06-01

    Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis and the most frequent cause of osteoporosis in young people. Bone loss and fracture risk increase rapidly after the initiation of corticosteroid therapy and are proportional to dose and treatment duration. The increase in fracture risk is not fully assessed by bone mineral density measurement, as it is also related to impaired bone quality and increased risk of falls. Prevention should be considered in all patients beginning corticosteroid therapy, especially as the underlying inflammation in itself impairs bone quality. Bisphosphonates and teriparatide have shown efficacy in the treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. Several national and international guidelines are available to improve management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, which remains inadequate. Duration of anti-osteoporotic treatment should be discussed at the individual level, depending on the subject's characteristics and on the progression of the underlying inflammation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor signaling in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmiel, Mahita; Cidlowski, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones regulated in a circadian and stres-associated manner to maintain various metabolic and homeostatic functions that are necessary for life. Synthetic glucocorticoids are widely prescribed drugs for many conditions including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and inflammatory disorders of the eye. Research in the last few years has begun to unravel the profound complexity of glucocorticoid signaling and has contributed remarkably to improved therapeutic strategies. Glucocorticoids signal through the glucocorticoid receptor, a member of the superfamily of nuclear receptors, in both genomic and non-genomic ways in almost every tissue in the human body. In this review, we will provide an update on glucocorticoid receptor signaling and highlight the role of GR signaling in physiological and pathophysiological conditions in the major organ systems in the human body. PMID:23953592

  12. Increasing signal intensity within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1W magnetic resonance images in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: correlation with cumulative dose of a macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent, gadobutrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Dragan A. [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Clinical Center Nis, Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra [Clinical Center Nis, Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Vojinovic, Slobodan; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Clinical Center Nis, Clinic for Neurology, Nis (Serbia); Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate correlation between cumulative dose of gadobutrol and signal intensity (SI) within dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted images in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Dentate nucleus-to-pons and globus pallidus-to-thalamus SI ratios, and renal and liver functions, were evaluated after multiple intravenous administrations of 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol at 27, 96-98, and 168 weeks. We compared SI ratios based on the number of administrations, total amount of gadobutrol administered, and time between injections. Globus pallidus-to-thalamus (p = 0.025) and dentate nucleus-to-pons (p < 0.001) SI ratios increased after multiple gadobutrol administrations, correlated with the number of administrations (ρ = 0.263, p = 0.046, respectively) and depended on the length of administration (p = 0.017, p = 0.037, respectively). Patients receiving gadobutrol at 27 weeks showed the greatest increase in both SI ratios (p = 0.006; p = 0.014, respectively, versus 96-98 weeks). GGT increased at the end of the study (p = 0.004). In patients with RRMS, SI within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus increased on unenhanced T1-weighted images after multiple gadobutrol injections. Administration of the same total amount of gadobutrol over a shorter period caused greater SI increase. (orig.)

  13. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene

  14. Effect of glucocorticoids and gamma radiation on epidermal Langerhans cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belsito, D.V.; Baer, R.L.; Thorbecke, G.J.; Gigli, I.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of 750 rads of gamma radiation on the rate of return of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) following suppressive doses of topical glucorticoids was studied in guinea pigs. Gamma radiation alone had no effect on the LC as assessed by staining for cell membrane ATPase activity and Ia antigen. It did, however, delay the expected return of Ia but not ATPase surface markers on the LC after perturbation with glucocorticoids. The delayed return of surface Ia antigen is possibly related to a radiation-induced defect in the production of a required lymphokine and/or in intracellular Ia transport. Although our data do not rule out a cytolytic effect of steroids on the LC, they do strongly suggest that, at least in part, glucocorticoids act on the LC by altering cell surface characteristics

  15. NALP3 inflammasome upregulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor cause glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W. Paugh (Steven); E.J. Bonten (Erik J.); D. Savic (Daniel); L.B. Ramsey (Laura B.); W.E. Thierfelder (William E.); P. Gurung (Prajwal); R.K.S. Malireddi (R. K. Subbarao); M. Actis (Marcelo); A. Mayasundari (Anand); J. Min (Jaeki); D.R. Coss (David R.); L.T. Laudermilk (Lucas T.); J.C. Panetta (John); J.R. McCorkle (J. Robert); Y. Fan (Yiping); K.R. Crews (Kristine R.); G. Stocco (Gabriele); M.R. Wilkinson (Mark R.); A.M. Ferreira (Antonio M.); C. Cheng (Cheng); W. Yang (Wenjian); S.E. Karol (Seth E.); C.A. Fernandez (Christian A.); B. Diouf (Barthelemy); C. Smith (Colton); J.K. Hicks (J Kevin); A. Zanut (Alessandra); A. Giordanengo (Audrey); D.J. Crona; J.J. Bianchi (Joy J.); L. Holmfeldt (Linda); C.G. Mullighan (Charles); M.L. den Boer (Monique); R. Pieters (Rob); S. Jeha (Sima); T.L. Dunwell (Thomas L.); F. Latif (Farida); D. Bhojwani (Deepa); W.L. Carroll (William L.); C.-H. Pui (Ching-Hon); R.M. Myers (Richard M.); R.K. Guy (R Kiplin); T.-D. Kanneganti (Thirumala-Devi); M.V. Relling (Mary); W.E. Evans (William)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and resistance to glucocorticoids in leukemia cells confers poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the prednisolone sensitivity of primary leukemia

  16. Deposition of intranasal glucocorticoids--preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapiejko, Piotr; Sosnowski, Tomasz R; Sova, Jarosław; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice in the therapy of rhinitis. The differences in efficiency of particular medications proven by therapeutic index may result from differences in composition of particular formulations as well as from diverse deposition in nasal cavities. Intranasal formulations of glucocorticoids differ in volume of a single dose in addition to variety in density, viscosity and dispenser nozzle structure. The aim of this report was to analyze the deposition of most often used intranasal glucocorticoids in the nasal cavity and assessment of the usefulness of a nose model from a 3D printer reflecting anatomical features of a concrete patient. Three newest and most often used in Poland intranasal glucocorticoids were chosen to analysis; mometasone furoate (MF), fluticasone propionate (FP) and fluticasone furoate (FF). Droplet size distribution obtained from the tested formulations was determined by use of a laser aerosol spectrometer Spraytec (Malvern Instruments, UK). The model of the nasal cavity was obtained using a 3D printer. The printout was based upon a tridimensional reconstruction of nasal cavity created on the basis of digital processing of computed tomography of paranasal sinuses. The deposition of examined medications was established by a method of visualization combined with image analysis using commercial substance which colored itself intensively under the influence of water being the dominant ingredient of all tested preparations. On the basis of obtained results regions of dominating deposition of droplets of intranasal medication on the wall and septum of the nasal cavity were compared. Droplet size of aerosol of tested intranasal medications typically lies within the range of 25-150 µm. All tested medications deposited mainly on the anterior part of inferior turbinate. FP preparation deposited also on the anterior part of the middle nasal turbinate, marginally embracing a fragment of the central part of this

  17. Level of coenzyme A and the activity of certain dehydrogenases under chronic low dose X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkasova, L A; Novik, V A; Tsychun, G F [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziologii

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of long-term x ray irradiation (cumulative dose 50 R) on: the content of co-enzyme A (KoA) in the brain and liver, the activity of a number of oxydizing reducing enzymes in the brain mitochondria and heart muscle, and the blood glucocorticoid content. It was established that the metabolism of brain and liver KoA is quite stable, the enzymes of the brain tricarbonic acids and pyruvate-dehydrogenase cycle are labile.

  18. Optimal glucocorticoid replacement in adrenal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øksnes, Marianne; Ross, Richard; Løvås, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency (glucocorticoid deficiency) comprises a group of rare diseases, including primary adrenal insufficiency, secondary adrenal insufficiency and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Lifesaving glucocorticoid therapy was introduced over 60 years ago, but since then a number of advances in treatment have taken place. Specifically, little is known about short- and long-term treatment effects, and morbidity and mortality. Over the past decade, systematic cohort and registry studies have described reduced health-related quality of life, an unfavourable metabolic profile and increased mortality in patients with adrenal insufficiency, which may relate to unphysiological glucocorticoid replacement. This has led to the development of new modes of replacement that aim to mimic normal glucocorticoid physiology. Here, evidence for the inadequacy of conventional glucocorticoid therapy and recent developments in treatment are reviewed, with an emphasis on primary adrenal insufficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Glucocorticoids as mediators of developmental programming effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khulan, Batbayar; Drake, Amanda J

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to an adverse environment in early life is associated with an increased risk of cardio-metabolic and behavioral disorders in adulthood, a phenomenon termed 'early life programming'. One major hypothesis for early life programming is fetal glucocorticoid overexposure. In animal studies, prenatal glucocorticoid excess as a consequence of maternal stress or through exogenous administration to the mother or fetus is associated with programming effects on cardiovascular and metabolic systems and on the brain. These effects can be transmitted to subsequent generations. Studies in humans provide some evidence that prenatal glucocorticoid exposure may exert similar programming effects on glucose/insulin homeostasis, blood pressure and neurodevelopment. The mechanisms by which glucocorticoids mediate these effects are unclear but may include a role for epigenetic modifications. This review discusses the evidence for glucocorticoid programming in animal models and in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Asparaginase Potentiates Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Liu

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis is a common dose-limiting toxicity of glucocorticoids. Data from clinical trials suggest that other medications can increase the risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Here we utilized a mouse model to study the effect of asparaginase treatment on dexamethasone-induced osteonecrosis. Mice receiving asparaginase along with dexamethasone had a higher rate of osteonecrosis than those receiving only dexamethasone after 6 weeks of treatment (44% vs. 10%, P = 0.006. Similarly, epiphyseal arteriopathy, which we have shown to be an initiating event for osteonecrosis, was observed in 58% of mice receiving asparaginase and dexamethasone compared to 17% of mice receiving dexamethasone only (P = 0.007. As in the clinic, greater exposure to asparaginase was associated with greater plasma exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.0001. This model also recapitulated other clinical risk factors for osteonecrosis, including age at start of treatment, and association with the systemic exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.027 and asparaginase (P = 0.036. We conclude that asparaginase can potentiate the osteonecrotic effect of glucocorticoids.

  1. Add-on treatment with intermediate-acting insulin versus sliding-scale insulin for patients with type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance during cyclic glucocorticoid-containing antineoplastic chemotherapy: a randomized crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, M. C.; de Maar, J. S.; Steenbruggen, T. G.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Vriesendorp, T. M.; Gerdes, V. E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of intermediate-acting insulin (IMI) titrated on body weight and glucocorticoid dose with that of short-acting sliding-scale insulin (SSI) in patients on recurrent high-dose glucocorticoid-containing chemotherapy. We enrolled 26

  2. Cumulative radiation exposure in children with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Reilly, R

    2010-02-01

    This retrospective study calculated the cumulative radiation dose for children with cystic fibrosis (CF) attending a tertiary CF centre. Information on 77 children with a mean age of 9.5 years, a follow up time of 658 person years and 1757 studies including 1485 chest radiographs, 215 abdominal radiographs and 57 computed tomography (CT) scans, of which 51 were thoracic CT scans, were analysed. The average cumulative radiation dose was 6.2 (0.04-25) mSv per CF patient. Cumulative radiation dose increased with increasing age and number of CT scans and was greater in children who presented with meconium ileus. No correlation was identified between cumulative radiation dose and either lung function or patient microbiology cultures. Radiation carries a risk of malignancy and children are particularly susceptible. Every effort must be made to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure in these patients whose life expectancy is increasing.

  3. Circumvention of glucocorticoid resistance in childhood leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarman, E G; Kaspers, G J L; Pieters, R; Rottier, M M A; Veerman, A J P

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we determined if in vitro resistance to prednisolone and dexamethasone could be circumvented by cortivazol or methylprednisolone, or reversed by meta-iodobenzylguanidine in pediatric lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia. As there were strong correlations between the LC50 values (drug concentration inducing 50% leukemic cell kill, LCK) of the different glucocorticoids and median prednisolone/methylprednisolone, prednisolone/dexamethasone and prednisolone/cortivazol LC50 ratios did not differ between the leukemia subtypes, we conclude that none of the glucocorticoids had preferential anti-leukemic activity. Meta-iodobenzylguanidine however, partially reversed glucocorticoid resistance in 19% of the lymphoblastic leukemia samples.

  4. Withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids and exacerbations of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Helgo; Disse, Bernd; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    fluticasone propionate (500 μg twice daily) during a 6-week run-in period. Patients were then randomly assigned to continued triple therapy or withdrawal of fluticasone in three steps over a 12-week period. The primary end point was the time to the first moderate or severe COPD exacerbation. Spirometric......-acting bronchodilators has not been fully explored. METHODS: In this 12-month, double-blind, parallel-group study, 2485 patients with a history of exacerbation of COPD received triple therapy consisting of tiotropium (at a dose of 18 μg once daily), salmeterol (50 μg twice daily), and the inhaled glucocorticoid...

  5. CUMBIN - CUMULATIVE BINOMIAL PROGRAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    The cumulative binomial program, CUMBIN, is one of a set of three programs which calculate cumulative binomial probability distributions for arbitrary inputs. The three programs, CUMBIN, NEWTONP (NPO-17556), and CROSSER (NPO-17557), can be used independently of one another. CUMBIN can be used by statisticians and users of statistical procedures, test planners, designers, and numerical analysts. The program has been used for reliability/availability calculations. CUMBIN calculates the probability that a system of n components has at least k operating if the probability that any one operating is p and the components are independent. Equivalently, this is the reliability of a k-out-of-n system having independent components with common reliability p. CUMBIN can evaluate the incomplete beta distribution for two positive integer arguments. CUMBIN can also evaluate the cumulative F distribution and the negative binomial distribution, and can determine the sample size in a test design. CUMBIN is designed to work well with all integer values 0 < k <= n. To run the program, the user simply runs the executable version and inputs the information requested by the program. The program is not designed to weed out incorrect inputs, so the user must take care to make sure the inputs are correct. Once all input has been entered, the program calculates and lists the result. The CUMBIN program is written in C. It was developed on an IBM AT with a numeric co-processor using Microsoft C 5.0. Because the source code is written using standard C structures and functions, it should compile correctly with most C compilers. The program format is interactive. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2 and has a memory requirement of 26K. CUMBIN was developed in 1988.

  6. Cumulation of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.; Bondarev, V.K.; Golovanov, L.B.

    1977-01-01

    Limit fragmentation of light nuclei (deuterium, helium) bombarded with 8,6 GeV/c protons was investigated. Fragments (pions, protons and deuterons) were detected within the emission angle 50-150 deg with regard to primary protons and within the pulse range 150-180 MeV/c. By the kinematics of collision of a primary proton with a target at rest the fragments observed correspond to a target mass upto 3 GeV. Thus, the data obtained correspond to teh cumulation upto the third order

  7. CROSSER - CUMULATIVE BINOMIAL PROGRAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    The cumulative binomial program, CROSSER, is one of a set of three programs which calculate cumulative binomial probability distributions for arbitrary inputs. The three programs, CROSSER, CUMBIN (NPO-17555), and NEWTONP (NPO-17556), can be used independently of one another. CROSSER can be used by statisticians and users of statistical procedures, test planners, designers, and numerical analysts. The program has been used for reliability/availability calculations. CROSSER calculates the point at which the reliability of a k-out-of-n system equals the common reliability of the n components. It is designed to work well with all integer values 0 < k <= n. To run the program, the user simply runs the executable version and inputs the information requested by the program. The program is not designed to weed out incorrect inputs, so the user must take care to make sure the inputs are correct. Once all input has been entered, the program calculates and lists the result. It also lists the number of iterations of Newton's method required to calculate the answer within the given error. The CROSSER program is written in C. It was developed on an IBM AT with a numeric co-processor using Microsoft C 5.0. Because the source code is written using standard C structures and functions, it should compile correctly with most C compilers. The program format is interactive. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2 and has a memory requirement of 26K. CROSSER was developed in 1988.

  8. Glucocorticoids are ineffective in alcoholic hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, E; Gluud, C

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials of glucocorticoid treatment in clinical alcoholic hepatitis, adjusting for prognostic variables and their possible interaction with therapy, because these trials have given appreciably different results. Weighted...... logistic regression analysis was applied using the summarised descriptive data (for example, % with encephalopathy, mean bilirubin value) of the treatment and control groups of 12 controlled trials that gave this information. Despite evidence of publication bias favouring glucocorticoid treatment, its...... overall effect on mortality was not statistically significant (p = 0.20)--the relative risk (steroid/control) was 0.78 (95% confidence intervals 0.51, 1.18). There was indication of interaction between glucocorticoid therapy and gender, but not encephalopathy. Thus, the effect of glucocorticoid treatment...

  9. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.

  10. Ex vivo stimulation of whole blood as a means to determine glucocorticoid sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnsides C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Burnsides,1,* Jacqueline Corry,1,* Jacob Alexander,1 Catherine Balint,1 David Cosmar,1 Gary Phillips,2 Jeanette I Webster Marketon1,31Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Center for Biostatistics, 3Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA*JC and CB have equally contributed to this workPurpose: Glucocorticoids are commonly prescribed to treat a number of diseases including the majority of inflammatory diseases. Despite considerable interpersonal variability in response to glucocorticoids, an insensitivity rate of about 30%, and the risk of adverse side effects of glucocorticoid therapy, currently no assay is performed to determine sensitivity.Patients and methods: Here we propose a whole blood ex vivo stimulation assay to interrogate known glucocorticoid receptor (GR up- and downregulated genes to indicate glucocorticoid sensitivity. We have chosen to employ real-time PCR in order to provide a relatively fast and inexpensive assay.Results: We show that the GR-regulated genes, GILZ and FKBP51, are upregulated in whole blood by treatment with dexamethasone and that LPS-induction of cytokines (IL-6 and TNFα are repressed by dexamethasone in a dose responsive manner. There is considerable interpersonal variability in the maximum induction of these genes but little variation in the EC50 and IC50 concentrations. The regulation of the GR-induced genes differs throughout the day whereas the suppression of LPS-induced cytokines is not as sensitive to time of day.Conclusion: In all, this assay would provide a method to determine glucocorticoid receptor responsiveness in whole blood.Keywords: glucocorticoid responsiveness, gene regulation, nuclear receptor, GILZ, FKBP51, cytokines

  11. Current smoking is an independent risk factor for new-onset diabetes mellitus during highdose glucocorticoid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Takao; Sugimoto, Toyohiko; Suzuki, Sawako; Sato, Yuta; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Tatsuno, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Although high-dose glucocorticoids have been reported to cause new-onset diabetes mellitus (glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus), its risk factors have remained to be determined. We investigated the risk factors related to glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus diagnosed within 2 months after the high-dose treatment (newly treated with an initial high dose of > 20 mg prednisolone (PSL) equivalent per day for at least more than 6 months) in collagen vascular diseases. A total of 2,631 patients with collagen vascular diseases was registered between 1986 and 2006 in the Chiba-Shimoshizu Rheumatic Cohort. We analyzed 681 patients newly treated with high-dose glucocorticoid who did not have diabetes mellitus and/or its previous diagnosis (age: 46.3 ± 16.7 years, PSL dose: 40.0 ± 14.1 mg/day). Glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus was diagnosed by two or more glucose measurements in patients with fasting glycaemia ≥ 7 mmol/L and 120 minutes post-load glycaemia ≥ 11.1 mmol/L. Glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus was observed in 26.3% of patients, and the glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus group had higher age, higher BMI, lower rates of females and systemic lupus erythematosus, higher rates of smoking, alcohol use, and microscopic polyangiitis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the risk of glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus was independently higher in every 10-year increment of initial age with adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.556 (95% confidence interval: 1.359 - 1.783), in every 1 kg/m2 increment of BMI with OR 1.062 (1.002 - 1.124), in current smoking with OR 1.664 (1.057 - 2.622), and in every 10 mg increment of initial dose of prednisolone with OR 1.250 (1.074 - 1.454). High-dose glucocorticoids caused diabetes mellitus with high prevalence within a short period, and current smokers should be considered at higher risk of glucocorticoidinduced diabetes mellitus in addition to age, BMI, and initial dose.

  12. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 2: Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    The lifelong health of an individual is shaped during critical periods of development. The fetus is particularly susceptible to internal and external stimuli, many of which can alter developmental trajectories and subsequent susceptibility to disease. Glucocorticoids are critical in normal development of the fetus, as they are involved in the growth and maturation of many organ systems. The surge in fetal glucocorticoid levels that occurs in most mammalian species over the last few days of pregnancy is an important developmental switch leading to fundamental changes in gene regulation in many organs, including the brain. These changes are important for the transition to postnatal life. Exposure of the fetus to increased levels of glucocorticoids, resulting from maternal stress or treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids, can lead to long-term 'programming' of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function and behaviours. Glucocorticoids act at multiple levels within the fetal brain. Growing evidence indicates that they can exert powerful effects on the epigenome, including on DNA methylation, histone acetylation and microRNA, to influence gene expression. Such influences probably represent a critical component of the 'programming' process, and might be partly responsible for the transgenerational effects of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure on neurologic, cardiovascular and metabolic function.

  13. Endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate cholestasis-associated liver injury and hypercholesterolemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Rick; Ouweneel, Amber B; van der Sluis, Ronald J; Groen, Albert K; Van Eck, Miranda; Hoekstra, Menno

    2016-09-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by a disruption of bile flow, bile acid toxicity, liver injury, and hypercholesterolemia. Relatively high secretion of glucocorticoids by the adrenals has been observed under cholestatic conditions. Here we investigated a contribution of the rise in endogenous glucocorticoids to initial stage cholestasis pathology. Adrenalectomized or sham-operated control C57BL/6 mice were given an oral dose of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate to induce cholestasis. Adrenalectomy effectively lowered plasma corticosterone levels (18±5ng/ml vs 472±58ng/ml; Phypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, we have shown that endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate the liver injury and hypercholesterolemia associated with acute cholestasis in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Glucocorticoids interact with the hippocampal endocannabinoid system in impairing retrieval of contextual fear memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsak, Piray; Hauer, Daniela; Campolongo, Patrizia; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that glucocorticoid hormones impair the retrieval of memory of emotionally arousing experiences. Although it is known that glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval impairment depend on rapid interactions with arousal-induced noradrenergic activity, the exact mechanism underlying this presumably nongenomically mediated glucocorticoid action remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that the hippocampal endocannabinoid system, a rapidly activated retrograde messenger system, is involved in mediating glucocorticoid effects on retrieval of contextual fear memory. Systemic administration of corticosterone (0.3–3 mg/kg) to male Sprague–Dawley rats 1 h before retention testing impaired the retrieval of contextual fear memory without impairing the retrieval of auditory fear memory or directly affecting the expression of freezing behavior. Importantly, a blockade of hippocampal CB1 receptors with AM251 prevented the impairing effect of corticosterone on retrieval of contextual fear memory, whereas the same impairing dose of corticosterone increased hippocampal levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. We also found that antagonism of hippocampal β-adrenoceptor activity with local infusions of propranolol blocked the memory retrieval impairment induced by the CB receptor agonist WIN55,212–2. Thus, these findings strongly suggest that the endocannabinoid system plays an intermediary role in regulating rapid glucocorticoid effects on noradrenergic activity in impairing memory retrieval of emotionally arousing experiences. PMID:22331883

  15. Paired hormone response elements predict caveolin-1 as a glucocorticoid target gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinus F van Batenburg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids act in part via glucocorticoid receptor binding to hormone response elements (HREs, but their direct target genes in vivo are still largely unknown. We developed the criterion that genomic occurrence of paired HREs at an inter-HRE distance less than 200 bp predicts hormone responsiveness, based on synergy of multiple HREs, and HRE information from known target genes. This criterion predicts a substantial number of novel responsive genes, when applied to genomic regions 10 kb upstream of genes. Multiple-tissue in situ hybridization showed that mRNA expression of 6 out of 10 selected genes was induced in a tissue-specific manner in mice treated with a single dose of corticosterone, with the spleen being the most responsive organ. Caveolin-1 was strongly responsive in several organs, and the HRE pair in its upstream region showed increased occupancy by glucocorticoid receptor in response to corticosterone. Our approach allowed for discovery of novel tissue specific glucocorticoid target genes, which may exemplify responses underlying the permissive actions of glucocorticoids.

  16. Cumulative environmental effects. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a compilation of knowledge about the state of the environment and human activity in the Norwegian part of the North Sea and Skagerrak. The report gives an overview of pressures and impacts on the environment from normal activity and in the event of accidents. This is used to assess the cumulative environmental effects, which factors have most impact and where the impacts are greatest, and to indicate which problems are expected to be most serious in the future. The report is intended to provide relevant information that can be used in the management of the marine area in the future. It also provides input for the identification of environmental targets and management measures for the North Sea and Skagerrak.(Author)

  17. Cumulative environmental effects. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of knowledge about the state of the environment and human activity in the Norwegian part of the North Sea and Skagerrak. The report gives an overview of pressures and impacts on the environment from normal activity and in the event of accidents. This is used to assess the cumulative environmental effects, which factors have most impact and where the impacts are greatest, and to indicate which problems are expected to be most serious in the future. The report is intended to provide relevant information that can be used in the management of the marine area in the future. It also provides input for the identification of environmental targets and management measures for the North Sea and Skagerrak.(Author)

  18. NEWTONP - CUMULATIVE BINOMIAL PROGRAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    The cumulative binomial program, NEWTONP, is one of a set of three programs which calculate cumulative binomial probability distributions for arbitrary inputs. The three programs, NEWTONP, CUMBIN (NPO-17555), and CROSSER (NPO-17557), can be used independently of one another. NEWTONP can be used by statisticians and users of statistical procedures, test planners, designers, and numerical analysts. The program has been used for reliability/availability calculations. NEWTONP calculates the probably p required to yield a given system reliability V for a k-out-of-n system. It can also be used to determine the Clopper-Pearson confidence limits (either one-sided or two-sided) for the parameter p of a Bernoulli distribution. NEWTONP can determine Bayesian probability limits for a proportion (if the beta prior has positive integer parameters). It can determine the percentiles of incomplete beta distributions with positive integer parameters. It can also determine the percentiles of F distributions and the midian plotting positions in probability plotting. NEWTONP is designed to work well with all integer values 0 < k <= n. To run the program, the user simply runs the executable version and inputs the information requested by the program. NEWTONP is not designed to weed out incorrect inputs, so the user must take care to make sure the inputs are correct. Once all input has been entered, the program calculates and lists the result. It also lists the number of iterations of Newton's method required to calculate the answer within the given error. The NEWTONP program is written in C. It was developed on an IBM AT with a numeric co-processor using Microsoft C 5.0. Because the source code is written using standard C structures and functions, it should compile correctly with most C compilers. The program format is interactive. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2 and has a memory requirement of 26K. NEWTONP was developed in 1988.

  19. Cumulative radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, J.; Gray, W.M.; Watson, E.R.

    1977-01-01

    In five previous papers, the concept of Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) has been presented as a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Simple nomographic and tabular methods for the solution of practical problems in radiotherapy are now described. An essential feature of solving a CRE problem is firstly to present it in a concise and readily appreciated form, and, to do this, nomenclature has been introduced to describe schedules and regimes as compactly as possible. Simple algebraic equations have been derived to describe the CRE achieved by multi-schedule regimes. In these equations, the equivalence conditions existing at the junctions between schedules are not explicit and the equations are based on the CREs of the constituent schedules assessed individually without reference to their context in the regime as a whole. This independent evaluation of CREs for each schedule has resulted in a considerable simplification in the calculation of complex problems. The calculations are further simplified by the use of suitable tables and nomograms, so that the mathematics involved is reduced to simple arithmetical operations which require at the most the use of a slide rule but can be done by hand. The order of procedure in the presentation and calculation of CRE problems can be summarised in an evaluation procedure sheet. The resulting simple methods for solving practical problems of any complexity on the CRE-system are demonstrated by a number of examples. (author)

  20. Maintenance hemodialysis patients have high cumulative radiation exposure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Sinead M

    2010-10-01

    Hemodialysis is associated with an increased risk of neoplasms which may result, at least in part, from exposure to ionizing radiation associated with frequent radiographic procedures. In order to estimate the average radiation exposure of those on hemodialysis, we conducted a retrospective study of 100 patients in a university-based dialysis unit followed for a median of 3.4 years. The number and type of radiological procedures were obtained from a central radiology database, and the cumulative effective radiation dose was calculated using standardized, procedure-specific radiation levels. The median annual radiation dose was 6.9 millisieverts (mSv) per patient-year. However, 14 patients had an annual cumulative effective radiation dose over 20 mSv, the upper averaged annual limit for occupational exposure. The median total cumulative effective radiation dose per patient over the study period was 21.7 mSv, in which 13 patients had a total cumulative effective radiation dose over 75 mSv, a value reported to be associated with a 7% increased risk of cancer-related mortality. Two-thirds of the total cumulative effective radiation dose was due to CT scanning. The average radiation exposure was significantly associated with the cause of end-stage renal disease, history of ischemic heart disease, transplant waitlist status, number of in-patient hospital days over follow-up, and death during the study period. These results highlight the substantial exposure to ionizing radiation in hemodialysis patients.

  1. Effect of single x-irradiation on glucocorticoid function of adrenal glands of adult and old rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorban', Je.M.; Topol'nyikova, N.V.

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of short-term (1 h, 1 day) adrenal glucocorticoid function in adult and old rats after single x-irradiation at different doses was studied. changes in the glucocorticoid function of the adrenal glands at studied terms after single x-irradiation at used doses were observed in adult but not in old animals. This testifies to an age-related decrease in the range of adaptive possibilities of this link of the organism adaptive system to x-irradiation effects

  2. NALP3 inflammasome up-regulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor causes glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugh, Steven W.; Bonten, Erik J.; Savic, Daniel; Ramsey, Laura B.; Thierfelder, William E.; Gurung, Prajwal; Malireddi, R. K. Subbarao; Actis, Marcelo; Mayasundari, Anand; Min, Jaeki; Coss, David R.; Laudermilk, Lucas T.; Panetta, John C.; McCorkle, J. Robert; Fan, Yiping; Crews, Kristine R.; Stocco, Gabriele; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Wenjian; Karol, Seth E.; Fernandez, Christian A.; Diouf, Barthelemy; Smith, Colton; Hicks, J. Kevin; Zanut, Alessandra; Giordanengo, Audrey; Crona, Daniel; Bianchi, Joy J.; Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G.; den Boer, Monique L.; Pieters, Rob; Jeha, Sima; Dunwell, Thomas L.; Latif, Farida; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Myers, Richard M.; Guy, R. Kiplin; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and leukemia cell resistant to glucocorticoids confers a poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the sensitivity to prednisolone of primary leukemia cells from 444 newly diagnosed ALL patients, revealing significantly higher expression of caspase 1 (CASP1) and its activator NLRP3 in glucocorticoid resistant leukemia cells, due to significantly lower somatic methylation of CASP1 and NLRP3 promoters. Over-expression of CASP1 resulted in cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor, diminished glucocorticoid-induced transcriptional response and increased glucocorticoid resistance. Knockdown or inhibition of CASP1 significantly increased glucocorticoid receptor levels and mitigated glucocorticoid resistance in CASP1 overexpressing ALL. Our findings establish a new mechanism by which the NLRP3/CASP1 inflammasome modulates cellular levels of the glucocorticoid receptor and diminishes cell sensitivity to glucocorticoids. The broad impact on glucocorticoid transcriptional response suggests this mechanism could also modify glucocorticoid effects in other diseases. PMID:25938942

  3. Glucocorticoids and the regulation of memory in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Quervain, Dominique J. -F; Aerni, Amanda; Schelling, Gustav; Roozendaal, Benno

    Over the last decades considerable evidence has accumulated indicating that glucocorticoids - stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex - are crucially involved in the regulation of memory. Specifically, glucocorticoids have been shown to enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing

  4. Adverse consequences of glucocorticoid medication: psychological, cognitive, and behavioral effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judd, L.L.; Schettler, P.J.; Brown, E.S.; Wolkowitz, O.M.; Sternberg, E.M.; Bender, B.G.; Bulloch, K.; Cidlowski, J.A.; Kloet, E.R. de; Fardet, L.; Joels, M.; Leung, D.Y.; McEwen, B.S.; Roozendaal, B.; Rossum, E.F. van; Ahn, J.; Brown, D.W.; Plitt, A.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressant medications worldwide. This article highlights the risk of clinically significant and sometimes severe psychological, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances that may be associated with glucocorticoid use, as well as

  5. Adverse Consequences of Glucocorticoid Medication : Psychological, Cognitive, and Behavioral Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judd, Lewis L.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Brown, E. Sherwood; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Sternberg, Esther M.; Bender, Bruce G.; Bulloch, Karen; Cidlowski, John A.; de Kloet, E. Ronald; Fardet, Laurence; Joëls, Marian; Leung, Donald Y. M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Roozendaal, Benno; Van Rossum, Elisabeth F. C.; Ahn, Junyoung; Brown, David W.; Plitt, Aaron; Singh, Gagandeep

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressant medications worldwide. This article highlights the risk of clinically significant and sometimes severe psychological, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances that may be associated with glucocorticoid use, as well as

  6. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 1: Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Fetal development is a critical period for shaping the lifelong health of an individual. However, the fetus is susceptible to internal and external stimuli that can lead to adverse long-term health consequences. Glucocorticoids are an important developmental switch, driving changes in gene regulation that are necessary for normal growth and maturation. The fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is particularly susceptible to long-term programming by glucocorticoids; these effects can persist throughout the life of an organism. Dysfunction of the HPA axis as a result of fetal programming has been associated with impaired brain growth, altered behaviour and increased susceptibility to chronic disease (such as metabolic and cardiovascular disease). Moreover, the effects of glucocorticoid-mediated programming are evident in subsequent generations, and transmission of these changes can occur through both maternal and paternal lineages.

  7. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids....... Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular...

  8. Secant cumulants and toric geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michalek, M.; Oeding, L.; Zwiernik, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    We study the secant line variety of the Segre product of projective spaces using special cumulant coordinates adapted for secant varieties. We show that the secant variety is covered by open normal toric varieties. We prove that in cumulant coordinates its ideal is generated by binomial quadrics. We

  9. A glucocorticoid education group meeting: an effective strategy for improving self-management to prevent adrenal crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repping-Wuts, Han J W J; Stikkelbroeck, Nike M M L; Noordzij, Alida; Kerstens, Mies; Hermus, Ad R M M

    2013-07-01

    To assess self-management in patients receiving glucocorticoid replacement therapy for primary or secondary adrenal failure before and 6 months after a glucocorticoid education group meeting. All patients with primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency, treated at the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, were invited by their endocrinologist to participate in a 3-h glucocorticoid education group meeting, consisting of a lecture about the disease and glucocorticoid doses adjustments in case of stress, followed by an instruction on how to inject hydrocortisone i.m. Finally, all participants could practise the i.m. injection and discuss their experience with (imminent) adrenal crises with other patients and the health care providers. Two weeks before the meeting and 6 months after the meeting, patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire about how they would act in six different conditions (e.g. febrile illness or vomiting). Of the 405 patients who were invited, 246 patients (61%) participated. At baseline the response by the participants on the questionnaire was 100% (n=246) and at follow-up 74% (n=183). At follow-up, significantly more participants (P≤0.005) gave the correct answers to how to act in different situations (e.g. self-administration of a glucocorticoid injection and phone contact in case of vomiting/diarrhoea without fever). Moreover, the use of self-management tools, such as having a 'medicine passport (travel document with information about disease and medication) (P=0.007) or SOS medallion (P=0.0007)', increased. A glucocorticoid education group meeting for patients with adrenal failure seems helpful to improve self-management and proper use of stress-related glucocorticoid dose adjustment.

  10. Risk of catecholaminergic crisis following glucocorticoid administration in patients with an adrenal mass: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Catherine; van Uum, Stan H M; Lenders, Jacques W M

    2015-11-01

    Glucocorticoids as diagnostic or therapeutic agents have been reported to carry an increased risk of catecholaminergic crisis (CC) in patients with pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma (PPGL). We searched literature databases using the following terms: pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma, adrenal incidentaloma, steroids, glucocorticoids, dexamethasone suppression test (DST), hypertensive crisis, cosyntropin and CRH. From all published case reports (1962-2013), we reviewed medical history, presenting symptoms, dose and route of steroid administration, location and size of adrenal mass, biochemical phenotype and outcome. Twenty-five case reports describing a CC were identified. Three patients with an adrenal incidentaloma suffered a CC following high-dose DST, and in one case, this was fatal. In two of these patients, biochemical testing missed the diagnosis, and in the third, a DST was done despite elevated urinary metanephrines. No CC has been reported for patients undergoing a low-dose DST. Three of 16 patients who received therapeutic glucocorticoids and four of six patients following cosyntropin testing died. No specific biochemical phenotype was related to adverse events. Although a causal relationship cannot be established from this review, it seems prudent to exclude a PPGL in patients with a large incidentaloma or when high-dose DST is considered in a patient with an incidentaloma of any size. Our literature review does not support the need for biochemical testing for PPGL prior to a low-dose (1 mg) DST. Finally, before starting therapeutic glucocorticoids, any clinical signs or symptoms of a potential PPGL should prompt reliable biochemical testing to rule out a PPGL. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Systems Biology of Glucocorticoids in Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and incurable muscular dystrophy of childhood. Muscle regeneration fails with...SUBJECT TERMS Duchenne Muscular dystrophy , Glucocorticoids, Systems biology, Drug mechanism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION...better targeted and more effective therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy dynamically. This MDA grant proposal is led by Dr. Eric Hoffman, and it

  12. On the retinal toxicity of intraocular glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriglia, Alicia; Valamanesh, Fatemeh; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2010-12-15

    Corticosteroids are hormones involved in many physiological responses such as stress, immune modulation, protein catabolism and water homeostasis. The subfamily of glucocorticoids is used systemically in the treatment of inflammatory diseases or allergic reactions. In the eye, glucocorticoides are used to treat macular edema, inflammation and neovascularization. The most commonly used glucocorticoid is triamcinolone acetonide (TA). The pharmaceutical formulation of TA is not adapted for intravitreal administration but has been selected by ophthalmologists because its very low intraocular solubility provides sustained effect. Visual benefits of intraocular TA do not clearly correlate with morpho-anatomical improvements, suggesting potential toxicity. We therefore studied, non-common, but deleterious effects of glucocorticoids on the retina. We found that the intravitreal administration of TA is beneficial in the treatment of neovascularization because it triggers cell death of endothelial cells of neovessels by a caspase-independent mechanism. However, this treatment is toxic for the retina because it induces a non-apoptotic, caspase-independent cell death related to paraptosis, mostly in the retinal pigmented epithelium cells and the Müller cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Are BDNF and glucocorticoid activities calibrated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneteau, Freddy; Chao, Moses V.

    2012-01-01

    One hypothesis to account for the onset and severity of neurological disorders is the loss of trophic support. Indeed, changes in the levels and activities of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) occur in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. A deficit promotes vulnerability whereas a gain of function facilitates recovery by enhancing survival, synapse formation and synaptic plasticity. Implementation of ‘BDNF therapies’, however, faces numerous methodological and pharmacokinetic issues. Identifying BDNF mimetics that activate the BDNF receptor or downstream targets of BDNF signaling represent an alternative approach. One mechanism that shows great promise is to study the interplay of BDNF and glucocorticoid hormones, a major class of natural steroid secreted during stress reactions and in synchrony with circadian rhythms. While small amounts of glucocorticoids support normal brain function, excess stimulation by these steroid hormones precipitate stress-related affective disorders. To date, however, because of the paucity of knowledge of underlying cellular mechanisms, deleterious effects of glucocorticoids are not prevented following extreme stress. In the present review, we will discuss the complementary roles share by BDNF and glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity, and delineate possible signaling mechanisms mediating these effects. PMID:23022538

  14. From receptor balance to rational glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, E Ron

    2014-08-01

    Corticosteroids secreted as end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis act like a double-edged sword in the brain. The hormones coordinate appraisal processes and decision making during the initial phase of a stressful experience and promote subsequently cognitive performance underlying the management of stress adaptation. This action exerted by the steroids on the initiation and termination of the stress response is mediated by 2 related receptor systems: mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). The receptor types are unevenly distributed but colocalized in abundance in neurons of the limbic brain to enable these complementary hormone actions. This contribution starts from a historical perspective with the observation that phasic occupancy of GR during ultradian rhythmicity is needed to maintain responsiveness to corticosteroids. Then, during stress, initially MR activation enhances excitability of limbic networks that are engaged in appraisal and emotion regulation. Next, the rising hormone concentration occupies GR, resulting in reallocation of energy to limbic-cortical circuits with a role in behavioral adaptation and memory storage. Upon MR:GR imbalance, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs, which can enhance an individual's vulnerability. Imbalance is characteristic for chronic stress experience and depression but also occurs during exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids. Hence, glucocorticoid psychopathology may develop in susceptible individuals because of suppression of ultradian/circadian rhythmicity and depletion of endogenous corticosterone from brain MR. This knowledge generated from testing the balance hypothesis can be translated to a rational glucocorticoid therapy.

  15. Glucocorticoid Regulation of the Vitamin D Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies indicate calcitriol has potent anti-tumor activity in different types of cancers. However, high levels of vitamin D can produce hypercalcemia in some patients. Glucocorticoids are used to ameliorate hypercalcemia and to enhance calcitriol anti-tumor activity. Calcitriol in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels and ligand binding in squamous cell carcinoma VII (SCC). In this study we found that both calcitriol and Dex induce VDR- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription respectively, indicating both hormone receptors are active in SCC. Pre-treatment with Dex increases VDR-mediated transcription at the human CYP24A1 promoter. Whereas, pre-treatment with other steroid hormones, including dihydrotestosterone and R1881, has no effect on VDR-mediated transcription. Real-time PCR indicates treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time-dependent manner, suggesting Dex may directly regulate expression of Vdr. Numerous putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were found in the Vdr gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated GR binding at several putative GREs located within the mouse Vdr gene. However, none of the putative GREs studied increase GR-mediated transcription in luciferase reporter assays. In an attempt to identify the response element responsible for Vdr transcript regulation, future studies will continue to analyze newly identified GREs more distal from the Vdr gene promoter. PMID:20398752

  16. Glucocorticoid effect on melphalan cytotoxicity, cell-cycle position, cell size, and [3H]uridine incorporation in one of three human melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benckhuijsen, C.; Osman, A.M.; Hillebrand, M.J.; Smets, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Three human melanoma cell lines of known content of specific glucocorticoid-binding sites were studied for colony formation after a microM dose of glucocorticoid combined with melphalan. In one of the three cell lines, M-5A, subcloned from M-5 (formerly designated RPMI 8322), the effect of combined treatment was markedly increased compared to that of melphalan even if the glucocorticoid was applied for 1 h only, 10 h before the melphalan. Semilogarithmic dose-effect plots for a reduction of final plating efficiency by glucocorticoid were curvilinear, according to a receptor-mediated process. The effects of glucocorticoid, melphalan, and their combination were linearized by bilogarithmic median-effect plotting which allowed the quantitation of a synergism which was more marked in case of glucocorticoid pretreatment, for 1 or 24 h, than on simultaneous exposure. According to sequential DNA per cell cytophotometry, melphalan abolished in M-5A a glucocorticoid-induced arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The cytotoxic synergism correlated with an apparent stimulation by glucocorticoid of the rate of acid-insoluble incorporation of [ 3 H]uridine and [ 14 C]leucine and an increase in cell size and protein content in M-5A cells but not in the other two cell lines. The way in which glucocorticoids induce an enhanced susceptibility to melphalan is not clear. Our results appear compatible with a hypothesis that chromatin in a transcriptionally activated state is more vulnerable to cytotoxic attack by an alkylating agent than under average conditions

  17. Efectos del tratamiento con glucocorticoides durante el embarazo. A propósito de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Machado Ramírez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids may be necessary during pregnancy to treat some maternal conditions. Its effects in pregnant women are virtually the same as those described in the general adult population. Avascular necrosis is the death of bone tissue due to the interruption of the blood supply, and is mainly associated with the use of high-dose corticosteroids for long periods. We present the case of a 21-year-old patient at 34 weeks’ gestation admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of the Enrique Cabrera Hospital because of decompensated hypertension, obesity and congenital adrenal hyperplasia treated with suppressive doses of steroids. Subsequently, she was diagnosed with an avascular necrosis of both femoral heads. Iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome resulting from all these factors was found. The newborn developed a seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the side effects of the chronic use of glucocorticoids in pregnant women.

  18. Use of glucocorticoids during pregnancy and risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Kristina; Byrjalsen, Anna; Frøslev, Trine

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Prenatal exposure to excess endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) has been linked to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We investigated whether prenatal exposure to exogenous GC is associated with ADHD. DESIGN: Nationwide cohort study. SETTING: A cohort of 875 996 singletons born...... ADHD risk in children prenatally exposed to GCs and in children of former GC users with risk in unexposed children of never users. We computed cumulative incidence at 10 years of age and adjusted HRs (aHRs). In addition, we compared exposed children with unexposed siblings in a sibling design. RESULTS......: We identified 875 996 children, among whom 5319 were prenatally exposed to systemic GCs and 36 780 to local/inhaled GCs. Cumulative incidences of ADHD at 10 years of age were 2.65% in prenatally exposed children and 2.03% in unexposed children of never users. At the general population level, prenatal...

  19. Determination of Glucocorticoids in UPLC-MS in Environmental Samples from an Occupational Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Oddone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposures to glucocorticoids are still a neglected issue in some work environments, including pharmaceutical plants. We developed an analytical method to quantify simultaneously 21 glucocorticoids using UPLC coupled with mass spectrometry to provide a basis to carry out environmental monitoring. Samples were taken from air, hand-washing tests, pad-tests and wipe-tests. This paper reports the contents of the analytical methodology, along with the results of this extensive environmental and personal monitoring of glucocorticoids. The method in UPLC-MS turned out to be suitable and effective for the aim of the study. Wipe-test and pad-test desorption was carried out using 50 mL syringes, a simple technique that saves time without adversely affecting analyte recovery. Results showed a widespread environmental pollution due to glucocorticoids. This is of particular concern. Evaluation of the dose absorbed by each worker and identification of a biomarker for occupational exposure will contribute to assessment and prevention of occupational exposure.

  20. Fast effects of glucocorticoids on memory-related network oscillations in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, E K; Krupka, N; Bähner, F; Both, M; Draguhn, A

    2008-05-01

    Transient or lasting increases in glucocorticoids accompany deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory formation. Recent data indicate that the formation and consolidation of declarative and spatial memory are mechanistically related to different patterns of hippocampal network oscillations. These include gamma oscillations during memory acquisition and the faster ripple oscillations (approximately 200 Hz) during subsequent memory consolidation. We therefore analysed the effects of acutely applied glucocorticoids on network activity in mouse hippocampal slices. Evoked field population spikes and paired-pulse responses were largely unaltered by corticosterone or cortisol, respectively, despite a slight increase in maximal population spike amplitude by 10 microm corticosterone. Several characteristics of sharp waves and superimposed ripple oscillations were affected by glucocorticoids, most prominently the frequency of spontaneously occurring sharp waves. At 0.1 microm, corticosterone increased this frequency, whereas maximal (10 microm) concentrations led to a reduction. In addition, gamma oscillations became slightly faster and less regular in the presence of high doses of corticosteroids. The present study describes acute effects of glucocorticoids on sharp wave-ripple complexes and gamma oscillations in mouse hippocampal slices, revealing a potential background for memory deficits in the presence of elevated levels of these hormones.

  1. The challenge of cumulative impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masden, Elisabeth

    2011-07-01

    Full text: As governments pledge to combat climate change, wind turbines are becoming a common feature of terrestrial and marine environments. Although wind power is a renewable energy source and a means of reducing carbon emissions, there is a need to ensure that the wind farms themselves do not damage the environment. There is particular concern over the impacts of wind farms on bird populations, and with increasing numbers of wind farm proposals, the concern focuses on cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any activity/action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. Cumulative impact assessment is a legislative requirement of environmental impact assessment but such assessments are rarely adequate restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Reasons for this are numerous but a recurring theme is the lack of clear definitions and guidance on how to perform cumulative assessments. Here we present a conceptual framework and include illustrative examples to demonstrate how the framework can be used to improve the planning and execution of cumulative impact assessments. The core concept is that explicit definitions of impacts, actions and scales of assessment are required to reduce uncertainty in the process of assessment and improve communication between stake holders. Only when it is clear what has been included within a cumulative assessment, is it possible to make comparisons between developments. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development assessments. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating cumulative

  2. Thyroid Storm Masked by Hemodialysis and Glucocorticoid Therapy in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Yohei; Shimizu, Yoshio; Nakata, Junichiro; Kameda, Toshiaki; Muto, Masahiro; Ohsawa, Isao; Io, Hiroaki; Hamada, Chieko; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function test values are generally at low levels in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Life-threatening thyrotoxicosis or thyroid storm is rare, especially in hemodialysis (HD) patients, and is characterized by multisystem involvement and a high mortality rate if not immediately recognized and treated. Here, we report a female patient with severe symptomatic thyroid storm, receiving long-term HD and glucocorticoid therapy. Methimazole at a dose of 15 mg per day, β-adrenergic bloc...

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Maartje S.; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Rotteveel, Joost; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, supraphysiological doses may cause suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis suppression resulting in reduced cortisol response may cause an impaired stress

  4. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Maartje S.; Rensen, Niki; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Rotteveel, Joost; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, supraphysiological doses can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis suppression resulting in reduced cortisol response may cause an impaired stress response and an inadequate

  5. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, Niki; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Rotteveel, Joost; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, supraphysiological doses can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis suppression resulting in reduced cortisol response may cause an impaired stress response and an inadequate

  6. BClI polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is associated with increased obesity, impaired glucose metabolism and dyslipidaemia in patients with Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Roberta; Marzotti, Stefania; Berardelli, Rita; Karamouzis, Ioannis; Brozzetti, Annalisa; D'Angelo, Valentina; Mengozzi, Giulio; Mandrile, Giorgia; Giachino, Daniela; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Bini, Vittorio; Falorni, Alberto; Ghigo, Ezio; Arvat, Emanuela

    2012-12-01

    Although glucocorticoids are essential for health, several studies have shown that glucocorticoids replacement in Addison's disease might be involved in anthropometric and metabolic impairment, with increased cardiovascular risk, namely if conventional doses are used. As the effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, encoded by NR3C1 gene, different polymorphisms in the NR3C1 gene have been linked to altered glucocorticoid sensitivity in general population as well as in patients with obesity or metabolic syndrome. We investigated the impact of glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphisms, including the BclI, N363S and ER22/23EK variants, on anthropometric parameters (BMI and waist circumference), metabolic profile (HOMA, OGTT and serum lipids) and ACTH levels in 50 patients with Addison's disease (34 women and 16 men, age 20-82 year) under glucocorticoids replacement. Neither N363S nor ER22/23EK variants were significantly associated with anthropometric, metabolic or hormonal parameters, while patients carrying the homozygous BclI polymorphism GG (n = 4) showed higher (P Addison's disease and may contribute, along with other factors, to the increase in central adiposity, impaired glucose metabolism and dyslipidaemia. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Positive and negative social support and HPA-axis hyperactivity: Evidence from glucocorticoids in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iob, Eleonora; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Steptoe, Andrew

    2018-06-12

    While positive social support is associated with lower prevalence of disease and better treatment outcomes, negative social relationships can instead have unfavourable consequences for several physical and mental health conditions. However, the specific mechanisms by which this nexus might operate remain poorly understood. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity owing to psychosocial stress has been proposed as a potential pathway underlying the link between social support and health. Hair glucocorticoids such as cortisol and cortisone are emerging as promising biomarkers of long-term retrospective HPA activation. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of positive and negative experiences of social support within key relationships (i.e. spouse/partner, children, other family members, and friends) on cortisol and cortisone. These associations were tested in a sample of 2520 older adults (mean age 68.1) from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Hair samples were collected in wave 6 (2012/13). To understand the impact of cumulative exposure to poor social support, the analysis used self-reported data from waves 4 (2008/09) and 6. Covariates included demographic, socioeconomic, lifestyle, and hair characteristics. In cross sectional analyses, lower positive support from all sources and specifically from children were associated with higher cortisol. Additionally, lower positive support from children was positively associated with cortisone. Similarly, higher overall negative support was related to higher cortisol, and greater negative support from children was also positively associated with cortisone. In longitudinal analyses, there was evidence for positive associations between hair glucocorticoids and cumulative exposure to poorer social support. Experiences of low positive and high negative social support, particularly from children, were both related to higher hair glucocorticoids. Hence, social relationships of

  8. A Psychoneuroimmunologic Examination of Cumulative Perinatal Steroid Exposures and Preterm Infant Behavioral Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Isabell B.; Smith, Lynne; Wiley, Dorothy; Badr, Lina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study’s aim was to explore relationships between preterm infant behavioral outcomes and maternal/infant glucocorticoid (dexamethasone [DEX]) treatments using a psychoneuroimmunologic approach. Research questions were (a) do relationships exist between infant cumulative perinatal steroid (PNS) exposure and child behavioral problems? and (b) do maternal/infant characteristics (e.g., immune markers and biophysiologic stressors) influence these relationships? Methods The convenience sample comprised 45 mother–child dyads in which the children (mean age 8 years ± 2.3) had been born at a mean postconceptional age of 28 weeks (± 4.2). We used the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) to assess behavior, the Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB) to score stress at birth, and retrospective record review to identify additional perinatal factors (PNS dosage, sepsis, and maternal and infant complete blood counts near delivery). Results Children were dichotomized into high (> 0.2mg/kg; n = 20) versus low–no (≤ 0.2 mg/kg; n = 25) PNS exposure groups. Significant relationships existed between CBCL Total Problems score and sepsis, PNS exposure, timing of initial PNS, and infant length percentile at discharge. Competence problems were significantly associated with PNS, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infant length percentile, CRIB score, sepsis, retinopathy of prematurity, hearing deficit, and immunity markers (i.e., maternal lymphocyte percentage and infant band/seg ratio). Children in the higher PNS group exhibited more behavioral problems (e.g., withdrawn, attention, conduct, social, and rule breaking problems), but there were no significant differences. The findings are reassuring regarding long-term effects of this PNS dose on preterm infant behavioral outcomes. PMID:21900308

  9. Glucocorticoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias: a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Margraf, Jürgen

    2008-04-07

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and phobias belong to the most common anxiety disorders and to the most common psychiatric illnesses in general. In both disorders, aversive memories are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology. Previously, we have reported that elevated glucocorticoid levels inhibit memory retrieval in animals and healthy humans. We therefore hypothesized that the administration of glucocorticoids might also inhibit the retrieval of aversive memory, thereby reducing symptoms in patients with PTSD and phobias. In recent clinical studies, we found first evidence to support this hypothesis. In patients with PTSD, low-dose cortisol treatment for one month reduced symptoms of traumatic memories without causing adverse side effects. Furthermore, we found evidence for a prolonged effect of the cortisol treatment. Persistent retrieval and reconsolidation of traumatic memories is a process that keeps these memories vivid and thereby the disorder alive. By inhibiting memory retrieval, cortisol may weaken the traumatic memory trace, and thus reduce symptoms even beyond the treatment period. In patients with social phobia, we found that a single oral administration of cortisone 1 h before a socio-evaluative stressor significantly reduced self-reported fear during the anticipation-, exposure-, and recovery phase of the stressor. In subjects with spider phobia, repeated oral administration of cortisol 1 h before exposure to a spider photograph induced a progressive reduction of stimulus-induced fear. This effect was maintained when subjects were exposed to the stimulus again two days after the last cortisol administration, indicating that cortisol facilitated the extinction of phobic fear. In conclusion, by a common mechanism of reducing the retrieval of aversive memories, glucocorticoids may be suited for the treatment of PTSD as well as phobias. More studies are needed to further evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of

  10. Covalent affinity labeling, radioautography, and immunocytochemistry localize the glucocorticoid receptor in rat testicular Leydig cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T.

    1989-01-01

    The presence and distribution of glucocorticoid receptors in the rat testis were examined by using 2 approaches: in vivo quantitative radioautography and immunocytochemistry. Radioautographic localization was made possible through the availability of a glucocorticoid receptor affinity label, dexamethasone 21-mesylate, which binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor, thereby preventing dissociation of the steroid-receptor complex. Adrenalectomized adult rats were injected with a tritiated (3H) form of this steroid into the testis and the tissue was processed for light-microscope radioautography. Silver grains were observed primarily over the Leydig cells of the interstitial space and to a lesser extent, over the cellular layers which make up the seminiferous epithelium, with no one cell type showing preferential labeling. To determine the specificity of the labeling, a 25- or 50-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone was injected simultaneously with the same dose of (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate. In these control experiments, a marked reduction in label intensity was noted over the Leydig as well as tubular cells. Endocytic macrophages of the interstitium were non-specifically labeled, indicating uptake of the ligand possibly by fluid-phase endocytosis. A quantitative analysis of the label confirmed the presence of statistically significant numbers of specific binding sites for glucocorticoids in both Leydig cells and the cellular layers of the seminiferous epithelium; 86% of the label was found over Leydig cells, and only 14% over the cells of the seminiferous epithelium. These binding data were confirmed by light-microscope immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal antibody to the glucocorticoid receptor

  11. Familial glucocorticoid deficiency presenting with generalized hyperpigmentation in an Egyptian child: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwalley Kotb A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Familial glucocorticoid deficiency, or hereditary unresponsiveness to adrenocorticotropic hormone, is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by glucocorticoid deficiency in the absence of mineralocorticoid deficiency. It may present in infancy or early childhood with hyperpigmentation, failure to thrive, recurrent infections, hypoglycemic attacks and convulsions that may result in coma or death. Here, we report the case of an 18-month-old Egyptian boy with familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Case presentation An 18-month-old Egyptian boy was referred to our institution for evaluation of generalized hyperpigmentation of the body associated with recurrent convulsions; one of his siblings, who had died at the age of nine months, also had generalized hyperpigmentation of the body. The initial clinical examination revealed generalized symmetrical deep hyperpigmentation of the body as well as hypotonia, normal blood pressure and normal male genitalia. He had low blood glucose and cortisol levels, normal aldosterone and high adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Based on the above mentioned data, a provisional diagnosis of familial glucocorticoid deficiency was made, which was confirmed by a molecular genetics study. Oral hydrocortisone treatment at a dose of 10 mg/m2/day was started. The child was followed up after two months of treatment; the hyperpigmentation has lessened in comparison with his initial presentation and his blood sugar and cortisol levels were normalized. Conclusion Familial glucocorticoid deficiency is a rare, treatable disease that can be easily missed due to nonspecific presentations. The consequences of delayed diagnosis and treatment are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality.

  12. Endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate cholestasis-associated liver injury and hypercholesterolemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geest, Rick van der; Ouweneel, Amber B.; Sluis, Ronald J. van der; Groen, Albert K.; Van Eck, Miranda; Hoekstra, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by a disruption of bile flow, bile acid toxicity, liver injury, and hypercholesterolemia. Relatively high secretion of glucocorticoids by the adrenals has been observed under cholestatic conditions. Here we investigated a contribution of the rise in endogenous glucocorticoids to initial stage cholestasis pathology. Adrenalectomized or sham-operated control C57BL/6 mice were given an oral dose of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate to induce cholestasis. Adrenalectomy effectively lowered plasma corticosterone levels (18 ± 5 ng/ml vs 472 ± 58 ng/ml; P < 0.001) and disrupted the metabolic and anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid function. Adrenal removal did not exacerbate the cholestasis extent. In contrast, the cholestasis-associated liver injury was markedly lower in adrenalectomized mice as compared to controls as evidenced by a 84%–93% decrease in liver necrosis and plasma alanine aminotransferase and bile acid levels (P < 0.001 for all). Gene expression analysis on livers from adrenalectomized mice suggested the absence of bile acid toxicity-associated farnesoid X receptor signaling in the context of a 44% (P < 0.01) and 82% (P < 0.001) reduction in sodium/bile acid cotransporter member 1 transcript level as compared to respectively control and non-diseased mice. Adrenalectomy reduced the expression of the cholesterol synthesis gene HMG-CoA reductase by 70% (P < 0.05), which translated into a 73% lower plasma total cholesterol level (P < 0.05). Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486 recapitulated the protective effect of adrenalectomy on indices of liver injury and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, we have shown that endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate the liver injury and hypercholesterolemia associated with acute cholestasis in mice. - Highlights: • Cholestasis is associated with increased plasma glucocorticoid levels in mice. • Adrenalectomy lowers cholestasis-associated liver

  13. Endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate cholestasis-associated liver injury and hypercholesterolemia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geest, Rick van der, E-mail: r.van.der.geest@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Ouweneel, Amber B., E-mail: a.b.ouweneel@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Sluis, Ronald J. van der, E-mail: r.vandersluis@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Groen, Albert K., E-mail: a.k.groen@umcg.nl [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Van Eck, Miranda, E-mail: m.eck@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Menno, E-mail: hoekstra@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands)

    2016-09-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by a disruption of bile flow, bile acid toxicity, liver injury, and hypercholesterolemia. Relatively high secretion of glucocorticoids by the adrenals has been observed under cholestatic conditions. Here we investigated a contribution of the rise in endogenous glucocorticoids to initial stage cholestasis pathology. Adrenalectomized or sham-operated control C57BL/6 mice were given an oral dose of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate to induce cholestasis. Adrenalectomy effectively lowered plasma corticosterone levels (18 ± 5 ng/ml vs 472 ± 58 ng/ml; P < 0.001) and disrupted the metabolic and anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid function. Adrenal removal did not exacerbate the cholestasis extent. In contrast, the cholestasis-associated liver injury was markedly lower in adrenalectomized mice as compared to controls as evidenced by a 84%–93% decrease in liver necrosis and plasma alanine aminotransferase and bile acid levels (P < 0.001 for all). Gene expression analysis on livers from adrenalectomized mice suggested the absence of bile acid toxicity-associated farnesoid X receptor signaling in the context of a 44% (P < 0.01) and 82% (P < 0.001) reduction in sodium/bile acid cotransporter member 1 transcript level as compared to respectively control and non-diseased mice. Adrenalectomy reduced the expression of the cholesterol synthesis gene HMG-CoA reductase by 70% (P < 0.05), which translated into a 73% lower plasma total cholesterol level (P < 0.05). Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486 recapitulated the protective effect of adrenalectomy on indices of liver injury and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, we have shown that endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate the liver injury and hypercholesterolemia associated with acute cholestasis in mice. - Highlights: • Cholestasis is associated with increased plasma glucocorticoid levels in mice. • Adrenalectomy lowers cholestasis-associated liver

  14. Glucocorticoid Availability in Colonic Inflammation of Rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ergang, Peter; Leden, Pavel; Bryndová, Jana; Žbánková, Šárka; Mikšík, Ivan; Kment, M.; Pácha, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 8 (2008), s. 2160-2167 ISSN 0163-2116 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR8576; GA ČR GA305/07/0328 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 77/2006C Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : glucocorticoids * 11beta hydroxisteroid dehydrogenase 1 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.583, year: 2008

  15. Biochemical endpoints of glucocorticoid hormone action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.A.; Nicholson, M.L.; Guyette, W.A.; Giddings, S.J.; Mendelsohn, S.L.; Nordeen, S.K.; Lyons, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    Both the rapidly evolving metabolic effects of glucocorticoids and the more slowly developing lethal actions appear to be initiated via the synthesis of new mRNAs and proteins. The chronic suppression of cell growth may be the consequence of suppression of overall rates of protein synthesis (and probably RNA and DNA synthesis as well) that in turn may represent the cellular response to the small changes in ratios of adenine nucleotides that result from the suppression of oxidative ATP production. The inhibition of glucose transport may also play a role here to prevent a compensatory increase in glycolytic ATP production. Some other hormone actions, the decrease in the ability of cells to concentrate AIB and the increase in nuclear fragility are unrelated to, and evolve separately from, the hormonal inhibitions on energy production. Cell killing is not the result of suppression of protein synthesis, nor of hormone-induced increases in calcium uptake. While the mechanisms are unknown, the increase in nuclear fragility appears to be the earliest measure of their operation. In tumor cells resistance to lethal actions of glucocorticoids may emerge via the selection of cells with hardier membranes, that are better able to withstand the intracellular destructive events set in motion by high levels of glucocorticoids.

  16. Dibutyltin disrupts glucocorticoid receptor function and impairs glucocorticoid-induced suppression of cytokine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Gumy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotins are highly toxic and widely distributed environmental chemicals. Dibutyltin (DBT is used as stabilizer in the production of polyvinyl chloride plastics, and it is also the major metabolite formed from tributyltin (TBT in vivo. DBT is immunotoxic, however, the responsible targets remain to be defined. Due to the importance of glucocorticoids in immune-modulation, we investigated whether DBT could interfere with glucocorticoid receptor (GR function. METHODOLOGY: We used HEK-293 cells transiently transfected with human GR as well as rat H4IIE hepatoma cells and native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages expressing endogenous receptor to study organotin effects on GR function. Docking of organotins was used to investigate the binding mechanism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that nanomolar concentrations of DBT, but not other organotins tested, inhibit ligand binding to GR and its transcriptional activity. Docking analysis indicated that DBT inhibits GR activation allosterically by inserting into a site close to the steroid-binding pocket, which disrupts a key interaction between the A-ring of the glucocorticoid and the GR. DBT inhibited glucocorticoid-induced expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and tyrosine-aminotransferase (TAT and abolished the glucocorticoid-mediated transrepression of TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activity. Moreover, DBT abrogated the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and TNF-alpha production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: DBT inhibits ligand binding to GR and subsequent activation of the receptor. By blocking GR activation, DBT may disturb metabolic functions and modulation of the immune system, providing an explanation for some of the toxic effects of this organotin.

  17. Glucocorticoid effects on object recognition memory require training-associated emotional arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Shoki; Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L

    2004-01-20

    Considerable evidence implicates glucocorticoid hormones in the regulation of memory consolidation and memory retrieval. The present experiments investigated whether the influence of these hormones on memory depends on the level of emotional arousal induced by the training experience. We investigated this issue in male Sprague-Dawley rats by examining the effects of immediate posttraining systemic injections of the glucocorticoid corticosterone on object recognition memory under two conditions that differed in their training-associated emotional arousal. In rats that were not previously habituated to the experimental context, corticosterone (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) administered immediately after a 3-min training trial enhanced 24-hr retention performance in an inverted-U shaped dose-response relationship. In contrast, corticosterone did not affect 24-hr retention of rats that received extensive prior habituation to the experimental context and, thus, had decreased novelty-induced emotional arousal during training. Additionally, immediate posttraining administration of corticosterone to nonhabituated rats, in doses that enhanced 24-hr retention, impaired object recognition performance at a 1-hr retention interval whereas corticosterone administered after training to well-habituated rats did not impair 1-hr retention. Thus, the present findings suggest that training-induced emotional arousal may be essential for glucocorticoid effects on object recognition memory.

  18. Glucocorticoid actions on L6 muscle cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, S.R.; Konagaya, M.; Konagaya, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Glucocorticoids exert striking catabolic effects on skeletal muscle. The mechanism of these effects remains poorly understood. They employed L6 muscle cells in culture to ascertain whether intracellular glucocorticoid receptors are involved. Studies in vitro permit exploration of glucocorticoid effects in the absence of other hormonal influences. L6 myoblasts were induced to form differentiated myotubes by growth in 1% serum. L6 myotubes were found to possess a high-affinity, limited capacity intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (apparent K/sub D/ = 5 x 10 -10 M; B/sub max/ = 711 pmols/g protein) with ligand specificity similar to that of glucocorticoid receptors from classical glucocorticoid target tissues. Further, [ 3 H] triamcinolone acetonide specific binding to L6 cell homogenates was blocked by a glucocorticoid antagonist, RU38486 (11β-(4-dimethyl-aminophenyl)-17β-hydroxy-17α-(prop-l-ynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one). Dexamethasone (10 -5 M) caused a 10-fold increase in the activity of gluatmine synthetase in L6 myotubes; this increase was prevented by RU38486. Similarly, dexamethasone (10 -5 M) caused a 20% decrease in [ 12 C] leucine incorporation into protein. This effect also was blocked by RU38486. Thus, induction of glutamine synthetase and diminution of protein synthesis by dexamethasone require intracellular glucocorticoid receptors. L6 cells should prove particularly valuable for further studies of glucocorticoid actions on skeletal muscle

  19. [High-dosage glucocorticoid therapy in acute heart infarct and in cardiogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krosch, H; Schäbitz, J

    1977-11-15

    40 patients with cardiogenic shock in consequence of contractility insufficiency of the heart were treated with high doses of prednisolon for short time. In 10 cases a good result of the treatment was to be seen so that the lethality quota was smaller than that of a reference group of the same age. The pharmacodynamic effect is seen in an improvement of the micro-circulation by a peripheric vasodilatation. 10 patients with acute myocardial infarction got a therapy with glucocorticoid combined with a treatment with anti-coagulants during the first both weeks. In this connection modern experimental examinations of animals are discussed which showed that glucocorticoides improve the anoxy tolerance of the heart muscle cell.

  20. Hormones, stress, and cognition: The effects of glucocorticoids and oxytocin on memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Hormones have nuanced effects on learning and memory processes. The degree and direction of the effect (e.g., is memory impaired or enhanced?) depends on the dose, type and stage of memory, and type of material being learned, among other factors. This review will focus on two specific topics within the realm of effects of hormones on memory: (1) How glucocorticoids (the output hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) affect long-term memory consolidation, retrieval, and working memory, with a focus on neural mechanisms and effects of emotion; and (2) How oxytocin affects memory, with emphasis on a speculative hypothesis that oxytocin might exert its myriad effects on human social cognition and behavior via impacts on more general cognitive processes. Oxytocin-glucocorticoid interactions will be briefly addressed. These effects of hormones on memory will also be considered from an evolutionary perspective. PMID:25893159

  1. Cumulative risk, cumulative outcome: a 20-year longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Atkinson

    Full Text Available Cumulative risk (CR models provide some of the most robust findings in the developmental literature, predicting numerous and varied outcomes. Typically, however, these outcomes are predicted one at a time, across different samples, using concurrent designs, longitudinal designs of short duration, or retrospective designs. We predicted that a single CR index, applied within a single sample, would prospectively predict diverse outcomes, i.e., depression, intelligence, school dropout, arrest, smoking, and physical disease from childhood to adulthood. Further, we predicted that number of risk factors would predict number of adverse outcomes (cumulative outcome; CO. We also predicted that early CR (assessed at age 5/6 explains variance in CO above and beyond that explained by subsequent risk (assessed at ages 12/13 and 19/20. The sample consisted of 284 individuals, 48% of whom were diagnosed with a speech/language disorder. Cumulative risk, assessed at 5/6-, 12/13-, and 19/20-years-old, predicted aforementioned outcomes at age 25/26 in every instance. Furthermore, number of risk factors was positively associated with number of negative outcomes. Finally, early risk accounted for variance beyond that explained by later risk in the prediction of CO. We discuss these findings in terms of five criteria posed by these data, positing a "mediated net of adversity" model, suggesting that CR may increase some central integrative factor, simultaneously augmenting risk across cognitive, quality of life, psychiatric and physical health outcomes.

  2. The Regulation of Muscle Mass by Endogenous Glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Marks

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are highly conserved fundamental regulators of energy homeostasis. In response to stress in the form of perceived danger or acute inflammation, glucocorticoids are released from the adrenal gland, rapidly mobilizing energy from carbohydrate, fat and protein stores. In the case of inflammation, mobilized protein is critical for the rapid synthesis of acute phase reactants and an efficient immune response to infection. While adaptive in response to infection, chronic mobilization can lead to a p rofound depletion of energy stores. Skeletal muscle represents the major body store of protein, and can become substantially atrophied under conditions of chronic inflammation. Glucocorticoids elicit the atrophy of muscle by increasing the rate of protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy lysosome system. Protein synthesis is also suppressed at the level of translational initiation, preventing the production of new myofibrillar protein. Glucocorticoids also antagonize the action of anabolic regulators such as insulin further exacerbating the loss of protein and muscle mass. The loss of muscle mass in the context of chronic disease is a key feature of cachexia and contributes substantially to morbidity and mortality. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that glucocorticoid signaling is a common mediator of wasting, irrespective of the underlying initiator or disease state. This review will highlight fundamental mechanisms of glucocorticoid signaling and detail the mechanisms of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. Additionally, the evidence for glucocorticoids as a driver of muscle wasting in numerous disease states will be discussed. Given the burden of wasting diseases and the nodal nature of glucocorticoid signaling, effective anti-glucocorticoid therapy would be a valuable clinical tool. Therefore, the progress and potential pitfalls in the development of glucocorticoid antagonists for muscle wasting will

  3. Sustained Interleukin-1β Exposure Modulates Multiple Steps in Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling, Promoting Split-Resistance to the Transactivation of Prominent Anti-Inflammatory Genes by Glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Escoll

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical treatment with glucocorticoids (GC can be complicated by cytokine-induced glucocorticoid low-responsiveness (GC-resistance, GCR, a condition associated with a homogeneous reduction in the expression of GC-receptor- (GR- driven anti-inflammatory genes. However, GR level and phosphorylation changes modify the expression of individual GR-responsive genes differently. As sustained IL-1β exposure is key in the pathogenesis of several major diseases with prevalent GCR, we examined GR signaling and the mRNA expression of six GR-driven genes in cells cultured in IL-1β and afterwards challenged with GC. After a GC challenge, sustained IL-1β exposure reduced the cytoplasmic GR level, GRSer203 and GRSer211 phosphorylation, and GR nuclear translocation and led to selective GCR in the expression of the studied genes. Compared to GC alone, in a broad range of GC doses plus sustained IL-1β, FKBP51 mRNA expression was reduced by 1/3, TTP by 2/3, and IRF8 was completely knocked down. In contrast, high GC doses did not change the expression of GILZ and DUSP1, while IGFBP1 was increased by 5-fold. These effects were cytokine-selective, IL-1β dose- and IL-1R1-dependent. The integrated gain and loss of gene functions in the “split GCR” model may provide target cells with a survival advantage by conferring resistance to apoptosis, chemotherapy, and GC.

  4. Adrenal gland hypofunction in active polymyalgia rheumatica. effect of glucocorticoid treatment on adrenal hormones and interleukin 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Straub, Rainer H; Foppiani, Luca; Prete, Camilla; Pulsatelli, Lia; Sulli, Alberto; Boiardi, Luigi; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Giusti, Massimo; Pizzorni, Carmen; Seriolo, Bruno; Salvarani, Carlo

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in patients with recent onset polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) not previously treated with glucocorticoids; and to detect possible correlations between adrenal hormone levels, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and other acute phase reactants at baseline and during 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment. Forty-one PMR patients of both sexes with recent onset disease and healthy sex and age matched controls were enrolled into a longitudinal study. Patients were monitored for serum cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), androstenedione (ASD), and clinical and laboratory measures of disease activity such as C-reactive protein and IL-6 concentrations at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment. To assess dynamic HPA axis function, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were evaluated in another 8 patients with recent onset PMR not treated with glucocorticoid in comparison to controls after challenge with ovine corticotropin releasing hormone (oCRH) test. In addition, serum cortisol and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) levels were evaluated after stimulation with low dose (1 microg) intravenous ACTH. Serum cortisol and ASD levels of all PMR patients at baseline did not differ from controls. During followup, cortisol levels dipped at one and 3 months. Serum DHEAS levels in all patients were significantly lower than in controls at baseline. In female PMR patients a significant correlation was found at baseline between cortisol levels and duration of disease. Serum concentrations of IL-6 at baseline were significantly higher in PMR patients than in controls. During 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment IL-6 levels dropped significantly at one month; thereafter they remained stable and did not increase again despite tapering of the glucocorticoid dose. After oCRH stimulation, a similar cortisol response was found in patients and controls. After ACTH

  5. Impacto da atividade inflamatória e uso de glicocorticóide nas variáveis nutricionais da artrite idiopática juvenil Impact of inflammatory activity and glucocorticoid use in the nutritional variables of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Souza Bisotto

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o estado nutricional na artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ, a influência da atividade inflamatória e o uso de glicocorticóide. MÉTODOS: foram estudados 116 pacientes com AIJ diagnosticados segundo os critérios da ILAR/1997. Subtipo e atividade da doença foram determinados por reumatologistas pediátricos, e a dose cumulativa de glicocorticóide foi revisada nos prontuários dos pacientes. Foram determinados os percentis do índice de massa corporal (IMC e da prega cutânea tricipital (PCT e o escore Z da estatura, de acordo com a OMS. Considerou-se baixo peso e baixa adiposidade quando o IMC e a PCT apresentavam-se abaixo do percentil 5. Baixa estatura foi definida por escore Z de estatura para idade menor do que -2. O nível sérico de IGF-1 foi medido por meio de radioimunoensaio. RESULTADOS: as prevalências de baixo peso, baixa adiposidade e baixa estatura foram 16,4%, 20,7% e 10,4%, respectivamente. Níveis séricos reduzidos de IGF-1 foram observados em 14 pacientes (12,1%. Os fatores negativamente associados com o escore Z da estatura na análise de regressão multivariável foram: duração da doença (coeficiente parcial de correlação, intervalo de confiança de 95%: -0,370, -0,527 a -0,188: pOBJECTIVE: To assess the nutritional status in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and the influence of inflammatory activity and glucocorticoid use. METHODS: One hundred and sixteen patients were evaluated. Disease subtype and disease activity were defined by the attending physician, and the cumulative glucocorticoid dose was recorded by chart review. The percentiles of body mass index (BMI and triceps skinfold (TSF and the Z-score for height were determined: low weight and low adiposity were diagnosed when BMI and TSF were below the 5th percentile. Short stature was defined by a Z-score of height for age < -2. The serum level of IGF-I was measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: The prevalences of low weight, low adiposity

  6. Cumulative or delayed nephrotoxicity after cisplatin (DDP) treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnarò, P; Ruggeri, E M; Carlini, P; Giovannelli, M; Cognetti, F

    1986-04-30

    The present retrospective study reports data regarding renal toxicity in 115 patients (63 males, 52 females; median age, 56 years) who received cumulative doses of cisplatin (DDP) greater than or equal to 200 mg/m2. DDP was administered alone or in combination at a dose of 50-70 mg/m2 in 91 patients, and at a dose of 100 mg/m2 in 22 patients. Two patients after progression of ovarian carcinoma treated with conventional doses of DDP received 4 and 2 courses, respectively, of high-dose DDP (40 mg/m2 for 5 days) in hypertonic saline. The median number of DDP courses was 6 (range 2-14), and the median cumulative dose was 350 mg/m2 (range, 200-1200). Serum creatinine and urea nitrogen were determined before initiating the treatment and again 13-16 days after each administration. The incidence of azotemia (creatinina levels that exceeded 1.5 mg/dl) was similar before (7.8%) and after (6.1%) DDP doses of 200 mg/m2. Azotemia appears to be related to the association of DDP with other potentially nephrotoxic antineoplastic drugs (methotrexate) more than to the dose per course of DDP. Of 59 patients followed for 2 months or more after discontinuing the DDP treatment, 3 (5.1%) presented creatinine values higher than 1.5 mg/dl. The data deny that the incidence of nephrotoxicity is higher in patients receiving higher cumulative doses of DDP and confirm that increases in serum creatinine levels may occur some time after discontinuation of the drug.

  7. Glucocorticoids facilitate the retention of acquired immobility during forced swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, H D; De Korte, C C; De Kloet, E R

    1985-01-01

    The adrenalectomy-induced decrease in the level of immobility during a 5 min retest period in the Porsolt swimming test could be reversed by glucocorticoids administered s.c. 15 min after the initial forced swimming exposure. The synthetic glucocorticoids dexamethasone and RU 28362 were active in

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Kroon, Jan; Puhr, M.; Buijs, J.T.; van der Horst, G.; Hemmer, D.M.; Marijt, K.A.; Hwang, M.S.; Masood, M.; Grimm, S.; Storm, Gerrit; Metselaar, Josbert Maarten; Meijer, O.C.; Culig, Z.; van der Pluijm, M.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance.

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T.; Van Der Horst, Geertje; Lemhemmer, Daniël; Marijt, Koen A.; Hwang, Ming S.; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/244207690; Meijer, Onno C.; Culig, Zoran; Van Der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCA). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance.

  10. 78 FR 25440 - Request for Information and Citations on Methods for Cumulative Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... Citations on Methods for Cumulative Risk Assessment AGENCY: Office of the Science Advisor, Environmental... influence exposures, dose-response or risk/hazard posed by environmental contaminant exposures, and methods... who wish to receive further information about submitting information on methods for cumulative risk...

  11. Assessment of the Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated With Glucocorticoid-Induced Diabetes Mellitus in Pemphigus Vulgaris Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darjani, Abbas; Nickhah, Nahid; Hedayati Emami, Mohammad Hassan; Alizadeh, Narges; Rafiei, Rana; Eftekhari, Hojat; Gharaei Nejad, Kaveh

    2017-06-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic autoimmune disease and glucocorticoids are one of the main treatments. Our study investigates the prevalence and associated factors of glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus in these patients under different glucocorticoid regimens. 36 patients with first diagnosed Pemphigus vulgaris based on pathological and direct immunofluorescence findings who had received different glucocorticoid regimens (1-2 mg/kg oral or 1-2 mg/kg oral with 1g methylprednisolone pulse daily for 3 consecutive days with or without azathioprine) were evaluated during 2014-2016. Our study found that 22.2% of patients had impaired fasting glucose and incidence of corticosteroid-induced diabetes mellitus was 22.2% with no difference between oral and pulse therapy of corticosteroid. The first day after pulse therapy 19 patients of 21 had post bolus hyperglycemia that 36% of them became diabetic after 8 weeks. None of the variables, including age, BMI, HbA1c, LDL, HDL, TG, cholesterol, family history and blood pressure were associated with diabetes. Pretreatment FBS was the factor that would increase the likelihood of glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus, 42.2% of patients with pretreatment FBS 100-126 developed diabetes in comparison with 17.2% in normal pretreatment FBS. Although the group who received azathioprine was associated with increased incidence of diabetes, the overall corticosteroid dose in this group was significantly higher than the other group (P=0.012), and controversy with other studies could be because of difference in corticosteroid dosage and small number of patients. The incidence of diabetes was not different between the group with glucocorticoid pulses and oral prednisolone without pulse therapy. Higher pretreatment FBS can be related to increased incidence of diabetes, but results from this study due to small number of patients are preliminary and multicenter studies are needed.

  12. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids...... reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported....... Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular...

  13. Exenatide improves glucocorticoid-induced glucose intolerance in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiying Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruiying Zhao1,2*, Enrique Fuentes-Mattei1,2*, Guermarie Velazquez-Torres1,3, Chun-Hui Su1,2, Jian Chen1, Mong-Hong Lee1,2, Sai-Ching Jim Yeung4,51Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 2Program in Genes and Development, 3Program in Cancer Biology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, 5Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA *Both authors contributed equally.Abstract: Exenatide is an incretin mimetic that is recently available in the US for the treatment of diabetes. There is a paucity of information on the effects of exenatide in glucocorticoid (GC-induced diabetes. Although the effect of continuous intravenous infusion of exenatide on GC-induced glucose intolerance has been investigated before in healthy human males receiving oral prednisolone, we investigated the efficacy of a single subcutaneous dose of exenatide (3 µg/kg in lowering blood glucose in GC-induced glucose intolerance in C57BL/6 mice. In a longitudinal experiment, the area under the curve (AUC of oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT significantly increased after dexamethasone (P = 0.004, which was subsequently decreased by exenatide (P < 0.001. A cross-sectional experiment showed that exenatide improved glucose tolerance compared with placebo in a mouse model of dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance. AUC of OGTT in the exenatide group were significantly (P < 0.001 lower than in the placebo group. Insulin tolerance tests (ITT demonstrated that exenatide decreased the ability of the mice to tolerate insulin compared with placebo. The AUC of ITT in the exenatide group were also significantly (P = 0.006 lower than in the placebo group. In conclusion, a single dose of exenatide was able to decrease glucose intolerance and

  14. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M Presman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation within the GR DNA-binding domain (GRdim mutant has been reported as crucial for receptor dimerization and DNA binding, this assumption has recently been challenged. Here we have analyzed the GR oligomerization state in vivo using the number and brightness assay. Our results suggest a complete, reversible, and DNA-independent ligand-induced model for GR dimerization. We demonstrate that the GRdim forms dimers in vivo whereas adding another mutation in the ligand-binding domain (I634A severely compromises homodimer formation. Contrary to dogma, no correlation between the GR monomeric/dimeric state and transcriptional activity was observed. Finally, the state of dimerization affected DNA binding only to a subset of GR binding sites. These results have major implications on future searches for therapeutic glucocorticoids with reduced side effects.

  15. Effect of insulin and glucocorticoids on glucose transporters in rat adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter-Su, C.; Okamoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of glucocorticoids to modify the effect of insulin on glucose (L-1- 3 H(N)]glucose and D-[ 14 C-U]glucose) transport was investigated in both intact isolated rat adipocytes and in membranes isolated from hormone-treated adipocytes. In intact adipocytes, dexamethasone, a potent synthetic glucocorticoid, inhibited insulin-stimulated 3-O-methylglucose transport at all concentrations of insulin tested. Insulin sensitivity, as well as the maximal response to insulin, was decreased by dexamethasone in the absence of a change in 125 I insulin binding. The inhibition was observed regardless of which hormone acted first, was blocked by actinomycin D, and resulted from a decrease in V/sub max/ rather than an increase in K/sub t/ of transport. In plasma membranes isolated from insulin-treated adipocytes, glucose transport activity and the amount of glucose transporter covalently labeled with [ 3 H]cytochalasin B were increased in parallel in a dose-dependent fashion. The amount of labeled transporter in a low-density microsomal fraction (LDMF) was decreased in a reciprocal fashion. In contrast, addition of dexamethasone to insulin-stimulated cells caused decreases in both transport activity and amount of labeled transporter in the plasma membranes. This was accompanied by a small increase in the amount of [ 3 H]cytochalasin B incorporated into the glucose transporter in the LDMF. These results are consistent with both insulin and glucocorticoids altering the distribution of glucose transporters between the plasma membrane and LDMF, in opposite directions

  16. The Algebra of the Cumulative Percent Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to help students avoid some pervasive reasoning errors in solving cumulative percent problems. Discusses the meaning of ."%+b%." the additive inverse of ."%." and other useful applications. Emphasizes the operational aspect of the cumulative percent concept. (KHR)

  17. Adaptive strategies for cumulative cultural learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Micael; Laland, Kevin

    2012-05-21

    The demographic and ecological success of our species is frequently attributed to our capacity for cumulative culture. However, it is not yet known how humans combine social and asocial learning to generate effective strategies for learning in a cumulative cultural context. Here we explore how cumulative culture influences the relative merits of various pure and conditional learning strategies, including pure asocial and social learning, critical social learning, conditional social learning and individual refiner strategies. We replicate the Rogers' paradox in the cumulative setting. However, our analysis suggests that strategies that resolved Rogers' paradox in a non-cumulative setting may not necessarily evolve in a cumulative setting, thus different strategies will optimize cumulative and non-cumulative cultural learning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 32 CFR 651.16 - Cumulative impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Cumulative impacts. 651.16 Section 651.16... § 651.16 Cumulative impacts. (a) NEPA analyses must assess cumulative effects, which are the impact on the environment resulting from the incremental impact of the action when added to other past, present...

  19. A paradox of cumulative culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yutaka; Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Ohtsuki, Hisashi

    2015-08-21

    Culture can grow cumulatively if socially learnt behaviors are improved by individual learning before being passed on to the next generation. Previous authors showed that this kind of learning strategy is unlikely to be evolutionarily stable in the presence of a trade-off between learning and reproduction. This is because culture is a public good that is freely exploited by any member of the population in their model (cultural social dilemma). In this paper, we investigate the effect of vertical transmission (transmission from parents to offspring), which decreases the publicness of culture, on the evolution of cumulative culture in both infinite and finite population models. In the infinite population model, we confirm that culture accumulates largely as long as transmission is purely vertical. It turns out, however, that introduction of even slight oblique transmission drastically reduces the equilibrium level of culture. Even more surprisingly, if the population size is finite, culture hardly accumulates even under purely vertical transmission. This occurs because stochastic extinction due to random genetic drift prevents a learning strategy from accumulating enough culture. Overall, our theoretical results suggest that introducing vertical transmission alone does not really help solve the cultural social dilemma problem. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction of glucocorticoids and progesterone derivatives with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Rola; Akil, Mohammad; Charcosset, Catherine; Greige-Gerges, Hélène

    2017-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) and progesterone derivatives (PGDs) are steroid hormones with well-known biological activities. Their interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) may control their distribution. Their binding to albumin is poorly studied in literature. This paper deals with the interaction of a series of GCs (cortisol, cortisone, prednisolone, prednisone, 6-methylprednisolone and 9-fluorocortisol acetate) and PGDs (progesterone, hydroxylated PGDs, methylated PGDs and dydrogesterone) with HSA solution (pH 7.4) at molar ratios steroid to HSA varying from 0 to 10. Similar titrations were conducted using Trp aqueous solution. Fluorescence titration method and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are used. PGDs (except dydrogesterone), cortisone and 9-fluorocortisol acetate affected weakly the fluorescence of Trp in buffer solution while they decreased in a dose-dependent manner that of HSA. Their binding constants to HSA were then calculated. Moreover, displacement experiment was performed using bilirubin as a site marker. The binding constant of bilirubin to albumin was determined in the absence and presence of a steroid at a molar ratio steroid to HSA of 1. The results indicate that the steroids bind to HSA at site I in a pocket different from that of bilirubin. Furthermore, the peak positions of amide I and amide II bands of HSA were shifted in the presence of progesterone, dydrogesterone and GCs. Also a variation was observed in amide I region indicating the formation of hydrogen bonding between albumin and steroids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of high-dose preoperative methylprednisolone on pain and recovery after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, Troels; Kristensen, Billy Bjarne; Andersen, Lasse

    2011-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with severe pain and inflammation despite an extensive multimodal analgesic approach, but the effect of high-dose glucocorticoid administration has not been studied.......Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with severe pain and inflammation despite an extensive multimodal analgesic approach, but the effect of high-dose glucocorticoid administration has not been studied....

  2. Infralimbic dopamine D2 receptors mediate glucocorticoid-induced facilitation of auditory fear memory extinction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadkhah, Masoumeh; Abdullahi, Payman Raise; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Vafaei, Abbas Ali

    2018-03-01

    The infralimbic (IL) cortex of the medial prefrontal cortex plays an important role in the extinction of fear memory. Also, it has been showed that both brain glucocorticoid and dopamine receptors are involved in many processes such as fear extinction that drive learning and memory; however, the interaction of these receptors in the IL cortex remains unclear. We examined a putative interaction between the effects of glucocorticoid and dopamine receptors stimulation in the IL cortex on fear memory extinction in an auditory fear conditioning paradigm in male rats. Corticosterone (the endogenous glucocorticoid receptor ligand), or RU38486 (the synthetic glucocorticoid receptor antagonist) microinfusion into the IL cortex 10 min before test 1 attenuated auditory fear expression at tests 1-3, suggesting as an enhancement of fear extinction. The effect of corticosterone, but not RU38486 was counteracted by the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride pre-treatment administered into the IL (at a dose that failed to alter freezing behavior on its own). In contrast, intra-IL infusion of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 pre-treatment failed to alter freezing behavior. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of the IL cortex D2 receptors in CORT-induced facilitation of fear memory extinction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Addison disease in patients treated with glucocorticoid therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Acute adrenal crisis in patients with unrecognized chronic adrenocortical failure is difficult to diagnose and potentially fatal. We describe 2 patients with acute adrenal crisis whose diagnoses were hindered because of concomitant glucocorticoid treatment. Acute adrenal insufficiency is primarily a state of mineralocorticoid deficiency. Prednisolone and prednisone, the most frequently prescribed anti-inflammatory corticosteroid agents, have minimal mineralocorticoid activity. Several conditions that may be treated with pharmacological glucocorticoids are associated with an increased risk of Addison disease. An acute adrenal crisis, against which concurrent glucocorticoid therapy does not confer adequate protection, may develop in such patients.

  4. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells...... and their responses to diverse stimuli, however, the role of autophagy in glucocorticoidinduced damage to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. The current study confirmed that glucocorticoid administration impaired the proliferation of BMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy...... that in response to glucocorticoid administration, induced autophagy aids to maintain proliferation and prevent apoptosis of BMSCs. Thus, it is hypothesized that autophagy may be a novel target in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis....

  5. Neuropsychiatric findings in Cushing syndrome and exogenous glucocorticoid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkman, Monica N

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the neuropsychiatric presentations elicited by spontaneous hypercortisolism and exogenous supraphysiologic glucocorticoids. Patients with Cushing disease and syndrome develop a depressive syndrome: irritable and depressed mood, decreased libido, disrupted sleep and cognitive decrements. Exogenous short-term glucocorticoid administration may elicit a hypomanic syndrome with mood, sleep and cognitive disruptions. Treatment options are discussed. Brain imaging and neuropsychological studies indicate elevated cortisol and other glucocorticoids are especially deleterious to hippocampus and frontal lobe. The research findings also shed light on neuropsychiatric abnormalities in conditions that have substantial subgroups exhibiting elevated and dysregulated cortisol: aging, major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Glucocorticoid treatment, immobility, and constipation are associated with nutritional risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre; Aschwanden, Josef; Iff, Samuel; Leuenberger, Michèle; Perrig, Martin; Stanga, Zeno

    2011-12-01

    The hypothesis of this clinical study was to determine whether glucocorticoid use and immobility were associated with in-hospital nutritional risk. One hundred and one patients consecutively admitted to the medical wards were enrolled. Current medical conditions, symptoms, medical history, eating and drinking habits, diagnosis, laboratory findings, medications, and anthropometrics were recorded. The Nutrition Risk Score 2002 (NRS-2002) was used as a screening instrument to identify nutritional risk. The results confirmed that glucocorticoid use and immobility are independently associated with nutritional risk determined by the NRS-2002. Constipation could be determined as an additional cofactor independently associated with nutritional risk. Glucocorticoid treatment, immobility, and constipation are associated with nutritional risk in a mixed hospitalized population. The presence of long-time glucocorticoid use, immobility, or constipation should alert the clinician to check for nutritional status, which is an important factor in mortality and morbidity.

  7. Hypersensitivity Reactions from Excipients in Systemic Glucocorticoid Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calogiuri, Gianfranco; Garvey, Lene H; Romita, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most widely used drugs for the treatment of hypersensitivity, however these drugs themselves and the excipients contained in commercial corticosteroid formulations are able to induce severe immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions. Reactions involving excipients have been...

  8. Both mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors regulate emotional memory in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, M.; Bakker, E.H.M.; Velzing, E.; Berger, S.; Oitzl, M.; Joëls, M.; Krugers, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormones are thought to promote optimal behavioral adaptation under fearful conditions, primarily via glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Here, we examined - using pharmacological and genetic approaches in mice - if mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) also play a role in fearful memory

  9. The emerging importance of ultradian glucocorticoid rhythms within metabolic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Benjamin P; Conway-Campbell, Becky L; Lightman, Stafford L

    2018-06-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) hormones play significant roles within homeostasis and the chrono-dynamics of their regulatory role has become increasingly recognised within dysregulated GC pathology, particularly with metabolic phenotypes. Within this article, we will discuss the relevance of the ultradian homeostatic rhythm, how its dysregulation effects glucocorticoid receptor and RNA polymeraseII recruitment and may play a significant role within aberrant metabolic action. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of glucocorticoids in sodium retention in cirrhotic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Højmark; Kristensen, Steffen Skott; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    sodium retention evident in cirrhosis. The aim was to elucidate the role of glucocorticoids in sodium retention in decompensated cirrhotic patients. Methods. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was performed in nine patients with alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver. A washout....... Conclusion. These results indicate that endogenous glucocorticoids contribute to the sodium retention in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver....

  11. Influencia de los glucocorticoides inhalados sobre la densidad mineral ósea y el metabolismo óseo Inhaled glucocorticoids: influence on bone mineral density and bone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando D. Saraví

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Los glucocorticoides inhalados (GCI constituyen hoy un tratamiento de primera línea del asma bronquial. Los efectos sistémicos de los GCI, como la supresión del eje hipotalámico- hipofisario-adrenal, son en general menores que los de los glucocorticoides orales. Sin embargo, existe el riesgo de efectos adversos sobre el hueso a largo plazo. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue revisar los datos publicados acerca de los efectos de los GCI sobre los marcadores del metabolismo óseo y la densidad mineral ósea en adultos y en pacientes pediátricos. Aunque los estudios examinados no proporcionan resultados uniformes, en términos generales sugieren que los GCI pueden afectar al metabolismo y a la densidad mineral ósea, en particular 1 cuando se administran a dosis elevadas (más de 400 µg/día en niños y más de 800 µg/día en adultos; 2 en pacientes pediátricos, en los que también pueden afectar al crecimiento en estatura; 3 en pacientes cuya ingesta de calcio y vitamina D es inadecuada, y 4 en mujeres postmenopáusicas sin terapia de reposición hormonal. En general, a dosis terapéuticamente equivalentes, la beclometasona tiene mayor efecto deletéreo sobre el hueso que la budesonida, y esta mayor que la fluticasona. Además de la precaución obvia de utilizar la menor dosis eficaz, se proponen como medidas preventivas: 1 la adecuada instrucción sobre el uso de los aerosoles; 2 el uso de cámaras de inhalación; 3 el enjuague bucal tras la administración de GCI, y 4 ajustes o suplementos dietéticos para asegurar una adecuada ingesta de calcio y vitamina D.Inhaled glucocorticoids (IGs are today the first-line treatment for bronchial asthma. The systemic effects of inhaled glucocorticoids, such as suppressing the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, are generally less than those with oral glucocorticoids. However, there is a long-term risk of adverse effects on bone. The objective of this piece was to review the published data on the

  12. The Association of Prenatal Exposure to Perfluorinated Chemicals with Glucocorticoid and Androgenic Hormones in Cord Blood Samples: The Hokkaido Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Houman; Araki, Atsuko; Itoh, Sachiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Mitsui, Takahiko; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Katsuya; Kishi, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) disrupt cholesterol homeostasis. All steroid hormones are derived from cholesterol, and steroid hormones such as glucocorticoids and androgenic hormones mediate several vital physiologic functions. However, the in utero effects of PFCs exposure on the homeostasis of these steroid hormones are not well understood in humans. We examined the relationship between prenatal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)/perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and cord blood levels of glucocorticoid and androgenic hormones. We conducted a hospital-based birth cohort study between July 2002 and October 2005 in Sapporo, Japan (n = 514). In total, 185 mother-infant pairs were included in the present study. Prenatal PFOS and PFOA levels in maternal serum samples were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Cord blood levels of glucocorticoid (cortisol and cortisone) and androgenic hormones [dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione] were also measured in the same way. We found a dose-response relationship of prenatal PFOS, but not PFOA, exposure with glucocorticoid levels after adjusting for potential confounders. Cortisol and cortisone concentrations were -23.98-ng/mL (95% CI: -0.47.12, -11.99; p for trend = 0.006) and -63.21-ng/mL (95% CI: -132.56, -26.72; p for trend blood. Citation: Goudarzi H, Araki A, Itoh S, Sasaki S, Miyashita C, Mitsui T, Nakazawa H, Nonomura K, Kishi R. 2017. The association of prenatal exposure to perfluorinated chemicals with glucocorticoid and androgenic hormones in cord blood samples: the Hokkaido Study. Environ Health Perspect 125:111-118; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP142.

  13. Differential effects of the new glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34517 and RU486 (mifepristone) on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation in the AtT20 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, B W M M; Ruigt, G S F; Craighead, M; Kitchener, P

    2008-12-01

    Glucocorticoid agonists bind to cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and subsequently translocate as an agonist-GR complex into the nucleus. In the nucleus the complex regulates the transcription of target genes. A number of GR antagonists (RU486, progesterone, RU40555) have also been shown to induce receptor translocation. These compounds should be regarded as partial agonists. For the nonselective progesterone receptor antagonists, RTI3021-012 and RTI3021-022, it was shown that GR antagonism is possible without the induction of GR translocation. In the present studies, the new GR antagonist, ORG 34517, was investigated for its potential to induce GR translocation and to antagonize corticosterone-induced GR translocation in the AtT20 (mouse pituitary) cell line. ORG 34517 was compared to RU486. In contrast to RU486, ORG 34517 (at doses up to 3 x 10(-7) M) did not induce GR translocation, but was able to block corticosterone (3 x 10(-8) M) induced GR translocation. ORG 34517 can be regarded as a true competitive GR antagonist without partial agonistic activities.

  14. 9β Polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene appears to have limited impact in patients with Addison's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Louis Ross

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Addison's disease (AD has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Glucocorticoid receptor polymorphisms that alter glucocorticoid sensitivity may influence metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with AD. The 9β polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is associated with relative glucocorticoid resistance and has been reported to increase the risk of myocardial infarction in the elderly. We explored the impact of this polymorphism in patients with AD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 147 patients with AD and 147 age, gender and ethnicity matched healthy controls were recruited. Blood was taken in a non-fasted state for plasma lipid determination, measurement of cardiovascular risk factors and DNA extraction. RESULTS: Genotype data for the 9β polymorphism was available for 139 patients and 146 controls. AD patients had a more atherogenic lipid profile characterized by an increase in the prevalence of small dense LDL (p = 0.003, increased triglycerides (p = 0.002, reduced HDLC (p<0.001 an elevated highly sensitive C-reactive protein (p = 0.01, compared with controls. The 9β polymorphism (at least one G allele was found in 28% of patients and controls respectively. After adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, BMI and hydrocortisone dose per metre square of body surface area in patients, there were no significant metabolic associations with this polymorphism and hydrocortisone doses were not higher in patients with the polymorphism. CONCLUSIONS: This study did not identify any associations between the 9β polymorphism and cardiovascular risk factors or hydrocortisone dose and determination of this polymorphism is therefore unlikely to be of clinical benefit in the management of patients with AD.

  15. 9β Polymorphism of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Appears to Have Limited Impact in Patients with Addison’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ian Louis; Dandara, Collet; Swart, Marelize; Lacerda, Miguel; Schatz, Desmond; Blom, Dirk Jacobus

    2014-01-01

    Background Addison’s disease (AD) has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Glucocorticoid receptor polymorphisms that alter glucocorticoid sensitivity may influence metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with AD. The 9β polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is associated with relative glucocorticoid resistance and has been reported to increase the risk of myocardial infarction in the elderly. We explored the impact of this polymorphism in patients with AD. Materials and Methods 147 patients with AD and 147 age, gender and ethnicity matched healthy controls were recruited. Blood was taken in a non-fasted state for plasma lipid determination, measurement of cardiovascular risk factors and DNA extraction. Results Genotype data for the 9β polymorphism was available for 139 patients and 146 controls. AD patients had a more atherogenic lipid profile characterized by an increase in the prevalence of small dense LDL (p = 0.003), increased triglycerides (p = 0.002), reduced HDLC (p<0.001) an elevated highly sensitive C-reactive protein (p = 0.01), compared with controls. The 9β polymorphism (at least one G allele) was found in 28% of patients and controls respectively. After adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, BMI and hydrocortisone dose per metre square of body surface area in patients, there were no significant metabolic associations with this polymorphism and hydrocortisone doses were not higher in patients with the polymorphism. Conclusions This study did not identify any associations between the 9β polymorphism and cardiovascular risk factors or hydrocortisone dose and determination of this polymorphism is therefore unlikely to be of clinical benefit in the management of patients with AD. PMID:24466047

  16. Effects of a new glucocorticoid, oxazacort, on some variables connected with bone metabolism in man: a comparison with prednisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniggia, A; Marchetti, M; Gennari, C; Vattimo, A; Nicolis, F B

    1977-03-01

    The urinary elimination of calcium, other electrolytes, and hydroxyproline and the oral absorption of 47Ca have been evaluated in three groups of 8 patients before and during a 15-day treatment with prednisone at daily doses of 25 and 50 mg and with oxazacort, a new glucocorticoid, at a daily dose of 50 mg. The results obtained demonstrate that oxazacort in short-term teatment with a high dose has no significant effect on the urinary elimination of calcium and hydroxypyroline in experimental conditions in which prednisone produces statistically significant and clinically relevant increase, both when given at the same dose and when given at half that dose. On the other hand, the oral absorption of 47Ca is decreased by oxazacort, but less than by prednisone at the same dose. As the antirheumatic activity of oxazacort appears to be only slightly lower than that of prednisone (activity ratio of about 0.84: 1), these findings may have interesting therapeutic implications.

  17. Cumulative trauma disorders: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zaheen A; Alghadir, Ahmad H

    2017-08-03

    Cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) is a term for various injuries of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems that are caused by repetitive tasks, forceful exertions, vibrations, mechanical compression or sustained postures. Although there are many studies citing incidence of CTDs, there are fewer articles about its etiology, pathology and management. The aim of our study was to discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, prevention and management of CTDs. A literature search was performed using various electronic databases. The search was limited to articles in English language pertaining to randomized clinical trials, cohort studies and systematic reviews of CTDs. A total of 180 papers were identified to be relevant published since 1959. Out of these, 125 papers reported about its incidence and 50 about its conservative treatment. Workplace environment, same task repeatability and little variability, decreased time for rest, increase in expectations are major factors for developing CTDs. Prevention of its etiology and early diagnosis can be the best to decrease its incidence and severity. For effective management of CTDs, its treatment should be divided into Primordial, Primary, Secondary and Tertiary prevention.

  18. Complete cumulative index (1963-1983)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This complete cumulative index covers all regular and special issues and supplements published by Atomic Energy Review (AER) during its lifetime (1963-1983). The complete cumulative index consists of six Indexes: the Index of Abstracts, the Subject Index, the Title Index, the Author Index, the Country Index and the Table of Elements Index. The complete cumulative index supersedes the Cumulative Indexes for Volumes 1-7: 1963-1969 (1970), and for Volumes 1-10: 1963-1972 (1972); this Index also finalizes Atomic Energy Review, the publication of which has recently been terminated by the IAEA

  19. Glucocorticoid regulation of astrocytic fate and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Yu

    Full Text Available Glial loss in the hippocampus has been suggested as a factor in the pathogenesis of stress-related brain disorders that are characterized by dysregulated glucocorticoid (GC secretion. However, little is known about the regulation of astrocytic fate by GC. Here, we show that astrocytes derived from the rat hippocampus undergo growth inhibition and display moderate activation of caspase 3 after exposure to GC. Importantly, the latter event, observed both in situ and in primary astrocytic cultures is not followed by either early- or late-stage apoptosis, as monitored by stage I or stage II DNA fragmentation. Thus, unlike hippocampal granule neurons, astrocytes are resistant to GC-induced apoptosis; this resistance is due to lower production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and a greater buffering capacity against the cytotoxic actions of ROS. We also show that GC influence hippocampal cell fate by inducing the expression of astrocyte-derived growth factors implicated in the control of neural precursor cell proliferation. Together, our results suggest that GC instigate a hitherto unknown dialog between astrocytes and neural progenitors, adding a new facet to understanding how GC influence the cytoarchitecture of the hippocampus.

  20. System-Reliability Cumulative-Binomial Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Ernest M.; Bowerman, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Cumulative-binomial computer program, NEWTONP, one of set of three programs, calculates cumulative binomial probability distributions for arbitrary inputs. NEWTONP, CUMBIN (NPO-17555), and CROSSER (NPO-17557), used independently of one another. Program finds probability required to yield given system reliability. Used by statisticians and users of statistical procedures, test planners, designers, and numerical analysts. Program written in C.

  1. Common-Reliability Cumulative-Binomial Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Ernest, M.; Bowerman, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Cumulative-binomial computer program, CROSSER, one of set of three programs, calculates cumulative binomial probability distributions for arbitrary inputs. CROSSER, CUMBIN (NPO-17555), and NEWTONP (NPO-17556), used independently of one another. Point of equality between reliability of system and common reliability of components found. Used by statisticians and users of statistical procedures, test planners, designers, and numerical analysts. Program written in C.

  2. Cumulative human impacts on marine predators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxwell, Sara M; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Stressors associated with human activities interact in complex ways to affect marine ecosystems, yet we lack spatially explicit assessments of cumulative impacts on ecologically and economically key components such as marine predators. Here we develop a metric of cumulative utilization and impact...

  3. Cumulative Student Loan Debt in Minnesota, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Wyche, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    To better understand student debt in Minnesota, the Minnesota Office of Higher Education (the Office) gathers information on cumulative student loan debt from Minnesota degree-granting institutions. These data detail the number of students with loans by institution, the cumulative student loan debt incurred at that institution, and the percentage…

  4. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smans, Lisanne; Lentjes, Eef; Hermus, Ad; Zelissen, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of salivary cortisol day curves (SCDC) in the individual adjustment of GRT in order to approach normal cortisol levels as closely as possible, reduce over- and underreplacement and study the short-term effects on quality of life (QoL). Twenty patients with Addison's disease were included in this prospective study. A SCDC was obtained and compared to normal controls; general and disease specific QoL-questionnaires were completed. Based on SCDC assessment of over- and undertreatment (calculated as duration (h) × magnitude (nmol/L) at different time points, glucocorticoid dose and regime were adjusted. After 4 weeks SCDC and QoL assessment were repeated and the effect of adjusting GRT was analysed. At baseline, underreplacement was present in 3 and overreplacement in 18 patients; total calculated overreplacement was 32.8 h.nmol/L. Overreplacement decreased significantly to 13.3 h. nmol/L (p =0.005) after adjustment of GRT. Overreplacement was found particularly in the afternoon and evening. After reducing overreplacement in the evening, complaints about sleep disturbances significantly decreased. Individual adjustment of GRT based on SCDC to approach normal cortisol concentrations during the day can reduce overreplacement, especially in the evening. This can lead to a reduction of sleep disturbances and fatigue in patients with Addison's disease. A SCDC is a simple and patient-friendly tool for adjusting GRT and can be useful in the follow-up of patients with Addison's disease.

  5. [Efficacy of systemic glucocorticoids combined with inhaled steroid on children with acute laryngitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q P; Zhou, R F; Zhang, Y M; Yang, L

    2018-01-07

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of systemic glucocorticoid (steroid) combined with high dose inhaled steroid in the treatment of children with acute laryngitis. Methods: A total of 78 children with acute laryngitis were randomly divided into study group( n =40) and control group( n =38) between November 2016 and April 2017. In addition to routine treatment of anti infection and symptomatic treatment, Dexamethasone injection(0.3-0.5 mg/kg, 1-3 d, according to the patient's condition) was provided to each group. In addition to the treatment mentioned above, the study group were assigned to receive 1.0 mg Budesonide suspension for inhalation, oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation, every/30 minutes, 2 times in a row, after that every 12 hours. The improvement of inspiratory dyspnea, hoarseness, barking cough and wheezing of both groups was evaluated at 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 72 h after treatment.Sigmaplot 11.5 software was used to analyze the data. Results: No significant difference was detected in terms of inspiratory dyspnea, hoarseness, barking cough or stridor score before treatment between the two groups( P >0.05). Compared with those before treatment, symptoms of inspiratory dyspnea, hoarseness, barking cough and stridor score of both groups improved markedly at 12 h and 24 h after treatment( P dyspnea, hoarseness, barking cough or stridor score at each time point after treatment between the two groups( P >0.05). The effective rate was 92.50% and 92.11% in study group and control group, respectively, and no significant difference was noted ( P >0.05). Conclusion: Compared with single systemic glucocorticoid, systemic glucocorticoids combined with inhaled steroid possessed similar efficacy in treating acute laryngitis and relieving laryngeal obstruction of children.

  6. Progesterone attenuates airway remodeling and glucocorticoid resistance in a murine model of exposing to ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Bao, Wuping; Fei, Xia; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Guoqing; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Min

    2018-04-01

    Airway remodeling is a vital component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Despite the broad anti-inflammation effects of glucocorticoids, they exhibit relatively little therapeutic benefit in COPD, indicating the accelerating demands of new agents for COPD. We aim to explore the effect of progesterone on airway remodeling in a murine modeling of exposing to ozone and to further examine the potential effect of progesterone on glucocorticoid insensitivity. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone for 12 times over 6 weeks, and were administered with progesterone alone or combined with budesonide (BUD) after each exposure until the 10th week. The peribronchial collagen deposition was measured. The protein levels of MMP8 and MMP9 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lungs were assessed. Western blot analysis was used to detect the levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). The expression of VEGF and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the lung were determined by Immunohistochemical analyses. We observe that progesterone attenuates the peribronchial collagen deposition, as well as the expression of MMP8, MMP9, HIF-1α, VEGF, α-SMA, and GSK-3β in BALF or lung tissues. Progesterone or BUD monotherapy has no effect on HDAC2 production. Progesterone combines with BUD induce dramatically enhanced effects. Thus, these results demonstrate novel roles of progesterone for the pathogenesis and airway remodeling in COPD. Progesterone plus BUD administration exerts more significant inhibition on airway remodeling with dose-independent. Additionally, progesterone may, to some extent, improve the glucocorticoid insensitivity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Fructose, Glucocorticoids and Adipose Tissue: Implications for the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeza, Balázs; Marcolongo, Paola; Gamberucci, Alessandra; Varga, Viola; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Benedetti, Angiolo; Odermatt, Alex

    2017-04-26

    The modern Western society lifestyle is characterized by a hyperenergetic, high sugar containing food intake. Sugar intake increased dramatically during the last few decades, due to the excessive consumption of high-sugar drinks and high-fructose corn syrup. Current evidence suggests that high fructose intake when combined with overeating and adiposity promotes adverse metabolic health effects including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and inflammation. Similarly, elevated glucocorticoid levels, especially the enhanced generation of active glucocorticoids in the adipose tissue due to increased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) activity, have been associated with metabolic diseases. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that fructose stimulates the 11β-HSD1-mediated glucocorticoid activation by enhancing the availability of its cofactor NADPH. In adipocytes, fructose was found to stimulate 11β-HSD1 expression and activity, thereby promoting the adipogenic effects of glucocorticoids. This article aims to highlight the interconnections between overwhelmed fructose metabolism, intracellular glucocorticoid activation in adipose tissue, and their metabolic effects on the progression of the metabolic syndrome.

  8. The role of glucocorticoids in emotional memory reconsolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir Drexler, Shira; Wolf, Oliver T

    2017-07-01

    Glucocorticoids are secreted following exposure to stressful events. Their modulating role on memory reconsolidation, a post-retrieval process of re-stabilization, has been investigated only recently, at times with conflicting results. The goal of this review is twofold. First, to establish the modulating role of glucocorticoids on memory reconsolidation. Second, to point the potential factors and confounds that might explain the seemingly paradoxical findings. Here we review recent pharmacological studies, conducted in rodents and humans, which suggest a critical role of glucocorticoids in this post-retrieval process. In particular, the activation of glucocorticoid receptors in the amygdala and hippocampus is suggested to be involved in emotional memories reconsolidation, pointing to a similarity between post-retrieval reconsolidation and initial memory consolidation. In addition, based on the general reconsolidation literature, we suggest several factors that might play a role in determining the direction and strength of the reconsolidation effect following glucocorticoids treatment: memory-related factors, manipulation-related factors, and individual differences. We conclude that only when taking these additional factors into account can the paradox be resolved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucocorticoid effects on hippocampal protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlatter, L.K.

    1988-01-01

    Following subcutaneous injection of rats with 5 mg corticosterone, hippocampal slices in vitro show increased [ 35 S]-methionine labeling of a cytosolic protein with an apparent molecular weight (M r ) of 35,000 and an isoelectric point (IEP) of 6.6. This labeling is temporally consistent with a transcriptional event, and is steroid- and tissue-specific. The pear serum concentration of steroid occurs one hour or less following the injection. Maximal labeling of this protein is reached whenever serum corticosterone values are approximately 100 ng/ml. When endogenous corticosterone levels are elevated to 100 ng/ml through stressors or exogenous ACTH injections the same maximal increase in synthesis of the 35,000 M r protein is observed. Adrenalectomy prevents the observed response from occurring following stressor application or ACTH injections. Comparison of the increases observed after administration of the type 2 receptor agonist RU 28362 and aldosterone, which has a higher affinity for the type 1 receptor, shows a 50-fold greater sensitivity of the response to the type 2 receptor agonist. Synthesis of this protein following serum increases of steroid possibly correlates to the theorized function of the type 2 receptor feedback regulation. The similar protein in the liver has an IEP of 6.8 and a slightly higher M r . A second hippocampal protein with an M r of 46,000 and an IEP of 6.2 is also increased in labeling. Two additional liver proteins, one of Mr 53,000 (IEP of 6.2) and the other with an M r of 45,000 (IEP of 8.7-7.8) are increased in the liver following glucocorticoid administration

  10. Comparison of different glucocorticoid regimens in the management of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajish, T P; Praveen, V P; Nisha, B; Kumar, Harish

    2014-11-01

    There are recommendations regarding the total dose of hydrocortisone to be administered in the treatment of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) to achieve the twin objectives of glucocorticoid replacement and control of hyperandrogenism. However, there is evidence gap regarding the breakup, timing and type of the steroid regimen. Efficacy of three different glucocorticoid regimens having the same total dose of steroid, differing in either the timing or type of evening steroid administered, in achieving biochemical control of the disease was assessed. The study was done in 13 prepubertal children with classical CAH over a 6-month period with 2 months devoted to each regimen. We used a prospective cross-over design using 10-15 mg/m(2) total dose of hydrocortisone. Two-fifths of the total dose of hydrocortisone was administered in the morning and one-fifth of the total dose was administered at noon in all the regimens. The regimens differed in the timing of the evening dose of hydrocortisone, 06.00-07.00 pm in regimen 1 and 09.00-10.00 pm in regimen 2. The third regimen had the evening dose of hydrocortisone replaced by an equivalent dose of prednisolone suspension which was administered at 10.00 pm. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone and testosterone levels were compared to assess the efficacy of treatment regimens. The three different regimens were found to be similar in their ability to control 17-hydroxyprogesterone and testosterone levels. The percentage of patients with predefined criteria for biochemically controlled disease was similar in all the three regimens. However, there was a trend toward better control of 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels in patients receiving evening dose of prednisolone. There is no significant advantage in administering the hydrocortisone dose late at night in patients with classical CAH.

  11. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smans, L.; Lentjes, E.G.W.M.; Hermus, A.R.; Zelissen, P.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects.

  12. Treatment of frozen shoulder with subcutaneous TNF-alpha blockade compared with local glucocorticoid injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schydlowsky, Pierre; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of subcutaneous adalimumab injections with intraarticular glucocorticoid injections on frozen shoulder of 18 patients with unilateral joint involvement. Ten patients were randomised to subcutaneous injections with adalimumab and eight to intraarticular glucocorticoid inject...

  13. The study of lymphocytes glucocorticoid receptor in severe head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dapei; Wang Haodan; Zhao Qihuang

    1994-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GCR) of peripheral lymphocytes from 14 patients with severe head injury and 11 normal volunteers are studied by means of single point method of radioligand binding assay. All these patients receive surgical therapy and glucocorticoid of routine dosage. The results show that the GCR level of these patients is lower than that of the normal, while the plasma cortisol level is much higher. These changes correlate closely to the patients' clinical outcome. It is indicated that the GCR level can reflect the degree of stress of these patients and their response to glucocorticoid therapy. Using peripheral lymphocytes instead of the brain biopsy for the measurement of GCR can reflect the GCR changes of brain tissue, it's more convenient to get the sample and more acceptable to the patients

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor polymorphism in obesity and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer-Łobodzińska, Agnieszka; Adamiec-Mroczek, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity plays a significant role in the etiology of obesity and is essential for glucose homeostasis, the development of hyperinsulinaemia and subsequent increased fat deposition. Several polymorphisms in the GR gene have been described, and at least three of them seem to be associated with altered glucocorticoid sensitivity and changes in glucose homeostasis, and other metabolic parameters. The N363S polymorphism has been associated with increased sensitivity to glucocorticoides, increased insulin response to dexamethasone and increased plasma glucose level. BclI polymorphism is associated with increased abdominal obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and increased insulin resistance. Another polymorphism, ER22/23EK, in contrast to the others, is associated with relative resistance to glucocoricides actions and more beneficial metabolic profile-lower insulin resistance level, decreased lower cardiovascular risk and subseuent prolongation of life time. More research is still needed to understand the mechanisms behind these associations at the molecular level.

  15. Osteoporosis secundaria y Osteoporosis inducida por glucocorticoides (OIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Forero Illera

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La osteoporosis es un problema de salud pública importante a nivel mundial, y su prevalencia está aumentando. La osteoporosis secundaria se puede producir por varias patologías y el uso de ciertos medicamentos. Los glucocorticoides son un grupo de fármacos usados extensamente en la práctica médica debido a su indiscutible utilidad. La osteoporosis inducida por glucocorticoides es un problema de salud pública. Aunque la patogénesis de la pérdida producida por los glucocorticoides en el hueso no se conoce totalmente, investigaciones recientes han proporcionado nuevas conocimientos en los mecanismos de estos fármacos a nivel celular y molecular. Diversas guías han sido propuestas por diversos grupos para el tratamiento de la OIG; desafortunadamente, las guías del tratamiento no se utilizan adecuadamente en los pacientes.

  16. Glucocorticoid receptors in monocytes in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Binder, C

    1989-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics were investigated in 8 males with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes mellitus and 14 healthy males. The cell type studied was monocytes, and a method for correction for heterogeneity in glucocorticoid binding in a mononuclear leucocyte population...... or with HbA1c. In conclusion, no major abnormalities in glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics could be demonstrated in Type 1 diabetes mellitus....... was introduced. The number of receptors and the dissociation constant KD were, respectively, 13,699 and 2.93 X 10(-8) mol/l for the control group and 15,788 and 2.75 X 10(-8) mol/l for diabetics (p greater than 0.05). In diabetics, KD correlated negatively with blood glucose (r = 0.762, p less than 0...

  17. Prevalent glucocorticoid and androgen activity in US water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavreva, Diana A; George, Anuja A; Klausmeyer, Paul; Varticovski, Lyuba; Sack, Daniel; Voss, Ty C; Schiltz, R Louis; Blazer, Vicki S; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of the environment with endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is a major health concern. The presence of estrogenic compounds in water and their deleterious effect are well documented. However, detection and monitoring of other classes of EDCs is limited. Here we utilize a high-throughput live cell assay based on sub-cellular relocalization of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GFP-GR and GFP-AR), in combination with gene transcription analysis, to screen for glucocorticoid and androgen activity in water samples. We report previously unrecognized glucocorticoid activity in 27%, and androgen activity in 35% of tested water sources from 14 states in the US. Steroids of both classes impact body development, metabolism, and interfere with reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems. This prevalent contamination could negatively affect wildlife and human populations.

  18. Acute stress-induced sensitization of the pituitary-adrenal response to heterotypic stressors: independence of glucocorticoid release and activation of CRH1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Xavier; Daviu, Núria; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    A single exposure to some severe stressors causes sensitization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) response to novel stressors. However, the putative factors involved in stress-induced sensitization are not known. In the present work we studied in adult male rats the possible role of glucocorticoids and CRH type 1 receptor (CRH-R1), using an inhibitor of glucocorticoid synthesis (metyrapone, MET), the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU38486 (mifepristone) and the non-peptide CRH-R1 antagonist R121919. In a first experiment we demonstrated with different doses of MET (40-150 mg/kg) that the highest dose acted as a pharmacological stressor greatly increasing ACTH release and altering the normal circadian pattern of HPA hormones, but no dose affected ACTH responsiveness to a novel environment as assessed 3 days after drug administration. In a second experiment, we found that MET, at a dose (75 mg/kg) that blocked the corticosterone response to immobilization (IMO), did not alter IMO-induced ACTH sensitization. Finally, neither the GR nor the CRH-R1 antagonists blocked IMO-induced ACTH sensitization on the day after IMO. Thus, a high dose of MET, in contrast to IMO, was unable to sensitize the HPA response to a novel environment despite the huge activation of the HPA axis caused by the drug. Neither a moderate dose of MET that markedly reduced corticosterone response to IMO, nor the blockade of GR or CRH-R1 receptors was able to alter stress-induced HPA sensitization. Therefore, stress-induced sensitization is not the mere consequence of a marked HPA activation and does not involve activation of glucocorticoid or CRH-R1 receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of dehydration-induced water intake by glucocorticoids is associated with activation of hypothalamic natriuretic peptide receptor-A in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    Full Text Available Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP provides a potent defense mechanism against volume overload in mammals. Its primary receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A, is localized mostly in the kidney, but also is found in hypothalamic areas involved in body fluid volume regulation. Acute glucocorticoid administration produces potent diuresis and natriuresis, possibly by acting in the renal natriuretic peptide system. However, chronic glucocorticoid administration attenuates renal water and sodium excretion. The precise mechanism underlying this paradoxical phenomenon is unclear. We assume that chronic glucocorticoid administration may activate natriuretic peptide system in hypothalamus, and cause volume depletion by inhibiting dehydration-induced water intake. Volume depletion, in turn, compromises renal water excretion. To test this postulation, we determined the effect of dexamethasone on dehydration-induced water intake and assessed the expression of NPR-A in the hypothalamus. The rats were deprived of water for 24 hours to have dehydrated status. Prior to free access to water, the water-deprived rats were pretreated with dexamethasone or vehicle. Urinary volume and water intake were monitored. We found that dexamethasone pretreatment not only produced potent diuresis, but dramatically inhibited the dehydration-induced water intake. Western blotting analysis showed the expression of NPR-A in the hypothalamus was dramatically upregulated by dexamethasone. Consequently, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (the second messenger for the ANP content in the hypothalamus was remarkably increased. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on water intake presented in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which emerged at least after 18-hour dexamethasone pretreatment. This effect was glucocorticoid receptor (GR mediated and was abolished by GR antagonist RU486. These results indicated a possible physiologic role for glucocorticoids in the hypothalamic control of

  20. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eddelien, Heidi Shil; Hoffmeyer, Henrik Westy; Lund, Eva Charlotte Løbner

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are used for intensive care unit (ICU) patients on several indications. We present a patient who was admitted to the ICU due to severe respiratory failure caused by bronchospasm requiring mechanical ventilation and treated with methylprednisolone 240 mg/day in addition...... to antibiotics and bronchiolytics. When the sedation was lifted on day 10, the patient was awake but quadriplegic. Blood samples revealed elevated muscle enzymes, electromyography showed myopathy, and a muscle biopsy was performed. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy was suspected, GC treatment was tapered...

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-05-10

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease.

  2. Contribution of glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid receptors to the regulation of neurodegenerative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Sheela; Maatouk, Layal

    2013-12-01

    Isolation of glucocorticoids (GCs) from adrenal glands followed by synthesis led rapidly to their first clinical application, about 70 years ago, for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. To this day GCs are used in diseases that have an inflammatory component. However, their use is carefully monitored because of harmful side effects. GCs are also synonymous with stress and adaptation. In CNS, GC binds and activates high affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and low affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GR, whose expression is ubiquitous, is only activated when GC levels rise as during circadian peak and in response to stress. Numerous recent studies have yielded important and new insights on the mechanisms concerning pulsatile secretory pattern of GCs as well as various processes that tightly control their synthesis via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis involving regulated release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from hypothalamus and pituitary, respectively. GR modulates neuronal functions and viability through both genomic and non-genomic actions, and importantly its transcriptional regulatory activity is tightly locked with GC secretory pattern. There is increasing evidence pointing to involvement of GC-GR in neurodegenerative disorders. Patients with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's or Huntington's disease show chronically high cortisol levels suggesting changes occurring in controls of HPA axis. In experimental models of these diseases, chronic stress or GC treatment was found to exacerbate both the clinical symptoms and neurodegenerative processes. However, recent evidence also shows that GC-GR can exert neuroprotective effects. Thus, for any potential therapeutic strategies in these neurodegenerative diseases we need to understand the precise modifications both in HPA axis and in GR activity and find ways to harness their protective actions.

  3. The Relationship between Gender, Cumulative Adversities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Relationship between Gender, Cumulative Adversities and Mental Health of Employees in ... CAs were measured in three forms (family adversities (CAFam), personal adversities ... Age of employees ranged between 18-65 years.

  4. Cumulative cultural learning: Development and diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The complexity and variability of human culture is unmatched by any other species. Humans live in culturally constructed niches filled with artifacts, skills, beliefs, and practices that have been inherited, accumulated, and modified over generations. A causal account of the complexity of human culture must explain its distinguishing characteristics: It is cumulative and highly variable within and across populations. I propose that the psychological adaptations supporting cumulative cultural transmission are universal but are sufficiently flexible to support the acquisition of highly variable behavioral repertoires. This paper describes variation in the transmission practices (teaching) and acquisition strategies (imitation) that support cumulative cultural learning in childhood. Examining flexibility and variation in caregiver socialization and children’s learning extends our understanding of evolution in living systems by providing insight into the psychological foundations of cumulative cultural transmission—the cornerstone of human cultural diversity. PMID:28739945

  5. Complexity and demographic explanations of cumulative culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querbes, A.; Vaesen, K.; Houkes, W.N.

    2014-01-01

    Formal models have linked prehistoric and historical instances of technological change (e.g., the Upper Paleolithic transition, cultural loss in Holocene Tasmania, scientific progress since the late nineteenth century) to demographic change. According to these models, cumulation of technological

  6. Cumulative human impacts on marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Sara M; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J; Halpern, Benjamin S; Breed, Greg A; Nickel, Barry; Teutschel, Nicole M; Crowder, Larry B; Benson, Scott; Dutton, Peter H; Bailey, Helen; Kappes, Michelle A; Kuhn, Carey E; Weise, Michael J; Mate, Bruce; Shaffer, Scott A; Hassrick, Jason L; Henry, Robert W; Irvine, Ladd; McDonald, Birgitte I; Robinson, Patrick W; Block, Barbara A; Costa, Daniel P

    2013-01-01

    Stressors associated with human activities interact in complex ways to affect marine ecosystems, yet we lack spatially explicit assessments of cumulative impacts on ecologically and economically key components such as marine predators. Here we develop a metric of cumulative utilization and impact (CUI) on marine predators by combining electronic tracking data of eight protected predator species (n=685 individuals) in the California Current Ecosystem with data on 24 anthropogenic stressors. We show significant variation in CUI with some of the highest impacts within US National Marine Sanctuaries. High variation in underlying species and cumulative impact distributions means that neither alone is sufficient for effective spatial management. Instead, comprehensive management approaches accounting for both cumulative human impacts and trade-offs among multiple stressors must be applied in planning the use of marine resources.

  7. Cumulative cultural learning: Development and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Cristine H

    2017-07-24

    The complexity and variability of human culture is unmatched by any other species. Humans live in culturally constructed niches filled with artifacts, skills, beliefs, and practices that have been inherited, accumulated, and modified over generations. A causal account of the complexity of human culture must explain its distinguishing characteristics: It is cumulative and highly variable within and across populations. I propose that the psychological adaptations supporting cumulative cultural transmission are universal but are sufficiently flexible to support the acquisition of highly variable behavioral repertoires. This paper describes variation in the transmission practices (teaching) and acquisition strategies (imitation) that support cumulative cultural learning in childhood. Examining flexibility and variation in caregiver socialization and children's learning extends our understanding of evolution in living systems by providing insight into the psychological foundations of cumulative cultural transmission-the cornerstone of human cultural diversity.

  8. Calculating Cumulative Binomial-Distribution Probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Ernest M.; Bowerman, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Cumulative-binomial computer program, CUMBIN, one of set of three programs, calculates cumulative binomial probability distributions for arbitrary inputs. CUMBIN, NEWTONP (NPO-17556), and CROSSER (NPO-17557), used independently of one another. Reliabilities and availabilities of k-out-of-n systems analyzed. Used by statisticians and users of statistical procedures, test planners, designers, and numerical analysts. Used for calculations of reliability and availability. Program written in C.

  9. About the cumulants of periodic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrau, Axel; El Badaoui, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    This note studies cumulants of time series. These functions originating from the probability theory being commonly used as features of deterministic signals, their classical properties are examined in this modified framework. We show additivity of cumulants, ensured in the case of independent random variables, requires here a different hypothesis. Practical applications are proposed, in particular an analysis of the failure of the JADE algorithm to separate some specific periodic signals.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling Mecanismos moleculares de señalización del receptor de glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.Esta revisión destaca los más recientes hallazgos sobre los mecanismos moleculares del receptor de glucocorticoides (GR. La mayoría de los efectos de los glucocorticoides son mediados por los GR intracelulares presentes en casi todos los tejidos y controlan la activación transcripcional por mecanismos directos e indirectos. Las respuestas a los glucocorticoides son específicas para cada gen y tejido. Los GR se asocian en forma selectiva con ligandos producidos en la glándula adrenal, corticosteroides, en respuesta a cambios neuroendocrinos. La interacción del ligando con el GR promueve: a la unión del GR a elementos genómicos de respuesta a glucocorticoides, modulando la transcripción; b la interacción de monómeros del GR con otros factores de transcripción activados por otras vías, llevando a la transrepresión. El GR regula un amplio espectro de funciones fisiológicas, incluyendo la

  11. Cumulative effects assessment: Does scale matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therivel, Riki; Ross, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Cumulative effects assessment (CEA) is (or should be) an integral part of environmental assessment at both the project and the more strategic level. CEA helps to link the different scales of environmental assessment in that it focuses on how a given receptor is affected by the totality of plans, projects and activities, rather than on the effects of a particular plan or project. This article reviews how CEAs consider, and could consider, scale issues: spatial extent, level of detail, and temporal issues. It is based on an analysis of Canadian project-level CEAs and UK strategic-level CEAs. Based on a review of literature and, especially, case studies with which the authors are familiar, it concludes that scale issues are poorly considered at both levels, with particular problems being unclear or non-existing cumulative effects scoping methodologies; poor consideration of past or likely future human activities beyond the plan or project in question; attempts to apportion 'blame' for cumulative effects; and, at the plan level, limited management of cumulative effects caused particularly by the absence of consent regimes. Scale issues are important in most of these problems. However both strategic-level and project-level CEA have much potential for managing cumulative effects through better siting and phasing of development, demand reduction and other behavioural changes, and particularly through setting development consent rules for projects. The lack of strategic resource-based thresholds constrains the robust management of strategic-level cumulative effects

  12. Long-term effects of glucocorticoids on function, quality of life, and survival in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Craig M; Henricson, Erik K; Abresch, Richard T; Duong, Tina; Joyce, Nanette C; Hu, Fengming; Clemens, Paula R; Hoffman, Eric P; Cnaan, Avital; Gordish-Dressman, Heather

    2018-02-03

    Glucocorticoid treatment is recommended as a standard of care in Duchenne muscular dystrophy; however, few studies have assessed the long-term benefits of this treatment. We examined the long-term effects of glucocorticoids on milestone-related disease progression across the lifespan and survival in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For this prospective cohort study, we enrolled male patients aged 2-28 years with Duchenne muscular dystrophy at 20 centres in nine countries. Patients were followed up for 10 years. We compared no glucocorticoid treatment or cumulative treatment duration of less than 1 month versus treatment of 1 year or longer with regard to progression of nine disease-related and clinically meaningful mobility and upper limb milestones. We used Kaplan-Meier analyses to compare glucocorticoid treatment groups for time to stand from supine of 5 s or longer and 10 s or longer, and loss of stand from supine, four-stair climb, ambulation, full overhead reach, hand-to-mouth function, and hand function. Risk of death was also assessed. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00468832. 440 patients were enrolled during two recruitment periods (2006-09 and 2012-16). Time to all disease progression milestone events was significantly longer in patients treated with glucocorticoids for 1 year or longer than in patients treated for less than 1 month or never treated (log-rank p<0·0001). Glucocorticoid treatment for 1 year or longer was associated with increased median age at loss of mobility milestones by 2·1-4·4 years and upper limb milestones by 2·8-8·0 years compared with treatment for less than 1 month. Deflazacort was associated with increased median age at loss of three milestones by 2·1-2·7 years in comparison with prednisone or prednisolone (log-rank p<0·012). 45 patients died during the 10-year follow-up. 39 (87%) of these deaths were attributable to Duchenne-related causes in patients with known duration of

  13. Glucocorticoid stimulates expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone gene in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.G.; Emanuel, R.L.; Frim, D.M.; Majzoub, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of purified human cytotrophoblasts have been used to examine the expression of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) gene in placenta. The authors report here that glucocorticoids stimulate placental CRH synthesis and secretion in primary cultures of human placenta. This stimulation is in contrast to the glucocorticoid suppression of CRH expression in hypothalamus. The positive regulation of CRH by glucocorticoids suggests that the rise in CRH preceding parturition could result from the previously described rise in fetal glucocorticoids. Furthermore, this increase in placental CRH could stimulate, via adrenocorticotropic hormone, a further rise in fetal glucocorticoids, completing a positive feedback loop that would be terminated by delivery

  14. The Glucocorticoid Receptor Controls Hepatic Dyslipidemia through Hes1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemke, U.; Krones-Herzig, A.; Berriel Diaz, M.; Narvekar, P.; Ziegler, A.; Vegiopoulos, A.; Cato, A.C.B.; Bohl, S.; Klingmüller, U.; Screaton, R.A.; Müller-Decker, K.; Kersten, A.H.; Herzig, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aberrant accumulation of lipids in the liver (¿fatty liver¿ or hepatic steatosis) represents a hallmark of the metabolic syndrome and is tightly associated with obesity, type II diabetes, starvation, or glucocorticoid (GC) therapy. While fatty liver has been connected with numerous abnormalities of

  15. CINRG: Systems Biology of Glucocorticoids in Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Contract W81XWH-09-1-0726 SYSTEMS BIOLOGY OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS IN MUSCLE DISEASE Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most... muscle and enable the development of better targeted and more effective therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy dynamically. This MDA grant...common and incurable muscular dystrophy of childhood. Muscle regeneration fails with advancing age, leading to considerable fibrosis. Corticosteroid

  16. Glucocorticoids and inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halloran, B.P.; Bikle, D.D.; Cone, C.M.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1988-01-01

    Skeletal unloading or loss of normal weight bearing in the growing animal inhibits bone formation and reduces bone calcium. To determine whether the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading is a consequence of an increase in plasma glucocorticoids and/or an increase in bone sensitivity to glucocorticoids, the authors measured plasma corticosterone throughout the day in unloaded and normally loaded rats (hindlimb elevation model) and examined the effect of adrenalectomy on the response of bone to skeletal unloading. Plasma corticosterone levels were similar in normally loaded and unloaded rats at all times. Skeletal unloading in sham-adrenalectomized animals reduced tibial and vertebral calcium by 11.5 and 11.1%, respectively, and in adrenalectomized animals by 15.3 and 20.3%, respectively. Uptake of 45 Ca and [ 3 H]proline in the tibia was reduced by 8 and 14%, respectively, in the sham-adrenalectomized animals and by 13 and 19% in the adrenalectomized animals. Bone formation and apposition rates were reduced to the same level in sham- and adrenalectomized animals. These results suggest that the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading is not a consequence of increased plasma glucocorticoids or an increase in bone sensitivity to the glucocorticoids but, rather, point to a local mediator in bone that senses mechanical load and transmits that information to the bone-forming cells directly

  17. General effect of endotoxin on glucocorticoid receptors in mammalian tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stith, R.D.; McCallum, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Considering the ubiquitous nature of glucocorticoid actions and the fact that endotoxin inhibits glucocorticoid action in the liver, we proposed to examine whether endotoxin affected extrahepatic actions of glucocorticoids. Fasted C57BL/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with endotoxin (LD50) at 0800 and were killed 6 h later. Control mice were injected with an equal volume of saline. 3 H-dexamethasone binding, measured by a new cytosol exchange assay utilizing molybdate plus dithiothreitol, in liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, spleen, lung, and heart tissue was significantly lower in treated than in control mice. The equilibrium dissociation constants were not significantly different, but the number of available binding sites in each tissue was reduced by endotoxin treatment. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity was significantly reduced in liver but not in kidney. Endotoxin treatment lowered glycogen content in liver but not in skeletal muscle. The reduction observed in the a form of liver glycogen synthase due to endotoxin was not seen in skeletal muscle glycogen synthase a. These data support the proposal that endotoxin or a mediator of its action inhibits systemic glucocorticoid action. The results also emphasize the central role of the liver in the metabolic disturbances of the endotoxin-treated mouse

  18. Uso de glucocorticoides en enfermedades alérgicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rodríguez-González

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Los glucocorticoides son análogos sintéticos de las hormonas adrenocorticales, de uso común, de gran utilidad en la práctica clínica del pediatra y se consideran la piedra angular del tratamiento farmacológico de enfermedades alérgicas.

  19. The effect of early administration of glucocorticoids on learning and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been observed that steroids administered postnatally may have transient retarding effect on learning and memory functions, and that animal age and sex may modify such effects. This study aims to illustrate the effect of early administration of glucocorticoids on learning and spatial memory. Wistar rat pups were ...

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor effects on the immune system and infl ammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThomas Addison’s discovery in the mid-1800s that the adrenal cortex was essential for survival preceded by nearly a century the demonstration that this gland produced at least two distinct hormones, each essential for normal life. How glucocorticoids sustained life remained a mystery for

  1. Postreactivation glucocorticoids impair recall of established fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wen-Hui; Blundell, Jacqueline; Han, Jie; Greene, Robert W; Powell, Craig M

    2006-09-13

    Pavlovian fear conditioning provides one of the best rodent models of acquired anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Injection of a variety of drugs after training in fear-conditioning paradigms can impair consolidation of fear memories. Indeed, early clinical trials suggest that immediate administration of such drugs after a traumatic event may decrease the risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder in humans (Pitman et al., 2002; Vaiva et al., 2003). The use of such a treatment is limited by the difficulty of treating every patient at risk and by the difficulty in predicting which patients will experience chronic adverse consequences. Recent clinical trials suggest that administration of glucocorticoids may have a beneficial effect on established posttraumatic stress disorder (Aerni et al., 2004) and specific phobia (Soravia et al., 2006). Conversely, glucocorticoid administration after training is known to enhance memory consolidation (McGaugh and Roozendaal, 2002; Roozendaal, 2002). From a clinical perspective, enhancement of a fear memory or a reactivated fear memory would not be desirable. We report here that when glucocorticoids are administered immediately after reactivation of a contextual fear memory, subsequent recall is significantly diminished. Additional experiments support the interpretation that glucocorticoids not only decrease fear memory retrieval but, in addition, augment consolidation of fear memory extinction rather than decreasing reconsolidation. These findings provide a rodent model for a potential treatment of established acquired anxiety disorders in humans, as suggested by others (Aerni et al., 2004; Schelling et al., 2004), based on a mechanism of enhanced extinction.

  2. Acute and Cumulative Effects of Unmodified 50-nm Nano-ZnO on Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Tao; Zhang, Shu-Hui; Zhang, Ji-Liang; Hao, Xue-Qin; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Cai; Yang, Zi-Jun; Zhang, Meng-Yu; Wang, Jie

    2018-01-02

    Nanometer zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) is widely used in diverse industrial and agricultural fields. Due to the extensive contact humans have with these particles, it is crucial to understand the potential effects that nano-ZnO have on human health. Currently, information related to the toxicity and mechanisms of nano-ZnO is limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate acute and cumulative toxic effects of 50-nm unmodified ZnO in mice. This investigation will seek to establish median lethal dose (LD50), a cumulative coefficient, and target organs. The acute and cumulative toxicity was investigated by Karber's method and via a dose-increasing method, respectively. During the experiment, clinical signs, mortality, body weights, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross pathology, organ weight, and histopathology were examined. The LD50 was 5177-mg/kg·bw; the 95% confidence limits for the LD50 were 5116-5238-mg/kg·bw. It could be concluded that the liver, kidney, lung, and gastrointestinal tract were target organs for the 50-nm nano-ZnO acute oral treatment. The cumulative coefficient (K) was 1.9 which indicated that the cumulative toxicity was apparent. The results also indicated that the liver, kidney, lung, and pancrea were target organs for 50-nm nano-ZnO cumulative oral exposure and might be target organs for subchronic and chronic toxicity of oral administered 50-nm ZnO.

  3. Glucocorticoid receptors in anorexia nervosa and Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invitti, C; Redaelli, G; Baldi, G; Cavagnini, F

    1999-06-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa do not display cushingoid features in spite of elevated cortisol plasma levels. Whether a cortisol resistance or a reduced availability of the metabolic substrates necessary to develop the effect of glucocorticoids is responsible for this has not been established. Twenty-two patients with severe restrictive anorexia nervosa, 10 patients with active Cushing's disease, and 24 healthy volunteers without psychiatric disorders or mood alterations were investigated. Glucocorticoid receptor characteristics were examined on mononuclear leukocytes by measuring [3H]dexamethasone binding and the effect of dexamethasone on [3H]thymidine incorporation, which represents an index of DNA synthesis. The number of glucocorticoid receptors on mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) was comparable in patients with anorexia nervosa, patients with active Cushing's disease, and normal subjects (binding capacity 3.3 +/- 0.23 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.30 and 3.5 +/- 0.20 fmol/10(6) cells). Conversely, glucocorticoid receptor affinity was significantly decreased in anorexia nervosa as well as in Cushing's patients compared to control subjects (dissociation constant 4.0 +/- 0.31 and 4.1 +/- 0.34 vs. 2.9 +/- 0.29 nmol/L, p Cushing's patients compared to control subjects (p Cushing's disease. In patients with anorexia nervosa, the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the MNL was inversely correlated with urinary free cortisol levels. These data indicate that the lack of cushingoid features in patients with anorexia nervosa is not ascribable to a reduced sensitivity to glucocorticoids but is more likely due to the paucity of metabolic substrates.

  4. Preadmission Use of Glucocorticoids and 30-Day Mortality After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbøll, Jens; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Schmidt, Morten; Dekkers, Olaf M; Christiansen, Christian F; Pedersen, Lars; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic impact of glucocorticoids on stroke mortality remains uncertain. We, therefore, examined whether preadmission use of glucocorticoids is associated with short-term mortality after ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study using medical registries in Denmark. We identified all patients with a first-time inpatient diagnosis of stroke between 2004 and 2012. We categorized glucocorticoid use as current use (last prescription redemption ≤90 days before admission), former use, and nonuse. Current use was further classified as new or long-term use. We used Cox regression to compute 30-day mortality rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), controlling for confounders. We identified 100 042 patients with a first-time stroke. Of these, 83 735 patients had ischemic stroke, 11 779 had ICH, and 4528 had SAH. Absolute mortality risk was higher for current users compared with nonusers for ischemic stroke (19.5% versus 10.2%), ICH (46.5% versus 34.4%), and SAH (35.0% versus 23.2%). For ischemic stroke, the adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratio was increased among current users compared with nonusers (1.58, 95% CI: 1.46-1.71), driven by the effect of glucocorticoids among new users (1.80, 95% CI: 1.62-1.99). Current users had a more modest increase in the adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratio for hemorrhagic stroke (1.26, 95% CI: 1.09-1.45 for ICH and 1.40, 95% CI: 1.01-1.93 for SAH) compared with nonusers. Former use was not substantially associated with mortality. Preadmission use of glucocorticoids was associated with increased 30-day mortality among patients with ischemic stroke, ICH, and SAH. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Glucocorticoids interact with the noradrenergic arousal system in the nucleus accumbens shell to enhance memory consolidation of both appetitive and aversive taste learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Romy; Fornari, Raquel V; Roozendaal, Benno

    2012-09-01

    It is well established that glucocorticoid hormones strengthen the consolidation of long-term memory of emotionally arousing experiences but have little effect on memory of low-arousing experiences. Although both positive and negative emotionally arousing events tend to be well remembered, studies investigating the neural mechanism underlying glucocorticoid-induced memory enhancement focused primarily on negatively motivated training experiences. In the present study we show an involvement of glucocorticoids within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in enhancing memory consolidation of both an appetitive and aversive form of taste learning. The specific glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist RU 28362 (1 or 3ng) administered bilaterally into the NAc shell, but not core, of male Sprague-Dawley rats immediately after an appetitive saccharin drinking experience dose-dependently enhanced 24-h retention of the safe taste, resulting in a facilitated attenuation of neophobia. Similarly, GR agonist infusions given into the NAc shell immediately after pairing of the saccharin taste with a malaise-inducing agent enhanced memory of this negative experience, resulting in an intensified conditioned aversion. Importantly, a suppression of noradrenergic activity within the NAc shell with the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol blocked the facilitating effect of a concurrently administered GR agonist on memory consolidation in both the appetitive and aversive learning task. Thus, these findings indicate that GR activation interacts with the noradrenergic arousal system within the NAc to enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing training experiences regardless of valence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Glucocorticoid-induced diabetes in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Helga; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Harder, Eva

    2018-01-01

    in a prospective, observational cohort study. The primary endpoint was development of DM defined by two or more plasma glucose values ≥11.1 mmol/L. Plasma glucose was monitored on a daily basis for 12 days during radiotherapy. RESULTS: Fifty-six of the patients (43%; 95% CI 35-52%) were diagnosed with DM based...... spinal cord compression (MSCC) in patients referred to radiotherapy. Furthermore, to describe the time course of development of DM. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 140 patients were recruited (131 were included in the analysis) with MSCC receiving high-dose glucocorticoid ≥100 mg prednisolone per day were included...... on plasma glucose measurements during the study period. Sixteen patients, 12% (95% CI 6-18%), were treated with insulin. At multivariate analysis, only high baseline HbA1c predicted the development of insulin-treated DM. An HbA1c-value value of 96...

  7. Thyroid storm masked by hemodialysis and glucocorticoid therapy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yohei; Shimizu, Yoshio; Nakata, Junichiro; Kameda, Toshiaki; Muto, Masahiro; Ohsawa, Isao; Io, Hiroaki; Hamada, Chieko; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function test values are generally at low levels in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Life-threatening thyrotoxicosis or thyroid storm is rare, especially in hemodialysis (HD) patients, and is characterized by multisystem involvement and a high mortality rate if not immediately recognized and treated. Here, we report a female patient with severe symptomatic thyroid storm, receiving long-term HD and glucocorticoid therapy. Methimazole at a dose of 15 mg per day, β-adrenergic blockade and HD succeeded in controlling the patient's condition by gradually adjusting the target dry weight for hyperthyroidism-induced weight loss. When she was discharged from the hospital, her dry weight was reduced from 47.2 to 39.2 kg. The management of patients with severe symptomatic thyroid storm on HD represents a rare scenario. It is essential to initiate the available treatments as early as possible to reduce its mortality.

  8. Glucocorticoids inhibit the proliferation of IL-2-dependent T cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresno, M.; Redondo, J.M.; Lopez-Rivas, A.

    1986-01-01

    It has been shown that glucocorticoids inhibit mitogen or antigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation by decreasing the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2). They have studied the effect of dexamethasone (Dx) on the proliferation of IL-2-dependent T cell clones. They have found that preincubation of these clones with Dx inhibits ( 3 H) thymidine incorporation and cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner (ID 50 % 5 x 10 -10 M). The inhibition of DNA synthesis by Dx was dependent on the concentration of IL-2. High concentration of IL-2 reversed completely this inhibition. The action of Dx seems to be mediated through the induction of a protein since the simultaneous presence of cycloheximide and Dx prevented the inhibitory effect of the latter. Moreover, dialyzed conditioned medium of Dx treated cells inhibited DNA synthesis by T cell clones. The biochemical characterization of this protein is in progress

  9. FBXW7 regulates glucocorticoid response in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia by targeting the glucocorticoid receptor for degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyukova, A; Brown, S; Papa, R; O'Brien, R; Giles, J; Trahair, T N; Dalla Pozza, L; Sutton, R; Liu, T; Haber, M; Norris, M D; Lock, R B; Sangfelt, O; Marshall, G M

    2013-04-01

    Loss of function mutation in FBXW7, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is associated with good prognosis and early glucocorticoid treatment response in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) by unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that FBXW7 targets the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) for ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in a manner dependent on glycogen synthase kinase 3 β-mediated phsophorylation. FBXW7 inactivation caused elevated GRα levels, and enhanced the transcriptional response to glucocorticoids. There was significant enhancement of GR transcriptional responses in FBXW7-deficient cell lines and primary T-ALL samples, in particular, for those pro-apoptotic regulatory proteins, BIM and PUMA. Reduced FBXW7 expression or function promoted glucocorticoid sensitivity, but not sensitivity to other chemotherapeutic agents used in T-ALL. Moreover, this was a general feature of different cancer cell types. Taken together, our work defines GRα as a novel FBXW7 substrate and demonstrates that favorable patient prognosis in T-ALL is associated with FBXW7 mutations due to enhanced GRα levels and steroid sensitivity. These findings suggest that inactivation of FBXW7, a putative tumor suppressor protein, may create a synthetic lethal state in the presence of specific anticancer therapies.

  10. Predicting Cumulative Incidence Probability: Marginal and Cause-Specific Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H.; Zhang, Mei-Jie

    2005-01-01

    cumulative incidence probability; cause-specific hazards; subdistribution hazard; binomial modelling......cumulative incidence probability; cause-specific hazards; subdistribution hazard; binomial modelling...

  11. Predicting Cumulative Incidence Probability by Direct Binomial Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H.; Zhang, Mei-Jie

    Binomial modelling; cumulative incidence probability; cause-specific hazards; subdistribution hazard......Binomial modelling; cumulative incidence probability; cause-specific hazards; subdistribution hazard...

  12. Managing cumulative impacts: A key to sustainability?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1994-12-31

    This paper addresses how science can be more effectively used in creating policy to manage cumulative effects on ecosystems. The paper focuses on the scientific techniques that we have to identify and to assess cumulative impacts on ecosystems. The term ``sustainable development`` was brought into common use by the World Commission on Environment and Development (The Brundtland Commission) in 1987. The Brundtland Commission report highlighted the need to simultaneously address developmental and environmental imperatives simultaneously by calling for development that ``meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the needs of future generations.`` We cannot claim to be working toward sustainable development until we can quantitatively assess cumulative impacts on the environment: The two concepts are inextricibally linked in that the elusiveness of cumulative effects likely has the greatest potential of keeping us from achieving sustainability. In this paper, assessment and management frameworks relevant to cumulative impacts are discussed along with recent literature on how to improve such assessments. When possible, examples are given for marine ecosystems.

  13. Glucocorticoids Protect Neonatal Rat Brain in Model of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Harding

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE resulting from asphyxia in the peripartum period is the most common cause of neonatal brain damage and can result in significant neurologic sequelae, including cerebral palsy. Currently therapeutic hypothermia is the only accepted treatment in addition to supportive care for infants with HIE, however, many additional neuroprotective therapies have been investigated. Of these, glucocorticoids have previously been shown to have neuroprotective effects. HIE is also frequently compounded by infectious inflammatory processes (sepsis and as such, the infants may be more amenable to treatment with an anti-inflammatory agent. Thus, the present study investigated dexamethasone and hydrocortisone treatment given after hypoxic-ischemic (HI insult in neonatal rats via intracerebroventricular (ICV injection and intranasal administration. In addition, we examined the effects of hydrocortisone treatment in HIE after lipopolysaccharide (LPS sensitization in a model of HIE and sepsis. We found that dexamethasone significantly reduced rat brain infarction size when given after HI treatment via ICV injection; however it did not demonstrate any neuroprotective effects when given intranasally. Hydrocortisone after HI insult also significantly reduced brain infarction size when given via ICV injection; and the intranasal administration showed to be protective of brain injury in male rats at a dose of 300 µg. LPS sensitization did significantly increase the brain infarction size compared to controls, and hydrocortisone treatment after LPS sensitization showed a significant decrease in brain infarction size when given via ICV injection, as well as intranasal administration in both genders at a dose of 300 µg. To conclude, these results show that glucocorticoids have significant neuroprotective effects when given after HI injury and that these effects may be even more pronounced when given in circumstances of additional

  14. The injury and cumulative effects on human skin by UV exposure from artificial fluorescence emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yan; Liu, Wei; Niu, TianHui; Dai, CaiHong; Li, Xiaoxin; Cui, Caijuan; Zhao, Xinyan; E, Yaping; Lu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The injury and cumulative effects of UV emission from fluorescence lamp were studied. UV intensity from fluorescence lamp was measured, and human skin samples (hips, 10 volunteers) were exposed to low-dose UV irradiation (three times per week for 13 consecutive weeks). Three groups were examined: control group without UV radiation; low-dose group with a cumulative dose of 50 J cm(-2) which was equivalent to irradiation of the face during indoor work for 1.5 years; and high-dose group with 1000 J cm(-2) cumulative dose equivalent to irradiation of the face during outdoor activities for 1 year. Specific indicators were measured before and after UVA irradiation. The findings showed that extending the low-dose UVA exposure decreased the skin moisture content and increased the transepidermal water loss as well as induced skin color changes (decreased L* value, increased M index). Furthermore, irradiated skin showed an increased thickness of cuticle and epidermis, skin edema, light color and unclear staining collagen fibers in the dermis, and elastic fiber fragmentation. In addition, MMP-1, p53 and SIRT1 expression was also increased. Long-term exposure of low-dose UVA radiation enhanced skin photoaging. The safety of the fluorescent lamp needs our attention. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  15. Glucocorticoids inhibit glucose transport and glutamate uptake in hippocampal astrocytes: implications for glucocorticoid neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgin, C E; Ha, T P; Packan, D R; Tombaugh, G C; Yang, S H; Horner, H C; Sapolsky, R M

    1991-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs), the adrenal steroid hormones secreted during stress, can damage the hippocampus and impair its capacity to survive coincident neurological insults. This GC endangerment of the hippocampus is energetic in nature, as it can be prevented when neurons are supplemented with additional energy substrates. This energetic endangerment might arise from the ability of GCs to inhibit glucose transport into both hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. The present study explores the GC inhibition in astrocytes. (1) GCs inhibited glucose transport approximately 15-30% in both primary and secondary hippocampal astrocyte cultures. (2) The parameters of inhibition agreed with the mechanisms of GC inhibition of glucose transport in peripheral tissues: A minimum of 4 h of GC exposure were required, and the effect was steroid specific (i.e., it was not triggered by estrogen, progesterone, or testosterone) and tissue specific (i.e., it was not triggered by GCs in cerebellar or cortical cultures). (3) Similar GC treatment caused a decrease in astrocyte survival during hypoglycemia and a decrease in the affinity of glutamate uptake. This latter observation suggests that GCs might impair the ability of astrocytes to aid neurons during times of neurologic crisis (i.e., by impairing their ability to remove damaging glutamate from the synapse).

  16. Perspectives on cumulative risks and impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, John B

    2010-01-01

    Cumulative risks and impacts have taken on different meanings in different regulatory and programmatic contexts at federal and state government levels. Traditional risk assessment methodologies, with considerable limitations, can provide a framework for the evaluation of cumulative risks from chemicals. Under an environmental justice program in California, cumulative impacts are defined to include exposures, public health effects, or environmental effects in a geographic area from the emission or discharge of environmental pollution from all sources, through all media. Furthermore, the evaluation of these effects should take into account sensitive populations and socioeconomic factors where possible and to the extent data are available. Key aspects to this potential approach include the consideration of exposures (versus risk), socioeconomic factors, the geographic or community-level assessment scale, and the inclusion of not only health effects but also environmental effects as contributors to impact. Assessments of this type extend the boundaries of the types of information that toxicologists generally provide for risk management decisions.

  17. Cumulative processes and quark distribution in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.; Shmatikov, M.

    1984-01-01

    Assuming existence of multiquark (mainly 12q) bags in nuclei the spectra of cumulative nucleons and mesons produced in high-energy particle-nucleus collisions are discussed. The exponential form of quark momentum distribution in 12q-bag (agreeing well with the experimental data on lepton-nucleus interactions at large q 2 ) is shown to result in quasi-exponential distribution of cumulative particles over the light-cone variable αsub(B). The dependence of f(αsub(B); psub(perpendicular)) (where psub(perpendicular) is the transverse momentum of the bag) upon psub(perpendicular) is considered. The yields of cumulative resonances as well as effects related to the u- and d-quark distributions in N > Z nuclei being different are dicscussed

  18. Cumulative Culture and Future Thinking: Is Mental Time Travel a Prerequisite to Cumulative Cultural Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, G. L.; Flynn, E. G.; Kendal, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Cumulative culture denotes the, arguably, human capacity to build on the cultural behaviors of one's predecessors, allowing increases in cultural complexity to occur such that many of our cultural artifacts, products and technologies have progressed beyond what a single individual could invent alone. This process of cumulative cultural evolution…

  19. Optimising glucocorticoid replacement therapy in severely adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) deficient hypopituitary male patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Behan, Lucy-Ann

    2011-04-18

    Context:  The optimal replacement regimen of hydrocortisone in adults with severe ACTH deficiency remains unknown. Management strategies vary from treatment with 15mg to 30mg or higher in daily divided doses, reflecting the paucity of prospective data on the adequacy of different glucocorticoid regimens. Objective:  Primarily to define the hydrocortisone regimen which results in a 24hour cortisol profile that most closely resembles that of healthy controls and secondarily to assess the impact on quality of life (QoL). Design:  10 male hypopituitary patients with severe ACTH deficiency (basal cortisol <100nM and peak response to stimulation <400nM) were enrolled in a prospective, randomised, crossover study of 3 hydrocortisone dose regimens. Following 6 weeks of each regimen patients underwent 24hour serum cortisol sampling and QoL assessment with the Short Form 36 and the Nottingham Health Profile questionnaires. Free cortisol was calculated using Coolen\\'s equation. All results were compared to those of healthy, matched controls. Results:  CBG was significantly lower across all dose regimens compared to controls (p<0.05). The lower dose regimen C(10mg mane\\/5mg tarde) produced a 24hour free cortisol profile which most closely resembled that of controls. Both regimen A(20mg mane\\/10mg tarde) and B(10mg mane\\/10mg tarde) produced supraphysiological post-absorption peaks. There was no significant difference in QoL in patients between the three regimens, however energy level was significantly lower across all dose regimens compared to controls (p<0.001). Conclusions:  The lower dose of HC(10mg\\/5mg) produces a more physiological cortisol profile, without compromising quality of life, compared to higher doses still used in clinical practice. This may have important implications in these patients, known to have excess cardiovascular mortality.

  20. Optimizing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in severely adrenocorticotropin-deficient hypopituitary male patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Behan, Lucy-Ann

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal replacement regimen of hydrocortisone in adults with severe ACTH deficiency remains unknown. Management strategies vary from treatment with 15-30 mg or higher in daily divided doses, reflecting the paucity of prospective data on the adequacy of different glucocorticoid regimens. OBJECTIVE: Primarily to define the hydrocortisone regimen which results in a 24 h cortisol profile that most closely resembles that of healthy controls and secondarily to assess the impact on quality of life (QoL). DESIGN: Ten male hypopituitary patients with severe ACTH deficiency (basal cortisol <100 nm and peak response to stimulation <400 nm) were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, crossover study of 3 hydrocortisone dose regimens. Following 6 weeks of each regimen patients underwent 24 h serum cortisol sampling and QoL assessment with the Short Form 36 (SF36) and the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) questionnaires. Free cortisol was calculated using Coolen\\'s equation. All results were compared to those of healthy, matched controls. RESULTS: Corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) was significantly lower across all dose regimens compared to controls (P < 0.05). The lower dose regimen C (10 mg mane\\/5 mg tarde) produced a 24 h free cortisol profile (FCP) which most closely resembled that of controls. Both regimen A(20 mg mane\\/10 mg tarde) and B(10 mg mane\\/10 mg tarde) produced supraphysiological post-absorption peaks. There was no significant difference in QoL in patients between the three regimens, however energy level was significantly lower across all dose regimens compared to controls (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The lower dose of hydrocortisone (10 mg\\/5 mg) produces a more physiological cortisol profile, without compromising QoL, compared to higher doses still used in clinical practice. This may have important implications in these patients, known to have excess cardiovascular mortality.

  1. EXAFS cumulants of CdSe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diop, D.

    1997-04-01

    EXAFS functions had been extracted from measurements on the K edge of Se at different temperatures between 20 and 300 K. The analysis of the EXAFS of the filtered first two shells has been done in the wavevector range laying between 2 and 15.5 A -1 in terms of the cumulants of the effective distribution of distances. The cumulants C 3 and C 4 obtained from the phase difference and the amplitude ratio methods have shown the anharmonicity in the vibrations of atoms around their equilibrium position. (author). 13 refs, 3 figs

  2. Cumulative effects of wind turbines. A guide to assessing the cumulative effects of wind energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This guidance provides advice on how to assess the cumulative effects of wind energy developments in an area and is aimed at developers, planners, and stakeholders interested in the development of wind energy in the UK. The principles of cumulative assessment, wind energy development in the UK, cumulative assessment of wind energy development, and best practice conclusions are discussed. The identification and assessment of the cumulative effects is examined in terms of global environmental sustainability, local environmental quality and socio-economic activity. Supplementary guidance for assessing the principle cumulative effects on the landscape, on birds, and on the visual effect is provided. The consensus building approach behind the preparation of this guidance is outlined in the annexes of the report.

  3. High cumulative insulin exposure: a risk factor of atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muis, Marian J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Stolk, Ronald P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Since insulin therapy might have an atherogenic effect, we studied the relationship between cumulative insulin dose and atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes. We have focused on patients with type 1 diabetes instead of type 2 diabetes to minimise the effect of insulin resistance as a

  4. High cumulative insulin exposure : a risk factor of atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muis, MJ; Bots, ML; Bilo, HJG; Hoogma, RPLM; Hoekstra, JBL; Grobbee, DE; Stolk, RP

    Background: Since insulin therapy might have an atherogenic effect, we studied the relationship between cumulative insulin dose and atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes. We have focused on patients with type 1 diabetes instead of type 2 diabetes to minimise the effect of insulin resistance as a

  5. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  6. Reducing glucocorticoid dosage improves serum osteocalcin in patients with rheumatoid arthritis-results from the TOMORROW study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, M; Inui, K; Sugioka, Y; Mamoto, K; Okano, T; Koike, T; Nakamura, H

    2016-02-01

    Decreasing the daily dose of glucocorticoids improved bone metabolic marker levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. However, changes in disease activity did not influence bone metabolism. Bone metabolism might thus remain uncontrolled even if disease activity is under good control. Decreasing glucocorticoid dosage appears important for improving bone metabolism. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develop osteoporosis more frequently than healthy individuals. Bone resorption is increased and bone formation is inhibited in patients with RA, and glucocorticoid negatively affects bone metabolism. We aimed to investigate factors influencing bone metabolic markers in patients with RA. We started the 10-year prospective cohort Total Management of Risk Factors in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients to Lower Morbidity and Mortality (TOMORROW) study in 2010. We compared changes in urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (uNTx) and serum osteocalcin (OC), as markers of bone resorption and formation, respectively, in 202 RA patients and age- and sex-matched volunteers between 2010 and 2011. We also investigated factors influencing ΔuNTx and ΔOC in the RA group using multivariate analysis. Values of ΔuNTx were significantly lower in patients with RA than in healthy controls (-0.51 vs. 7.41 nmol bone collagen equivalents (BCE)/mmol creatinine (Cr); p = 0.0013), whereas ΔOC values were significantly higher in RA patients (0.94 vs. 0.37 ng/ml; p = 0.0065). Changes in prednisolone dosage correlated negatively with ΔOC (β = -0.229, p = 0.001), whereas changes in disease activity score, bisphosphonate therapy, and period of biologics therapy did not correlate significantly with ΔOC. No significant correlation was seen between ΔuNTx and change in prednisolone dosage. Decreased glucocorticoid dosage improved bone metabolic markers in RA, but disease activity, bisphosphonate therapy, and period of biologics therapy did not influence

  7. Modulation of Rat 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations by Glucocorticoid Signaling: Possible Relevance to Reward and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simola, Nicola; Paci, Elena; Serra, Marcello; Costa, Giulia; Morelli, Micaela

    2018-01-01

    Rats emit 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) to communicate positive emotional states, and these USVs are increasingly being investigated in preclinical studies on reward and motivation. Although it is the activation of dopamine receptors that initiates the emission of 50-kHz USVs, non-dopaminergic mechanisms may modulate calling in the 50 kHz frequency band. To further elucidate these mechanisms, the present study investigated whether the pharmacological manipulation of glucocorticoid signaling influenced calling. Rats were administered corticosterone (1-5 mg/kg, s.c.), the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone (40 or 100 mg/kg, s.c.), or the corticosterone synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (50 or 100 mg/kg, i.p.). The effects of these drugs on calling initiation and on calling recorded during nonaggressive social contacts or after the administration of amphetamine (0.25 or 1 mg/kg, i.p.) were then evaluated. Corticosterone failed to initiate the emission of 50-kHz USVs and did not influence pro-social and amphetamine-stimulated calling. Similarly, mifepristone and metyrapone did not initiate calling. However, metyrapone suppressed pro-social calling and calling stimulated by a moderate dose (1 mg/kg, i.p.) of amphetamine. Conversely, mifepristone attenuated calling stimulated by a low (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.), but not moderate (1 mg/kg, i.p.), dose of amphetamine and had no influence on pro-social calling. The present results demonstrate that glucocorticoid signaling modulates calling in the 50 kHz frequency band only in certain conditions and suggest that mechanisms different from the inhibition of corticosterone synthesis may participate in the suppression of calling by metyrapone. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  8. A systematic review of the effect of oral glucocorticoids on energy intake, appetite, and body weight in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Bronwyn S; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley K; Wood, Lisa G

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a serious risk factor for chronic disease, and commonly prescribed oral glucocorticoids (OCS) may be contributing to the prevalence of obesity. The objective of this review was to assess the impact of OCS on obesity in humans through effects on body weight (BW), energy intake, appetite, and body composition. An electronic search of English language peer-reviewed studies from 1973 up to March 2012 was conducted using Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. Original studies that addressed the effects of OCS on appetite, energy intake, BW, or body composition in adults were considered eligible. Data from 21 studies with objectively measured outcomes were extracted and assessed for quality using standardized tools. The publication year varied from 1986 to 2013, and the sample size, from 6 to 189. Energy intake was measured in 6 studies; BW, in 19 studies; energy expenditure, in 3 studies; body composition, in 6 studies; and appetite was evaluated in 3 studies. Short-term oral glucocorticoid therapy may result in small increases in energy intake but does not appear to result in increased BW, possibly due to an increase in energy expenditure. Long-term therapy may result in clinically significant weight gain. Within-subject variation due to metabolism and physical activity levels confounds the relationship. A dose-response relationship of oral glucocorticoid therapy on energy intake, appetite, BW, or body composition was not found. Additional well-designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials that use standardized doses of OCS and assess the effects on appetite, energy intake, BW, and composition are strongly justified to confirm the findings of this review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiparty correlation measure based on the cumulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, D. L.; Zeng, B.; Xu, Z.; You, L.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a genuine multiparty correlation measure for a multiparty quantum system as the trace norm of the cumulant of the state. The legitimacy of our multiparty correlation measure is explicitly demonstrated by proving it satisfies the five basic conditions required for a correlation measure. As an application we construct an efficient algorithm for the calculation of our measures for all stabilizer states

  10. Decision analysis with cumulative prospect theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoumi, A M; Redelmeier, D A

    2000-01-01

    Individuals sometimes express preferences that do not follow expected utility theory. Cumulative prospect theory adjusts for some phenomena by using decision weights rather than probabilities when analyzing a decision tree. The authors examined how probability transformations from cumulative prospect theory might alter a decision analysis of a prophylactic therapy in AIDS, eliciting utilities from patients with HIV infection (n = 75) and calculating expected outcomes using an established Markov model. They next focused on transformations of three sets of probabilities: 1) the probabilities used in calculating standard-gamble utility scores; 2) the probabilities of being in discrete Markov states; 3) the probabilities of transitioning between Markov states. The same prophylaxis strategy yielded the highest quality-adjusted survival under all transformations. For the average patient, prophylaxis appeared relatively less advantageous when standard-gamble utilities were transformed. Prophylaxis appeared relatively more advantageous when state probabilities were transformed and relatively less advantageous when transition probabilities were transformed. Transforming standard-gamble and transition probabilities simultaneously decreased the gain from prophylaxis by almost half. Sensitivity analysis indicated that even near-linear probability weighting transformations could substantially alter quality-adjusted survival estimates. The magnitude of benefit estimated in a decision-analytic model can change significantly after using cumulative prospect theory. Incorporating cumulative prospect theory into decision analysis can provide a form of sensitivity analysis and may help describe when people deviate from expected utility theory.

  11. Cumulative watershed effects: a research perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie M. Reid; Robert R. Ziemer

    1989-01-01

    A cumulative watershed effect (CWE) is any response to multiple land-use activities that is caused by, or results in, altered watershed function. The CWE issue is politically defined, as is the significance of particular impacts. But the processes generating CWEs are the traditional focus of geomorphology and ecology, and have thus been studied for decades. The CWE...

  12. Short-term use of glucocorticoids and risk of peptic ulcer bleeding: a nationwide population-based case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C-L; Chen, Y-T; Huang, C-J; Luo, J-C; Peng, Y-L; Huang, D-F; Hou, M-C; Lin, H-C; Lee, F-Y

    2015-09-01

    Controversy exists regarding glucocorticoids therapy and the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). The present study was undertaken to determine whether short-term use of glucocorticoids is associated with the occurrence of peptic ulcer bleeding. The records of adult patients hospitalised for newly diagnosed peptic ulcer bleeding from 2000 to 2012 were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, a nationwide population-based registry system. The association between systemic glucocorticoids usage and peptic ulcer bleeding was determined with a conditional logistic regression model comparing cases and controls during time windows of 7, 14 and 28 days using a case-crossover design. Of the 8894 enrolled patients, the adjusted self-matched odds ratios for peptic ulcer bleeding after exposure to the glucocorticoids were 1.37 (95% CI: 1.12-1.68, P = 0.003) for the 7-day window, 1.66 (95% CI: 1.38-2.00, P peptic ulcer bleeding. Concomitant use of a nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or aspirin further elevated the risk. However, it does not eliminate the effect of underlying diseases flare-up that may have placed the patients at risk for peptic ulcer bleeding in this kind of study design. Short-term (7-28 days) exposure to glucocorticoids is significantly associated with peptic ulcer bleeding; this risk seems dose-dependent and is higher when nonselective NSAIDs or aspirin are used concurrently. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A radioreceptor assay for measurement of plasma glucocorticoid binding activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Jie

    1990-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay (RRA) for plasma glucocorticoid binding activity (GCBA) has been developed using glucocorticoid receptor in rat thymocytes. Unlike other assays for natural and certain synthetic corticosteroids, RRA measures the GCBA of all natural and synthetic GC in plasma. The range of standard curve was 0 ∼ 1.00 mg/L. The sensitivity was 0.01 mg/l. The recovery rate was 92.1%, and the intra and inter assay CV was 0.7% (n = 3) and 4.4% (n = 3) respectively. The level of corticosterone in 9 rat plasma samples was determined by RRA and CBG-isotope binding assay. There was a general correlation over a wide range between the values determined by the two assays (r = 0.95; P < 0.001). The measuring condition was described in detail

  14. The transcriptomics of glucocorticoid receptor signaling in developing zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinushan Nesan

    Full Text Available Cortisol is the primary corticosteroid in teleosts that is released in response to stressor activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis. The target tissue action of this hormone is primarily mediated by the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR, a ligand-bound transcription factor. In developing zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos, GR transcripts and cortisol are maternally deposited into the oocyte prior to fertilization and influence early embryogenesis. To better understand of the molecular mechanisms involved, we investigated changes in the developmental transcriptome prior to hatch, in response to morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of GR using the Agilent zebrafish microarray platform. A total of 1313 and 836 mRNA transcripts were significantly changed at 24 and 36 hours post fertilization (hpf, respectively. Functional analysis revealed numerous developmental processes under GR regulation, including neurogenesis, eye development, skeletal and cardiac muscle formation. Together, this study underscores a critical role for glucocorticoid signaling in programming molecular events essential for zebrafish development.

  15. Chronic Stress and Glucocorticoids: From Neuronal Plasticity to Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela Vyas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress and stress hormones, glucocorticoids (GCs, exert widespread actions in central nervous system, ranging from the regulation of gene transcription, cellular signaling, modulation of synaptic structure, and transmission and glial function to behavior. Their actions are mediated by glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors which are nuclear receptors/transcription factors. While GCs primarily act to maintain homeostasis by inducing physiological and behavioral adaptation, prolonged exposure to stress and elevated GC levels may result in neuro- and psychopathology. There is now ample evidence for cause-effect relationships between prolonged stress, elevated GC levels, and cognitive and mood disorders while the evidence for a link between chronic stress/GC and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s (AD and Parkinson’s (PD diseases is growing. This brief review considers some of the cellular mechanisms through which stress and GC may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD and PD.

  16. Gastroprotective role of glucocorticoids during NSAID-induced gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaretova, Ludmila

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) make significant contributions to gastric ulcer disease which remains widespread. Although several factors have been postulated as pathogenic elements of the gastric injury induced by NSAIDs, it is, however believed that prostaglandin deficiency plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of this injury. During prostaglandin deficiency, other defensive mechanisms might operate to attenuate NSAID-induced gastropathy. According to our results, NSAIDs, similar to stress, induce an increase in glucocorticoid production that in turn helps the gastric mucosa to resist the harmful actions of these drugs. In this article, we review our experimental data suggesting that glucocorticoids may play a role as natural defensive factors in maintaining the integrity of the gastric mucosa during NSAID therapy and might operate to attenuate NSAID-induced gastropathy.

  17. An evaluation paradigm for cumulative impact analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakhiv, Eugene Z.

    1988-09-01

    Cumulative impact analysis is examined from a conceptual decision-making perspective, focusing on its implicit and explicit purposes as suggested within the policy and procedures for environmental impact analysis of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and its implementing regulations. In this article it is also linked to different evaluation and decision-making conventions, contrasting a regulatory context with a comprehensive planning framework. The specific problems that make the application of cumulative impact analysis a virtually intractable evaluation requirement are discussed in connection with the federal regulation of wetlands uses. The relatively familiar US Army Corps of Engineers' (the Corps) permit program, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) responsibilities in managing its share of the Section 404 regulatory program requirements, is used throughout as the realistic context for highlighting certain pragmatic evaluation aspects of cumulative impact assessment. To understand the purposes of cumulative impact analysis (CIA), a key distinction must be made between the implied comprehensive and multiobjective evaluation purposes of CIA, promoted through the principles and policies contained in NEPA, and the more commonly conducted and limited assessment of cumulative effects (ACE), which focuses largely on the ecological effects of human actions. Based on current evaluation practices within the Corps' and EPA's permit programs, it is shown that the commonly used screening approach to regulating wetlands uses is not compatible with the purposes of CIA, nor is the environmental impact statement (EIS) an appropriate vehicle for evaluating the variety of objectives and trade-offs needed as part of CIA. A heuristic model that incorporates the basic elements of CIA is developed, including the idea of trade-offs among social, economic, and environmental protection goals carried out within the context of environmental

  18. Locomotor therapy with extended-release crystalline glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vasilyevich Badokin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical glucocorticoid (GC therapy for locomotor diseases is an extremely important component of a comprehensive program to treat inflammatory and, to a lesser extent, degenerative diseases. It reduces the time of hospitalization by 5—10 days in this category of patients, has a prompt and potent anti-inflammatory effect, and shows predictable efficiency. This therapy shows good tolerability and high safety and prevents serious adverse reactions to GC treatment.

  19. Social Regulation of Leukocyte Homeostasis: The Role of Glucocorticoid Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Steve W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent small-scale genomics analyses suggest that physiologic regulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression by endogenous glucocorticoids may be compromised in individuals who experience chronic social isolation. This could potentially contribute to the elevated prevalence of inflammation-related disease previously observed in social isolates. The present study assessed the relationship between leukocyte distributional sensitivity to glucocorticoid regulation and subjective social isolation in a large population-based sample of older adults. Initial analyses confirmed that circulating neutrophil percentages were elevated, and circulating lymphocyte and monocyte percentages were suppressed, in direct proportion to circulating cortisol levels. However, leukocyte distributional sensitivity to endogenous glucocorticoids was abrogated in individuals reporting either occasional or frequent experiences of subjective social isolation. This finding held in both nonparametric univariate analyses and in multivariate linear models controlling for a variety of biological, social, behavioral, and psychological confounders. The present results suggest that social factors may alter immune cell sensitivity to physiologic regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in ways that could ultimately contribute to the increased physical health risks associated with social isolation. PMID:18394861

  20. CHLORPYRIFOS DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY: INTERACTION WITH GLUCOCORTICOIDS IN PC12 CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Theodore A.; Card, Jennifer; Seidler, Frederic J.

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal coexposures to glucocorticoids and organophosphate pesticides are widespread. Glucocorticoids are elevated by maternal stress and are commonly given in preterm labor; organophosphate exposures are virtually ubiquitous. We used PC12 cells undergoing neurodifferentiation in order to assess whether dexamethasone enhances the developmental neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos, focusing on concentrations relevant to human exposures. By themselves, each agent reduced the number of cells and the combined exposure elicited a correspondingly greater effect than with either agent alone. There was no general cytotoxicity, as cell growth was actually enhanced, and again, the combined treatment evoked greater cellular hypertrophy than with the individual compounds. The effects on neurodifferentiation were more complex. Chlorpyrifos alone had a promotional effect on neuri to genesis whereas dexamethasone impaired it; combined treatment showed an overall impairment greater than that seen with dexamethasone alone. The effect of chlorpyrifos on differentiation into specific neurotransmitter phenotypes was shifted by dexamethasone. Either agent alone promoted differentiation into the dopaminergic phenotype at the expense of the cholinergic phenotype. However, in dexamethasone-primed cells, chlorpyrifos actually enhanced cholinergic neurodifferentiation instead of suppressing this phenotype. Our results indicate that developmental exposure to glucocorticoids, either in the context of stress or the therapy of preterm labor, could enhance the developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphates and potentially of other neurotoxicants, as well as producing neurobehavioral outcomes distinct from those seen with either individual agent. PMID:22796634

  1. Cannabinoids and glucocorticoids modulate emotional memory after stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akirav, Irit

    2013-12-01

    Bidirectional and functional relationships between glucocorticoids and the endocannabinoid system have been demonstrated. Here, I review the interaction between the endocannabinoid and glucocorticoid/stress systems. Specifically, stress is known to produce rapid changes in endocannabinoid signaling in stress-responsive brain regions. In turn, the endocannabinoid system plays an important role in the downregulation and habituation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity in response to stress. Glucocorticoids also recruit the endocannabinoid system to exert rapid negative feedback control of the HPA axis during stress. It became increasingly clear, however, that cannabinoid CB1 receptors are also abundantly expressed in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and other limbic regions where they modulate emotional arousal effects on memory. Enhancing cannabinoids signaling using exogenous CB1 receptor agonists prevent the effects of acute stress on emotional memory. I propose a model suggesting that the ameliorating effects of exogenously administered cannabinoids on emotional learning after acute stress are mediated by the decrease in the activity of the HPA axis via GABAergic mechanisms in the amygdala. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of NAD(P)H:quininone oxidoreductase by glucocorticoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinaire, J.A.; Xiao, G.-H.; Falkner, K.C.; Prough, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies in neonatal and adolescent rats as well as adrenalectomized rats have demonstrated that glucocorticoids regulate the expression of the rat NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase gene (QOR). We used primary cultures of rat adult hepatocytes to document that added glucorticoids repress both the basal and 1,2-benzanthracene-induced expression of QOR mRNA by 65-70%. QOR enzyme activity and protein were concomitantly suppressed as well. The monotonic concentration response for repression of QOR gene products up to 100 μM DEX concentration demonstrated that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was most likely involved in this process. The lack of effect at higher concentration rules out a role for the Pregnane X receptor in this regulation by DEX. In addition, the anti-glucorticoid RU38486 blocked this negative regulation and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide had no effect on this repression process. Similar results of GR dependence were observed using a luciferase reporter construct containing the 5'-flanking region of the human QOR gene using HepG2 cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that GR must directly participate in the negative regulation of QOR gene expression by dexamethasone and other glucocorticoids in vivo

  3. Effects of Social Isolation on Glucocorticoid Regulation in Social Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkley, Louise C.; Cole, Steve W.; Capitanio, John P.; Norman, Greg J.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and glucocorticoids have been well conserved across vertebrate species. Glucocorticoids influence a wide range of physiological functions that include glucose regulation, metabolism, inflammatory control, as well as cardiovascular, reproductive, and neuronal effects. Some of these are relatively quick-acting non-genomic effects, but most are slower-acting genomic effects. Thus, any stimulus that affects HPA function has the potential to exert wide-ranging short-term and long-term effects on much of vertebrate physiology. Here, we review the effects of social isolation on the functioning of the HPA axis in social species, and on glucocorticoid physiology in social mammals in particular. Evidence indicates that objective and perceived social isolation alter HPA regulation, although the nature and direction of the HPA response differs among species and across age. The inconsistencies in the direction and nature of HPA effects have implications for drawing cross-species conclusions about the effects of social isolation, and are particularly problematic for understanding HPA-related physiological processes in humans. The animal and human data are incommensurate because, for example, animal studies of objective isolation have typically not been modeled on, or for comparability with, the subjective experience of isolation in humans. An animal model of human isolation must be taken more seriously if we want to advance our understanding of the mechanisms for the effects of objective and perceived isolation in humans. PMID:22663934

  4. α-fetoprotein involvement during glucocorticoid-induced precocious maturation in rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Sun, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Dong, Dan; Du, Jun; Gu, Luo; Ge, Ying-Bin

    2011-06-28

    To investigate the role of α-fetoprotein (AFP), a cancer-associated fetal glycoprotein, in glucocorticoid-induced precocious maturation in rat colon. Colons from suckling Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Corticosterone acetate at a dose of 100 μg/g body weight was given to normal pups on days 7, 9 and 11 after birth to induce hypercorticoidism. Control animals were injected with identical volumes of normal saline. Some rats receiving corticosterone 7 d after birth were also treated with mifepristone (RU38486), a glucocorticoid cytoplasm receptor antagonist to investigate the effects of glucocorticoids (GCs). The morphological changes of the crypt depth and villous height of the villous zone in colon were observed as indices of colon maturation. Expression levels of AFP in colons were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. To identify the cellular localization of AFP in developing rat colons, double-immunofluorescent staining was performed using antibodies to specific mesenchymal cell marker and AFP. Corticosterone increased the crypt depth and villous height in the colon of 8- and 10-d-old rats with hypercorticoidism compared with that in the control animals (120% in 8-d-old rats and 118% in 10-d-old rats in villous height, P = 0.021; 145% in 8-d-old rats and 124% in 10-d-old rats in crypt depth, P = 0.017). These increases were accompanied by an increase of AFP expression in both mRNA and protein (2.5-folds in 8-d-old and 2.5-folds in 10-d-old rats higher than in control animals, P = 0.035; 1.8-folds in 8-d-old and 1.3-folds in 10-d-old rats higher than in control animals, P = 0.023). Increased crypt depth and villous height and increased expression of AFP in the colon of rats with hypercorticoidism were blocked by mifepristone. Both had positive staining for AFP or vimentin, and overlapped in mesenchymal cells at each tested colon. GCs promote the development of rat colon. AFP appears to be involved, in

  5. The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    of 3 months without treatment. Group 3 was left untreated and served as controls. All sheep received a restricted diet with low calcium and phosphorus. At sacrifice, cortical bone samples from the femur midshaft of each sheep were harvested, micro-CT scanned and subjected to three-point bending...... and tensile strength testing. Bone collagen and mineral were determined. Cortical porosity was significantly increased in the glucocorticoid-2 compared with the glucocorticoid-1 and control groups. Apparent density was significantly decreased in the glucocorticoid-2 compared with the glucocorticoid-1 group....... Collagen content was significantly increased in the glucocorticoid-2 compared with the glucocorticoid-1 and control groups. Bone mineral content did not differ between the groups. Neither the three-point bending mechanical properties nor the tensile mechanical properties differed significantly between...

  6. A new factor from enteric bacteria of rats amplifying induction of liver enzyme by glucocorticoid. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Hiroshi; Higashi, Takao; Katanuma, Nobuhiko

    1977-01-01

    1) An amplifier of the action of glucocorticoid was purified from Proteus mirabilis as described previously. It was found that it amplified the induction of liver tyrosine aminotransferase by dexamethasone markedly with doses of dexamethasone that caused minimal enzyme induction, but had little effect with doses that caused maximal induction. Thus the amplification may represent a saving of glucocorticoid. The amplification of enzyme activity was brought about by increase in amount of enzyme. 2) The amplification was observed when the amplifier was administered before or with dexamethasone, but not when it was given 2 h after dexamethasone. These results and the finding that actinomycin D inhibited the amplification indicate that the amplifier does not act on the translational level of enzyme induction. 3) It was found that the amplifier increased both incorporation of [ 3 H]dexamethasone into the cytosol and binding of [ 3 H]dexamethasone to cytosol protein and that it decreased decay of the [ 3 H]dexamethasone protein complex. (orig.) [de

  7. Science review: Mechanisms of impaired adrenal function in sepsis and molecular actions of glucocorticoids

    OpenAIRE

    Prigent, Hélène; Maxime, Virginie; Annane, Djillali

    2004-01-01

    This review describes current knowledge on the mechanisms that underlie glucocorticoid insufficiency in sepsis and the molecular action of glucocorticoids. In patients with severe sepsis, numerous factors predispose to glucocorticoid insufficiency, including drugs, coagulation disorders and inflammatory mediators. These factors may compromise the hypothalamic–pituitary axis (i.e. secondary adrenal insufficiency) or the adrenal glands (i.e. primary adrenal failure), or may impair glucocorticoi...

  8. Glucocorticoids and Preterm Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury: The Good and the Bad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bennet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses at risk of premature delivery are now routinely exposed to maternal treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids. In randomized clinical trials, these substantially reduce acute neonatal systemic morbidity, and mortality, after premature birth and reduce intraventricular hemorrhage. However, the overall neurodevelopmental impact is surprisingly unclear; worryingly, postnatal glucocorticoids are consistently associated with impaired brain development. We review the clinical and experimental evidence on how glucocorticoids may affect the developing brain and highlight the need for systematic research.

  9. Assignment of the human gene for the glucocorticoid receptor to chromosome 5.

    OpenAIRE

    Gehring, U; Segnitz, B; Foellmer, B; Francke, U

    1985-01-01

    Human lymphoblastic leukemia cells of line CEM-C7 are glucocroticoid-sensitive and contain glucocorticoid receptors of wild-type characteristics. EL4 mouse lymphoma cells are resistant to lysis by glucocorticoids due to mutant receptors that exhibit abnormal DNA binding. Hybrids between the two cell lines were prepared and analyzed with respect to glucocorticoid responsiveness and to receptor types by DNA-cellulose chromatrography. Sensitive hybrid cell clones contained the CEM-C7-specific re...

  10. Cumulative keyboard strokes: a possible risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheriou Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contradictory reports have been published regarding the association of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS and the use of computer keyboard. Previous studies did not take into account the cumulative exposure to keyboard strokes among computer workers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cumulative keyboard use (keyboard strokes and CTS. Methods Employees (461 from a Governmental data entry & processing unit agreed to participate (response rate: 84.1 % in a cross-sectional study. Α questionnaire was distributed to the participants to obtain information on socio-demographics and risk factors for CTS. The participants were examined for signs and symptoms related to CTS and were asked if they had previous history or surgery for CTS. The cumulative amount of the keyboard strokes per worker per year was calculated by the use of payroll’s registry. Two case definitions for CTS were used. The first included subjects with personal history/surgery for CTS while the second included subjects that belonged to the first case definition plus those participants were identified through clinical examination. Results Multivariate analysis used for both case definitions, indicated that those employees with high cumulative exposure to keyboard strokes were at increased risk of CTS (case definition A: OR = 2.23;95 % CI = 1.09-4.52 and case definition B: OR = 2.41; 95%CI = 1.36-4.25. A dose response pattern between cumulative exposure to keyboard strokes and CTS has been revealed (p  Conclusions The present study indicated a possible association between cumulative exposure to keyboard strokes and development of CTS. Cumulative exposure to key-board strokes would be taken into account as an exposure indicator regarding exposure assessment of computer workers. Further research is needed in order to test the results of the current study and assess causality between cumulative keyboard strokes and

  11. Clinical observation of alprostadil combined with glucocorticoids on acute optic neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Shun Fan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the clinical effect of alprostadil combined with glucocorticoids in the treatment of acute optic neuritis(AON.METHODS: Seventy patients(70 eyeswith AON from January, 2012 to June, 2014 were randomly divided into two groups. 35 patients in observation group were used 10ug alprostadil with 10mL normal saline(NSby intravenous injection, once/d for 7d/one treatment course, and 10mL NS was used by intravenous injection in 35 patients of control group. Besides, the two groups were treated with the combined therapy as follows: 20mg methylprednisolone was injected periglomerularly beside the eyeballs, once /3d for 3 times; 800~1 000mg of methylprednisolone through intravenous drip for 3d, once/d; after 3d, oral administration of prednisone acetate for 1wk, 1mg/(kg·d; after 1wk, the dose decreased to 5mg/wk until withdraw. Simultaneously, oral administration of ranitidine capsules, calcium carbonate and vitamin D3 tablets were combined in the supportive treament. The differences of curative effect between two groups were comparatively analyzed.RESULTS: In the observation group, 25 eyes(71.4%were markedly effective, 7 eyes(20.0%were valid and 3 eyes(8.6%were invalid, and the total effective rate was 91.4%. In the control group, 15 eyes(42.9%were markedly effective, 14 eyes(40.0%were valid and 6 eyes(17.1%were invalid, and the total effective rate was 82.9%. The difference of total effective rate between the two groups was not statistically significant(P=0.477, but there was a significant difference in markedly effective rate between the two groups(χ2=5.833, P=0.016.CONCLUSION: Alprostadil combined with glucocorticoids is effective for AON, and it is worth of advocation.

  12. Glucocorticoid suppression of human lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Influence of phytohemagglutinin concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segel, G.B.; Lukacher, A.; Gordon, B.R.; Lichtman, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to suppress lectin-stimulated lymphocyte DNA synthesis in some studies, whereas in other studies, the hormones have had little effect. We have found that the position on the PHA dose-response curve that is studied is the most important determinant of whether cortisol inhibits 3 H-thymidine incorporation into lymphocyte DNA. The proportion of monocytes in culture also influenced the cortisol effect, but it was quantitatively less important than PHA concentration. Cortisol (5 nM to 100 μM) had little effect on blastogenesis or thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures that contained both a high concentration (14% +- 2 (S.E.)) of monocytes and a concentration of PHA (0.6 to 1.2 μg/ml) that produced maximal stimulation of mitogenesis. When monocytes were reduced from 14 to 1.4%, cortisol (5 μM) caused a 30% reduction in thymidine incorporation in cultures stimulated by 0.6 to 1.2 μg/ml PHA. Much greater cortisol suppression of thymidine incorporation occurred if the concentration of PHA was reduced. For example, reduction of the PHA concentration from 1.2 to 0.075 μg/ml resulted in an increase in suppression by 5 μM cortisol from 5 to 90% even in the presence of 14% monocytes. These data indicate that the suppressive effects of glucocorticoids on blastogenesis and thymidine incorporation in vitro depend principally on the concentration of PHA used to stimulate blastogenesis and secondarily on the proportion of monocytes in the culture system

  13. Vertebral fractures assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in patients with Addison's disease on glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camozzi, Valentina; Betterle, Corrado; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Zaccariotto, Veronica; Zaninotto, Martina; De Caneva, Erica; Lucato, Paola; Gomiero, Walter; Garelli, Silvia; Sabbadin, Chiara; Salvà, Monica; Costa, Miriam Dalla; Boscaro, Marco; Luisetto, Giovanni

    2018-02-01

    to assess bone damage and metabolic abnormalities in patients with Addison's disease given replacement doses of glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. A total of 87 patients and 81 age-matched and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. The following parameters were measured: urinary cortisol, serum calcium, phosphorus, creatinine, 24-h urinary calcium excretion, bone alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, serum CrossLaps, 25 hydroxyvitamin D, and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D. Clear vertebral images were obtained with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 61 Addison's disease patients and 47 controls and assessed using Genant's classification. Nineteen Addison's disease patients (31.1%) had at least one morphometric vertebral fracture, as opposed to six controls (12.8%, odds ratio 3.09, 95% confidence interval 1.12-8.52). There were no significant differences in bone mineral density parameters at any site between patients and controls. In Addison's disease patients, there was a positive correlation between urinary cortisol and urinary calcium excretion. Patients with fractures had a longer history of disease than those without fractures. Patients taking fludrocortisone had a higher bone mineral density than untreated patients at all sites except the lumbar spine. Addison's disease patients have more fragile bones irrespective of any decrease in bone mineral density. Supra-physiological doses of glucocorticoids and longer-standing disease (with a consequently higher glucocorticoid intake) might be the main causes behind patients' increased bone fragility. Associated mineralocorticoid treatment seems to have a protective effect on bone mineral density.

  14. Sharing a quota on cumulative carbon emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupach, Michael R.; Davis, Steven J.; Peters, Glen P.; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Ciais, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Any limit on future global warming is associated with a quota on cumulative global CO 2 emissions. We translate this global carbon quota to regional and national scales, on a spectrum of sharing principles that extends from continuation of the present distribution of emissions to an equal per-capita distribution of cumulative emissions. A blend of these endpoints emerges as the most viable option. For a carbon quota consistent with a 2 C warming limit (relative to pre-industrial levels), the necessary long-term mitigation rates are very challenging (typically over 5% per year), both because of strong limits on future emissions from the global carbon quota and also the likely short-term persistence in emissions growth in many regions. (authors)

  15. Complexity and demographic explanations of cumulative culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querbes, Adrien; Vaesen, Krist; Houkes, Wybo

    2014-01-01

    Formal models have linked prehistoric and historical instances of technological change (e.g., the Upper Paleolithic transition, cultural loss in Holocene Tasmania, scientific progress since the late nineteenth century) to demographic change. According to these models, cumulation of technological complexity is inhibited by decreasing--while favoured by increasing--population levels. Here we show that these findings are contingent on how complexity is defined: demography plays a much more limited role in sustaining cumulative culture in case formal models deploy Herbert Simon's definition of complexity rather than the particular definitions of complexity hitherto assumed. Given that currently available empirical evidence doesn't afford discriminating proper from improper definitions of complexity, our robustness analyses put into question the force of recent demographic explanations of particular episodes of cultural change.

  16. Complexity and demographic explanations of cumulative culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Querbes

    Full Text Available Formal models have linked prehistoric and historical instances of technological change (e.g., the Upper Paleolithic transition, cultural loss in Holocene Tasmania, scientific progress since the late nineteenth century to demographic change. According to these models, cumulation of technological complexity is inhibited by decreasing--while favoured by increasing--population levels. Here we show that these findings are contingent on how complexity is defined: demography plays a much more limited role in sustaining cumulative culture in case formal models deploy Herbert Simon's definition of complexity rather than the particular definitions of complexity hitherto assumed. Given that currently available empirical evidence doesn't afford discriminating proper from improper definitions of complexity, our robustness analyses put into question the force of recent demographic explanations of particular episodes of cultural change.

  17. Conceptual models for cumulative risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Stephen H; Sexton, Ken

    2011-12-01

    In the absence of scientific consensus on an appropriate theoretical framework, cumulative risk assessment and related research have relied on speculative conceptual models. We argue for the importance of theoretical backing for such models and discuss 3 relevant theoretical frameworks, each supporting a distinctive "family" of models. Social determinant models postulate that unequal health outcomes are caused by structural inequalities; health disparity models envision social and contextual factors acting through individual behaviors and biological mechanisms; and multiple stressor models incorporate environmental agents, emphasizing the intermediary role of these and other stressors. The conclusion is that more careful reliance on established frameworks will lead directly to improvements in characterizing cumulative risk burdens and accounting for disproportionate adverse health effects.

  18. Childhood Cumulative Risk and Later Allostatic Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doan, Stacey N; Dich, Nadya; Evans, Gary W

    2014-01-01

    State, followed for 8 years (between the ages 9 and 17). Poverty- related stress was computed using the cumulative risk approach, assessing stressors across 9 domains, including environmental, psychosocial, and demographic factors. Allostatic load captured a range of physiological responses, including......Objective: The present study investigated the long-term impact of exposure to poverty-related stressors during childhood on allostatic load, an index of physiological dysregulation, and the potential mediating role of substance use. Method: Participants (n = 162) were rural children from New York...... cardiovascular, hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal medullary system, and metabolic activity. Smoking and alcohol/drug use were tested as mediators of the hypothesized childhood risk-adolescent allostatic load relationship. Results: Cumulative risk exposure at age 9 predicted increases...

  19. Fuzzy set theory for cumulative trauma prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Daniel J.; Merritt, Thomas W.; Moynihan, Gary P.

    2001-01-01

    A widely used fuzzy reasoning algorithm was modified and implemented via an expert system to assess the potential risk of employee repetitive strain injury in the workplace. This fuzzy relational model, known as the Priority First Cover Algorithm (PFC), was adapted to describe the relationship between 12 cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs) of the upper extremity, and 29 identified risk factors. The algorithm, which finds a suboptimal subset from a group of variables based on the criterion of...

  20. Sikap Kerja Duduk Terhadap Cumulative Trauma Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmawati, Yulita; Sugiharto, -

    2011-01-01

    Permasalahan yang diteliti adalah adakah hubungan antara sikap kerja duduk dengan kejadian Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD) pada pekerja bagian pengamplasan di PT. Geromar Jepara. Tujuan yang ingin dicapai adalah untuk mengetahui hubungan antara sikap kerja duduk dengan kejadian CTD pada pekerja bagian pengamplasan. Metode penelitian ini bersifat explanatory dengan menggunakan pendekatan belah lintang. Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah pekerja bagian pengamplasan sebanyak 30 orang. Teknik ...

  1. Power Reactor Docket Information. Annual cumulation (citations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    An annual cumulation of the citations to the documentation associated with civilian nuclear power plants is presented. This material is that which is submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of applications for construction and operating licenses. Citations are listed by Docket number in accession number sequence. The Table of Contents is arranged both by Docket number and by nuclear power plant name

  2. Cumulative Effect of Depression on Dementia Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Olazarán, J.; Trincado, R.; Bermejo-Pareja, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To analyze a potential cumulative effect of life-time depression on dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), with control of vascular factors (VFs). Methods. This study was a subanalysis of the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES) study. Past and present depression, VFs, dementia status, and dementia due to AD were documented at study inception. Dementia status was also documented after three years. Four groups were created according to baseline data: never depression (n...

  3. Cumulative release to the accessible environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanehiro, B.

    1985-01-01

    The Containment and Isolation Working Group considered issues related to the postclosure behavior of repositories in crystalline rock. This working group was further divided into subgroups to consider the progress since the 1978 GAIN Symposium and identify research needs in the individual areas of regional ground-water flow, ground-water travel time, fractional release, and cumulative release. The analysis and findings of the Fractional Release Subgroup are presented

  4. EPA Workshop on Epigenetics and Cumulative Risk ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agenda Download the Workshop Agenda (PDF) The workshop included presentations and discussions by scientific experts pertaining to three topics (i.e., epigenetic changes associated with diverse stressors, key science considerations in understanding epigenetic changes, and practical application of epigenetic tools to address cumulative risks from environmental stressors), to address several questions under each topic, and included an opportunity for attendees to participate in break-out groups, provide comments and ask questions. Workshop Goals The workshop seeks to examine the opportunity for use of aggregate epigenetic change as an indicator in cumulative risk assessment for populations exposed to multiple stressors that affect epigenetic status. Epigenetic changes are specific molecular changes around DNA that alter expression of genes. Epigenetic changes include DNA methylation, formation of histone adducts, and changes in micro RNAs. Research today indicates that epigenetic changes are involved in many chronic diseases (cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, mental health disorders, and asthma). Research has also linked a wide range of stressors including pollution and social factors with occurrence of epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic changes have the potential to reflect impacts of risk factors across multiple stages of life. Only recently receiving attention is the nexus between the factors of cumulative exposure to environmental

  5. Higher order cumulants in colorless partonic plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherif, S. [Sciences and Technologies Department, University of Ghardaia, Ghardaia, Algiers (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique et de Mathématiques Appliquées (LPMA), ENS-Kouba (Bachir El-Ibrahimi), Algiers (Algeria); Ahmed, M. A. A. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Taibah University Al-Madinah Al-Mounawwarah KSA (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Taiz University in Turba, Taiz (Yemen); Laboratoire de Physique et de Mathématiques Appliquées (LPMA), ENS-Kouba (Bachir El-Ibrahimi), Algiers (Algeria); Ladrem, M., E-mail: mladrem@yahoo.fr [Department of Physics, College of Science, Taibah University Al-Madinah Al-Mounawwarah KSA (Saudi Arabia); Laboratoire de Physique et de Mathématiques Appliquées (LPMA), ENS-Kouba (Bachir El-Ibrahimi), Algiers (Algeria)

    2016-06-10

    Any physical system considered to study the QCD deconfinement phase transition certainly has a finite volume, so the finite size effects are inevitably present. This renders the location of the phase transition and the determination of its order as an extremely difficult task, even in the simplest known cases. In order to identify and locate the colorless QCD deconfinement transition point in finite volume T{sub 0}(V), a new approach based on the finite-size cumulant expansion of the order parameter and the ℒ{sub m,n}-Method is used. We have shown that both cumulants of higher order and their ratios, associated to the thermodynamical fluctuations of the order parameter, in QCD deconfinement phase transition behave in a particular enough way revealing pronounced oscillations in the transition region. The sign structure and the oscillatory behavior of these in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition point might be a sensitive probe and may allow one to elucidate their relation to the QCD phase transition point. In the context of our model, we have shown that the finite volume transition point is always associated to the appearance of a particular point in whole higher order cumulants under consideration.

  6. Cumulative irritation potential of topical retinoid formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyden, James J; Grossman, Rachel; Nighland, Marge

    2008-08-01

    Localized irritation can limit treatment success with topical retinoids such as tretinoin and adapalene. The factors that influence irritant reactions have been shown to include individual skin sensitivity, the particular retinoid and concentration used, and the vehicle formulation. To compare the cutaneous tolerability of tretinoin 0.04% microsphere gel (TMG) with that of adapalene 0.3% gel and a standard tretinoin 0.025% cream. The results of 2 randomized, investigator-blinded studies of 2 to 3 weeks' duration, which utilized a split-face method to compare cumulative irritation scores induced by topical retinoids in subjects with healthy skin, were combined. Study 1 compared TMG 0.04% with adapalene 0.3% gel over 2 weeks, while study 2 compared TMG 0.04% with tretinoin 0.025% cream over 3 weeks. In study 1, TMG 0.04% was associated with significantly lower cumulative scores for erythema, dryness, and burning/stinging than adapalene 0.3% gel. However, in study 2, there were no significant differences in cumulative irritation scores between TMG 0.04% and tretinoin 0.025% cream. Measurements of erythema by a chromameter showed no significant differences between the test formulations in either study. Cutaneous tolerance of TMG 0.04% on the face was superior to that of adapalene 0.3% gel and similar to that of a standard tretinoin cream containing a lower concentration of the drug (0.025%).

  7. Raised urinary glucocorticoid and adrenal androgen precursors in the urine of young hypertensive patients: possible evidence for partial glucocorticoid resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, W; Yousufuddin, M; Francis, D; Gualdiero, P; Honour, J; Anker, S; Coats, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate urinary glucocorticoid excretion profiles in a cohort of recently diagnosed young hypertensive patients.
METHODS—After excluding patients with secondary causes, 60 individuals with premature hypertension were recruited (diagnosed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring before the age of 36 years). In addition, 30 older hypertensive controls (age of onset > 36 years, "middle aged hypertensive controls"), and 30 normal controls (age matched to the young hypertensive group) were studied. All provided 24 hour urine collections for mass spectrometry for total cortisol metabolites and total androgen metabolites by gas chromatography.
RESULTS—Among male patients, those with premature hypertension had higher total urinary excretion of cortisol metabolites (mean (SD), 13 332 (6472) µg/day) than age matched normal controls (7270 (1788) µg/day; p = 0.00001) or middle aged hypertensive controls (8315 (3565) µg/day; p = 0.002). A similar increase was seen among the female patients, although the absolute concentrations were lower. There was no significant difference between middle aged hypertensive patients and normal controls. Urinary total androgen excretion profiles in female patients also showed an unusual increase in the premature hypertension group (2958 (1672) µg/day) compared with the other groups (middle aged hypertensive controls, 1373 (748) µg/day, p = 0.0003; normal controls, 1687 (636) µg/day, p = 0.002). In all subjects, serum sodium and creatinine concentrations were within the normal range; serum potassium concentrations were found to be low before the start of treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—Individuals presenting with premature hypertension have an abnormally high excretion of glucocorticoid metabolites in the urine. While the mechanism remains uncertain, these findings are compatible with partial resistance of the glucocorticoid receptors, with a compensatory increase in cortisol and androgen

  8. Nicotinic Acid-Mediated Activation of Both Membrane and Nuclear Receptors towards Therapeutic Glucocorticoid Mimetics for Treating Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Todd Penberthy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute attacks of multiple sclerosis (MS are most commonly treated with glucocorticoids, which can provide life-saving albeit only temporary symptomatic relief. The mechanism of action (MOA is now known to involve induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and interleukin-10 (IL-10, where IL-10 requires subsequent heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1 induction. Ectopic expression studies reveal that even small changes in expression of IDO, HMOX-1, or mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2 can prevent demyelination in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE animal models of MS. An alternative to glucocorticoids is needed for a long-term treatment of MS. A distinctly short list of endogenous activators of both membrane G-protein-coupled receptors and nuclear peroxisome proliferating antigen receptors (PPARs demonstrably ameliorate EAE pathogenesis by MOAs resembling that of glucocorticoids. These dual activators and potential MS therapeutics include endocannabinoids and the prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2. Nicotinamide profoundly ameliorates and prevents autoimmune-mediated demyelination in EAE via maintaining levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, without activating PPAR nor any G-protein-coupled receptor. By comparison, nicotinic acid provides even greater levels of NAD than nicotinamide in many tissues, while additionally activating the PPAR-dependent pathway already shown to provide relief in animal models of MS after activation of GPR109a/HM74a. Thus nicotinic acid is uniquely suited for providing therapeutic relief in MS. However nicotinic acid is unexamined in MS research. Nicotinic acid penetrates the blood brain barrier, cures pellagric dementia, has been used for over 50 years clinically without toxicity, and raises HDL concentrations to a greater degree than any pharmaceutical, thus providing unparalleled benefits against lipodystrophy. Summary analysis reveals that the expected therapeutic benefits of high-dose nicotinic

  9. Increase of glucocorticoids is not required for the acquisition, but hinders the extinction, of lithium-induced conditioned taste aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Nam; Kim, Bom-Taeck; Kim, Young-Sang; Lee, Jong-Ho; Jahng, Jeong Won

    2014-05-05

    Lithium chloride at doses sufficient to induce conditioned taste aversion (CTA) causes c-Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus and increases the plasma level of corticosterone with activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This study was conducted to define the role of glucocorticoid in the acquisition and extinction of lithium-induced CTA. In experiment 1, Sprague-Dawley rats received dexamethasone (2mg/kg) or RU486 (20mg/kg) immediately after 5% sucrose access, and then an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic lithium chloride (12ml/kg) was followed with 30min interval. Rats had either 1 or 7 days of recovery period before the daily sucrose drinking tests. In experiment 2, rats were conditioned with the sucrose-lithium pairing, and then received dexamethasone or vehicle at 30min before each drinking test. In experiment 3, adrenalectomized (ADX or ADX+B) rats were subjected to sucrose drinking tests after the sucrose-lithium pairing. Dexamethasone, but not RU486, pretreatment blunted the formation of lithium-induced CTA memory. Dexamethasone prior to each drinking test suppressed sucrose consumption and prolonged the extinction of lithium-induced CTA. Sucrose consumption was significantly suppressed not only in ADX+B rats but also in ADX rats during the first drinking session; however, a significant decrease was found only in ADX rats on the fourth drinking session. These results reveal that glucocorticoid is not a necessary component in the acquisition, but an important player in the extinction, of lithium-induced CTA, and suggest that a pulse increase of glucocorticoid may hinder the extinction memory formation of lithium-induced CTA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on epigenetic regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene in Holocaust survivor offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P; Lehrner, Amy; Desarnaud, Frank; Bader, Heather N; Makotkine, Iouri; Flory, Janine D; Bierer, Linda M; Meaney, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Differential effects of maternal and paternal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been observed in adult offspring of Holocaust survivors in both glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and vulnerability to psychiatric disorder. The authors examined the relative influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on DNA methylation of the exon 1F promoter of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR-1F) gene (NR3C1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and its relationship to glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity in Holocaust offspring. Adult offspring with at least one Holocaust survivor parent (N=80) and demographically similar participants without parental Holocaust exposure or parental PTSD (N=15) completed clinical interviews, self-report measures, and biological procedures. Blood samples were collected for analysis of GR-1F promoter methylation and of cortisol levels in response to low-dose dexamethasone, and two-way analysis of covariance was performed using maternal and paternal PTSD as main effects. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to permit visualization of maternal compared with paternal PTSD effects on clinical variables and GR-1F promoter methylation. A significant interaction demonstrated that in the absence of maternal PTSD, offspring with paternal PTSD showed higher GR-1F promoter methylation, whereas offspring with both maternal and paternal PTSD showed lower methylation. Lower GR-1F promoter methylation was significantly associated with greater postdexamethasone cortisol suppression. The clustering analysis revealed that maternal and paternal PTSD effects were differentially associated with clinical indicators and GR-1F promoter methylation. This is the first study to demonstrate alterations of GR-1F promoter methylation in relation to parental PTSD and neuroendocrine outcomes. The moderation of paternal PTSD effects by maternal PTSD suggests different mechanisms for the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related vulnerabilities.

  11. Cushing’s glucocorticoid syndrome in the practice of a rheumatologist (A review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs are used to treat different inflammatory and autoimmune diseases due to their anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory properties. However, GC may lead to the development of many adverse reactions (ARs: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, lipid metabolic disturbances, sleep apnea, osteoporosis, myopathy, and coagulation and fibrinolysis disorders, which are components of the Itsenko – Cushing syndrome. ARs induced by GCs are known to depend on their composition, route of administration, dose, and duration of treatment. However, the major pathogenic mechanisms of ARs are not clearly defined. There is evidence suggesting a role for imbalance between vasoconstrictionand vasodilation, and its possible association with nitric oxide, prostanoids (prostaglandins, prostacyclin, and thromboxane, angiotensin II, vasopressin, arginine, endothelins, catecholamines, neuropeptides Y, and atrial natriuretic peptide. Enhanced oxidative stress, activated reninangiotensin system, escalating pressor response, metabolic syndrome, and sleep apnea also make their contribution. It could be ideal to discontinue GC treatment; but this is most commonly impossible because of a further disease exacerbation. In addition, it is necessary to carefully plan the choice of the dose, time, and route of administration of GCs and to evaluate each AR. The design of a GC with marked anti-inflammatory activity and insignificant metabolic effects must hold a central position in its researches.

  12. Cushing’s glucocorticoid syndrome in the practice of a rheumatologist (A review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs are used to treat different inflammatory and autoimmune diseases due to their anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory properties. However, GC may lead to the development of many adverse reactions (ARs: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, lipid metabolic disturbances, sleep apnea, osteoporosis, myopathy, and coagulation and fibrinolysis disorders, which are components of the Itsenko – Cushing syndrome. ARs induced by GCs are known to depend on their composition, route of administration, dose, and duration of treatment. However, the major pathogenic mechanisms of ARs are not clearly defined. There is evidence suggesting a role for imbalance between vasoconstrictionand vasodilation, and its possible association with nitric oxide, prostanoids (prostaglandins, prostacyclin, and thromboxane, angiotensin II, vasopressin, arginine, endothelins, catecholamines, neuropeptides Y, and atrial natriuretic peptide. Enhanced oxidative stress, activated reninangiotensin system, escalating pressor response, metabolic syndrome, and sleep apnea also make their contribution. It could be ideal to discontinue GC treatment; but this is most commonly impossible because of a further disease exacerbation. In addition, it is necessary to carefully plan the choice of the dose, time, and route of administration of GCs and to evaluate each AR. The design of a GC with marked anti-inflammatory activity and insignificant metabolic effects must hold a central position in its researches.

  13. Glucocorticoid administration for Graves' hyperthyroidism treated by radioiodine. A questionnaire survey among members of the European Thyroid Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazarus, J. H.; Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Kahaly, G. J.; Krassas, G.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Baldeschi, L.; Boboridis, K.; Boschi, A.; Currò, N.; Daumerie, C.; Dickinson, A. J.; Eckstein, A.; Kendall-Taylor, P.; Lane, C. M.; Ludgate, M. E.; Mann, K.; Marinò, M.; Mourits, M. P.; Nardi, M.; Neoh, C.; Orgiazzi, J.; Pearce, S.; Perros, P.; Pinchera, A.; Pitz, S.; Salvi, M.; Sivelli, P.; Stahl, M.; von Arx, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glucocorticoid prophylaxis is required in some instances after radioiodine (RAI) treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism to prevent progression of Graves' orbitopathy (GO). However, no randomized clinical trial has been performed to ascertain the optimum glucocorticoid therapy. Aim and

  14. Glucocorticoid Effects on Memory Consolidation Depend on Functional Interactions between the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Basolateral Amygdala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McReynolds, Jayme R.; Van der Zee, Eddy A.; Lee, Sangkwan; McGaugh, James L.; McIntyre, Christa K.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) interacts with efferent brain regions in mediating glucocorticoid effects on memory consolidation. Here, we investigated whether glucocorticoid influences on the consolidation of memory for emotionally arousing

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheplyagina Larisa A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 has been suggested as a candidate gene affecting juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA course and prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the glucocorticoid receptor gene BclI polymorphism (rs41423247 in JIA patients, the gene's role in susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and its associations with JIA activity, course and bone mineralization. Methods One hundred twenty-two Caucasian children with JIA and 143 healthy ethnically matched controls were studied. We checked markers of clinical and laboratory activity: morning stiffness, Ritchie Articular Index (RAI, swollen joint count (SJC, tender joint count (TJC, physician's visual analog scale (VAS, hemoglobin level (Hb, leukocyte count (L, platelet count (Pl, Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, albumin, DAS and DAS28. Bone mineralization was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA of lumbar spine L1-L4. Assessments of bone metabolism included osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide (CTT, parathyroid hormone (PTH, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate and total alkaline phosphatase (TAP. BclI polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results No association was observed between glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and the presence or absence of JIA. In girls with JIA, the presence of the G allele was associated with an unfavorable arthritis course, a younger age of onset of arthritis (p = 0.0017, and higher inflammatory activity. The higher inflammatory activity was demonstrated by the following: increased time of morning stiffness (p = 0.02, VAS (p = 0.014, RAI (p = 0.048, DAS (p = 0.035, DAS28 (p = 0.05, Pl (p = 0.003, L (p = 0.046, CRP (p = 0.01. In addition, these patients had bone metabolism disturbances as follows: decreased BA (p = 0.0001, BMC (p = 0.00007, BMD (0.005 and Z score (p = 0.002; and

  16. Behavioral neuroadaptation to alcohol : from glucocorticoids to histone acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Beracochea

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A prime mechanism that contributes to the development and maintenance of alcoholism is the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity and the release of glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans and primates, corticosterone in rodents from the adrenal glands. In the brain, sustained, local elevation of glucocorticoid concentration even long after cessation of chronic alcohol consumption compromises functional integrity of a circuit including the prefrontal cortex, the hippocampus and the amygdala. These structures are implicated in learning and memory processes as well as in orchestrating neuroadaptive responses to stress and anxiety responses. Thus, potentiation of anxiety-related neuroadaptation by alcohol is characterized by an abnormally amygdala hyperactivity coupled with a hypofunction of the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. This review describes research on molecular and epigenetic mechanisms by which alcohol causes distinct region-specific adaptive changes in gene expression patterns and ultimately, leads to a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments on prefrontal- and hippocampal-based tasks. Alcohol-induced neuroadaptations involve the dysregulation of numerous signaling cascades, leading to long-term changes in transcriptional profiles of genes, through the actions of transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP response element binding protein and chromatin remodeling due to post-translational modifications of histone proteins. We describe the role of prefrontal-hippocampus-amygdala circuit in mediating the effects of acute and chronic alcohol on learning and memory, and region-specific molecular and epigenetic mechanisms involved in this process. This review first discusses the importance of brain region-specific dysregulation of glucocorticoid concentration in the development of alcohol dependence and describes on how persistently increased glucocorticoid levels in prefrontal cortex may be involved in

  17. Glucocorticoid resistance as a major drive in sepsis pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendoncker, Karen; Libert, Claude

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis is an acute systemic inflammatory disease. Glucocorticoids (GCs), which function by binding to the GC receptor GR have very powerful anti-inflammatory activities, yet they are hardly useful in sepsis. We can thus consider sepsis as a GC resistant disease. We here review the literature which has investigated this GC resistance, and summarize the mechanisms of GC resistance that have been observed in other diseases and in experimental models. We also discuss the importance of GC resistance in sepsis, in terms of the contribution of this phenomenon to the pathogenesis of sepsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A bivariate optimal replacement policy with cumulative repair cost ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Min-Tsai Lai

    Shock model; cumulative damage model; cumulative repair cost limit; preventive maintenance model. 1. Introduction ... with two types of shocks: one type is failure shock, and the other type is damage ...... Theory, methods and applications.

  19. Glucocorticoids Enhance Taste Aversion Memory via Actions in the Insular Cortex and Basolateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Maria Isabel; Quirarte, Gina L.; Rodriguez-Garcia, Gabriela; McGaugh, James L.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that glucocorticoid hormones strengthen the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent spatial and contextual memory. The present experiments investigated glucocorticoid effects on the long-term formation of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), an associative learning task that does not depend critically on hippocampal function.…

  20. Polymorphisms in the glucocorticoid receptor gene and their associations with metabolic parameters and body composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractMost actions of glucocorticoids (GCs) are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The interindividual response to GCs varies considerably, as demonstrated by a variable suppressive response to 0.25-mg dexamethasone (DEX). Several polymorphisms in the gene coding

  1. Investigation of radioprotective properties of synthetic antagonist of glucocorticoids RU 38 486

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejliev, A.A.; Zvonareva, N.B.; Zhivotovskij, B.D.; Khanson, K.P.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Leningrad

    1992-01-01

    Radioprotective properties of synthetic antiglucocorticoid RU 38 486 were investigated. It was demonstrated that this antigonist of glucocorticoids possesses radioprotective effect in vitro and in vivo systems. Radioprotective properties at molecular level exhibited in inhibition of postirradiation endonuclease activation and in prevention of internucleosome chromatin degradation. Involvement of cytosol glucocorticoid receptors in initiation of radiation-induced programmed cell death is discussed

  2. Fatal and non-fatal adverse events of glucocorticoid therapy for Graves' orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcocci, Claudio; Watt, Torquil; Altea, Maria Antonietta

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the side effects of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy observed by European thyroidologists during the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy (GO).......The objective of this study was to investigate the side effects of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy observed by European thyroidologists during the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy (GO)....

  3. Pulsatile thyrotropin secretion in patients with Addison's disease during variable glucocorticoid therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hangaard, J; Andersen, M; Grodum, E

    1996-01-01

    , increasing significantly (P glucocorticoids, when the pulse frequency was also significantly reduced (P ... of glucocorticoids on the TSH response to TRH, our data indicate that even physiological serum levels of cortisol have an influence on endogenous TSH secretion, probably caused by regulation of the pituitary sensitivity to TRH....

  4. Fecal glucocorticoid response to environmental stressors in green iguanas (Iguana iguana)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Timm, Jeanette; Ibsen, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of glucocorticoid metabolites in feces has been shown to be a powerful tool in evaluating well-being in vertebrates. Little is known however about the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis response to stressors, and consequent glucocorticoid excretion, in reptiles. In a longitudinal...

  5. Glucocorticoid metabolites in newborns: A marker for traffic noise related stress?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lech Cantuaria, Manuella; Usermann, Jakob; Proietti, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Traffic noise has been associated with an increased risk for several non-auditory health effects, which may be explained by a noise-induced release of stress hormones (e.g. glucocorticoids). Although several studies in children and adults have indicated an increased secretion of glucocorticoids...

  6. Maternal PTSD associates with greater glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring of Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrner, Amy; Bierer, Linda M; Passarelli, Vincent; Pratchett, Laura C; Flory, Janine D; Bader, Heather N; Harris, Iris R; Bedi, Aarti; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P; Makotkine, Iouri; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Intergenerational effects of trauma have been observed clinically in a wide range of populations, and parental PTSD has been associated with an increased risk for psychopathology in offspring. In studies of Holocaust survivor offspring, parental PTSD, and particularly maternal PTSD, has been associated with increased risk for PTSD, low basal urinary cortisol excretion and enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone. Such findings implicate maternally derived glucocorticoid programming in the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related consequences, potentially resulting from in utero influences or early life experiences. This study investigated the relative influence of Holocaust exposure and PTSD in mothers and fathers on glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring. Eighty Holocaust offspring and 15 offspring of non-exposed Jewish parents completed evaluations and provided blood and urine samples. Glucocorticoid sensitivity was evaluated using the lysozyme suppression test (LST), an in vitro measure of glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity in a peripheral tissue, the dexamethasone suppression test (DST), and 24-h urinary cortisol excretion. Maternal PTSD was associated with greater glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring across all three measures of glucocorticoid function. An interaction of maternal and paternal PTSD on the DST and 24-h urinary cortisol showed an effect of decreased glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring with paternal, but not maternal, PTSD. Although indirect, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that epigenetic programming may be involved in the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related effects on glucocorticoid regulation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. On interference of cumulative proton production mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, M.A.; Vechernin, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamical picture of the cumulative proton production in hA-collisions by means of diagram analysis with NN interaction described by a non-relativistic NN potential is considered. The contributions of the various mechanisms (spectator, direct and rescattering) for backward hemisphere proton production within the framework of this common approach is calculated. The emphasis is on the comparison of the relative contributions of these mechanisms for various angles, taking into account the interference of these contributions. Comparison with experimental data is also presented. (author)

  8. Preserved cumulative semantic interference despite amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Michael Oppenheim

    2015-05-01

    As predicted by Oppenheim et al’s (2010 implicit incremental learning account, WRP’s BCN RTs demonstrated strong (and significant repetition priming and semantic blocking effects (Figure 1. Similar to typical results from neurally intact undergraduates, WRP took longer to name pictures presented in semantically homogeneous blocks than in heterogeneous blocks, an effect that increased with each cycle. This result challenges accounts that ascribe cumulative semantic interference in this task to explicit memory mechanisms, instead suggesting that the effect has the sort of implicit learning bases that are typically spared in hippocampal amnesia.

  9. Is cumulated pyrethroid exposure associated with prediabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Rune; Jørs, Erik; Lander, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    was to investigate an association between exposure to pyrethroids and abnormal glucose regulation (prediabetes or diabetes). A cross-sectional study was performed among 116 pesticide sprayers from public vector control programs in Bolivia and 92 nonexposed controls. Pesticide exposure (duration, intensity...... pyrethroids, a significant positive trend was observed between cumulative pesticide exposure (total number of hours sprayed) and adjusted OR of abnormal glucose regulation, with OR 14.7 [0.9-235] in the third exposure quintile. The study found a severely increased prevalence of prediabetes among Bolivian...

  10. Chapter 19. Cumulative watershed effects and watershed analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie M. Reid

    1998-01-01

    Cumulative watershed effects are environmental changes that are affected by more than.one land-use activity and that are influenced by.processes involving the generation or transport.of water. Almost all environmental changes are.cumulative effects, and almost all land-use.activities contribute to cumulative effects

  11. Original and cumulative prospect theory: a discussion of empirical differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, P.P.; Fennema, H.

    1997-01-01

    This note discusses differences between prospect theory and cumulative prospect theory. It shows that cumulative prospect theory is not merely a formal correction of some theoretical problems in prospect theory, but it also gives different predictions. Experiments are described that favor cumulative

  12. Total brain, cortical and white matter volumes in children previously treated with glucocorticoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sara K; Madsen, Kathrine S; Vestergaard, Martin

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal exposure to glucocorticoids and elevated endogenous glucocorticoid-levels during childhood can have detrimental effects on the developing brain. Here, we examined the impact of glucocorticoid-treatment during childhood on brain volumes. METHODS: Thirty children and adolescents...... with rheumatic or nephrotic disease previously treated with glucocorticoids and 30 controls matched on age, sex, and parent education underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Total cortical grey and white matter, brain, and intracranial volume, and total cortical thickness and surface area were...... were mainly driven by the children with rheumatic disease. Total cortical thickness and cortical surface area did not significantly differ between groups. We found no significant associations between glucocorticoid-treatment variables and volumetric measures. CONCLUSION: Observed smaller total brain...

  13. Glucocorticoids maintain human osteoclasts in the active mode of their resorption cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Kent; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    that glucocorticoids deeply modify this resorptive behavior. First, glucocorticoids gradually induce excavations with a trenchlike morphology while reducing the time-dependent increase in excavation numbers. This indicates that glucocorticoids make osteoclasts elongate the excavations they initiated rather than...... migrating to a new resorption site, as in control conditions. Second, the round excavations in control conditions contain undegraded demineralized collagen as repeatedly reported earlier, whereas the excavations with a trenchlike morphology generated under glucocorticoid exposure appear devoid of leftovers...... of demineralized collagen. This indicates that collagenolysis proceeds generally at a lower rate than demineralization under control conditions, whereas collagenolysis rates are increased up to the level of demineralization rates in the presence of glucocorticoids. Taking these observations together leads...

  14. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0021 TITLE: A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...way it adapts is by upregulating another hormone receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which may compensate for diminished AR activity. The

  15. Expression and function of nuclear receptor coregulators in brain : understanding the cell-specific effects of glucocorticoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Siem van der

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the raising awareness of the role of glucocorticoids in the onset of numerous (neuro)-pathologies constitutes the increasing necessity of understanding the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in bodily processes and brain functioning. Glucocorticoids mediate their effects by binding

  16. Glucocorticoids exert context-dependent effects on cells of the joint in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Suzi H; Andreassen, Kim V; Christensen, Søren T

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to attenuate bone formation in vivo leading to decreased bone volume and increased risk of fractures, whereas effects on the joint tissue are less characterized. However, glucocorticoids appear to have a reducing effect on inflammation and pain in osteoarthritis. This st....... This study aimed at characterizing the effect of glucocorticoids on chondrocytes, osteoclasts, and osteoblasts....

  17. A membrane glucocorticoid receptor mediates the rapid/non-genomic actions of glucocorticoids in mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María Hernández-Alcalá; Cormack, Jonathan; Mallinson, David; Mutungi, Gabriel

    2013-10-15

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are steroid hormones released from the adrenal gland in response to stress. They are also some of the most potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs currently in clinical use. They exert most of their physiological and pharmacological actions through the classical/genomic pathway. However, they also have rapid/non-genomic actions whose physiological and pharmacological functions are still poorly understood. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to investigate the rapid/non-genomic effects of two widely prescribed glucocorticoids, beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) and prednisolone acetate (PDNA), on force production in isolated, intact, mouse skeletal muscle fibre bundles. The results show that the effects of both GCs on maximum isometric force (Po) were fibre-type dependent. Thus, they increased Po in the slow-twitch fibre bundles without significantly affecting that of the fast-twitch fibre bundles. The increase in Po occurred within 10 min and was insensitive to the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. Also, it was maximal at ∼250 nM and was blocked by the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) inhibitor RU486 and a monoclonal anti-GCR, suggesting that it was mediated by a membrane (m) GCR. Both muscle fibre types expressed a cytosolic GCR. However, a mGCR was present only in the slow-twitch fibres. The receptor was more abundant in oxidative than in glycolytic fibres and was confined mainly to the periphery of the fibres where it co-localised with laminin. From these findings we conclude that the rapid/non-genomic actions of GCs are mediated by a mGCR and that they are physiologically/therapeutically beneficial, especially in slow-twitch muscle fibres.

  18. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-10-18

    Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines regulate DKK1 synthesis in synovial fibroblasts during inflammatory arthritis. We examined expression and regulation of DKK1 in primary cultures of human synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with inflammatory arthritis. The effect of TNFα, IL-1β and glucocorticoids on DKK1 mRNA and protein expression was examined by real-time PCR and ELISA. The ability of inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of the glucocorticoid-activating enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) to sensitise fibroblasts to endogenous glucocorticoids was explored. Global expression of Wnt signalling and target genes in response to TNFα and glucocorticoids was assessed using a custom array. DKK1 expression in human synovial fibroblasts was directly regulated by glucocorticoids but not proinflammatory cytokines. Glucocorticoids, but not TNFα, regulated expression of multiple Wnt agonists and antagonists in favour of inhibition of Wnt signalling. However, TNFα and IL-1β indirectly stimulated DKK1 production through increased expression of 11β-HSD1. These results demonstrate that in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts, DKK1 expression is directly regulated by glucocorticoids rather than TNFα. Consequently, the links between synovial inflammation, altered Wnt signalling and bone remodelling are not direct but are dependent on local activation of endogenous glucocorticoids.

  19. Cumulative Environmental Management Association : Wood Buffalo Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, B.

    2001-01-01

    The recently announced oil sands development of the Wood Buffalo Region in Alberta was the focus of this power point presentation. Both mining and in situ development is expected to total $26 billion and 2.6 million barrels per day of bitumen production. This paper described the economic, social and environmental challenges facing the resource development of this region. In addition to the proposed oil sands projects, this region will accommodate the needs of conventional oil and gas production, forestry, building of pipelines and power lines, municipal development, recreation, tourism, mining exploration and open cast mining. The Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA) was inaugurated as a non-profit association in April 2000, and includes 41 members from all sectors. Its major role is to ensure a sustainable ecosystem and to avoid any cumulative impacts on wildlife. Other work underway includes the study of soil and plant species diversity, and the effects of air emissions on human health, wildlife and vegetation. The bioaccumulation of heavy metals and their impacts on surface water and fish is also under consideration to ensure the quality and quantity of surface water and ground water. 3 figs

  20. Stabilization of glucocorticoid receptors in isolated rat hepatocytes by radioprotectants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karle, J.M.; Ridder, W.E.; Wright, N.; Olmeda, R.; Nielsen, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Previous work has shown that glucocorticoid receptors in rat liver homogenate can be stabilized by the addition of MoO 4 plus the sulfhydryl-containing compounds dithiothreitol and WR 1065. The latter is the dephosphorylated, principal metabolite of the radioprotectant WR 2721 (or S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanesphosphorothioic acid). The current work results from applying this knowledge to intact rat hepatocytes. Cells were isolated by collagenase perfusion and incubated in supplemented minimum essential medium at 37 0 C with various concentrations of WR 2721, WR 1065, or vehicle. Samples of these cell suspensions were analyzed at various times for steroid binding capacity by incubating homogenates (27,000 x g supernates) with 50 nM 3 H-triamcinolone acetonide in the presence or absence of excess unlabelled dexamethasone. Concentrations of 10 mM WR 2721 provided marked preservation of the binding capacity (>85% of the initial value at 5 hours) compared to control at 60% of the binding capacity. WR 1065 at 10 mM provided no such protection. This is consistent with the observation that WR 1065 does not pass cell membranes. The authors propose that supplying reducing equivalents to intracellular components such as the glucocorticoid receptor may be one mechanism of the radioprotection afforded by WR 2721

  1. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A. [Cell Systems Division, Invitrogen, Madison, WI (United States); Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Mais, Dale E. [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); MPI Research, Mattawan, MI (United States); Wang, Ming-Wei, E-mail: wangmw@mail.shcnc.ac.cn [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  2. Glucocorticoid augmentation of prolonged exposure therapy: rationale and case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pratchett

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Prolonged exposure (PE therapy has been found to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; however, it is difficult for many patients to engage fully in the obligatory retelling of their traumatic experiences. This problem is compounded by the fact that habituation and cognitive restructuring – the main mechanisms through which PE is hypothesized to work – are not instantaneous processes, and often require several weeks before the distress associated with imaginal exposure abates. Case reports: Two cases are described that respectively illustrate the use of hydrocortisone and placebo, in combination with PE, for the treatment of combat-related PTSD. Based on known effects of glucocorticoids on learning and memory performance, we hypothesized that augmentation with hydrocortisone would improve the therapeutic effects of PE by hastening “new” learning and facilitating decreases in the emotional impact of fear memories during the course of treatment. The veteran receiving hydrocortisone augmentation of PE displayed an accelerated and ultimately greater decline in PTSD symptoms than the veteran receiving placebo. Conclusions: While no general conclusion can be derived from comparison of two patients, the findings are consistent with the rationale for augmentation. These case reports support the potential for an appropriately designed and powered clinical trial to examine the efficacy of glucocorticoids in augmenting the effects of psychotherapy for PTSD.

  3. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA

  4. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng; Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A.; Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang; Mais, Dale E.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K i = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  5. Autoimmune hyperthyroidism due to secondary adrenal insufficiency: resolution with glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skamagas, Maria; Geer, Eliza B

    2011-01-01

    To describe the course of autoimmune hyperthyroid disease in a patient with corticotropin (ACTH) deficiency treated with glucocorticoids. We report the clinical presentation, laboratory data, imaging studies, and management of a patient with weight loss, fatigue, apathy, hallucinations, and arthritis. Autoimmune hyperthyroidism (positive thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies and borderline positive thyrotropin receptor antibody) was diagnosed in a 71-year-old woman. New psychotic symptoms prompted brain magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed a partially empty sella. Undetectable morning cortisol, undetectable ACTH, and failure to stimulate cortisol with synthetic ACTH (cosyntropin 250 mcg) secured the diagnosis of long-standing secondary adrenal insufficiency. Hydrocortisone replacement improved the patient's symptoms, resolved the thyroid disease, and decreased thyroid antibody titers. In retrospect, the patient recalled severe postpartum hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion at age 38 years. A Sheehan event probably occurred 33 years before the patient presented with corticotropin deficiency. Hyperthyroidism accelerated cortisol metabolism and provoked symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. The hypocortisolemic state may precipitate hyperimmunity and autoimmune thyroid disease. Rapid resolution of hyperthyroidism and decreased thyroid antibody titers with glucocorticoid treatment support this hypothesis.

  6. Fecal Glucocorticoid Analysis: Non-invasive Adrenal Monitoring in Equids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, Kelly; Purcell, Rebecca S; Walker, Susan L

    2016-04-25

    Adrenal activity can be assessed in the equine species by analysis of feces for corticosterone metabolites. During a potentially aversive situation, corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) is released from the hypothalamus in the brain. This stimulates the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland, which in turn stimulates release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal gland. In horses the glucocorticoid corticosterone is responsible for several adaptations needed to support equine flight behaviour and subsequent removal from the aversive situation. Corticosterone metabolites can be detected in the feces of horses and assessment offers a non-invasive option to evaluate long term patterns of adrenal activity. Fecal assessment offers advantages over other techniques that monitor adrenal activity including blood plasma and saliva analysis. The non-invasive nature of the method avoids sampling stress which can confound results. It also allows the opportunity for repeated sampling over time and is ideal for studies in free ranging horses. This protocol describes the enzyme linked immunoassay (EIA) used to assess feces for corticosterone, in addition to the associated biochemical validation.

  7. Cytokine modulation by glucocorticoids: mechanisms and actions in cellular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattsand, R; Linden, M

    1996-01-01

    Glucocorticoids inhibit the expression and action of most cytokines. This is part of the in vivo feed-back system between inflammation-derived cytokines and CNS-adrenal produced corticosteroids with the probable physiological relevance to balance parts of the host defence and anti-inflammatory systems of the body. Glucocorticoids modulate cytokine expression by a combination of genomic mechanisms. The activated glucocorticoid-receptor complex can (i) bind to and inactivate key proinflammatory transcription factors (e.g. AP-1, NF kappa B). This takes place at the promotor responsive elements of these factors, but has also been reported without the presence of DNA; (ii) via glucocorticoid responsive elements (GRE), upregulate the expression of cytokine inhibitory proteins, e.g. I kappa B, which inactivates the transcription factor NF kappa B and thereby the secondary expression of a series of cytokines; (iii) reduce the half-life time and utility of cytokine mRNAs. In studies with triggered human blood mononuclear cells in culture, glucocorticoids strongly diminish the production of the 'initial phase' cytokines IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha and the 'immunomodulatory' cytokines IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-gamma, as well as of IL-6, IL-8 and the growth factor GM-CSF. While steroid treatment broadly attenuates cytokine production, it cannot modulate it selectively, e.g. just the TH0, the TH1 or the TH2 pathways. The production of the 'anti-inflammatory' IL-10 is also inhibited. The exceptions of steroid down-regulatory activity on cytokine expression seem to affect 'repair phase' cytokines like TGF-beta and PDGF. These are even reported to be upregulated, which may explain the rather weak steroid dampening action on healing and fibrotic processes. Some growth factors, e.g. G-CSF and M-CSF, are only weakly affected. In addition to diminishing the production of a cytokine, steroids can also often inhibit its subsequent actions. Because cytokines work in

  8. Experimental Study on the Effect of Calcitonin in Osteoporosis Induced by the Immobilization and Long-Term Glucocorticoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Jin; Lee, Sang Rae

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that the glucocorticoid induces osteoporosis by suppression of the osteoblast, but its effect on the osteoclast has some controversy whether it activates or suppresses the osteoclast. If the calcitonin, which is known to suppress the osteoclast, prevents the osteoporosis by glucocorticoid, then the suppression of the osteoclast by the glucocorticoid is not so significant. And if the calcitonin increases the osteoblastic activity, Tc-99m MDP uptake will be increased in spite of the glucocorticoid effect on the osteoblast. The immobilization operation was performed to the right leg of male Wistar rats weighing about 200 gm each. For 16 weeks after operation, rats were injected glucocorticoid alone or glucocorticoid and calcitonin. The bone density was measured by means of photodensitometry under reference aluminum step wedge and Tc-99m MDP uptake was available to the index of the osteoblastic activity. 1. The bone density of femoral head was markedly reduced than that of femoral shaft following ratio of cancellous and cortical components in both site. 2. glucocorticoid caused decrease in bone density of spine and femur, and there is significantly increase of it when medication of glucocorticoid and calcitonin injection simultaneously than that of glucocorticoid. 3. Tc-99m MDP uptake was revealed significant reduction in medication of glucocorticoid but increase in glucocorticoid and calcitonin injection simultaneously in later experimental period. 4. There was a slight reduction in plasma osteocalcin in medication of glucocorticoid through experimental periods and an increase in its value in case of giving glucocorticoid and calcitonin simultaneously in later experimental period. From these results, we suggest that osteoporosis by immobilization is more pronounced by glucocorticoid hormone and osteoporosis induced by immobilization and glucocorticoid use is prevented by calcitonin administration with increasing osteoblastic activity.

  9. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Zhang, Yuanzhen; Feng, Jianghua; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal metabonome

  10. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Yuanzhen [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Jianghua, E-mail: jianghua.feng@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal

  11. Cumulative ionizing radiation exposure in patients with end stage kidney disease: a 6-year retrospective analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coyle, Joe

    2011-08-13

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation in patients with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). To investigate factors which may be independently associated with risk of high cumulative effective dose (CED). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study had local institutional review board ethical approval. We conducted a retrospective study of 394 period prevalent ESKD patients attending a single tertiary referral centre between 2004 and 2009. Patient demographics were obtained from case records. Details of radiological investigations were obtained from the institutional radiology computerized database. CED was calculated using standard procedure specific radiation levels. High exposure was defined as CED > 50 mSv, an exposure which has been reported to increase cancer mortality by 5%. Data were compared using Pearson χ(2) and Mann-Whitney U test or Kruskal-Wallis tests. RESULTS: 394 patients were followed for a median of 4 years (1518 patient years follow-up). Of these 63% were male. Seventeen percent of patients had a CED of >50 mSv. Computed tomography (CT) accounted for 9% of total radiological studies\\/procedures while contributing 61.4% of total study dose. Median cumulative dose and median dose per patient year were significantly higher in the hemodialysis (HD) group (15.13 and 5.79 mSv, respectively) compared to the post-transplant group (2.9 and 0.52 mSv, respectively) (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: ESKD patients are at risk of cumulative exposure to significant levels of diagnostic radiation. The majority of this exposure is imparted as a result of CT examinations to patients in the HD group.

  12. Cytokine-induced loss of glucocorticoid function: effect of kinase inhibitors, long-acting β(2-adrenoceptor [corrected] agonist and glucocorticoid receptor ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Rider

    Full Text Available Acting on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, glucocorticoid resistance often leads to suboptimal asthma control. Since glucocorticoid-induced gene expression contributes to glucocorticoid activity, the aim of this study was to use a 2 × glucocorticoid response element (GRE reporter and glucocorticoid-induced gene expression to investigate approaches to combat cytokine-induced glucocorticoid resistance. Pre-treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF or interleukin-1β inhibited dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of the putative anti-inflammatory genes RGS2 and TSC22D3, or just TSC22D3, in primary human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells, respectively. Dexamethasone-induced DUSP1 mRNA was unaffected. In human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, dexamethasone-induced TSC22D3 and CDKN1C expression (at 6 h was reduced by TNF pre-treatment, whereas DUSP1 and RGS2 mRNAs were unaffected. TNF pre-treatment also reduced dexamethasone-dependent 2×GRE reporter activation. This was partially reversed by PS-1145 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK inhibitor VIII, inhibitors of IKK2 and JNK, respectively. However, neither inhibitor affected TNF-dependent loss of dexamethasone-induced CDKN1C or TSC22D3 mRNA. Similarly, inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, phosphoinositide 3-kinase or protein kinase C pathways failed to attenuate TNF-dependent repression of the 2×GRE reporter. Fluticasone furoate, fluticasone propionate and budesonide were full agonists relative to dexamethasone, while GSK9027, RU24858, des-ciclesonide and GW870086X were partial agonists on the 2×GRE reporter. TNF reduced reporter activity in proportion with agonist efficacy. Full and partial agonists showed various degrees of agonism on RGS2 and TSC22D3 expression, but were equally effective at inducing CDKN1C and DUSP1, and did not affect the repression of CDKN1C or TSC22D3

  13. Repeated Radionuclide therapy in metastatic paraganglioma leading to the highest reported cumulative activity of 131I-MIBG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezziddin, Samer; Sabet, Amir; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Xun, Sunny; Matthies, Alexander; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    131 I-MIBG therapy for neuroendocrine tumours may be dose limited. The common range of applied cumulative activities is 10-40 GBq. We report the uneventful cumulative administration of 111 GBq (= 3 Ci) 131 I-MIBG in a patient with metastatic paraganglioma. Ten courses of 131 I-MIBG therapy were given within six years, accomplishing symptomatic, hormonal and tumour responses with no serious adverse effects. Chemotherapy with cisplatin/vinblastine/dacarbazine was the final treatment modality with temporary control of disease, but eventually the patient died of progression. The observed cumulative activity of 131 I-MIBG represents the highest value reported to our knowledge, and even though 12.6 GBq of 90 Y-DOTATOC were added intermediately, no associated relevant bone marrow, hepatic or other toxicity were observed. In an individual attempt to palliate metastatic disease high cumulative activity alone should not preclude the patient from repeat treatment

  14. Evolution model with a cumulative feedback coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimper, Steffen; Zabrocki, Knud; Schulz, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The paper is concerned with a toy model that generalizes the standard Lotka-Volterra equation for a certain population by introducing a competition between instantaneous and accumulative, history-dependent nonlinear feedback the origin of which could be a contribution from any kind of mismanagement in the past. The results depend on the sign of that additional cumulative loss or gain term of strength λ. In case of a positive coupling the system offers a maximum gain achieved after a finite time but the population will die out in the long time limit. In this case the instantaneous loss term of strength u is irrelevant and the model exhibits an exact solution. In the opposite case λ<0 the time evolution of the system is terminated in a crash after ts provided u=0. This singularity after a finite time can be avoided if u≠0. The approach may well be of relevance for the qualitative understanding of more realistic descriptions.

  15. Psychometric properties of the Cumulated Ambulation Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferriero, Giorgio; Kristensen, Morten T; Invernizzi, Marco

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the geriatric population, independent mobility is a key factor in determining readiness for discharge following acute hospitalization. The Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS) is a potentially valuable score that allows day-to-day measurements of basic mobility. The CAS was developed...... and validated in older patients with hip fracture as an early postoperative predictor of short-term outcome, but it is also used to assess geriatric in-patients with acute medical illness. Despite the fast- accumulating literature on the CAS, to date no systematic review synthesizing its psychometric properties....... Of 49 studies identified, 17 examined the psychometric properties of the CAS. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Most papers dealt with patients after hip fracture surgery, and only 4 studies assessed the CAS psychometric characteristics also in geriatric in-patients with acute medical illness. Two versions of CAS...

  16. Tumor-promoting phorbol ester amplifies the inductions of tyrosine aminotransferase and ornithine decarboxylase by glucocorticoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, H.; Fukusen, N.; Katunuma, N.

    1987-01-01

    In adrenalectomized rats, the tumor-promoting phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) markedly enhanced the inductions of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and ornithine decarboxylase by glucocorticoids, even with sufficient concentration of glucocorticoids to have a maximal effect, whereas it had no effect on TAT activity and increased ornithine decarboxylase activity only slightly in the absence of glucocorticoids. Phorbol derivatives and components of TPA such as 4β-phorbol, phorbol 12-tetradecanoate, phorbol 13-acetate, and 4-O-methylphorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate, which have no tumor-promoting activity or ability to activate protein kinase C, did not have any effect on TAT induction by glucocorticoid. TPA enhanced the induction of TAT by various glucocorticoids but had no effect on induction of TAT by glucagon or insulin and did not enhance the induction of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by 17β-estradiol. These results suggest that TPA specifically enhances the induction of TAT and ornithine decarboxylase by glucocorticoids. Similar effects of TPA on TAT induction by glucocorticoid were observed in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes. Another activator of protein kinase C, rac-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, was also found to have similar effects on the cells

  17. Radioreceptor assay for evaluation of the plasma glucocorticoid activity of natural and synthetic steroids in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, P.L.; Carter, J.P.; Graham, B.S.; Baxter, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    An assay for plasma glucocorticoid activity has been developed using specific glucocorticoid receptors. Unlike other assays for cortisol and certain synthetic corticosteroids, this radioreceptor assay measures the glucocorticoid activity of all natural and synthetic steroids. Steroids extracted from as little as 0.05 ml of plasma are incubated with 3 H-dexamethasone and cytosol receptors from cultured rat hepatoma cells. From 0.5 to 50 ng of cortisol are accurately detected. Glucocorticoid activities of adult plasmas determined by the assay correlate closely with corticoid levels obtained in the CBG-isotope and fluorometric assays. Other steroids are measured in proportion to both concentration and potency as glucocorticoids. Relative activities include: cortisol 100, dexamethasone 940, prednisolone 230, prednisone 3, estradiol 1 and androstenedione 1. A similar ranking of steroids was found using receptors from a human source (fetal lung). The assay has been useful in detecting glucocorticoid activity in unidentified medications and in measuring plasma glucocorticoid levels after administration of synthetic corticosteroids. (auth)

  18. Functional interaction between the glucocorticoid receptor and GANP/MCM3AP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Waffa; Laine, Sanna; Zilliacus, Johanna

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory diseases but have a number of side effects that partly are connected to inhibition of cell proliferation. Glucocorticoids mediated their action by binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. In the present study, we have identified by two-hybrid screens the germinal center-associated protein (GANP) and MCM3-associated protein (MCM3AP), a splicing variant of GANP, as glucocorticoid receptor interacting proteins. GANP and MCM3AP can bind to the MCM3 protein involved in initiation of DNA replication. Glutathione-S-transferase-pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the C-terminal domain of GANP, encompassing MCM3AP, interacts with the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Characterization of the intracellular localization of GANP revealed that GANP is shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we show that glucocorticoids are unable to inhibit DNA replication in HeLa cells overexpressing MCM3AP suggesting a role for both glucocorticoid receptor and GANP/MCM3AP in regulating cell proliferation

  19. A case report: Familial glucocorticoid deficiency associated with familial focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Nanik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by isolated glucocorticoid deficiency in the presence of normal plasma renin and aldosterone level. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is a form of glomerular disease associated with proteinuria and nephritic syndrome. This is the first case of familial glucocorticoid deficiency associated with familial focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Case presentation An eight month old boy presented with increased genital pigmentation. Initial investigation revealed that he was glucocorticoid deficient and was started on hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone with a diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency. Later fludrocortisone was withdrawn and he was diagnosed to have isolated glucocorticoid deficiency. He later developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis for which he underwent renal transplantation at the age of five years. Now at the age of twelve years, this boy is doing well on hydrocortisone treatment. His two siblings and a first degree cousin also had isolated glucocorticoid deficiency. One of the above two siblings died due to renal failure secondary to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Conclusion Patients with familial glucocorticoid deficiency should be carefully followed for development of features of nephrotic syndrome.

  20. A role for glucocorticoids in stress-impaired reproduction: beyond the hypothalamus and pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whirledge, Shannon; Cidlowski, John A

    2013-12-01

    In addition to the well-characterized role of the sex steroid receptors in regulating fertility and reproduction, reproductive events are also mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to an individual's environment. Glucocorticoid secretion in response to stress contributes to the well-characterized suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis through central actions in the hypothalamus and pituitary. However, both animal and in vitro studies indicate that other components of the reproductive system are also regulated by glucocorticoids. Furthermore, in the absence of stress, it appears that homeostatic glucocorticoid signaling plays a significant role in reproduction and fertility in all tissues comprising the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Indeed, as central regulators of the immune response, glucocorticoids are uniquely poised to integrate an individual's infectious, inflammatory, stress, nutritional, and metabolic status through glucocorticoid receptor signaling in target tissues. Endocrine signaling between tissues regulating the immune and stress response and those determining reproductive status provides an evolutionary advantage, facilitating the trade-off between reproductive investment and offspring fitness. This review focuses on the actions of glucocorticoids in tissues important for fertility and reproduction, highlighting recent studies that show glucocorticoid signaling plays a significant role throughout the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and characterizing these effects as permissive or inhibitory in terms of facilitating reproductive success.

  1. Cell-specific expression of the glucocorticoid receptor within granular convoluted tubules of the rat submaxillary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antakly, T.; Zhang, C.X.; Sarrieau, A.; Raquidan, D.

    1991-01-01

    The submaxillary gland, a heterogeneous tissue composed essentially of two functionally distinct cell types (tubular epithelial and acinar), offers an interesting system in which to study the mechanisms of steroid-dependent growth and differentiation. One cell type, the granular convoluted tubular (GCT) cell, secretes a large number of physiologically important polypeptides, including epidermal and nerve growth factors. Two steroids, androgens and glucocorticoids, greatly influence the growth, differentiation, and secretory activity of GCT cells. Because glucocorticoids can partially mimic or potentiate androgen effects, it has been thought that glucocorticoids act via androgen receptors. Since the presence of glucocorticoid receptors is a prerequisite for glucocorticoid action, we have investigated the presence and cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the rat submaxillary gland. Binding experiments using [3H]dexamethasone revealed the presence of high affinity binding sites in rat submaxillary tissue homogenates. Most of these sites were specifically competed by dexamethasone, corticosterone, and a pure glucocorticoid agonist RU 28362. Neither testosterone nor dihydrotestosterone competed for glucocorticoid binding. The cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the submaxillary gland was investigated by immunocytochemistry, using two highly specific glucocorticoid receptor antibodies. The receptor was localized in the GCT cells, but not in the acinar cells of rat and mouse submaxillary tissue sections. In GCT cells, the glucocorticoid receptor colocalized with several secretory polypeptides, including epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, alpha 2u-globulin, and atrial natriuretic factor

  2. Long-term safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of teriparatide in the management of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dore RK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Robin K DoreDavid Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Glucocorticoids are commonly prescribed medications to treat multiple diseases across many medical specialties. One of the most common yet largely unappreciated side effect of glucocorticoid use is increased risk of fracture. Many different therapies are indicated to prevent and treat this condition; many guidelines exist that suggest appropriate use of both glucocorticoids and the medications approved to prevent this common side effect of glucocorticoid therapy. Nevertheless, 30%–50% of patients on long-term glucocorticoid therapy sustain a fracture. Teriparatide, recombinant human parathyroid hormone (1–34, is a daily self-injectable therapy for 24 months approved for use in patients taking long-term glucocorticoids. Teriparatide has been shown to increase bone mineral density and reduce vertebral fracture risk in glucocorticoid-treated patients. Glucocorticoids have many adverse effects on bone that teriparatide has been shown to prevent or negate. Given the fact that preventive therapy for glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is often not prescribed, one wonders whether a daily self-injectable therapy for this condition would be prescribed by physicians and accepted by patients. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment, guidelines, and persistence data (when available for patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis treated with teriparatide.Keywords: glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, teriparatide, anabolic, PTH, parathyroid hormone

  3. The effect of exogenous glucocorticoids on plasma catecholamines and metanephrines in patients without phaeochromocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, M R; Walker, D; Maher, K T; Dodzo, K; Perry, L; Ball, S; Peaston, R; Chew, S L; Drake, W M; Akker, S A; Grossman, A B

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of steroid administration under standardised conditions in a range of patients both normal and with adrenal pathologies and to review the impact on plasma catecholamines and metanephrines. Corticosteroid administration has been linked to the development of hypertensive crises in patients with phaeochromocytoma, however a mechanism for this is not fully understood. We aimed to add useful information about the effect of steroids on levels of these hormones under usual circumstances. A prospective, observational cohort study of 50 patients undergoing the low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST) was undertaken. Additional blood samples were taken at the start and end of the standard LDDST. Biochemical analysis was carried out for plasma catecholamines and plasma free metanephrines. Demographic and hormonal data were acquired from review of the notes or measured at baseline. No significant changes in plasma catecholamines or metanephrines were seen at the end of the LDDST compared to baseline. This was also true of subgroup analysis, divided by age, gender, or type of underlying pathology. Our results suggest that hypertensive reaction responses, rare as they are, are unlikely to be related to normal adrenal physiology. Thus LDDST is likely to be safe under most circumstances, however caution should be exercised in patients with adrenal masses with imaging characteristics compatible with phaeochromocytoma. It may be prudent to defer glucocorticoid administration until functioning phaeochromocytoma has been excluded biochemically. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. HDAC2 is required by the physiological concentration of glucocorticoid to inhibit inflammation in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haining; He, Yanhua; Zhang, Guiping; Li, Xiaobin; Yan, Suikai; Hou, Ning; Xiao, Qing; Huang, Yue; Luo, Miaoshan; Zhang, Genshui; Yi, Quan; Chen, Minsheng; Luo, Jiandong

    2017-09-01

    We previously suggested that endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs) may inhibit myocardial inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vivo. However, the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms were poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of physiological concentration of GCs in inflammation induced by LPS in cardiac fibroblasts and explored the possible mechanisms. The results showed that hydrocortisone at the dose of 127 ng/mL (equivalent to endogenous basal level of GCs) inhibited LPS (100 ng/mL)-induced productions of TNF-α and IL-1β in cardiac fibroblasts. Xanthine oxidase/xanthine (XO/X) system impaired the anti-inflammatory action of GCs through downregulating HDAC2 activity and expression. Knockdown of HDAC2 restrained the anti-inflammatory effects of physiological level of hydrocortisone, and blunted the ability of XO/X system to downregulate the inhibitory action of physiological level of hydrocortisone on cytokines. These results suggested that HDAC2 was required by the physiological concentration of GC to inhibit inflammatory response. The dysfunction of HDAC2 induced by oxidative stress might be account for GC resistance and chronic inflammatory disorders during the cardiac diseases.

  5. Regulation of lipogenesis by glucocorticoids and insulin in human adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L Gathercole

    Full Text Available Patients with glucocorticoid (GC excess, Cushing's syndrome, develop a classic phenotype characterized by central obesity and insulin resistance. GCs are known to increase the release of fatty acids from adipose, by stimulating lipolysis, however, the impact of GCs on the processes that regulate lipid accumulation has not been explored. Intracellular levels of active GC are dependent upon the activity of 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 and we have hypothesized that 11β-HSD1 activity can regulate lipid homeostasis in human adipose tissue (Chub-S7 cell line and primary cultures of human subcutaneous (sc and omental (om adipocytes. Across adipocyte differentiation, lipogenesis increased whilst β-oxidation decreased. GC treatment decreased lipogenesis but did not alter rates of β-oxidation in Chub-S7 cells, whilst insulin increased lipogenesis in all adipocyte cell models. Low dose Dexamethasone pre-treatment (5 nM of Chub-S7 cells augmented the ability of insulin to stimulate lipogenesis and there was no evidence of adipose tissue insulin resistance in primary sc cells. Both cortisol and cortisone decreased lipogenesis; selective 11β-HSD1 inhibition completely abolished cortisone-mediated repression of lipogenesis. GCs have potent actions upon lipid homeostasis and these effects are dependent upon interactions with insulin. These in vitro data suggest that manipulation of GC availability through selective 11β-HSD1 inhibition modifies lipid homeostasis in human adipocytes.

  6. Detection of glucocorticoid receptor agonists in effluents from sewage treatment plants in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Go; Sato, Kentaro; Isobe, Tomohiko; Takigami, Hidetaka; Brouwer, Abraham; Nakayama, Kei

    2015-09-15

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely used as anti-inflammatory drugs. Our previous study demonstrated that several GCs such as cortisol and dexamethasone (Dex) were frequently detected in effluents collected from Japanese sewage treatment plants (STPs) in 2012. In this study, we used the GC-Responsive Chemical-Activated LUciferase gene eXpression (GR-CALUX) assay to elucidate GC receptor (GR) agonistic activities of ten pure synthetic GCs and selected STP effluents in Japan for assessment of the risks associated with the presence of GR agonists. The tested GCs demonstrated dose-dependent agonistic effects in the GR-CALUX assay and their EC50 values were calculated for estimation of relative potencies (REPs) compared to Dex. The GR agonistic potency was in the rank of: clobetasol propionate > clobetasone butyrate > betamethasone 17-valerate > difluprednate > betamethasone 17,21-dipropionate > Dex > betamethasone > 6α-methylprednisolone > prednisolone > cortisol. The GR agonistic activity in STP effluents as measured in Dex-equivalent (Dex-EQ) activities ranged from effluents in Japan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The distorting effect of varying diets on fecal glucocorticoid measurements as indicators of stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, A. Charlotte; Abelson, Klas S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The physiological stress response is frequently gauged in animals, non-invasively, through measuring glucocorticoids in excreta. A concern with this method is, however, the unknown effect of variations in diets on the measurements. With an energy dense diet, leading to reduced defecation, will low...... concentrations of glucocorticoids be artificially inflated? Can this effect be overcome by measuring the total output of glucocorticoids in excreta? In a controlled laboratory setting we explored the effect in mice. When standard mouse chow – high in dietary fiber – was replaced with a 17% more energy-dense diet...

  8. The Ups and Downs of Glucocorticoid Signaling | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucocorticoids are steroids that react to stress by regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism. Because of their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, corticosteroids are among the most frequently prescribed drugs. Glucocorticoids are often used to treat arthritis and autoimmune diseases and are also given in combination with other drugs to treat cancers—such as leukemias and lymphomas—or to alleviate side effects from chemotherapy and radiation. In humans, a glucocorticoid called cortisol is released from the adrenal gland approximately every hour to send signals to cells throughout the body. This pulsed release of hormone is called ultradian secretion.  

  9. Influence of chronic x-ray exposure on adrenal glucocorticoid function and adrenocorticocyte membrane potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorban', Je.M.; Topol'nikova, N.V.

    1998-01-01

    The peculiarities of adrenal glucocorticoid function and membrane potential (MP) of zona fasciculata adrenocorticocyte (ACC) in rats after chronic x-ray exposure was studied. The changes of adrenal glucocorticoid function caused by chronic x-ray exposure within a relatively small period of irradiation (1.5 months) are obscure and manifest themselves only at physiological load. With the prolongation of the period (8 and 15 months), more considerable inhibition of the adrenal glucocorticoid function and disturbances in the membrane mechanisms of ACC MP level regulation are revealed

  10. OSTEOPENIA in cancellous bone of sheep induced by Glucocorticoid alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Cheng, L.; Bollen, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: There is a great need for suitable large animal models that closely resemble osteoporosis in humans, and that they have adequate bone size for bone prosthesis and biomaterial research. Previous investigations have shown that osteoporotic sheep model requires glucocorticoid (GC......) microarchitectural properties and mechanical properties of sheep cancellous bone after a 7 months steroid treatment; and thus to validate a large animal model for orthopaedic implant/biomaterial research. Materials and Methods: Eighteen female sheep were randomly allocated into 3 groups: group 1 (GC-1) received GC......, osteocalcin was significantly reduced after 7 months but a rebound phenomenon was observed 3 months after cessation of GC. In conclusion, this study has validated an osteopenia sheep model. Bone quality was significantly reduced following a 7 months GC-treatment and recovered after further 3 month observation...

  11. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  12. Sulforaphane reverses glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in osteoblastic cells through regulation of the Nrf2 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hao Lin,1,* Bo Wei,1,* Guangsheng Li,1 Jinchang Zheng,1 Jiecong Sun,1 Jiaqi Chu,2 Rong Zeng,1 Yanru Niu21Department of Spinal Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang, People’s Republic of China; 2Laboratory Institute of Minimally Invasive Orthopedic Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Apoptosis of osteoblasts triggered by high-dose glucocorticoids (GCs has been identified as a major cause of osteoporosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms accounting for this action remain elusive, which has impeded the prevention and cure of this side effect. Sulforaphane (SFP is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate that has huge health benefits for humans. In this study, by using osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells as a model, we demonstrate the protective effects of SFP against dexamethasone (Dex-induced apoptosis and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. The results show that SFP could effectively inhibit the Dex-induced growth inhibition and release of lactate dehydrogenase in MC3T3-E1 cells. Treatment with Dex induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells, as evidenced by an increase in the Sub-G1 phase, chromatin condensation, and deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, which were significantly suppressed by coincubation with SFP. Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway contributed importantly to Dex-induced apoptosis, as revealed by the activation of caspase-3/-9 and subsequent cleavage of poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase, which was also effectively blocked by SFP. Moreover, treatments of Dex strongly induced overproduction of reactive oxygen species and inhibited the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and the downstream effectors HO1 and NQO1. However, cotreatment with SFP effectively reversed this action of Dex. Furthermore, silencing of Nrf2 by

  13. Glucocorticoid regimens for prevention of Graves' ophthalmopathy progression following radioiodine treatment: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiber, Shachaf; Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Shimon, Ilan; Grossman, Alon; Robenshtok, Eyal

    2014-10-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy has been shown to prevent Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) progression following radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment. However, the optimal regimen is controversial, with studies from recent years suggesting the use of lower doses and shorter GC treatment courses. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and retrospective controlled trials comparing GC regimens versus placebo, no treatment, or other GC regimens. Eight trials evaluating 850 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. In patients with preexisting GO, standard dose prednisone (0.4-0.5 mg/kg tapered over 3 months) was very effective for prevention of GO progression (OR 0.14 [CI 0.06-0.35], phyperthyroidism resolution (OR 1.05 [CI 0.69-1.58]), and GC side effects were common but mild. Current evidence supports a three-tier approach for prevention of GO progression following RAI. Standard dose prednisone is the best validated regimen and should be used in patients with mild to moderate GO who have high risk of progression, while low dose prednisone can be used in patients with mild GO, and in patients without preexisting GO who have risk factors and are selected for GC prophylaxis. Patients without preexisting GO and without risk factors should not be treated with GC prophylaxis.

  14. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Sara A.; McGettrick, Julie R.; Hansen, Warren K.; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  15. Inflammation in Parkinson’s disease: Role of glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trinidad eHerrero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a major characteristic feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Studies in PDpatients show evidence of augmented levels of potent pro-inflammatory molecules e.g. TNF-α, iNOS,IL-1β whereas in experimental Parkinsonism it has been consistently demonstrated that dopaminergicneurons are particularly vulnerable to activated glia releasing these toxic factors. Recent geneticstudies point to the role of immune system in the etiology of PD, thus in combination withenvironmental factors, both peripheral and CNS-mediated immune responses could play importantroles in onset and progression of PD. Whereas microglia, astrocytes and infiltrating T cells are knownto mediate chronic inflammation, the roles of other immune-competent cells are less well understood.Inflammation is a tightly controlled process. One major effector system of regulation is HPA axis.Glucocorticoids released from adrenal glands upon stimulation of HPA axis, in response to either cellinjury or presence of pathogen, activate their receptor, GR. GR regulates inflammation both throughdirect transcriptional action on target genes and by indirectly inhibiting transcriptional activities oftranscriptional factors such as NF-kB, AP-1 or interferon regulatory factors. In PD patients, the HPAaxis is unbalanced and the cortisol levels are significantly increased, implying a deregulation of GRfunction in immune cells. In experimental Parkinsonism, the activation of microglial GR has a crucialeffect in diminishing microglial cell activation and reducing dopaminergic degeneration. Moreover,glucocorticoids are also known to regulate human brain vasculature as well as blood brain barrierpermeability, any dysfunction in their actions may influence infiltration of cytotoxic moleculesresulting in increased vulnerability of dopamine neurons in PD. Overall, deregulation ofGR actions is likely important in dopamine neuron degeneration throughestablishment of chronic inflammation.

  16. Management of glucocorticoids-induced osteoporosis: role of teriparatide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Migliaccio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Migliaccio1, Marina Brama1, Nazzarena Malavolta21Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medica, Policlinico Umberto I, Università degli Studi Sapienza di Roma, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Policlinico S Orsola Malpighi, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Glucocorticoids (GC-induced osteoporosis (GIOP is the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis, which leads to an increased fracture risk in patients. The normal bone turnover depends on a balance between osteoblasts and osteoclasts activity and GC can cause a rapid bone loss, decreasing bone formation and increasing bone resorption. The decreased bone formation is mainly due to the GC-induced apoptosis of both osteoblasts and osteocytes, while the increased bone resorption is due to the increased life-span of pre-existing osteoclasts. Bisphosphonates are clearly effective in preventing and treating GIOP but anabolic therapeutic strategies are the new promising therapeutic alternative. Experimental and clinical studies indicate that teriparatide, the active (1–34 parathyroid hormone (PTH molecule, is efficacious for the treatment of GIOP, being able to induce an increase in bone mass in these patients. Intermittent administration of human PTH (1–34 stimulates bone formation by increasing osteoblast number. Additionally, human PTH (1–34 modulates the level and/or activity of locally produced growth factors and cytokines. Teriparatide has been demonstrated in several clinical studies to significantly decrease the incidence of fractures in patients affected by GIOP. It has recently received an indication for GIOP and its label indication has also been expanded.Keywords: glucocorticoids, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteoporosis, teriparatide

  17. Quantitative tissue-specific dynamics of in vivo GILZ mRNA expression and regulation by endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyar, Vivaswath S; Almon, Richard R; Jusko, William J; DuBois, Debra C

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are steroid hormones, which regulate metabolism and immune function. Synthetic GCs, or corticosteroids (CS), have appreciable clinical utility via their ability to suppress inflammation in immune-mediated diseases like asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Recent work has provided insight to novel GC-induced genes that mediate their anti-inflammatory effects, including glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). Since GILZ comprises an important part of GC action, its regulation by both drug and hormone will influence CS therapy. In addition, GILZ expression is often employed as a biomarker of GC action, which requires judicious selection of sampling time. Understanding the in vivo regulation of GILZ mRNA expression over time will provide insight into both the physiological regulation of GILZ by endogenous GC and the dynamics of its enhancement by CS. A highly quantitative qRT-PCR assay was developed for measuring GILZ mRNA expression in tissues obtained from normal and CS-treated rats. This assay was applied to measure GILZ mRNA expression in eight tissues; to determine its endogenous regulation over time; and to characterize its dynamics in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver following treatment with CS. We demonstrate that GILZ mRNA is expressed in several tissues. GILZ mRNA expression in adipose tissue displayed a robust circadian rhythm that was entrained with the circadian oscillation of endogenous corticosterone; and is strongly enhanced by acute and chronic dosing. Single dosing also enhanced GILZ mRNA in muscle and liver, but the dynamics varied. In conclusion, GILZ is widely expressed in the rat and highly regulated by endogenous and exogenous GCs. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  18. Involvement of glucocorticoid-mediated Zn2+ signaling in attenuation of hippocampal CA1 LTP by acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Miki; Tamano, Haruna; Takada, Shunsuke; Ide, Kazuki; Oku, Naoto

    2012-03-01

    Glucocorticoid-glutamatergic interactions have been proposed as a potential model to explain stress-mediated impairment of cognition. However, it is unknown whether glucocorticoid-zincergic interactions are involved in this impairment. Histochemically reactive zinc (Zn(2+)) is co-released with glutamate from zincergic neurons. In the present study, involvement of synaptic Zn(2+) in stress-induced attenuation of CA1 LTP was examined in hippocampal slices from young rats after exposure to tail suspension stress for 30s, which significantly increased serum corticosterone. Stress-induced attenuation of CA1 LTP was ameliorated by administration of clioquinol, a membrane permeable zinc chelator, to rats prior to exposure to stress, implying that the reduction of synaptic Zn(2+) by clioquinol participates in this amelioration. To pursue the involvement of corticosterone-mediated Zn(2+) signal in the attenuated CA1 LTP by stress, dynamics of synaptic Zn(2+) was checked in hippocampal slices exposed to corticosterone. Corticosterone increased extracellular Zn(2+) levels measured with ZnAF-2 dose-dependently, as well as the intracellular Ca(2+) levels measured with calcium orange AM, suggesting that corticosterone excites zincergic neurons in the hippocampus and increases Zn(2+) release from the neuron terminals. Intracellular Zn(2+) levels measured with ZnAF-2DA were also increased dose-dependently, but not in the coexistence of CaEDTA, a membrane-impermeable zinc chelator, suggesting that intracellular Zn(2+) levels is increased by the influx of extracellular Zn(2+). Furthermore, corticosterone-induced attenuation of CA1 LTP was abolished in the coexistence of CaEDTA. The present study suggests that corticosterone-mediated increase in postsynaptic Zn(2+) signal in the cytosolic compartment is involved in the attenuation of CA1 LTP after exposure to acute stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Tyagi, Neelam; Balter, James M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2007-01-01

    Variations in target volume position between and during treatment fractions can lead to measurable differences in the dose distribution delivered to each patient. Current methods to estimate the ongoing cumulative delivered dose distribution make idealized assumptions about individual patient motion based on average motions observed in a population of patients. In the delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC), errors are introduced in both the implementation and delivery processes. In addition, target motion and MLC motion can lead to dosimetric errors from interplay effects. All of these effects may be of clinical importance. Here we present a method to compute delivered dose distributions for each treatment beam and fraction, which explicitly incorporates synchronized real-time patient motion data and real-time fluence and machine configuration data. This synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction method properly accounts for the two primary classes of errors that arise from delivering IMRT with an MLC: (a) Interplay errors between target volume motion and MLC motion, and (b) Implementation errors, such as dropped segments, dose over/under shoot, faulty leaf motors, tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf ends, and communications delays. These reconstructed dose fractions can then be combined to produce high-quality determinations of the dose distribution actually received to date, from which individualized adaptive treatment strategies can be determined

  20. The cumulative effect of air pollutants on the acute exacerbation of COPD in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xian Wen; Chen, Pei Li; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ying Ni; Zhou, Jian Ping; Ni, Lei; Li, Qing Yun

    2018-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown the effect of air pollutants on acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). However, little is known regarding the dose-response relationship. This study aimed to investigate the cumulative effect of air pollutants on AECOPD. We collected 101 patients with AECOPD from November 2010 through August 2011 in Shanghai. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate associations between air pollutants and AECOPD. Poisson regression was then applied to determine the cumulative effect of air pollutants including particulate matter 10 (PM10), PM2.5, nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and ozone (O 3 ) on AECOPD, of which the seasonal variation was further explored. The monthly episodes of AECOPD were associated with the concentrations of PM2.5 (r=0.884, peffect in cold season, whereas 7days in warm season. The RR for AECOPD for per 10μg/m 3 increment in NO 2 was 1.07, with a 5-day cumulative effect without seasonal variation. High consecutive levels of PM2.5 and NO 2 increase the risk of developing AECOPD. Cumulative effect of PM2.5 and NO 2 appears before the exacerbation onset. These gradations were more evident in the PM2.5 during different seasons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 7 CFR 42.132 - Determining cumulative sum values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determining cumulative sum values. 42.132 Section 42... Determining cumulative sum values. (a) The parameters for the on-line cumulative sum sampling plans for AQL's... 3 1 2.5 3 1 2 1 (b) At the beginning of the basic inspection period, the CuSum value is set equal to...

  2. Improving cumulative effects assessment in Alberta: Regional strategic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dallas; Lalonde, Kim; McEachern, Menzie; Kenney, John; Mendoza, Gustavo; Buffin, Andrew; Rich, Kate

    2011-01-01

    The Government of Alberta, Canada is developing a regulatory framework to better manage cumulative environmental effects from development in the province. A key component of this effort is regional planning, which will lay the primary foundation for cumulative effects management into the future. Alberta Environment has considered the information needs of regional planning and has concluded that Regional Strategic Assessment may offer significant advantages if integrated into the planning process, including the overall improvement of cumulative environmental effects assessment in the province.

  3. Glucocorticoid treatment earlier in childhood and adolescence show dose-response associations with diurnal cortisol levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Holm, Sara K; Uldall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    or diurnal cortisol output; however, sex-dependent group differences were observed. Specifically, female patients had a higher CAR relative to female controls, while male patients had higher daily cortisol levels compared to male controls. Notably, CAR in female patients and daily cortisol levels in male...... for males and females....

  4. Role of glucocorticoid receptor-mediated mechanisms in cocaine memory enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfield, S J; Higginbotham, J A; Wang, R; Berger, A L; McLaughlin, R J; Fuchs, R A

    2017-09-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is a critical site for the reconsolidation of labile contextual cocaine memories following retrieval-induced reactivation/destabilization. Here, we examined whether glucocorticoid receptors (GR), which are abundant in the BLA, mediate this phenomenon. Rats were trained to lever press for cocaine reinforcement in a distinct environmental context, followed by extinction training in a different context. Rats were then briefly exposed to the cocaine-paired context (to elicit memory reactivation and reconsolidation) or their home cages (no reactivation control). Exposure to the cocaine-paired context elicited greater serum corticosterone concentrations than home cage stay. Interestingly, the GR antagonist, mifepristone (3-10 ng/hemisphere), administered into the BLA after memory reactivation produced a further, dose-dependent increase in serum corticosterone concentrations during the putative time of cocaine-memory reconsolidation but produced an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve on subsequent cocaine-seeking behavior 72 h later. This effect was anatomically selective, dependent on memory reactivation (i.e., not observed after home cage exposure), and did not reflect protracted hyperactivity. However, the effect was also observed when mifepristone was administered after novelty stress that mimics drug context-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation without explicit memory reactivation. Together, these findings suggest that, similar to explicit memory retrieval, a stressful event is sufficient to destabilize cocaine memories and permit their manipulation. Furthermore, BLA GR stimulation exerts inhibitory feedback upon HPA axis activation and thus suppresses cocaine-memory reconsolidation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Baseline glucocorticoids are drivers of body mass gain in a diving seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennin, Holly; Berlin, Alicia; Love, Oliver P.

    2016-01-01

    Life-history trade-offs are influenced by variation in individual state, with individuals in better condition often completing life-history stages with greater success. Although resource accrual significantly impacts key life-history decisions such as the timing of reproduction, little is known about the underlying mechanisms driving resource accumulation. Baseline corticosterone (CORT, the primary avian glucocorticoid) mediates daily and seasonal energetics, responds to changes in food availability, and has been linked to foraging behavior, making it a strong potential driver of individual variation in resource accrual and deposition. Working with a captive colony of white-winged scoters (Melanitta fusca deglandi), we aimed to causally determine whether variation in baseline CORT drives individual body mass gains mediated through fattening rate (plasma triglycerides corrected for body mass). We implanted individuals with each of three treatment pellets to elevate CORT within a baseline range in a randomized order: control, low dose of CORT, high dose of CORT, then blood sampled and recorded body mass over a two-week period to track changes in baseline CORT, body mass, and fattening rates. The high CORT treatment significantly elevated levels of plasma hormone for a short period of time within the biologically relevant, baseline range for this species, but importantly did not inhibit the function of the HPA (hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal) axis. Furthermore, an elevation in baseline CORT resulted in a consistent increase in body mass throughout the trial period compared to controls. This is some of the first empirical evidence demonstrating that elevations of baseline CORT within a biologically relevant range have a causal, direct, and positive influence on changes in body mass.

  6. Baseline glucocorticoids are drivers of body mass gain in a diving seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennin, Holly L; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M; Love, Oliver P

    2016-03-01

    Life-history trade-offs are influenced by variation in individual state, with individuals in better condition often completing life-history stages with greater success. Although resource accrual significantly impacts key life-history decisions such as the timing of reproduction, little is known about the underlying mechanisms driving resource accumulation. Baseline corticosterone (CORT, the primary avian glucocorticoid) mediates daily and seasonal energetics, responds to changes in food availability, and has been linked to foraging behavior, making it a strong potential driver of individual variation in resource accrual and deposition. Working with a captive colony of white-winged scoters (Melanitta fusca deglandi), we aimed to causally determine whether variation in baseline CORT drives individual body mass gains mediated through fattening rate (plasma triglycerides corrected for body mass). We implanted individuals with each of three treatment pellets to elevate CORT within a baseline range in a randomized order: control, low dose of CORT, high dose of CORT, then blood sampled and recorded body mass over a two-week period to track changes in baseline CORT, body mass, and fattening rates. The high CORT treatment significantly elevated levels of plasma hormone for a short period of time within the biologically relevant, baseline range for this species, but importantly did not inhibit the function of the HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) axis. Furthermore, an elevation in baseline CORT resulted in a consistent increase in body mass throughout the trial period compared to controls. This is some of the first empirical evidence demonstrating that elevations of baseline CORT within a biologically relevant range have a causal, direct, and positive influence on changes in body mass.

  7. Role of NeuroD1 on the negative regulation of Pomc expression by glucocorticoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Parvin

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the negative regulation of proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc by glucocorticoids (Gcs is still unclear in many points. Here, we demonstrated the involvement of neurogenic differentiation factor 1 (NeuroD1 in the Gc-mediated negative regulation of Pomc. Murine pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH producing corticotroph tumor-derived AtT20 cells were treated with dexamethasone (DEX (1-100 nM and cultured for 24 hrs. Thereafter, Pomc mRNA expression was studied by quantitative real-time PCR and rat Pomc promoter (-703/+58 activity was examined by luciferase assay. Both Pomc mRNA expression and Pomc promoter activity were inhibited by DEX in a dose-dependent manner. Deletion and point mutant analyses of Pomc promoter suggested that the DEX-mediated transcriptional repression was mediated via E-box that exists at -376/-371 in the promoter. Since NeuroD1 is known to bind to and activate E-box of the Pomc promoter, we next examined the effect of DEX on NeuroD1 expression. Interestingly, DEX dose-dependently inhibited NeuroD1 mRNA expression, mouse NeuroD1 promoter (-2.2-kb activity, and NeuroD1 protein expression in AtT20 cells. In addition, we confirmed the inhibitory effect of DEX on the interaction of NeuroD1 and E-box on Pomc promoter by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. Finally, overexpression of mouse NeuroD1 could rescue the DEX-mediated inhibition of Pomc mRNA expression and Pomc promoter activity. Taken together, it is suggested that the suppression of NeuroD1 expression and the inhibition of NeuroD1/E-box interaction may play an important role in the Gc-mediated negative regulation of Pomc.

  8. Children neglected: Where cumulative risk theory fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Mandy; Legano, Lori; Homel, Peter; Walker-Descartes, Ingrid; Rojas, Mary; Laraque, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    Neglected children, by far the majority of children maltreated, experience an environment most deficient in cognitive stimulation and language exchange. When physical abuse co-occurs with neglect, there is more stimulation through negative parent-child interaction, which may lead to better cognitive outcomes, contrary to Cumulative Risk Theory. The purpose of the current study was to assess whether children only neglected perform worse on cognitive tasks than children neglected and physically abused. Utilizing LONGSCAN archived data, 271 children only neglected and 101 children neglected and physically abused in the first four years of life were compared. The two groups were assessed at age 6 on the WPPSI-R vocabulary and block design subtests, correlates of cognitive intelligence. Regression analyses were performed, controlling for additional predictors of poor cognitive outcome, including socioeconomic variables and caregiver depression. Children only neglected scored significantly worse than children neglected and abused on the WPPSI-R vocabulary subtest (p=0.03). The groups did not differ on the block design subtest (p=0.4). This study shows that for neglected children, additional abuse may not additively accumulate risk when considering intelligence outcomes. Children experiencing only neglect may need to be referred for services that address cognitive development, with emphasis on the linguistic environment, in order to best support the developmental challenges of neglected children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P.

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, ''A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set

  10. Analysis of Memory Codes and Cumulative Rehearsal in Observational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of memory codes varying in meaningfulness and retrievability and cumulative rehearsal on retention of observationally learned responses over increasing temporal intervals. (Editor)

  11. Decreased plasma cholesterol esterification and cholesteryl ester transfer in hypopituitary patients on glucocorticoid replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; Van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    Cardiovascular risk is increased in hypopituitary patients. No data are available with respect to the effect of glucocorticoid replacement therapy on high density lipoproteins (HDL) metabolism in such patients. Plasma lecithin:choresterol acyl transferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein

  12. Glucocorticoid and cytokine crosstalk: Feedback, feedforward, and co-regulatory interactions determine repression or resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert; Shah, Suharsh; Altonsy, Mohammed O; Gerber, Antony N

    2017-04-28

    Inflammatory signals induce feedback and feedforward systems that provide temporal control. Although glucocorticoids can repress inflammatory gene expression, glucocorticoid receptor recruitment increases expression of negative feedback and feedforward regulators, including the phosphatase, DUSP1, the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme, TNFAIP3, or the mRNA-destabilizing protein, ZFP36. Moreover, glucocorticoid receptor cooperativity with factors, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), may enhance regulator expression to promote repression. Conversely, MAPKs, which are inhibited by glucocorticoids, provide feedforward control to limit expression of the transcription factor IRF1, and the chemokine, CXCL10. We propose that modulation of feedback and feedforward control can determine repression or resistance of inflammatory gene expression toglucocorticoid. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl C; Overgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone – Validation of large animal model for tissue engineering and biomaterial research Ming Ding,1* Carl Christian Danielsen,2 Søren Overgaard1 1Orthopaedic Research Laboratory......, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark 2Department of Connective Tissue Biology, Institute of Anatomy, University of Aarhus, Aarhus C, Denmark Osteopenia in sheep has been successfully induced...... by glucocorticoid treatment and the changes in properties of cancellous bone were comparable with those observed in humans after long-term glucocorticoid treatment. However, the influence on cortical bone has not been thoroughly elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the influence of glucocorticoid on sheep...

  14. Regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by systemic factors including stress, glucocorticoids, sleep, and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Oomen, C.; van Dam, A.-M.; Czéh, B.; Gage, F.H.; Kempermann, G.; Song, H.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes and discusses the regulation of adult neurogenesis and hippocampal cellular plasticity by systemic factors. We focus on the role of stress, glucocorticoids, and related factors such as sleep deprivation and inflammation.

  15. Stress, glucocorticoids and memory: implications for treating fear-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique; Schwabe, Lars; Roozendaal, Benno

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones are crucially involved in modulating mnemonic processing of emotionally arousing experiences. They enhance the consolidation of new memories, including those that extinguish older memories, but impair the retrieval of information stored in long-term memory. As strong aversive memories lie at the core of several fear-related disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias, the memory-modulating properties of glucocorticoids have recently become of considerable translational interest. Clinical trials have provided the first evidence that glucocorticoid-based pharmacotherapies aimed at attenuating aversive memories might be helpful in the treatment of fear-related disorders. Here, we review important advances in the understanding of how glucocorticoids mediate stress effects on memory processes, and discuss the translational potential of these new conceptual insights.

  16. Memory consolidation in human sleep depends on inhibition of glucocorticoid release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plihal, W; Born, J

    1999-09-09

    Early sleep dominated by slow-wave sleep has been found to be particularly relevant for declarative memory formation via hippocampo-neocortical networks. Concurrently, early nocturnal sleep is characterized by an inhibition of glucocorticoid release from the adrenals. Here, we show in healthy humans that this inhibition serves to support declarative memory consolidation during sleep. Elevating plasma glucocorticoid concentration during early sleep by administration of cortisol impaired consolidation of paired associate words, but not of non-declarative memory of visuomotor skills. Since glucocorticoid concentration was enhanced only during retention sleep, but not during acquisition or retrieval, a specific effect on the consolidation process is indicated. Blocking mineralocorticoid receptors by canrenoate did not affect memory, suggesting inactivation of glucocorticoid receptors to be the essential prerequisite for memory consolidation during early sleep.

  17. Risk of catecholaminergic crisis following glucocorticoid administration in patients with an adrenal mass: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, C.; Uum, S.H. van; Lenders, J.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glucocorticoids as diagnostic or therapeutic agents have been reported to carry an increased risk of catecholaminergic crisis (CC) in patients with pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma (PPGL). METHODS: We searched literature databases using the following terms: pheochromocytoma,

  18. The different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Zhu

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS - nitric oxide (NO pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression.

  19. Risk of cardiovascular events in people prescribed glucocorticoids with iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome: cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is an increased risk of cardiovascular events in people who exhibit iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome during treatment with glucocorticoids. Design Cohort study. Setting 424 UK general practices contributing to The Health Improvement Network database. Participants People prescribed systemic glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (n=547) and two comparison groups: those prescribed glucocorticoids and with no diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (n=3231) and those not prescribed systemic glucocorticoids (n=3282). Main outcome measures Incidence of cardiovascular events within a year after diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome or after a randomly selected date, and association between iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome and risk of cardiovascular events. Results 417 cardiovascular events occurred in 341 patients. Taking into account only the first event by patient (coronary heart disease n=177, heart failure n=101, ischaemic stroke n=63), the incidence rates of cardiovascular events per 100 person years at risk were 15.1 (95% confidence interval 11.8 to 18.4) in those prescribed glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome, 6.4 (5.5 to 7.3) in those prescribed glucocorticoids without a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome, and 4.1 (3.4 to 4.8) in those not prescribed glucocorticoids. In multivariate analyses adjusted for sex, age, intensity of glucocorticoid use, underlying disease, smoking status, and use of aspirin, diabetes drugs, antihypertensive drugs, lipid lowering drugs, or oral anticoagulant drugs, the relation between iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome and cardiovascular events was strong (adjusted hazard ratios 2.27 (95% confidence interval 1.48 to 3.47) for coronary heart disease, 3.77 (2.41 to 5.90) for heart failure, and 2.23 (0.96 to 5.17) for ischaemic cerebrovascular events). The adjusted hazard ratio for any cardiovascular event was 4

  20. Risk of cardiovascular events in people prescribed glucocorticoids with iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardet, Laurence; Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin

    2012-07-30

    To investigate whether there is an increased risk of cardiovascular events in people who exhibit iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome during treatment with glucocorticoids. Cohort study. 424 UK general practices contributing to The Health Improvement Network database. People prescribed systemic glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (n = 547) and two comparison groups: those prescribed glucocorticoids and with no diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (n = 3231) and those not prescribed systemic glucocorticoids (n = 3282). Incidence of cardiovascular events within a year after diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome or after a randomly selected date, and association between iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome and risk of cardiovascular events. 417 cardiovascular events occurred in 341 patients. Taking into account only the first event by patient (coronary heart disease n = 177, heart failure n = 101, ischaemic stroke n = 63), the incidence rates of cardiovascular events per 100 person years at risk were 15.1 (95% confidence interval 11.8 to 18.4) in those prescribed glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, 6.4 (5.5 to 7.3) in those prescribed glucocorticoids without a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, and 4.1 (3.4 to 4.8) in those not prescribed glucocorticoids. In multivariate analyses adjusted for sex, age, intensity of glucocorticoid use, underlying disease, smoking status, and use of aspirin, diabetes drugs, antihypertensive drugs, lipid lowering drugs, or oral anticoagulant drugs, the relation between iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome and cardiovascular events was strong (adjusted hazard ratios 2.27 (95% confidence interval 1.48 to 3.47) for coronary heart disease, 3.77 (2.41 to 5.90) for heart failure, and 2.23 (0.96 to 5.17) for ischaemic cerebrovascular events). The adjusted hazard ratio for any cardiovascular event was 4.16 (2.98 to 5.82) when the group prescribed glucocorticoids and with

  1. Cellular and biochemical actions of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones on rat thymic lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, D A; Voris, B P; Nicholson, M L

    1981-01-01

    The molecular, biochemical, and cellular effects of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones on thymic lymphocytes are reviewed, with emphasis on their relationship to the growth suppressive and lethal actions that occur in lymphoid tissues when glucocorticoids are administered to the whole animal. The data support the hypothesis that the hormonal inhibition of growth and development is a consequence of its ability to suppress cellular energy production, causing the cells to behave as though they were...

  2. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytok...

  3. Glucocorticoids have state-dependent stimulant effects on the mesencephalic dopaminergic transmission.

    OpenAIRE

    Piazza, P V; Rougé-Pont, F; Deroche, V; Maccari, S; Simon, H; Le Moal, M

    1996-01-01

    An increase in the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons has been implicated in the appearance of pathological behaviors such as psychosis and drug abuse. Several observations suggest that glucocorticoids might contribute to such an increase in dopaminergic activity. The present experiments therefore analyzed the effects of corticosterone, the major glucocorticoid in the rat, both on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving animals by means of microdialysis, and on ...

  4. Glucocorticoid effects on object recognition memory require training-associated emotional arousal

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Shoki; Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Considerable evidence implicates glucocorticoid hormones in the regulation of memory consolidation and memory retrieval. The present experiments investigated whether the influence of these hormones on memory depends on the level of emotional arousal induced by the training experience. We investigated this issue in male Sprague–Dawley rats by examining the effects of immediate posttraining systemic injections of the glucocorticoid corticosterone on object recognition memory under two condition...

  5. Preadmission glucocorticoid use and anastomotic leakage after colon and rectal cancer resections: a Danish cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, Eva Bjerre; Erichsen, Rune; Baron, John A; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Riis, Anders H; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether preadmission glucocorticoid use increases the risk of anastomotic leakage after colon and rectal cancer resections. Design A population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark (2001–2011). Participants We identified patients who had undergone a primary anastomosis after a colorectal cancer resection by linking medical registries. Participants who filled their most recent glucocorticoid prescription ≤90, 91–365 and >365 days before their surgery date were categorised as current, recent and former users, respectively. Main outcome measures We calculated 30-day absolute risk of anastomotic leakage and computed ORs using logistic regression models with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Of the 18 190 patients with colon cancer, anastomotic leakage occurred in 1184 (6.5%). Glucocorticoid use overall was not associated with an increased risk of leakage (6.4% vs 6.9% among never-users; OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.23). Categories of oral, inhaled or intestinal-acting glucocorticoids did not greatly affect risk of leakage. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 695 (13.2%) of 5284 patients with rectal cancer. Glucocorticoid use overall slightly increased risk of leakage (14.6% vs 12.8% among never-users; OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.72). Results did not differ significantly within glucocorticoid categories. Conclusions Preadmission glucocorticoids modestly increased the risk of anastomotic leakage mainly after rectal cancer resection. However, absolute risk differences were small and the clinical impact of glucocorticoid use may therefore be limited. PMID:26408282

  6. Endocannabinoids in the rat basolateral amygdala enhance memory consolidation and enable glucocorticoid modulation of memory

    OpenAIRE

    Campolongo, Patrizia; Roozendaal, Benno; Trezza, Viviana; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.; Cuomo, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) modulates the consolidation of memories for emotionally arousing experiences, an effect that involves the activation of the glucocorticoid system. Because the BLA expresses high densities of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, the present experiments investigated whether the endocannabinoid system in the BLA influences memory consolidation and whether glucocorticoids interact with this system. The CB1 receptor agonist WIN5...

  7. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 regulates glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Stuart A

    2009-11-01

    Glucocorticoid excess is characterized by increased adiposity, skeletal myopathy, and insulin resistance, but the precise molecular mechanisms are unknown. Within skeletal muscle, 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) converts cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in rodents) to active cortisol (corticosterone in rodents). We aimed to determine the mechanisms underpinning glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and indentify how 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors improve insulin sensitivity.

  8. Do the interactions between glucocorticoids and sex hormones regulate the development of the Metabolic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marià eAlemany

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is basically a maturity-onset disease. Typically, its manifestations begin to flourish years after the initial dietary or environmental aggression began. Since most hormonal, metabolic or defense responses are practically immediate, the procrastinated response don't seem justified. Only in childhood, the damages of the metabolic syndrome appear with minimal delay. Sex affects the incidence of the metabolic syndrome, but this is more an effect of timing than absolute gender differences, females holding better than males up to menopause, when the differences between sexes tend to disappear. The metabolic syndrome is related to an immune response, countered by a permanent increase in glucocorticoids, which keep the immune system at bay but also induce insulin resistance, alter the lipid metabolism, favor fat deposition, mobilize protein and decrease androgen synthesis. Androgens limit the operation of glucocorticoids, which is also partly blocked by estrogens, since they decrease inflammation (which enhances glucocorticoid release. These facts suggest that the appearance of the metabolic syndrome symptoms depends on the strength (i.e. levels of androgens and estrogens. The predominance of glucocorticoids and the full manifestation of the syndrome in men are favored by decreased androgen activity. Low androgens can be found in infancy, maturity, advanced age, or because of their inhibition by glucocorticoids (inflammation, stress, medical treatment. Estrogens decrease inflammation and reduce the glucocorticoid response. Low estrogen (infancy, menopause again allow the predominance of glucocorticoids and the manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. It is postulated that the equilibrium between sex hormones and glucocorticoids may be a critical element in the timing of the manifestation of metabolic syndrome-related pathologies.

  9. Peripheral CLOCK regulates target-tissue glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity in a circadian fashion in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Charmandari

    Full Text Available Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the "master" circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral "slave" counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans.We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs as non-synchronized controls.GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo.Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night.

  10. Peripheral CLOCK Regulates Target-Tissue Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity in a Circadian Fashion in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P.; Lambrou, George I.; Pavlaki, Aikaterini; Koide, Hisashi; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Kino, Tomoshige

    2011-01-01

    Context and Objective Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the “master” circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral “slave” counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans. Design and Participants We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs) as non-synchronized controls. Results GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo. Conclusions Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night. PMID:21980503

  11. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shoko, E-mail: satosho@rs.tus.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Shirakawa, Hitoshi, E-mail: shirakah@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Tomita, Shuhei, E-mail: tomita@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Tohkin, Masahiro, E-mail: tohkin@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Medical Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Science, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 267-8603 (Japan); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: gonzalef@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Komai, Michio, E-mail: mkomai@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  12. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction

  13. Testosterone supplementation, glucocorticoid milieu and bone homeostasis in the ageing male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdžanović, Vladimir Z; Filipović, Branko R; Šošić Jurjević, Branka T; Milošević, Verica Lj

    2017-08-01

    Male ageing is entwined with a continuous fall in free testosterone levels, which contributes to the pathogenesis of bone loss. Glucocorticoid excess, either dependent on the ageing process or iatrogenically induced, was found to additionally impair the bone structure and metabolism. Cautious testosterone supplementation in this respect may positively affect the glucocorticoid milieu and bone homeostasis, while testosterone-induced changes in the glucocorticoid output could serve as a determinant of bone-related therapeutic outcome. Namely, bone mineral content/density, the parameters of trabecular bone structure as well as bone strength are enhanced, serum calcitonin levels tend to increase, while serum osteocalcin, serum parathyroid hormone and urinary calcium decrease, all upon testosterone administration to the ageing male. In parallel, testosterone application decreases glucocorticoid secretion in the animal models of male ageing, while clinical data in this field are still inconsistent. Importantly, a physiological link exists between testosterone-induced changes in glucocorticoid levels and the tendency of bone status improvement in the ageing male. We believe that the assessment of circulating adrenocorticotropic hormone concentrations together with glucocorticoid levels, reflecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis feedback loop operativeness during testosterone supplementation, represents a well-balanced bone-related therapeutic update. © 2017 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  14. Effects of a single glucocorticoid injection on propylene glycol-treated cows with clinical ketosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Drift, Saskia G A; Houweling, Martin; Bouman, Marina; Koets, Ad P; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Nielen, Mirjam; Jorritsma, Ruurd

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the metabolic effects of glucocorticoids when administered to propylene glycol-treated cows with clinical ketosis. Clinical ketosis was defined by depressed feed intake and milk production, and a maximal score for acetoacetate in urine. All cows received 250 mL oral propylene glycol twice daily for 3 days and were randomly assigned to a single intramuscular injection with sterile isotonic saline solution (n = 14) or dexamethasone-21-isonicotinate (n = 17). Metabolic blood variables were monitored for 6 days and adipose tissue variables for 3 days. β-Hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations in blood decreased in all cows during treatment, but were lower in glucocorticoid-treated cows. Cows treated with glucocorticoids had higher plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, whereas concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids, 3-methylhistidine and growth hormone were unaffected. mRNA expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, BHBA receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type γ in adipose tissue was not affected. This shows that lipolytic effects do not appear to be important in ketotic cows when glucocorticoids are combined with PG. Plasma 3-methyl histidine concentrations were similar in both groups, suggesting that glucocorticoids did not increase muscle breakdown and that the greater rise in plasma glucose in glucocorticoid-treated cows may not be due to increased supply of glucogenic amino acids from muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Activated Glucocorticoid Receptor Interacts with the INHAT Component Set/TAF-Iβ and Releases it from a Glucocorticoid-responsive Gene Promoter, Relieving Repression: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Glucocorticoid Resistance in Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia with Set-Can Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Set/template-activating factor (TAF)-Iβ, part of the Set-Can oncogene product found in acute undifferentiated leukemia, is a component of the inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) complex. Set/TAF-Iβ interacted with the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in yeast two-hybrid screening, and repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity of a chromatin-integrated glucocorticoid-responsive and a natural promoter. Set/TAF-Iβ was co-precipitated with glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) of these promoters in the absence of dexamethasone, while addition of the hormone caused dissociation of Set/TAF-Iβ from and attraction of the p160-type coactivator GRIP1 to the promoter GREs. Set-Can fusion protein, on the other hand, did not interact with GR, was constitutively co-precipitated with GREs and suppressed GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR transcriptional activity and histone acetylation. Thus, Set/TAF-Iβ acts as a ligand-activated GR-responsive transcriptional repressor, while Set-Can does not retain physiologic responsiveness to ligand-bound GR, possibly contributing to the poor responsiveness of Set-Can-harboring leukemic cells to glucocorticoids. PMID:18096310

  16. Activated glucocorticoid receptor interacts with the INHAT component Set/TAF-Ibeta and releases it from a glucocorticoid-responsive gene promoter, relieving repression: implications for the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistance in acute undifferentiated leukemia with Set-Can translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P; Kino, Tomoshige

    2008-02-13

    Set/template-activating factor (TAF)-Ibeta, part of the Set-Can oncogene product found in acute undifferentiated leukemia, is a component of the inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) complex. Set/TAF-Ibeta interacted with the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in yeast two-hybrid screening, and repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity of a chromatin-integrated glucocorticoid-responsive and a natural promoter. Set/TAF-Ibeta was co-precipitated with glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) of these promoters in the absence of dexamethasone, while addition of the hormone caused dissociation of Set/TAF-Ibeta from and attraction of the p160-type coactivator GRIP1 to the promoter GREs. Set-Can fusion protein, on the other hand, did not interact with GR, was constitutively co-precipitated with GREs and suppressed GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR transcriptional activity and histone acetylation. Thus, Set/TAF-Ibeta acts as a ligand-activated GR-responsive transcriptional repressor, while Set-Can does not retain physiologic responsiveness to ligand-bound GR, possibly contributing to the poor responsiveness of Set-Can-harboring leukemic cells to glucocorticoids.

  17. The modulation of corticosteroid metabolism by hydrocortisone therapy in patients with hypopituitarism increases tissue glucocorticoid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, Mark; Behan, Lucy Ann; Hannon, Mark J; Alonso, Aurora Aragon; Thompson, Christopher J; Murray, Robert D; Crabtree, Nicola; Hughes, Beverly A; Arlt, Wiebke; Agha, Amar; Toogood, Andrew A; Stewart, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased morbidity and mortality. There is ongoing debate about the optimum glucocorticoid (GC) replacement therapy. To assess the effect of GC replacement in hypopituitarism on corticosteroid metabolism and its impact on body composition. We assessed the urinary corticosteroid metabolite profile (using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) and body composition (clinical parameters and full body DXA) of 53 patients (19 female, median age 46 years) with hypopituitarism (33 ACTH-deficient/20 ACTH-replete) (study A). The corticosteroid metabolite profile of ten patients with ACTH deficiency was then assessed prospectively in a cross over study using three hydrocortisone (HC) dosing regimens (20/10 mg, 10/10 mg and 10/5 mg) (study B) each for 6 weeks. 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) activity was assessed by urinary THF+5α-THF/THE. Endocrine Centres within University Teaching Hospitals in the UK and Ireland. Urinary corticosteroid metabolite profile and body composition assessment. In study A, when patients were divided into three groups - patients not receiving HC and patients receiving HC≤20 mg/day or HC>20 mg/day - patients in the group receiving the highest daily dose of HC had significantly higher waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) than the ACTH replete group. They also had significantly elevated THF+5α-THF/THE (P=0.0002) and total cortisol metabolites (P=0.015). In study B, patients on the highest HC dose had significantly elevated total cortisol metabolites and all patients on HC had elevated THF+5α-THF/THE ratios when compared to controls. In ACTH-deficient patients daily HC doses of >20 mg/day have increased WHR, THF+5α-THF/THE ratios and total cortisol metabolites. GC metabolism and induction of 11β-HSD1 may play a pivitol role in the development of the metabolically adverse hypopituitary phenotype. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  18. Cumulative Effect of Depression on Dementia Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olazarán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze a potential cumulative effect of life-time depression on dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD, with control of vascular factors (VFs. Methods. This study was a subanalysis of the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES study. Past and present depression, VFs, dementia status, and dementia due to AD were documented at study inception. Dementia status was also documented after three years. Four groups were created according to baseline data: never depression (nD, past depression (pD, present depression (prD, and present and past depression (prpD. Logistic regression was used. Results. Data of 1,807 subjects were investigated at baseline (mean age 74.3, 59.3% women, and 1,376 (81.6% subjects were evaluated after three years. The prevalence of dementia at baseline was 6.7%, and dementia incidence was 6.3%. An effect of depression was observed on dementia prevalence (OR [CI 95%] 1.84 [1.01–3.35] for prD and 2.73 [1.08–6.87] for prpD, and on dementia due to AD (OR 1.98 [0.98–3.99] for prD and OR 3.98 [1.48–10.71] for prpD (fully adjusted models, nD as reference. Depression did not influence dementia incidence. Conclusions. Present depression and, particularly, present and past depression are associated with dementia at old age. Multiple mechanisms, including toxic effect of depression on hippocampal neurons, plausibly explain these associations.

  19. Quantitative cumulative biodistribution of antibodies in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Victor; Palma, Enzo; Tesar, Devin B; Mundo, Eduardo E; Bumbaca, Daniela; Torres, Elizabeth K; Reyes, Noe A; Shen, Ben Q; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta; Khawli, Leslie A; Boswell, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in antibody recycling in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and thus it influences the systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of immunoglobulin G (IgG). However, considerably less is known about FcRn’s role in the metabolism of IgG within individual tissues after intravenous administration. To elucidate the organ distribution and gain insight into the metabolism of humanized IgG1 antibodies with different binding affinities FcRn, comparative biodistribution studies in normal CD-1 mice were conducted. Here, we generated variants of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D-specific antibody (humanized anti-gD) with increased and decreased FcRn binding affinity by genetic engineering without affecting antigen specificity. These antibodies were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, purified and paired radiolabeled with iodine-125 and indium-111. Equal amounts of I-125-labeled and In-111-labeled antibodies were mixed and intravenously administered into mice at 5 mg/kg. This approach allowed us to measure both the real-time IgG uptake (I-125) and cumulative uptake of IgG and catabolites (In-111) in individual tissues up to 1 week post-injection. The PK and distribution of the wild-type IgG and the variant with enhanced binding for FcRn were largely similar to each other, but vastly different for the rapidly cleared low-FcRn-binding variant. Uptake in individual tissues varied across time, FcRn binding affinity, and radiolabeling method. The liver and spleen emerged as the most concentrated sites of IgG catabolism in the absence of FcRn protection. These data provide an increased understanding of FcRn’s role in antibody PK and catabolism at the tissue level. PMID:24572100

  20. A Framework for Treating Cumulative Trauma with Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative trauma is relatively undocumented in art therapy practice, although there is growing evidence that art therapy provides distinct benefits for resolving various traumas. This qualitative study proposes an art therapy treatment framework for cumulative trauma derived from semi-structured interviews with three art therapists and artistic…

  1. Cumulative effects of forest management activities: how might they occur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Rice; R. B. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Concerns are often voiced about possible environmental damage as the result of the cumulative sedimentation effects of logging and forest road construction. In response to these concerns, National Forests are developing procedures to reduce the possibility that their activities may lead to unacceptable cumulative effects

  2. Cumulative effect in multiple production processes on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubyatnikova, E.S.; Shmonin, V.L.; Kalinkin, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the cumulative effect is a natural result of the process of hadron multiple production in nuclear reactions. Interpretation is made of the universality of slopes of inclusive spectra and other characteristics of cumulative hadrons. The character of information from such reactions is discussed, which could be helpful in studying the mechanism of multiparticle production. 27 refs.; 4 figs

  3. Cumulative particle production in the quark recombination model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, V.B.; Leksin, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Production of cumulative particles in hadron-nuclear inteactions at high energies is considered within the framework of recombination quark model. Predictions for inclusive cross sections of production of cumulative particles and different resonances containing quarks in s state are made

  4. Altered placental development in undernourished rats: role of maternal glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun-Hung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maternal undernutrition (MUN during pregnancy may lead to fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, which itself predisposes to adult risk of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. IUGR may stem from insufficient maternal nutrient supply or reduced placental nutrient transfer. In addition, a critical role for maternal stress-induced glucocorticoids (GCs has been suggested to contribute to both IUGR and the ensuing risk of adult metabolic syndrome. While GC-induced fetal organ defects have been examined, there have been few studies on placental responses to MUN-induced maternal stress. Therefore, we hypothesize that 50% MUN associates with increased maternal GC levels and decreased placental HSD11B. This in turn leads to decreased placental and fetal growth, hence the need to investigate nutrient transporters. We measured maternal serum levels of corticosterone, and the placental basal and labyrinth zone expression of glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B 1 (HSD11B-1 predominantly activates cortisone to cortisol and 11-dehydrocorticosterone (11-DHC to corticosterone, although can sometimes drive the opposing (inactivating reaction, and HSD11B-2 (only inactivates and converts corticosterone to 11-DHC in rodents in control and MUN rats at embryonic day 20 (E20. Moreover, we evaluated the expression of nutrient transporters for glucose (SLC2A1, SLC2A3 and amino acids (SLC38A1, 2, and 4. Our results show that MUN dams displayed significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels compared to control dams. Further, a reduction in fetal and placental weights was observed in both the mid-horn and proximal-horn positions. Notably, the placental labyrinth zone, the site of feto-maternal exchange, showed decreased expression of HSD11B1-2 in both horns, and increased HSD11B-1 in proximal-horn placentas, but no change in NR3C1. The reduced placental GCs catabolic capacity was accompanied by downregulation of SLC2A3, SLC

  5. High cumulants of conserved charges and their statistical uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Zhu, Chen; Ye-Yin, Zhao; Xue, Pan; Zhi-Ming, Li; Yuan-Fang, Wu

    2017-10-01

    We study the influence of measured high cumulants of conserved charges on their associated statistical uncertainties in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. With a given number of events, the measured cumulants randomly fluctuate with an approximately normal distribution, while the estimated statistical uncertainties are found to be correlated with corresponding values of the obtained cumulants. Generally, with a given number of events, the larger the cumulants we measure, the larger the statistical uncertainties that are estimated. The error-weighted averaged cumulants are dependent on statistics. Despite this effect, however, it is found that the three sigma rule of thumb is still applicable when the statistics are above one million. Supported by NSFC (11405088, 11521064, 11647093), Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (2014CB845402) and Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST) (2016YFE0104800)

  6. Radiation dose monitoring in the clinical routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika [UK Essen (Germany). Radiology

    2017-04-15

    Here we describe the first clinical experiences regarding the use of an automated radiation dose management software to monitor the radiation dose of patients during routine examinations. Many software solutions for monitoring radiation dose have emerged in the last decade. The continuous progress in radiological techniques, new scan features, scanner generations and protocols are the primary challenge for radiation dose monitoring software systems. To simulate valid dose calculations, radiation dose monitoring systems have to follow current trends and stay constantly up-to-date. The dose management software is connected to all devices at our institute and conducts automatic data acquisition and radiation dose calculation. The system incorporates 18 virtual phantoms based on the Cristy phantom family, estimating doses in newborns to adults. Dose calculation relies on a Monte Carlo simulation engine. Our first practical experiences demonstrate that the software is capable of dose estimation in the clinical routine. Its implementation and use have some limitations that can be overcome. The software is promising and allows assessment of radiation doses, like organ and effective doses according to ICRP 60 and ICRP 103, patient radiation dose history and cumulative radiation doses. Furthermore, we are able to determine local diagnostic reference doses. The radiation dose monitoring software systems can facilitate networking between hospitals and radiological departments, thus refining radiation doses and implementing reference doses at substantially lower levels.

  7. Towards Greenland Glaciation: cumulative or abrupt transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstein, Gilles; Tan, Ning; Ladant, Jean-baptiste; Dumas, Christophe; Contoux, Camille

    2017-04-01

    During the mid-Pliocene warming period (3-3.3 Ma BP), the global annual mean temperatures inferred by data and model studies were 2-3° warmer than pre-industrial values. Accordingly, Greenland ice sheet volume is supposed to reach at the most, only half of that of present-day [Haywood et al. 2010]. Around 2.7-2.6 Ma BP, just ˜ 500 kyr after the warming peak of mid-Pliocene, the Greenland ice sheet has reached its full size [Lunt et al. 2008]. A crucial question concerns the evolution of the Greenland ice sheet from half to full size during the 3 - 2.5 Ma period. Data show a decreasing trend of atmospheric CO2 concentration from 3 Ma to 2.5 Ma [Seki et al.2010; Bartoli et al. 2011; Martinez et al. 2015]. However, a recent study [Contoux et al. 2015] suggests that a lowering of CO2 is not sufficient to initiate a perennial glaciation on Greenland and must be combined with low summer insolation to preserve the ice sheet during insolation maxima. This suggests rather a cumulative process than an abrupt event. In order to diagnose the evolution of the ice sheet build-up, we carry on, for the first time, a transient simulation of climate and ice sheet evolutions from 3 Ma to 2.5 Ma. This strategy enables us to investigate the waxing and waning of the ice sheet during several orbital cycles. We use a tri-dimensional interpolation method designed by Ladant et al. (2014), which allows the evolution of CO2 concentration and of orbital parameters, and the evolution of the Greenland ice sheet size to be taken into account. By interpolating climatic snapshot simulations ran with various possible combinations of CO2, orbits and ice sheet sizes, we can build a continuous climatic forcing that is then used to provide 500 kyrs-long ice sheet simulations. With such a tool, we may offer a physically based answer to different CO2 reconstructions scenarios and analyse which one is the most consistent with Greenland ice sheet buildup.

  8. Dose gradient curve: A new tool for evaluating dose gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, KiHoon; Choi, Young Eun

    2018-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy, which delivers an ablative high radiation dose to a target volume for maximum local tumor control, requires a rapid dose fall-off outside the target volume to prevent extensive damage to nearby normal tissue. Currently, there is no tool to comprehensively evaluate the dose gradient near the target volume. We propose the dose gradient curve (DGC) as a new tool to evaluate the quality of a treatment plan with respect to the dose fall-off characteristics. The average distance between two isodose surfaces was represented by the dose gradient index (DGI) estimated by a simple equation using the volume and surface area of isodose levels. The surface area was calculated by mesh generation and surface triangulation. The DGC was defined as a plot of the DGI of each dose interval as a function of the dose. Two types of DGCs, differential and cumulative, were generated. The performance of the DGC was evaluated using stereotactic radiosurgery plans for virtual targets. Over the range of dose distributions, the dose gradient of each dose interval was well-characterized by the DGC in an easily understandable graph format. Significant changes in the DGC were observed reflecting the differences in planning situations and various prescription doses. The DGC is a rational method for visualizing the dose gradient as the average distance between two isodose surfaces; the shorter the distance, the steeper the dose gradient. By combining the DGC with the dose-volume histogram (DVH) in a single plot, the DGC can be utilized to evaluate not only the dose gradient but also the target coverage in routine clinical practice.

  9. Glucocorticoid treatment and impaired mood, memory and metabolism in people with diabetes: the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca M; Labad, Javier; Sears, Alison V; Williamson, Rachel M; Strachan, Mark W J; Deary, Ian J; Lowe, Gordon D O; Price, Jackie F; Walker, Brian R

    2012-01-01

    Objective Both type 2 diabetes and glucocorticoid therapy are highly prevalent. Although people with type 2 diabetes may be more susceptible to adverse effects of glucocorticoids, and it is recommended that glucocorticoid therapy is avoided for fear of worsening glycaemic control, the extent to which this advice is followed and the consequences when glucocorticoids are prescribed are poorly documented. The aim was to assess the characteristics of people with type 2 diabetes prescribed glucocorticoids in a real-world setting and to quantify resulting adverse effects. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Methods Cardiometabolic variables, body fat distribution, cognitive function and mood were studied in the 1066 participants of the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study, of whom 162 (15%) were taking systemic, topical or inhaled glucocorticoids. Results Glucocorticoid therapy was more common in women and in smokers but was not avoided in patients with diabetic complications or cardiovascular risk factors. People taking glucocorticoids were more centrally obese with slightly higher HbA1c and total serum cholesterol but were no more likely to have hepatic steatosis or hypertension. Glucocorticoid treatment was associated with substantially lower mood and greater anxiety. Women taking glucocorticoid therapy were twice as likely to report depressive symptoms compared with those not taking treatment. Glucocorticoid therapy was also associated with poorer cognitive function among those with subclinical atherosclerosis, as indicated by low ankle–brachial pressure index. Conclusions Glucocorticoids are prescribed commonly for people with type 2 diabetes despite being associated with adverse indices of glycaemic control, cardiovascular risk factors, mood and cognitive function. PMID:22408122

  10. Effects of prasterone on bone mineral density in women with active systemic lupus erythematosus receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Fragoso-Loyo, Hilda E; Neuwelt, C Michael; Wallace, Daniel J; Ginzler, Ellen M; Sherrer, Yvonne R S; McIlwain, Harris H; Freeman, Pamela G; Aranow, Cynthia; Petri, Michelle A; Deodhar, Atul A; Blanton, Ellen; Manzi, Susan; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; McKay, James D; Kivitz, Alan J; Mease, Philip J; Winkler, Anne E; Kahl, Leslie E; Lee, Albert H; Furie, Richard A; Strand, C Vibeke; Lou, Lillian; Ahmed, Mumtaz; Quarles, Betty; Schwartz, Kenneth E

    2008-08-01

    To assess prevention of bone mineral density (BMD) loss and durability of the response during treatment with prasterone in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) receiving chronic glucocorticoids. 155 patients with SLE received 200 mg/day prasterone or placebo for 6 months in a double-blind phase. Subsequently, 114 patients were re-randomized to receive 200 or 100 mg/day prasterone for 12 months in an open-label phase. Primary efficacy endpoints were changes in BMD at the lumbar spine (L-spine) from baseline to Month 6 and maintenance of BMD from Month 6 to 18 for patients who received prasterone during the double-blind phase. In the double-blind phase, there was a trend for a small gain in BMD at the L-spine for patients who received 200 mg/day prasterone for 6 months versus a loss in the placebo group (mean +/- SD, 0.003 +/- 0.035 vs -0.005 +/- 0.053 g/cm(2), respectively; p = 0.293 between groups). In the open-label phase, there was dose-dependent increase in BMD at the L-spine at Month 18 between patients who received 200 versus 100 mg/day prasterone (p = 0.021). For patients who received 200 mg/day prasterone for 18 months, the L-spine BMD gain was 1.083 +/- 0.512% (p = 0.042). There was no overall change in BMD at the total hip over 18 months with 200 mg/day prasterone treatment. The safety profile reflected the weak androgenic properties of prasterone. This study suggests prasterone 200 mg/day may offer mild protection against bone loss in women with SLE receiving glucocorticoids. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifiers NCT00053560 and NCT00082511).

  11. An Analysis of Cumulative Risks Indicated by Biomonitoring Data of Six Phthalates Using the Maximum Cumulative Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Maximum Cumulative Ratio (MCR) quantifies the degree to which a single component of a chemical mixture drives the cumulative risk of a receptor.1 This study used the MCR, the Hazard Index (HI) and Hazard Quotient (HQ) to evaluate co-exposures to six phthalates using biomonito...

  12. An analysis of cumulative risks based on biomonitoring data for six phthalates using the Maximum Cumulative Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Maximum Cumulative Ratio (MCR) quantifies the degree to which a single chemical drives the cumulative risk of an individual exposed to multiple chemicals. Phthalates are a class of chemicals with ubiquitous exposures in the general population that have the potential to cause ...

  13. Age-related synthesis of glucocorticoids in thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Shengjun; Chen Liying; Okret, Sam; Jondal, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are primarily synthesized in the adrenal glands but an ectopic production has also been reported in the brain, the gastrointestinal tract and in thymic epithelial cells (TEC). Here we show that thymocytes express genes encoding for all enzymes required for de novo GC synthesis and produce the hormone as demonstrated by both a GC specific reporter assay and a corticosterone specific ELISA assay. Interestingly, GC synthesis is detectable in cells from young mice (4 weeks) and thereafter increases during aging (14-22 weeks) together with an increased gene expression of the rate-limiting enzymes StAR and CYP11A1. Hormone production occurred at a thymocyte differentiation stage characterized by being double positive for the CD4 and CD8 surface markers but was found to be unrelated to CD69 expression, a marker for thymocytes undergoing positive selection. No GC synthesis was found in resting or anti-CD3 activated CD4 and CD8 positive T cells isolated from the spleen. Thymocyte-derived GC had an anti-proliferative effect on a GR-transfected cell line and induced apoptosis in thymocytes. The age- and differentiation stage-related GC synthesis in thymocytes may play a role in the involution process that the thymus gland undergoes

  14. Combined Effects of Glucocorticoid and Noradrenergic Activity on Loss Aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margittai, Zsofia; Nave, Gideon; Van Wingerden, Marijn; Schnitzler, Alfons; Schwabe, Lars; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Loss aversion is a well-known behavioral regularity in financial decision making, describing humans' tendency to overweigh losses compared to gains of the same amount. Recent research indicates that stress and associated hormonal changes affect loss aversion, yet the underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the causal influence of two major stress neuromodulators, cortisol and noradrenaline, on loss aversion during financial decision making. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled between-subject design, we orally administered either the α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine (increasing noradrenergic stimulation), hydrocortisone, both substances, or a placebo to healthy young men. We tested the treatments' influence on a financial decision-making task measuring loss aversion and risk attitude. We found that both drugs combined, relative to either drug by itself, reduced loss aversion in the absence of an effect on risk attitude or choice consistency. Our data suggest that concurrent glucocorticoid and noradrenergic activity prompts an alignment of reward- with loss-sensitivity, and thus diminishes loss aversion. Our results have implications for the understanding of the susceptibility to biases in decision making.

  15. Glucocorticoids and Type 2 Diabetes: From Physiology to Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Di Dalmazi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the result of interaction between genetic and environmental factors, leading to heterogeneous and progressive pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Overweight and obesity are major contributors to the development of insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. The inability of β cells to secrete enough insulin produces type 2 diabetes. Abnormalities in other hormones such as reduced secretion of the incretin glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, hyperglucagonemia, and raised concentrations of other counterregulatory hormones also contribute to insulin resistance, reduced insulin secretion, and hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes. Clinical-overt and experimental cortisol excess is associated with profound metabolic disturbances of intermediate metabolism resulting in abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and low HDL-cholesterol levels, which can lead to diabetes. It was therefore suggested that subtle abnormalities in cortisol secretion and action are one of the missing links between insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this paper is to address the role of glucocorticoids on glucose homeostasis and to explain the relationship between hypercortisolism and type 2 diabetes.

  16. Osteoporosis prophylaxis in patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Mir Sadat; AlElq, Abdulmohsen H.; AlShafei, Badar A.; AbuJubarac, Mohammed A.; AlTurki, Haifa A.

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis, yet few patients receive proper measures to prevent its development. We retrospectively searched prescription records to determine if patients receiving oral prednisolone were receiving prophylaxis or treatment for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Patients who were prescribed greater or equal to 7.5 milligrams of prednisolone for 6 months or longer during a 6- month period were identified through the prescription monitoring system. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from the patient records, and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were retrieved, when available. Use of oral calcium, vitamin D and anti-resorptives was recorded. One hundred males and 65 females were receiving oral prednisolone for a mean (SD) duration of 40.4 (29.9) months in males and 41.2 (36.4) months in females. Twenty-one females (12.7%) and 5 (3%) males had bone mineral density measured by DEXA. Of those, 10 (47.6%) females and 3 (50%) males were osteoporotic and 11(52.4%) females and 2 (40%) males were osteopenic. Calcium and vitamin D were prescribed to the majority of patients (60% to 80%), but none were prescribed antiresorptive/anabolic therapy. Patients in this study were neither investigated properly nor treated according to the minimum recommendations for the management of GIOP. Physician awareness about the prevention and treatment of GIOP should be a priority for the local health care system. (author)

  17. Genetic, functional and molecular features of glucocorticoid receptor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Luca

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs are key mediators of stress response and are widely used as pharmacological agents to treat immune diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease, and certain types of cancer. GCs act mainly by activating the GC receptor (GR, which interacts with other transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Here, we combined different functional genomics approaches to gain molecular insights into the mechanisms of action of GC. By profiling the transcriptional response to GC over time in 4 Yoruba (YRI and 4 Tuscans (TSI lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, we suggest that the transcriptional response to GC is variable not only in time, but also in direction (positive or negative depending on the presence of specific interacting transcription factors. Accordingly, when we performed ChIP-seq for GR and NF-κB in two YRI LCLs treated with GC or with vehicle control, we observed that features of GR binding sites differ for up- and down-regulated genes. Finally, we show that eQTLs that affect expression patterns only in the presence of GC are 1.9-fold more likely to occur in GR binding sites, compared to eQTLs that affect expression only in its absence. Our results indicate that genetic variation at GR and interacting transcription factors binding sites influences variability in gene expression, and attest to the power of combining different functional genomic approaches.

  18. Reduced glucocorticoid receptor expression predicts bladder tumor recurrence and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Zheng, Yichun; Netto, George J; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    To assess the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in bladder tumors because the status and its prognostic value remain largely unknown. We immunohistochemically stained for GR in bladder tumor and matched non-neoplastic bladder tissue specimens. Overall, GR was positive in 129 (87%) of 149 urothelial tumors, which was significantly (P=.026) lower than in non-neoplastic urothelium (90 [96%] of 94). Forty-two (79%) of 53 low-grade tumors vs 45 (47%) of 96 high-grade carcinomas (Pcancer-specific survival of MI tumors (P=.067). Multivariate analysis identified low GR expression as a strong predictor for recurrence of NMI tumors (P=.034). GR expression was downregulated in bladder tumors compared with nonneoplastic bladder tumors and in high-grade/MI tumors compared with low-grade/NMI tumors. Decreased expression of GR, as an independent prognosticator, predicted recurrence of NMI tumors. These results support experimental evidence suggesting an inhibitory role of GR signals in bladder cancer outgrowth. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  19. Dose estimation from residual and fallout radioactivity, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Kenji

    1975-01-01

    External dose rates and cumulative doses for early entrants from areal surveys and simulated experiments are reviewed. The average cumulative doses to infinity at the hypocenters were 101 rad in Hiroshima and 32 rad in Nagasaki, with a variation of about 60 percent. Radioactive fallout areas nearly matched the ''black rain'' areas in Nagasaki and in Hiroshima. Radioactivity in the fallout areas was affected by radioactive decay and by the leaching and dissipation by rains. Considering these factors, the cumulative dose to infinity in the fallout area of Hiroshima was estimated to be 13 rad, excluding internal radiation doses from inhaled and ingested radionuclides. Attempts to estimate radiation dose from internally deposited radionuclides are also described. (auth.)

  20. Occurrence and in vitro bioactivity of estrogen, androgen, and glucocorticoid compounds in a nationwide screen of United States stream waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In vitro bioactivity concentrations and chemical concentrations of estrogens, androgens, and glucocorticoids from a nationwide screen of United States stream water...

  1. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β attenuates glucocorticoid-induced suppression of myogenic differentiation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Ma

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are the only therapy that has been demonstrated to alter the progress of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, the most common muscular dystrophy in children. However, glucocorticoids disturb skeletal muscle metabolism and hamper myogenesis and muscle regeneration. The mechanisms involved in the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of myogenic differentiation are not fully understood. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β is considered to play a central role as a negative regulator in myogenic differentiation. Here, we showed that glucocorticoid treatment during the first 48 h in differentiation medium decreased the level of phosphorylated Ser9-GSK-3β, an inactive form of GSK-3β, suggesting that glucocorticoids affect GSK-3β activity. We then investigated whether GSK-3β inhibition could regulate glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of myogenic differentiation in vitro. Two methods were employed to inhibit GSK-3β: pharmacological inhibition with LiCl and GSK-3β gene knockdown. We found that both methods resulted in enhanced myotube formation and increased levels of muscle regulatory factors and muscle-specific protein expression. Importantly, GSK-3β inhibition attenuated glucocorticoid-induced suppression of myogenic differentiation. Collectively, these data suggest the involvement of GSK-3β in the glucocorticoid-mediated impairment of myogenic differentiation. Therefore, the inhibition of GSK-3β may be a strategy for preventing glucocorticoid-induced muscle degeneration.

  2. Effects of chronic mild stress on behavioral and neurobiological parameters - Role of glucocorticoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Zhen-zhen; Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Shuai; Chu, Shi-feng; Chen, Nai-hong

    2016-02-01

    Major depression is thought to originate from maladaptation to adverse events, particularly when impairments occur in mood-related brain regions. Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is one of the major systems involved in physiological stress response. HPA axis dysfunction and high glucocorticoid concentrations play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. In addition, astrocytic disability and dysfunction of neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) greatly influence the development of depression and anxiety disorders. Therefore, we investigated whether depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviors manifest in the absence of glucocorticoid production and circulation in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats after chronic mild stress (CMS) exposure and its potential molecular mechanisms. The results demonstrate that glucocorticoid-controlled rats showed anxiety-like behaviors but not depression-like behaviors after CMS. Molecular and cellular changes included the decreased BDNF in the hippocampus, astrocytic dysfunction with connexin43 (cx43) decreasing and abnormality in gap junction in prefrontal cortex (PFC). Interestingly, we did not find any changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or its chaperone protein FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5) expression in the hippocampus or PFC in ADX rats subjected to CMS. In conclusion, the production and circulation of glucocorticoids are one of the contributing factors in the development of depression-like behaviors in response to CMS. In contrast, the effects of CMS on anxiety-like behaviors are independent of the presence of circulating glucocorticoids. Meanwhile, stress decreased GR expression and enhanced FKBP5 expression via higher glucocorticoid exposure. Gap junction dysfunction and changes in BDNF may be associated with anxiety-like behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The next step for stress research in primates: To identify relationships between glucocorticoid secretion and fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beehner, Jacinta C; Bergman, Thore J

    2017-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are hormones that mediate the energetic demands that accompany environmental challenges. It is therefore not surprising that these metabolic hormones have come to dominate endocrine research on the health and fitness of wild populations. Yet, several problems have been identified in the vertebrate research that also apply to the non-human primate research. First, glucocorticoids should not be used as a proxy for fitness (unless a link has previously been established between glucocorticoids and fitness for a particular population). Second, stress research in behavioral ecology has been overly focused on "chronic stress" despite little evidence that chronic stress hampers fitness in wild animals. Third, research effort has been disproportionately focused on the causes of glucocorticoid variation rather than the fitness consequences. With these problems in mind, we have three objectives for this review. We describe the conceptual framework behind the "stress concept", emphasizing that high glucocorticoids do not necessarily indicate a stress response, and that a stress response does not necessarily indicate an animal is in poor health. Then, we conduct a comprehensive review of all studies on "stress" in wild primates, including any study that examined environmental factors, the stress response, and/or fitness (or proxies for fitness). Remarkably, not a single primate study establishes a connection between all three. Finally, we provide several recommendations for future research in the field of primate behavioral endocrinology, primarily the need to move beyond identifying the factors that cause glucocorticoid secretion to additionally focus on the relationship between glucocorticoids and fitness. We believe that this is an important next step for research on stress physiology in primates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. RGD(F/S/V-Dex: towards the development of novel, effective, and safe glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang X

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xueyun Jiang,1 Ming Zhao,1,2 Yuji Wang,1 Haimei Zhu,1 Shurui Zhao,1 Jianhui Wu,1 Yuanbo Song,3 Shiqi Peng1 1Beijing Area Major Laboratory of Peptide and Small Molecular Drugs, Engineering Research Center of Endogenous Prophylactic of Ministry of Education of China, Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Faculty of Biomedical Science and Environmental Biology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 3Guangxi Pusen Biotechnology Co. Ltd., Nanning, Guangxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Dexamethasone (Dex is an effective glucocorticoid in treating inflammation and preventing rejection reaction. However, the side effects limit its clinical application. To improve its druggable profile, the conjugates of RGD-peptide-modified Dex were presented and their enhanced anti-inflammation activity, minimized osteoporotic action, and nanoscaled assembly were explored. (RGD stands for Arg-Gly-Asp. Standard single letter biochemical abbreviations for amino acids have been used throughout this paper. In respect of the rejection reaction, the survival time of the implanted myocardium of the mice treated with 1.43 µmol/kg/d of the conjugates for 15 consecutive days was significantly longer than that of the mice treated with 2.5 µmol/kg/d of Dex, and the conjugates, but not Dex, exhibited no toxic action. At a single dose of 14.3 µmol/kg (100 times minimal effective dose, 0.143 µmol/kg, the conjugates induced no liver, kidney, or systemic toxicity. At the dose of 1.43 µmol/kg, the conjugates, but not Dex, prolonged the bleeding time of the mice, and inhibited the thrombosis of the rats. In water and rat plasma, the conjugates formed nanoparticles of 14–250 and 101–166 nm in diameter, respectively. Since the nanoparticles of ~100 nm in size cannot be entrapped by macrophages in the circulation, RGDF-Dex would particularly be worthy

  5. Case Example of Dose Optimization Using Data From Bortezomib Dose-Finding Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shing M; Backenroth, Daniel; Cheung, Ying Kuen Ken; Hershman, Dawn L; Vulih, Diana; Anderson, Barry; Ivy, Percy; Minasian, Lori

    2016-04-20

    The current dose-finding methodology for estimating the maximum tolerated dose of investigational anticancer agents is based on the cytotoxic chemotherapy paradigm. Molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) have different toxicity profiles, which may lead to more long-lasting mild or moderate toxicities as well as to late-onset and cumulative toxicities. Several approved MTAs have been poorly tolerated during long-term administration, leading to postmarketing dose optimization studies to re-evaluate the optimal treatment dose. Using data from completed bortezomib dose-finding trials, we explore its toxicity profile, optimize its dose, and examine the appropriateness of current designs for identifying an optimal dose. We classified the toxicities captured from 481 patients in 14 bortezomib dose-finding studies conducted through the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, computed the incidence of late-onset toxicities, and compared the incidence of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) among groups of patients receiving different doses of bortezomib. A total of 13,008 toxicities were captured: 46% of patients' first DLTs and 88% of dose reductions or discontinuations of treatment because of toxicity were observed after the first cycle. Moreover, for the approved dose of 1.3 mg/m(2), the estimated cumulative incidence of DLT was > 50%, and the estimated cumulative incidence of dose reduction or treatment discontinuation because of toxicity was nearly 40%. When considering the entire course of treatment, the approved bortezomib dose exceeds the conventional ceiling DLT rate of 20% to 33%. Retrospective analysis of trial data provides an opportunity for dose optimization of MTAs. Future dose-finding studies of MTAs should take into account late-onset toxicities to ensure that a tolerable dose is identified for future efficacy and comparative trials. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Cumulative stress and autonomic dysregulation in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Rachel; Tuit, Keri; Hong, Kwang-Ik; Donovan, Theresa; Lee, Forrester; Sinha, Rajita

    2016-05-01

    Whether cumulative stress, including both chronic stress and adverse life events, is associated with decreased heart rate variability (HRV), a non-invasive measure of autonomic status which predicts poor cardiovascular outcomes, is unknown. Healthy community dwelling volunteers (N = 157, mean age 29 years) participated in the Cumulative Stress/Adversity Interview (CAI), a 140-item event interview measuring cumulative adversity including major life events, life trauma, recent life events and chronic stressors, and underwent 24-h ambulatory ECG monitoring. HRV was analyzed in the frequency domain and standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN) calculated. Initial simple regression analyses revealed that total cumulative stress score, chronic stressors and cumulative adverse life events (CALE) were all inversely associated with ultra low-frequency (ULF), very low-frequency (VLF) and low-frequency (LF) power and SDNN (all p accounting for additional appreciable variance. For VLF and LF, both total cumulative stress and chronic stress significantly contributed to the variance alone but were not longer significant after adjusting for race and health behaviors. In summary, total cumulative stress, and its components of adverse life events and chronic stress were associated with decreased cardiac autonomic function as measured by HRV. Findings suggest one potential mechanism by which stress may exert adverse effects on mortality in healthy individuals. Primary preventive strategies including stress management may prove beneficial.

  7. Glucocorticoid mediated regulation of inflammation in human monocytes is associated with depressive mood and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tiefu; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Pruitt, Christopher; Hong, Suzi

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is observed in various conditions, including depression and obesity, which are also often related. Glucocorticoid (GC) resistance and desensitization of peripheral GC receptors (GRs) are often the case in HPA dysregulation seen in depression, and GC plays a critical role in regulation of inflammation. Given the growing evidence that inflammation is a central feature of some depression cases and obesity, we aimed to investigate the immune-regulatory role of GC-GR in relation to depressive mood and obesity in 35 healthy men and women. Depressive mood and level of obesity were assessed, using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-Ia) and body mass index (BMI), respectively. We measured plasma cortisol levels via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated intracellular tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production by monocytes, using flow cytometry. Cortisol sensitivity was determined by the difference in monocytic TNF production between the conditions of 1 and 0 μM cortisol incubation ("cortisol-mediated inflammation regulation, CoMIR"). GR vs. mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism for CoMIR was examined by using mifepristone and spironolactone. A series of multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate independent contribution of depressive mood vs. obesity after controlling for age, gender, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and plasma cortisol in predicting CoMIR. CoMIR was explained by somatic subcomponents of depressive mood (BDI-S: β=-0.499, p=0.001), or BMI (β=-0.466, pcortisol dose (1 μM). There was initial indication that greater obesity and somatic depressive symptoms were associated with smaller efficacy of the blockers, which warrants further investigation. Our findings, although in a preclinical sample, signify the shared pathophysiology of immune dysregulation in depression and obesity and warrant further mechanistic investigation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Dietary flavonoid kaempferol inhibits glucocorticoid-induced bone loss by promoting osteoblast survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Sulekha; Choudhary, Dharmendra; Ahmad, Naseer; Karvande, Anirudha; Kumar, Avinash; Banala, Venkatesh Teja; Mishra, Prabhat Ranjan; Trivedi, Ritu

    2018-02-13

    Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, has been reported to reverse osteopenic condition in ovariectomized rats. Because kaempferol is endowed with osteogenic activity, the aim of this study was to determine whether it has a beneficial effect on glucocorticoid (GC)-induced bone loss. Adult female rats were divided into four groups as control (vehicle; distilled water), methylprednisolone (MP; 5 mg•kg•d, subcutaneously), MP + kaempferol (5 mg•kg•d, oral), and MP + human parathyroid 1-34 (30 µg/kg, 5 times/wk, subcutaneously) and treated for 4 wk. To study the antagonizing effect of kaempferol on GC-induced inhibition of fracture healing, drill-hole injury was performed on control and GC-treated rats. An oral dose of kaempferol was given for 14 d to observe the effect on callus formation at the site of injury. After treatment, bones were collected for further analysis. GC was associated with a decreased bone mineral density and impaired bone microarchitecture parameters. Consumption of kaempferol induced bone-sparing effects in GC-induced osteopenic condition. Additionally, improved callus formation at site of drill injury in femur diaphysis was observed with kaempferol consumption in animals on GC. Consistent with the in vivo data, kaempferol elicited a higher expression of osteogenic markers in vitro and antagonized the apoptotic effect of dexamethasone on calvarial osteoblasts. These results suggested that kaempferol reduced GC-induced bone loss and enhanced bone regeneration at fractured site, thus emphasizing the positive role of flavonoids on bone health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cumulants in perturbation expansions for non-equilibrium field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauser, R.

    1995-11-01

    The formulation of perturbation expansions for a quantum field theory of strongly interacting systems in a general non-equilibrium state is discussed. Non-vanishing initial correlations are included in the formulation of the perturbation expansion in terms of cumulants. The cumulants are shown to be the suitable candidate for summing up the perturbation expansion. Also a linked-cluster theorem for the perturbation series with cumulants is presented. Finally a generating functional of the perturbation series with initial correlations is studied. We apply the methods to a simple model of a fermion-boson system. (orig.)