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Sample records for cumulative frequency distributions

  1. The Interannual Stability of Cumulative Frequency Distributions for Convective System Size and Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Molinari, John; Thorncroft, Chris D,

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of convective system populations in West Africa and the western Pacific tropical cyclone basin were analyzed to investigate whether interannual variability in convective activity in tropical continental and oceanic environments is driven by variations in the number of events during the wet season or by favoring large and/or intense convective systems. Convective systems were defined from TRMM data as a cluster of pixels with an 85 GHz polarization-corrected brightness temperature below 255 K and with an area at least 64 km 2. The study database consisted of convective systems in West Africa from May Sep for 1998-2007 and in the western Pacific from May Nov 1998-2007. Annual cumulative frequency distributions for system minimum brightness temperature and system area were constructed for both regions. For both regions, there were no statistically significant differences among the annual curves for system minimum brightness temperature. There were two groups of system area curves, split by the TRMM altitude boost in 2001. Within each set, there was no statistically significant interannual variability. Sub-setting the database revealed some sensitivity in distribution shape to the size of the sampling area, length of sample period, and climate zone. From a regional perspective, the stability of the cumulative frequency distributions implied that the probability that a convective system would attain a particular size or intensity does not change interannually. Variability in the number of convective events appeared to be more important in determining whether a year is wetter or drier than normal.

  2. Effects of site characteristics on cumulative frequency distribution of water table depth in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Michel; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Frahm, Enrico; Roßkopf, Niko

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies demonstrated strong dependency of vegetation development and GHG emissions from peatlands on annual mean water table depth. It is also proposed that the duration of ponding and low water level periods are important indicators for CH4 emissions and the presence of specific plant species. Better understanding of the annual water table dynamics and the influence of site characteristics helps to explain variability of vegetation and emissions at the plot scale. It also provides essential information for a nation-wide upscaling of local gas flux measurements and for estimating the impact of regional adaption strategies. In this study, we analyze the influence of site characteristics on the cumulative frequency distribution of water table depth in a peatland. On the basis of data from about 100 sites we evaluate how distribution functions, e.g. the beta distribution function, are a tool for the systematic analysis of the site-specific frequency distribution of water table depth. Our analysis shows that it is possible to differentiate different shape types of frequency distributions, in particular left-skewed (bias towards the water table minimum), right-skewed (bias towards the water table maximum), and 'S'-shaped distributions (bias towards the mid of min and max). The shape is primarily dependent on the annual mean water table depth, but also shows dependencies on land use, peatland type, catchment size and soil properties. Forest soils are for example all characterized by a 'S'-shaped distribution. Preliminary results indicate that data sets that do not show a beta distribution are mostly from observation wells that are located close to drainage courses and/or are from sites characterized by strong water management (e.g. abruptly changing weir levels). The beta distribution might thus be a tool to identify sites with a 'non-natural' frequency distribution or erroneous data sets. Because the parameters of the beta distribution show a dependency on site

  3. Frequency, magnitude, and distribution of head impacts in Pop Warner football: the cumulative burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ricky H; Wong, Andrew K; Bailes, Julian E

    2014-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that subconcussive head impacts or repetitive mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) can have cumulative and deleterious effects. Several studies have investigated head impacts in football at the professional, collegiate, and high school levels, in an attempt to elucidate the biomechanics of head impacts among football players. Youth football players, generally from 7 to 14 years of age, constitute 70% of all football players, yet burden of, and susceptibility to, head injury in this population is not well known. A novel impact sensor utilizing binary force switches (Shockbox(®)) was used to follow an entire Pop Warner football team consisting of twenty-two players for six games and five practices. The impact sensor was designed to record impacts with linear accelerations over 30g. In addition, video recording of games and practices were used to further characterize the head impacts by type of position (skilled versus unskilled), field location of impact (open field versus line of scrimmage), type of hit (tackling, tackled, or hold/push), and whether the impact was a head-to-head impact or not. We recorded a total of 480 head impacts. An average of 21.8 head impacts occurred per practice, while 61.8 occurred per game. Players had an average of 3.7 head impacts per game and 1.5 impacts per practice (p80g) was 11. Two concussions were diagnosed over the course of the season. However, due to technical reasons the biomechanics of those hits resulting in concussions were not captured. Despite smaller players and slower play when compared to high school, collegiate or professional players, those involved in youth football sustain a moderate number of head impacts per season with several high magnitude impacts. Our results suggest that players involved in open-field, tackling plays that have head-to-head contact sustain impacts with the highest linear accelerations. Our data supports previously published data that suggests changes to the

  4. Calculating Cumulative Binomial-Distribution Probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Ernest M.; Bowerman, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Cumulative-binomial computer program, CUMBIN, one of set of three programs, calculates cumulative binomial probability distributions for arbitrary inputs. CUMBIN, NEWTONP (NPO-17556), and CROSSER (NPO-17557), used independently of one another. Reliabilities and availabilities of k-out-of-n systems analyzed. Used by statisticians and users of statistical procedures, test planners, designers, and numerical analysts. Used for calculations of reliability and availability. Program written in C.

  5. Obtaining magnitude-cumulative frequency curves from rockfall scar size distribution using cosmogenic chlorine-36 in the Montsec area (Eastern Pyrenees, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Guillem; Mavrouli, Olga; Corominas, Jordi; Abellán, Antonio; Merchel, Silke; Pavetich, Stefan; Rugel, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Magnitude-cumulative frequency (MCF) relations are commonly used components for assessing the rockfall hazard using databases of recorded events. However, in some cases, data are lacking or incomplete. To overcome this restriction, the volume distribution of the rockfall scars has been used instead. The latter may yield the temporal probability of occurrence if the time span required to generate the scars is known. The Montsec range, located in the Eastern Pyrenees, Spain, was chosen as a pilot study area for investigating MCF distributions. This cliff, which is composed of limestones from Upper Cretaceous age, shows distinct evidences of rockfall activity, including large recent rockfall scars. These areas are identifiable by their orange colour, which contrasts in front of the greyish old stable (reference) surface of the cliff face. We present a procedure to obtain the MCF of the rockfall scars by dating an old reference cliff surface and measuring the total volume released since then. The reference cliff surface was dated using the terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) chlorine-36 (Merchel et al., 2013). We used the Rockfall Scar Size Distribution (RSSD) obtained in Domènech et al. (2014) that considers several rockfall pattern scenarios. Scenario 1 allows for, mostly, large rockfall scar volumes, scenario 2 considers smaller occurrences and scenario 3 suggests that rockfall scars can be the result of one or several rockfall events, and thus contemplating a wider range of scar volumes. The main steps of the methodology are: a) Obtaining the RSSD, b) Volume calculation of material lost, c) Calculation of time (T0) elapsed for the cliff to retreat (age of the old reference surface), and d) generation of the MCF curve from the RSSD. A total volume of material lost of 78900 m3 was obtained as well as an elapsed period of time of 15350 years. The MCF curves for different rockfall scenarios are found to be well fitted by a power law with exponents -1.7, -1.1 and -1

  6. Recursive Numerical Evaluation of the Cumulative Bivariate Normal Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for evaluation of the cumulative bivariate normal distribution, building upon Marsaglia's ideas for evaluation of the cumulative univariate normal distribution. The algorithm is mathematically transparent, delivers competitive performance and can easily be extended to arbitrary precision.

  7. Joint frequency, 2D AOA and polarization estimation using fourth-order cumulants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建英; 陈天琪

    2000-01-01

    Based on fourth-order cumulant and ESPRIT algorithm, a novel joint frequency, two-dimensional angle of arrival (2D AOA) and the polarization estimation method of incoming multiple independent spatial narrow-band non-Gaussian signals in arbitrary Gaussian noise environment are proposed . The array is composed of crossed dipoles parallel to the coordinate axes. The crossed dipole positions are arbitrarily distributed. Computer simulation confirms its feasibility.

  8. Joint frequency, 2D AOA and polarization estimation using fourth-order cumulants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on fourth-order cumulant and ESPRIT algorithm, a novel joint frequency, two-dimensional angle of arrival (2D AOA) and the polarization estimation method of incoming multiple independent spatial narrow-band non-Gaussian signals in arbitrary Gaussian noise environment are proposed. The array is composed of crossed dipoles parallel to the coordinate axes. The crossed dipole positions are arbitrarily distributed. Computer simulation confirms its feasibility.

  9. A cumulative entropy method for distribution recognition of model error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingjie; Chen, Wen

    2015-02-01

    This paper develops a cumulative entropy method (CEM) to recognize the most suitable distribution for model error. In terms of the CEM, the Lévy stable distribution is employed to capture the statistical properties of model error. The strategies are tested on 250 experiments of axially loaded CFT steel stub columns in conjunction with the four national building codes of Japan (AIJ, 1997), China (DL/T, 1999), the Eurocode 4 (EU4, 2004), and United States (AISC, 2005). The cumulative entropy method is validated as more computationally efficient than the Shannon entropy method. Compared with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and root mean square deviation, the CEM provides alternative and powerful model selection criterion to recognize the most suitable distribution for the model error.

  10. Generalized Cumulative Residual Entropy for Distributions with Unrestricted Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noomane Drissi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the cumulative residual entropy (CRE a recently introduced measure of entropy. While in previous works distributions with positive support are considered, we generalize the definition of CRE to the case of distributions with general support. We show that several interesting properties of the earlier CRE remain valid and supply further properties and insight to problems such as maximum CRE power moment problems. In addition, we show that this generalized CRE can be used as an alternative to differential entropy to derive information-based optimization criteria for system identification purpose.

  11. Cumulative Interarrival Time Distributions of Freeway Entrance Ramp Traffic for Traffic Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdinç Öner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative interarrival time (IAT distributions for signalized and non-signalized freeway entrance ramps were developed to be used in digital computer traffic simulation models. The data from four different non-signalized entrance ramps (three ramps with a single lane, one ramp with two lanes and two different signalized entrance ramps (both with a single lane were used for developing the cumulative IAT distributions. The cumulative IAT distributions for the signalized and non-signalized entrance ramps were compared with each other and with the cumulative IAT distributions of the lanes for freeways. The comparative results showed that the cumulative IAT distributions for non-signalized entrance ramps are very close to the leftmost lane of a 3-lane freeway where the maximum absolute difference between the cumulative IAT distribution of the leftmost lane of a 3-lane freeway and the entrance ramps cumulative IAT distribution was 3%. The cumulative IAT distribution for the signalized entrance ramps was found to be different from the non-signalized entrance ramp cumulative IAT distribution. The approximated cumulative IAT distributions for signalized and non-signalized entrance ramp traffic for any hourly traffic volume from a few vehicles/hour up to 2,500 vehicles/hour can be obtained at http://www.ohio.edu/orite/research/uitds.cfm.

  12. CDF-XL: computing cumulative distribution functions of reaction time data in Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, George; Grange, James A

    2011-12-01

    In experimental psychology, central tendencies of reaction time (RT) distributions are used to compare different experimental conditions. This emphasis on the central tendency ignores additional information that may be derived from the RT distribution itself. One method for analysing RT distributions is to construct cumulative distribution frequency plots (CDFs; Ratcliff, Psychological Bulletin 86:446-461, 1979). However, this method is difficult to implement in widely available software, severely restricting its use. In this report, we present an Excel-based program, CDF-XL, for constructing and analysing CDFs, with the aim of making such techniques more readily accessible to researchers, including students (CDF-XL can be downloaded free of charge from the Psychonomic Society's online archive). CDF-XL functions as an Excel workbook and starts from the raw experimental data, organised into three columns (Subject, Condition, and RT) on an Input Data worksheet (a point-and-click utility is provided for achieving this format from a broader data set). No further preprocessing or sorting of the data is required. With one click of a button, CDF-XL will generate two forms of cumulative analysis: (1) "standard" CDFs, based on percentiles of participant RT distributions (by condition), and (2) a related analysis employing the participant means of rank-ordered RT bins. Both analyses involve partitioning the data in similar ways, but the first uses a "median"-type measure at the participant level, while the latter uses the mean. The results are presented in three formats: (i) by participants, suitable for entry into further statistical analysis; (ii) grand means by condition; and (iii) completed CDF plots in Excel charts.

  13. TESTING FOR DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CUMULATIVE DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS FROM COMPLEX ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING SURVEYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) employs the cumulative distribution function (cdf) to measure the status of quantitative variables for resources of interest. The ability to compare cdf's for a resource from, say,...

  14. CUMULATIVE DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS FOR THE TEMPERATURE THRESHOLD FOR THE ONSET OF CARBON STEEL CORROSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    1998-05-15

    The purpose of this calculation is to process the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) characterizing the temperature threshold for the onset of corrosion provided by expert elicitation and minimize the set of values to 200 points for use in WAPDEG.

  15. ROBUST MODULATION CLASSIFIER BASED ON CUMULANTS FOR MDPSK WITH FREQUENCY OFFSET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Gang; Li Jiandong; Chen Chen

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an improved algorithm for classification of M-Differential Phase-Shift Keying(MDPSK) signals based on cumulant. The feature proposed in the algorithm is invariant with respect to constellation scale, rotation, the shift and the carrier frequency offset between transmitter and receiver. The invariant property is proved theoretically. Through computer simulation the performance is evaluated and the results show that the improved classification algorithm is better and valuable in practice.

  16. Microcanonical thermostatistics analysis without histograms: cumulative distribution and Bayesian approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, Nelson A; Rizzi, Leandro G

    2015-01-01

    Microcanonical thermostatistics analysis has become an important tool to reveal essential aspects of phase transitions in complex systems. An efficient way to estimate the microcanonical inverse temperature $\\beta(E)$ and the microcanonical entropy $S(E)$ is achieved with the statistical temperature weighted histogram analysis method (ST-WHAM). The strength of this method lies on its flexibility, as it can be used to analyse data produced by algorithms with generalised sampling weights. However, for any sampling weight, ST-WHAM requires the calculation of derivatives of energy histograms $H(E)$, which leads to non-trivial and tedious binning tasks for models with continuous energy spectrum such as those for biomolecular and colloidal systems. Here, we discuss two alternative methods that avoid the need for such energy binning to obtain continuous estimates for $H(E)$ in order to evaluate $\\beta(E)$ by using ST-WHAM: (i) a series expansion to estimate probability densities from the empirical cumulative distrib...

  17. On scheduling models for the frequency interval assignment problem with cumulative interferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatmanaroj, Kata; Artigues, Christian; Houssin, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    In this article, models and methods for solving a real-life frequency assignment problem based on scheduling theory are investigated. A realistic frequency assignment problem involving cumulative interference constraints in which the aim is to maximize the number of assigned users is considered. If interferences are assumed to be binary, a multiple carrier frequency assignment problem can be treated as a disjunctive scheduling problem since a user requesting a number of contiguous frequencies can be considered as a non-preemptive task with a processing time, and two interfering users can be modelled through a disjunctive constraint on the corresponding tasks. A binary interference version of the problem is constructed and a disjunctive scheduling model is derived. Based on the binary representation, two models are proposed. The first one relies on an interference matrix and the second one considers maximal cliques. A third, cumulative, model that yields a new class of scheduling problems is also proposed. Computational experiments show that the case-study frequency assignment problem can be solved efficiently with disjunctive scheduling techniques.

  18. Cumulative overlap distribution function in realistic spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billoire, A.; Maiorano, A.; Marinari, E.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Yllanes, D.

    2014-09-01

    We use a sample-dependent analysis, based on medians and quantiles, to analyze the behavior of the overlap probability distribution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and 3D Edwards-Anderson models of Ising spin glasses. We find that this approach is an effective tool to distinguish between replica symmetry breaking-like and droplet-like behavior of the spin-glass phase. Our results are in agreement with a replica symmetry breaking-like behavior for the 3D Edwards-Anderson model.

  19. Robust user equilibrium model based on cumulative prospect theory under distribution-free travel time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 孙会君; 吴建军

    2015-01-01

    The assumption widely used in the user equilibrium model for stochastic network was that the probability distributions of the travel time were known explicitly by travelers. However, this distribution may be unavailable in reality. By relaxing the restrictive assumption, a robust user equilibrium model based on cumulative prospect theory under distribution-free travel time was presented. In the absence of the cumulative distribution function of the travel time, the exact cumulative prospect value (CPV) for each route cannot be obtained. However, the upper and lower bounds on the CPV can be calculated by probability inequalities. Travelers were assumed to choose the routes with the best worst-case CPVs. The proposed model was formulated as a variational inequality problem and solved via a heuristic solution algorithm. A numerical example was also provided to illustrate the application of the proposed model and the efficiency of the solution algorithm.

  20. On Interpreting and Extracting Information from the Cumulative Distribution Function Curve: A New Perspective with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasooriya, Uditha; Li, Jackie; Low, Chan Kee

    2012-01-01

    For any density function (or probability function), there always corresponds a "cumulative distribution function" (cdf). It is a well-known mathematical fact that the cdf is more general than the density function, in the sense that for a given distribution the former may exist without the existence of the latter. Nevertheless, while the density…

  1. Percent relative cumulative frequency analysis in indirect calorimetry: application to studies of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachi, Marc; Himms-Hagen, Jean; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2004-12-01

    Indirect calorimetry is commonly used in research and clinical settings to assess characteristics of energy expenditure. Respiration chambers in indirect calorimetry allow measurements over long periods of time (e.g., hours to days) and thus the collection of large sets of data. Current methods of data analysis usually involve the extraction of only a selected small proportion of data, most commonly the data that reflects resting metabolic rate. Here, we describe a simple quantitative approach for the analysis of large data sets that is capable of detecting small differences in energy metabolism. We refer to it as the percent relative cumulative frequency (PRCF) approach and have applied it to the study of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) deficient and control mice. The approach involves sorting data in ascending order, calculating their cumulative frequency, and expressing the frequencies in the form of percentile curves. Results demonstrate the sensitivity of the PRCF approach for analyses of oxygen consumption (.VO2) as well as respiratory exchange ratio data. Statistical comparisons of PRCF curves are based on the 50th percentile values and curve slopes (H values). The application of the PRCF approach revealed that energy expenditure in UCP1-deficient mice housed and studied at room temperature (24 degrees C) is on average 10% lower (p calorimetry is increasingly used, and the PRCF approach provides a novel and powerful means for data analysis.

  2. Joint estimation of DOA, frequency, and polarization based on cumulants and UCA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Jiacai; Shi Yaowu; Tao Jianwu

    2007-01-01

    A joint estimation algorithm of direction of arrival (DOA), frequency, and polarization, based on fourth-order cumulants and uniform circular array (UCA) of trimmed vector sensors is presented for narrowband non-Gaussian signals. The proposed approach, which is suitable for applications in arbitrary Gaussian noise environments, gives a closed-form representation of the estimated parameters, without spectral peak searching. An efficient method is also provided for elimination of cyclic phase ambiguities. Simulations are presented to show the performance of the algorithm.

  3. Cumulants of multiplicity distributions in most-central heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao-jie

    2016-11-01

    I investigate the volume corrections on cumulants of total charge distributions and net proton distributions. The required volume information is generated by an optical Glauber model. I find that the corrected statistical expectations of multiplicity distributions mimic the negative binomial distributions at noncentral collisions, and they tend to approach the Poisson ones at most-central collisions due to the "boundary effects," which suppress the volume corrections. However, net proton distributions and reference multiplicity distributions are sensitive to the external volume fluctuations at most-central collisions, which imply that one has to consider the details of volume distributions in event-by-event multiplicity fluctuation studies.

  4. CDFTBL: A statistical program for generating cumulative distribution functions from data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, P.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-06-01

    This document describes the theory underlying the CDFTBL code and gives details for using the code. The CDFTBL code provides an automated tool for generating a statistical cumulative distribution function that describes a set of field data. The cumulative distribution function is written in the form of a table of probabilities, which can be used in a Monte Carlo computer code. A a specific application, CDFTBL can be used to analyze field data collected for parameters required by the PORMC computer code. Section 2.0 discusses the mathematical basis of the code. Section 3.0 discusses the code structure. Section 4.0 describes the free-format input command language, while Section 5.0 describes in detail the commands to run the program. Section 6.0 provides example program runs, and Section 7.0 provides references. The Appendix provides a program source listing. 11 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Galactic Subsystems on the Basis of Cumulative Distribution of Space Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojević, S.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A sample containing $4,614$ stars with available space velocities and high-quality kinematical data from the Arihip Catalogue is formed. For the purpose of distinguishing galactic subsystems the cumulative distribution of space velocities is studied. The fractions of the three subsystems are found to be: thin disc 92\\%, thick disc 6\\% and halo 2\\%. These results are verified by analysing the elements of velocity ellipsoids and the shape and size of the galactocentric orbits of the sample stars, i.e. the planar and vertical eccentricities of the orbits.

  6. Fast and accurate calculations for cumulative first-passage time distributions in Wiener diffusion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blurton, Steven Paul; Kesselmeier, M.; Gondan, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    related work on the density of first-passage times [Navarro, D.J., Fuss, I.G. (2009). Fast and accurate calculations for first-passage times in Wiener diffusion models. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 53, 222-230]. Two representations exist for the distribution, both including infinite series. We......We propose an improved method for calculating the cumulative first-passage time distribution in Wiener diffusion models with two absorbing barriers. This distribution function is frequently used to describe responses and error probabilities in choice reaction time tasks. The present work extends...... derive upper bounds for the approximation error resulting from finite truncation of the series, and we determine the number of iterations required to limit the error below a pre-specified tolerance. For a given set of parameters, the representation can then be chosen which requires the least...

  7. Cumulative distribution functions associated with bubble-nucleation processes in cavitation

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2010-11-15

    Bubble-nucleation processes of a Lennard-Jones liquid are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Waiting time, which is the lifetime of a superheated liquid, is determined for several system sizes, and the apparent finite-size effect of the nucleation rate is observed. From the cumulative distribution function of the nucleation events, the bubble-nucleation process is found to be not a simple Poisson process but a Poisson process with an additional relaxation time. The parameters of the exponential distribution associated with the process are determined by taking the relaxation time into account, and the apparent finite-size effect is removed. These results imply that the use of the arithmetic mean of the waiting time until a bubble grows to the critical size leads to an incorrect estimation of the nucleation rate. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  8. Multifractality of stock markets based on cumulative distribution function and multiscale multifractal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aijing; Shang, Pengjian

    2016-04-01

    Considering the diverse application of multifractal techniques in natural scientific disciplines, this work underscores the versatility of multiscale multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MMA) method to investigate artificial and real-world data sets. The modified MMA method based on cumulative distribution function is proposed with the objective of quantifying the scaling exponent and multifractality of nonstationary time series. It is demonstrated that our approach can provide a more stable and faithful description of multifractal properties in comprehensive range rather than fixing the window length and slide length. Our analyzes based on CDF-MMA method reveal significant differences in the multifractal characteristics in the temporal dynamics between US and Chinese stock markets, suggesting that these two stock markets might be regulated by very different mechanism. The CDF-MMA method is important for evidencing the stable and fine structure of multiscale and multifractal scaling behaviors and can be useful to deepen and broaden our understanding of scaling exponents and multifractal characteristics.

  9. ANALYSIS OF A CUMULANT-BASED 2D-RAKE RECEIVER FOR CDMA SYSTEM OVER FREQUENCY-SELECTIVE FADING CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨维; 程时昕

    2003-01-01

    The conventional 2D-Rake receivers for code-division multiple access (CDMA) system over frequency-selective fading channels are generally based on the second-order statistics while assuming perfect array conditions. However, the sensor response, location uncertainty, and the use of sample statistics can severely degrade the performance of second-order statistics processing. And in practical application, it is impossible to calibrate the array frequently. In this paper a cumulant-based 2D-Rake receiver for synchronous CDMA system with decorrelator is presented. Decorrelating is a multi-user detection approach that not only provides a fundamental solution to the mutual interference problem in CDMA communications but also makes it convenient for the decoupled signal to be processed spatially and temporally. High-order signal processing has some inherent advantages over that of second-order. Employing second-order statistics it is impossible to estimate source steering vector blindly, while employing higher than second-order cumulants, this purpose can be achieved. The performance analysis shows that employing cumulant-based signal processing technique the proposed 2D-Rake receiver is blind and demonstrates excellent performance.

  10. Kriging with cumulative distribution function of order statistics for delineation of heavy-metal contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juang, K.W.; Lee, D.Y.; Hsiao, C.K. [National Taiwan Univ., Tapei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1998-10-01

    Accurate delineation of contaminated soils is essential for risk assessment and remediation. The probability of pollutant concentrations lower than a cutoff value is more important than the best estimate of pollutant concentrations for unsampled locations in delineating contaminated soils. In this study, a new method, kriging with the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of order statistics (CDF kriging), is introduced and compared with indicator kriging. It is used to predict the probability that extractable concentrations of Zn will be less than a cut-off value for soils to be declared hazardous. The 0.1 M HCl-extractable Zn concentrations of topsoil of a paddy field having an area of about 2000 ha located in Taiwan are used. A comparison of the CDF of order statistics and indicator function transformation shows that the variance and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the CDF of order statistics transformed data are smaller than those of the indicator function transformed data. This suggests that the CDF of order statistics transformation possesses less variability than does the indicator function transformation. In addition, based on cross-validation, CDF kriging is found to reduce the mean squared errors of estimations by about 30% and to reduce the mean kriging variances by about 26% compared with indicator kriging.

  11. Cumulative luminosity distributions of Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients in hard X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Paizis, A

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed in a systematic way about nine years of INTEGRAL data (17-100 keV) focusing on Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) and three classical High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). Our approach has been twofold: image based analysis, sampled over a ~ks time frame to investigate the long-term properties of the sources, and lightcurve based analysis, sampled over a 100s time frame to seize the fast variability of each source during its ~ks activity. We find that while the prototypical SFXTs (IGR J17544-2619, XTE J1739-302 and SAX J1818.6-1703) are among the sources with the lowest ~ks based duty cycle ($<$1% activity over nine years of data), when studied at the 100s level, they are the ones with the highest detection percentage, meaning that, when active, they tend to have many bright short-term flares with respect to the other SFXTs. To investigate in a coherent and self consistent way all the available results within a physical scenario, we have extracted cumulative luminosity distributions for ...

  12. Benchmarking PARTISN with Analog Monte Carlo: Moments of the Neutron Number and the Cumulative Fission Number Probability Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, Patrick Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to provide the reader with an understanding of how a Monte Carlo neutron transport code was written, developed, and evolved to calculate the probability distribution functions (PDFs) and their moments for the neutron number at a final time as well as the cumulative fission number, along with introducing several basic Monte Carlo concepts.

  13. Recurrence and frequency of disturbance have cumulative effect on methanotrophic activity, abundance, and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eHo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by methanotrophic bacteria. Although aerobic methanotrophs showed remarkable resilience to a suite of physical disturbances induced as a single event, their resilience to recurring disturbances is less known. Here, using a rice field soil in a microcosm study, we determined whether recurrence and frequency of desiccation-rewetting impose an accumulating effect on the methanotrophic activity. The response of key aerobic methanotroph subgroups (type Ia, Ib, and II were monitored using qPCR assays, and was supported by a t-RFLP analysis. The methanotrophic activity was resilient to recurring desiccation-rewetting, but increasing the frequency of the disturbance by two-fold significantly decreased methane uptake rate. Both the qPCR and t-RFLP analyses were congruent, showing the dominance of type Ia/Ib methanotrophs prior to disturbance, and after disturbance, the recovering community was predominantly comprised of type Ia (Methylobacter methanotrophs. Both type Ib and type II (Methylosinus/Methylocystis methanotrophs were adversely affected by the disturbance, but type II methanotrophs showed recovery over time, indicating relatively higher resilience to the disturbance. This revealed distinct, yet unrecognized traits among the methanotroph community members. Our results show that recurring desiccation-rewetting before a recovery in community abundance had an accumulated effect, compromising methanotrophic activity. While methanotrophs may recover well following sporadic disturbances, their resilience may reach a ‘tipping point’ where activity no longer recovered if disturbance persists and increase in frequency.

  14. Recurrence and Frequency of Disturbance have Cumulative Effect on Methanotrophic Activity, Abundance, and Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Adrian; van den Brink, Erik; Reim, Andreas; Krause, Sascha M B; Bodelier, Paul L E

    2015-01-01

    Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by methanotrophic bacteria. Although aerobic methanotrophs showed remarkable resilience to a suite of physical disturbances induced as a single event, their resilience to recurring disturbances is less known. Here, using a rice field soil in a microcosm study, we determined whether recurrence and frequency of desiccation-rewetting impose an accumulating effect on the methanotrophic activity. The response of key aerobic methanotroph subgroups (type Ia, Ib, and II) were monitored using qPCR assays, and was supported by a t-RFLP analysis. The methanotrophic activity was resilient to recurring desiccation-rewetting, but increasing the frequency of the disturbance by twofold significantly decreased methane uptake rate. Both the qPCR and t-RFLP analyses were congruent, showing the dominance of type Ia/Ib methanotrophs prior to disturbance, and after disturbance, the recovering community was predominantly comprised of type Ia (Methylobacter) methanotrophs. Both type Ib and type II (Methylosinus/Methylocystis) methanotrophs were adversely affected by the disturbance, but type II methanotrophs showed recovery over time, indicating relatively higher resilience to the disturbance. This revealed distinct, yet unrecognized traits among the methanotroph community members. Our results show that recurring desiccation-rewetting before a recovery in community abundance had an accumulated effect, compromising methanotrophic activity. While methanotrophs may recover well following sporadic disturbances, their resilience may reach a 'tipping point' where activity no longer recovered if disturbance persists and increase in frequency.

  15. Frequency-coded quantum key distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Matthieu; McLaughlin, Steven W; Merolla, Jean-Marc; Patois, Frédéric

    2007-02-01

    We report an intrinsically stable quantum key distribution scheme based on genuine frequency-coded quantum states. The qubits are efficiently processed without fiber interferometers by fully exploiting the nonlinear interaction occurring in electro-optic phase modulators. The system requires only integrated off-the-shelf devices and could be used with a true single-photon source. Preliminary experiments have been performed with weak laser pulses and have demonstrated the feasibility of this new setup.

  16. Improving environmental exposure analysis using cumulative distribution functions and individual geocoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Jayajit

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessments of environmental exposure and health risks that utilize Geographic Information Systems (GIS often make simplifying assumptions when using: (a one or more discrete buffer distances to define the spatial extent of impacted regions, and (b aggregated demographic data at the level of census enumeration units to derive the characteristics of the potentially exposed population. A case-study of school children in Orange County, Florida, is used to demonstrate how these limitations can be overcome by the application of cumulative distribution functions (CDFs and individual geocoded locations. Exposure potential for 159,923 school children was determined at the childrens' home residences and at school locations by determining the distance to the nearest gasoline station, stationary air pollution source, and industrial facility listed in the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI. Errors and biases introduced by the use of discrete buffer distances and data aggregation were examined. Results The use of discrete buffers distances in proximity-based exposure analysis introduced substantial bias in terms of determining the potentially exposed population, and the results are strongly dependent on the choice of buffer distance(s. Comparisons of exposure potential between home and school locations indicated that different buffer distances yield different results and contradictory conclusions. The use of a CDF provided a much more meaningful representation and is not based on the a-priori assumption that any particular distance is more relevant than another. The use of individual geocoded locations also provided a more accurate characterization of the exposed population and allowed for more reliable comparisons among sub-groups. In the comparison of children's home residences and school locations, the use of data aggregated at the census block group and tract level introduced variability as well as bias, leading to incorrect conclusions as

  17. Available Energy and Cumulative Frequency Curves for Parabolic Trough Concentrators with Alignment North–South, in the Northwest of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Lentz–Herrea

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Northwest of Mexico is a well known region with the highest ambient temperatures along the summer and the highest levels of irradiance, which make it feasible to install solar field concentrators. This work provides beam irradiance data that can be used to design a solar north–south parabolic trough system. The variation between the value of beam solar irradiance estimated by a pyranometer and the direct irradiance received by the aperture area of a parabolic trough concentrator (PTC is well–known as cosθ. This variation was evaluated every day of the year, obtaining values of average irradiance for Cerro Prieto (CP lat. 32°39', long. 115° 21', and San Luis Rio Colorado (SLR lat. 32°30', long. 114°46', with which they were elaborated the available energy and cumulative frequency curves (CFC. These are useful to know the number of hours of field solar concentrators which can operate at different levels of energy, as well as the steam production of a solar–geothermal hybrid system to produce electricity.

  18. Asymptotic Time Averages and Frequency Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad El-Taha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Consider an arbitrary nonnegative deterministic process (in a stochastic setting {X(t,  t≥0} is a fixed realization, i.e., sample-path of the underlying stochastic process with state space S=(-∞,∞. Using a sample-path approach, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for the long-run time average of a measurable function of process to be equal to the expectation taken with respect to the same measurable function of its long-run frequency distribution. The results are further extended to allow unrestricted parameter (time space. Examples are provided to show that our condition is not superfluous and that it is weaker than uniform integrability. The case of discrete-time processes is also considered. The relationship to previously known sufficient conditions, usually given in stochastic settings, will also be discussed. Our approach is applied to regenerative processes and an extension of a well-known result is given. For researchers interested in sample-path analysis, our results will give them the choice to work with the time average of a process or its frequency distribution function and go back and forth between the two under a mild condition.

  19. Estimating the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baratti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose an original approach to infer the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scale. Our purpose is to estimate the peak flow that is expected for an assigned return period T, independently of the season in which it occurs (i.e. annual flood frequency regime, as well as in different selected sub-yearly periods (i.e. seasonal flood frequency regime. While a huge literature exists on annual flood frequency analysis, few studies have focused on the estimation of seasonal flood frequencies despite the relevance of the issue, for instance when scheduling along the months of the year the construction phases of river engineering works directly interacting with the active river bed, like for instance dams. An approximate method for joint frequency analysis is presented here that guarantees consistency between fitted annual and seasonal distributions, i.e. the annual cumulative distribution is the product of the seasonal cumulative distribution functions, under the assumption of independence among floods in different seasons. In our method the parameters of the seasonal frequency distributions are fitted by maximising an objective function that accounts for the likelihoods of both seasonal and annual peaks. In contrast to previous studies, our procedure is conceived to allow the users to introduce subjective weights to the components of the objective function in order to emphasize the fitting of specific seasons or of the annual peak flow distribution. An application to the time series of the Blue Nile daily flows at the Sudan–Ethiopia border is presented.

  20. Effects of volume corrections and resonance decays on cumulants of net-charge distributions in a Monte Carlo hadron resonance gas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao-jie

    2017-02-01

    The effects of volume corrections and resonance decays (the resulting correlations between positive charges and negative charges) on cumulants of net-proton distributions and net-charge distributions are investigated by using a Monte Carlo hadron resonance gas (MCHRG) model. The required volume distributions are generated by a Monte Carlo Glauber (MC-Glb) model. Except the variances of net-charge distributions, the MCHRG model with more realistic simulations of volume corrections, resonance decays and acceptance cuts can reasonably explain the data of cumulants of net-proton distributions and net-charge distributions reported by the STAR collaboration. The MCHRG calculations indicate that both the volume corrections and resonance decays make the cumulant products of net-charge distributions deviate from the Skellam expectations: the deviations of Sσ and κσ2 are dominated by the former effect while the deviations of ω are dominated by the latter one.

  1. Rock size-frequency distribution analysis at the Chang'E-3 landing site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Kaichang; Xu, Bin; Peng, Man; Yue, Zongyu; Liu, Zhaoqin; Wan, Wenhui; Li, Lichun; Zhou, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the rock size-frequency distribution at the Chang'E-3 landing site. Using 84 Navcam stereo images acquired at 7 waypoints by the Yutu rover and an interactive stereo image processing system, a total of 582 rocks larger than 0.05 m in diameter were identified and measured. The statistical results of the size-frequency distribution show that the cumulative fractional area covered by rocks versus their diameter follows a simple exponential function and has a convex-up shape on log-log graphs with the slope increasing with diameter. The cumulative number of rocks versus diameter derived by numerically integrating the cumulative fractional area also shows a good fit with the data. A diameter-height relationship was also determined from height and diameter ratios. The observed rock statistics were also compared with those from other lunar missions, including the Surveyor, Apollo, and Lunokhod missions; results suggest that the rock distribution at the Chang'E-3 landing site is similar to that found by Surveyor III.

  2. Parametrizing Impulsive X-ray Heating with a Cumulative Initial-Temperature Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Gayley, K G

    2014-01-01

    In collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), the X-ray spectrum from a plasma depends on the distribution of emission measure over temperature (DEM). Due to the well-known ill conditioning problem, no precisely resolved DEM can be inverted directly from the spectrum, so often only a gross parametrization of the DEM is used to approximate the data, in hopes that the parametrization can provide useful model-independent constraints on the heating process. However, ill conditioning also introduces ambiguity into the various different parametrizations that could approximate the data, which may spoil the perceived advantages of model independence. Thus, this paper instead suggests a single parametrization for both the heating mechanism and the X-ray sources, based on a model of impulsive heating followed by complete cooling. This approach is similar to a ``cooling flow'' approach, but allows injection at multiple initial temperatures, and applies even when the steady state is distribution of different shock strengt...

  3. Adaptive sampling based on the cumulative distribution function of order statistics to delineate heavy-metal contaminated soils using kriging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Kai-Wei; Lee, Dar-Yuan; Teng, Yun-Lung

    2005-11-01

    Correctly classifying "contaminated" areas in soils, based on the threshold for a contaminated site, is important for determining effective clean-up actions. Pollutant mapping by means of kriging is increasingly being used for the delineation of contaminated soils. However, those areas where the kriged pollutant concentrations are close to the threshold have a high possibility for being misclassified. In order to reduce the misclassification due to the over- or under-estimation from kriging, an adaptive sampling using the cumulative distribution function of order statistics (CDFOS) was developed to draw additional samples for delineating contaminated soils, while kriging. A heavy-metal contaminated site in Hsinchu, Taiwan was used to illustrate this approach. The results showed that compared with random sampling, adaptive sampling using CDFOS reduced the kriging estimation errors and misclassification rates, and thus would appear to be a better choice than random sampling, as additional sampling is required for delineating the "contaminated" areas.

  4. Forecasting the Stock Market with Linguistic Rules Generated from the Minimize Entropy Principle and the Cumulative Probability Distribution Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ho Su

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To forecast a complex and non-linear system, such as a stock market, advanced artificial intelligence algorithms, like neural networks (NNs and genetic algorithms (GAs have been proposed as new approaches. However, for the average stock investor, two major disadvantages are argued against these advanced algorithms: (1 the rules generated by NNs and GAs are difficult to apply in investment decisions; and (2 the time complexity of the algorithms to produce forecasting outcomes is very high. Therefore, to provide understandable rules for investors and to reduce the time complexity of forecasting algorithms, this paper proposes a novel model for the forecasting process, which combines two granulating methods (the minimize entropy principle approach and the cumulative probability distribution approach and a rough set algorithm. The model verification demonstrates that the proposed model surpasses the three listed conventional fuzzy time-series models and a multiple regression model (MLR in forecast accuracy.

  5. The cumulative overlap distribution function in spin glasses: mean field vs. three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yllanes, David; Billoire, Alain; Maiorano, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo; Martin-Mayor, Victor

    2015-03-01

    We use a sample-dependent analysis, based on medians and quantiles, to analyze the behavior of the overlap probability distribution in spin glasses. Using analytical and numerical mean-field results for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, as well as data from toy models, we show that this approach is an effective tool to distinguish the low-temperature behavior of replica symmmetry breaking systems from that expected in the droplet picture. An application of the method to the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson models shows agreement with the replica symmetry breaking predictions. Supported by ERC Grant No. 247328 and from MINECO (Spain), Contract No. FIS2012-35719-C02.

  6. Load balancing in distributed framework for frequency based thread pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheraz Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The consequence of load balancing algorithms on a thread pool framework name is distributed load balancing frequency based optimization scheme (LDFBOS to increase its execution. Load balancing in distributed frequency based thread pool scheme is residential towards the ground of synchronizing overhead crude named LDFBOS in Java that slows down its execution due to framework exchange and synchronizing overhead in nodes, we are demonstrating the contrive and execution of load balancing in distributed frequency based thread pool LDFBOS to does usage from distributed in frequency based thread pool (DFBOS, synchronizing primitives that propose benefits of significant scalable moreover, dynamism. We have got resembled the execution of some schemes by Thread Pool Tester which is a Java application simulator and the consequence have demonstrated that load balancing in distributed frequency based thread pool LDFBOS exceeds preceding DFBOS scheme.

  7. Adaptive sampling based on the cumulative distribution function of order statistics to delineate heavy-metal contaminated soils using kriging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juang, K.-W. [Department of Post-Modern Agriculture, MingDao University, Pitou, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lee, D.-Y. [Graduate Institute of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: dylee@ccms.ntu.edu.tw; Teng, Y.-L. [Graduate Institute of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2005-11-15

    Correctly classifying 'contaminated' areas in soils, based on the threshold for a contaminated site, is important for determining effective clean-up actions. Pollutant mapping by means of kriging is increasingly being used for the delineation of contaminated soils. However, those areas where the kriged pollutant concentrations are close to the threshold have a high possibility for being misclassified. In order to reduce the misclassification due to the over- or under-estimation from kriging, an adaptive sampling using the cumulative distribution function of order statistics (CDFOS) was developed to draw additional samples for delineating contaminated soils, while kriging. A heavy-metal contaminated site in Hsinchu, Taiwan was used to illustrate this approach. The results showed that compared with random sampling, adaptive sampling using CDFOS reduced the kriging estimation errors and misclassification rates, and thus would appear to be a better choice than random sampling, as additional sampling is required for delineating the 'contaminated' areas. - A sampling approach was derived for drawing additional samples while kriging.

  8. Classification of EEG Signals Using Adaptive Time-Frequency Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Nabeel A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Time-Frequency (t-f distributions are frequently employed for analysis of new-born EEG signals because of their non-stationary characteristics. Most of the existing time-frequency distributions fail to concentrate energy for a multicomponent signal having multiple directions of energy distribution in the t-f domain. In order to analyse such signals, we propose an Adaptive Directional Time-Frequency Distribution (ADTFD. The ADTFD outperforms other adaptive kernel and fixed kernel TFDs in terms of its ability to achieve high resolution for EEG seizure signals. It is also shown that the ADTFD can be used to define new time-frequency features that can lead to better classification of EEG signals, e.g. the use of the ADTFD leads to 97.5% total accuracy, which is by 2% more than the results achieved by the other methods.

  9. Cumulants of Net-Proton, Net-Kaon and Net-Charge Multiplicity Distributions in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC BES Energies from UrQMD Model

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Ji; Liu, Feng; Luo, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations of conserved quantities are sensitive observables to probe the signature of QCD phase transition and critical point in heavy-ion collisions. With the UrQMD model, we have studied the centrality and energy dependence of various order cumulants and cumulant ratios (up to fourth order) of net-proton,net-charge and net-kaon multiplicity distributions in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, 200 GeV. The model results show that the production mechanism of the particles and anti-particles have significant impacts on the cumulants of net-particles multiplicity distributions and show strong energy dependence. We also made comparisons between model calculations and experimental data measured in the first phase of the beam energy scan (BES) program by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The comparisons indicate that the baryon conservation effect strongly suppress the cumulants of net-proton distributions at low energies and the non-monotonic energy dependence for the net-proton {\\KV...

  10. Recurrent frequency-size distribution of characteristic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Abaimov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Statistical frequency-size (frequency-magnitude properties of earthquake occurrence play an important role in seismic hazard assessments. The behavior of earthquakes is represented by two different statistics: interoccurrent behavior in a region and recurrent behavior at a given point on a fault (or at a given fault. The interoccurrent frequency-size behavior has been investigated by many authors and generally obeys the power-law Gutenberg-Richter distribution to a good approximation. It is expected that the recurrent frequency-size behavior should obey different statistics. However, this problem has received little attention because historic earthquake sequences do not contain enough events to reconstruct the necessary statistics. To overcome this lack of data, this paper investigates the recurrent frequency-size behavior for several problems. First, the sequences of creep events on a creeping section of the San Andreas fault are investigated. The applicability of the Brownian passage-time, lognormal, and Weibull distributions to the recurrent frequency-size statistics of slip events is tested and the Weibull distribution is found to be the best-fit distribution. To verify this result the behaviors of numerical slider-block and sand-pile models are investigated and the Weibull distribution is confirmed as the applicable distribution for these models as well. Exponents β of the best-fit Weibull distributions for the observed creep event sequences and for the slider-block model are found to have similar values ranging from 1.6 to 2.2 with the corresponding aperiodicities CV of the applied distribution ranging from 0.47 to 0.64. We also note similarities between recurrent time-interval statistics and recurrent frequency-size statistics.

  11. The BASIC program to analyse the polymodal frequency distribution into normal distributions with Marqualdt's method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akamine, T

    1984-01-01

    The method analysing the polymodal distribution into normal distribution enables by plotting the frequencies in the medium values of the classes to perform a resolution to the regression curve method...

  12. Distributed Frequency Control of Prosumer-Based Electric Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, MH; Costello, Z; Feizollahi, MJ; Grijalva, S; Egerstedt, M

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed frequency regulation framework for prosumer-based electric energy systems, where a prosumer (producer-consumer) is defined as an intelligent agentwhich can produce, consume, and/or store electricity. Despite the frequency regulators being distributed, stability can be ensured while avoiding inter-area oscillations using a limited control effort. To achieve this, a fully distributed one-step model-predictive control protocol is proposed and analyzed, whereby each prosumer communicates solely with its neighbors in the network. The efficacy of the proposed frequency regulation framework is shown through simulations on two real-world electric energy systems of different scale and complexity. We show that prosumers can indeed bring frequency and power deviations to their desired values after small perturbations.

  13. Visualization of EEG using time-frequency distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiber, B Z; Sato, S

    1997-12-01

    The EEG is a time-varying or nonstationary signal. Frequency and amplitude are two of its significant characteristics, and are valuable clues to different states of brain activity. Detection of these temporal features is important in understanding EEGs. Commonly, spectrograms and AR models are used for EEG analysis. However, their accuracy is limited by their inherent assumption of stationarity and their trade-off between time and frequency resolution. We investigate EEG signal processing using existing compound kernel time-frequency distributions (TFDs). By providing a joint distribution of signal intensity at any frequency along time, TFDs preserve details of the temporal structure of the EEG waveform, and can extract its time-varying frequency and amplitude features. We expect that this will have significant implications for EEG analysis and medical diagnosis.

  14. Efficacy of cumulative high-frequency rTMS on freezing of gait in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Su; Hyuk Chang, Won; Cho, Jin Whan; Youn, Jinyoung; Kim, Yun Kwan; Woong Kim, Sun; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Freezing of gait (FOG) affects mobility and balance seriously. Few reports have investigated the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on FOG in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We investigated the efficacy of high-frequency rTMS for the treatment of FOG in PD. Methods: Seventeen patients diagnosed with PD were recruited in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over study. We applied high frequency rTMS (90% of resting motor threshold, 10 Hz, 1,000 pulses) over the lower leg primary motor cortex of the dominant hemisphere (M1-LL) for five sessions in a week. We also administered alternative sham stimulation with a two-week wash out period. The primary outcomes were measured before, immediately after, and one week after the intervention using the Standing Start 180° Turn Test (SS-180) with video analysis and the Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG-Q). The secondary outcome measurements consisted of Timed Up and Go (TUG) tasks and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III). Motor cortical excitability was also evaluated. Results: There were significant improvements in the step required to complete the SS-180 and FOG-Q in the rTMS condition compared to the sham condition, and the effects continued for a week. The TUG and UPDRS-III also showed significant ameliorations over time in the rTMS condition. The MEP amplitude at 120% resting motor threshold and intracortical facilitation also increased after real rTMS condition. Conclusions: High frequency rTMS over the M1-LL may serve as an add-on therapy for improving FOG in PD. PMID:26409410

  15. Influences on flood frequency distributions in Irish river catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ahilan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores influences which result in shifts of flood frequency distributions in Irish rivers. Generalised Extreme Value (GEV type I distributions are recommended in Ireland for estimating flood quantiles. This paper presents the findings of an investigation that identified the GEV statistical distributions that best fit the annual maximum (AM data series extracted from 172 gauging stations of 126 rivers in Ireland. Of these 126 rivers, 25 have multiple gauging stations. Analysis of this data was undertaken to explore hydraulic and hydro-geological factors that influence flood frequency distributions and whether shifts in distributions occur in the down-river direction. The methodology involved determining the shape parameter of GEV distributions that were fitted to AM data at each site and to statistically test this shape parameter to determine whether a type I, type II or type III distribution was valid. The classification of these distributions was further supported by moment and L-moment diagrams and probability plots. Results indicated that of the 143 stations with flow records exceeding 25 yr, data for 92 was best represented by GEV type I distributions and that for another 12 and 39 stations followed type II and type III distributions respectively. The spatial, hydraulic and hydro-geological influences on flood frequency distributions were assessed by incorporating results on an Arc-GIS platform with individual layers showing karst features, flood attenuation polygons and lakes. This data reveals that type I distributions are spatially well represented throughout the country. The majority of type III distributions appear in four distinct clusters in well defined geographical areas where attenuation influences from floodplains and lakes appear to be influential. The majority of type II distributions appear to be in a single cluster in a region in the west of the country that is characterised by a karst landscape. The

  16. Distributed optical multiplexing with precise frequency allocation using fiber frequency conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tomoyuki; Okabe, Ryo; Watanabe, Shigeki

    2013-12-01

    Effective utilization of fiber capacity in optical communication networks is required to keep up with the increasing traffic demand. Precise optical frequency allocation among carriers is essential for improving the spectral efficiency to utilize the limited spectral resource. In this paper, we show a distributed optical multiplexing scheme, in which data signals are sequentially multiplexed by frequency-division multiplexing on a single-wavelength optical carrier using fiber frequency conversion with locally provided optical subcarrier signals. The scheme achieves dense packing of distributed multi-channel signals with precise frequency allocation using free-running lasers. Using the scheme we demonstrate a precise multiplexing of coherent-optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing and Nyquist wavelength-division multiplexing.

  17. Measurement of higher cumulants of net-charge multiplicity distributions in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=7.7 -200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isinhue, A.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Maruyama, T.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We report the measurement of cumulants (Cn,n =1 ,...,4 ) of the net-charge distributions measured within pseudorapidity (|η |<0.35 ) in Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 -200 GeV with the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The ratios of cumulants (e.g., C1/C2 , C3/C1 ) of the net-charge distributions, which can be related to volume independent susceptibility ratios, are studied as a function of centrality and energy. These quantities are important to understand the quantum-chromodynamics phase diagram and possible existence of a critical end point. The measured values are very well described by expectation from negative binomial distributions. We do not observe any nonmonotonic behavior in the ratios of the cumulants as a function of collision energy. The measured values of C1/C2 and C3/C1 can be directly compared to lattice quantum-chromodynamics calculations and thus allow extraction of both the chemical freeze-out temperature and the baryon chemical potential at each center-of-mass energy. The extracted baryon chemical potentials are in excellent agreement with a thermal-statistical analysis model.

  18. Measurement of higher cumulants of net-charge multiplicity distributions in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=7.7-200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Ta'ani, H; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Black, D; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Cronin, N; Crossette, N; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Hayashi, S; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isinhue, A; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khandai, P K; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Maruyama, T; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Midori, J; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mohanty, A K; Mohapatra, S; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moskowitz, M; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Novitzky, N; Nukariya, A; Nyanin, A S; Obayashi, H; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Riveli, N; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Ryu, M S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, M; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A

    2015-01-01

    We report the measurement of cumulants ($C_n, n=1\\ldots4$) of the net-charge distributions measured within pseudorapidity ($|\\eta|<0.35$) in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=7.7-200$ GeV with the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The ratios of cumulants (e.g. $C_1/C_2$, $C_3/C_1$) of the net-charge distributions, which can be related to volume independent susceptibility ratios, are studied as a function of centrality and energy. These quantities are important to understand the quantum-chromodynamics phase diagram and possible existence of a critical end point. The measured values are very well described by expectation from negative binomial distributions. We do not observe any nonmonotonic behavior in the ratios of the cumulants as a function of collision energy. The measured values of $C_1/C_2 = \\mu/\\sigma^2$ and $C_3/C_1 = S\\sigma^3/\\mu$ can be directly compared to lattice quantum-chromodynamics calculations and thus allow extraction of both the chemical freeze-out temperat...

  19. Power Quality Analysis Using Bilinear Time-Frequency Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha'ameri AhmadZuri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bilinear time-frequency distributions (TFDs are powerful techniques that offer good time and frequency resolution of time-frequency representation (TFR. It is very appropriate to analyze power quality signals which consist of nonstationary and multi-frequency components. However, the TFDs suffer from interference because of cross-terms. Many TFDs have been implemented, and there is no fixed window or kernel that can remove the cross-terms for all types of signals. In this paper, the bilinear TFDs are implemented to analyze power quality signals such as smooth-windowed Wigner-Ville distribution (SWWVD, Choi-Williams distribution (CWD, B-distribution (BD, and modified B-distribution (MBD. The power quality signals focused are swell, sag, interruption, harmonic, interharmonic, and transient based on IEEE Std, 1159-1995. A set of performance measures is defined and used to compare the TFRs. It shows that SWWVD presents the best performance and is selected for power quality signal analysis. Thus, an adaptive optimal kernel SWWVD is designed to determine the separable kernel automatically from the input signal.

  20. Measurement of the ratio of the sixth order to the second order cumulant of net-proton multiplicity distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Lizhu; Cui, Fenping; Wu, Yuanfang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the measurement of the sixth order cumulant and its ratio to the second order cumulant ($C_6/C_2$) in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The influence of statistics and different methods of centrality bin width correction on $C_6/C_2$ of net-proton multiplicity distributions is demonstrated. There is no satisfactory method to extract $C_6/C_2$ with the current statistics recorded at lower energies by STAR at RHIC. With statistics comparable to the expected statistics at the planned future RHIC Beam Energy Scan II (BES II), no energy dependence of $C_6/C_2$ is observed in central collisions using the UrQMD model. We find if the transition signal is as strong as predicted by the PQM model, then it is hopefully observed at the upcoming RHIC BES II.

  1. Measurement of the ratio of the sixth order to the second order cumulant of net-proton multiplicity distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lizhu; Li, Zhiming; Cui, Fenping; Wu, Yuanfang

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the measurement of the sixth order cumulant and its ratio to the second order cumulant (C6 /C2) in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The influence of statistics and different methods of centrality bin width correction on C6 /C2 of net-proton multiplicity distributions is demonstrated. There is no satisfactory method to extract C6 /C2 with the current statistics recorded at lower energies by STAR at RHIC. With statistics comparable to the expected statistics at the planned future RHIC Beam Energy Scan II (BES II), no energy dependence of C6 /C2 is observed in central collisions using the UrQMD model. We find that if the transition signal is as strong as predicted by the PQM model, then it is hopefully observed at the upcoming RHIC BES II.

  2. The frequency-independent control method for distributed generation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naderi, Siamak; Pouresmaeil, Edris; Gao, Wenzhong David

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a novel frequency-independent control method suitable for distributed generation (DG) is presented. This strategy is derived based on the . abc/. αβ transformation and . abc/. dq transformation of the ac system variables. The active and reactive currents injected by the DG...... are controlled in the synchronously rotating orthogonal . dq reference frame. The transformed variables are used in control of the voltage source inverter that connects DG to distribution network. Due to importance of distributed resources in modern power systems, development of new, practical, cost...

  3. Influences on flood frequency distributions in Irish river catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahilan, S.; O'Sullivan, J. J.; Bruen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This study explores influences on flood frequency distributions in Irish rivers. A Generalised Extreme Value (GEV) type I distribution is recommended in Ireland for estimating flood quantiles in a single site flood frequency analysis. This paper presents the findings of an investigation that identified the GEV statistical distributions that best fit the annual maximum (AM) data series extracted from 172 gauging stations of 126 rivers in Ireland. Analysis of these data was undertaken to explore hydraulic and hydro-geological factors that influence flood frequency distributions. A hierarchical approach of increasing statistical power that used probability plots, moment and L-moment diagrams, the Hosking goodness of fit algorithm and a modified Anderson-Darling (A-D) statistical test was followed to determine whether a type I, type II or type III distribution was valid. Results of the Hosking et al. method indicated that of the 143 stations with flow records exceeding 25 yr, data for 95 (67%) was best represented by GEV type I distributions and a further 9 (6%) and 39 (27%) stations followed type II and type III distributions respectively. Type I, type II and type III distributions were determined for 83 (58%), 16 (11%) and 34 (24%) stations respectively using the modified A-D method (data from 10 stations was not represented by GEV family distributions). The influence of karst terrain on these flood frequency distributions was assessed by incorporating results on an Arc-GIS platform showing karst features and using Monte Carlo simulations to assess the significance of the number and clustering of the observed distributions. Floodplain effects were identified by using two-sample t-tests to identify statistical correlations between the distributions and catchment properties that are indicative of strong floodplain activity. The data reveals that type I distributions are spatially well represented throughout the country. While also well represented throughout the

  4. Influences on flood frequency distributions in Irish river catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ahilan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores influences on flood frequency distributions in Irish rivers. A Generalised Extreme Value (GEV type I distribution is recommended in Ireland for estimating flood quantiles in a single site flood frequency analysis. This paper presents the findings of an investigation that identified the GEV statistical distributions that best fit the annual maximum (AM data series extracted from 172 gauging stations of 126 rivers in Ireland. Analysis of these data was undertaken to explore hydraulic and hydro-geological factors that influence flood frequency distributions. A hierarchical approach of increasing statistical power that used probability plots, moment and L-moment diagrams, the Hosking goodness of fit algorithm and a modified Anderson-Darling (A-D statistical test was followed to determine whether a type I, type II or type III distribution was valid. Results of the Hosking et al. method indicated that of the 143 stations with flow records exceeding 25 yr, data for 95 (67% was best represented by GEV type I distributions and a further 9 (6% and 39 (27% stations followed type II and type III distributions respectively. Type I, type II and type III distributions were determined for 83 (58%, 16 (11% and 34 (24% stations respectively using the modified A-D method (data from 10 stations was not represented by GEV family distributions. The influence of karst terrain on these flood frequency distributions was assessed by incorporating results on an Arc-GIS platform showing karst features and using Monte Carlo simulations to assess the significance of the number and clustering of the observed distributions. Floodplain effects were identified by using two-sample t-tests to identify statistical correlations between the distributions and catchment properties that are indicative of strong floodplain activity. The data reveals that type I distributions are spatially well represented throughout the country. While also well represented throughout

  5. Similarity of Symbol Frequency Distributions with Heavy Tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Martin; Font-Clos, Francesc; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the similarity between symbolic sequences is a traditional problem in information theory which requires comparing the frequencies of symbols in different sequences. In numerous modern applications, ranging from DNA over music to texts, the distribution of symbol frequencies is characterized by heavy-tailed distributions (e.g., Zipf's law). The large number of low-frequency symbols in these distributions poses major difficulties to the estimation of the similarity between sequences; e.g., they hinder an accurate finite-size estimation of entropies. Here, we show analytically how the systematic (bias) and statistical (fluctuations) errors in these estimations depend on the sample size N and on the exponent γ of the heavy-tailed distribution. Our results are valid for the Shannon entropy (α =1 ), its corresponding similarity measures (e.g., the Jensen-Shanon divergence), and also for measures based on the generalized entropy of order α . For small α 's, including α =1 , the errors decay slower than the 1 /N decay observed in short-tailed distributions. For α larger than a critical value α*=1 +1 /γ ≤2 , the 1 /N decay is recovered. We show the practical significance of our results by quantifying the evolution of the English language over the last two centuries using a complete α spectrum of measures. We find that frequent words change more slowly than less frequent words and that α =2 provides the most robust measure to quantify language change.

  6. Magnitude-frequency characteristics and preparatory factors for spatial debris-slide distribution in the northern Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mads-Peter Jakob; Jensen, Niels H.; Veihe, Anita

    2013-01-01

    the magnitude and frequency of their debris-slide origins as well as identifying which preparatory factors are responsible for the spatial debris-slide distribution in the landscape. For that purpose a debris-slide inventory was generated from aerial photo interpretation (API), fieldwork and anecdotal sources......, covering a 159 km(2) study area in the northern Faroe Islands. A magnitude-cumulative frequency (MCF) curve was derived to predict magnitude dependant debris-slide frequencies, while preparatory factors responsible for spatial debris-slide distribution were quantified through GIS-supported discriminant...... function analysis (DFA). Nine factors containing geological (lithology, dip), geomorphological (slope angle, altitude, aspect; plan and profile curvature) and land use (infield/outfield, sheep density) information were included in the multivariate analysis. Debris-slides larger than 100 m(2) with magnitude...

  7. Distributed coupling and multi-frequency microwave accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Li, Zenghai; Borchard, Philipp

    2016-07-05

    A microwave circuit for a linear accelerator has multiple metallic cell sections, a pair of distribution waveguide manifolds, and a sequence of feed arms connecting the manifolds to the cell sections. The distribution waveguide manifolds are connected to the cell sections so that alternating pairs of cell sections are connected to opposite distribution waveguide manifolds. The distribution waveguide manifolds have concave modifications of their walls opposite the feed arms, and the feed arms have portions of two distinct widths. In some embodiments, the distribution waveguide manifolds are connected to the cell sections by two different types of junctions adapted to allow two frequency operation. The microwave circuit may be manufactured by making two quasi-identical parts, and joining the two parts to form the microwave circuit, thereby allowing for many manufacturing techniques including electron beam welding, and thereby allowing the use of un-annealled copper alloys, and hence greater tolerance to high gradient operation.

  8. Simple method of generating and distributing frequency-entangled qudits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rui-Bo; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Mikio; Takeoka, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Ryota; Yamashita, Taro; Miki, Shigehito; Terai, Hirotaka; Gerrits, Thomas; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-11-01

    High-dimensional, frequency-entangled photonic quantum bits (qudits for d-dimension) are promising resources for quantum information processing in an optical fiber network and can also be used to improve channel capacity and security for quantum communication. However, up to now, it is still challenging to prepare high-dimensional frequency-entangled qudits in experiments, due to technical limitations. Here we propose and experimentally implement a novel method for a simple generation of frequency-entangled qudts with d\\gt 10 without the use of any spectral filters or cavities. The generated state is distributed over 15 km in total length. This scheme combines the technique of spectral engineering of biphotons generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and the technique of spectrally resolved Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. Our frequency-entangled qudits will enable quantum cryptographic experiments with enhanced performances. This distribution of distinct entangled frequency modes may also be useful for improved metrology, quantum remote synchronization, as well as for fundamental test of stronger violation of local realism.

  9. On the similarity of symbol frequency distributions with heavy tails

    CERN Document Server

    Gerlach, Martin; Altmann, Eduardo G

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the similarity between symbolic sequences is a traditional problem in Information Theory which requires comparing the frequencies of symbols in different sequences. In numerous modern applications, ranging from DNA over music to texts, the distribution of symbol frequencies is characterized by heavy-tailed distributions (e.g., Zipf's law). The large number of low-frequency symbols in these distributions poses major difficulties to the estimation of the similarity between sequences, e.g., they hinder an accurate finite-size estimation of entropies. Here we show how the accuracy of estimations depend on the sample size~$N$, not only for the Shannon entropy $(\\alpha=1)$ and its corresponding similarity measures (e.g., the Jensen-Shanon divergence) but also for measures based on the generalized entropy of order $\\alpha$. For small $\\alpha$'s, including $\\alpha=1$, the bias and fluctuations in the estimations decay slower than the $1/N$ decay observed in short-tailed distributions. For $\\alpha$ larger ...

  10. Determination of the frequency of inadequate antibiotic therapy using calculation of indication failure (IF), cumulative indication failure (CIF), and balanced indication failure (BIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgmann, Heinz

    2003-01-01

    Because results of pathogen identification are often lacking when antibiotic therapy is initiated, treatment must frequently be instituted on an empirical basis. The type of empirical therapy will depend on the anticipated pathogen spectrum and naturally also on the prevailing resistance patterns. Inadequate antibiotic therapy may not only be associated with increased overall treatment costs, but will also have adverse effects on mortality. The clinician is frequently faced with an overabundant variety of microbiological data and may fail to interpret them correctly. Therefore, the present study has attempted to "translate" the available microbiological resistance data, frequently presented in the form of percentage rates, into concrete patient numbers and thus illustrate the frequency of inadequate antibiotic therapy. For this purpose, "Indication Failure" (IF), "Cumulative Indication Failure" (CIF) and "Balanced Indication Failure" (BIF) have been calculated based on available microbiological data. For the indication "nosocomial pneumonia", calculations of the BIF show that only one out of 67 or one out of 63 patients is inadequately treated with a therapy with cefepime or imipenem, while one out of 25 patients is inadequately treated when using ceftazidime. However, it must be pointed out that these calculations only represent an interpretation of microbiological data and the success of antibiotic therapy will ultimately also depend on parameters such as the pharmacodynamic properties of an antibiotic or on the immunocompetence of the patient treated.

  11. Convergence of the frequency-size distribution of global earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Andrew F.; Naylor, Mark; Main, Ian G.

    2013-06-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter (GR) frequency-magnitude relation is a fundamental empirical law of seismology, but its form remains uncertain for rare extreme events. Here, we show that the temporal evolution of model likelihoods and parameters for the frequency-magnitude distribution of the global Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor catalog is inconsistent with an unbounded GR relation, despite if being the preferred model at the current time. During the recent spate of 12 great earthquakes in the last 8 years, record-breaking events result in profound steps in favor of the unbounded GR relation. However, between such events the preferred model gradually converges to the tapered GR relation, and the form of the convergence cannot be explained by random sampling of an unbounded GR distribution. The convergence properties are consistent with a global catalog composed of superposed randomly-sampled regional catalogs, each with different upper bounds, many of which have not yet sampled their largest event.

  12. A Monte Carlo procedure for the construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions for comparison with the EPA release limits for radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helton, J.C.; Shiver, A.W.

    1994-10-01

    A Monte Carlo procedure for the construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for comparison with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits for radioactive waste disposal (40 CFR 191, Subpart B) is described and illustrated with results from a recent performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Monte Carlo procedure produces CCDF estimates similar to those obtained with stratified sampling in several recent PAs for the WIPP. The advantages of the Monte Carlo procedure over stratified sampling include increased resolution in the calculation of probabilities for complex scenarios involving drilling intrusions and better use of the necessarily limited number of mechanistic calculations that underlie CCDF construction.

  13. Assessing cumulative impacts of forest development on the distribution of furbearers using expert-based habitat modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, M C; Johnson, C J; Gillingham, M P

    2016-03-01

    Cumulative impacts of anthropogenic landscape change must be considered when managing and conserving wildlife habitat. Across the central-interior of British Columbia, Canada, industrial activities are altering the habitat of furbearer species. This region has witnessed unprecedented levels of anthropogenic landscape change following rapid development in a number of resource sectors, particularly forestry. Our objective was to create expert-based habitat models for three furbearer species: fisher (Pekania pennanti), Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis), and American marten (Martes americana) and quantify habitat change for those species. We recruited 10 biologist and 10 trapper experts and then used the analytical hierarchy process to elicit expert knowledge of habitat variables important to each species. We applied the models to reference landscapes (i.e., registered traplines) in two distinct study areas and then quantified the change in habitat availability from 1990 to 2013. There was strong agreement between expert groups in the choice of habitat variables and associated scores. Where anthropogenic impacts had increased considerably over the study period, the habitat models showed substantial declines in habitat availability for each focal species (78% decline in optimal fisher habitat, 83% decline in optimal lynx habitat, and 79% decline in optimal marten habitat). For those traplines with relatively little forest harvesting, the habitat models showed no substantial change in the availability of habitat over time. The results suggest that habitat for these three furbearer species declined significantly as a result of the cumulative impacts of forest harvesting. Results of this study illustrate the utility of expert knowledge for understanding large-scale patterns of habitat change over long time periods.

  14. High-resolution time-frequency distributions for fall detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Boashash, Boualem

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we examine the role of high-resolution time-frequency distributions (TFDs) of radar micro-Doppler signatures for fall detection. The work supports the recent and rising interest in using emerging radar technology for elderly care and assisted living. Spectrograms have been the de facto joint-variable signal representation, depicting the signal power in both time and frequency. Although there have been major advances in designing quadratic TFDs which are superior to spectrograms in terms of detailing the local signal behavior, the contributions of these distributions in the area of human motion classifications and their offerings in enhanced feature extractions have not yet been properly evaluated. The main purpose of this paper is to show the effect of using high-resolution TFD kernels, in lieu of spectrogram, on fall detection. We focus on the extended modified B-distribution (EMBD) and exploit the level of details it provides as compared with the coarse and smoothed time-frequency signatures offered by spectrograms.

  15. Generalized Exponential Distribution in Flood Frequency Analysis for Polish Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Iwona; Strupczewski, Witold G.; Bogdanowicz, Ewa; Kochanek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Many distributions have been used in flood frequency analysis (FFA) for fitting the flood extremes data. However, as shown in the paper, the scatter of Polish data plotted on the moment ratio diagram shows that there is still room for a new model. In the paper, we study the usefulness of the generalized exponential (GE) distribution in flood frequency analysis for Polish Rivers. We investigate the fit of GE distribution to the Polish data of the maximum flows in comparison with the inverse Gaussian (IG) distribution, which in our previous studies showed the best fitting among several models commonly used in FFA. Since the use of a discrimination procedure without the knowledge of its performance for the considered probability density functions may lead to erroneous conclusions, we compare the probability of correct selection for the GE and IG distributions along with the analysis of the asymptotic model error in respect to the upper quantile values. As an application, both GE and IG distributions are alternatively assumed for describing the annual peak flows for several gauging stations of Polish Rivers. To find the best fitting model, four discrimination procedures are used. In turn, they are based on the maximized logarithm of the likelihood function (K procedure), on the density function of the scale transformation maximal invariant (QK procedure), on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics (KS procedure) and the fourth procedure based on the differences between the ML estimate of 1% quantile and its value assessed by the method of moments and linear moments, in sequence (R procedure). Due to the uncertainty of choosing the best model, the method of aggregation is applied to estimate of the maximum flow quantiles. PMID:26657239

  16. Generalized Exponential Distribution in Flood Frequency Analysis for Polish Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Iwona; Strupczewski, Witold G; Bogdanowicz, Ewa; Kochanek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Many distributions have been used in flood frequency analysis (FFA) for fitting the flood extremes data. However, as shown in the paper, the scatter of Polish data plotted on the moment ratio diagram shows that there is still room for a new model. In the paper, we study the usefulness of the generalized exponential (GE) distribution in flood frequency analysis for Polish Rivers. We investigate the fit of GE distribution to the Polish data of the maximum flows in comparison with the inverse Gaussian (IG) distribution, which in our previous studies showed the best fitting among several models commonly used in FFA. Since the use of a discrimination procedure without the knowledge of its performance for the considered probability density functions may lead to erroneous conclusions, we compare the probability of correct selection for the GE and IG distributions along with the analysis of the asymptotic model error in respect to the upper quantile values. As an application, both GE and IG distributions are alternatively assumed for describing the annual peak flows for several gauging stations of Polish Rivers. To find the best fitting model, four discrimination procedures are used. In turn, they are based on the maximized logarithm of the likelihood function (K procedure), on the density function of the scale transformation maximal invariant (QK procedure), on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics (KS procedure) and the fourth procedure based on the differences between the ML estimate of 1% quantile and its value assessed by the method of moments and linear moments, in sequence (R procedure). Due to the uncertainty of choosing the best model, the method of aggregation is applied to estimate of the maximum flow quantiles.

  17. Frequency distributions: from the sun to the earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Crosby

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The space environment is forever changing on all spatial and temporal scales. Energy releases are observed in numerous dynamic phenomena (e.g. solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar energetic particle events where measurements provide signatures of the dynamics. Parameters (e.g. peak count rate, total energy released, etc. describing these phenomena are found to have frequency size distributions that follow power-law behavior. Natural phenomena on Earth, such as earthquakes and landslides, display similar power-law behavior. This suggests an underlying universality in nature and poses the question of whether the distribution of energy is the same for all these phenomena. Frequency distributions provide constraints for models that aim to simulate the physics and statistics observed in the individual phenomenon. The concept of self-organized criticality (SOC, also known as the "avalanche concept", was introduced by Bak et al. (1987, 1988, to characterize the behavior of dissipative systems that contain a large number of elements interacting over a short range. The systems evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. It is found that frequency distributions of the output parameters from the chain reaction taken over a period of time can be represented by power-laws. During the last decades SOC has been debated from all angles. New SOC models, as well as non-SOC models have been proposed to explain the power-law behavior that is observed. Furthermore, since Bak's pioneering work in 1987, people have searched for signatures of SOC everywhere. This paper will review how SOC behavior has become one way of interpreting the power-law behavior observed in natural occurring phenomenon in the Sun down to the Earth.

  18. Frequency distributions: from the sun to the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, N. B.

    2011-11-01

    The space environment is forever changing on all spatial and temporal scales. Energy releases are observed in numerous dynamic phenomena (e.g. solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar energetic particle events) where measurements provide signatures of the dynamics. Parameters (e.g. peak count rate, total energy released, etc.) describing these phenomena are found to have frequency size distributions that follow power-law behavior. Natural phenomena on Earth, such as earthquakes and landslides, display similar power-law behavior. This suggests an underlying universality in nature and poses the question of whether the distribution of energy is the same for all these phenomena. Frequency distributions provide constraints for models that aim to simulate the physics and statistics observed in the individual phenomenon. The concept of self-organized criticality (SOC), also known as the "avalanche concept", was introduced by Bak et al. (1987, 1988), to characterize the behavior of dissipative systems that contain a large number of elements interacting over a short range. The systems evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. It is found that frequency distributions of the output parameters from the chain reaction taken over a period of time can be represented by power-laws. During the last decades SOC has been debated from all angles. New SOC models, as well as non-SOC models have been proposed to explain the power-law behavior that is observed. Furthermore, since Bak's pioneering work in 1987, people have searched for signatures of SOC everywhere. This paper will review how SOC behavior has become one way of interpreting the power-law behavior observed in natural occurring phenomenon in the Sun down to the Earth.

  19. Magnitude-frequency distribution of submarine landslides in the Gioia Basin (southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, D.; Chiocci, F.; Casalbore, D.; Ercilla, G.; de Urbina, J. Ortiz

    2016-07-01

    Regional inventories and magnitude-frequency relationships provide critical information about landslides and represent a first step in landslide hazard assessment. Despite this, the availability of accurate inventories in the marine environment remains poor because of the commonly low accessibility of high-resolution data at regional scales. Evaluating high-resolution bathymetric data spanning the time interval 2007-2011 for the Gioa Basin of the southern Tyrrhenian Sea yielded a landslide inventory of 428 events affecting an area of >85 km2 and mobilizing approximately 1.4 km3 of sediment. This is the first time that this area is studied in such detail, justifying comparison with other areas both onland and offshore. Statistical analyses revealed that the cumulative distribution of the dataset is characterized by two right-skewed probability distributions with a heavy tail. Moreover, evidence of a rollover for smaller landslide volumes is consistent with similar trends reported in other settings worldwide. This may reflect an observational limitation and the site-specific geologic factors that influence landslide occurrence. The robust validation of both power-law and log-normal probability distributions enables the quantification of a range of probabilities for new extreme events far from the background landslide sizes defined in the area. This is a useful tool at regional scales, especially in geologically active areas where submarine landslides can occur frequently, such as the Gioia Basin.

  20. Magnitude-frequency distribution of submarine landslides in the Gioia Basin (southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, D.; Chiocci, F.; Casalbore, D.; Ercilla, G.; de Urbina, J. Ortiz

    2016-12-01

    Regional inventories and magnitude-frequency relationships provide critical information about landslides and represent a first step in landslide hazard assessment. Despite this, the availability of accurate inventories in the marine environment remains poor because of the commonly low accessibility of high-resolution data at regional scales. Evaluating high-resolution bathymetric data spanning the time interval 2007-2011 for the Gioa Basin of the southern Tyrrhenian Sea yielded a landslide inventory of 428 events affecting an area of >85 km2 and mobilizing approximately 1.4 km3 of sediment. This is the first time that this area is studied in such detail, justifying comparison with other areas both onland and offshore. Statistical analyses revealed that the cumulative distribution of the dataset is characterized by two right-skewed probability distributions with a heavy tail. Moreover, evidence of a rollover for smaller landslide volumes is consistent with similar trends reported in other settings worldwide. This may reflect an observational limitation and the site-specific geologic factors that influence landslide occurrence. The robust validation of both power-law and log-normal probability distributions enables the quantification of a range of probabilities for new extreme events far from the background landslide sizes defined in the area. This is a useful tool at regional scales, especially in geologically active areas where submarine landslides can occur frequently, such as the Gioia Basin.

  1. A Robust Function to Return the Cumulative Density of Non-Central F Distributions in Microsoft Office Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James Byron

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript presents a Visual Basic[superscript R] for Applications function that operates within Microsoft Office Excel[superscript R] to return the area below the curve for a given F within a specified non-central F distribution. The function will be of use to Excel users without programming experience wherever a non-central F distribution is…

  2. Incoherent Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry for Distributed Thermal Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Emir

    2006-01-01

    This thesis reports the main results from an investigation of a fibre-optic distributed temperature sensor based on spontaneous Raman scattering. The technique used for spatial resolving is the incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry, where a pump laser is sine modulated with a stepwise...... increasing frequency, after which the inverse Fourier transform is applied to the signal from the backscattered light. This technique is compared with the more conventional optical time domain reflectometry, where a short pulse is sent through the fibre, and the location of the scattering section...... is determined by the time difference from the emission to the detection of light. A temperature sensor with a range of 2-4km comprising a step-index multi-mode fibre and a high-power 980nm pump laser existed prior to the start of the PhD study. In this study, a sensor range of approximately 10km, and a spatial...

  3. Distributive estimation of frequency selective channels for massive MIMO systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zaib, Alam

    2015-12-28

    We consider frequency selective channel estimation in the uplink of massive MIMO-OFDM systems, where our major concern is complexity. A low complexity distributed LMMSE algorithm is proposed that attains near optimal channel impulse response (CIR) estimates from noisy observations at receive antenna array. In proposed method, every antenna estimates the CIRs of its neighborhood followed by recursive sharing of estimates with immediate neighbors. At each step, every antenna calculates the weighted average of shared estimates which converges to near optimal LMMSE solution. The simulation results validate the near optimal performance of proposed algorithm in terms of mean square error (MSE). © 2015 EURASIP.

  4. STATISTICAL FEATURE OF PITCH FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR ROBUST SPEAKER IDENTIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Linghua; Zheng Baoyu; Yang Zhen

    2005-01-01

    This letter proposes an effective and robust speech feature extraction method based on statistical analysis of Pitch Frequency Distributions (PFD) for speaker identification. Compared with the conventional cepstrum, PFD is relatively insensitive to Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN), but it does not show good performance for speaker identification, even if under clean environments. To compensate this shortcoming, PFD and conventional cepstrum are combined to make the ultimate decision, instead of simply taking one kind of features into account.Experimental results indicate that the hybrid approach can give outstanding improvement for text-independent speaker identification under noisy environments corrupted by AWGN.

  5. Combining scenarios in a calculation of the overall probability distribution of cumulative releases of radioactivity from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, M.S.

    1991-11-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in southeastern New Mexico, is a research and development facility to demonstrate safe disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste. The US Department of Energy will designate WIPP as a disposal facility if it meets the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for disposal of such waste; the standard includes a requirement that estimates of cumulative releases of radioactivity to the accessible environment be incorporated in an overall probability distribution. The WIPP Project has chosen an approach to calculation of an overall probability distribution that employs the concept of scenarios for release and transport of radioactivity to the accessible environment. This report reviews the use of Monte Carlo methods in the calculation of an overall probability distribution and presents a logical and mathematical foundation for use of the scenario concept in such calculations. The report also draws preliminary conclusions regarding the shape of the probability distribution for the WIPP system; preliminary conclusions are based on the possible occurrence of three events and the presence of one feature: namely, the events attempted boreholes over rooms and drifts,'' mining alters ground-water regime,'' water-withdrawal wells provide alternate pathways,'' and the feature brine pocket below room or drift.'' Calculation of the WIPP systems's overall probability distributions for only five of sixteen possible scenario classes that can be obtained by combining the four postulated events or features.

  6. Distribution of Earthquakes as Described by the Generalized Logistic Equation and the Gutenberg-Richter Magnitude-Frequency Formula

    CERN Document Server

    Maslov, Lev A

    2012-01-01

    In this work we developed a new differential equation to study the statistics of earthquake distributions. We call this equation the generalized logistic equation. We used the solution of this equation to analyze earthquake data from the following regions: the Central Atlantic, the Canary Islands, the Magellan Mountains, and the Sea of Japan. Our solution showed excellent correspondence with the observed cumulative distribution of earthquakes for all magnitudes. Historically, the Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude formula has been used to study the distribution of earthquakes. However, the Gutenberg-Richter formula is only accurate for large magnitudes. As shown in our analysis, the Gutenberg-Richter formula is a special case of the solution to our generalized logistic equation for large magnitudes.

  7. Identification of Electrooculography Signals Frequency Energy Distribution Using Wavelet Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Bukhari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The time frequency analysis of non-stationary signals has been the considerable research effort in recent years. Wavelet transform is one of the favored tool for the analyzing the biomedical signals. Approach: We describe the identification of Electro-Oculograph (EOG signals of eye movement potentials by using wavelet algorithm which gives a lot of information than FFT. The capability of wavelet transform was to distribute the signal energy with the change of time in different frequency bands. This will showed the characteristic of the signals since energy was an important physical variable in signal analysis. The EOG signals were captured using electrodes placed on the forehead around the eyes to record the eye movements. The wavelet features used to determine the characteristic of eye movement waveform. This technique adopted because it was a non-invasive, inexpensive and accurate. The new technology enhancement has allowed the EOG signals captured using the Neuronal EEG-9200. The recorded data was composed of an eye movement toward four directions, i.e., downward, upward, leftward and rightward. The proposed analysis for each eyes signal is analyzed by using Wavelet Transform (WT with energy algorithm and by comparing the energy distribution with the change of time and frequency of each signal. Results: A wavelet Scalogram was plotted to display the different percentages of energy for each wavelet coefficient towards different movement. Conclusion: From the result, it is proved that the different EOG signals exhibit differences in signals energy with their corresponding scale such as leftward with scale 6 (8- 16Hz, rightward with scale 8 (2-4Hz, downward with scale 9 (1-2Hz and upward with level 7 (4-8Hz. Statistically, the results in this study indicate that there are 93% (averages significance differences in the extracted features of wavelet Scalogram analysis.

  8. Size-frequency distribution of boulders ≥10 m on comet 103P/Hartley 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, Maurizio; Lucchetti, Alice; Bertini, Ivano; Marzari, Francesco; A'Hearn, Michael F.; La Forgia, Fiorangela; Lazzarin, Monica; Naletto, Giampiero; Barbieri, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We derive the size-frequency distribution of boulders on comet 103P/Hartley 2, which are computed from the images taken by the Deep Impact/HRI-V imaging system. We indicate the possible physical processes that lead to these boulder size distributions. Methods: We used images acquired by the High Resolution Imager-Visible CCD camera on 4 November 2010. Boulders ≥10 m were identified and manually extracted from the datasets with the software ArcGIS. We derived the global size-frequency distribution of the illuminated side of the comet (~50%) and identified the power-law indexes characterizing the two lobes of 103P. The three-pixel sampling detection, together with the shadowing of the surface, enables unequivocally detection of boulders scattered all over the illuminated surface. Results: We identify 332 boulders ≥10 m on the imaged surface of the comet, with a global number density of nearly 140/km2 and a cumulative size-frequency distribution represented by a power law with index of -2.7 ± 0.2. The two lobes of 103P show similar indexes, i.e., -2.7 ± 0.2 for the bigger lobe (called L1) and -2.6+ 0.2/-0.5 for the smaller lobe (called L2). The similar power-law indexes and similar maximum boulder sizes derived for the two lobes both point toward a similar fracturing/disintegration phenomena of the boulders as well as similar lifting processes that may occur in L1 and L2. The difference in the number of boulders per km2 between L1 and L2 suggests that the more diffuse H2O sublimation on L1 produce twice the boulders per km2 with respect to those produced on L2 (primary activity CO2 driven). The 103P comet has a lower global power-law index (-2.7 vs. -3.6) with respect to 67P. The global differences between the two comets' activities, coupled with a completely different surface geomorphology, make 103P hardly comparable to 67P. A shape distribution analysis of boulders ≥30 m performed on 103P suggests that the cometary boulders show more elongated shapes

  9. Direct releases to the surface and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessments for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Direct brine release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STOELZEL,D.M.; O' BRIEN,D.G.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SCOTT,L.N.

    2000-05-19

    The following topics related to the treatment of direct brine releases to the surface environment in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty, and (4) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented analyses indicate that direct brine releases do not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for direct brine releases fall substantially to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (4O CFR 191.40 CFR 194).

  10. Cumulants and waitingtime distribution of the photon emission from driven BaF molecule%外场作用下BaF分子发射光子累积量及等待时间分布的研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古丽姗; 彭勇刚

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a single BaF molecule driven by an external field. When the symmetry is broken, the states of the BaF molecule demonstrate the permanent dipole moments. An external laser field to excite BaF molecule transition from its ground state to its excited state, and a radio frequency field couple with the permanent dipole moment of the BaF. The first order and second order cumulants of the emission photons and the waiting time distribution are studied via the recently developed generating function approach, which is very convenient to study the counting statistics and the corresponding probability distributions. The results demonstrate that the radio frequency field could help the BaF molecule to absorb photons from the driving field. The second and third order waiting time distributions oscillate with the evolution time, which reflects the states oscillating with the external radio frequency field.

  11. Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexed Quantum Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Sima; Razavi, Mohsen; Salehi, Jawad A.

    2015-12-01

    We propose orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), as a spectrally efficient multiplexing technique, for quantum key distribution (QKD) at the core of trustednode quantum networks. Two main schemes are proposed and analyzed in detail, considering system imperfections, specifically, time misalignment issues. It turns out that while multiple service providers can share the network infrastructure using the proposed multiplexing techniques, no gain in the total secret key generation rate is obtained if one uses conventional all-optical passive OFDM decoders. To achieve a linear increase in the key rate with the number of channels, an alternative active setup for OFDM decoding is proposed, which employs an optical switch in addition to conventional passive circuits. We show that by using our proposed decoder the bandwidth utilization is considerably improved as compared to conventional wavelength division multiplexing techniques.

  12. The Frequency Distribution of Celiac Autoantibodies in Alopecia Areata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Panjehpour, Tayebeh; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Matin, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is a noncicatricial (nonscarring) alopecia. The association between AA and celiac disease (CD) is debatable. Several studies declare the relationship between AA and CD as measurement of celiac autoantibodies (anti-gliadin IgA and anti-gliadin IgG), but a few studies consider anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency distribution of celiac autoantibodies (all of them) in patients with AA compared with controls. Methods: This study is a case–control study. Thirty-five patients entered in each group. Anti-gliadin IgA, anti-gliadin IgG, and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA were tested in all patients. Samples were examined in ELISA method with binding site's kits, and the result was reported as positive/negative. Finally, the frequency distribution of autoantibodies was examined. Results: The age average did not show a significant difference between two groups (P = 0.62). In addition, there was no significant difference between the two groups based on gender (P = 0.15). The prevalence of antibody in case and control groups was 2.85% and 0%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.31). Conclusions: There may be a relationship between CD and AA, but the absence of statistical association between AA and CD does not mean that there is no relationship between gluten and AA in certain patients. Thus, we have shown here that the biological tests to search for CD do not bring information and proof enough, and it is why we recommend another approach to disclose gluten intolerance in AA patients. PMID:27833723

  13. Directional spatial frequency analysis of lipid distribution in atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Clyde; Reese, Eric; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert; Russell, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the growth of fibrous plaques due to the retention of cholesterol and lipids within the artery wall, which can lead to vessel occlusion and cardiac events. One way to evaluate arterial disease is to quantify the amount of lipid present in these plaques, since a higher disease burden is characterized by a higher concentration of lipid. Although therapeutic stimulation of reverse cholesterol transport to reduce cholesterol deposits in plaque has not produced significant results, this may be due to current image analysis methods which use averaging techniques to calculate the total amount of lipid in the plaque without regard to spatial distribution, thereby discarding information that may have significance in marking response to therapy. Here we use Directional Fourier Spatial Frequency (DFSF) analysis to generate a characteristic spatial frequency spectrum for atherosclerotic plaques from C57 Black 6 mice both treated and untreated with a cholesterol scavenging nanoparticle. We then use the Cauchy product of these spectra to classify the images with a support vector machine (SVM). Our results indicate that treated plaque can be distinguished from untreated plaque using this method, where no difference is seen using the spatial averaging method. This work has the potential to increase the effectiveness of current in-vivo methods of plaque detection that also use averaging methods, such as laser speckle imaging and Raman spectroscopy.

  14. LPI Radar Waveform Recognition Based on Time-Frequency Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Liu, Lutao; Diao, Ming

    2016-10-12

    In this paper, an automatic radar waveform recognition system in a high noise environment is proposed. Signal waveform recognition techniques are widely applied in the field of cognitive radio, spectrum management and radar applications, etc. We devise a system to classify the modulating signals widely used in low probability of intercept (LPI) radar detection systems. The radar signals are divided into eight types of classifications, including linear frequency modulation (LFM), BPSK (Barker code modulation), Costas codes and polyphase codes (comprising Frank, P1, P2, P3 and P4). The classifier is Elman neural network (ENN), and it is a supervised classification based on features extracted from the system. Through the techniques of image filtering, image opening operation, skeleton extraction, principal component analysis (PCA), image binarization algorithm and Pseudo-Zernike moments, etc., the features are extracted from the Choi-Williams time-frequency distribution (CWD) image of the received data. In order to reduce the redundant features and simplify calculation, the features selection algorithm based on mutual information between classes and features vectors are applied. The superiority of the proposed classification system is demonstrated by the simulations and analysis. Simulation results show that the overall ratio of successful recognition (RSR) is 94.7% at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of -2 dB.

  15. LPI Radar Waveform Recognition Based on Time-Frequency Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an automatic radar waveform recognition system in a high noise environment is proposed. Signal waveform recognition techniques are widely applied in the field of cognitive radio, spectrum management and radar applications, etc. We devise a system to classify the modulating signals widely used in low probability of intercept (LPI radar detection systems. The radar signals are divided into eight types of classifications, including linear frequency modulation (LFM, BPSK (Barker code modulation, Costas codes and polyphase codes (comprising Frank, P1, P2, P3 and P4. The classifier is Elman neural network (ENN, and it is a supervised classification based on features extracted from the system. Through the techniques of image filtering, image opening operation, skeleton extraction, principal component analysis (PCA, image binarization algorithm and Pseudo–Zernike moments, etc., the features are extracted from the Choi–Williams time-frequency distribution (CWD image of the received data. In order to reduce the redundant features and simplify calculation, the features selection algorithm based on mutual information between classes and features vectors are applied. The superiority of the proposed classification system is demonstrated by the simulations and analysis. Simulation results show that the overall ratio of successful recognition (RSR is 94.7% at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of −2 dB.

  16. Duality Revisited: Construction of Fractional Frequency Distributions Based on Two Dual Lotka Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egghe, L.; Rao, I. K. Ravichandra

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of fractional frequency distributions of authors with a certain (fractional) number of papers focuses on the use of Lotka laws to model theoretical fractional frequency distributions with one parameter. Shows that irregular fractional frequency distributions are a consequence of Lotka's law, not breakdowns of the law. (Author/LRW)

  17. Validating the operational bias and hypothesis of universal exponent in landslide frequency-area distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Teng, Tse-Yang; Chen, Yi-Chin; Huang, Cho-Ying; Lee, Cheing-Tung

    2014-01-01

    The exponent decay in landslide frequency-area distribution is widely used for assessing the consequences of landslides and with some studies arguing that the slope of the exponent decay is universal and independent of mechanisms and environmental settings. However, the documented exponent slopes are diverse and hence data processing is hypothesized for this inconsistency. An elaborated statistical experiment and two actual landslide inventories were used here to demonstrate the influences of the data processing on the determination of the exponent. Seven categories with different landslide numbers were generated from the predefined inverse-gamma distribution and then analyzed by three data processing procedures (logarithmic binning, LB, normalized logarithmic binning, NLB and cumulative distribution function, CDF). Five different bin widths were also considered while applying LB and NLB. Following that, the maximum likelihood estimation was used to estimate the exponent slopes. The results showed that the exponents estimated by CDF were unbiased while LB and NLB performed poorly. Two binning-based methods led to considerable biases that increased with the increase of landslide number and bin width. The standard deviations of the estimated exponents were dependent not just on the landslide number but also on binning method and bin width. Both extremely few and plentiful landslide numbers reduced the confidence of the estimated exponents, which could be attributed to limited landslide numbers and considerable operational bias, respectively. The diverse documented exponents in literature should therefore be adjusted accordingly. Our study strongly suggests that the considerable bias due to data processing and the data quality should be constrained in order to advance the understanding of landslide processes.

  18. Validating the operational bias and hypothesis of universal exponent in landslide frequency-area distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jr-Chuan Huang

    Full Text Available The exponent decay in landslide frequency-area distribution is widely used for assessing the consequences of landslides and with some studies arguing that the slope of the exponent decay is universal and independent of mechanisms and environmental settings. However, the documented exponent slopes are diverse and hence data processing is hypothesized for this inconsistency. An elaborated statistical experiment and two actual landslide inventories were used here to demonstrate the influences of the data processing on the determination of the exponent. Seven categories with different landslide numbers were generated from the predefined inverse-gamma distribution and then analyzed by three data processing procedures (logarithmic binning, LB, normalized logarithmic binning, NLB and cumulative distribution function, CDF. Five different bin widths were also considered while applying LB and NLB. Following that, the maximum likelihood estimation was used to estimate the exponent slopes. The results showed that the exponents estimated by CDF were unbiased while LB and NLB performed poorly. Two binning-based methods led to considerable biases that increased with the increase of landslide number and bin width. The standard deviations of the estimated exponents were dependent not just on the landslide number but also on binning method and bin width. Both extremely few and plentiful landslide numbers reduced the confidence of the estimated exponents, which could be attributed to limited landslide numbers and considerable operational bias, respectively. The diverse documented exponents in literature should therefore be adjusted accordingly. Our study strongly suggests that the considerable bias due to data processing and the data quality should be constrained in order to advance the understanding of landslide processes.

  19. Multiscale Point Correspondence Using Feature Distribution and Frequency Domain Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Shun Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a hybrid scheme is proposed to find the reliable point-correspondences between two images, which combines the distribution of invariant spatial feature description and frequency domain alignment based on two-stage coarse to fine refinement strategy. Firstly, the source and the target images are both down-sampled by the image pyramid algorithm in a hierarchical multi-scale way. The Fourier-Mellin transform is applied to obtain the transformation parameters at the coarse level between the image pairs; then, the parameters can serve as the initial coarse guess, to guide the following feature matching step at the original scale, where the correspondences are restricted in a search window determined by the deformation between the reference image and the current image; Finally, a novel matching strategy is developed to reject the false matches by validating geometrical relationships between candidate matching points. By doing so, the alignment parameters are refined, which is more accurate and more flexible than a robust fitting technique. This in return can provide a more accurate result for feature correspondence. Experiments on real and synthetic image-pairs show that our approach provides satisfactory feature matching performance.

  20. On the frequency-magnitude distribution of converging boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, W.; Laura, S.; Heuret, A.; Funiciello, F.

    2011-12-01

    The occurrence of the last mega-thrust earthquake in Japan has clearly remarked the high risk posed to society by such events in terms of social and economic losses even at large spatial scale. The primary component for a balanced and objective mitigation of the impact of these earthquakes is the correct forecast of where such kind of events may occur in the future. To date, there is a wide range of opinions about where mega-thrust earthquakes can occur. Here, we aim at presenting some detailed statistical analysis of a database of worldwide interplate earthquakes occurring at current subduction zones. The database has been recently published in the framework of the EURYI Project 'Convergent margins and seismogenesis: defining the risk of great earthquakes by using statistical data and modelling', and it provides a unique opportunity to explore in detail the seismogenic process in subducting lithosphere. In particular, the statistical analysis of this database allows us to explore many interesting scientific issues such as the existence of different frequency-magnitude distributions across the trenches, the quantitative characterization of subduction zones that are able to produce more likely mega-thrust earthquakes, the prominent features that characterize converging boundaries with different seismic activity and so on. Besides the scientific importance, such issues may lead to improve our mega-thrust earthquake forecasting capability.

  1. [Frequency distribution of dibucaine numbers in 24,830 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, G; Sprenger, H; Rothhammer, A

    2003-06-01

    Atypical cholinesterase prolongs the duration of neuromuscular blocking drugs such as succinylcholine and mivacurium. Measuring the dibucaine number identifies patients who are at risk. This study shows the frequency distribution of dibucaine numbers routinely measured and discusses avoidable clinical problems and economic implications. Dibucaine numbers were measured on a Hitachi 917-analyzer and all dibucaine numbers recorded over a period of 4 years were taken into consideration. Repeat observations were excluded. A total of 24,830 dibucaine numbers were analysed and numbers below 30 were found in 0.07% ( n=18) giving an incidence of 1:1,400. Dibucaine numbers from 30 to 70 were found in 1.23% ( n=306). On the basis of identification of the Dibucaine numbers we could avoid the administration of succinylcholine or mivacurium resulting in a cost reduction of 12,280 Euro offset against the total laboratory costs amounting to 10,470 Euro. An incidence of 1:1,400 of dibucaine numbers below 30 is higher than documented in the literature. Therefore, routine measurement of dibucaine number is a cost-effective method of identifying patients at increased risk of prolonged neuromuscular blockade due to atypical cholinesterase.

  2. The Soft Cumulative Constraint

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    This research report presents an extension of Cumulative of Choco constraint solver, which is useful to encode over-constrained cumulative problems. This new global constraint uses sweep and task interval violation-based algorithms.

  3. Radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAMSEY, JAMES L.; BLAINE,R.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SMITH,L.N.; WALLACE,M.

    2000-05-22

    The following topics related to radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented: (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, and (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty. The presented results indicate that radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite does not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, no radionuclide transport to the boundary with the accessible environment was observed; thus the associated CCDFs for comparison with the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194) are degenerate in the sense of having a probability of zero of exceeding a release of zero.

  4. Dynamic Response to Pedestrian Loads with Statistical Frequency Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Pedestrian loads depend on the regularity and frequency of the footfall process. Traditionally, pedestrian loads have been represented by one or more specific harmonic components with a well-defined frequency, and light footbridges have been investigated for resonance vibration generated by the h......Pedestrian loads depend on the regularity and frequency of the footfall process. Traditionally, pedestrian loads have been represented by one or more specific harmonic components with a well-defined frequency, and light footbridges have been investigated for resonance vibration generated...

  5. Study on resonance frequency distribution of high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; WANG Zuoqing; ZHANG Shuyi

    2005-01-01

    Based on the method of characterizing piezo-films by the resonance frequency distributions, the factors influencing the resonance frequency distribution of a High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonator (HBAR) consisting of a piezoelectric thin film with twoelectrodes and a substrate are studied. Some HBARs are simulated. The results manifest that changing the acoustic impedance ratio of the substrate to piezo-film the distribution of the space of the parallel resonance frequency and the effective electromechanical coupling factor are changed. When the fundamental mode of the piezo-film is at high frequency, changing the acoustic impedance ratio of the electrode to piezo-film and the thickness of the electrodes make the resonance frequency distribution of HBARs change. These results manifest that the HBARs can be resonant at specified frequencies by means of adjusting the factors affecting the resonance frequency distribution.

  6. The Effects of Frequency, Distribution, Mode of Presentation, and First Language on Learning an Artificial Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Munehiko

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation presents results from a series of experiments investigating adult learning of an artificial language and the effects that input frequency (high vs. low token frequency), frequency distribution (skewed vs. balanced), presentation mode (structured vs. scrambled), and first language (English vs. Japanese) have on such learning.…

  7. [High-frequency ventilation. I. Distribution of alveolar pressure amplitudes during high frequency oscillation in the lung model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen, J; Lunkenheimer, P P; Niederer, P; Bush, E; Frieling, G; Lawin, P

    1987-09-01

    The pattern of intrapulmonary pressure distribution was studied during high-frequency ventilation in order to explain the inconsistent results reported in the literature. Methods. Pressure and flow velocity (hot-wire anemometry) were measured in different lung compartments: 1. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of dried pig lungs; 2. In emphysema-simulating airbags sealed to the isolated bronchial trees of dried pig lungs; and 3. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of freshly excised pig lungs. Results. 1. The pressure amplitudes change from one area to another and depending on the exciting frequency. 2. High-frequency oscillation is associated with an increase in pressure amplitude when the exciting frequency rises, whereas with conventional high-frequency jet ventilation the pressure amplitude is more likely to decrease with frequency. 3. During high-frequency jet ventilation the local pressure amplitude changes with the position of the tube in the trachea rather than with the exciting frequency. 4. When the volume of the measuring chamber is doubled the resulting pressure amplitude falls to half the control value. 5. The pressure amplitude and mean pressure measured in the transalveolar chamber vary more or less independently from the peak flow velocity. High-frequency ventilation is thus seen to be a frequency-dependant, inhomogeneous mode of ventilation that can essentially be homogenized by systematically changing the exciting frequency. The frequency-dependant response to different lung areas to excitation is likely to result from an intrabronchially-localized aerodynamic effect rather than the mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma.

  8. Relationship between the shape and density distribution of the femur and its natural frequencies of vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoli, G; Baka, N; Kaptein, B L; Valstar, E R; Zachow, S; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2014-10-17

    It has been recently suggested that mechanical loads applied at frequencies close to the natural frequencies of bone could enhance bone apposition due to the resonance phenomenon. Other applications of bone modal analysis are also suggested. For the above-mentioned applications, it is important to understand how patient-specific bone shape and density distribution influence the natural frequencies of bones. We used finite element models to study the effects of bone shape and density distribution on the natural frequencies of the femur in free boundary conditions. A statistical shape and appearance model that describes shape and density distribution independently was created, based on a training set of 27 femora. The natural frequencies were then calculated for different shape modes varied around the mean shape while keeping the mean density distribution, for different appearance modes around the mean density distribution while keeping the mean bone shape, and for the 27 training femora. Single shape or appearance modes could cause up to 15% variations in the natural frequencies with certain modes having the greatest impact. For the actual femora, shape and density distribution changed the natural frequencies by up to 38%. First appearance mode that describes the general cortical bone thickness and trabecular bone density had one of the strongest impacts. The first appearance mode could therefore provide a sensitive measure of general bone health and disease progression. Since shape and density could cause large variations in the calculated natural frequencies, patient-specific FE models are needed for accurate estimation of bone natural frequencies.

  9. Randomized algorithms for tracking distributed count, frequencies, and ranks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zengfeng, Huang; Ke, Yi; Zhang, Qin

    2012-01-01

    We show that randomization can lead to significant improvements for a few fundamental problems in distributed tracking. Our basis is the count-tracking problem, where there are k players, each holding a counter ni that gets incremented over time, and the goal is to track an ∑-approximation...

  10. Performance Comparison of Time-Frequency Distributions for Estimation of Instantaneous Frequency of Heart Rate Variability Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel Ali Khan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The instantaneous frequency (IF of a non-stationary signal is usually estimated from a time-frequency distribution (TFD. The IF of heart rate variability (HRV is an important parameter because the power in a frequency band around the IF can be used for the interpretation and analysis of the respiratory rate but also for a more accurate analysis of heart rate (HR signals. In this study, we compare the performance of five states of the art kernel-based time-frequency distributions (TFDs in terms of their ability to accurately estimate the IF of HR signals. The selected TFDs include three widely used fixed kernel methods: the modified B distribution, the S-method and the spectrogram; and two adaptive kernel methods: the adaptive optimal kernel TFD and the recently developed adaptive directional TFD. The IF of the respiratory signal, which is usually easier to estimate as the respiratory signal is a mono-component with small amplitude variations with time, is used as a reference to examine the accuracy of the HRV IF estimates. Experimental results indicate that the most reliable estimates are obtained using the adaptive directional TFD in comparison to other commonly used methods such as the adaptive optimal kernel TFD and the modified B distribution.

  11. Radar signal analysis of ballistic missile with micro-motion based on time-frequency distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianming; Liu, Lihua; Yu, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The micro-motion of ballistic missile targets induces micro-Doppler modulation on the radar return signal, which is a unique feature for the warhead discrimination during flight. In order to extract the micro-Doppler feature of ballistic missile targets, time-frequency analysis is employed to process the micro-Doppler modulated time-varying radar signal. The images of time-frequency distribution (TFD) reveal the micro-Doppler modulation characteristic very well. However, there are many existing time-frequency analysis methods to generate the time-frequency distribution images, including the short-time Fourier transform (STFT), Wigner distribution (WD) and Cohen class distribution, etc. Under the background of ballistic missile defence, the paper aims at working out an effective time-frequency analysis method for ballistic missile warhead discrimination from the decoys.

  12. HYPOCENTER DISTRIBUTION OF LOW FREQUENCY EVENT AT PAPANDAYAN VOLCANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mifta Hasan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Papandayan volcano is a stratovolcano with irregular cone-shaped has eight craters around the peak. The most active crater in Papandayan is a Mas crater. Distribution of relocated event calculated using Geiger Adaptive Damping Algorithm (GAD shows that the epicenter of the event centered below Mas crater with maximum rms 0.114. While depth of the hypocenter range between 0-2 km and 5-6 km due to activity of steam and gas.

  13. Construction Learning as a Function of Frequency, Frequency Distribution, and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Nick C.; Ferreira-Junior, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This article considers effects of construction frequency, form, function, and prototypicality on second language acquisition (SLA). It investigates these relationships by focusing on naturalistic SLA in the European Science Foundation corpus (Perdue, 1993) of the English verb-argument constructions (VACs): verb locative (VL), verb object locative…

  14. Pseudo Wigner–Ville Time-Frequency Distribution and Its Application to Machinery Condition Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young S. Shin

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Machinery operating in a nonstationary mode generates a signature that at each instant of time has a distinct frequency. A Time-frequency domain representation is needed to characterize such a signature. Pseudo Wigner–Ville distribution is ideally suited for portraying a nonstationary signal in the time-frequency domain and is carried out by adapting the fast Fourier transform algorithm. The important parameters affecting the pseudo Wigner–Ville distribution are discussed and sensitivity analyses are also performed. Practical examples of an actual transient signal are used to illustrate its dynamic features jointly in time and frequency.

  15. Distributed multi-frequency image reconstruction for radio-interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Deguignet, Jérémy; Mary, David; Ferrari, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The advent of enhanced technologies in radio interferometry and the perspective of the SKA telescope bring new challenges in image reconstruction. One of these challenges is the spatio-spectral reconstruction of large (Terabytes) data cubes with high fidelity. This contribution proposes an alternative implementation of one such 3D prototype algorithm, MUFFIN (MUlti-Frequency image reconstruction For radio INterferometry), which combines spatial and spectral analysis priors. Using a recently proposed primal dual algorithm, this new version of MUFFIN allows a parallel implementation where computationally intensive steps are split by spectral channels. This parallelization allows to implement computationally demanding translation invariant wavelet transforms (IUWT), as opposed to the union of bases used previously. This alternative implementation is important as it opens the possibility of comparing these efficient dictionaries, and others, in spatio-spectral reconstruction. Numerical results show that the IUWT-...

  16. Randomized Algorithms for Tracking Distributed Count, Frequencies, and Ranks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Zengfeng; Yi, Ke; Zhang, Qin

    2011-01-01

    We show that randomization can lead to significant improvements for a few fundamental problems in distributed tracking. Our basis is the {\\em count-tracking} problem, where there are $k$ players, each holding a counter $n_i$ that gets incremented over time, and the goal is to track an $\\eps......$-approximation of their sum $n=\\sum_i n_i$ continuously at all times, using minimum communication. While the deterministic communication complexity of the problem is $\\Theta(k/\\eps \\cdot \\log N)$, where $N$ is the final value of $n$ when the tracking finishes, we show that with randomization, the communication cost can...

  17. Text mixing shapes the anatomy of rank-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jake Ryland; Bagrow, James P.; Danforth, Christopher M.; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2015-05-01

    Natural languages are full of rules and exceptions. One of the most famous quantitative rules is Zipf's law, which states that the frequency of occurrence of a word is approximately inversely proportional to its rank. Though this "law" of ranks has been found to hold across disparate texts and forms of data, analyses of increasingly large corpora since the late 1990s have revealed the existence of two scaling regimes. These regimes have thus far been explained by a hypothesis suggesting a separability of languages into core and noncore lexica. Here we present and defend an alternative hypothesis that the two scaling regimes result from the act of aggregating texts. We observe that text mixing leads to an effective decay of word introduction, which we show provides accurate predictions of the location and severity of breaks in scaling. Upon examining large corpora from 10 languages in the Project Gutenberg eBooks collection, we find emphatic empirical support for the universality of our claim.

  18. Damage Detection Based on Cross-Term Extraction from Bilinear Time-Frequency Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yuchao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abundant damage information is implicated in the bilinear time-frequency distribution of structural dynamic signals, which could provide effective support for structural damage identification. Signal time-frequency analysis methods are reviewed, and the characters of linear time-frequency distribution and bilinear time-frequency distribution typically represented by the Wigner-Ville distribution are compared. The existence of the cross-term and its application in structural damage detection are demonstrated. A method of extracting the dominant term is proposed, which combines the short-time Fourier spectrum and Wigner-Ville distribution; then two-dimensional time-frequency transformation matrix is constructed and the complete cross-term is extracted finally. The distribution character of which could be applied to the structural damage identification. Through theoretical analysis, model experiment and numerical simulation of the girder structure, the change rate of cross-term amplitude is validated to identify the damage location and degree. The effectiveness of the cross-term of bilinear time-frequency distribution for damage detection is confirmed and the analytical method of damage identification used in structural engineering is available.

  19. Distributed cavity phase frequency shifts of the caesium fountain PTB-CSF2

    CERN Document Server

    Weyers, S; Nemitz, N; Li, R; Gibble, K

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate the frequency error from distributed cavity phase in the caesium fountain clock PTB-CSF2 at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt with a combination of frequency measurements and ab initio calculations. The associated uncertainty is 1.3E-16, with a frequency bias of 0.4E-16. The agreement between the measurements and calculations explains the previously observed frequency shifts at elevated microwave amplitude. We also evaluate the frequency bias and uncertainty due to the microwave lensing of the atomic wavepackets. We report a total PTB-CSF2 systematic uncertainty of 4.1E-16.

  20. Rock size-frequency distributions analysis at lunar landing sites based on remote sensing and in-situ imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Ling, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian

    2017-10-01

    Rock populations can supply fundamental geological information about origin and evolution of a planet. In this paper, we used Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) narrow-angle camera (NAC) images to identify rocks at the lunar landing sites (including Chang'e 3 (CE-3), Apollo and Surveyor series). The diameter and area of each identified rock were measured to generate distributions of rock cumulative fractional area and size-frequency on a log-log plot. The two distributions both represented the same shallow slopes at smaller diameters followed by steeper slopes at larger diameters. A reasonable explanation for the lower slopes may be the resolution and space weathering effects. By excluding the smaller diameters, rock populations derived from NAC images showed approximately linear relationships and could be fitted well by power laws. In the last, the entire rock populations derived from both NAC and in-situ imagery could be described by one power function at the lunar landing sites except the CE-3 and Apollo 11 landing sites. This may be because that the process of a large rock breaking down to small rocks even fine particles can be modeled by fractal theories. Thus, rock populations on lunar surfaces can be extrapolated along the curves of rock populations derived from NAC images to smaller diameters. In the future, we can apply rock populations from remote sensing images to estimate the number of rocks with smaller diameters to select the appropriate landing sites for the CE-4 and CE-5 missions.

  1. Distributed Hierarchical Control of Multi-Area Power Systems with Improved Primary Frequency Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Jianming; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Du, Pengwei; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2012-12-12

    The conventional distributed hierarchical control architecture for multi-area power systems is revisited. In this paper, a new distributed hierarchical control architecture is proposed. In the proposed architecture, pilot generators are selected in each area to be equipped with decentralized robust control as a supplementary to the conventional droop speed control. With the improved primary frequency control, the system frequency can be restored to the nominal value without the help of secondary frequency control, which reduces the burden of the automatic generation control for frequency restoration. Moreover, the low frequency inter-area electromechanical oscillations can also be effectively damped. The effectiveness of the proposed distributed hierarchical control architecture is validated through detailed simulations.

  2. Cross-language distributions of high frequency and phonetically similar cognates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Job Schepens

    Full Text Available The coinciding form and meaning similarity of cognates, e.g. 'flamme' (French, 'Flamme' (German, 'vlam' (Dutch, meaning 'flame' in English, facilitates learning of additional languages. The cross-language frequency and similarity distributions of cognates vary according to evolutionary change and language contact. We compare frequency and orthographic (O, phonetic (P, and semantic similarity of cognates, automatically identified in semi-complete lexicons of six widely spoken languages. Comparisons of P and O similarity reveal inconsistent mappings in language pairs with deep orthographies. The frequency distributions show that cognate frequency is reduced in less closely related language pairs as compared to more closely related languages (e.g., French-English vs. German-English. These frequency and similarity patterns may support a better understanding of cognate processing in natural and experimental settings. The automatically identified cognates are available in the supplementary materials, including the frequency and similarity measurements.

  3. Frequency distributions of helminths of wolves in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdybekova, A M; Torgerson, P R

    2012-03-23

    Between 2001 and 2008 a total of 41 wolves (Canis lupus) were necropsied in southern Kazakhstan and their intestinal parasite fauna evaluated. Of these animals 8 (19.5%) were infected with Echinococcus granulosus, 15 (36%) with Taenia spp, 13 (31.7%) with Dypilidium caninum, 5 (12.2%) with Mesocestoides lineatus, 15 (36.6%) with Toxocara canis, 16 (39%) with Toxascaris leonina, 8 (19.5%) with Trichuris vulpis, 9 (22%) with Macracanthorhynchus catulinus and 1 (2.4%) with Moniliformis moniliformis. All parasites had an aggregated distribution which followed a zero inflated or hurdle model. Although a small convenience sample of wolves, the results indicate a high prevalence of infection with E. granulosus. The mean abundance (1275 E. granulosus per wolf) was high with individual infected wolves carrying intensities of several thousand parasites. As wolves are common in Kazakhstan they may act as an important host in the transmission of this zoonotic parasite. The wolves were sampled from an area of Kazakhstan where there is a high prevalence of hydatid cysts in livestock and where echinococcosis has been observed in wild ungulates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Distributed Optimization Design of Continuous-Time Multiagent Systems With Unknown-Frequency Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghu; Hong, Yiguang; Yi, Peng; Ji, Haibo; Kang, Yu

    2017-05-24

    In this paper, a distributed optimization problem is studied for continuous-time multiagent systems with unknown-frequency disturbances. A distributed gradient-based control is proposed for the agents to achieve the optimal consensus with estimating unknown frequencies and rejecting the bounded disturbance in the semi-global sense. Based on convex optimization analysis and adaptive internal model approach, the exact optimization solution can be obtained for the multiagent system disturbed by exogenous disturbances with uncertain parameters.

  5. Daris, a low-frequency distributed aperture array for radio astronomy in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.J.; Saks, N.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; van 't Klooster, K.; Falcke, H.

    2010-01-01

    DARIS (Distributed Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy in Space) is a radio astronomy space mission concept aimed at observing the low-frequency radio sky in the range 1-10 MHz. Because of the Earth's ionospheric disturbances and opaqueness, this frequency range can only be observed from space. The a

  6. 17 CFR 270.19b-1 - Frequency of distribution of capital gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frequency of distribution of... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.19b-1 Frequency of... or interest on its eligible trust securities; or (3) A change in market, revenue or credit factors...

  7. Frequencies Estimation of Sinusoidal Embedded in Colored Noises via Cross-High-Order Cumulant LS Method%色噪声背景下正弦频率估计的互高阶谱LS方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马彦; 石要武; 戴逸松

    2001-01-01

    Harmonic retrieval problem considered here concerns with the estimation of the sinusoidal frequencies in hybrid col-red noises. It is applied to the cross-spectral theory and high-order self-spectral theory now. In this paper, Yule-Walker equation based on cross-fourth-order cumulant is developed first. And least square(LS) modified Yule-Walker (LS-Yule-Walker) method is also provided. Simulation results show that the method is effective to estimation sinusoid signal frequencies from hybrid colored noises and has good performance.%在互功率谱估计方法和高阶统计量理论相结合的基础上,提出了现代互高阶谱估计理论。首先推导并建立了基于互四阶累积量的Yule-Walker方程,并在此基础上提出了互四阶累积量的最小二乘(LS)修正Yule-Walker方程方法。仿真结果表明,在混合色噪声背景下,在信噪比达到-5dB的情况下,该方法仍能有效地抑制相关的和不相关的色噪声,具有良好的频率估计性能。

  8. The global size-frequency distribution of boulders > 7 m on Comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, Maurizio; Baptiste Vincent, Jean; Lee, Jui-Chi; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Bertini, Ivano; Massironi, Matteo; Simioni, Emanuele; Barbieri, Cesare; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marzari, Francesco; Naletto, Giampiero; Giacomini, Lorenza; Jorda, Laurent; Thomas, Nicholas; Pommerol, Antoine; Kueppers, Michael; Moissl, Richard; Besse, Sebastien; Sierks, Holger

    2015-04-01

    After a ten years journey through the Solar System, the ESA Rosetta spacecraft reached on 6 August 2014 its primary target, the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, hereafter 67P. During the approaching phase, several images of the nucleus of comet 67P, captured by the OSIRIS scientific imaging camera, have been taken to study its structure, activity and the surface morphology. The close distance between spacecraft and comet, and the high resolution of our images, provided a unique opportunity to study features which could not have been detected before on other comets, but yet hold key parameters to derive the physical properties of the surface. We made use of the images acquired by the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera, NAC, on 5 and 6 August 2014 in order to study the statistical size-frequency distribution and the morphological properties of both clustered and isolated roundish structures ("boulders") scattered all over the currently illuminated side of the comet (70% of the total surface). Such dataset has been taken at a distance ranging between 131.45 and 109.76 km far from the comet center and the scale of these images (2.44 - 2.03 m/px) is such that boulders ≥ 7 m can be unequivocally identified and extracted. These images are the last ones where the entire comet is 2048 x 2048 pixels full frame and they cover a complete comet rotation (12.4 h), hence providing the possibility to derive a global size-frequency distribution statistics of the presently illuminated surface of 67P. A total amount of 3526 boulders has been identified on the surface of the comet: i) 2218 belonging to the big lobe, body, ii) 1115 boulders are located on the small lobe, head, while iii) 213 boulders belong to the transition region between the two lobes, called the neck. Here, global cumulative size-frequency distributions of boulders per square km are presented, together with specific and localized areas distributions. Moreover we indicate the different formation processes

  9. Sub-nanosecond machine timing and frequency distribution via serial data links

    CERN Document Server

    Rohlev, A; Serrano, J; Cattin, M; Settler, M

    2008-01-01

    FERMI@ELETTRA is a 4th generation light source under construction at Sincrotrone Trieste. It will be operated as a seeded FEL driven by a warm S-band Linac which places very stringent specifications on control of the amplitude and phase of the RF stations. The local clock generation and distribution system at each station will not be based on the phase reference distribution but rather on a separate frequency reference distribution which has significantly less stringent phase stability requirements. This frequency reference will be embedded in the serial data link to each station and has the further advantage of being able to broadcast synchronous machine timing signals with sub-nanosecond temporal accuracy. The phase and amplitude of the phase reference line is measured for each pulse and used to calibrate the other measurements. This paper describes the architecture used to distribute the frequency reference along with the precision machine timing and clocking signals.

  10. Cumulative Paired φ-Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Klein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new kind of entropy will be introduced which generalizes both the differential entropy and the cumulative (residual entropy. The generalization is twofold. First, we simultaneously define the entropy for cumulative distribution functions (cdfs and survivor functions (sfs, instead of defining it separately for densities, cdfs, or sfs. Secondly, we consider a general “entropy generating function” φ, the same way Burbea et al. (IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 1982, 28, 489–495 and Liese et al. (Convex Statistical Distances; Teubner-Verlag, 1987 did in the context of φ-divergences. Combining the ideas of φ-entropy and cumulative entropy leads to the new “cumulative paired φ-entropy” ( C P E φ . This new entropy has already been discussed in at least four scientific disciplines, be it with certain modifications or simplifications. In the fuzzy set theory, for example, cumulative paired φ-entropies were defined for membership functions, whereas in uncertainty and reliability theories some variations of C P E φ were recently considered as measures of information. With a single exception, the discussions in the scientific disciplines appear to be held independently of each other. We consider C P E φ for continuous cdfs and show that C P E φ is rather a measure of dispersion than a measure of information. In the first place, this will be demonstrated by deriving an upper bound which is determined by the standard deviation and by solving the maximum entropy problem under the restriction of a fixed variance. Next, this paper specifically shows that C P E φ satisfies the axioms of a dispersion measure. The corresponding dispersion functional can easily be estimated by an L-estimator, containing all its known asymptotic properties. C P E φ is the basis for several related concepts like mutual φ-information, φ-correlation, and φ-regression, which generalize Gini correlation and Gini regression. In addition, linear rank tests for scale that

  11. Bonus-Malus System with the Claim Frequency Distribution is Geometric and the Severity Distribution is Truncated Weibull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, D. N.; Purnaba, I. G. P.; Mangku, I. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bonus-Malus system is said to be optimal if it is financially balanced for insurance companies and fair for policyholders. Previous research about Bonus-Malus system concern with the determination of the risk premium which applied to all of the severity that guaranteed by the insurance company. In fact, not all of the severity that proposed by policyholder may be covered by insurance company. When the insurance company sets a maximum bound of the severity incurred, so it is necessary to modify the model of the severity distribution into the severity bound distribution. In this paper, optimal Bonus-Malus system is compound of claim frequency component has geometric distribution and severity component has truncated Weibull distribution is discussed. The number of claims considered to follow a Poisson distribution, and the expected number λ is exponentially distributed, so the number of claims has a geometric distribution. The severity with a given parameter θ is considered to have a truncated exponential distribution is modelled using the Levy distribution, so the severity have a truncated Weibull distribution.

  12. Effects of Nuclear Potential on the Cumulants of Net-Proton and Net-Baryon Multiplicity Distributions in Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\text{NN}}} = 5\\,\\text{GeV}$

    CERN Document Server

    He, Shu; Nara, Yasushi; Esumi, ShinIchi; Xu, Nu

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the rapidity and transverse momentum dependence for the cumulants of the net-proton and net-baryon distributions in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\text{NN}}} = 5\\,\\text{GeV}$ with a microscopic hadronic transport (JAM) model. To study the effects of mean field potential and softening of equation of state (EoS) on the fluctuations of net-proton (baryon) in heavy-ion collisions, the calculations are performed with two different modes. The softening of EoS is realized in the model by implementing the attractive orbit in the two-body scattering to introduce a reduction pressure of the system. By comparing the results from the two modes with the results from default cascade, we find the mean field potential and softening of EoS have strong impacts on the rapidity distributions ($\\text{d}N/\\text{d}y$) and the shape of the net-proton (baryon) multiplicity distributions. The net-proton (baryon) cumulants and their ratios calculated from all of the three modes are with similar trends and show significant s...

  13. Effects of nuclear potential on the cumulants of net-proton and net-baryon multiplicity distributions in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 5GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shu; Luo, Xiaofeng; Nara, Yasushi; Esumi, ShinIchi; Xu, Nu

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the rapidity and transverse momentum dependence for the cumulants of the net-proton and net-baryon distributions in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 5GeV with a microscopic hadronic transport (JAM) model. To study the effects of mean field potential and softening of equation of state (EoS) on the fluctuations of net-proton (baryon) in heavy-ion collisions, the calculations are performed with two different modes. The softening of EoS is realized in the model by implementing the attractive orbit in the two-body scattering to introduce a reduction pressure of the system. By comparing the results from the two modes with the results from default cascade, we find the mean field potential and softening of EoS have strong impacts on the rapidity distributions (d N /d y) and the shape of the net-proton (baryon) multiplicity distributions. The net-proton (baryon) cumulants and their ratios calculated from all of the three modes are with similar trends and show significant suppression with respect to unity, which can be explained by the presence of baryon number conservations. It indicates that the effects of mean field potential and softening of EoS might be not the ingredients that are responsible to the observed strong enhancement in the most central Au+Au collisions at 7.7 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC.

  14. Estimation Method of Ionospheric TEC Distribution using Single Frequency Measurements of GPS Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win Zaw Hein

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The satellite-to-ground communications are influenced by ionospheric plasma which varies depending on solar and geomagnetic activities as well as regions and local times. With the expansion of use of the space, continuous monitoring of the ionospheric plasma has become an important issue. In Global Positioning System (GPS, the ionospheric delay, which is proportional to ionospheric total electron content (TEC along the propagation path, is the largest error in signal propagation. The TEC has been observed from dual frequency GPS signals because only the ionospheric delay has frequency dependences. Costs of multi-frequency receivers are, however, much higher than those of single frequency ones. In the present study, an estimation method of TEC distribution map from single frequency GPS measurements was developed. The developed method was evaluated by comparing its results with those from dual frequency measurements. The method makes it possible to expand ionospheric TEC observation networks easily.

  15. Cumulative fatigue damage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of calculating expected component life under fatigue loading conditions is complicated by the fact that component loading histories contain, in many cases, cyclic loads of widely varying amplitudes. In such a case a cumulative damage model is required, in addition to a fatigue damage criterion, or life relationship, in order to compute the expected fatigue life. The traditional cumulative damage model used in design is the linear damage rule. This model, while being simple to use, can yield grossly unconservative results under certain loading conditions. Research at the NASA Lewis Research Center has led to the development of a nonlinear cumulative damage model, named the double damage curve approach (DDCA), that has greatly improved predictive capability. This model, which considers the life (or loading) level dependence of damage evolution, was applied successfully to two polycrystalline materials, 316 stainless steel and Haynes 188. The cumulative fatigue behavior of the PWA 1480 single-crystal material is currently being measured to determine the applicability of the DDCA for this material.

  16. Ultra-stable long distance optical frequency distribution using the Internet fiber network

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Olivier; Chanteau, Bruno; Chardonnet, Christian; Amy-Klein, Anne; Santarelli, Georgio

    2012-01-01

    We report an optical link of 540 km for ultrastable frequency distribution over the Internet fiber network. The stable frequency optical signal is processed enabling uninterrupted propagation on both directions. The robustness and the performance of the link are enhanced by a cost effective fully automated optoelectronic station. This device is able to coherently regenerate the return optical signal with a heterodyne optical phase locking of a low noise laser diode. Moreover the incoming signal polarization variation are tracked and processed in order to maintain beat note amplitudes within the operation range. Stable fibered optical interferometer enables optical detection of the link round trip phase signal. The phase-noise compensated link shows a fractional frequency instability in 10 Hz bandwidth of 5\\times10-15 at one second measurement time and 2\\times10-19 at 30 000 s. This work is a significant step towards a sustainable wide area ultrastable optical frequency distribution and comparison network.

  17. Secondary Frequency and Voltage Control of Islanded Microgrids via Distributed Averaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W. Simpson-Porco, John; Shafiee, Qobad; Dorfler, Florian

    2015-01-01

    actions. The frequency controller rapidly regulates the microgrid frequency to its nominal value while maintaining active power sharing among the distributed generators. Tuning of the voltage controller provides a simple and intuitive trade-off between the conflicting goals of voltage regulation......In this work we present new distributed controllers for secondary frequency and voltage control in islanded microgrids. Inspired by techniques from cooperative control, the proposed controllers use localized information and nearest neighbour communication to collectively perform secondary control...... and reactive power sharing. Our designs require no knowledge of the microgrid topology, impedances or loads. The distributed architecture allows for flexibility and redundancy, and eliminates the need for a central microgrid controller. We provide a voltage stability analysis and present extensive experimental...

  18. Effect on Stratum Gradient Frequency Distribution of Landslides in the Three Gorges Area of Northeast Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiaoyi; QIAO Jianping

    2006-01-01

    The landslide data were calculated in the Three Gorges Area of northeast Chongqing. The results showed that landslide frequency distributions of gradients accorded with the Weibull probability density distribution function. The landslide hazard ratios of gradients were acquired by Weibull accumulation probability distribution function in the different geological units. There was discord between landslide hazard ratio of different geological units and variance of landslide gradient. But they were approximate homology in the strata of Jurassic. The results indicate that the Weibull distribution can quantitatively evaluate the landslide hazard ratios of gradients of the different strata in the Three Gorges Area.

  19. MHC allele frequency distributions under parasite-driven selection: A simulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radwan Jacek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extreme polymorphism that is observed in major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes, which code for proteins involved in recognition of non-self oligopeptides, is thought to result from a pressure exerted by parasites because parasite antigens are more likely to be recognized by MHC heterozygotes (heterozygote advantage and/or by rare MHC alleles (negative frequency-dependent selection. The Ewens-Watterson test (EW is often used to detect selection acting on MHC genes over the recent history of a population. EW is based on the expectation that allele frequencies under balancing selection should be more even than under neutrality. We used computer simulations to investigate whether this expectation holds for selection exerted by parasites on host MHC genes under conditions of heterozygote advantage and negative frequency-dependent selection acting either simultaneously or separately. Results In agreement with simple models of symmetrical overdominance, we found that heterozygote advantage acting alone in populations does, indeed, result in more even allele frequency distributions than expected under neutrality, and this is easily detectable by EW. However, under negative frequency-dependent selection, or under the joint action of negative frequency-dependent selection and heterozygote advantage, distributions of allele frequencies were less predictable: the majority of distributions were indistinguishable from neutral expectations, while the remaining runs resulted in either more even or more skewed distributions than under neutrality. Conclusions Our results indicate that, as long as negative frequency-dependent selection is an important force maintaining MHC variation, the EW test has limited utility in detecting selection acting on these genes.

  20. Application of Choi—Williams Reduced Interference Time Frequency Distribution to Machinery Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard A. Gaberson

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses time frequency analysis of machinery diagnostic vibration signals. The short time Fourier transform, the Wigner, and the Choi–Williams distributions are explained and illustrated with test cases. Examples of Choi—Williams analyses of machinery vibration signals are presented. The analyses detect discontinuities in the signals and their timing, amplitude and frequency modulation, and the presence of different components in a vibration signal.

  1. Finite Time Control for Fractional Order Nonlinear Hydroturbine Governing System via Frequency Distributed Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the application of frequency distributed model for finite time control of a fractional order nonlinear hydroturbine governing system (HGS. Firstly, the mathematical model of HGS with external random disturbances is introduced. Secondly, a novel terminal sliding surface is proposed and its stability to origin is proved based on the frequency distributed model and Lyapunov stability theory. Furthermore, based on finite time stability and sliding mode control theory, a robust control law to ensure the occurrence of the sliding motion in a finite time is designed for stabilization of the fractional order HGS. Finally, simulation results show the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  2. Interference structure of shallow water reverberation in time-frequency distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The striations of the reverberation spectrum in the time-frequency distribution were observed in a shallow water acoustic experiment in 2002. A model following the coherent reverberation model developed in 2002 is presented to explain the observed striations. To examine the consistency between the measured data and numerical predictions, we have used a method based on Radon transform for determining the slope of the striations to the measured reverberation data and numerical predictions. The results indicate that the previously developed coherent reverberation model can predict the interference structure of the reverberation intensity in the time-frequency distribution.

  3. Distributed feedback terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers with dual periodicity gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, F; Li, L H; Pitanti, A; Tredicucci, A; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Vitiello, M S

    2016-01-01

    We have developed terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers that exploit a double-periodicity distributed feedback grating to control the emission frequency and the output beam direction independently. The spatial refractive index modulation of the gratings necessary to provide optical feedback at a fixed frequency and, simultaneously, a far-field emission pattern centered at controlled angles, was designed through use of an appropriate wavevector scattering model. Single mode THz emission at angles tuned by design between 0{\\deg} and 50{\\deg} was realized, leading to an original phase-matching approach, lithographically independent, for highly collimated THz QCLs.

  4. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  5. On the frequency distribution of neutral particles from low-energy strong interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Colecchia, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The rejection of the contamination, or background, from low-energy strong interactions at hadron collider experiments is a topic that has received significant attention in the field of particle physics. This article builds on a particle-level view of collision events, in line with recently-proposed subtraction methods. While conventional techniques in the field usually concentrate on probability distributions, our study is, to our knowledge, the first attempt at estimating the frequency distribution of background particles across the kinematic space inside individual collision events. In fact, while the probability distribution can generally be estimated given a model of low-energy strong interactions, the corresponding frequency distribution inside a single event typically deviates from the average and cannot be predicted a priori. We present preliminary results in this direction, and establish a connection between our technique and the particle weighting methods that have been the subject of recent investig...

  6. Beyond word frequency: Bursts, lulls, and scaling in the temporal distributions of words

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, Eduardo G; Motter, Adilson E

    2009-01-01

    Zipf's discovery that word frequency distributions obey a power law established parallels between biological and physical processes, and language, laying the groundwork for a complex systems perspective on human communication. By considering frequent words in USENET discussion groups and in disparate databases where the language has different levels of formality, here we show that the distributions of distances between successive occurrences of the same word display bursty deviations from a Poisson distribution and are well characterized by a stretched exponential scaling. The extent of this deviation depends strongly on semantic type - a measure of the abstractness of eachword - and only weakly on frequency. We develop a generative model of this behavior, deriving the stretched exponential distribution of recurrence times as a new empirical scaling law that cannot be anticipated from Zipf's law. Our analysis not merely describes deviations from a simple bag-of-words model, it accounts for differential deviat...

  7. Universal spectrum for DNA base CG frequency distribution in Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) genome

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2007-01-01

    The frequency distribution of DNA bases A, C, G, T exhibit fractal fluctuations, namely a zigzag pattern of an increase followed by a decrease of all orders of magnitude along the length of the DNA molecule. Selfsimilar fractal fluctuations are ubiquitous to space-time fluctuations of dynamical systems in nature. The power spectra of fractal fluctuations exhibit inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations such that there is two-way communication between local (small-scale) and global (large-scale) perturbations. In this paper it is shown that DNA base CG frequency distribution in Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) Genome Release 4 exhibit universal inverse power law form of the statistical normal distribution consistent with a general systems theory model prediction of quantumlike chaos governing fractal space-time distributions. The model predictions are (i) quasicrystalline Penrose tiling pattern for the nested coiled structure thereby achieving maximum packing efficiency for the DNA m...

  8. Simulation of multi-frequency EPR spectra for a distribution of the zero-field splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarkh, Mykhailo; Groenen, Edgar J. J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a numerical procedure called 'grid-of-errors' to extract the distribution of magnetic interactions from continuous-wave electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) spectra at multiple microwave frequencies. The approach is based on the analysis of the lineshape of the spectra and explicitly worked out for high-spin systems for which the lineshape is determined by a distribution of the zero-field splitting. Initial principal values of the zero-field splitting tensor are obtained from the EPR spectrum at a microwave frequency in the high-field limit, and the initial distribution is taken Gaussian. Subsequently, the grid-of-errors procedure optimizes this distribution, without any restriction to its shape, taking into account spectra at various microwave frequencies. The numerical procedure is illustrated for the Fe(III)-EDTA complex. An optimized distribution of the zero-field splitting is obtained, which provides a proper description of the EPR spectra at 9.5, 34, 94, and 275 GHz. The proposed approach can be used as well for distributions of magnetic interactions other than the zero-field splitting.

  9. Cumulative Effects of Human Activities on Marine Mammal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Cumulative Effects of Human Activities on Marine Mammal ...marine mammals . OBJECTIVES The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has convened a volunteer committee that will...Review the present scientific understanding of cumulative effects of anthropogenic stressors on marine mammals with a focus on anthropogenic sound

  10. Altered Crossover Distribution and Frequency in Spermatocytes of Infertile Men with Azoospermia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ren

    Full Text Available During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair to facilitate the exchange of DNA at crossover sites along the chromosomes. The frequency and distribution of crossover formation are tightly regulated to ensure the proper progression of meiosis. Using immunofluorescence techniques, our group and others have studied the meiotic proteins in spermatocytes of infertile men, showing that this population displays a reduced frequency of crossovers compared to fertile men. An insufficient number of crossovers is thought to promote chromosome missegregation, in which case the faulty cell may face meiotic arrest or contribute to the production of aneuploid sperm. Increasing evidence in model organisms has suggested that the distribution of crossovers may also be important for proper chromosome segregation. In normal males, crossovers are shown to be rare near centromeres and telomeres, while frequent in subtelomeric regions. Our study aims to characterize the crossover distribution in infertile men with non-obstructive (NOA and obstructive azoospermia (OA along chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. Eight of the 16 NOA men and five of the 21 OA men in our study displayed reduced crossover frequency compared to control fertile men. Seven NOA men and nine OA men showed altered crossover distributions on at least one of the chromosome arms studied compared to controls. We found that although both NOA and OA men displayed altered crossover distributions, NOA men may be at a higher risk of suffering both altered crossover frequencies and distributions compared to OA men. Our data also suggests that infertile men display an increase in crossover formation in regions where they are normally inhibited, specifically near centromeres and telomeres. Finally, we demonstrated a decrease in crossovers near subtelomeres, as well as increased average crossover distance to telomeres in infertile men. As telomere-guided mechanisms are speculated to play a role in crossover formation in

  11. Dairy cow defecation and urination frequency and spatial distribution in relation to time-limited grazing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, F.W.; Kristensen, T.; Sharak Nadimi, I.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the effect of limited grazing time on urination and defecation frequency, spatial distribution of excrement in the paddock, and the resulting nitrogen balance at animal and field level. During a 6-week period in early summer, 60 Holstein Frisian dairy c

  12. GMLC Hawaii Regional Partnership: Distributed Inverter-Based Grid Frequency Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Austin; Hoke, Andy

    2017-05-04

    This presentation is part of a panel session at the IEEE ISGT conference on Grid Modernization Initiative projects. This segment of the panel session provides a brief overview of a Hawaii Regional Partnership project focusing grid frequency support from distributed resources on the fastest time scales.

  13. Topology Optimization of Distributed Mass Dampers for Low-frequency Vibration Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the method of topology optimization is used to find optimized parameter distributions for a multiple mass damper system with the purpose of minimizing the low-frequency steady-state response of a carrier structure. An effective density model that describes the steady-state effect...

  14. Dairy cow defecation and urination frequency and spatial distribution in relation to time-limited grazing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, F.W.; Kristensen, T.; Sharak Nadimi, I.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the effect of limited grazing time on urination and defecation frequency, spatial distribution of excrement in the paddock, and the resulting nitrogen balance at animal and field level. During a 6-week period in early summer, 60 Holstein Frisian dairy

  15. High-frequency oscillations in Parkinson's disease: spatial distribution and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Hirschmann, Jan; Elben, Saskia; Hartmann, Christian J; Vesper, Jan; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2014-09-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been related to excessive beta band oscillations in the basal ganglia. Recent recordings from the subthalamic nucleus of PD patients showed that beta oscillations show strong cross-frequency coupling with high-frequency oscillations (>200 Hz). However, little is known about the characteristics and functional properties of these oscillations. We studied the spatial distribution of high-frequency oscillations and their relation to PD motor symptoms. We included 10 PD patients in medication OFF who underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Intraoperative five-channel microelectrode recordings were performed at 9 to 10 recording sites within the subthalamic nucleus and its immediate surroundings. We found a focal spatial distribution of high-frequency oscillations with highest power 2 mm below the dorsolateral border of the subthalamic nucleus. Within the subthalamic nucleus, power peaked slightly anterior to the DBS target site. In addition, contralateral akinesia/rigidity scores were negatively correlated with high-frequency oscillation power. Our results demonstrate a focal origin of high-frequency oscillations within the subthalamic nucleus and provide further evidence for their functional association with motor state. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. ESTIMATION OF CARRIER FREQUENCY OFFSETS FOR MIMO SYSTEMS WITH DISTRIBUTED TRANSMIT ANTENNAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Kai; Tang Youxi; Lei Xia; Li Shaoqian

    2007-01-01

    The problem of estimating the carrier frequency offsets in Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) systems with distributed transmit antennas is addressed. It is supposed that the transmit antennas are distributed while the receive antennas are still centralized, and the general case where both the time delays and the frequency offsets are possibly different for each transmit antenna is considered. The channel is supposed to be frequency flat, and the macroscopic fading is also taken into consideration. A carrier frequency offset estimator based on Maximum Likelihood (ML) is proposed,which can separately estimate the frequency offset for each transmit antenna and exploit the spatial diversity. The Cramer-Rao Bound (CRB) for synchronous MIMO (i.e., the time delays for each transmit antenna are all equal) is also derived. Simulation results are given to illustrate the performance of the estimator and compare it with the CRB. It is shown that the estimator can provide satisfactory frequency offset estimates and its performance is close to the CRB for the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) below 20dB.

  17. Measuring coral size-frequency distribution using stereo video technology, a comparison with in situ measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joseph A; Polunin, Nicholas V C; Field, Stuart N; Wilson, Shaun K

    2015-05-01

    Coral colony size-frequency distribution data offer valuable information about the ecological status of coral reefs. Such data are usually collected by divers in situ, but stereo video is being increasingly used for monitoring benthic marine communities and may be used to collect size information for coral colonies. This study compared the size-frequency distributions of coral colonies obtained by divers measuring colonies 'in situ' with digital video imagery collected using stereo video and later processed using computer software. The size-frequency distributions of the two methods were similar for corymbose colonies, although distributions were different for massive, branching and all colonies combined. The differences are mainly driven by greater abundance of colonies >50 cm and fewer colonies 5 cm and was able to record measurements on 87% of the colonies detected. However, stereo video only detected 57% of marked colonies coral recruits. Estimates of colony size made with the stereo video were smaller than the in situ technique for all growth forms, particularly for massive morphologies. Despite differences in size distributions, community assessments, which incorporated genera, growth forms and size, were similar between the two techniques. Stereo video is suitable for monitoring coral community demographics and provided data similar to in situ measure for corymbose corals, but the ability to accurately measure massive and branching coral morphologies appeared to decline with increasing colony size.

  18. Effect of rotational disruption on the size-frequency distribution of the Main Belt asteroid population

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Seth A; Rossi, Alessandro; Scheeres, Daniel J; Davis, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    The size distribution of small asteroids in the Main Belt is assumed to be determined by an equilibrium between the creation of new bodies out of the impact debris of larger asteroids and the destruction of small asteroids by collisions with smaller projectiles. However, for a diameter less than 6 km we find that YORP-induced rotational disruption significantly contributes to the erosion even exceeding the effects of collisional fragmentation. Including this additional grinding mechanism in a collision evolution model for the asteroid belt, we generate size-frequency distributions from either an accretional (Weidenschilling, 2011) or an "Asteroids were born big" (Morbidelli, 2009) initial size-frequency distribution that are consistent with observations reported in Gladman et al. (2009). Rotational disruption is a new mechanism that must be included in all future collisional evolution models of asteroids.

  19. Cumulative Timers for Microprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, John O.

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed to equip future microprocessors with electronic cumulative timers, for essentially the same reasons for which land vehicles are equipped with odometers (total-distance-traveled meters) and aircraft are equipped with Hobbs meters (total-engine-operating time meters). Heretofore, there has been no way to determine the amount of use to which a microprocessor (or a product containing a microprocessor) has been subjected. The proposed timers would count all microprocessor clock cycles and could only be read by means of microprocessor instructions but, like odometers and Hobbs meters, could never be reset to zero without physically damaging the chip.

  20. Cumulative Vehicle Routing Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, &#;mdat; Kara, Bahar Yeti&#;; Yeti&#;, M. Kadri

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a new objective function and corresponding formulations for the vehicle routing problem. The new cost function defined as the product of the distance of the arc and the flow on that arc. We call a vehicle routing problem with this new objective function as the Cumulative Vehicle Routing Problem (CumVRP). Integer programming formulations with O(n2) binary variables and O(n2) constraints are developed for both collection and delivery cases. We show that the CumVRP is a gener...

  1. Regional parent flood frequency distributions in Europe - Part 2: Climate and scale controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, J. L.; Castellarin, A.; Kohnová, S.; Kjeldsen, T. R.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to better understand the effect of catchment scale and climate on the statistical properties of regional flood frequency distributions. A database of L-moment ratios of annual maximum series (AMS) of peak discharges from Austria, Italy and Slovakia, involving a total of 813 catchments with more than 25 yr of record length is presented, together with mean annual precipitation (MAP) and basin area as catchment descriptors surrogates of climate and scale controls. A purely data-based investigation performed on the database shows that the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution provides a better representation of the averaged sample L-moment ratios compared to the other distributions considered, for catchments with medium to higher values of MAP independently of catchment area, while the three-parameter lognormal distribution is probably a more appropriate choice for drier (lower MAP) intermediate-sized catchments, which presented higher skewness values. Sample L-moment ratios do not follow systematically any of the theoretical two-parameter distributions. In particular, the averaged values of L-coefficient of skewness (L-Cs) are always larger than Gumbel's fixed L-Cs. The results presented in this paper contribute to the progress in defining a set of "process-driven" pan-European flood frequency distributions and to assess possible effects of environmental change on its properties.

  2. Regional parent flood frequency distributions in Europe – Part 2: Climate and scale controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Salinas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to better understand the effect of catchment scale and climate on the statistical properties of regional flood frequency distributions. A database of L-moment ratios of annual maximum series (AMS of peak discharges from Austria, Italy and Slovakia, involving a total of 813 catchments with more than 25 yr of record length is presented, together with mean annual precipitation (MAP and basin area as catchment descriptors surrogates of climate and scale controls. A purely data-based investigation performed on the database shows that the generalized extreme value (GEV distribution provides a better representation of the averaged sample L-moment ratios compared to the other distributions considered, for catchments with medium to higher values of MAP independently of catchment area, while the three-parameter lognormal distribution is probably a more appropriate choice for drier (lower MAP intermediate-sized catchments, which presented higher skewness values. Sample L-moment ratios do not follow systematically any of the theoretical two-parameter distributions. In particular, the averaged values of L-coefficient of skewness (L-Cs are always larger than Gumbel's fixed L-Cs. The results presented in this paper contribute to the progress in defining a set of "process-driven" pan-European flood frequency distributions and to assess possible effects of environmental change on its properties.

  3. Orthogonal frequency division multiplexed quantum key distribution in the presence of Raman noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Sima; Razavi, Mohsen; Salehi, Jawad A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed quantum key distribution (OFDM-QKD) in an integrated quantum-classical wavelength-division-multiplexing system. The presence of an intense classical signal alongside the quantum one generates Raman background noise. Noise reduction techniques should, then, be carried out at the receiver to suppress this crosstalk noise. In this work, we show that OFDM-QKD enables efficient filtering, in time and frequency domains, making it an attractive solution for the high-rate links at the core of quantum-classical networks.

  4. Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

    2005-07-26

    This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

  5. Effect of Sampling Period on Flood Frequency Distributions in the Susquehanna Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, M.; Beighley, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Flooding is a devastating natural hazard that claims many human lives and significantly impact regional economies each year. Given the magnitude of flooding impacts, significant resources are dedicated to the development of forecasting models for early warning and evacuation planning, construction of flood defenses (levees/dams) to limit flooding, and the design of civil infrastructure (bridges, culverts, storm sewers) to convey flood flows without failing. In all these cases, it is particularly important to understand the potential flooding risk in terms of both recurrence interval (i.e., return period) and magnitude. Flood frequency analysis (FFA) is a form of risk analysis used to extrapolate the return periods of floods beyond the gauged record. The technique involves using observed annual peak flow discharge data to calculate statistical information such as mean values, standard deviations, skewness, and recurrence intervals. Since discharge data for most catchments have been collected for periods of time less than 100 years, the estimation of the design discharge requires a degree of extrapolation. This study focuses on the assessment and modifications of flood frequency based discharges for sites with limited sampling periods. Here, limited sampling period is intended to capture two issues: (1) limited number of observations to adequately capture the flood frequency signal (i.e., minimum number of annual peaks needed) and (2) climate variability (i.e., sampling period contains primarily “wet” or “dry” periods only). Total of 34 gauges (more than 70 years of data) spread throughout the Susquehanna River basin (71,000 sq km) were used to investigate the impact of sampling period on flood frequency distributions. Data subsets ranging from 10 years to the total number of years available were created from the data for each gauging station. To estimate the flood frequency, the Log Pearson Type III distribution was fit to the logarithms of instantaneous

  6. A New Quantum Key Distribution Scheme Based on Frequency and Time Coding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chang-Hua; PEI Chang-Xing; QUAN Dong-Xiao; GAO Jing-Liang; CHEN Nan; YI Yun-Hui

    2010-01-01

    @@ A new scheme of quantum key distribution (QKD) using frequency and time coding is proposed,in which the security is based on the frequency-time uncertainty relation.In this scheme,the binary information sequence is encoded randomly on either the central frequency or the time delay of the optical pulse at the sender.The central frequency of the single photon pulse is set as ω1 for bit 0 and set as ω2 for bit 1 when frequency coding is selected.However,the single photon pulse is not delayed for bit 0 and is delayed in T for 1 when time coding is selected.At the receiver,either the frequency or the time delay of the pulse is measured randomly,and the final key is obtained after basis comparison,data reconciliation and privacy amplification.With the proposed method,the effect of the noise in the fiber channel and environment on the QKD system can be reduced effectively.

  7. Analysis of experimental data on correlations between cumulative particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasov, A.V.; Doroshkevich, E.A.; Leksin, G.A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Experimental data on correlations between cumulative particles are analyzed. A space-time and energy-transfer pattern of hadron-nucleus interaction based on both correlation data and data on the inclusive spectra of cumulative particles is considered. A new variable that is convenient for describing the production of cumulative particles is proposed using the concept of symmetry between the one-particle and multiparticle distributions. 32 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A FEMTOSECOND-LEVEL FIBER-OPTICS TIMING DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM USING FREQUENCY-OFFSET INTERFEROMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, J.W.; Byrd, J.; Doolittle, L.; Huang, G.; Wilcox, R.

    2009-10-17

    An optical fiber-based frequency and timing distribution system based on the principle of heterodyne interferometry has been in development at LBNL for several years. The fiber drift corrector has evolved from an RF-based to an optical-based system, from mechanical correctors (piezo and optical trombone) to fully electronic, and the electronics from analog to fully digital, all using inexpensive off-the-shelf commodity fiber components. Short-term optical phase jitter and long-term phase drift are both in the femtosecond range over distribution paths of 2 km or more.

  9. A distributed fiber optic sensor system for dike monitoring using Brillouin optical frequency domain analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöther, Nils; Wosniok, Aleksander; Krebber, Katerina; Thiele, Elke

    2008-03-01

    We report on the development of a complete system for spatially resolved detection of critical soil displacement in river embankments. The system uses Brillouin frequency domain analysis (BOFDA) for distributed measurement of strain in silica optical fibers. Our development consists of the measurement unit, an adequate coating for the optical fibers and a technique to integrate the coated optical fibers into geotextiles as they are commonly used in dike construction. We present several laboratory and field tests that prove the capability of the system to detect areas of soil displacement as small as 2 meters. These are the first tests of truly distributed strain measurements on optical fibers embedded into geosynthetics.

  10. Fitting Ranked English and Spanish Letter Frequency Distribution in U.S. and Mexican Presidential Speeches

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wentian

    2011-01-01

    The limited range in its abscissa of ranked letter frequency distributions causes multiple functions to fit the observed distribution reasonably well. In order to critically compare various functions, we apply the statistical model selections on ten functions, using the texts of U.S. and Mexican presidential speeches in the last 1-2 centuries. Dispite minor switching of ranking order of certain letters during the temporal evolution for both datasets, the letter usage is generally stable. The best fitting function, judged by either least-square-error or by AIC/BIC model selection, is the Cocho/Beta function. We also use a novel method to discover clusters of letters by their observed-over-expected frequency ratios.

  11. The Distribution and Frequency of the Terms "Pride" and "Prejudice" in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Dromnes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we examine the title terms of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813 with particular attention to their distribution and frequency in the text. Our method is to connect the statistical material gathered on frequency and distribution to a narratological analysis of the terms, with special emphasis on whether they occur within the focalization of the external narrator, or that of character-focalizers. In order to approach this task, we have availed ourselves of the narratological theories of Mieke Bal. We conclude that there is a differentiation among types of focalization in the novel that enhances the thematic structure of match-making. Although Jane Austen wrote and published her major works two centuries ago, they continue to fascinate literary scholars and general readers alike.

  12. The Size-Frequency Distribution of the Zodiacal Cloud Evidence from the Solar System Dust Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Grogan, K; Durda, D D

    2000-01-01

    Recent observations of the size-frequency distribution of zodiacal cloud particles obtained from the cratering record on the LDEF satellite (Love and Brownlee 1993) reveal a significant large particle population (100 micron diameter or greater) near 1 AU. Our previous modeling of the Solar System dust bands (Grogan et al 1997), features of the zodiacal cloud associated with the comminution of Hirayama family asteroids, has been limited by the fact that only small particles (25 micron diameter or smaller) have been considered. This was due to the prohibitively large amount of computing power required to numerically analyze the dynamics of larger particles. The recent availability of cheap, fast processors has finally made this work possible. Models of the dust bands are created, built from individual dust particle orbits, taking into account a size-frequency distribution of the material and the dynamical history of the constituent particles. These models are able to match both the shapes and amplitudes of the ...

  13. Single-frequency Yb-doped fiber laser with distributed feedback based on a random FBG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullina, S. R.; Vlasov, A. A.; Lobach, I. A.; Belai, O. V.; Shapiro, D. A.; Babin, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Single-frequency operation of a 1.03 μm fiber laser with random distributed feedback (RDFB) is demonstrated. The laser cavity is based on a 4 cm long fiber Bragg grating (FBG) consisting of 10 homogeneous subgratings with random phase and amplitude of refractive index modulation inscribed in a polarization maintaining (PM) Yb-doped fiber. Such RDFB laser generates single longitudinal mode with output power up to 25 mW, which is 3.5 times higher than that for a DFB laser based on regular π-shifted FBG of the same length in the same fiber. The single-frequency linewidth is measured to be  <100 kHz in both cases. The observed difference of the DFB and RDFB lasers is confirmed by numerical simulation showing different longitudinal distribution of intra-cavity radiation in these cases, analogous to those in the experiment.

  14. Techniques to Obtain Good Resolution and Concentrated Time-Frequency Distributions: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Shafi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of the diversity of concepts and motivations for improving the concentration and resolution of time-frequency distributions (TFDs along the individual components of the multi-component signals. The central idea has been to obtain a distribution that represents the signal's energy concentration simultaneously in time and frequency without blur and crosscomponents so that closely spaced components can be easily distinguished. The objective is the precise description of spectral content of a signal with respect to time, so that first, necessary mathematical and physical principles may be developed, and second, accurate understanding of a time-varying spectrum may become possible. The fundamentals in this area of research have been found developing steadily, with significant advances in the recent past.

  15. Cumulative environmental effects. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of knowledge about the state of the environment and human activity in the Norwegian part of the North Sea and Skagerrak. The report gives an overview of pressures and impacts on the environment from normal activity and in the event of accidents. This is used to assess the cumulative environmental effects, which factors have most impact and where the impacts are greatest, and to indicate which problems are expected to be most serious in the future. The report is intended to provide relevant information that can be used in the management of the marine area in the future. It also provides input for the identification of environmental targets and management measures for the North Sea and Skagerrak.(Author)

  16. Single-frequency thulium-doped distributed-feedback fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Søren; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Varming, Poul

    2004-07-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a single-frequency distributed-feedback (DFB) thulium-doped silica fiber laser emitting at a wavelength of 1735 nm. The laser cavity is less than 5 cm long and is formed by intracore UV-written Bragg gratings with a phase shift. The laser is pumped at 790 nm from a Ti:sapphire laser and has a threshold pump power of 59 mW. The laser has a maximum output power of 1 mW in a single-frequency, single-polarization radiation mode and is tunable over a few nanometers. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a single-frequency DFB fiber laser that uses thulium as the amplifying medium. The lasing wavelength is the longest demonstrated with DFB fiber lasers and yet is among the shortest obtained for thulium-doped silica fiber lasers.

  17. Time-Frequency Distribution of Music based on Sparse Wavelet Packet Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endelt, Line Ørtoft

    We introduce a new method for generating time-frequency distributions, which is particularly useful for the analysis of music signals. The method presented here is based on $\\ell1$ sparse representations of music signals in a redundant wavelet packet dictionary. The representations are found usin......, by masking the energy from less structured music instruments. We present four examples for visualizing structured content, including vocal and single instrument....

  18. Distribution of Argon Arc Contaminated with Nitrogen as Function of Frequency in Pulsed TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Tanaka, Tatsuro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-09-01

    TIG arc welding is the high-quality and much applicable material joining technology. However, the current has to be small because the cathode melting should be prevented. In this case, the heat input to the welding pool becomes low, then, the welding defect sometimes occurs. The pulsed TIG arc welding is used to improve this disadvantage This welding can be controlled by some current parameters such as frequency However, few report has reported the distribution of argon arc contaminated with nitrogen It is important to prevent the contamination of nitrogen because the melting depth increases in order to prevent the welding defects. In this paper, the distribution of argon arc contaminated as function of frequency with nitrogen in pulsed TIG welding is elucidated. The nitrogen concentration, the radial flow velocity, the arc temperature were calculated using the EMTF simulation when the time reached at the base current. As a result, the nitrogen concentration into the arc became low with increasing the frequency The diffusion coefficient decreased because of the decrement of temperature over 4000 K. In this case, the nitrogen concentration became low near the anode. Therefore, the nitrogen concentration became low because the frequency is high.

  19. Structural Vibration Monitoring Using Cumulative Spectral Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Goto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a resonance decay estimation for structural health monitoring in the presence of nonstationary vibrations. In structural health monitoring, the structure's frequency response and resonant decay characteristics are very important for understanding how the structure changes. Cumulative spectral analysis (CSA estimates the frequency decay by using the impulse response. However, measuring the impulse response of buildings is impractical due to the need to shake the building itself. In a previous study, we reported on system damping monitoring using cumulative harmonic analysis (CHA, which is based on CSA. The current study describes scale model experiments on estimating the hidden resonance decay under non-stationary noise conditions by using CSA for structural condition monitoring.

  20. Oxide vapor distribution from a high-frequency sweep e-beam system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, R.; Tassano, P. L.; Tsujimoto, N.

    1995-03-01

    Oxide vapor distributions have been determined as a function of operating parameters of a high frequency sweep e-beam source combined with a programmable sweep controller. We will show which parameters are significant, the parameters that yield the broadest oxide deposition distribution, and the procedure used to arrive at these conclusions. A design-of-experimental strategy was used with five operating parameters: evaporation rate, sweep speed, sweep pattern (pre-programmed), phase speed (azimuthal rotation of the pattern), profile (dwell time as a function of radial position). A design was chosen that would show which of the parameters and parameter pairs have a statistically significant effect on the vapor distribution. Witness flats were placed symmetrically across a 25 inches diameter platen. The stationary platen was centered 24 inches above the e-gun crucible. An oxide material was evaporated under 27 different conditions. Thickness measurements were made with a stylus profilometer. The information will enable users of the high frequency e-gun systems to optimally locate the source in a vacuum system and understand which parameters have a major effect on the vapor distribution.

  1. Proposal of a function for modelling the hourly frequency distributions of photosynthetically active radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Pescador, J.; Pozo-Vazquez, D.; Batlles, J.; López, G.; Muñoz-Vicente, D.

    2004-10-01

    Solar irradiance is a key factor in the physiological processes of living beings. To obtain simple correlations for the estimation of the performance of biological systems, which transform the solar energy by photosynthesis, and to generate synthetic data, it is necessary to know the frequency distributions of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). In this work we carried out an analysis of the properties of hourly values of PAR data, using 9 years of data collected in southern Spain. In particularly, its dependence on the optical mass, for all type of skies including cloudy skies, is studied. Results shows that, for a given value of the optical mass, the PAR density distributions are not symmetrical and have a certain degree of bimodality. The increment in the optical mass value has two effects on the PAR distributions, the first one is a shift toward lower values of the maximum and the second one is a decrease in the range of PAR values. Finally, a model of the frequency distribution of PAR values, based on a new kind of functions related to the Boltzmann’s statistic, is proposed. The parameters of these functions depend just on the optical mass. Results show a very good agreement between the data and the model proposed.

  2. Coastal waters monitoring data: frequency distributions of the principal water quality variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca DI LORENZO

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Examining the results of the Italian national programme of marine coastal monitoring, the old problem has arisen about the choice of the most appropriate procedures and methods to validate data and screen preliminary data. Therefore, statistical distributions of water quality parameters have been taken into consideration, in order to assign appropriate frequency distributions to all the routinely measured variables. Each sample distribution has been analysed and defined by a probability density function (p.d.f., by means of a powerful method of data analysis (Johnson 1949 that allows for the computation of statistical parameters of a wide variety of non-normal distributions. The resulting Johnson distributions are then classified depending on four fundamental categories of frequency distributions: normal, log-normal, bounded and unbounded. Theoretical aspects of the method are explained and discussed in an adequate way, so as to allow for practical applications. The shape and nature of these curves require further consideration, in order to understand the behaviour of water quality variables and to make comparison among different coastal zones. To this end, two coastal systems were considered in this work: the Emilia-Romagna coastal area of the NW Adriatic Sea and the Tuscany littoral of the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea. There are notable advantages to the adopted approach. First it offers the possibility to overcome severe constraints requested by the normality assumption, and avoids the troublesome search for the most appropriate transformation function (i.e. for ensuring normality. Second, it avoids searching for other kinds of theoretical distributions that are appropriate for the data. In our approach, the density functions are opportunely integrated, in such a way that, for whatever value assumed by a given variable, the corresponding expected percentage point value under the respective frequency curve, can be calculated, and vice versa. We

  3. A Dynamic Assignment of Extrinsic Information Distribution by a Frequency Means for Iterative Turbo Decoder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGFengfan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a new strategy for iterative turbo decoding is proposed, where a Generalized Gaussian distribution (GGD) is applied to model the statistical distributions of the extrinsic information generated by the component decoders. An Euclidean distance criterion is also introduced to choose a most likely candidate of the extrinsic information distribution before the each constituent decoding by a novel frequency means. The simulation results show that performance of an iterative decoder with this new technique surpasses the conventional Gaussian solution for the extrinsic information under the same channel conditions. Meanwhile, the evolution process of the extrinsic information density function can be tracked from iteration to iteration in the sense of the proposed criterion.

  4. Distributed Secondary Voltage and Frequency Control for Islanded Microgrids with Uncertain Communication Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xinghuo; Lai, Jingang

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a robust distributed secondary control (DSC) scheme for inverter-based microgrids (MGs) in a distribution sparse network with uncertain communication links. By using the iterative learning mechanics, two discrete-time DSC controllers are designed, which enable all distributed...... energy resources (DERs) in a MG to achieve the voltage/frequency restoration and active power sharing accuracy, respectively. In special, the secondary control inputs are merely updated at the end of each round of iteration, and thus each DER only needs to share information with its neighbors...... intermittently in a low-bandwidth communication manner. This way, the communication costs are greatly reduced, and some sufficient conditions on the system stability and robustness to the uncertainties are also derived by using the tools of Lyapunov stability theory, algebraic graph theory, and matrix inequality...

  5. Cumulative stress and autonomic dysregulation in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Rachel; Tuit, Keri; Hong, Kwang-Ik; Donovan, Theresa; Lee, Forrester; Sinha, Rajita

    2016-05-01

    Whether cumulative stress, including both chronic stress and adverse life events, is associated with decreased heart rate variability (HRV), a non-invasive measure of autonomic status which predicts poor cardiovascular outcomes, is unknown. Healthy community dwelling volunteers (N = 157, mean age 29 years) participated in the Cumulative Stress/Adversity Interview (CAI), a 140-item event interview measuring cumulative adversity including major life events, life trauma, recent life events and chronic stressors, and underwent 24-h ambulatory ECG monitoring. HRV was analyzed in the frequency domain and standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN) calculated. Initial simple regression analyses revealed that total cumulative stress score, chronic stressors and cumulative adverse life events (CALE) were all inversely associated with ultra low-frequency (ULF), very low-frequency (VLF) and low-frequency (LF) power and SDNN (all p stress and chronic stress each was significantly associated with SDNN and ULF even after the highly significant contributions of age and sex, with no other covariates accounting for additional appreciable variance. For VLF and LF, both total cumulative stress and chronic stress significantly contributed to the variance alone but were not longer significant after adjusting for race and health behaviors. In summary, total cumulative stress, and its components of adverse life events and chronic stress were associated with decreased cardiac autonomic function as measured by HRV. Findings suggest one potential mechanism by which stress may exert adverse effects on mortality in healthy individuals. Primary preventive strategies including stress management may prove beneficial.

  6. ABO and Rh (D group distribution and gene frequency; the first multicentric study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The study was undertaken with the objective to provide data on the ABO and Rh(D blood group distribution and gene frequency across India. Materials and Methods: A total of 10,000 healthy blood donors donating in blood banks situated in five different geographical regions of the country (North, South, East and Center were included in the study. ABO and Rh (D grouping was performed on all these samples. Data on the frequency of ABO and Rh(D blood groups was reported in simple numbers and percentages. Results: The study showed that O was the most common blood group (37.12% in the country closely followed by B at 32.26%, followed by A at 22.88% while AB was the least prevalent group at 7.74%. 94.61% of the donor population was Rh positive and the rest were Rh negative. Regional variations were observed in the distribution. Using the maximum likelihood method, the frequencies of the I A , I B and I O alleles were calculated and tested according to the Hardy Weinberg law of Equilibrium. The calculated gene frequencies are 0.1653 for I A (p, 0.2254 for I B (q and 0.6093 for I O (r. In Indian Population, O (r records the highest value followed by B (q and A (p; O > B > A. Conclusion: The study provides information about the relative distribution of various alleles in the Indian population both on a pan-India basis as well as region-wise. This vital information may be helpful in planning for future health challenges, particularly planning with regards to blood transfusion services.

  7. ABO and Rh (D) group distribution and gene frequency; the first multicentric study in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Mehta, Nidhi; Bhattacharya, Prasun; Wankhede, Ravi; Tulsiani, Sunita; Kamath, Susheela

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The study was undertaken with the objective to provide data on the ABO and Rh(D) blood group distribution and gene frequency across India. Materials and Methods: A total of 10,000 healthy blood donors donating in blood banks situated in five different geographical regions of the country (North, South, East and Center) were included in the study. ABO and Rh (D) grouping was performed on all these samples. Data on the frequency of ABO and Rh(D) blood groups was reported in simple numbers and percentages. Results: The study showed that O was the most common blood group (37.12%) in the country closely followed by B at 32.26%, followed by A at 22.88% while AB was the least prevalent group at 7.74%. 94.61% of the donor population was Rh positive and the rest were Rh negative. Regional variations were observed in the distribution. Using the maximum likelihood method, the frequencies of the IA, IB and IO alleles were calculated and tested according to the Hardy Weinberg law of Equilibrium. The calculated gene frequencies are 0.1653 for IA (p), 0.2254 for IB (q) and 0.6093 for IO (r). In Indian Population, O (r) records the highest value followed by B (q) and A (p); O > B > A. Conclusion: The study provides information about the relative distribution of various alleles in the Indian population both on a pan-India basis as well as region-wise. This vital information may be helpful in planning for future health challenges, particularly planning with regards to blood transfusion services. PMID:25161353

  8. The Effect of Total Cumulative Dose, Number of Treatment Cycles, Interval between Injections, and Length of Treatment on the Frequency of Occurrence of Antibodies to Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Treatment of Muscle Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid O.; Liptrot, Anthea; Newton, Rachel; Pickett, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    A large cumulative dose of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A), frequent injections, a short interval between treatment cycles, and a long duration of treatment have all been suggested, but not confirmed, to be associated with a high incidence of neutralizing antibodies to the neurotoxin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these…

  9. UBIQUITOUS POLLUTANTS FROM CUMULATIVE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) as environmental pollutants is a multifaceted issue whose scope continues to become better delineated since the escalation of concerted attention beginning in the 1980s. PPCPs typically occur as trace environmental pollutants (primarily in surface but also in ground waters) as a result of their widespread, continuous, combined usage in a broad range of human and veterinary therapeutic activities and practices. With respect to the risk-assessment paradigm, the growing body of published work has focused primarily on the origin and occurrence of these substances. Comparatively less is known about human and ecological exposure, and even less about the known or even potential hazards associated with exposure to these anthropogenic substances, many of which are highly bioactive. The continually growing, worldwide importance of freshwater resources underscores the need for ensuring that any aggregate or cumulative impacts on water supplies and resultant potential for human or ecological exposure be minimized. This has prompted the more recent investigations on waste treatment processes for one of the major sources of environmental disposition, namely sewage. Despite the paucity of health effects data for long-term, simultaneous exposure to multiple xenobiotics (particularly PPCPS) at low doses (a major toxicological issue that can be described by the

  10. Real-time updating of the flood frequency distribution through data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Cristina; Montanari, Alberto; Polo, María-José

    2017-07-01

    We explore the memory properties of catchments for predicting the likelihood of floods based on observations of average flows in pre-flood seasons. Our approach assumes that flood formation is driven by the superimposition of short- and long-term perturbations. The former is given by the short-term meteorological forcing leading to infiltration and/or saturation excess, while the latter is originated by higher-than-usual storage in the catchment. To exploit the above sensitivity to long-term perturbations, a meta-Gaussian model and a data assimilation approach are implemented for updating the flood frequency distribution a season in advance. Accordingly, the peak flow in the flood season is predicted in probabilistic terms by exploiting its dependence on the average flow in the antecedent seasons. We focus on the Po River at Pontelagoscuro and the Danube River at Bratislava. We found that the shape of the flood frequency distribution is noticeably impacted by higher-than-usual flows occurring up to several months earlier. The proposed technique may allow one to reduce the uncertainty associated with the estimation of flood frequency.

  11. Using frequency maps to explore the distribution function of the Milky Way stellar halo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valluri M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Resolved surveys of the Milky Way's stellar halo can obtain all 6 phase space coordinates of tens of thousands of individual stars, making it possible to compute their 3-dimensional orbits. When frequency mapping is applied to such orbits they also represent the underlying phase space distribution function since the orbits that the are drawn from 3. A frequency maps clearly separates out the major types of orbits that constitute the DF and their relative abundances. The structure of the frequency maps, especially the locations of resonant orbits, reflects the formation history and shape of the dark matter potential and its orientation relative to the disk. The application of frequency analysis to cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of disk galaxies shows that the orbital families occupied by halo stars and dark matter particles are very similar, implying that stellar halo orbits can be used to constrain the DF of the dark matter halo, possibly impacting the interpretation of results from direct dark matter detection experiments. An application of these methods to a sample of ~ 16,000 Milky Way halo and thick disk stars from the SDSS-SEGUE survey yields a frequency map with strong evidence for resonant trapping of halo stars by the Milky Way disk, in a manner predicted by controlled simulations in which the disk grows adiabatically. The application of frequency analysis methods to current and future phase space data for Milky Way halo stars will provide new insights into the formation history of the different components of the Galaxy and the DF of the halo.

  12. Distribution and deposition of organic fouling on the microfiltration membrane evaluated by high-frequency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-04-15

    A 50 MHz high-frequency ultrasound and analysis method were developed to further improve the in situ assessment of deposition and distribution of organic fouling on the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes. Measurements of fouling depositions were performed from PVDF membranes filtrated with aqueous humic acid solutions (HAS) of 2 and 4 ppm concentrations in a flat-sheet module. Ultrasound signals reflected from the PVDF membranes, following filtrations at various durations including 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, and 100 min, were acquired. The thickness and distribution of fouling estimated and assessed by peak-to-peak echo voltage (Vpp) and C-mode images were found to be non-homogeneously deposited on the membranes. Following the filtrations with 2 and 4 ppm HAS for 100 min, the corresponding thickness of fouling deposition increased from 1.81±9 to 2.4571.57 mm, respectively; those average Vpp decreased from 2.05±07 to 1.13±16 V and from 2.11±08 to 0.94±15 V. These results demonstrated that the deposition and distribution of organic fouling could be sensitively and rapidly evaluated by high-frequency ultrasound image incorporated with the analysis method.

  13. Beyond word frequency: bursts, lulls, and scaling in the temporal distributions of words.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo G Altmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zipf's discovery that word frequency distributions obey a power law established parallels between biological and physical processes, and language, laying the groundwork for a complex systems perspective on human communication. More recent research has also identified scaling regularities in the dynamics underlying the successive occurrences of events, suggesting the possibility of similar findings for language as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By considering frequent words in USENET discussion groups and in disparate databases where the language has different levels of formality, here we show that the distributions of distances between successive occurrences of the same word display bursty deviations from a Poisson process and are well characterized by a stretched exponential (Weibull scaling. The extent of this deviation depends strongly on semantic type -- a measure of the logicality of each word -- and less strongly on frequency. We develop a generative model of this behavior that fully determines the dynamics of word usage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Recurrence patterns of words are well described by a stretched exponential distribution of recurrence times, an empirical scaling that cannot be anticipated from Zipf's law. Because the use of words provides a uniquely precise and powerful lens on human thought and activity, our findings also have implications for other overt manifestations of collective human dynamics.

  14. Vehicle-to-Grid Systems for Frequency Regulation in an Islanded Danish Distribution Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) have gained significant attention in the recent years due to their prospects in reducing greenhouse gas emissions benefitting the transportation sector directly and the electricity sector indirectly. Vehicle-to-grid (V2G) systems using the battery storages of electric...... vehicles could provide power system ancillary services in the form of power balancing reserves to support the large-scale integration of variable renewable energy sources like wind power. This paper investigates the dynamic frequency response of an islanded Danish distribution system operation with large...... amount of wind power supported by the Vehicle-to-grid systems. The power system simulations are analysed for scenarios with 48% and 65% of wind power penetration. The simulation results show that the V2G systems provide a faster and stable frequency control than the conventional generation units. V2G...

  15. Single-frequency thulium-doped distributed-feedback fibre laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Søren; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Varming, Poul

    2004-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a single-frequency distributed-feedback (DFB) thulium-doped silica fiber laser emitting at a wavelength of 1735 nm. The laser cavity is less than 5 cm long and is formed by intracore UV-written Bragg gratings with a phase shift. The laser is pumped at 790 nm from...... that uses thulium as the amplifying medium. The lasing wavelength is the longest demonstrated with DFB fiber lasers and yet is among the shortest obtained for thulium-doped silica fiber lasers....... a Ti:sapphire laser and has a threshold pump power of 59 mW. The laser has a maximum output power of 1 mW in a singlefrequency, single-polarization radiation mode and is tunable over a few nanometers. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of a single-frequency DFB fiber laser...

  16. Dynamics of two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Terada, Yu

    2014-01-01

    A large variety of rhythms have been observed in nature. These rhythms can be often regarded to interact with each other, such as electroencephalogram (EEG) in the brain. To investigate the dynamical properties of such systems, in this paper, we consider two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions, particularly under the condition that the average frequency of fast oscillators is almost equal to the integral multiple of that of slow oscillators. What is the most important point is that we have to use the specific type of the coupling function derived from the phase reduction theory. Under some additional assumption, moreover, we can reduce the system consisting of two populations of coupled phase oscillators to a low-dimensional system in the continuum limit. As a result, we find chimera states in which clustering and incoherent states coexist. We also confirm that the behaviors of the derived low-dimensional model fairly agree with that of the original one.

  17. CCN frequency distributions and aerosol chemical composition from long-term observations at European ACTRIS supersites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decesari, Stefano; Rinaldi, Matteo; Schmale, Julia Yvonne; Gysel, Martin; Fröhlich, Roman; Poulain, Laurent; Henning, Silvia; Stratmann, Frank; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Cloud droplet number concentration is regulated by the availability of aerosol acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Predicting the air concentrations of CCN involves knowledge of all physical and chemical processes that contribute to shape the particle size distribution and determine aerosol hygroscopicity. The relevance of specific atmospheric processes (e.g., nucleation, coagulation, condensation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol, etc.) is time- and site-dependent, therefore the availability of long-term, time-resolved aerosol observations at locations representative of diverse environments is strategic for the validation of state-of-the-art chemical transport models suited to predict CCN concentrations. We focused on long-term (year-long) datasets of CCN and of aerosol composition data including black carbon, and inorganic as well as organic compounds from the Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at selected ACTRIS supersites (http://www.actris.eu/). We discuss here the joint frequency distribution of CCN levels and of aerosol chemical components concentrations for two stations: an alpine site (Jungfraujoch, CH) and a central European rural site (Melpitz, DE). The CCN frequency distributions at Jungfraujoch are broad and generally correlated with the distributions of the concentrations of aerosol chemical components (e.g., high CCN concentrations are most frequently found for high organic matter or black carbon concentrations, and vice versa), which can be explained as an effect of the strong seasonality in the aerosol characteristics at the mountain site. The CCN frequency distributions in Melpitz show a much weaker overlap with the distributions of BC concentrations or other chemical compounds. However, especially at high CCN concentration levels, a statistical correlation with organic matter (OM) concentration can be observed. For instance, the number of CCN (with particle diameter between 20 and 250 nm) at a supersaturation of 0.7% is

  18. Impact of ventilation frequency and parenchymal stiffness on flow and pressure distribution in a canine lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Reza; Kaczka, David W

    2013-12-01

    To determine the impact of ventilation frequency, lung volume, and parenchymal stiffness on ventilation distribution, we developed an anatomically-based computational model of the canine lung. Each lobe of the model consists of an asymmetric branching airway network subtended by terminal, viscoelastic acinar units. The model allows for empiric dependencies of airway segment dimensions and parenchymal stiffness on transpulmonary pressure. We simulated the effects of lung volume and parenchymal recoil on global lung impedance and ventilation distribution from 0.1 to 100 Hz, with mean transpulmonary pressures from 5 to 25 cm H2O. With increasing lung volume, the distribution of acinar flows narrowed and became more synchronous for frequencies below resonance. At higher frequencies, large variations in acinar flow were observed. Maximum acinar flow occurred at first antiresonance frequency, where lung impedance achieved a local maximum. The distribution of acinar pressures became very heterogeneous and amplified relative to tracheal pressure at the resonant frequency. These data demonstrate the important interaction between frequency and lung tissue stiffness on the distribution of acinar flows and pressures. These simulations provide useful information for the optimization of frequency, lung volume, and mean airway pressure during conventional ventilation or high frequency oscillation (HFOV). Moreover our model indicates that an optimal HFOV bandwidth exists between the resonant and antiresonant frequencies, for which interregional gas mixing is maximized.

  19. The frequency distribution of vitamin D Receptor fok I gene polymorphism among Ugandan pulmonary TB patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acen, Ester L.; Worodria, William; Mulamba, Peter; Kambugu, Andrew; Erume, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) is still a major problem globally and especially in Africa. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to TB in the past and studies have found vitamin D deficiency to be common among Ugandan TB patients. The functional activity of vitamin D is dependent on the genotype of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphic genes. Recent findings have indicated that VDR polymorphisms may cause increased resistance or susceptibility to TB. The vitamin D ligand and its receptor play a pivotal role in innate immunity by eliciting antimicrobial activity, which is important in prevention of TB. The fok I vitamin D receptor gene has extensively been examined in TB patients but findings so far have been inconclusive. Objectives: This study sought to investigate the frequency distribution of the VDR fok I gene polymorphisms in pulmonary TB patients and controls. Methods: A pilot case control study of 41 newly diagnosed TB patients and 41 healthy workers was set up. Vitamin D receptor fok I gene was genotyped. Results: The frequency distribution of fok I genotype in Ugandan TB patients was 87.8% homozygous-dominant (FF), 7.3% (Ff) heterozygous and 4.8% (ff) homozygous recessive. For normal healthy subjects the frequencies were (FF) 92.6%, (Ff) 2.4% and (ff) 4.8%. No significant difference was observed in the FF and ff genotypes among TB patients and controls. The Ff heterozygous genotype distribution appeared more in TB patients than in controls. A significant difference was observed in the fok I genotype among gender p value 0.02. No significant difference was observed in ethnicity, p value 0.30. Conclusions: The heterozygous Ff fok I genotype may be associated with TB in the Ugandan population.

  20. Colony size-frequency distribution of pocilloporid juvenile corals along a natural environmental gradient in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Lozano-Cortes, Diego

    2015-10-29

    Coral colony size-frequency distributions can be used to assess population responses to local environmental conditions and disturbances. In this study, we surveyed juvenile pocilloporids, herbivorous fish densities, and algal cover in the central and southern Saudi Arabian Red Sea. We sampled nine reefs with different disturbance histories along a north–south natural gradient of physicochemical conditions (higher salinity and wider temperature fluctuations in the north, and higher turbidity and productivity in the south). Since coral populations with negatively skewed size-frequency distributions have been associated with unfavorable environmental conditions, we expected to find more negative distributions in the southern Red Sea, where corals are potentially experiencing suboptimal conditions. Although juvenile coral and parrotfish densities differed significantly between the two regions, mean colony size and size-frequency distributions did not. Results suggest that pocilloporid colony size-frequency distribution may not be an accurate indicator of differences in biological or oceanographic conditions in the Red Sea.

  1. Colony size-frequency distribution of pocilloporid juvenile corals along a natural environmental gradient in the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Cortés, Diego F; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-04-30

    Coral colony size-frequency distributions can be used to assess population responses to local environmental conditions and disturbances. In this study, we surveyed juvenile pocilloporids, herbivorous fish densities, and algal cover in the central and southern Saudi Arabian Red Sea. We sampled nine reefs with different disturbance histories along a north-south natural gradient of physicochemical conditions (higher salinity and wider temperature fluctuations in the north, and higher turbidity and productivity in the south). Since coral populations with negatively skewed size-frequency distributions have been associated with unfavorable environmental conditions, we expected to find more negative distributions in the southern Red Sea, where corals are potentially experiencing suboptimal conditions. Although juvenile coral and parrotfish densities differed significantly between the two regions, mean colony size and size-frequency distributions did not. Results suggest that pocilloporid colony size-frequency distribution may not be an accurate indicator of differences in biological or oceanographic conditions in the Red Sea.

  2. All-Optical Frequency Modulated High Pressure MEMS Sensor for Remote and Distributed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    a shift in the Bragg wavelength. The simple and robust design combined with the small chip area of 1 × 1.8 mm2 makes the sensor ideally suited for remote and distributed sensing in harsh environments and where miniaturized sensors are required. The sensor is designed for high pressure applications up......We present the design, fabrication and characterization of a new all-optical frequency modulated pressure sensor. Using the tangential strain in a circular membrane, a waveguide with an integrated nanoscale Bragg grating is strained longitudinally proportional to the applied pressure causing...

  3. Exact results for the Kuramoto model with a bimodal frequency distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Barreto, E.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze a large system of globally coupled phase oscillators whose natural frequencies are bimodally distributed. The dynamics of this system has been the subject of long-standing interest. In 1984 Kuramoto proposed several conjectures about its behavior; ten years later, Crawford obtained...... weighted Lorentzians. Using an ansatz recently discov- ered by Ott and Antonsen, we show that in this case the infinite-dimensional problem reduces exactly to a flow in four dimensions. Depending on the parameters and initial conditions, the long-term dynamics evolves to one of three states: incoherence...

  4. Sampling frequency of ciliated protozoan microfauna for seasonal distribution research in marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Henglong; Yong, Jiang; Xu, Guangjian

    2015-12-30

    Sampling frequency is important to obtain sufficient information for temporal research of microfauna. To determine an optimal strategy for exploring the seasonal variation in ciliated protozoa, a dataset from the Yellow Sea, northern China was studied. Samples were collected with 24 (biweekly), 12 (monthly), 8 (bimonthly per season) and 4 (seasonally) sampling events. Compared to the 24 samplings (100%), the 12-, 8- and 4-samplings recovered 94%, 94%, and 78% of the total species, respectively. To reveal the seasonal distribution, the 8-sampling regime may result in >75% information of the seasonal variance, while the traditional 4-sampling may only explain marine ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  6. Altered Frequency Distribution in the Electroencephalogram is Correlated to the Analgesic Effect of Remifentanil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Carina; Malver, Lasse P; Kurita, Geana P

    2015-01-01

    locations altered by remifentanil in healthy volunteers. Sixty-two channels of resting EEG followed by independent measures of pain scores to heat and bone pain were recorded in 21 healthy males before and during remifentanil infusion in a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. EEG frequency...... distributions were extracted by a continuous wavelet transform and normalized into delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. Alterations relative to pre-treatment responses were calculated for all channels and used as input to the MVPA. Compared to placebo, remifentanil increased the delta band and decreased...

  7. Comparison of frequency distributions of doubled haploid and single seed descent lines in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, T M; Reinbergs, E; Park, S J

    1982-09-01

    Both doubled haploid (DH) and single seed descent (SSD) methods were used to derive homozygous lines from two crosses of barley. The frequency distributions of grain yield, heading date, and plant height of the DH and SSD lines were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov twosample test and Wald-Wolfowitz runs test. It was found that the DH lines distributed in the same manner as the SSD lines with respect to the three characters. The results indicated that although the SSD method had more opportunity for recombination than the DH method, it did not produce a sample of recombinants which differed significantly from the DH sample; thus both methods were equally efficient for use in deriving homozygous lines from F1 hybrids in a relatively short time.

  8. Low Frequency Oscillations of the Heat Distribution in the Global Upper Ocean Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The heat distributions in the upper layers of the ocean have been studied and some important low frequency oscillations (LFOs) are already found and quantified by using various characteristic factors. In this paper, the 'heat center' of a sea area is defined with a simple method. Then the temperature data set of the upper layer of the global ocean (from surface down to 400 m, 1955 - 2003) is analyzed to detect the possible LFOs. Not only some zonal LFOs, which were reported early, but also some strong LFOs of the vertical and meridional heat distribution, which might imply some physical sense, are detected. It should be noted that the similar vertical oscillation pattern can be found in the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean and Indian Ocean. Results from some preliminary studies show that the vertical LFO might be caused by the solar irradiance anomalies. This study may help reveal some unknown dynamical processes in the global oceans and may also benefit other related studies.

  9. Universal spectrum for DNA base C+G frequency distribution in Human chromosomes 1 to 24

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2007-01-01

    Power spectra of human DNA base C+G frequency distribution in all available contiguous sections exhibit the universal inverse power law form of the statistical normal distribution for the 24 chromosomes. Inverse power law form for power spectra of space-time fluctuations is generic to dynamical systems in nature and indicate long-range space-time correlations. A recently developed general systems theory predicts the observed non-local connections as intrinsic to quantumlike chaos governing space-time fluctuations of dynamical systems. The model predicts the following. (1) The quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the nested coiled structure of the DNA molecule in the chromosome resulting in maximum packing efficiency. (2) The DNA molecule functions as a unified whole fuzzy logic network with ordered two-way signal transmission between the coding and non-coding regions. Recent studies indicate influence of non-coding regions on functions of coding regions in the DNA molecule.

  10. Sharing a quota on cumulative carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Michael R.; Davis, Steven J.; Peters, Glen P.; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Jotzo, Frank; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Le Quéré, Corinne

    2014-10-01

    Any limit on future global warming is associated with a quota on cumulative global CO2 emissions. We translate this global carbon quota to regional and national scales, on a spectrum of sharing principles that extends from continuation of the present distribution of emissions to an equal per-capita distribution of cumulative emissions. A blend of these endpoints emerges as the most viable option. For a carbon quota consistent with a 2 °C warming limit (relative to pre-industrial levels), the necessary long-term mitigation rates are very challenging (typically over 5% per year), both because of strong limits on future emissions from the global carbon quota and also the likely short-term persistence in emissions growth in many regions.

  11. Advanced multi-frequency radar: Design, preliminary measurements and particle size distribution retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majurec, Ninoslav

    lower output power of klystron amplifiers (comparing to magnetrons) is compensated by use of pulse compression (linear FM). The problem of range sidelobes (pulse compression artifacts) has been solved by using appropriate windowing functions in the receiver. Satisfactory sidelobe suppression level of 45 dB has been demonstrated in the lab. The currently best achievable range resolution of the AMFR system is 30 m (corresponds to 5 MHz receiver BW, set by the sampling rate of the Analog-to-Digital card). During the design stage, various polarization schemes have been investigated. The polarization scheme analysis showed the switching polarization scheme to be the best suited for the AMFR system. The AMFR subsystems were partially finished in the winter of 2005. Some preliminary tests were conducted in January 2006. Antenna platform was fabricated in summer 2006. The final assembly took place in the fall of 2006. Early results are presented in the dissertation. These results were helpful in revealing of certain problems in the radar system (i.e. immediate processing computer synchronization) that needed to be addressed during system development. Stratiform rain event occurred on December 18 2006 has been analyzed in detail. A number of commonly used theoretical particle size distributions is presented. Furthermore, it is shown that a fully calibrated multi-frequency radar system has capability of separating scattering and attenuation effects. This was accomplished by fitting the theoretical models into the measured data. An alternative method of estimating rain rate that relies on the dual wavelength ratios is also presented. Although not as powerful as theoretical model fitting, it has its merits for off-zenith observations. During January 2007, AMFR system participated in the C3VP experiment (Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project) in south Ontario, Canada. Some of the data obtained during C3VP experiment has been analyzed and presented. Analysis of these two

  12. High-resolution harmonic retrieval using the full fourth-order cumulant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, S.H.J.A.; Naus, H.W.L.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The harmonic retrieval (HR) problem concerns the estimation of the frequencies in a sum of real or complex harmonics. Both correlation and cumulant-based approaches are used for this purpose. Cumulant-based HR algorithms use a single 1-D slice of the fourth-order cumulant that is estimated directly

  13. The frequency and distribution of canine leishmaniosis diagnosed by veterinary practitioners in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattin, M J; Solano-Gallego, L; Dhollander, S; Afonso, A; Brodbelt, D C

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the frequency and spatial distribution of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) in France, Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain. An online questionnaire investigated the location and frequency of CanL cases diagnosed by veterinary practitioners. Further data from the practice management systems of veterinary clinics in France were provided by a financial benchmarking company in relation to all treatment and test invoice data from participating practices. The geographical and temporal web interest in leishmaniosis was explored using Google Trends. Veterinary practitioners from France, Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain completed 1231 questionnaires. The percentage of practice-attending dogs with a veterinary diagnosis of CanL ranged from 0.71% in France to 7.80% in Greece. However, due to regional differences in response rates, particularly in France, the mean regional estimates may better reflect the disease burden. Benchmarking data relating to approximately 180,000 dogs estimated that 0.05% of dogs attending veterinary clinics were treated for CanL or euthanased with suspected CanL in France. The regional frequency of Google web queries for leishmaniosis generally reflected the spatial patterns of disease identified from the other data sources. In conclusion, CanL was a relatively common diagnosis in veterinary clinics in many regions of the countries studied. Knowledge of CanL in endemic areas can direct the use of preventative measures and help estimate the likelihood of infection in dogs visiting or inhabiting these countries.

  14. Factors influencing recombination frequency and distribution in a human meiotic crossover hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffreys, Alec J; Neumann, Rita

    2005-08-01

    Little is known about the factors that influence the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination events within human crossover hotspots. We now describe the detailed analysis of sperm recombination in the NID1 hotspot. Like the neighbouring MS32 hotspot, the NID1 hotspot is associated with a minisatellite, suggesting that hotspots predispose DNA to tandem repetition. Unlike MS32, crossover resolution breakpoints in NID1 avoid the minisatellite, producing a cold spot within the hotspot. This avoidance may be related to the palindromic nature of the minisatellite interfering with the generation and/or processing of recombination intermediates. The NID1 hotspot also contains a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) close to the centre, which appears to directly influence the frequency of crossover initiation. Quantitative gene conversion assays show that this SNP affects the frequency of gene conversion and crossover to a very similar extent, providing evidence that conversions and crossovers are triggered by the same recombination initiating events. The recombination-suppressing allele is over-transmitted to recombinant progeny, and provides the most dramatic example to date of recombination-mediated meiotic drive, of a magnitude sufficient to virtually guarantee that the recombination suppressor will eventually replace the more active allele in human populations.

  15. An efficient hybrid causative event-based approach for deriving the annual flood frequency distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Mark; Li, Jing; Lambert, Martin; Kuczera, George; Metcalfe, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Flood extremes are driven by highly variable and complex climatic and hydrological processes. Derived flood frequency methods are often used to predict the flood frequency distribution (FFD) because they can provide predictions in ungauged catchments and evaluate the impact of land-use or climate change. This study presents recent work on development of a new derived flood frequency method called the hybrid causative events (HCE) approach. The advantage of the HCE approach is that it combines the accuracy of the continuous simulation approach with the computational efficiency of the event-based approaches. Derived flood frequency methods, can be divided into two classes. Event-based approaches provide fast estimation, but can also lead to prediction bias due to limitations of inherent assumptions required for obtaining input information (rainfall and catchment wetness) for events that cause large floods. Continuous simulation produces more accurate predictions, however, at the cost of massive computational time. The HCE method uses a short continuous simulation to provide inputs for a rainfall-runoff model running in an event-based fashion. A proof-of-concept pilot study that the HCE produces estimates of the flood frequency distribution with similar accuracy as the continuous simulation, but with dramatically reduced computation time. Recent work incorporated seasonality into the HCE approach and evaluated with a more realistic set of eight sites from a wide range of climate zones, typical of Australia, using a virtual catchment approach. The seasonal hybrid-CE provided accurate predictions of the FFD for all sites. Comparison with the existing non-seasonal hybrid-CE showed that for some sites the non-seasonal hybrid-CE significantly over-predicted the FFD. Analysis of the underlying cause of whether a site had a high, low or no need to use seasonality found it was based on a combination of reasons, that were difficult to predict apriori. Hence it is recommended

  16. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 4 - Atlas of temperature / salinity frequency distributions (2 disc set) (NODC Accession 0101473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Atlas presents more than 80,000 plots of the empirical frequency distributions of temperature and salinity for each 5-degree square area of the North Atlantic...

  17. Korean Speakers' Acquisition of the English Ditransitive Construction: The Role of Verb Prototype, Input Distribution, and Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Year, Jungeun; Gordon, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in usage-based linguistics have found that construction learning is more effective when input is skewed toward a prototypical exemplar of the construction, thereby reflecting the frequency distribution in natural language. This study investigates the extent to which a prototypical ditransitive verb with high frequency ("give")…

  18. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as a source of distributed frequency regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Sara Kathryn

    The movement to transform the North American power grid into a smart grid may be accomplished by expanding integrated sensing, communications, and control technologies to include every part of the grid to the point of end-use. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) provide an opportunity for small-scale distributed storage while they are plugged-in. With large numbers of PHEV and the communications and sensing associated with the smart grid, PHEV could provide ancillary services for the grid. Frequency regulation is an ideal service for PHEV because the duration of supply is short (order of minutes) and it is the highest priced ancillary service on the market offering greater financial returns for vehicle owners. Using Simulink a power system simulator modeling the IEEE 14 Bus System was combined with a model of PHEV charging and the controllers which facilitate vehicle-to-grid (V2G) regulation supply. The system includes a V2G controller for each vehicle which makes regulation supply decisions based on battery state, user preferences, and the recommended level of supply. A PHEV coordinator controller located higher in the system has access to reliable frequency measurements and can determine a suitable local automatic generation control (AGC) raise/lower signal for participating vehicles. A first step implementation of the V2G supply system where battery charging is modulated to provide regulation was developed. The system was simulated following a step change in loading using three scenarios: (1) Central generating units provide frequency regulation, (2) PHEV contribute to primary regulation analogous to generator speed governor control, and (3) PHEV contribute to primary and secondary regulation using an additional integral term in the PHEV control signal. In both cases the additional regulation provided by PHEV reduced the area control error (ACE) compared to the base case. Unique contributions resulting from this work include: (1) Studied PHEV energy systems

  19. Monetizing Leakage Risk of Geologic CO2 Storage using Wellbore Permeability Frequency Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, Jeffrey; Fitts, Jeffrey; Peters, Catherine; Wilson, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) may be captured from large point sources (e.g., coal-fired power plants, oil refineries, cement manufacturers) and injected into deep sedimentary basins for storage, or sequestration, from the atmosphere. This technology—CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS)—may be a significant component of the portfolio of technologies deployed to mitigate climate change. But injected CO2, or the brine it displaces, may leak from the storage reservoir through a variety of natural and manmade pathways, including existing wells and wellbores. Such leakage will incur costs to a variety of stakeholders, which may affect the desirability of potential CO2 injection locations as well as the feasibility of the CCS approach writ large. Consequently, analyzing and monetizing leakage risk is necessary to develop CCS as a viable technological option to mitigate climate change. Risk is the product of the probability of an outcome and the impact of that outcome. Assessment of leakage risk from geologic CO2 storage reservoirs requires an analysis of the probabilities and magnitudes of leakage, identification of the outcomes that may result from leakage, and an assessment of the expected economic costs of those outcomes. One critical uncertainty regarding the rate and magnitude of leakage is determined by the leakiness of the well leakage pathway. This leakiness is characterized by a leakage permeability for the pathway, and recent work has sought to determine frequency distributions for the leakage permeabilities of wells and wellbores. We conduct a probabilistic analysis of leakage and monetized leakage risk for CO2 injection locations in the Michigan Sedimentary Basin (USA) using empirically derived frequency distributions for wellbore leakage permeabilities. To conduct this probabilistic risk analysis, we apply the RISCS (Risk Interference of Subsurface CO2 Storage) model (Bielicki et al, 2013a, 2012b) to injection into the Mt. Simon Sandstone. RISCS monetizes leakage risk

  20. Effect of correlation on cumulants in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, D K; Netrakanti, P K

    2015-01-01

    We study the effects of correlation on cumulants and their ratios of net-proton multiplicity distribution which have been measured for central (0-5\\%) Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This effect has been studied assuming individual proton and anti-proton distributions as Poisson or Negative Binomial Distribution (NBD). In-spite of significantly correlated production due to baryon number, electric charge conservation and kinematical correlations of protons and anti-protons, the measured cumulants of net-proton distribution follow the independent production model. In the present work we demonstrate how the introduction of correlations will affect the cumulants and their ratios for the difference distributions. We have also demonstrated this study using the proton and anti-proton distributions obtained from HIJING event generator.

  1. Lattice QCD results on cumulant ratios at freeze-out

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2016-01-01

    Ratios of cumulants of net proton-number fluctuations measured by the STAR Collaboration show strong deviations from a skellam distribution, which should describe thermal properties of cumulant ratios, if proton-number fluctuations are generated in equilibrium and a hadron resonance gas (HRG) model would provide a suitable description of thermodynamics at the freeze-out temperature. We present some results on sixth order cumulants entering the calculation of the QCD equation of state at non-zero values of the baryon chemical potential (mu_B) and discuss limitations on the applicability of HRG thermodynamics deduced from a comparison between QCD and HRG model calculations of cumulants of conserved charge fluctuations. We show that basic features of the $\\mu_B$-dependence of skewness and kurtosis ratios of net proton-number fluctuations measured by the STAR Collaboration resemble those expected from a O(mu_B^2) QCD calculation of the corresponding net baryon-number cumulant ratios.

  2. Spatial Distribution of the Errors in Modeling the Mid-Latitude Critical Frequencies by Different Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilifarska, N. A.

    There are some models that describe the spatial distribution of greatest frequency yielding reflection from the F2 ionospheric layer (foF2). However, the distribution of the models' errors over the globe and how they depend on seasons, solar activity, etc., are unknown till this time. So the aim of the present paper is to compare the accuracy in describing the latitudinal and longitudinal variation of the mid-latitude maximum electron density, of CCIR, URSI, and a new created theoretical model. A comparison between the above mentioned models and all available from Boulder's data bank VI data (among 35 deg and 70 deg) have been made. Data for three whole years with different solar activity - 1976 (F_10.7 = 73.6), 1981 (F_10.7 = 20.6), 1983 (F_10.7 = 119.6) have been compared. The final results show that: 1. the areas with greatest and smallest errors depend on UT, season and solar activity; 2. the error distribution of CCIR and URSI models are very similar and are not coincident with these ones of theoretical model. The last result indicates that the theoretical model, described briefly bellow, may be a real alternative to the empirical CCIR and URSI models. The different spatial distribution of the models' errors gives a chance for the users to choose the most appropriate model, depending on their needs. Taking into account that the theoretical models have equal accuracy in region with many or without any ionosonde station, this result shows that our model can be used to improve the global mapping of the mid-latitude ionosphere. Moreover, if Re values of the input aeronomical parameters (neutral composition, temperatures and winds), are used - it may be expected that this theoretical model can be applied for Re or almost Re-time mapping of the main ionospheric parameters (foF2 and hmF2).

  3. Comparative Study on the Selection Criteria for Fitting Flood Frequency Distribution Models with Emphasis on Upper-Tail Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The upper tail of a flood frequency distribution is always specifically concerned with flood control. However, different model selection criteria often give different optimal distributions when the focus is on the upper tail of distribution. With emphasis on the upper-tail behavior, five distribution selection criteria including two hypothesis tests and three information-based criteria are evaluated in selecting the best fitted distribution from eight widely used distributions by using datasets from Thames River, Wabash River, Beijiang River and Huai River. The performance of the five selection criteria is verified by using a composite criterion with focus on upper tail events. This paper demonstrated an approach for optimally selecting suitable flood frequency distributions. Results illustrate that (1 there are different selections of frequency distributions in the four rivers by using hypothesis tests and information-based criteria approaches. Hypothesis tests are more likely to choose complex, parametric models, and information-based criteria prefer to choose simple, effective models. Different selection criteria have no particular tendency toward the tail of the distribution; (2 The information-based criteria perform better than hypothesis tests in most cases when the focus is on the goodness of predictions of the extreme upper tail events. The distributions selected by information-based criteria are more likely to be close to true values than the distributions selected by hypothesis test methods in the upper tail of the frequency curve; (3 The proposed composite criterion not only can select the optimal distribution, but also can evaluate the error of estimated value, which often plays an important role in the risk assessment and engineering design. In order to decide on a particular distribution to fit the high flow, it would be better to use the composite criterion.

  4. A hospital-based retrospective study on frequency and distribution of viral Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Antony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem throughout the world. It is the inflammation of the liver due to the infection of any of the five main hepatic viruses A to E and it affects the liver through different modes of transmission. This study mainly aims at the frequency and distribution of viral hepatitis based on age and sex during a time period of 5 years. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective study of 5 years at a tertiary level hospital in Kerala state in India. Medical records department of the hospital follow the guidelines of International Classification of Diseases-10 for coding the diseases. The data on frequency and distribution of viral hepatitis based on age and sex during a period of 5 years from April 2005 to March 2010 were collected and analyzed and ′z′ test was used for finding out the difference in proportions. Result: Out of 818 cases, 76.03% were males and 23.96% were females. The preponderance of males was apparent in all types of viral hepatitis infection. The high risk groups were the adults in the age group of 20-39 years. The main cause in the present study was hepatitis E virus (HEV and followed by hepatitis A virus (HAV. Of total viral hepatitis cases, 31.54% were due to HAV, 6.35% hepatitis B virus, 0.85% hepatitis C virus and 61.24% were due to HEV respectively. In the present study, there was no case of hepatitis D virus has reported. The case fatality rate of viral hepatitis in the present study was minor than 1% (0.98%; whereas males were 0.96%; females of 1.02%. Conclusion: Taking the safety measures including vaccination and proper management of waste materials are the only solution to control or eradicate this infection.

  5. Modeling particle size distributions by the Weibull distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang (Rogers Tool Works, Rogers, AR (United States)); Patterson, B.R.; Turner, M.E. Jr (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States))

    1993-10-01

    A method is proposed for modeling two- and three-dimensional particle size distributions using the Weibull distribution function. Experimental results show that, for tungsten particles in liquid phase sintered W-14Ni-6Fe, the experimental cumulative section size distributions were well fit by the Weibull probability function, which can also be used to compute the corresponding relative frequency distributions. Modeling the two-dimensional section size distributions facilitates the use of the Saltykov or other methods for unfolding three-dimensional (3-D) size distributions with minimal irregularities. Fitting the unfolded cumulative 3-D particle size distribution with the Weibull function enables computation of the statistical distribution parameters from the parameters of the fit Weibull function.

  6. Evaluation of ion current density distribution on an extraction electrode of a radio frequency ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masherov, P.; Riaby, V.; Abgaryan, V.

    2017-01-01

    The radial distributions of ion current density on an ion extracting electrode of a radio frequency (RF) ion thruster (RIT) with an inductive plasma source were obtained using probe diagnostics of the RF xenon plasma. Measurements were carried out using a plane wall probe simulator and the VGPS-12 Probe System of Plasma Sensors Co. At xenon flow rate q  =  2 sccm plasma pressure was 2 · 10-3 Torr, incident RF generator power varied in the range P g  =  50-250 W with RF power absorbed by plasma up to P p  =  220 W. Ion current densities were determined using semi- and double-logarithmic probe characteristics by linear extrapolations of their ion branches to probe floating potentials. The same parameters were also measured in undisturbed plasma by a classic cylindrical probe. They exceeded plane probe data by more than two times, showing the effectiveness of plasma sheath reproduction of the RIT ion extracting electrode by the plane wall probe simulator. Slight non-uniformity of the resulting plasma distributions and simplified RIT model design showed that the studied device with flat antenna coil and ferrite core could be considered as a promising prospect for RITs of new generation.

  7. Sex differences in chiasma distribution along two marked mouse chromosomes: differences in chiasma distribution as a reason for sex differences in recombination frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlov, I P; Zhelezova, A I; Gorlova OYu

    1994-12-01

    Chiasma distributions along bivalents 1 and 14 in female and male mice were studied. It was shown that the average chiasma number in both chromosomes show no sex difference. There are however, significant sex differences in chiasma distribution along 1 and 14 chromosomes. In males there are two terminal chiasma peaks in chromosome 1 and one subtelomeric peak of chiasmata in chromosome 14. In females chiasma distributions are more even. According to genetic data, females produce more recombinants between loci of chromosome 1 than males do. By means of a computer simulation it was demonstrated that the differences in the average recombination frequency result from differences in chiasma distribution.

  8. Translation-Invariant Representation for Cumulative Foot Pressure Images

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Shuai; Tan, Tieniu

    2010-01-01

    Human can be distinguished by different limb movements and unique ground reaction force. Cumulative foot pressure image is a 2-D cumulative ground reaction force during one gait cycle. Although it contains pressure spatial distribution information and pressure temporal distribution information, it suffers from several problems including different shoes and noise, when putting it into practice as a new biometric for pedestrian identification. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical translation-invariant representation for cumulative foot pressure images, inspired by the success of Convolutional deep belief network for digital classification. Key contribution in our approach is discriminative hierarchical sparse coding scheme which helps to learn useful discriminative high-level visual features. Based on the feature representation of cumulative foot pressure images, we develop a pedestrian recognition system which is invariant to three different shoes and slight local shape change. Experiments are conducted on...

  9. Improved curvelet thresholding denoising method by the Chi-Squared cumulation distribution function and PDE%融合卡方累积分布函数和PDE的曲波阈值去噪法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔华; 严玍伻

    2014-01-01

    针对硬阈值函数不连续导致视觉失真和软阈值函数存在恒定重构偏差的问题,依据噪声的曲波系数分布特性以及理想阈值函数特性,提出了基于卡方累积分布函数的新阈值函数。为了克服阈值去噪法固有的环绕效应和难以兼顾细节保持与去噪效果的性能缺陷,将偏微分方程去噪图像中包含的有益信息融合进新阈值函数去噪图像中,提出了新去噪方法。理论分析和仿真结果一致表明,较软、硬阈值去噪法,文中采用卡方累积分布函数和偏微分方程改进的曲波阈值去噪方法,可以有效地改善去噪效果和视觉质量。%To circumvent the visual distortion due to the discontinuity of the hard threshold function and the constant reconstruction deviation caused by the soft thresholding function,this paper presents a novel thresholding function based on the Chi-Square cumulative distribution function according to the distribution characteristics of curvelet coefficients of the noise and the ideal properties thehigh effective curvelet threshold functions should have.Further,in order to eliminate the surrounding effect inherent in curvelet threshold denoising methods and achieve a better balance between detail conservation and noise reduction, useful information involved in a denoised image produced by the partial differential equation denoising method is fused with that by the novel curvelet threshold function into the proposed denoising method. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed denoiding method outper forms the soft and hard threshold denoising methods in terms of the denoising effect and visual quality.

  10. Some Characterization Results on Dynamic Cumulative Residual Tsallis Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Mohan Sati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a generalized cumulative residual information measure based on Tsallis entropy and its dynamic version. We study the characterizations of the proposed information measure and define new classes of life distributions based on this measure. Some applications are provided in relation to weighted and equilibrium probability models. Finally the empirical cumulative Tsallis entropy is proposed to estimate the new information measure.

  11. Extended-bandwidth frequency sweeps of a distributed feedback laser using combined injection current and temperature modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefferman, Gerald; Chen, Zhen; Wei, Tao

    2017-07-01

    This article details the generation of an extended-bandwidth frequency sweep using a single, communication grade distributed feedback (DFB) laser. The frequency sweep is generated using a two-step technique. In the first step, injection current modulation is employed as a means of varying the output frequency of a DFB laser over a bandwidth of 99.26 GHz. A digital optical phase lock loop is used to lock the frequency sweep speed during current modulation, resulting in a linear frequency chirp. In the second step, the temperature of the DFB laser is modulated, resulting in a shifted starting laser output frequency. A laser frequency chirp is again generated beginning at this shifted starting frequency, resulting in a frequency-shifted spectrum relative to the first recorded data. This process is then repeated across a range of starting temperatures, resulting in a series of partially overlapping, frequency-shifted spectra. These spectra are then aligned using cross-correlation and combined using averaging to form a single, broadband spectrum with a total bandwidth of 510.9 GHz. In order to investigate the utility of this technique, experimental testing was performed in which the approach was used as the swept-frequency source of a coherent optical frequency domain reflectometry system. This system was used to interrogate an optical fiber containing a 20 point, 1-mm pitch length fiber Bragg grating, corresponding to a period of 100 GHz. Using this technique, both the periodicity of the grating in the frequency domain and the individual reflector elements of the structure in the time domain were resolved, demonstrating the technique's potential as a method of extending the sweeping bandwidth of semiconductor lasers for frequency-based sensing applications.

  12. Frequency and Distribution of Tuberculosis Resistance-Associated Mutations between Mumbai, Moldova, and Eastern Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georghiou, S B; Seifert, M; Catanzaro, D; Garfein, R S; Valafar, F; Crudu, V; Rodrigues, C; Victor, T C; Catanzaro, A; Rodwell, T C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular diagnostic assays, with their ability to rapidly detect resistance-associated mutations in bacterial genes, are promising technologies to control the spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). Sequencing assays provide detailed information for specific gene regions and can help diagnostic assay developers prioritize mutations for inclusion in their assays. We performed pyrosequencing of seven Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene regions (katG, inhA, ahpC, rpoB, gyrA, rrs, and eis) for 1,128 clinical specimens from India, Moldova, and South Africa. We determined the frequencies of each mutation among drug-resistant and -susceptible specimens based on phenotypic drug susceptibility testing results and examined mutation distributions by country. The most common mutation among isoniazid-resistant (INH(r)) specimens was the katG 315ACC mutation (87%). However, in the Eastern Cape, INH(r) specimens had a lower frequency of katG mutations (44%) and higher frequencies of inhA (47%) and ahpC (10%) promoter mutations. The most common mutation among rifampin-resistant (RIF(r)) specimens was the rpoB 531TTG mutation (80%). The mutation was common in RIF(r) specimens in Mumbai (83%) and Moldova (84%) but not the Eastern Cape (17%), where the 516GTC mutation appeared more frequently (57%). The most common mutation among fluoroquinolone-resistant specimens was the gyrA 94GGC mutation (44%). The rrs 1401G mutation was found in 84%, 84%, and 50% of amikacin-resistant, capreomycin-resistant, and kanamycin (KAN)-resistant (KAN(r)) specimens, respectively. The eis promoter mutation -12T was found in 26% of KAN(r) and 4% of KAN-susceptible (KAN(s)) specimens. Inclusion of the ahpC and eis promoter gene regions was critical for optimal test sensitivity for the detection of INH resistance in the Eastern Cape and KAN resistance in Moldova. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT02170441.).

  13. Use of population exposure frequency distributions to simulate effects of policy interventions on NO2 exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulopoulou, C.; Ashmore, M. R.; Terry, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Health effects of air pollution on individuals depend on their personal exposure, but few modelling tools are available which can predict how the distribution of personal exposures within a city will change in response to policies to reduce emissions both indoors and outdoors. We describe a new probabilistic modelling framework (INDAIR-2/EXPAIR), which provides predictions of the personal exposure frequency distribution (PEFD) across a city to assess the effects of both reduced emissions from home sources and reduced roadside concentrations on population exposure. The model uses a national time activity database, which gives the percentage of each population group in different residential and non-residential micro-environments, and links this, for the home, to predictions of concentrations from a three-compartment model, and for non-residential microenvironments to empirical indoor/outdoor ratios. This paper presents modelled PEFDs for NO2 in the city of Leicester, for children, the elderly, and office workers, comparing results in different seasons and on different days of the week. While the mean NO2 population exposure was close to, or below the urban background concentration, the 95%ile of the PEFD was well above the urban background concentration. The relationship between both mean and 95%ile PEFD and urban background concentrations was strongly influenced by air exchange rate. The 24 h mean PEFD showed relative small differences between the population groups, with both removal of home sources and reductions of roadside concentrations on roads with a high traffic density having similar effects in reducing mean exposure. In contrast, the 1 h maximum of the PEFD was significantly higher for children and the elderly than for office workers, and showed a much greater response to reduced home emissions in these groups. The results demonstrate the importance of understanding the dynamics of NO2 exposure at a population level within different groups, if the benefits

  14. Size-frequency distribution of different secondary crater populations: 1. Equilibrium caused by secondary impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyong

    2016-12-01

    Accumulation of impact craters is the major reason causing equilibrium of crater populations on airless planetary surfaces. Besides primary craters, the effect of widespread secondaries on the equilibrium of local crater populations is little studied. Here the different secondary crater populations formed by the Hokusai crater on Mercury are systematically studied, and they are compared with those on the Moon to investigate their contribution to the evolution of local crater populations. Self-secondaries cause equilibrium on continuous ejecta deposits in a short time, and the equilibrium crater population has a differential size-frequency distribution (SFD) slope of about -3. Background secondaries are abundant on Mercury, and equilibrium caused by a combination of primaries and potential background secondaries follows the same pattern on the Moon and Mercury. The spatial dispersion of fragments that form both near-field and distant secondaries is the major factor affecting the degree of mutual destruction and thus the final crater SFD. Some clustered distant secondaries on Mercury are likely formed by individual fragments considering their large spatial dispersion and identical morphology with same-sized primaries, and the SFD rollovers of these secondaries possibly reflect the inherent SFD rollovers of the impact fragments. Near-field secondaries and many other distant secondaries have morphology and spatial distribution that are consistent with being formed by clustered fragments, and mutual destruction of secondaries may be the major reason causing the observed SFD rollovers. Heterogeneous secondary impacts are a potential explanation for both different crater densities within the equilibrium diameter range and different regolith thicknesses on coeval surfaces.

  15. Frequency and Distribution of Microsatellites in the Genome of Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng-yun; LI Jin-bin; ZHOU Xiao-gang; ZHANG Shao-song; XU Ming-hui

    2005-01-01

    A total of 38.0 Mb of publicly available DNA sequence in Neurospora crassa was researched for mono- to hexanucleotide simple sequence repeats (SSR or microsatellite) to determine the type, size and frequency. A total of 14 788 SSRs were observed in the whole genomic DNA sequence, about one every 2.57 kb, with the criteria of SSR length >15 bp and 80%matches. The most abundant microsatellite was trinucleotide repeat, the number was 4 729, followed by hexanucleotide and mononucleotide repeats, the numbers were 2 940 and 2 489 respectively, and the least abundance was dinucleotide repeat, only 691 were found. Among the 10 082 ORFs, 4 094 SSRs were harbored in 2 373 ORF (no intron) of the organism.One thousand and fifty six ORFs harbored only one SSR. Similar with other organisms, tri- and hexanucleotide repeats were predominant in ORFs, 54.1 and 48.8% oftri- and hexanucleotide repeats were distributed in ORF region. The density of these two motifs was overpresented in coding regions, because ORF region and coding region constitutes only 46 and 38.3% of genomic sequence, respectively. Upstream and downstream 300 bp of regulatory regions were high density regions of SSRs, particularly density of pentanucleotide SSR in upstream region was as high as five times of average density in genomic DNA, density of di- and tetranucleotide SSR was also more than two times of average density. The density of penta-, tetra-, di- and mononucleotide SSRs was relatively higher than average density. There were 47 SSRs in mitochondria 64 840 bp DNA sequence, their distribution is similar with genomic DNA sequence. These results suggested that SSRs were clustered in regulatory regions of genomic DNA.

  16. Cumulant matching for independent source extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlypo, Ronald; Zarzoso, Vicente; Comon, Pierre; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2008-01-01

    In this work we show how one can make use of priors on signal statistics under the form of cumulant guesses to extract an independent source from an observed mixture. The advantage of using statistical priors on the signal lies in the fact that no specific knowledge is needed about its temporal behavior, neither about its spatial distribution. We show that these statistics can be obtained either by reasoning on the theoretical values of a supposed waveform, either by using a subset of the observations from which we know that their statistics are merely hindered by interferences. Results on an electro-cardiographic recording confirm the above assumptions.

  17. A database of frequency distributions of energy depositions in small-size targets by electrons and ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikjoo, H; Uehara, S; Emfietzoglou, D; Pinsky, L

    2011-02-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) is an average quantity, which cannot display the stochastics of the interactions of radiation tracks in the target volume. For this reason, microdosimetry distributions have been defined to overcome the LET shortcomings. In this paper, model calculations of frequency distributions for energy depositions in nanometre size targets, diameters 1-100 nm, and for a 1 μm diameter wall-less TEPC, for electrons, protons, alpha particles and carbon ions are reported. Frequency distributions for energy depositions in small-size targets with dimensions similar to those of biological molecules are useful for modelling and calculations of DNA damage. Monte Carlo track structure codes KURBUC and PITS99 were used to generate tracks of primary electrons 10 eV to 1 MeV, and ions 1 keV µm(-1) to 300 MeV µm(-1) energies. Distribution of absolute frequencies of energy depositions in volumes with diameters of 1-100 nm randomly positioned in unit density water irradiated with 1 Gy of the given radiation was obtained. Data are presented for frequency of energy depositions and microdosimetry quantities including mean lineal energy, dose mean lineal energy, frequency mean specific energy and dose mean specific energy. The modelling and calculations presented in this work are useful for characterisation of the quality of radiation beam in biophysical studies and in radiation therapy.

  18. Seasonal Variation and Frequency Distribution of Ectoparasites in Crossbreed Cattle in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Socorro Ferraz da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the seasonal variation and frequency distribution of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, Haematobia irritans, and Dermatobia hominis on crossbred heifers under field conditions in the northeast of Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil. From November 2007 to September 2009 (23 months, 40 heifers aged 16.6±2.4 months were divided into groups A (1/4 Holstein × 3/4 Gir and B (1/2 Holstein × 1/2 Gir and had the monthly infestation estimated along with the climatic conditions. The mean maximum and minimum temperatures were 28.5 and 19°C, respectively. The ectoparasites were present on animals in all months of the year. The levels of ticks on the animals were low (3.0±0.2 ticks/animal, with the highest density in midwinter. The temperature was the climatic factor that most influenced the tick levels. The population of H. irritans (13.9±0.3 flies/animal and D. hominis (1.5±0.2 larvae/animal on heifers was more influenced by rainfall and exhibited two population peaks during the year. 1/2 Holstein heifers harbored significantly more H. irritans and D. hominis than 1/4 Holstein heifers. The results are discussed considering the most appropriate periods to apply ectoparasiticides and the genetic make-up of the animals.

  19. High-frequency oscillations in distributed neural networks reveal the dynamics of human decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian G Guggisberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We examine the relative timing of numerous brain regions involved in human decisions that are based on external criteria, learned information, personal preferences, or unconstrained internal considerations. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG and advanced signal analysis techniques, we were able to non-invasively reconstruct oscillations of distributed neural networks in the high-gamma frequency band (60–150 Hz. The time course of the observed neural activity suggested that two-alternative forced choice tasks are processed in four overlapping stages: processing of sensory input, option evaluation, intention formation, and action execution. Visual areas are activated fi rst, and show recurring activations throughout the entire decision process. The temporo-occipital junction and the intraparietal sulcus are active during evaluation of external values of the options, 250–500 ms after stimulus presentation. Simultaneously, personal preference is mediated by cortical midline structures. Subsequently, the posterior parietal and superior occipital cortices appear to encode intention, with different subregions being responsible for different types of choice. The cerebellum and inferior parietal cortex are recruited for internal generation of decisions and actions, when all options have the same value. Action execution was accompanied by activation peaks in the contralateral motor cortex. These results suggest that high-gamma oscillations as recorded by MEG allow a reliable reconstruction of decision processes with excellent spatiotemporal resolution.

  20. Analysis of Power Quality Signals Using an Adaptive Time-Frequency Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel A. Khan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Spikes frequently occur in power quality (PQ disturbance signals due to various causes such as switching of the inductive loads and the energization of the capacitor bank. Such signals are difficult to analyze using existing time-frequency (TF methods as these signals have two orthogonal directions in a TF plane. To address this issue, this paper proposes an adaptive TF distribution (TFD for the analysis of PQ signals. In the proposed adaptive method, the smoothing kernel’s direction is locally adapted based on the direction of energy in the joint TF domain, and hence an improved TF resolution can be obtained. Furthermore, the performance of the proposed adaptive technique in analyzing electrical PQ is thoroughly studied for both synthetic and real world electrical power signals with the help of extensive simulations. The simulation results (specially for empirical data indicate that the adaptive TFD method achieves high energy concentration in the TF domain for signals composed of tones and spikes. Moreover, the local adaptation of the smoothing kernel in the adaptive TFD enables the extraction of TF signature of spikes from TF images, which further helps in measuring the energy of spikes in a given signal. This new measure can be used to both detect the spikes as well as to quantify the extent of distortion caused by the spikes in a given signal.

  1. Faunal identifiation and frequency distribution of wild sand fles infected with Leishmania tropica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Djaefar Moemenbellah-Fard

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the sand fly composition, its frequency distribution and natural infection with Leishmania parasites to incriminate the likely vectors of cutaneous leishmaniosis in Jiroft, Southeast Iran. Methods: Sand flies were caught with sticky paper traps during a 6-month period in 2013. They were morphologically identified to species level using valid taxonomic keys. They were then subjected to nested PCR method and the results were analyzed. Results: A total of 3 751 sand flies were identified to belong to 21 species in two genera (8 spp. in the Phlebotomus genus, and 13 spp. in the Sergentomyia genus most of which were males (65.60% and exophilic (63.80%. The two most frequent species were Phlebotomus papatasi (39.40% and Phlebotomus sergenti (17.20%. The latter was confirmed by PCR to be naturally infected with Leishmania tropica (3.33%. Conclusions: It was thus concluded that wild-caught Phlebotomus sergenti naturally infected with Leishmania tropica was mainly incriminated by molecular method to be the principal vector of cutaneous leishmaniosis in this endemic focus.

  2. Crater size-frequency distribution measurements and age of the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, K. A.; Zanetti, M.; Jolliff, B.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex (CBVC) is a 25 × 35 km feature on the lunar farside marked by elevated topography, high albedo, high thorium concentration, and high silica content. Morphologies indicate that the complex is volcanic in origin and compositions indicate that it represents rare silicic volcanism on the Moon. Constraining the timing of silicic volcanism at the complex is necessary to better understand the development of evolved magmas and when they were active on the lunar surface. We employ image analysis and crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements on several locations within the complex and at surrounding impact craters, Hayn (87 km diameter), and Compton (160 km diameter), to determine relative and absolute model ages of regional events. Using CSFD measurements, we establish a chronology dating regional resurfacing events and the earliest possible onset of CBVC volcanism at ∼3.8 Ga, the formation of Compton Crater at 3.6 Ga, likely resurfacing by volcanism at the CBVC at ∼3.5 Ga, and the formation of Hayn Crater at ∼1 Ga. For the CBVC, we find the most consistent results are obtained using craters larger than 300 m in diameter; the small crater population is affected by their approach to an equilibrium condition and by the physical properties of regolith at the CBVC.

  3. Space-frequency analysis with parallel computing in a phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer distributed sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Xiaonan; Ye, Taihang; Zheng, Shilie; Zhou, Jinhai; Chi, Hao; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2014-10-01

    For a phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer (ϕ-OTDR) distributed sensor system, space-frequency analysis can reduce the false alarm by analyzing the frequency distribution compared with the traditional difference value method. We propose a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel computing method to perform multichannel fast Fourier transform (FFT) and realize the real-time space-frequency analysis. The experiment results show that the time taken by the multichannel FFT decreased considerably based on this GPU parallel computing. The method can be completed with a sensing fiber up to 16 km long and an entry-level GPU. Meanwhile, the GPU can reduce the computing load of the central processing unit from 70% down to less than 20%. We carried out an experiment on a two-point space-frequency analysis, and the results clearly and simultaneously show the vibration point locations and frequency components. The sensor system outputs the real-time space-frequency spectra continuously with a spatial resolution of 16.3 m and frequency resolution of 2.25 Hz.

  4. Regional parent flood frequency distributions in Europe - Part 1: Is the GEV model suitable as a pan-European parent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, J. L.; Castellarin, A.; Viglione, A.; Kohnová, S.; Kjeldsen, T. R.

    2014-11-01

    This study addresses the question of the existence of a parent flood frequency distribution on a European scale. A new database of L-moment ratios of flood annual maximum series (AMS) from 4105 catchments was compiled by joining 13 national data sets. Simple exploration of the database presents the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution as a potential pan-European flood frequency distribution, being the three-parameter statistical model that with the closest resemblance to the estimated average of the sample L-moment ratios. Additional Monte Carlo simulations show that the variability in terms of sample skewness and kurtosis present in the data is larger than in a hypothetical scenario where all the samples were drawn from a GEV model. Overall, the generalized extreme value distribution fails to represent the kurtosis dispersion, especially for the longer sample lengths and medium to high skewness values, and therefore may be rejected in a statistical hypothesis testing framework as a single pan-European parent distribution for annual flood maxima. The results presented in this paper suggest that one single statistical model may not be able to fit the entire variety of flood processes present at a European scale, and presents an opportunity to further investigate the catchment and climatic factors controlling European flood regimes and their effects on the underlying flood frequency distributions.

  5. Cumulative Risks of Foster Care Placement for Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter; Emanuel, Natalia; Wildeman, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Although recent research suggests that the cumulative risk of foster care placement is far higher for American children than originally suspected, little is known about the cumulative risk of foster care placement in other countries, which makes it difficult to gauge the degree to which factor...... is for Danish children. Results suggest that at the beginning of the study period (in 1998) the cumulative risk of foster care placement for Danish children was roughly in line with the risk for American children. Yet, by the end of the study period (2010), the risk had declined to half the risk for American...... foster care placement is salient in other contexts. In this article, we provide companion estimates to those provided in recent work on the US by using Danish registry data and synthetic cohort life tables to show how high and unequally distributed the cumulative risk of foster care placement...

  6. Mapping cumulative human impacts in the eastern North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stock, A.; Andersen, Jesper; Heinänen, S.

    of the MSFD; and 3) to deepen the understanding of how errors in expert judgment affect the resulting cumulative human impact maps by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We combined existing data sets on the spatial distribution of 33 anthropogenic stressors (linked to the MSFD pressures) and 28 key habitats....... In contrast, the predicted impacts for much of the Norwegian EEZ and areas far offshore were lower. The Monte Carlo simulations confirmed earlier findings that mapping cumulative impacts is generally "robust", but also showed that specific combinations of errors can seriously change local and regional...... on marine ecosystems have only recently been developed. The aims of our study were: 1) to develop a map of cumulative human impacts for the Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and German parts of the Greater North Sea; 2) to adjust the existing methods for mapping cumulative human impacts to fit the requirements...

  7. Frequency distributions of Escherichia coli in the confectionery products offered in retail market in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Rezaei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Raw ingredients used in confectionary carry high risk of infection with Escherichia coli. Since confectionaries are offered in the market in quite varied forms and types and there is a great difference in the sanitary status of the confectionaries, this study aimed at evaluation of E.coli   frequency distribution in different types of confectionery products in Isfahan market. In addition, the effect of moisture content, products category and the sanitary level of the confectionaries as well as product types (Industrially or traditionally produced on the contamination level were studied. Materials and methods: A total of 200 samples were randomly collected from confectioneries in Isfahan city through simple random sampling method. Preparation and dilution procedures were conducted under sterile conditions. Samples were cultured on EMB agar medium. Later, some of the positive isolates were randomly selected and confirmed by TSI and IMVIC test. Data analysis was performed using descriptive indices. Also, one way ANOVA and LSD test or independent t test were applied to determine the statistically significant difference between the mean E.coli cell numbers in the categorized groups of sweets. Results: It was found that 19% of the total tested samples were contaminated with E.coli strains. The mean, median and maximum of contamination were (35±.5, (0 and (3.4 CFU/gr, respectively. Moisture content, products category and being traditionally or industrially produced have significant effects on the level of contamination; while, the sanitary status of the traditional confectionaries as graded in this study has no impact on the average E.coli cell count. Discussion and conclusion: Regarding the microbial quality, at least about 25% of the sweets in the market do not meet the national standards of confectionary products. Implementation of strict hygiene regulation in the traditional confectionaries is in need to provide the public with

  8. A statistical approach to quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMO) using frequency distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Lars; Busch, Ulrich; Pecoraro, Sven

    2014-12-14

    According to Regulation (EU) No 619/2011, trace amounts of non-authorised genetically modified organisms (GMO) in feed are tolerated within the EU if certain prerequisites are met. Tolerable traces must not exceed the so-called 'minimum required performance limit' (MRPL), which was defined according to the mentioned regulation to correspond to 0.1% mass fraction per ingredient. Therefore, not yet authorised GMO (and some GMO whose approvals have expired) have to be quantified at very low level following the qualitative detection in genomic DNA extracted from feed samples. As the results of quantitative analysis can imply severe legal and financial consequences for producers or distributors of feed, the quantification results need to be utterly reliable. We developed a statistical approach to investigate the experimental measurement variability within one 96-well PCR plate. This approach visualises the frequency distribution as zygosity-corrected relative content of genetically modified material resulting from different combinations of transgene and reference gene Cq values. One application of it is the simulation of the consequences of varying parameters on measurement results. Parameters could be for example replicate numbers or baseline and threshold settings, measurement results could be for example median (class) and relative standard deviation (RSD). All calculations can be done using the built-in functions of Excel without any need for programming. The developed Excel spreadsheets are available (see section 'Availability of supporting data' for details). In most cases, the combination of four PCR replicates for each of the two DNA isolations already resulted in a relative standard deviation of 15% or less. The aims of the study are scientifically based suggestions for minimisation of uncertainty of measurement especially in -but not limited to- the field of GMO quantification at low concentration levels. Four PCR replicates for each of the two DNA isolations

  9. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  10. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    CERN Document Server

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J B

    2015-01-01

    The equations governing atmospheric flows are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifests itself only weakly through interactions of mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. We review how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can successfully capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. Seco...

  11. Electro-cumulation CNF project

    CERN Document Server

    Grishin, V G

    2000-01-01

    bound or free ion current within solid substances; non-plain symmetry; cumulation of the ion interaction. Experimental result: an Ice SuperPolarization. Cold nuclear fusion ? At http://www.shortway.to/to2084 . Keywords: ion, current, solid, symmetry, cumulation, cold nuclear fusion, polarization, depolarization, ionic conductor, superionic conductor, ice, crystal, strain, V-center, V-centre, doped crystal, interstitial impurity, intrinsic color center, high pressure technology, Bridgman, experiment, crowdion, dielectric, proton, layer, defect, lattice, dynamics, electromigration, mobility, muon catalysis, concentration, doping, dopant, conductivity, pycnonuclear reaction, permittivity, dielectric constant, point defects, interstitials, polarizability, imperfection, defect centers, glass, epitaxy, sodium hydroxide, metallic substrate, crystallization, point, tip, susceptibility, ferroelectric, ordering, force, correlation, collective, shift, distortion, coalescence, crowdions, electrolysis.

  12. Artificial Neural Network Approach for Islanding Detection in Inverter Based Distributed Generator with a Forced Transient in System Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an intelligent islanding detection method is presented for inverter based distributed generation (DG using probabilistic neural network (PNN and wavelet transform. The presented method is based on the change of DG reactive power reference (Qref in inverter control interface to create a small forced transient in frequency and its derivative. Changing the Qref causes a forced transient in system frequency and also in its derivative in islanding conditions. The main idea is to use the created transient in frequency derivative in islanding conditions. The PNN is trained by features extracted from the frequency derivative data through the discrete wavelet transformation (DWT in islanding and non-islanding conditions. The proposed method is evaluated in islanding and non-islanding conditions, using PSCAD/EMTDC and MATLAB software. Simulation results show that the proposed method has a proper operation in the islanding and non-islanding conditions.

  13. A novel approach for generating flat optical frequency comb based on externally injected gain-switching distributed feedback semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huatao; Wang, Rong; Pu, Tao; Xiang, Peng; Zheng, Jilin; Fang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach for generating flat optical frequency comb (OFC) based on externally injected gain-switched distributed feedback (DFB) semiconductor laser is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed system, the flatness, the number of OFC spectral lines, and the spectral line to background noise ratio can be tuned to their optimized values by adjusting the current of the modulation signal, the injection ratio and the detuning frequency. Since the frequency of the modulation signal decides the frequency spacing of the output spectral lines, OFC spectral lines of different spacing can be achieved. In the experiment, 10 spectral lines with 1.5 dB power variation are demonstrated to verify the proposed approach. In addition, the expansion of the spectral line is investigated.

  14. A New Function for Modelling Diameter Frequency Distribution in the Tropical Rain Forest of Xishuangbanna, Southwest of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yuanchang; Lei Xiangdong; Jiang Lei

    2003-01-01

    Permanent plots in the montane tropical rain forests in Xishuangbanna, southwest China, were established, and different empirical models, based on observation data of these plots in 1992, were built to model diameter frequency distributions. The focus of this study is on predicting accuracy of stem number in the larger diameter classes, which is much more important than that of the smaller trees, from the view of forest management, and must be adequately considered in the modelling and estimate. There exist 3 traditional ways of modelling the diameter frequency distribution: the negative exponential function model, limiting line function model, and Weibull distribution model. In this study, a new model, named as the logarithmic J-shape function, together with the others, was experimented and was found as a more suitable model for modelling works in the tropical forests.

  15. Spatial variation in the frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes under the tectonic framework in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S. Mostafa

    2017-10-01

    Spatial variations of seismic energy released and b-value over the Middle East region are investigated based on a seismicity catalog from 1995 to 2007. The goal is to use these seismic parameters and based on other geodetic and geophysical observations, such as GPS measurements, strain rate model, fault distribution, focal mechanism, crustal model, Q model, and gravity measurements, etc., to uncover spatial patterns that seem anomalous. Areas of high energy released (cumulative) seem to correspond to the areas of relatively high b-values. Areas of high energy released and high b-values seem to correspond very well with the location of continental collision where earthquake activities are high. The divergent boundary between Arabia and African plates and subduction zone at Makran seem to correspond to low to moderate energy release. Northern Pamir, Azerbaijan-Caucasus, the lower part of Zagros Mountains, eastern Turkey, Owen Fracture Zone, Strait of Bob-el-Mandeb, and south of the Sulaiman Shear Zone seem to correspond to high cumulative energy-released, high strain rate, high b-values, and high fault density. While, the central and eastern Iran, southern Zagros, northern Pakistan, Gulf of Aden, Alborz, southwest of the Caspian Sea, western Caucasus and Kopeh-Dagh seem to correspond with lower b-values. The cross-section map for Hindu-Kush shows general decreasing of the b-values with depth, however, a region of high b-value is observed underneath Pamir at depths from 170 to 230 km. This anomaly region can be due to dehydration of Pamir crustal slab at depth.

  16. Frequency Distribution in Domestic Microwave Ovens and Its Influence on Heating Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Donglei; Wang, Yifen; Tang, Juming; Jain, Deepali

    2017-02-01

    In this study, snapshots of operating frequency profiles of domestic microwave ovens were collected to reveal the extent of microwave frequency variations under different operation conditions. A computer simulation model was developed based on the finite difference time domain method to analyze the influence of the shifting frequency on heating patterns of foods in a microwave oven. The results showed that the operating frequencies of empty and loaded domestic microwave ovens varied widely even among ovens of the same model purchased on the same date. Each microwave oven had its unique characteristic operating frequencies, which were also affected by the location and shape of the load. The simulated heating patterns of a gellan gel model food when heated on a rotary plate agreed well with the experimental results, which supported the reliability of the developed simulation model. Simulation indicated that the heating patterns of a stationary model food load changed with the varying operating frequency. However, the heating pattern of a rotary model food load was not sensitive to microwave frequencies due to the severe edge heating overshadowing the effects of the frequency variations. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  17. Real-Time Analysis of an Active Distribution Network - Coordinated Frequency Control for Islanding Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, Seung-Tae

    the proposed con-trol performance. Thirdly, a new fuzzy logic based secondary frequency control strategy between a BESS and dispatchable DG units is proposed for further improving the system frequency per-formance as well as reducing output power fluctuations. The simulation results show that the frequency...... regulation performance is highly improved with fuzzy logic control (FLC) when the system enters into islanding operation. Lastly, an intelligent multi-agent based secondary frequency control strategy for the islanding operation of ADN is proposed. A complete software-in-the-loop (SIL) simula-tion is carried...... of the DERs, etc. Particularly during islanding operation, with relatively few DG units, the frequency and voltage control of the islanded system is not straightforward. DG units, specially based on renewable energy sources (RESs), i.e. wind and solar, have an inter-mittent nature and intrinsic...

  18. A Cumulative Damage Reliability Model on the Basis of Contact Fatigue of the Rolling Bearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Li

    2006-01-01

    A cumulative damage reliability model of contact fatigue of the rolling bearing is more identical with the actual conditions. It is put forward on the basis of contact fatigue life probability distribution of the rolling bearing that obey Weibull distribution and rest on the Miner cumulative damage theory. Finally a case is given to predict the reliability of bearing roller by using these models.

  19. The Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto Follows a Truncated Pareto Distribution: Results from a First Data Set Based on the Recent New Horizons' Flyby

    CERN Document Server

    Zaninetti, L

    2015-01-01

    Recently it could be shown ( that the impact crater size-frequency distribution of Pluto (based on an analysis of first images obtained by the recent New Horizons flyby) follows a power law alpha = 2.4926 in the interval of diameter (D) values ranging from 3.75 km to the largest determined value of 37.77 km. A reanalysis of this data set revealed that the whole crater SFD (i.e., with values in the interval of 1.2-37.7 km) can be described by a truncated Pareto distribution.

  20. Distributed Generation Integration in the Electric Grid: Energy Storage System for Frequency Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Delfanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years generation from renewable energy sources (RESs has grown considerably in European electrical networks. Transmission system operators are greatly concerned about the impact of RESs on the operational security and efficiency of their networks and more in general of the ENTSO-E interconnected system. Grid codes are to be revised in order to harmonise the rules regarding the connection of RES power plants. A main issue concerns frequency control: frequency is greatly affected by RESs intermittency and its deviations must be limited as much as possible in order to guarantee a suitable level of power quality. To improve frequency stability, in the future, Grid codes could extend frequency control requirements also to RES units, whereas today they are applied only to conventional power plants. Energy storage systems can be a possible solution to increase the flexibility and performance of RES power plants: they allow generators to modulate their power injections without wasting renewable energy. In this paper, the authors studied the suitability of extending frequency control to RES units integrating them with energy storage systems. In particular, the paper focuses on the impact of frequency control on the storage lifetime by analysing the power charge/discharge in response to real frequency oscillations.

  1. Time variation in amplitude-frequency distribution of deep non-volcanic tremors in the Bungo Channel region, southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Y.; Suda, N.

    2009-12-01

    Magnitude-frequency distribution of earthquakes follows the Gutenberg-Richter law. The slope of this law, b value, represents the relative occurrence of large and small earthquakes. Since magnitude is defined as corrected logarithmic amplitude, amplitude-frequency distribution of earthquakes is linear on log-log graph. On the other hand, that of non-volcanic tremors is linear on semi-log graph, indicating that it follows the exponential distribution, not the power-law distribution [Hiramatsu et al., 2008]. Thus the slope of amplitude-frequency distribution for tremors is equivalent to b value for earthquakes. In this study, we investigated time variation in the slope of amplitude-frequency distribution from analyses of tremor activities in the Bungo Channel region, where long-term slow slip events occurred in 1997 and 2003. We analyzed vertical-component records from Hi-net and the seismic networks of Japan Meteorological Agency and universities for the five-year period between 2004 and 2008. We also used records from the temporal seismic station in Hiburi Island installed by us in the period after Sept. 2004. In the Bungo Channel region, tremor activity occurs with a recurrence interval of approximately two months. We observed a total of 35 activities including small ones in the analysis period. To detect tremors and determine their hypocenters, we used the same software as Automatic Tremor Monitoring System (ATMOS) [Suda et al., in press]. We obtained frequency distribution of reduced displacements (RDs) for each tremor activity. RD is RMS amplitude of ground displacement corrected with hypocentral distance [Aki and Koyanagi, 1981], and it is proportional to seismic moment rate. The observed slopes of RD-frequency distribution for active swarms were approximately constant in the period between 2004 and 2006, but they declined in 2007. At the end of 2008, the slopes decreased bellow half the values between 2004 and 2006. As well as b value, the slope represents

  2. Tailoring electron energy distribution functions through energy confinement in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, C.; Waskoenig, J. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Gans, T. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-08

    A multi-scale numerical model based on hydrodynamic equations with semi-kinetic treatment of electrons is used to investigate the influence of dual frequency excitation on the effective electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma. It is found that variations of power density, voltage ratio, and phase relationship provide separate control over the electron density and the mean electron energy. This is exploited to directly influence both the phase dependent and time averaged effective EEDF. This enables tailoring the EEDF for enhanced control of non-equilibrium plasma chemical kinetics at ambient pressure and temperature.

  3. Voltage and frequency control in the Islanded portion of the CIGRE Low Voltage distribution network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, Ghullam; Bak, Claus Leth; Buriro, Ehsan Ali

    2017-01-01

    imbalance in the islanded MG. The voltage and the frequency of the islanded MG can be restored to the permissible limits if the desired/exceeded amount of active and reactive power is injected/absorbed by the locally available sources in islanded MG. This paper proposes the control strategy which can...... by providing some ancillary services. The main focus of this paper is about the development of a control system for the islanded MG, the selection of Voltage-Frequency controller for the most suitable DG unit of the Low Voltage test network and the control of voltage and frequency in islanding condition. Under...... compensate the problems of the voltage and the frequency deviations in the islanded MG. The selection of the VF controller for the most suitable DG unit of the LV test network is also presented in this paper and effectiveness of the controllers is verified by presenting simulation results...

  4. The Algebra of the Cumulative Percent Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to help students avoid some pervasive reasoning errors in solving cumulative percent problems. Discusses the meaning of ."%+b%." the additive inverse of ."%." and other useful applications. Emphasizes the operational aspect of the cumulative percent concept. (KHR)

  5. Adaptive strategies for cumulative cultural learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Micael; Laland, Kevin

    2012-05-21

    The demographic and ecological success of our species is frequently attributed to our capacity for cumulative culture. However, it is not yet known how humans combine social and asocial learning to generate effective strategies for learning in a cumulative cultural context. Here we explore how cumulative culture influences the relative merits of various pure and conditional learning strategies, including pure asocial and social learning, critical social learning, conditional social learning and individual refiner strategies. We replicate the Rogers' paradox in the cumulative setting. However, our analysis suggests that strategies that resolved Rogers' paradox in a non-cumulative setting may not necessarily evolve in a cumulative setting, thus different strategies will optimize cumulative and non-cumulative cultural learning.

  6. Allele frequency distribution based on 17 STR markers in three major Dravidian linguistic populations of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindu, G Hima; Trivedi, R; Kashyap, V K

    2007-07-20

    Allele frequencies for 15 tetranucleotides and 2 pentanucleotides repeat loci were determined in 317 unrelated, healthy individuals of Andhra Pradesh, India, belonging to three pre-dominant endogamous populations namely, Kappu Naidu, Kamma Chaudhary and Kapu Reddy. Adherence to the expectations of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was confirmed for all loci with few exceptions, which were not significant after applying Bonferroni's correction. Statistical parameters of forensic interest; observed heterozygosity, probability of homozygosity, probability of extact test, power of discrimination, match probability, polymorphism information content, power of exclusion and mean paternity index were determined for all loci. The present study reveals that Penta E and D2S1338 are the most informative loci in all the studied populations. The combined power of discrimination was greater than 0.976, whereas the cumulative power of exclusion gave an expected value of 0.9999 for all the tested microsatellite loci. No difference was observed in the discriminatory power of 15 loci in studied populations on comparison with other populations of India. Population differentiation tests revealed significant differences between the studied and neighboring populations at several loci. Analyzed parameters indicate the utility and efficacy of the studied 17 STR systems as a powerful tool in forensic human identification, paternity testing and human population genetic studies.

  7. Frequencies and ethnic distribution of ABO and Rh(D) blood groups in Mauritania: results of first nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, C T; Bollahi, M A; Abdelhamid, I; Med Mahmoud, M A; Ba, B; Ghaber, S; Habti, N; Houmeida, A

    2012-04-01

    There is no data available on the ABO/Rh(D) frequencies in the Mauritanian population. We retrospectively analysed records of a 5-year database that contained ABO/Rh phenotype and ethnic origin of 10 116 volunteers giving blood at the national blood transfusion centre to derive the frequencies of ABO/Rh(D) groups in the Mauritanian population. The two race categories in the country and their sub-ethnic groups: the Moors (whites and black) and the black Africans (Pulhars, Soninkes and Wolof) were included in this study. Globally, group O had the highest frequency (49.10%) followed by A (28.28%), B (18.56%) and AB (4.05%). This order more common in North African populations was found in four of the five ethnic groups composing our population. Allele frequencies were, respectively, 70.20%, 17.74% and 12.04% giving the same order of O > A > B. We observed no significant variation in these frequencies between the different ethnic groups. Rhesus study showed that with a percentage of 94.23% Rh(D) positive is by far the most prevalent, while Rh(D) negative is present only in 5.77% of the total population. This frequency distribution supports the mixed-race composition of the Mauritanian population. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Innovation in globally distributed teams: the role of LMX, communication frequency, and member influence on team decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajendran, Ravi S; Joshi, Aparna

    2012-11-01

    For globally distributed teams charged with innovation, member contributions to the team are crucial for effective performance. Prior research, however, suggests that members of globally distributed teams often feel isolated and excluded from their team's activities and decisions. How can leaders of such teams foster member inclusion in team decisions? Drawing on leader-member exchange (LMX) theory, we propose that for distributed teams, LMX and communication frequency jointly shape member influence on team decisions. Findings from a test of our hypotheses using data from 40 globally distributed teams suggest that LMX can enhance member influence on team decisions when it is sustained through frequent leader-member communication. This joint effect is strengthened as team dispersion increases. At the team level, member influence on team decisions has a positive effect on team innovation.

  9. "Buddha's Light" of Cumulative Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B; Potashnikova, Irina K

    2014-01-01

    We show analytically that in the cumulative particles production off nuclei multiple interactions lead to a glory-like backward focusing effect. Employing the small phase space method we arrived at a characteristic angular dependence of the production cross section $d\\sigma \\sim 1/ \\sqrt {\\pi - \\theta}$ near the strictly backward direction. This effect takes place for any number $n\\geq 3 $ of interactions of rescattered particle, either elastic or inelastic (with resonance excitations in intermediate states), when the final particle is produced near corresponding kinematical boundary. Such a behaviour of the cross section near the backward direction is in qualitative agreement with some of available data.

  10. A Resource Cost Aware Cumulative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Helmut; Hadzic, Tarik

    We motivate and introduce an extension of the well-known cumulative constraint which deals with time and volume dependent cost of resources. Our research is primarily interested in scheduling problems under time and volume variable electricity costs, but the constraint equally applies to manpower scheduling when hourly rates differ over time and/or extra personnel incur higher hourly rates. We present a number of possible lower bounds on the cost, including a min-cost flow, different LP and MIP models, as well as greedy algorithms, and provide a theoretical and experimental comparison of the different methods.

  11. A simple marriage model for the power-law behaviour in the frequency distributions of family names

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao-Yun; Chou, Chung-I.; Tseng, Jie-Jun

    2011-01-01

    In many countries, the frequency distributions of family names are found to decay as a power law with an exponent ranging from 1.0 to 2.2. In this work, we propose a simple marriage model which can reproduce this power-law behaviour. Our model, based on the evolution of families, consists of the growth of big families and the formation of new families. Preliminary results from the model show that the name distributions are in good agreement with empirical data from Taiwan and Norway.

  12. Energy storage systems impact on the short-term frequency stability of distributed autonomous microgrids, an analysis using aggregate models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serban, Ioan; Teodorescu, Remus; Marinescu, Corneliu

    2013-01-01

    of storing and releasing energy when required by the system. Therefore the need of boosting the MG power reserves by adding energy storage systems is often a requirement. The study highlights the improvement in the MG short-term frequency stability brought by an original BESS control structure enhanced......This study analyses the integration impact of battery energy storage systems (BESSs) on the short-term frequency control in autonomous microgrids (MGs). Short-term frequency stability relates with the primary or speed control level, as defined in the regulations of the classical grids. The focus...... is on autonomous MGs that dynamically behave similarly to the classical power systems. This is the systems case with classical distributed generators (DGs), but which can also contain renewable energy sources (RESs) in a certain penetration level. During MG islanded operation, the local generators take over most...

  13. Frequency analysis for planned islanding operation in the Danish distribution system - Bornholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Xu, Zhao; Østergaard, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The power system in the Danish island Bornholm is a distribution system with a high penetration of wind generation, which is representative for expected future power systems. During the period from 11th to 14th September 2007, the Distribution System Operator (DSO) Ostkraft in Bornholm conducted ...

  14. Estimation of the Publication Potential in 50 U.S. States and in the District of Columbia Based on the Frequency Distribution of Scientific Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Andras; Telcs, Andras

    1989-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of the Waring distribution as a model for the frequency distribution of scientific productivity. Methods for testing the fit at both ends of the distribution, as well as for estimating the parameters of the distribution and the total number of scientists, are outlined. (16 references) (Author/CLB)

  15. A paradox of cumulative culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yutaka; Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Ohtsuki, Hisashi

    2015-08-21

    Culture can grow cumulatively if socially learnt behaviors are improved by individual learning before being passed on to the next generation. Previous authors showed that this kind of learning strategy is unlikely to be evolutionarily stable in the presence of a trade-off between learning and reproduction. This is because culture is a public good that is freely exploited by any member of the population in their model (cultural social dilemma). In this paper, we investigate the effect of vertical transmission (transmission from parents to offspring), which decreases the publicness of culture, on the evolution of cumulative culture in both infinite and finite population models. In the infinite population model, we confirm that culture accumulates largely as long as transmission is purely vertical. It turns out, however, that introduction of even slight oblique transmission drastically reduces the equilibrium level of culture. Even more surprisingly, if the population size is finite, culture hardly accumulates even under purely vertical transmission. This occurs because stochastic extinction due to random genetic drift prevents a learning strategy from accumulating enough culture. Overall, our theoretical results suggest that introducing vertical transmission alone does not really help solve the cultural social dilemma problem. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nonlinear Time-Frequency Distributions of Spectrum Energy Operator in Large Vocabulary Mandarin Speaker Independent Speech Recognition System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fadhil H. T. Al-dulaimy; WANG Zuoying(王作英)

    2003-01-01

    This work demonstrates the use of the nonlinear time-frequency distribution (NLTFD) of a discrete time energy operator (DTEO) based on amplitude modulation-frequency modulation demodulation techniques as a feature in speech recognition. The duration distribution based hidden Markov module in a speaker independent large vocabulary mandarin speech recognition system was reconstructed from the feature vectors in the front-end detection stage. The goal was to improve the performance of the existing system by combining new features to the baseline feature vector. This paper also deals with errors associated with using a pre-emphasis filter in the front end processing of the present scheme, which causes an increase in the noise energy at high frequencies above 4 kHz and in some cases degrades the recognition accuracy. The experimental results show that eliminating the pre-emphasis filters from the pre-processing stage and using NLTFD with compensated DTEO combined with Mel frequency cepstrum components give a 21.95% reduction in the relative error rate compared to the conventional technique with 25 candidates used in the test.

  17. Gene frequency distribution of the BoLA-DRB3 locus in Saavedreño Creole dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoli, M V; Lirón, J P; De Luca, J C; Rojas, F; Dulout, F N; Giovambattista, G

    2004-08-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the gene frequency distribution of the bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA)-DRB3 locus in Saavedreño Creole dairy cattle and to compare it with previously reported patterns in other cattle breeds. One hundred and twenty-five Saavedreño Creole dairy cattle were genotyped for the BoLA-DRB3.2 allele by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Twenty-two out of 53 previously identified BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles were detected, with gene frequencies ranging from 0.4 to 16.8%. Seventy percent of the variation corresponded to the seven most frequent alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2*7, *8, *11, *16, *27, *36, and *37). The studied population exhibits a high degree of expected heterozygosity (he = 0.919). The FIS index did not show significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. However, the neutrality test showed an even gene frequency distribution. This result could be better explained assuming balancing selection instead of neutral or positive selection for one or a few alleles. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrated that BoLA-DRB3.2 is a highly polymorphic locus in Saavedreño Creole dairy cattle, with significant variation in allele frequency among cattle breeds.

  18. Simulation of the cumulative hydrological response to green infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellaneda, P. M.; Jefferson, A. J.; Grieser, J. M.; Bush, S. A.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the cumulative hydrologic performance of green infrastructure in a residential area of the city of Parma, Ohio, draining to a tributary of the Cuyahoga River. Green infrastructure included the following spatially distributed devices: 16 street-side bioretention cells, 7 rain gardens, and 37 rain barrels. Data consisted of rainfall and outfall flow records for a wide range of storm events, including pretreatment and treatment periods. The Stormwater Management Model was calibrated and validated to predict the hydrologic response of green infrastructure. The calibrated model was used to quantify annual water budget alterations and discharge frequency over a 6 year simulation period. For the study catchment, we observed a treatment effect with increases of 1.4% in evaporation, 7.6% in infiltration, and a 9.0% reduction in surface runoff. The hydrologic performance of green infrastructure was evaluated by comparing the flow duration curve for pretreatment and treatment outfall flow scenarios. The flow duration curve shifted downward for the green infrastructure scenario. Discharges with a 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 year return period were reduced by an average of 29%. Parameter and predictive uncertainties were inspected by implementing a Bayesian statistical approach.

  19. DARIS : a low-frequency distributed aperture array for radio astronomy in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.J.; Saks, N.; Falcke, H.; Klein-Wolt, M.; Bentum, M.J.; Rajan, R.T.; Wijnholds, M.; Arts, M.; Klooster, van 't K.; Beliën, F.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency band below 30 MHz is one of the last unexplored bands in radio astronomy. This band is well suited for studying the early cosmos at high hydrogen redshifts, the so-called dark ages, extragalactic surveys, (extra) solar planetary bursts, and high energy particle physics. In addition, sp

  20. A low-frequency distributed aperture array for radio astronomy in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.J.; Saks, N.; Falcke, H.; Klein-Wolt, M.; Bentum, M.J.; Rajan, R.T.; Wijnholds, S.J.; Arts, M.; Klooster, van 't K.; Beliën, F.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency band below 30 MHz is one of the last unexplored bands in radio astronomy. This band is well suited for studying the early cosmos at high hydrogen redshifts, the so-called dark ages, extragalactic surveys, (extra) solar planetary bursts, and high energy particle physics. In addition, sp

  1. The frequency and distribution of recent landslides in three montane tropical regions of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew C. Larsen; Angel J. Torres-Sanchez

    1998-01-01

    Landslides are common in steep mountainous areas of Puerto Rico where mean annual rainfall and the frequency of intense storms are high. Each year, landslides cause extensive damage to property and occasionally result in loss of life. Average population density is high, 422 peoplerkm2, and is increasing. This increase in population density is accompanied by growing...

  2. Real-Time Analysis of an Active Distribution Network - Coordinated Frequency Control for Islanding Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, Seung-Tae

    regulation performance is highly improved with fuzzy logic control (FLC) when the system enters into islanding operation. Lastly, an intelligent multi-agent based secondary frequency control strategy for the islanding operation of ADN is proposed. A complete software-in-the-loop (SIL) simula-tion is carried...

  3. Improving Frequency Stability Based on Distributed Control of Multiple Load Aggregators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Jianqiang; Cao, Jinde; Guerrero, Josep M.;

    2017-01-01

    loads, to provide frequency regulation services. Specifically, a leader-following communication protocol is considered for the load aggregators in which there is a centralized pinner (leader) and multiple load aggregators (followers). The regulation objective is generated from the pinner and only shared...

  4. DARIS : a low-frequency distributed aperture array for radio astronomy in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.J.; Saks, N.; Falcke, H.; Klein-Wolt, M.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Rajan, R.T.; Rajan, Raj; Wijnholds, M.; Arts, M.; van 't Klooster, K.; Beliën, F.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency band below 30 MHz is one of the last unexplored bands in radio astronomy. This band is well suited for studying the early cosmos at high hydrogen redshifts, the so-called dark ages, extragalactic surveys, (extra) solar planetary bursts, and high energy particle physics. In addition, sp

  5. A low-frequency distributed aperture array for radio astronomy in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.J.; Saks, N.; Falcke, H.; Klein-Wolt, M.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Rajan, R.T.; Rajan, Raj; Wijnholds, S.J.; Arts, M.; van 't Klooster, K.; Beliën, F.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency band below 30 MHz is one of the last unexplored bands in radio astronomy. This band is well suited for studying the early cosmos at high hydrogen redshifts, the so-called dark ages, extragalactic surveys, (extra) solar planetary bursts, and high energy particle physics. In addition, sp

  6. Extended parametric gain range in photonic crystal fibers with strongly frequency-dependent field distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Sidsel R; Alkeskjold, Thomas T; Olausson, Christina B; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2014-08-15

    The parametric gain range of a degenerate four-wave mixing process is determined in the undepleted pump regime. The gain range is considered with and without taking the mode field distributions of the four-wave mixing components into account. It is found that the mode field distributions have to be included to evaluate the parametric gain correctly in dispersion-tailored speciality fibers and that mode profile engineering can provide a way to increase the parametric gain range.

  7. Signal processing method based on group delay calculation for distributed Bragg wavelength shift in optical frequency domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka; Murayama, Hideaki; Kasai, Tokio

    2014-03-24

    A signal processing method based on group delay calculations is introduced for distributed measurements of long-length fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR). Bragg wavelength shifts in interfered signals of OFDR are regarded as group delay. By calculating group delay, the distribution of Bragg wavelength shifts is obtained with high computational efficiency. We introduce weighted averaging process for noise reduction. This method required only 3.5% of signal processing time which was necessary for conventional equivalent signal processing based on short-time Fourier transform. The method also showed high sensitivity to experimental signals where non-uniform strain distributions existed in a long-length FBG.

  8. Distributed Control of Inverter-Based Lossy Microgrids for Power Sharing and Frequency Regulation Under Voltage Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chin-Yao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents a new distributed control framework to coordinate inverter-interfaced distributed energy resources (DERs) in island microgrids. We show that under bounded load uncertainties, the proposed control method can steer the microgrid to a desired steady state with synchronized inverter frequency across the network and proportional sharing of both active and reactive powers among the inverters. We also show that such convergence can be achieved while respecting constraints on voltage magnitude and branch angle differences. The controller is robust under various contingency scenarios, including loss of communication links and failures of DERs. The proposed controller is applicable to lossy mesh microgrids with heterogeneous R/X distribution lines and reasonable parameter variations. Simulations based on various microgrid operation scenarios are also provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  9. Low-frequency analog signal distribution on digital photonic networks by optical delta-sigma modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2013-12-01

    We propose a delta-sigma modulation scheme for low- and medium-frequency signal transmission in a digital photonic network system. A 10-Gb/s-class optical transceiver with a delta-sigma modulator utilized as a high-speed analog-to-digital converter (ADC) provides a binary optical signal. On the signal reception side, a low-cost and slow-speed photonic receiver directly converts the binary signal into an analog signal at frequencies from several hundreds of kilohertz several tens of megahertz. Further, by using a clock and data recovery circuit at the receiver to reduce jitters, the single-sideband phase noise of the generated signals can be significantly reduced.

  10. Parametric analysis of hollow conductor parallel and coaxial transmission lines for high frequency space power distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, K. S.; Renz, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric analysis was performed of transmission cables for transmitting electrical power at high voltage (up to 1000 V) and high frequency (10 to 30 kHz) for high power (100 kW or more) space missions. Large diameter (5 to 30 mm) hollow conductors were considered in closely spaced coaxial configurations and in parallel lines. Formulas were derived to calculate inductance and resistance for these conductors. Curves of cable conductance, mass, inductance, capacitance, resistance, power loss, and temperature were plotted for various conductor diameters, conductor thickness, and alternating current frequencies. An example 5 mm diameter coaxial cable with 0.5 mm conductor thickness was calculated to transmit 100 kW at 1000 Vac, 50 m with a power loss of 1900 W, an inductance of 1.45 micron and a capacitance of 0.07 micron-F. The computer programs written for this analysis are listed in the appendix.

  11. Conformists and Contrarians in a Kuramoto Model with Uniformly Distributed Natural Frequencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Di; YANG Jun-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    A generalization of the Kuramoto model in which oscillators are coupled to the mean field with random signs is investigated in this work.We focus on a situation in which the natural frequencies of oscillators follow a uniform probability density.By numerically simulating the model,we find that the model supports a modulated travelling wave state except for already reported π state and travelling wave state in the one with natural frequencies following Lorenztian probability density or a delta function.The dependence of the observed dynamics on the parameters of the model is explored and we find that the onset of synchronization in the model displays a non-monotonic dependence on both positive and negative coupling strength.

  12. Cumulant dynamics in a finite population linkage equilibrium theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rattray, M; Rattray, Magnus; Shapiro, Jonathan L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of a finite population at linkage equilibrium is described in terms of the dynamics of phenotype distribution cumulants. This provides a powerful method for describing evolutionary transients and we elucidate the relationship between the cumulant dynamics and the diffusion approximation. A separation of time-scales between the first and higher cumulants for low mutation rates is demonstrated in the diffusion limit and provides a significant simplification of the dynamical system. However, the diffusion limit may not be appropriate for strong selection as the standard Fisher-Wright model of genetic drift can break down in this case. Two novel examples of this effect are considered: we shown that the dynamics may depend on the number of loci under strong directional selection and that environmental variance results in a reduced effective population size. We also consider a simple model of a changing environment which cannot be described by a diffusion equation and we derive the optimal mutation ra...

  13. Plant frequency and distribution on high-lead soil near Leadhills, Lanarkshire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxbrow, A.; Moffat, J.

    1979-06-01

    The mean frequency of plants along a transect descending Wanlock Dod, near Leadhills, Lanarkshire, Scotland was determined by quadrat analysis. The results obtained strongly suggested that lead tolerant ecotypes of Agrostis tenuis, Nardus stricta and Potentialla erecta were present above known lead veins. The evidence for Vaccinium myrtillus was less certain. Other species appeared to be affected by soil moisture content, grazing pressure and climatic factors. The areas above known lead veins exhibited a larger diversity of species than the areas between veins.

  14. XML The Distribution of Fungal Seasonal Frequency in The Air of Zahedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaee Firoozabadi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Airborne fungi have been proposed as the most common cause of some adverse health effects such as skin, eye and respiratory disorders; therefore, we carried out an aerobiological study to determine fungal seasonal frequency in the air of Zahedan, Iran. Materials and Methods: The air samples (n=1080 of this descriptive cross sectional study were obtained, in different hours, from different urban places of zahedan in 2001, and studied via sabouraud dextrose agar(S.D.A. Results: 1917 colonies were found in the 1080 studied plates and indicated that the most Common fungi were aspergillus(41%, penicillium(33% and rhizopus(6.8%, based on chi square, The fungal frequencies in the evening(39.3%, at noon(38.2% and in the morning(22.5% were not statistically different . Highly contaminated area was down town (Bazar and then hospitals. There was significant correlation (p<0.001 between fungal frequency and the seasons- winter (15.9% and summer (31.4%. Conclusion: Based on the results, we suggest strongly improving environmental hygienic condition of the buildings and passages and rapid waste material disposal. It seems that the most effective strategy in decreasing fungal disorder is performing some educational programs. Keywords: Fungal agents, air, Zahedan.

  15. Frequency and Distribution of Enamel Hypoplasia in Ancient Skulls from Different Eras and Areas in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Ζafiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an anthropological analysis of enamel hypoplasias form from 309 skulls fromarchaeological excavations in various geographical areas of the Hellenic landscape belonging todifferent chronological periods. The sample comprises a total of 1386 permanent teeth of differentmorphological types were recognized and graded as to the feature of enamel hypoplasia The examineof the enamel hypoplasia is based on macroscopic observation. The diagram used for the evaluation ofthis feature was the one proposed by Brothwell in 1971. The frequency of enamel hypoplasia in thedentition of ancient skulls from Greece is relatively restricted. Of the total of 1386 teeth examined, 323teeth of the upper jaw displayed the characteristic linear hypoplasia which corresponds to 23.2 % of allcases. In particular, in the skull series we examined the greatest disruption of enamel formation wasfound on the canines of the upper jaw, while it also exists, albeit at a declining frequency, in the firstmolars, the second molars, followed by the lateral incisors and central incisors as well as the thirdmolars. In the first molars, the frequency of hypoplasia is consistently high in the teeth of these skullsfrom all three periods examined (antiquity, the middle ages and the new age.

  16. Experimental and numerical assessment of low-frequency current distributions from UMTS and GSM mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2013-12-07

    The evaluation of the exposure from mobile communication devices requires consideration of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) over a broad frequency range from dc to GHz. Mobile phones in operation have prominent spectral components in the low-frequency (LF) and radio-frequency (RF) ranges. While the exposure to RF fields from mobile phones has been comprehensively assessed in the past, the LF fields have received much less attention. In this study, LF fields from mobile phones are assessed experimentally and numerically for the global system for mobile (GSM) and universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) communication systems and conclusions about the global (LF and RF) EMF exposure from both systems are drawn. From the measurements of the time-domain magnetic fields, it was found that the contribution from the audio signal at a normal speech level, i.e., -16 dBm0, is the same order of magnitude as the fields induced by the current bursts generated from the implementation of the GSM communication system at maximum RF output level. The B-field induced by currents in phones using the UMTS is two orders of magnitude lower than that induced by GSM. Knowing that the RF exposure from the UMTS is also two orders of magnitude lower than from GSM, it is now possible to state that there is an overall reduction of the exposure from this communication system.

  17. Flat acoustic sources with frequency response correction based on feedback and feed-forward distributed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur P

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an acoustic source with a small thickness and high bending stiffness. The high bending stiffness is obtained with a sandwich structure in which the face of the sandwich structure internal to the source is perforated to increase the acoustic compliance, thereby leading to increased electroacoustic conversion efficiency. Multiple actuators are used to drive the moving component of the acoustic source. Control of the acoustic resonances and structural resonances is required to obtain an even frequency response. The use of collocated decentralized feedback control based on velocity sensing was found to be ineffective for controlling these resonances due to the destabilizing asymmetric modes caused by the coupling of the internal acoustic cavity and the rigid body vibration of the moving component. Resonances can be controlled by a set of independent combinations of symmetric driving patterns with corresponding velocity feedback controllers such that the fundamental mass-air resonance is effectively controlled, as is the lowest bending mode of the moving component. Finally, a compensation scheme for low frequencies is used which enables a flat frequency response in the range of 30 Hz to 1 kHz with deviations smaller than 3 dB.

  18. Extended parametric gain range in photonic crystal fibers with strongly frequency-dependent field distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2014-01-01

    The parametric gain range of a degenerate four-wave mixing process is determined in the undepleted pump regime. The gain range is considered with and without taking the mode field distributions of the four-wave mixing components into account. It is found that the mode field distributions have...... to be included to evaluate the parametric gain correctly in dispersion-tailored speciality fibers and that mode profile engineering can provide a way to increase the parametric gain range. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America...

  19. Cumulative risks of foster care placement for Danish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallesen, Peter; Emanuel, Natalia; Wildeman, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Although recent research suggests that the cumulative risk of foster care placement is far higher for American children than originally suspected, little is known about the cumulative risk of foster care placement in other countries, which makes it difficult to gauge the degree to which factor foster care placement is salient in other contexts. In this article, we provide companion estimates to those provided in recent work on the US by using Danish registry data and synthetic cohort life tables to show how high and unequally distributed the cumulative risk of foster care placement is for Danish children. Results suggest that at the beginning of the study period (in 1998) the cumulative risk of foster care placement for Danish children was roughly in line with the risk for American children. Yet, by the end of the study period (2010), the risk had declined to half the risk for American children. Our results also show some variations by parental ethnicity and sex, but these differences are small. Indeed, they appear quite muted relative to racial/ethnic differences in these risks in the United States. Last, though cumulative risks are similar between Danish and American children (especially at the beginning of the study period), the age-specific risk profiles are markedly different, with higher risks for older Danish children than for older American children.

  20. The Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto Follows a Truncated Pareto Distribution: Results from a First Data Set Based on the Recent New Horizons' Flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaninetti L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently it could be shown (Scholkmann, Prog. in Phys. , 2016, v. 12(1, 26-29 that the impact crater size-frequency distribution of Pluto (based on an analysis of first images obtained by the recent New Horizons’ flyby follows a power law (α =2.4926±0.3309 in the interval of diameter ( D values ranging from 3.75±1.14 km to the largest deter- mined value of 37.77 km. A reanalysis of this data set revealed that the whole crater SFD (i.e., with values in the interval of 1.2–37.7 km can be described by a truncated Pareto distribution.

  1. STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF PARTICULATE MATTER AND THE ERROR ASSOCIATED WITH SAMPLING FREQUENCY. (R828678C010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The distribution of particulate matter (PM) concentrations has an impact on human health effects and the setting of PM regulations. Since PM is commonly sampled on less than daily schedules, the magnitude of sampling errors needs to be determined. Daily PM data from Spokane, W...

  2. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THUNDERSTORM FREQUENCY VARIATION AND THEIR POSSIBLE RELATION WITH THE ADJUSTMENT OF CROP DISTRIBUTION IN THE LEIZHOU PENINSULA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu; NIU Sheng-jie

    2009-01-01

    In order to research possible influences of the adjustment of plant distribution on the development frequency of thunderstorms over the Leizhou Peninsula,mathematic statistic methods, including correlation analyses,11 kinds of fitting models and all-variable regression methods,were used for analyses and research. The results show that the average trend of the number of annual thunderstorm days is descending obviously,and there are thunderstorms in all seasons,in which warm post-midday thunderstorms have taken up the most part,and high frequency is found from May to September,and the starting and ending dates of thunderstorms have a great annual discrepancy. The vegetation structure has been improved along with the reduction of rice fields and the area increment of sugarcane and fruits planting,which results in the decrease of the number of thunderstorm days; the change in the characteristics of winter spare fields,which is caused by the planting of vegetables,limits the formation of thunderstorms in early winter and late spring. Meanwhile,the area adjustment of peanut planting has little influence on the variation of thunderstorm days. The adjustment of principal crop distribution,such as rice, sugarcane,fruits and vegetables,may have obvious influence on the formation of thunderstorms,and sugarcane has the largest effect,followed in turn by rice,vegetables and fruits,and the adjustment of crop distribution has little influence on the starting and ending dates of thunderstorms.

  3. Comparison of minute distribution frequency for anesthesia start and end times from an anesthesia information management system and paper records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Michael; Latif, Asad; Thomsen, Robert; Slodzinski, Martin; Raghavan, Rahul; Paul, Sharon Leigh; Stonemetz, Jerry

    2017-08-01

    Use of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) has been reported to improve accuracy of recorded information. We tested the hypothesis that analyzing the distribution of times charted on paper and computerized records could reveal possible rounding errors, and that this effect could be modulated by differences in the user interface for documenting certain event times with an AIMS. We compared the frequency distribution of start and end times for anesthesia cases completed with paper records and an AIMS. Paper anesthesia records had significantly more times ending with "0" and "5" compared to those from the AIMS (p anesthesia records. For case end times, the distribution of minutes recorded with AIMS was almost evenly distributed, unlike those from paper records that still showed significant end-digit preference. The accuracy of anesthesia case start times and case end times, as inferred by statistical analysis of the distribution of the times, is enhanced with the use of an AIMS. Furthermore, the differences in AIMS user interface for documenting case start and case end times likely affects the degree of end-digit preference, and likely accuracy, of those times.

  4. The size-frequency distribution of H > 13 NEOs and ARM target candidates detected by Pan-STARRS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunová-Lilly, Eva; Jedicke, Robert; Vereš, Peter; Denneau, Larry; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2017-03-01

    We determine the absolute magnitude (H) distribution (or size-frequency distribution, SFD; N(H)∝10αH where α is the slope of the distribution) for near-Earth objects (NEO) with 13 orbit distribution. The debiased Pan-STARRS1 NEO absolute magnitude distribution is more complex than a single slope power law - it shows two transitions - at H ∼ 16 from steep to shallow slope, and in the 21 22. There is also another change in slope from steep to shallow around H = 27. The three ARM target candidates detected by Pan-STARRS1 in one year of surveying have a corrected SFD with slope α = 0.40-0.45+0.33. We also show that the window for follow up observations of small (H≳ 22) NEOs with the NASA IRTF telescope and Arecibo and Goldstone radars are extremely short - on order of days, and procedures for fast response must be implemented in order to measure physical characteristics of small Earth-approaching objects. CFHT's MegaCam and Pan-STARRS1 have longer observing windows and are capable of following-up more NEOs due to their deeper limiting magnitudes and wider fields of view.

  5. Hepatitis B virus infection in blood donors in Argentina: prevalence of infection, genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, María Belén; Blanco, Sebastián; Carrizo, Horacio; Ré, Viviana Elizabeth; Gallego, Sandra

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the prevalence of HBV infection based on detection of HBsAg and HBV-DNA by NAT in 70,102 blood donors in Argentina (Córdoba province) and shows the viral genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection (OBI) in this population. Forty-two donors were confirmed positive for HBV infection (0.06 %), and four had OBI. Genotype F was the most prevalent (71.4 %), followed by A (14.3 %), C (7.1 %) and D (7.1 %). This is the first report of the prevalence of confirmed HBV infection and the high frequency of occult HBV infection in a blood bank in Argentina.

  6. Cumulative Advantage and Success-Breeds-Success: The Value of Time Pattern Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, John C.

    1998-01-01

    For the case of the distribution of papers across authors, the Success-Breeds-Success or Cumulative Advantage model is a popular candidate for informetrics. The method of time pattern of publication for individual authors can be used to discriminate between Cumulative Advantage and non-uniform giftedness models. The non-uniform giftedness model is…

  7. Matrix factorization to time-frequency distribution for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Huang, Shieh-Kung

    2016-04-01

    Structural health monitoring enables structural information to be acquired through sensing technology, and is of need to early detect problems and damages in structures. Health monitoring strategies are often realized through a combination of qualitative sensing systems and high-performance structural integrity assessment methods. Structural deviations can be then effectively identified by interpreting the raw sensor measurements using signal processing techniques. The objective of this study is to develop a new structural health monitoring method that applies a matrix factorization algorithm to a time-frequency representation of multi-channel signals measured from a structure. This method processes vibrational input and/or output responses of structures to improve raw data quality, to estimate structural responses, to derive signal features, and to detect structural variations. For example, the proposed method can reduce the signal noise by utilizing first few principle vectors to reconstruct the measured signals. For frequency-domain responses, this method can smooth the phase to obtain a better input-output relationship of a structure. Additionally, the method removes abnormal signals in time series, allowing better understanding of structural behavior. Due to communication loss, this method is able to recover lost data from other channel measurements in a structure. Moreover, the proposed method transforms the signal components into a specific domain and then yield meaningful characteristics. All these features are numerically verified using experimental data, and the proposed method permits more detailed investigation of structural behavior.

  8. Notes on the Ecuadorian media debate: Distribution of broadcasting frequencies, possibilities for “educommunication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sánchez Montoya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, some progressive countries in Latin America have made changes to laws that regulate media, with a particular emphasis on audiovisual media that make use of radio broadcasting space. A key feature shared by these new media laws is the criteria for reallocating radio and TV concessions, with a compromise of assigning a third of these frequencies to non governmental organizations, referred to as community media. Moreover, in several cases, as in Ecuador, another third of the frecuencias are reserved for public institutions. These changes would allow, in the medium term, for community and public groups to own most of the range of audiovisual media frequencies in several countries in the region. In theory, we would have spaces that had been previously hoarded by the private sector, now in the hands of groups outside of the strictly commercial rationality used for their own benefit. In this context, we ask, what possibilities are there for a relaunch of communication proposals oriented, in the general sense, to “educommunication” (educational communication? We will attempt to provide answers by using Ecuador as a reference for both challenges, learned successes, and limitations under the new Law of Communication.

  9. Distributed demand side management via smart appliances contributing to frequency control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-chen

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays renewable energy has become a trend for energy production but its variable nature has made balancing of demand and supply of the power grid difficult. Dynamic demand management using smart appliances is proposed to serve as a way that part of the regulation burden of balancing demand and supply is shifted to the demand side. However, if all appliances respond to the same frequency deviation, they may start to synchronize, causing large power overshoots and instability of the power grid. Therefore, the idea of implementing randomness into the frequency control of the appliances is proposed and this is what we call a stochastic approach. Simulators are built from scratch to model both scenarios. The effect of synchronization is analyzed and the parameters that can affect the synchronization are investigated. It has been found that the larger the contribution from the smart appliances to the power grid, the easier and faster the synchronization takes place. The stochastic approach solves the problem of synchronization and averages out the large power overshoot. However, the overall performance of stochastic operations is unacceptable due to the randomness in the operation though the mean and variance are as expected. More advanced feedback policies and schemes may be designed to achieve a better performance.

  10. Frequency of legionella contamination in conditional & water distribution systems of Tehran hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davod Esmaieli

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Legionella species are ubiquitous in natural aquatic environments, capable of existing in waters with varied temperatures, PH levels, and nutrient and oxygen contents. Of 49 known legionella species, 20 species have been linked to pneumonia in humans. Contamination by legionella has occurred in the distribution systems of many hospitals. Aerosol-generating systems such as faucets, showerheads, cooling towers, and nebulizers are responsible for their transmission from water to air. Methods: A total of 113 water samples were gathered from different wards of 32 hospitals in different geographical regions of Tehran city. These samples were concentrated by filtration, treated with the acid and temperature buffers, and isolated on a BCYE agar culture medium. Results: A total of 22 hospitals out of 33 (26.5% were contaminated by legionella species, and 30 samples (26.5% out of 113 were positive. Chlorine concentration and pH level of the water samples were 0.18-2.2 mg/l and 6.6-7.6, respectively. Conclusion: The high rate of waste water contamination in Tehran hospitals with Legionella indicates the resistance of this microorganism to chlorine and other disinfectants, or inadequate disinfection process, representing the insufficiency of the current decontamination of hospital water distribution system. Thus identifying legionella species and their controlling in water distribution system of hospitals is of great importance.

  11. Observation and simulation of space-charge effects in a radio-frequency photoinjector using a transverse multibeamlet distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rihaoui

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental study of space-charge effects in a radio-frequency (rf photoinjector. A 5 MeV electron bunch, consisting of a number of beamlets separated transversely, was generated in an rf photocathode gun and propagated in the succeeding drift space. The collective interaction of these beamlets was studied for different experimental conditions. The experiment allowed the exploration of space-charge effects and its comparison with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Our observations also suggest the possible use of a multibeam configuration to tailor the transverse distribution of an electron beam.

  12. Energy storage systems impact on the short-term frequency stability of distributed autonomous microgrids, an analysis using aggregate models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serban, Ioan; Teodorescu, Remus; Marinescu, Corneliu

    2013-01-01

    is on autonomous MGs that dynamically behave similarly to the classical power systems. This is the systems case with classical distributed generators (DGs), but which can also contain renewable energy sources (RESs) in a certain penetration level. During MG islanded operation, the local generators take over most...... with both inertial response and an adaptive droop characteristic during battery state-of-charge limitations. The conducted analysis is accomplished by adopting aggregated models for the involved control mechanisms. The developed model is analysed in frequency domain, whereas an experimental test bench...

  13. Adaptive Time-Frequency Distribution Based on Time-Varying Autoregressive and Its Application to Machine Fault Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The time-varying autoregressive (TVAR) modeling of a non-stationary signal is studied. In the proposed method, time-varying parametric identification of a non-stationary signal can be translated into a linear time-invariant problem by introducing a set of basic functions. Then, the parameters are estimated by using a recursive least square algorithm with a forgetting factor and an adaptive time-frequency distribution is achieved. The simulation results show that the proposed approach is superior to the short-time Fourier transform and Wigner distribution. And finally, the proposed method is applied to the fault diagnosis of a bearing, and the experiment result shows that the proposed method is effective in feature extraction.

  14. Using radio frequency and ultrasonic antennas for inspecting pin-type insulators on medium-voltage overhead distribution lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cícero Lefort Borges

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarises the activities undertaken when using antennas (ultrasound and radiofrequency for identifying insulators in pre-failure state by detecting the noise emitted by the distribution line and correlating this with these insulators (porcelain pin type dielectric breakdown. This has led to developing low-cost maintenance procedures and providing support and criteria for engineer-ing decisions regarding replacing these insulators. The technique used two detectors; a radio frequency detector was used in a first investigation of a particular distribution line, set to 40 MHz and installed on the roof of a moving vehicle. The ultrasound detector was used for inspecting (phases A, B, C each structure (pole selected. Atmospheric conditions had no influence on defining pre-failure insulators (pin type based on the noise detection technique. Pin type insulators emitting noise should be replaced since measurement was made from the ground and near the base of the post.

  15. Complex frequencies and field distributions of localized surface plasmon modes in graphene-coated subwavelength wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Mauro; Riso, Máximo A.; Depine, Ricardo A.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study the modal characteristics of localized surface plasmons in graphene-coated, circular cross-section wires. Localized surface plasmons are represented in terms of cylindrical multipole partial waves characterized by discrete, complex frequencies that depend on the size of the wire and can be dynamically tuned via a gate voltage. We consider both intrinsically nonplasmonic wires and intrinsically plasmonic wires. In the first case the localized surface plasmons are introduced by the graphene coating, whereas in the second case the localized eigenmodes of the graphene coating are expected to hybridize those already existing in the bare wire. We show that the approach presented here, valid for particle sizes where the retardation effects can be significant, is in good agreement with analytical expressions obtained in the limit when particle size is very small compared to the wavelength of the eigenmode and with results indirectly determined from scattering cross-section spectra.

  16. RH 1.5D: Polarized multi-level radiative transfer with partial frequency distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tiago M. D.; Uitenbroek, Han

    2015-02-01

    RH 1.5D performs Zeeman multi-level non-local thermodynamical equilibrium calculations with partial frequency redistribution for an arbitrary amount of chemical species. Derived from the RH code and written in C, it calculates spectra from 3D, 2D or 1D atmospheric models on a column-by-column basis (or 1.5D). It includes optimization features to speed up or improve convergence, which are particularly useful in dynamic models of chromospheres. While one should be aware of its limitations, the calculation of spectra using the 1.5D or column-by-column is a good approximation in many cases, and generally allows for faster convergence and more flexible methods of improving convergence. RH 1.5D scales well to at least tens of thousands of CPU cores.

  17. High rhesus (Rh(D)) negative frequency and ethnic-group based ABO blood group distribution in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golassa, Lemu; Tsegaye, Arega; Erko, Berhanu; Mamo, Hassen

    2017-07-26

    Knowledge of the distribution of ABO-Rh(D) blood groups in a locality is vital for safe blood services. However, the distribution of these blood systems among Ethiopians in general is little explored. This study was, therefore, designed to determine the ABO-Rh(D) blood group distribution among patients attending Gambella hospital, southwestern Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted between November and December 2013 (N = 449). The patients were grouped into two broad categories. Those who originally moved from different parts of Ethiopia and currently residing in Gambella are named 'highlanders' (n = 211). The other group consisted of natives (Nilotics) to the locality (n = 238). ABO-Rh(D) blood groups were typed by agglutination, open-slide test method, using commercial antisera (Biotech laboratories Ltd, Ipswich, Suffolk, UK). Overall, majority of the participants (41.20%) had blood type 'O' followed by types 'A' (34.96%), 'B' (20.48%) and 'AB' (3.34%). However, blood type 'A' was the most frequent (44.07%) blood group among the 'highlanders' and 50.42% of Nilotic natives had type 'O'. The proportion of participants devoid of the Rh factor was 19.37%. While the ABO blood group distribution is similar to previous reports, the Rh(D) frequency is much higher than what was reported so far for Ethiopia and continental Africa.

  18. No effects of power line frequency extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure on selected neurobehavior tests of workers inspecting transformers and distribution line stations versus controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Xiong, De-fu; Liu, Jia-wen; Li, Zi-xin; Zeng, Guang-cheng; Li, Hua-liang

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the interference of 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) occupational exposure on the neurobehavior tests of workers performing tour-inspection close to transformers and distribution power lines. Occupational short-term "spot" measurements were carried out. 310 inspection workers and 300 logistics staff were selected as exposure and control. The neurobehavior tests were performed through computer-based neurobehavior evaluation system, including mental arithmetic, curve coincide, simple visual reaction time, visual retention, auditory digit span and pursuit aiming. In 500 kV areas electric field intensity at 71.98% of total measured 590 spots were above 5 kV/m (national occupational standard), while in 220 kV areas electric field intensity at 15.69% of total 701 spots were above 5 kV/m. Magnetic field flux density at all the spots was below 1,000 μT (ICNIRP occupational standard). The neurobehavior score changes showed no statistical significance. Results of neurobehavior tests among different age, seniority groups showed no significant changes. Neurobehavior changes caused by daily repeated ELF-EMF exposure were not observed in the current study.

  19. Distribution of electrical activation to the external intercostal muscles during high frequency spinal cord stimulation in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Anthony F; Kowalski, Krzysztof E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In contrast to previous methods of electrical stimulation of the inspiratory muscles, high frequency spinal cord stimulation (HF-SCS) results in more physiological activation of these muscles. The spatial distribution of activation to the external intercostal muscles by this method is unknown. In anaesthetized dogs, multiunit and single motor unit (SMU) EMG activity was monitored in the dorsal portion of the 3rd, 5th and 7th interspaces and ventral portion of the 3rd interspace during spontaneous breathing and HF-SCS following C2 spinal section. Stimulus amplitude during HF-SCS was adjusted such that inspired volumes matched spontaneous breathing (Protocol 1). During HF-SCS, mean peak SMU firing frequency was highest in the 3rd interspace (dorsal) (18.8 ± 0.3 Hz) and significantly lower in the 3rd interspace (ventral) (12.2 ± 0.2 Hz) and 5th interspace (dorsal) (15.3 ± 0.3 Hz) (P intercostal muscles during HF-SCS is similar to that occurring during spontaneous breathing and (b) differential descending synaptic input from supraspinal centres is not a required component of the differential spatial distribution of external intercostal muscle activation. HF-SCS may provide a more physiological method of inspiratory muscle pacing. PMID:21242258

  20. Assessment of landslide distribution map reliability in Niigata prefecture - Japan using frequency ratio approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahardianto, Trias; Saputra, Aditya; Gomez, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Research on landslide susceptibility has evolved rapidly over the few last decades thanks to the availability of large databases. Landslide research used to be focused on discreet events but the usage of large inventory dataset has become a central pillar of landslide susceptibility, hazard, and risk assessment. Indeed, extracting meaningful information from the large database is now at the forth of geoscientific research, following the big-data research trend. Indeed, the more comprehensive information of the past landslide available in a particular area is, the better the produced map will be, in order to support the effective decision making, planning, and engineering practice. The landslide inventory data which is freely accessible online gives an opportunity for many researchers and decision makers to prevent casualties and economic loss caused by future landslides. This data is advantageous especially for areas with poor landslide historical data. Since the construction criteria of landslide inventory map and its quality evaluation remain poorly defined, the assessment of open source landslide inventory map reliability is required. The present contribution aims to assess the reliability of open-source landslide inventory data based on the particular topographical setting of the observed area in Niigata prefecture, Japan. Geographic Information System (GIS) platform and statistical approach are applied to analyze the data. Frequency ratio method is utilized to model and assess the landslide map. The outcomes of the generated model showed unsatisfactory results with AUC value of 0.603 indicate the low prediction accuracy and unreliability of the model.

  1. Time-frequency distribution decomposition with applications to recognize the looseness state of the viscoelastic sandwich structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wang; Zhang, Zhousou; Qu, Jinxiu; Sun, Chuang

    2016-07-01

    In general, a vibration signal consists of several frequency modulation (FM) components. Every component contains different information, and can be characterized by its instantaneous amplitude (IA) and instantaneous phase (IP). In engineering applications, conventional time-frequency analysis methods and signal decomposition methods have shown their power in investigating features of the vibration signal. However, they are limited in resolution and it is hard to analyze these FM components individually. To overcome these deficiencies, a novel signal decomposition algorithm, named time-frequency distribution decomposition (TFDD), is proposed in this paper, which reconstructs one FM component of the signal at a time by estimating its IP and IA. The IA and IP are approximated by two polynomial functions respectively. One important advantage of TFDD is that it can directly extract the component we are interested in. Therefore, we can analyze the key component of the signal with little influence from other components. This will help us to characterize the vibration signal more deeply. Furthermore, it is very stable to noise. This is conductive to protecting the information of the vibration signal. The effectiveness of the TFDD is validated by a numerical simulation and the study of the vibration response signal collected from a viscoelastic sandwich structure (VSS). From the value of permutation entropy of the component extracted by TFDD, the looseness state of the VSS is recognized.

  2. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  3. Order-disorder transition in conflicting dynamics leading to rank-frequency generalized beta distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Martinez, R.; Martinez-Mekler, G.; Cocho, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of rank-ordered distributions of phenomena present in a variety of fields such as biology, sociology, linguistics, finance and geophysics has been a matter of intense research. Often power laws have been encountered; however, their validity tends to hold mainly for an intermediate range of rank values. In a recent publication (Martínez-Mekler et al., 2009 [7]), a generalization of the functional form of the beta distribution has been shown to give excellent fits for many systems of very diverse nature, valid for the whole range of rank values, regardless of whether or not a power law behavior has been previously suggested. Here we give some insight on the significance of the two free parameters which appear as exponents in the functional form, by looking into discrete probabilistic branching processes with conflicting dynamics. We analyze a variety of realizations of these so-called expansion-modification models first introduced by Wentian Li (1989) [10]. We focus our attention on an order-disorder transition we encounter as we vary the modification probability p. We characterize this transition by means of the fitting parameters. Our numerical studies show that one of the fitting exponents is related to the presence of long-range correlations exhibited by power spectrum scale invariance, while the other registers the effect of disordering elements leading to a breakdown of these properties. In the absence of long-range correlations, this parameter is sensitive to the occurrence of unlikely events. We also introduce an approximate calculation scheme that relates this dynamics to multinomial multiplicative processes. A better understanding through these models of the meaning of the generalized beta-fitting exponents may contribute to their potential for identifying and characterizing universality classes.

  4. Spatial distribution of spectral parameters of high latitude geomagnetic disturbances in the Pc5/Pi3 frequency range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Pilipenko

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze spectral parameters of the geomagnetic disturbances within the 1–4 mHz (Pc5/Pi3 frequency range for 29 observatories from polar to auroral latitudes. The main object of this study is the broadband (noise background under quiet and moderately disturbed conditions. To obtain a quantitative description of background high-latitude long period ULF activity the log-log dependence of the spectral power on frequency is expanded over Legendre polynomials, and the coefficients of this expansion (spectral moments are used to describe the most common features of these spectra. Not only the spectral power, but also the spectral slope and higher spectral moments, averaged over relatively long time intervals, demonstrate a systematic dependence on corrected geomagnetic (CGM latitude, Φ, and magnetic local time, MLT. The 2-D distributions of the spectral moments in Φ-MLT coordinates are characterized by existence of structures, narrow in latitude and extended in MLT, which can be attributed to the projections of different magnetospheric domains. Spatio-temporal distributions of spectral power of elliptically (P-component and randomly (N-component polarized signal are similar, but not identical. The N-component contribution to the total signal becomes non-negligible in regions with a high local activity, such as the auroral oval and dayside polar cusp. The spectral slope indicates a larger relative contribution of higher frequencies upon the latitude decrease, probably, as a result of the resonant effects in the ULF noise. The higher spectral moments are also controlled mostly by CGM latitude and MLT and are fundamentally different for the polarized and non-polarized components. This study is a step towards the construction of an empirical model of the ULF wave power in Earth's magnetosphere.

  5. Cumulative human impacts on marine predators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxwell, Sara M; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Stressors associated with human activities interact in complex ways to affect marine ecosystems, yet we lack spatially explicit assessments of cumulative impacts on ecologically and economically key components such as marine predators. Here we develop a metric of cumulative utilization and impact...

  6. Frequency Distribution of Edentulous Posterior Mandibular Ridge Types using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in an Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The existing bone is regarded as an important criteria in dental implants. In this regard, the radiographic modality is of great significance in quantifying the remaining bone, and CBCT accurately represents height and width of the existing bone. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the frequency distribution of the edentulous posterior mandibular ridge types using cone beam computed tomography in an Iranian population. Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, CBCT scans of 127 patients with full edentulous mandible with an average age of 61.15 were evaluated who referred to a radiology clinic in Tehran. The images were analyzed applying OnDemand3D application and bone height and width of each area were determined. To analyze the collected data, SPSS software (ver,17 was employed applying Fisher's exact test. Results: The ridges were classified in 4 different groups (A,B+,B-w,C-w. The frequency of ridge types A and B + in male and ridge types B-w and C-w in females were demonstrated to be higher. An increase in age led to a reduction in the frequency of type A and a rise in the frequency of type C-w. The mean bone height was higher in males in all areas. In addition, the mean bone width was higher in males in all areas except for the first molar area. Conclusions:  The study results indicated that as the age increases, the height of edentulous mandible reduces, while no significant relationship was detected between the bone width and aging. As a result, with aging the evolution of bone was held to be from type A to type C-W.

  7. The Frequency Distribution of Inter-Event Times of M e 3 Earthquakes in the Taipei Metropolitan Area: 1973 - 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeen-Hwa Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available M ≥ 3 earthquakes which occurred in the Taipei Metropolitan Area from 1973 through 2010 are used to study seismicity of the area. First, the epicentral distribution, depth distribution, and temporal sequences of earthquake magnitudes are described. The earthquakes can be divided into two groups: one for shallow events with focal depths ranging 0 - 40 km and the other with focal depths deeper than 60 km. Shallow earthquakes are mainly located in the depth range from 0 - 10 km north of 25.1°N, and down to 35 km for those south of 25.1°N. Deep events are located in the subduction zone, with a dip angle of about 70°. Three statistical models, the gamma, power-law, and exponential functions, are applied to describe the single frequency distribution of inter-occurrence times between two consecutive events for both shallow and deep earthquakes. Numerical tests suggest that the most appropriate time interval for counting the frequency of events for statistical analysis is 10 days. Results show that among the three functions, the power-law function is the most appropriate for describing the data points. While the exponential function is the least appropriate to describe the observations, thus, the time series of earthquakes in consideration are not Poissonian. The gamma function is less and more appropriate to describe the observations than the power-law function and the exponential function, respectively. The scaling exponent of the power-law function decreases linearly with an increasingly lower-bound magnitude. The slope value of the regression equation is smaller for shallow earthquakes than for deep events. Meanwhile, the power-law function cannot work when the lower-bound magnitude is 4.2 for shallow earthquakes and 4.3 for deep events.

  8. Southern San Andreas Fault seismicity is consistent with the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude-frequency distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Morgan T.; Felzer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The magnitudes of any collection of earthquakes nucleating in a region are generally observed to follow the Gutenberg-Richter (G-R) distribution. On some major faults, however, paleoseismic rates are higher than a G-R extrapolation from the modern rate of small earthquakes would predict. This, along with other observations, led to formulation of the characteristic earthquake hypothesis, which holds that the rate of small to moderate earthquakes is permanently low on large faults relative to the large-earthquake rate (Wesnousky et al., 1983; Schwartz and Coppersmith, 1984). We examine the rate difference between recent small to moderate earthquakes on the southern San Andreas fault (SSAF) and the paleoseismic record, hypothesizing that the discrepancy can be explained as a rate change in time rather than a deviation from G-R statistics. We find that with reasonable assumptions, the rate changes necessary to bring the small and large earthquake rates into alignment agree with the size of rate changes seen in epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) modeling, where aftershock triggering of large earthquakes drives strong fluctuations in the seismicity rates for earthquakes of all magnitudes. The necessary rate changes are also comparable to rate changes observed for other faults worldwide. These results are consistent with paleoseismic observations of temporally clustered bursts of large earthquakes on the SSAF and the absence of M greater than or equal to 7 earthquakes on the SSAF since 1857.

  9. Time-frequency analysis of transient signals in power distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danisor, Alin

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we propose an analysis of the possibilities of spikes detection which appears on the power lines of electrical distribution. The importance of this problem consists in the possibility of surveillance at distance the regimes of power electrical motors. This regime was studied in an industrial network which supplies the power pumps necessary to assures a city water consumption. We consider the industrial electrical networks as a linear, time invariant and causal system which has a certain response to the electrical spikes, assimilates with Dirac impulses. For that reason the output signal represents the impulse response of the system. The main problem is to detect this signal and to establish the moments of its presence. To detect and extract the useful signal linear methods like fourier transform or Short Time Fourier Analysis are not very relevant. A more efficient method to detect the spikes presence consists in using quadratic detectors in timefrequency domain, like detectors based on Wigner-Ville transform or detectors based on Ambiguity Function. In this paper we tried to present the advantages of these last detectors.

  10. Transient hepatic attenuation difference (THAD) in patients without neoplasm. Frequency, shape, distribution, and causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Michio; Furukawa, Akira; Murata, Kiyoshi; Morita, Rikushi [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Transient hepatic attenuation difference (THAD) is a valuable finding in detecting hypervascular lesions. However, similar findings are also observed in patients even without known hepatic diseases. We elucidate the characteristic findings and the causes of THAD in patients without hepatic neoplasm in this article. Dual-phased contrast-enhanced CT studies performed in 450 patients were reviewed, and THAD was observed in 42 (9.3%). THAD was linear or wedge-shaped and was seen contiguous to the liver surface with a relatively obscure margin in 40 of the 42 cases. The most common cause of THAD was chronic cholecystitis followed by previous biliary surgery. THAD was also seen in 30 patients with no hepatic diseases in whom it had a tendency to locate around the gallbladder fossa or in the periphery of the liver particularly in the left lobe. The knowledge of the prevalence, shape, distribution and causes of THAD is essential for the evaluation of contrast-enhanced CT images obtained during the arterial phase. (author)

  11. Frequency Locking and Monitoring Based on Bi-directional Terahertz Radiation of a 3rd-Order Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Marrewijk, N.; Mirzaei, B.; Hayton, D.; Gao, J.R.; Kao, T.Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed frequency locking of a dual, forward reverse emitting third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 3.5 THz. By using both directions of THz emission in combination with two gas cells and two power detectors, we can for the first time perform frequency stabilizati

  12. The size-frequency distribution of H>13 NEOs and ARM targets detected by Pan-STARRS1

    CERN Document Server

    Lilly, Eva Schunová; Vereš, Peter; Denneau, Larry; Wainscoat, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    We determine the absolute magnitude (H) distribution (or size-frequency distribution, SFD; $N(H) \\propto 10^{\\alpha H}$ where $\\alpha$ is the slope of the distribution) for near-Earth objects (NEO) with $1322$. There is also another change in slope from steep to shallow around H=27. The three ARM target candidates detected by Pan-STARRS1 in one year of surveying have a corrected SFD with slope $\\alpha = 0.40^{+0.33}_{-0.45}$. We also show that the window for follow up observations of small (H$\\gtrsim$22) NEOs with the NASA IRTF telescope and Arecibo and Goldstone radars are extremely short - on order of days, and procedures for fast response must be implemented in order to measure physical characteristics of small Earth-approaching objects. CFHT's MegaCam and Pan-STARRS1 have longer observing windows and are capable of following-up more NEOs due to their deeper limiting magnitudes and wider fields of view.

  13. Modeling and distributed gain scheduling strategy for load frequency control in smart grids with communication topology changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shichao; Liu, Xiaoping P; El Saddik, Abdulmotaleb

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the modeling and distributed control problems for the load frequency control (LFC) in a smart grid. In contrast with existing works, we consider more practical and real scenarios, where the communication topology of the smart grid changes because of either link failures or packet losses. These topology changes are modeled as a time-varying communication topology matrix. By using this matrix, a new closed-loop power system model is proposed to integrate the communication topology changes into the dynamics of a physical power system. The globally asymptotical stability of this closed-loop power system is analyzed. A distributed gain scheduling LFC strategy is proposed to compensate for the potential degradation of dynamic performance (mean square errors of state vectors) of the power system under communication topology changes. In comparison to conventional centralized control approaches, the proposed method can improve the robustness of the smart grid to the variation of the communication network as well as to reduce computation load. Simulation results show that the proposed distributed gain scheduling approach is capable to improve the robustness of the smart grid to communication topology changes.

  14. Low-Frequency Variability in the Northern Hemisphere Winter: Geographical Distribution, Structure and Time-Scale Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Yochanan; Wallace, John M.

    1989-10-01

    Low-frequency variability in wintertime 500 mb height is examined, with emphasis on its structure, geographical distribution, and frequency dependence. A 39-year record of 500 mb geopotential height fields from the NMC analyses is time filtered to partition the fluctuations into frequency bands corresponding to periods of 10-60 days, 60-180 days and > 180 days. Winter is defined as the six month period November through April. Variance, teleconnectivity, and anisotropy fields, and selected loading vectors derived from orthogonal and oblique rotations of the eigenvectors of the temporal correlation matrix for each band are shown and discussed.The variability in all frequency bands exhibits substantial anistropy, with meridionally elongated features arranged as zonally oriented wave trains prevailing over the continents and zonally elongated features organized in the form of north-south oriented dipole patterns prevailing over the oceanic sectors of the hemisphere. The wave trains are most pronounced in the 10-60 day variability, while the dipoles are most pronounced at lower frequencies. Eastward energy dispersion is apparent in the wave trains, but there is no evidence of phase propagation.Most of the `teleconnection patterns' identified in previous studies appear among the more prominent loading vectors. However, in most cases the loading vectors occur in pairs, in which the two patterns are in spatial quadrature with one another and account for comparable fractions of the hemispherically integrated variance. It is argued that such patterns should be interpreted as basis functions that can be linearly combined to form a continuum of anisotropic structures. Evidence of the existence of discrete `modal structures' is found only in the interannual (> 180-day period) variability, where two patterns stand out clearly above the background continuum: the Pacific-North American (PNA) pattern and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). These patterns leave clear imprints upon

  15. Cumulant Based Harmonic Retrieval in Mixed Colored Gaussian and Non-Gaussian ARMA Noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shenghong; ZHU Hongwen

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of retrieving one-dimensional real harmonic signals in presence of mixed colored Gaussian and non-Gaussian autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) noises, and proposes a new approach to harmonic retrieval. In the approach, Hilbert transform is first used to transform the real noisy observed data into their complex form; and then, some kind of fourth-order cumulant,which is defined particularly, is employed to identify the autoregressive (AR) parameters of the colored non-Gaussian ARMA noise model; after the real noisy observed data are filtered with the identified AR parameters, cumulant based methods can be used to compute the frequencies and the amplitudes of the harmonics. The proposed new approach can be applied to retrieve one-dimensional real harmonic signals in mixed colored Gaussian and non-Gaussian ARMA noises, no matter whether there is quadratic phase coupling or not in the harmonic signals and no matter whether the distribution of the colored non-Gaussian ARMA noise is symmetrical or not. Simulation examples are presented to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  16. Lévy Stable Distribution and [0, 2] Power Law Dependence of Acoustic Absorption on Frequency in Various Lossy Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wen

    2005-01-01

    @@ Absorption of acoustic wave propagation in a large variety of lossy media is characterized by an empirical power law function of frequency, αo|ω|y. It has long been noted that the exponent y ranges from 0 to 2 for diverse media. Recently, the present author [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 115 (2004) 1424] developed a fractional Laplacian wave equation to accurately model the power law dissipation, which can be further reduced to the fractional Laplacian diffusion equation. The latter is known underlying the Lévy stable distribution theory. Consequently,the parameters y is found to be the Lévy stability index, which is known to be bounded within 0 < y ≤ 2. This finding first provides a theoretical explanation of empirical observations y ∈ [0, 2]. Statistically, the frequencydependent absorption can thus be understood a Lévy stable process, where the parameter y describes the fractal nature of attenuative media.

  17. Deka-keV X-ray observations of solar bursts with WATCH/GRANAT: frequency distributions of burst parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, N.; Vilmer, N.; Lund, N.; Sunyaev, R.

    1998-06-01

    Solar flare observations in the deka-keV range are performed by the WATCH experiment on board the GRANAT satellite. The WATCH experiment is presented, including the energy calibration as applied in the present work. The creation of the solar burst catalogue covering two years of observation is described and some examples of solar observations are given. The estimated energy releases in the flares presented here are found to extend below the range of hard X-ray flares which were previously studied by ISEE-3 and HXRBS/SMM detectors. The X-ray emitting component cannot be exclusively explained by contributions from a thermal plasma around a few keV. Either a hotter component or a non-thermal population of particles must also be present to produce the observed deka-keV emission. The WATCH data furthermore shows that the relative contributions of these components may change during an event or from event to event and that the injection of energy contained in suprathermal electrons may occur throughout an event and not only during the rise phase. For the most energetic WATCH flares simultaneous observations performed by other experiments at higher energies further indicate that non-thermal emission can be observed as low as 10 keV. A statistical study is performed on the total WATCH solar database and frequency distributions are built on measured X-ray flare parameters. It is also investigated how the properties of these frequency distributions behave when subgroups of events defined by different ranges of parameters are considered. No correlation is found between the elapsed time interval between successive flares arising from the same active region and the peak intensity of the flare.

  18. Semicircular canal dehiscence: Frequency and distribution on temporal bone CT and its relationship with the clinical outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmali, Muzaffer, E-mail: muzafel@yahoo.com.tr [Department of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Polat, Ahmet Veysel, E-mail: veyselp@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Kucuk, Harun, E-mail: hardrmd@yahoo.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Atmaca, Sinan, E-mail: sinanatmaca@yahoo.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Aksoy, Ahmet, E-mail: toxocara47@hotmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of SCD and its distribution and relationship with clinical outcomes on thin-section CT of the temporal bone. Materials and methods: Digital temporal bone CT images of 850 consecutive patients (1700 temporal bone CTs, 5100 SCs) who presented with a range of complaints such as vertigo, deafness, ear pain, fullness, and discharge between January 2008 and December 2011 were re-evaluated. Axial and oblique coronal reconstruction images of the temporal bone were made with a reconstruction thickness of 0.5 mm. Additionally, superior SC was evaluated in two perpendicular planes. Results: Out of 850 patients, 70 had completely normal temporal bone CT. Ninety-three patients had at least one SCD. In the temporal bone-based evaluation, 119 (26 bilateral, 67 unilateral) of 1700 temporal bones (7%) showed dehiscence. The SC-based evaluation revealed 125 SCD (2.5%) in 5100 SCs. The total number and rates of SCD were as follows: superior 103 (82.4%), posterior 13 (10.4%), and lateral nine (7.2%). Twenty of the 93 patients with SCD (21.5%) revealed no other findings on their temporal bone CTs. We determined a significant correlation between vestibular complaints, conductive hearing loss and SCD but there was no correlation between mixed, sensorineural hearing loss and SCD. Conclusion: We determined the frequency of SCD in 11% of patients and 7% of temporal bones. With regards to the distribution, the superior SC showed the highest dehiscence rate (82.4%). We found a significant correlation between vestibular symptoms, conductive hearing loss and SCD.

  19. Adamantane-Resistant Influenza A Viruses in the World (1902–2013): Frequency and Distribution of M2 Gene Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guoying; Peng, Chao; Luo, Jing; Wang, Chengmin; Han, Le; Wu, Bin; Ji, Guangju; He, Hongxuan

    2015-01-01

    Adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) have been used to prevent and treat influenza A virus infections for many years; however, resistance to these drugs has been widely reported in the world. To investigate the frequency and distribution of M2 gene mutations in adamantane-resistant influenza variants circulated in the world between 1902 and 2013, 31251 available M2 protein sequences from different HA-subtype influenza A viruses (H1–H17) were analyzed and adamantane resistance-associated mutations were compared (L26F, V27A, A30T, A30V, S31N, G34E, and L38F). We find that 45.2% (n = 14132) of influenza A (H1–H17) viruses circulating globally were resistant to adamantanes, and the vast majority of resistant viruses (95%) bear S31N mutations. Whereas, only about 1% have V27A mutations and other mutations (L26F, A30T, G34E, and L38F) were extremely rare (their prevalence appeared to be resistance to adamantanes. In contrast, the appearance of adamantane-resistant mutants in H2, H4, H6, H10, and H11 subtypes was rare. However, no adamantane resistance viruses were identified among other HA subtypes (H8, H12–H16). Our findings indicate that the frequency and distribution of adamantane-resistant influenza variants varied among different HA subtypes, host species, years of isolation, and geographical areas. This comprehensive study raises concerns about the increasing prevalence of adamantane-resistant influenza A viruses and highlights the importance of monitoring the emergence and worldwide spread of adamantane-resistant variants. PMID:25768797

  20. Time-frequency distribution properties of event-related potentials in mental fatigue induced by visual memory tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyang; Liu, Juntao; Gai, Shuping; Meyer, Kristina; Xu, Shengwei; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-09-28

    Prolonged periods of demanding cognitive tasks lead to an exhausted feeling known as mental fatigue. The neural underpinnings of mental fatigue are still under exploration. In the present study, we aimed to identify neurophysiological indicators of mental fatigue by studying the time-frequency distribution of the event-related potentials (ERPs) measured in N=26 adults in nonfatigued versus fatigued states. We were interested in the frontal theta and occipital alpha variations, which have shown consistent relationships with mental fatigue in previous studies. Furthermore, we expected differential changes in left and right electrodes, in line with previously detected lateralization effects in cognitive tasks. Mental fatigue was induced by a sustained two-back verbal visual memory task for 125 min and assessed using the Chalder Fatigue Scale. We applied a high-resolution time-frequency analysis method called smoothed pseudo Wigner Ville distribution and used regional integrals as indicators for changing trends of signal energy. Results showed an increase in ERP frontal theta energy (P=0.03) and a decrease in occipital alpha energy (P=0.028) when participants became mentally fatigued. The change in frontal theta was more pronounced in left electrode sites (P=0.032), hinting toward a differential fatigue effect in the two hemispheres. The results were discussed on the basis of previous lateralization studies with memory tasks and interpreted as an indicator of a causal relationship between the sustained task execution and the physiological changes. Our findings also suggest that the ERP signal energy variations in frontal theta and occipital alpha might be used as neural biomarkers to assess mental fatigue.

  1. Nonlinear cumulative damage model for multiaxial fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG De-guang; SUN Guo-qin; DENG Jing; YAN Chu-liang

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the continuum fatigue damage theory,a nonlinear uniaxial fatigue cumulative damage model is first proposed.In order to describe multiaxial fatigue damage characteristics,a nonlinear multiaxial fatigue cumulative damage model is developed based on the critical plane approach,The proposed model can consider the multiaxial fatigue limit,mean hydrostatic pressure and the unseparated characteristic for the damage variables and loading parameters.The recurrence formula of fatigue damage model was derived under multilevel loading,which is used to predict multiaxial fatigue life.The results showed that the proposed nonlinear multiaxial fatigue cumulative damage model is better than Miner's rule.

  2. Determination of plasma frequency, damping constant, and size distribution from the complex dielectric function of noble metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Arboleda, David Muñetón [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp), (CONICET La Plata-CIC) (Argentina); Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B., E-mail: lucias@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp), (CONICET La Plata-CIC) (Argentina); Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad de Ingeniería, UNLP (Argentina)

    2014-12-21

    This paper develops a novel method for simultaneously determining the plasma frequency ω{sub P}   and the damping constant γ{sub free} in the bulk damped oscillator Drude model, based on experimentally measured real and imaginary parts of the metal refractive index in the IR wavelength range, lifting the usual approximation that restricts frequency values to the UV-deep UV region. Our method was applied to gold, silver, and copper, improving the relative uncertainties in the final values for ω{sub p} (0.5%–1.6%) and for γ{sub free} (3%–8%), which are smaller than those reported in the literature. These small uncertainties in ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determination yield a much better fit of the experimental complex dielectric function. For the case of nanoparticles (Nps), a series expansion of the Drude expression (which includes ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determined using our method) enables size-dependent dielectric function to be written as the sum of three terms: the experimental bulk dielectric function plus two size corrective terms, one for free electron, and the other for bound-electron contributions. Finally, size distribution of nanometric and subnanometric gold Nps in colloidal suspension was determined through fitting its experimental optical extinction spectrum using Mie theory based on the previously determined dielectric function. Results are compared with size histogram obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

  3. Multi-frequency monitoring of gamma-ray loud blazars: I. Light curves and spectral energy distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, U; Villata, M; Fuhrmann, L; Buemi, C S; Larionov, V M; Leto, P; Arkharov, A A; Coloma, J M; Di Paola, A; Dolci, M; Efimova, N; Forne, E; Ibrahimov, M A; Hagen-Thorn, V; Konstantinova, T; Kopatskaya, E; Lanteri, L; Kurtanidze, O M; Maccaferri, G; Nikolashvili, M G; Orlati, A; Ros, J A; Tosti, G; Trigilio, C; Umana, G

    2006-01-01

    Context: Being dominated by non-thermal emission from aligned relativistic jets, blazars allow us to elucidate the physics of extragalactic jets, and, ltimately, how the energy is extracted from the central black hole in radio-loud active galactic nuclei. Aims: Crucial information is provided by broad-band spectral energy distributions (SEDs), their trends with luminosity and correlated multi-frequency variability. With this study we plan to obtain a database of contemporaneous radio-to-optical spectra of a sample of blazars, which are and will be observed by current and future high-energy satellites. Methods: Since December 2004 we are performing a monthly multi-frequency radio monitoring of a sample of 35 blazars at the antennas in Medicina and Noto. Contemporaneous near-IR and optical observations for all our observing epochs are organised. Results: Until June 2006 about 4000 radio measurements and 5500 near-IR and optical measurements were obtained. Most of the sources show significant variability in all ...

  4. 基于高阶累积量的局部放电超高频信号时延估计算法%Time-delay Estimation Algorithm of Partial Discharge Ultra High Frequency Signals Based on Higher-order Cumulant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯慧娟; 盛戈皞; 朱文俊; 王红斌; 江秀臣

    2013-01-01

    Time-delay estimation is the basis of the location algorithm for partial discharge based on time difference in substations, and it is the key to the accuracy of location. According to the higher-order statistics theory raised by Tugnait, a novel time delay estimation algorithm for partial discharge ultra-high frequency (UHF) signals is put forward based on 4-order cumulant. The algorithm substitutes high-order cumulants for the signals themselves to analyze the correlation, then the signal time delay is gained after estimating the time delay between signals. The presented method has advantages in its insensitive to Gaussian noises with unknown related characteristics. The signals of the UHF caused by partial discharge are simulated by double exponential oscillation decay function, interfered by Gaussian noises and fixed-frequency signals, meanwhile, the accuracy of the algorithm has been verified by the simulated signals. Finally the algorithm has been used to calculate the time delay of field partial discharge(PD) signals, and the sequence of the delay has been applied to substation PD location based on antenna array. The PD source location is estimated, and the locating error is less than 0. 3 m. Therefore the effectiveness and practicality of the algorithm are verified.%时延估计是基于时间差的变电站局部放电空间定位算法的基础,也是决定定位准确度的关键.为此,以Tugnait的高阶统计量理论为基础,提出了基于4阶累积量的局部放电超高频(UHF)信号时延估计算法,并给出了具体的时延计算方法.该算法以高阶累积量代替信号本身来进行相关分析,估算得出信号时延,具有对相关特性未知的Gaussian噪声不敏感的优点.仿真实验利用双指数振荡衰减函数,并加入Gaussian噪声和定频干扰,模拟变电站现场局部放电超高频信号,利用该时延估计算法可以准确得到信号时延.最终利用该算法计算变电站实测多路超高频信号

  5. Combined Deterministic and Stochastic Approach to Determine Spatial Distribution of Drought Frequency and Duration in the Great Hungarian Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, J. A.; Kuti, L.; Bakacsi, Zs.; Pásztor, L.; Tahy, Á.

    2009-04-01

    Drought is one of the major weather driven natural hazards, which has most harm impacts on environment, agricultural and hydrological factors than the other hazards. In spite of the fact that Hungary - that country is situated in Central Europe - belongs to the continental climate zone (influenced by Atlantic and Mediterranean streams) and this weather conditions should be favourable for agricultural production, the drought is a serious risk factor in Hungary, especially on the so called "Great Hungarian Plain", which area has been hit by severe drought events. These drought events encouraged the Ministry of Environment and Water of Hungary to embark on a countrywide drought planning programme to coordinate drought planning efforts throughout the country, to ensure that available water is used efficiently and to provide guidance on how drought planning can be accomplished. With regard to this plan, it is indispensable to analyze the regional drought frequency and duration in the target region of the programme as fundamental information for the further works. According to these aims, first we initiated a methodological development for simulating drought in a non-contributing area. As a result of this work, it has been agreed that the most appropriate model structure for our purposes using a spatially distributed physically based Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) model embedded into a Markov Chain-Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for estimate multi-year drought frequency and duration. In this framework: - the spatially distributed SVAT component simulates all the fundamental SVAT processes (such as: interception, snow-accumulation and melting, infiltration, water uptake by vegetation and evapotranspiration, vertical and horizontal distribution of soil moisture, etc.) taking the groundwater table as lower, and the hydrometeorological fields as upper boundary conditions into account; - and the MCMC based stochastic component generates time series of daily weather

  6. Accurate reconstruction of the optical parameter distribution in participating medium based on the frequency-domain radiative transfer equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yao-Bin; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fang-Zhou; Ruan, Li-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Reconstructing the distribution of optical parameters in the participating medium based on the frequency-domain radiative transfer equation (FD-RTE) to probe the internal structure of the medium is investigated in the present work. The forward model of FD-RTE is solved via the finite volume method (FVM). The regularization term formatted by the generalized Gaussian Markov random field model is used in the objective function to overcome the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. The multi-start conjugate gradient (MCG) method is employed to search the minimum of the objective function and increase the efficiency of convergence. A modified adjoint differentiation technique using the collimated radiative intensity is developed to calculate the gradient of the objective function with respect to the optical parameters. All simulation results show that the proposed reconstruction algorithm based on FD-RTE can obtain the accurate distributions of absorption and scattering coefficients. The reconstructed images of the scattering coefficient have less errors than those of the absorption coefficient, which indicates the former are more suitable to probing the inner structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51476043), the Major National Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development Special Foundation of China (Grant No. 51327803), and the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51121004).

  7. Updating the geographical distribution and frequency of Aedes albopictus in Brazil with remarks regarding its range in the Americas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Gomes Carvalho/

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The geographical distribution of Aedes albopictus in Brazil was updated according to the data recorded across the country over the last eight years. Countrywide house indexes (HI for Ae. albopictus in urban and suburban areas were described for the first time using a sample of Brazilian municipalities. This mosquito is currently present in at least 59% of the Brazilian municipalities and in 24 of the 27 federal units (i.e., 26 states and the Federal District. In 34 Brazilian municipalities, the HI values for Ae. albopictus were higher than those recorded for Ae. aegypti, reaching figures as high as HI = 7.72 in the Southeast Region. Remarks regarding the current range of this mosquito species in the Americas are also presented. Nineteen American countries are currently infested and few mainland American countries have not confirmed the occurrence of Ae. albopictus. The large distribution and high frequency of Ae. albopictus in the Americas may become a critical factor in the spread of arboviruses like chikungunya in the new world.

  8. High frequency (hourly) variation in vertical distribution and abundance of meroplanktonic larvae in nearshore waters during strong internal tidal forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévana MacTavish, A.; Ladah, L. B.; Lavín, M. F.; Filonov, A.; Tapia, Fabian J.; Leichter, J.

    2016-04-01

    We related the vertical distribution and abundance of nearshore meroplankton at hourly time scales with internal tidal wave events. We proposed that significant changes in plankter abundance would occur across internal tidal fronts, and that surface and bottom strata would respond in opposite fashions. First-mode internal tidal bores propagating in the alongshore direction were detected in water-column currents and baroclinic temperature changes. Surface and bottom currents always flowed in opposite directions, and abrupt flow reversals coincided with large temperature changes during arrival of bores. Crab zoeae and barnacle cyprids were more abundant in the bottom strata, whereas barnacle nauplii showed the opposite pattern. Significant changes in vertical distribution and abundance of target meroplankters occurred across internal tidal fronts, especially for crabs at depth, with surface and bottom organisms responding in opposite fashions. Changes in plankter abundance were significantly correlated with current flows in the strata where they were most abundant. The manner in which plankters were affected (increasing or decreasing abundance) appeared to be modulated by their vertical position within the water column. The significant differences found at the high frequencies of this study, maintained across sampling days, suggest that nearshore meroplankton populations may have greater and more consistent temporal and vertical variability than previously considered.

  9. An Approach to High-Order Cumulants Used to Detect Multifrequency Signals in Telephone Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In accordance with the detecting process of multi-frequency signals between the offices in telephone networks, and in contrast with the autocorrelation method used to handle the multi-frequency signals, a fast,inexpensive and unbiased of cumulants estimation method is adopted in detecting signals. This detecting method is better for resisting noise performance and more practical than the autocorrelation method.

  10. Cumulative cultural learning: Development and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Cristine H

    2017-07-24

    The complexity and variability of human culture is unmatched by any other species. Humans live in culturally constructed niches filled with artifacts, skills, beliefs, and practices that have been inherited, accumulated, and modified over generations. A causal account of the complexity of human culture must explain its distinguishing characteristics: It is cumulative and highly variable within and across populations. I propose that the psychological adaptations supporting cumulative cultural transmission are universal but are sufficiently flexible to support the acquisition of highly variable behavioral repertoires. This paper describes variation in the transmission practices (teaching) and acquisition strategies (imitation) that support cumulative cultural learning in childhood. Examining flexibility and variation in caregiver socialization and children's learning extends our understanding of evolution in living systems by providing insight into the psychological foundations of cumulative cultural transmission-the cornerstone of human cultural diversity.

  11. Modelling the ancestral sequence distribution and model frequencies in context-dependent models for primate non-coding sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baele Guy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent approaches for context-dependent evolutionary modelling assume that the evolution of a given site depends upon its ancestor and that ancestor's immediate flanking sites. Because such dependency pattern cannot be imposed on the root sequence, we consider the use of different orders of Markov chains to model dependence at the ancestral root sequence. Root distributions which are coupled to the context-dependent model across the underlying phylogenetic tree are deemed more realistic than decoupled Markov chains models, as the evolutionary process is responsible for shaping the composition of the ancestral root sequence. Results We find strong support, in terms of Bayes Factors, for using a second-order Markov chain at the ancestral root sequence along with a context-dependent model throughout the remainder of the phylogenetic tree in an ancestral repeats dataset, and for using a first-order Markov chain at the ancestral root sequence in a pseudogene dataset. Relaxing the assumption of a single context-independent set of independent model frequencies as presented in previous work, yields a further drastic increase in model fit. We show that the substitution rates associated with the CpG-methylation-deamination process can be modelled through context-dependent model frequencies and that their accuracy depends on the (order of the Markov chain imposed at the ancestral root sequence. In addition, we provide evidence that this approach (which assumes that root distribution and evolutionary model are decoupled outperforms an approach inspired by the work of Arndt et al., where the root distribution is coupled to the evolutionary model. We show that the continuous-time approximation of Hwang and Green has stronger support in terms of Bayes Factors, but the parameter estimates show minimal differences. Conclusions We show that the combination of a dependency scheme at the ancestral root sequence and a context

  12. Cumulative cultural evolution: the role of teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Laureano; Toro, Miguel A

    2014-04-21

    In humans, cultural transmission occurs usually by cumulative inheritance, generating complex adaptive behavioral features. Cumulative culture requires key psychological processes (fundamentally imitation and teaching) that are absent or impoverished in non-human primates. In this paper we analyze the role that teaching has played in human cumulative cultural evolution. We assume that a system of cumulative culture generates increasingly adaptive behaviors, that are also more complex and difficult to imitate. Our thesis is that, as cultural traits become more complex, cumulative cultural transmission requires teaching to ensure accurate transmission from one generation to the next. In an increasingly complex cultural environment, we consider that individuals commit errors in imitation. We develop a model of cumulative cultural evolution in a changing environment and show that these errors hamper the process of cultural accumulation. We also show that a system of teaching between parents and offspring that increases the fidelity of imitation unblocks the accumulation and becomes adaptive whenever the gain in fitness compensates the cost of teaching.

  13. Human cumulative culture: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lewis G; Vale, Gill L; Laland, Kevin N; Flynn, Emma; Kendal, Rachel L

    2014-05-01

    Many animals exhibit social learning and behavioural traditions, but human culture exhibits unparalleled complexity and diversity, and is unambiguously cumulative in character. These similarities and differences have spawned a debate over whether animal traditions and human culture are reliant on homologous or analogous psychological processes. Human cumulative culture combines high-fidelity transmission of cultural knowledge with beneficial modifications to generate a 'ratcheting' in technological complexity, leading to the development of traits far more complex than one individual could invent alone. Claims have been made for cumulative culture in several species of animals, including chimpanzees, orangutans and New Caledonian crows, but these remain contentious. Whilst initial work on the topic of cumulative culture was largely theoretical, employing mathematical methods developed by population biologists, in recent years researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including psychology, biology, economics, biological anthropology, linguistics and archaeology, have turned their attention to the experimental investigation of cumulative culture. We review this literature, highlighting advances made in understanding the underlying processes of cumulative culture and emphasising areas of agreement and disagreement amongst investigators in separate fields.

  14. 4D Near-Field Source Localization Using Cumulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Feng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new cumulant-based algorithm to jointly estimate four-dimensional (4D source parameters of multiple near-field narrowband sources. Firstly, this approach proposes a new cross-array, and constructs five high-dimensional Toeplitz matrices using the fourth-order cumulants of some properly chosen sensor outputs; secondly, it forms a parallel factor (PARAFAC model in the cumulant domain using these matrices, and analyzes the unique low-rank decomposition of this model; thirdly, it jointly estimates the frequency, two-dimensional (2D directions-of-arrival (DOAs, and range of each near-field source from the matrices via the low-rank three-way array (TWA decomposition. In comparison with some available methods, the proposed algorithm, which efficiently makes use of the array aperture, can localize sources using sensors. In addition, it requires neither pairing parameters nor multidimensional search. Simulation results are presented to validate the performance of the proposed method.

  15. 4D Near-Field Source Localization Using Cumulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junying Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new cumulant-based algorithm to jointly estimate four-dimensional (4D source parameters of multiple near-field narrowband sources. Firstly, this approach proposes a new cross-array, and constructs five high-dimensional Toeplitz matrices using the fourth-order cumulants of some properly chosen sensor outputs; secondly, it forms a parallel factor (PARAFAC model in the cumulant domain using these matrices, and analyzes the unique low-rank decomposition of this model; thirdly, it jointly estimates the frequency, two-dimensional (2D directions-of-arrival (DOAs, and range of each near-field source from the matrices via the low-rank three-way array (TWA decomposition. In comparison with some available methods, the proposed algorithm, which efficiently makes use of the array aperture, can localize N−3 sources using N sensors. In addition, it requires neither pairing parameters nor multidimensional search. Simulation results are presented to validate the performance of the proposed method.

  16. Comparative analysis of the frequency and distribution of stem and progenitor cells in the adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Mohammad G; Blackmore, Daniel G; Large, Beatrice; Azari, Hassan; Esfandiary, Ebrahim; Paxinos, George; Franklin, Keith B J; Reynolds, Brent A; Rietze, Rodney L

    2008-04-01

    The neurosphere assay can detect and expand neural stem cells (NSCs) and progenitor cells, but it cannot discriminate between these two populations. Given two assays have purported to overcome this shortfall, we performed a comparative analysis of the distribution and frequency of NSCs and progenitor cells detected in 400 mum coronal segments along the ventricular neuraxis of the adult mouse brain using the neurosphere assay, the neural colony forming cell assay (N-CFCA), and label-retaining cell (LRC) approach. We observed a large variation in the number of progenitor/stem cells detected in serial sections along the neuraxis, with the number of neurosphere-forming cells detected in individual 400 mum sections varying from a minimum of eight to a maximum of 891 depending upon the rostral-caudal coordinate assayed. Moreover, the greatest variability occurred in the rostral portion of the lateral ventricles, thereby explaining the large variation in neurosphere frequency previously reported. Whereas the overall number of neurospheres (3730 +/- 276) or colonies (4275 +/- 124) we detected along the neuraxis did not differ significantly, LRC numbers were significantly reduced (1186 +/- 188, 7 month chase) in comparison to both total colonies and neurospheres. Moreover, approximately two orders of magnitude fewer NSC-derived colonies (50 +/- 10) were detected using the N-CFCA as compared to LRCs. Given only 5% of the LRCs are cycling (BrdU+/Ki-67+) or competent to divide (BrdU+/Mcm-2+), and proliferate upon transfer to culture, it is unclear whether this technique selectively detects endogenous NSCs. Overall, caution should be taken with the interpretation and employment of all these techniques.

  17. Effect of driving frequency on the electron energy distribution function and electron-sheath interaction in a low pressure capacitively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S.; Sirse, N.; Kaw, P. K.; Turner, M. M.; Ellingboe, A. R.

    2016-11-01

    By using a self-consistent particle-in-cell simulation, we investigated the effect of driving frequency (27.12-70 MHz) on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and electron-sheath interaction in a low pressure (5 mTorr) capacitively coupled Ar discharge for a fixed discharge voltage. We observed a mode transition with driving frequency, changing the shape of EEDF from a strongly bi-Maxwellian at a driving frequency of 27.12 MHz to a convex type distribution at an intermediate frequency, 50 MHz, and finally becomes a weak bi-Maxwellian at a higher driving frequency, i.e., above 50 MHz. The transition is caused by the electric field transients, which is of the order of electron plasma frequency caused by the energetic "beams" of electrons ejected from near the sheath edge. Below the transition frequency, 50 MHz, these high energy electrons redistribute their energy with low energy electrons, thereby increasing the effective electron temperature in the plasma, whereas the plasma density remains nearly constant. Above the transition frequency, high-energy electrons are confined between opposite sheaths, which increase the ionization probability and therefore the plasma density increases drastically.

  18. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF TROPICAL CYCLONE FREQUENCIES OVER THE SOUTH CHINA SEA AND ITS AFFECTING OCEANIC FACTORS IN THE PAST 50 YEARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun-hui; LIU Chun-xia; CHENG Zheng-quan

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of temporal and spatial distribution of tropical cyclone frequencies over the South China Sea areas and its affecting factors in the past 50yrs are analyzed based on typhoon data that provided by CMA and Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA). The results show that the tropical cyclone frequencies from June to October show concentrated geographic distribution, for they mainly distribute over the SCS area from 15 - 20 °N. The characteristics present significant interdecadal changes. The impact of oceanic factors on the tropical cyclone frequencies in the SCS area is mainly realized by La Ni(n)a and La Ni(n)a-like events before 1975 but mainly by El Ni(n)o and El Nifo-like events after 1975.

  19. Predicting the influence of compressibility and thermal and flow distribution asymmetry on the frequency-response characteristics of multitube two-phase condensing flow systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobus, C.J.; Wedekind, G.L.; Bhatt, B.L.

    2000-02-01

    An equivalent single-tube model concept was extended to predict the frequency-response characteristics of multitube two-phase condensing flow systems, complete with the ability to predict the influence of compressibility and thermal and flow distribution asymmetry. The predictive capability of the equivalent single-tube model was verified experimentally with extensive data that encompassed a three-order-of-magnitude range of frequencies, and a wide range of operating parameters.

  20. Predicting Cumulative Incidence Probability by Direct Binomial Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H.; Zhang, Mei-Jie

    Binomial modelling; cumulative incidence probability; cause-specific hazards; subdistribution hazard......Binomial modelling; cumulative incidence probability; cause-specific hazards; subdistribution hazard...

  1. The Solar-Type Hard-Binary Frequency and Distributions of Orbital Parameters in the Open Cluster M37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Meibom, Soren; Barnes, Sydney A.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2014-02-01

    Binary stars, and particularly the short-period ``hard'' binaries, govern the dynamical evolution of star clusters and determine the formation rates and mechanisms for exotic stars like blue stragglers and X-ray sources. Understanding the near-primordial hard-binary population of star clusters is of primary importance for dynamical models of star clusters, which have the potential to greatly advance our understanding of star cluster evolution. Yet the binary frequencies and distributions of binary orbital parameters (period, eccentricity, etc.) for young coeval stellar populations are poorly known, due to a lack of necessary observations. The young (~540 Myr) open cluster M37 hosts a rich binary population that can be used to empirically define these initial conditions. Importantly, this cluster has been the target of a comprehensive WIYN/Hydra radial-velocity (RV) survey, from which we have already identified a nearly complete sample of 329 solar-type (1.5 data with a multi-epoch RV survey using WIYN/Hydra to derive kinematic orbital solutions for these 82 binaries in M37. This project was granted time in 2013B and scheduled for later this year. We anticipate that about half of the detected binaries in M37 will acquire enough RV measurements (>=10) in 2013B to begin searching for orbital solutions. With this proposal and perhaps one additional semester we should achieve >=10 RV measurements for the remaining binaries.

  2. Spatial and temporal analysis on the distribution of active radio-frequency identification (RFID) tracking accuracy with the Kriging method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Shannon, Jeremy; Voun, Howard; Truijens, Martijn; Chi, Hung-Lin; Wang, Xiangyu

    2014-10-29

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has already been applied in a number of areas to facilitate the tracking process. However, the insufficient tracking accuracy of RFID is one of the problems that impedes its wider application. Previous studies focus on examining the accuracy of discrete points RFID, thereby leaving the tracking accuracy of the areas between the observed points unpredictable. In this study, spatial and temporal analysis is applied to interpolate the continuous distribution of RFID tracking accuracy based on the Kriging method. An implementation trial has been conducted in the loading and docking area in front of a warehouse to validate this approach. The results show that the weak signal area can be easily identified by the approach developed in the study. The optimum distance between two RFID readers and the effect of the sudden removal of readers are also presented by analysing the spatial and temporal variation of RFID tracking accuracy. This study reveals the correlation between the testing time and the stability of RFID tracking accuracy. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can be used to assist the RFID system setup process to increase tracking accuracy.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Analysis on the Distribution of Active Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID Tracking Accuracy with the Kriging Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency identification (RFID technology has already been applied in a number of areas to facilitate the tracking process. However, the insufficient tracking accuracy of RFID is one of the problems that impedes its wider application. Previous studies focus on examining the accuracy of discrete points RFID, thereby leaving the tracking accuracy of the areas between the observed points unpredictable. In this study, spatial and temporal analysis is applied to interpolate the continuous distribution of RFID tracking accuracy based on the Kriging method. An implementation trial has been conducted in the loading and docking area in front of a warehouse to validate this approach. The results show that the weak signal area can be easily identified by the approach developed in the study. The optimum distance between two RFID readers and the effect of the sudden removal of readers are also presented by analysing the spatial and temporal variation of RFID tracking accuracy. This study reveals the correlation between the testing time and the stability of RFID tracking accuracy. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can be used to assist the RFID system setup process to increase tracking accuracy.

  4. Analysis of Maneuvering Targets with Complex Motions by Two-Dimensional Product Modified Lv's Distribution for Quadratic Frequency Modulation Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Fulong; Jiao, Shuhong; Hou, Changbo; Si, Weijian; Wang, Yu

    2017-06-21

    For targets with complex motion, such as ships fluctuating with oceanic waves and high maneuvering airplanes, azimuth echo signals can be modeled as multicomponent quadratic frequency modulation (QFM) signals after migration compensation and phase adjustment. For the QFM signal model, the chirp rate (CR) and the quadratic chirp rate (QCR) are two important physical quantities, which need to be estimated. For multicomponent QFM signals, the cross terms create a challenge for detection, which needs to be addressed. In this paper, by employing a novel multi-scale parametric symmetric self-correlation function (PSSF) and modified scaled Fourier transform (mSFT), an effective parameter estimation algorithm is proposed-referred to as the Two-Dimensional product modified Lv's distribution (2D-PMLVD)-for QFM signals. The 2D-PMLVD is simple and can be easily implemented by using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and complex multiplication. These measures are analyzed in the paper, including the principle, the cross term, anti-noise performance, and computational complexity. Compared to the other three representative methods, the 2D-PMLVD can achieve better anti-noise performance. The 2D-PMLVD, which is free of searching and has no identifiability problems, is more suitable for multicomponent situations. Through several simulations and analyses, the effectiveness of the proposed estimation algorithm is verified.

  5. Analysis and prediction of acoustic speech features from mel-frequency cepstral coefficients in distributed speech recognition architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darch, Jonathan; Milner, Ben; Vaseghi, Saeed

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this work is to develop methods that enable acoustic speech features to be predicted from mel-frequency cepstral coefficient (MFCC) vectors as may be encountered in distributed speech recognition architectures. The work begins with a detailed analysis of the multiple correlation between acoustic speech features and MFCC vectors. This confirms the existence of correlation, which is found to be higher when measured within specific phonemes rather than globally across all speech sounds. The correlation analysis leads to the development of a statistical method of predicting acoustic speech features from MFCC vectors that utilizes a network of hidden Markov models (HMMs) to localize prediction to specific phonemes. Within each HMM, the joint density of acoustic features and MFCC vectors is modeled and used to make a maximum a posteriori prediction. Experimental results are presented across a range of conditions, such as with speaker-dependent, gender-dependent, and gender-independent constraints, and these show that acoustic speech features can be predicted from MFCC vectors with good accuracy. A comparison is also made against an alternative scheme that substitutes the higher-order MFCCs with acoustic features for transmission. This delivers accurate acoustic features but at the expense of a significant reduction in speech recognition accuracy.

  6. Multistation template matching to characterize frequency-magnitude distributions of induced seismicity in the Central and Eastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudzinski, M. R.; Skoumal, R.; Currie, B.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the frequency-magnitude distribution (FMD) of recent seismic sequences thought to be induced by wastewater injection and hydraulic fracturing in the Central and Eastern U.S. to investigate their physical origin and improve hazard estimates. Multistation template matching is utilized to increase the number of events analyzed by lowering the magnitude of detection. In cases where local deployments are available, we demonstrate that the FMD obtained through template matching using regional data are comparable to those obtained from traditional detection using the local deployment. Since deployments usually occur after seismicity has already been identified, catalogs constructed with regional data offer the advantage of providing a more complete history of the seismicity. We find two primary groups of FMDs for induced sequences: those that generally follow the Gutenberg-Richter power-law and those that generally do not. All of the induced sequences are typically characterized by swarm-like behavior, but the non-power-law FMDs are also characterized by a clustering of events at low magnitudes and particularly low aftershock productivity for a continental interior. Each of the observations in the non-power law FMD cases is predicted by numerical simulations of a seismogenic zone governed by a viscoelastic damage rheology with low effective viscosity in the fault zone. Such a reduction in effective viscosity is expected if fluid injection increases fluid pressures in the fault zone to the point that the fault zone begins to dilate.

  7. Quantitative assessment on the orientation and distribution of carbon fibers in a conductive polymer composite using high-frequency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2012-05-01

    uniformly in the deeper regions of the samples. This study validates that the distribution and orientation of CFs in conductive polymer composites could be sensitively and quantitatively assessed by high-frequency ultrasound in conjunction with current analysis methods.

  8. Mapping cumulative environmental effects, social vulnerability, and health in the San Joaquin Valley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ganlin; London, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    To understand the social distribution of environmental hazards, methods to assess cumulative effects and their health implications are needed. We developed a cumulative environmental hazard index integrating environmental data on pollution sites, air quality, and pesticide use; a social vulnerability index to measure residents' resources to prevent or mitigate health effects; and a health index. We found that communities in California's San Joaquin Valley with high social vulnerability face more environmental burdens and have worse health conditions.

  9. Cumulative Culture and Future Thinking: Is Mental Time Travel a Prerequisite to Cumulative Cultural Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, G. L.; Flynn, E. G.; Kendal, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Cumulative culture denotes the, arguably, human capacity to build on the cultural behaviors of one's predecessors, allowing increases in cultural complexity to occur such that many of our cultural artifacts, products and technologies have progressed beyond what a single individual could invent alone. This process of cumulative cultural evolution…

  10. Assessment of flow distribution in the mouse fetal circulation at late gestation by high-frequency Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Qing; Cahill, Lindsay S; Wong, Michael D; Seed, Mike; Macgowan, Christopher K; Sled, John G

    2014-08-15

    This study used high-frequency ultrasound to evaluate the flow distribution in the mouse fetal circulation at late gestation. We studied 12 fetuses (embryonic day 17.5) from 12 pregnant CD1 mice with 40 MHz ultrasound to assess the flow in 11 vessels based on Doppler measurements of blood velocity and M-mode measurements of diameter. Specifically, the intrahepatic umbilical vein (UVIH), ductus venosus (DV), foramen ovale (FO), ascending aorta (AA), main pulmonary artery (MPA), ductus arteriosus (DA), descending thoracic aorta (DTA), common carotid artery (CCA), inferior vena cava (IVC), and right and left superior vena cavae (RSVC, LSVC) were examined, and anatomically confirmed by micro-CT. The mouse fetal circulatory system was found to be similar to that of the humans in terms of the major circuit and three shunts, but characterized by bilateral superior vena cavae and a single umbilical artery. The combined cardiac output (CCO) was 1.22 ± 0.05 ml/min, with the left ventricle (flow in AA) contributing 47.8 ± 2.3% and the right ventricle (flow in MPA) 52.2 ± 2.3%. Relative to the CCO, the flow percentages were 13.6 ± 1.0% for the UVIH, 10.4 ± 1.1% for the DV, 35.6 ± 2.4% for the DA, 41.9 ± 2.6% for the DTA, 3.8 ± 0.3% for the CCA, 29.5 ± 2.2% for the IVC, 12.7 ± 1.0% for the RSVC, and 9.9 ± 0.9% for the LSVC. The calculated flow percentage was 16.6 ± 3.4% for the pulmonary circulation and 31.2 ± 5.3% for the FO. In conclusion, the flow in mouse fetal circulation can be comprehensively evaluated with ultrasound. The baseline data of the flow distribution in normal mouse fetus serve as the reference range for future studies.

  11. Time–frequency analysis of nonstationary complex magneto-hydro-dynamics in fusion plasma signals using the Choi–Williams distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, L.Q.; Hu, L.Q., E-mail: lqhu@ipp.ac.cn; Chen, K.Y.; Li, E.Z.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Choi–Williams distribution yields excellent time–frequency resolution for discrete signal. • CWD method provides clear time–frequency pictures of EAST and HT-7 fast MHD events. • CWD method has advantages to wavelets transform scalogram and the short-time Fourier transform spectrogram. • We discuss about how to choose the windows and free parameter of CWD method. -- Abstract: The Choi–Williams distribution is applied to the time–frequency analysis of signals describing rapid magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) modes and events in tokamak plasmas. A comparison is made with Soft X-ray (SXR) signals as well as Mirnov signal that shows the advantages of the Choi–Williams distribution over both continuous wavelets transform scalogram and the short-time Fourier transform spectrogram. Examples of MHD activities in HT-7 and EAST tokamak are shown, namely the onset of coupling tearing modes, high frequency precursors of sawtooth, and low frequency MHD instabilities in edge localized mode (ELM) free in H mode discharge.

  12. Distribution and genotype frequency of the C1431T and pro12ala polymorphisms of the peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma gene in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooki, Hassan; Haerian, Monir-Sadat; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Mirhafez, Reza; Ferns, Gordon; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Zali, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear transcription factor regulating multiple genes involved in cell growth, differentiation, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and energy production. Several genetic variations in the PPARγ gene have been identified to be associated with diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease. The present study was designed to explore the distribution of two common single nucleotide polymorphisms of the PPARγ gene (C1431T and Pro12Ala) in an Iranian population. Genotype frequencies for these two polymorphisms were compared for 160 healthy Iranian individuals with reports from other populations. The Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The genotype distribution of the C1431T PPARγ polymorphism was 0.869 for the CC genotype, 0.119 for the CT genotype and 0.013 for uncommon TT genotype. Allelic frequencies were 0.93 for C and 0.07 for T allele respectively. For the Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPARγ gene, genotypic distributions and allelic frequencies were, 0.813 for CC, 0.181 for CG and 0.06 for GG and 0.903 for C and 0.097 for G respectively. Allelic and genotypic frequencies for both polymorphisms of PPARγ gene were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Iran is a country with an ethnically diverse population and a comparison of allelic and genotypic frequencies of PPARγ C1431T and Pro12Ala polymorphisms between our population and others showed significant differences.

  13. Structure-borne low-frequency noise from multi-span bridges: A prediction method and spatial distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X. D.; Wu, D. J.; Li, Q.; Botteldooren, D.

    2016-04-01

    Structure-borne noise from railway bridges at far-field points is an important indicator in environmental noise assessment. However, studies that predict structure-borne noise tend to model only single-span bridges, thus ignoring the sound pressure radiating from adjacent spans. To simulate the noise radiating from multi-span bridges induced by moving vehicles, the vibrations of a multi-span bridge are first obtained from a three-dimensional (3D) vehicle-track-bridge dynamic interaction simulation using the mode superposition method. A procedure based on the 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) boundary element method (BEM) is then presented to promote the efficiency of acoustical computation compared with the 3D BEM. The simulated results obtained from both the single-span and multi-span bridge models are compared with the measured results. The sound predictions calculated from the single-span model are accurate only for a minority of near-field points. In contrast, the sound pressures calculated from the multi-span bridge model match the measured results in both the time and frequency domains for all of the near-field and far-field points. The number of bridge spans required in the noise simulation is then recommended related to the distance between the track center and the field points of interest. The spatial distribution of multi-span structure-borne noise is also studied. The variation in sound pressure levels is insignificant along the length of the bridge, which validates the finding that the sound test section can be selected at an arbitrary plane perpendicular to the multi-span bridge.

  14. Identifying the Distribution of Alteration Zone Using Very Low Frequency Method in Candi Gedong Songo, Ungaran, Semarang, Central Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfianto, A. D.; Sari, D. P.; Almas, S. A.; Kurniawan, W. S.; Ambariani, S. G.; Suyanto, I.

    2016-09-01

    The alteration zone could be a key link and a proof to know where the paleo heat source was previously located. An electromagnetic survey to identify and to map the lateral and vertical distribution of alteration zone had been done at geothermal area Candi Gedong Songo, Ungaran, Central Java, from 9th - 19th of June 2014, using VLF method. The survey consisted of 6 profiles, with NW - SE direction, which were located nearby the fumaroles spots and then went down to the observed alteration zone. Each profile was 600 m long and the distance between each profile was 20 m. The space between each measurement point of a profile was 20 m. In this study, tilt and ellipticity data with frequency of 19.8 kHz (Japan) and 24 kHz (Panama) were used. First, the data was processed to get the cross features anomaly between tilt and ellipticity data on the chart. Then, the derivative fraser and the relative current density pseudosection were also made to support the cross features anomaly. The interpretation of this data was done qualitatively using fraser and relative current density pseudosection. The result shows that the alteration zone gives high response of conductivity compared to its surrounding area. This is supported by the anomaly cross features between tilt and ellipticity data on the chart, also by high value of fraser and relative current density. Thus, the alteration zone are located in meter 150 - 250 in V1 and V2 profiles, also in meter 180 - 250 in V5 and V6 profiles. This result indicates that the ancient heat source was previously located nearby the fumaroles area and it is physically shown by the presence of sulphuric clay mineral content at the alteration surface area.

  15. Application of a frequency distribution method for determining instars of the beet armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from widths of cast head capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. Chen; S. J. Seybold

    2013-01-01

    Instar determination of field-collected insect larvae has generally been based on the analysis of head capsule width frequency distributions or bivariate plotting, but few studies have tested the validity of such methods. We used head capsules from exuviae of known instars of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae),...

  16. Critical periods for foetal mortality in gilts identified by analysing the length distribution of mummified foetuses and frequency of non-fresh stillborn piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lende, van der T.; Rens, van B.T.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the timing of foetal mortality in gilts of a segregating F2 cross of Large White and Meishan pigs on the basis of the length distribution of mummified foetuses and the frequency of non-fresh stillborn piglets in order to establish whether critical perio

  17. Is cumulated pyrethroid exposure associated with prediabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Rune; Jørs, Erik; Lander, Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    , cumulative exposure) was assessed from questionnaire data. Participants were asked about symptoms of diabetes. Blood samples were analyzed for glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a measure of glucose regulation. No association was found between pyrethroid exposure and diabetes symptoms. The prevalence...

  18. Cumulative Disadvantage among the Highly Ambitious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Katherine

    1990-01-01

    Using a social reproduction theory framework, analyzes the process by which high school seniors aspiring to high-level positions are sorted out after graduation. Analyzes early educational attainments and changes in occupational expectations. Shows a process of cumulative disadvantage in which White males are more likely to achieve their goals.…

  19. Pavlovian conditioning and cumulative reinforcement rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Justin A; Patterson, Angela E; Gharaei, Saba

    2015-04-01

    In 5 experiments using delay conditioning of magazine approach with rats, reinforcement rate was varied either by manipulating the mean interval between onset of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) or by manipulating the proportion of CS presentations that ended with the US (trial-based reinforcement rate). Both manipulations influenced the acquisition of responding. In each experiment, a specific comparison was made between 2 CSs that differed in their mean CS-US interval and in their trial-based reinforcement rate, such that the cumulative reinforcement rate-the cumulative duration of the CS between reinforcements-was the same for the 2 CSs. For example, a CS reinforced on 100% of trials with a mean CS-US interval of 60 s was compared with a CS reinforced on 33% of trials and a mean duration of 20 s. Across the 5 experiments, conditioning was virtually identical for the 2 CSs with matched cumulative reinforcement rate. This was true as long as the timing of the US was unpredictable and, thus, response rates were uniform across the length of the CS. We conclude that the effects of CS-US interval and of trial-based reinforcement rate are reducible entirely to their common effect on cumulative reinforcement rate. We discuss the implications of this for rate-based, trial-based, and real-time associative models of conditioning.

  20. An Axiomatization of Cumulative Prospect Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, P.P.; Tversky, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a method for axiomatizing a variety of models for decision making under uncertainty, including Expected Utility and Cumulative Prospect Theory. This method identifies, for each model, the situations that permit consistent inferences about the ordering of value differences. Exampl

  1. Cumulative Disadvantage among the Highly Ambitious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Katherine

    1990-01-01

    Using a social reproduction theory framework, analyzes the process by which high school seniors aspiring to high-level positions are sorted out after graduation. Analyzes early educational attainments and changes in occupational expectations. Shows a process of cumulative disadvantage in which White males are more likely to achieve their goals.…

  2. Singular statistics to model the distribution of large and small magnitude earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Maslov, Lev A

    2014-01-01

    The solution of the Generalized Logistic Equation is obtained to study earthquake statistics for large and small magnitudes. It is shown that the same solution fits the distribution of small magnitude earthquakes, m3, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The Gutenberg-Richter cumulative frequency-magnitude empirical formula is derived from the solution of this equation.

  3. Sheet beam model for intense space-charge: with application to Debye screening and the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies in a thermal equilibrium beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Steven M.; Friedman, Alex; Bazouin, Guillaume

    2011-01-10

    A one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson model for sheet beams is reviewed and extended to provide a simple framework for analysis of space-charge effects. Centroid and rms envelope equations including image charge effects are derived and reasonable parameter equivalences with commonly employed 2D transverse models of unbunched beams are established. This sheet beam model is then applied to analyze several problems of fundamental interest. A sheet beam thermal equilibrium distribution in a continuous focusing channel is constructed and shown to have analogous properties to two- d three-dimensional thermal equilibrium models in terms of the equilibrium structure and Deybe screening properties. The simpler formulation for sheet beams is exploited to explicitly calculate the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies within a thermal equilibrium beam. It is shown that as space-charge intensity increases, the frequency distribution becomes broad, suggesting that beams with strong space-charge can have improved stability.

  4. The quest for narrow e{sup +}e{sup -} cumulative energy distributions heavy ion collisions. The GSI e{sup +}e{sup -} puzzle; Die Suche nach schmalen e{sup +}e{sup -} Summenenergieverteilungen in Schwerionenkollisionen. Das GSI e{sup +}e{sup -}-Puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganz, R.

    1995-12-01

    The examination of electron-positron pairs which are emitted in heavy-ion collisions at the Coulomb barrier was continued with the newly designed EPoS II spectrometer at the UNILAC accelerator. The objective of the experiments was to further analyse the narrow line structures in the positron-electron cumulative energy distributions, which were observed in preceding measurements examining the collision systems U 238 + Th 232 and U 238 + Ta181 with the EPOS I spectrometer. By means of a reproduction experiment, the existence of the lines was statistically verified relying on a large data pool. [Deutsch] Die Untersuchung von Elektron- Positron Paaren, die bei Schwerionenkol lisionen an der Coulombbarriere emittiert werden, wurde mit dem neu kon zipierten EPoS II Spektrometer am UNILAC- Beschleuniger fortgesetzt. D ie Motivation der Experimente war die weitere Untersuchung der schmale n Linienstrukturen in den Positron- Elektron- Summenenergieverteilunge n, die in vorangegangenen Messungen der Stosssysteme U 238+ Th 232 un d U 238+ Ta 181 mit dem EPOS I Spektrometer beobachtet wurden. Durch ei ne Reproduktion wurde die Existenz der Linien anhand einer grossen Date nmenge statistisch sicher geprueft.

  5. 经纬网格与流域计算的地形指数累积分布函数及其均值差异分析%Analyses on Differences Between Cumulative Distribution Functions and Means of Topographic Indexes for Grid Cell and Individual Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖燕; 邓慧平; 孙菽芬

    2012-01-01

    To improve simulations of hydrological processes,the topographic-index hydrological model(TOPMODEL)has been applied to land surface models.The simplified scheme which applies TOPMODEL to grid cells of Global Climate Model(GCM)can simplify application of TOPMODEL in land surface models.The 2°×2°grid cell located in mountainous region of Changjiang basin and the other located in relatively flat region of Amazon basin are selected.The topographic indexes are calculated and statistical properties of topographic indexes for two grid cells are extracted using the data from digital elevation model of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission.River basins and drainage network are extracted using the same dataset and statistics are extracted for each basin.The difference between the cumulative distribution functions and means of topographic index for whole grid cell and for individual basin are analyzed.the cumulative distribution functions for whole grid cell and individual basin are fitted by exponential function.The main conclusions are summarized as follows:(1)Although there are differences between the cumulative distribution functions and means for whole grid cell and individual basin but the differences are not significant.It may be a reasonable simplification to apply TOPMODEL directly to grid cell of GCM;(2)The exponential function can fit the cumulative distribution functions well.These results provide helpful information for designing a TOPMODEL based and simplified hydrological model for use in land surface model.%为了改进陆面模式对水文过程的模拟,地形指数水文模型(Topographic-index hydrologicalmodel,TOPMODEL)已被应用于陆面模式(Land Surface Models,LSMs)。当前直接将TOPMODEL应用于全球气候模式(Global Climate Model,GCM)的网格单元的方案,简化了TOPMODEL在陆面模式中的应用。按GCM网格单元统计与按流域单元统计的地形指数分布函数之间的差异大小进行分析,可为研

  6. Design and Quasi-Equilibrium Analysis of a Distributed Frequency-Restoration Controller for Inverter-Based Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, Nathan G [ORNL; Grijalva, Prof. Santiago [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed frequency restoration controller which operates as an outer loop to frequency droop for voltage-source inverters. By quasi-equilibrium analysis, we show that the proposed controller is able to provide arbitrarily small steady-state frequency error while maintaing power sharing between inverters without need for communication or centralized control. We derive rate of convergence, discuss design considerations (including a fundamental trade-off that must be made in design), present a design procedure to meet a maximum frequency error requirement, and show simulation results verifying our analysis and design method. The proposed controller will allow flexible plug-and-play inverter-based networks to meet a specified maximum frequency error requirement.

  7. Oil spill characterization in the hybrid polarity SAR domain using log-cumulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeseth, Martine M.; Skrunes, Stine; Brekke, Camilla; Salberg, Arnt-Børre; Jones, Cathleen E.; Holt, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    Log-cumulants have proven to be an interesting tool for evaluating the statistical properties of potential oil spills in polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data within the common horizontal (H) and vertical (V) polarization basis. The use of first, second, and third order sample log-cumulants has shown potential for evaluating the texture and the statistical distributions, as well as discriminating oil from look-alikes. Log-cumulants are cumulants derived in the log-domain and can be applied to both single-polarization and multipolarization SAR data. This study is the first to investigate the differences between hybrid-polarity (HP) and full-polarimetric (FP) modes based on the sample log-cumulants of various oil slicks and open water from nine Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) scenes acquired off the coast of Norway in 2015. The sample log-cumulants calculated from the HP intensities show similar statistical behavior to the FP ones, resulting in a similar interpretation of the sample log-cumulants from HP and FP. Approximately eight hours after release the sample log-cumulants representing emulsion slicks have become more similar to the open water compared to plant oil. We find that the sample log-cumulants of the various oil slicks and open water varies between the scenes and also between the slicks and open water. This might be due to changes in ocean and wind condition, the initial slick properties, and/or the difference in the weathering process of the oil slicks.

  8. Prefiltering and Cumulant Based Harmonic Retrieval in Mixed ARMA Noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIShenghong; LIJianhua; XUEZhi; CHENLiya

    2005-01-01

    Harmonic retrieval is an important issue in the the field of statistical signal processing. However, in the case of harmonic retrieval in mixed colored Gaussian and Non-Gaussian Autoregressive movingaverage (ARMA) noises, the corresponding existing approaches can not retrieve a harmonic signal either with quadratic phase coupling components, or with cubic phase coupling components, or when the colored non-Gaussian ARMA noise is symmetrically distributed. In this paper, a new general approach is proposed to retrieve a one-dimensional real harmonic signal in the above mixed ARMA noises. A suitable filter is first used to remove all the sharp power spectrum peaks of the noisy observed process, then some kind of fourth-order cumulant is employed to identify the Autoregressive (AR) parameter values of the colored non-Gaussian ARMA noise model. After the real noisy observed data are filtered with the identified AR parameter values again, cumulant based methods can be made use of to retrieve the harmonics. The proposed new approach can be applied to retrieve a one-dimensional real harmonic signal in the above mixed colored Gaussian and non-Gaussian ARMA noises with no restrictions on the phase coupling of the harmonics and the distribution of the colored non-Gaussian ARMA noise. Simulation examples are presented to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  9. Frequency distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in different geographical regions of Pakistan and their possible routes of transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riazuddin Sheikh

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information regarding hepatitis C virus genotypes and subtypes circulating in Pakistan and various risk factors for their transmission are not known well. The specific objective of this study was to find out the frequency of various HCV genotypes present in well-characterized Pakistani HCV isolates and their possible routes of transmission. Methods A total of 3351 serum samples were tested by type-specific genotyping assay. Out of 3351 HCV RNA positive patients, 2039 were males and 1312 were females. As regard as genotyped samples, 2165 belonged to Punjab region, 823 belonged to N.W.F.P., 239 to Sindh and 124 patients were from Balochistan. Results Out of the total 3351 tested serum samples, type-specific PCR fragments were observed in 3150 (94.00% serum samples. The distribution of genotypes of the typeable samples as determined by this assay, was as follows: 1664 (49.05% genotype 3a; 592 (17.66% genotype 3b; 280 (8.35% genotype 1a; 252 (7.52% genotype 2a; 101 (3.01% genotype 1b; 50 (1.49% with genotype 4; 25 (0.75% with 3c; 27 (0.80% genotype 2b; 6 (0.18% with subtype 5a; 5 (0.15% genotype 1c; 4 (0.12% with subtype 6a; 3 (0.09% genotype 2c; and 161 (4.80% patients were infected with mixed infection. Two hundred and one (5.99% serum samples were found untypeable by the present genotyping system. More than 86% and 72% patients with genotypes 3a and 3b respectively had received multiple injections in past. For genotypes 1a and 1b the route of transmission was major/minor surgery along with unknown reasons. Majority of the cases with type 2a, 2b and indeterminate genotypes were sporadic. Mixed infections were common in thalassaemic patients. Conclusion The most common HCV genotype in Pakistan is type 3a. Regional difference in genotypes was observed only in Balochistan province of Pakistan. More than 70% of the cases were acquired in hospitals through reuse of needles/syringes and major/minor surgery that is very common in this

  10. Nanostructures for very broadband or multi-frequency transition from wave beams to a subwavelength light distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Luukkonen, O; Simovski, C

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we suggest and theoretically study a tapered plasmonic nanostructure which connects the incident wave beam with a subwavelength spatial region where the field is locally enhanced in a broad frequency range or for different operation frequencies. This spatial region has a frequency stable location near the contour of the tapered structure. This results from a special waveguide mode which can also exist in the tapered structure. We foresee many possible applications for our structure from prospective near-field scanning optical microscopes to interconnects between conventional optical waveguides and prospective optical nanocircuits.

  11. Complexity and demographic explanations of cumulative culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Querbes

    Full Text Available Formal models have linked prehistoric and historical instances of technological change (e.g., the Upper Paleolithic transition, cultural loss in Holocene Tasmania, scientific progress since the late nineteenth century to demographic change. According to these models, cumulation of technological complexity is inhibited by decreasing--while favoured by increasing--population levels. Here we show that these findings are contingent on how complexity is defined: demography plays a much more limited role in sustaining cumulative culture in case formal models deploy Herbert Simon's definition of complexity rather than the particular definitions of complexity hitherto assumed. Given that currently available empirical evidence doesn't afford discriminating proper from improper definitions of complexity, our robustness analyses put into question the force of recent demographic explanations of particular episodes of cultural change.

  12. Avoiding Program-Induced Cumulative Overload (PICO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Robin; Knapik, Joseph J; Pope, Rodney

    2016-01-01

    This article defines the concept of program-induced cumulative overload (PICO), provides examples, and advises ways to mitigate the adverse effects. PICO is the excessive cumulative physical workload that can be imparted to military personnel by a military training program with an embedded physical training component. PICO can be acute (accumulating within a single day) or chronic (accumulating across the entirety of the program) and results in adverse outcomes for affected personnel, including detrimental fatigue, performance degradation, injuries, or illness. Strategies to mitigate PICO include focusing administration and logistic practices during the development and ongoing management of a trainee program and implementing known musculoskeletal injury prevention strategies. More training is not always better, and trainers need to consider the total amount of physical activity that military personnel experience across both operational training and physical training if PICO is to be mitigated.

  13. Longhi Games, Internal Reservoirs, and Cumulate Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, S. A.

    2009-05-01

    Fe in plagioclase at an early age, T-rollers (or not) on the Di-Trid boundary in Fo-Di-Sil, the mantle solidus, origins of anorthosites, esoteric uses of Schreinemakers rules and many more topics are all fresh and pleasant memories of John Longhi's prolific and creative work. The Fram-Longhi experimental effect of pressure on plagioclase partitioning with liquid in mafic rocks became essential to an understanding of multiphase Rayleigh fractionation of plagioclase in big layered intrusions. Only by using the pressure effect could I find a good equation through the data for the Kiglapait intrusion, and that result among others required the existence with probability 1.0 of an internal reservoir (Morse, JPet 2008). Knowledge of cumulate porosity is a crucial key to the understanding of layered igneous rocks. We seek both the initial (inverse packing fraction) and residual porosity to find the time and process path from sedimentation to solidification. In the Kiglapait Lower Zone we have a robust estimate of mean residual porosity from the modes of the excluded phases augite, oxides, sulfide, and apatite. To this we apply the maximum variance of plagioclase composition (the An range) to find an algorithm that extends through the Upper Zone and to other intrusions. Of great importance is that all these measurements were made in grain mounts concentrated from typically about 200 g of core or hand specimen, hence the represented sample volume is thousands of times greater than for a thin section. The resulting distribution and scatter of the An range is novel and remarkable. It is V-shaped in the logarithmic representation of stratigraphic height, running from about 20 mole % at both ends (base to top of the Layered Series) to near-zero at 99 PCS. The intercept of the porosity-An range relation gives An range = 3.5 % at zero residual porosity. Petrographic analysis reveals that for PCS less than 95 and greater than 99.9, the An range is intrinsic, i.e. pre-cumulus, for

  14. Cumulative Laws,Team Assembling Mechanisms Determining Network Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; LIU Qi; YE Qi

    2008-01-01

    A number of researching works have shed light on the field of complex networks recently.We investigate a wide range of real-world networks and find several interesting phenomena.Firstly,almost all of these networks evolve by overlapping new small graphs on former networks.Secondly,not only the degree sequence of the mature network follows a power-law distribution,but also the distribution of the cumulative occurrence times during the growing process are revealed to have a heavy tail.Existing network evolving models do not provide interpretation to these phenomena.We suggest a model based on the team assembling mechanism,which is extracted from the growing processes of real-world networks and requires simple parameters,and produces networks exhibiting these properties observed in the present study and in previous works.

  15. Cumulative carbon emissions and the Green Paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Ploeg, Frederick Van der

    2013-01-01

    The green paradox states that a gradually more ambitious climate policy such as a renewables subsidy or an anticipated carbon tax induces fossil fuel owners to extract more rapidly and accelerate global warming. However, if extraction becomes more costly as reserves are depleted, such policies also shorten the fossil fuel era, induce more fossil fuel to be left in the earth, and thus curb cumulative carbon emissions. These consequences are relevant, as global warming depends primarily on cumu...

  16. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-xiao Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil.

  17. EPA Workshop on Epigenetics and Cumulative Risk ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agenda Download the Workshop Agenda (PDF) The workshop included presentations and discussions by scientific experts pertaining to three topics (i.e., epigenetic changes associated with diverse stressors, key science considerations in understanding epigenetic changes, and practical application of epigenetic tools to address cumulative risks from environmental stressors), to address several questions under each topic, and included an opportunity for attendees to participate in break-out groups, provide comments and ask questions. Workshop Goals The workshop seeks to examine the opportunity for use of aggregate epigenetic change as an indicator in cumulative risk assessment for populations exposed to multiple stressors that affect epigenetic status. Epigenetic changes are specific molecular changes around DNA that alter expression of genes. Epigenetic changes include DNA methylation, formation of histone adducts, and changes in micro RNAs. Research today indicates that epigenetic changes are involved in many chronic diseases (cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, mental health disorders, and asthma). Research has also linked a wide range of stressors including pollution and social factors with occurrence of epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic changes have the potential to reflect impacts of risk factors across multiple stages of life. Only recently receiving attention is the nexus between the factors of cumulative exposure to environmental

  18. On the relation between activity-related frequency shifts and the sunspot distribution over the solar cycle 23

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, A R G; Avelino, P P; Chaplin, W J; Campante, T L

    2016-01-01

    The activity-related variations in the solar acoustic frequencies have been known for 30 years. However, the importance of the different contributions is still not well established. With this in mind, we developed an empirical model to estimate the spot-induced frequency shifts, which takes into account the sunspot properties, such as area and latitude. The comparison between the model frequency shifts obtained from the daily sunspot records and those observed suggests that the contribution from a stochastic component to the total frequency shifts is about 30%. The remaining 70% is related to a global, long-term variation. We also propose a new observable to investigate the short- and mid-term variations of the frequency shifts, which is insensitive to the long-term variations contained in the data. On the shortest time scales the variations in the frequency shifts are strongly correlated with the variations in the total area covered by sunspots. However, a significant loss of correlation is still found, whic...

  19. Frequency fraction and spatial distribution of clay minerals detection by sub-pixel classification of ASTER data, case study, Esteghlal mine of Abadeh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Hashemi Tangestani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Esteghlal fireclay mine, northern Abadeh, with dominant composition of kaolinite and pyrophyllite, and annual production of over a million tons, is one of the largest sedimentary deposits in Iran. Linear Spectral Unmixing (LSU and Mixture Tuned Matched Filtering (MTMF processes were applied on the VNIR + SWIR dataset of ASTER for identifying the frequency fraction and distribution of clay minerals in this mine. Sub-pixel frequency assessment of ASTER data showed that distribution of pixels with higher fractions belong to the kaolinite and pyrophyllite, outcropped in two different parts of the mine. Comparison of LSU and MTMF output results showed that MTMF is more reliable to determining the relative fraction of clay minerals at the study area.

  20. A cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts from major dental institutions of Bangalore city: A study of 252 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Ramachandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to perform a cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts obtained from the data of major dental institutions of Bangalore city, as well as to evaluate their distribution during a 5-year period and compare the results with other international studies. Materials and Methods: Data for the study were obtained from the reports of patients diagnosed with odontogenic cysts between 2005 and 2010 from different dental institutions of Bangalore. Case records of patients that fit the histological classification of the World Health Organization (WHO (2005 were included in the study and the following variables were analyzed: age, gender, anatomic location, and histological type. Results: In a total of 252 cyst specimens diagnosed, 79.76% were odontogenic cysts and 20.24% were nonodontogenic cysts. Among the odontogenic cysts most frequent lesions were radicular cysts (50.25%, followed by keratocysts (27.36% and dentigerous cysts (22.39%. Conclusions: Our study provides a cumulative data of odontogenic cysts in the population of Bangalore city. The results of our study showed a similar frequency of odontogenic cysts as compared to other populations of the world, with radicular cyst being identified as the most frequent odontogenic cyst. Keratocyst was the second most common cyst followed by dentigerous cyst.

  1. Frequency stabilization of 1. 5-. mu. m InGaAsP distributed feedback laser to NH/sub 3/ absorption lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, T.; Saito, S.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1984-10-15

    NH/sub 3/ absorption lines due to vibration-rotation transitions are observed at 1.50--1.54 ..mu..m by using an InGaAsP superluminescent diode. A 1.5-..mu..m InGaAsP distributed feedback (DFB) laser is frequency stabilized to an NH/sub 3/ linear absorption line at 15196 A. Frequency stability of sigma(2,tau) = 8 x 10/sup -11/tau/sup -1/ is achieved for an averaging time range of 10 ms< or =tau< or =1 s. Such an absolute frequency-stabilized DFB laser is useful for coherent optical system applications, since it is free from the longitudinal mode jumping which results from a wide range of temperature changes and long-term device degradation.

  2. Comparative analysis of frequency and noise characteristics of Fabry – Perot and distributed feedback laser diodes with external optical injection locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonenko, A A; Dorogush, E S [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus); Malyshev, S A; Chizh, A L [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-11-30

    Using a system of coupled travelling wave equations, in the small-signal regime we analyse frequency and noise characteristics of index- or absorption-coupled distributed feedback laser diodes, as well as of Fabry – Perot (FP) laser diodes. It is shown that the weakest dependence of the direct modulation efficiency on the locking frequency in the regime of strong external optical injection locking is exhibited by a FP laser diode formed by highly reflective and antireflective coatings on the end faces of a laser structure. A reduction in the dependence of output characteristics of the laser diode on the locking frequency can be attained by decreasing the reflection coefficient of the antireflective FP mirror. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  3. The characteristics of frequency distribution of KIR2DL1 alleles polymorphism and recognition HLA-C ligand in the Chinese Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王苗

    2014-01-01

    Objective To find out the distributed characteristics of KIR2DL1 alleles frequencies and the recognition HLAC ligand in the Chinese Han population.Methods The111 patients and 116 donors from CMDP were performed the KIR2DL1 high-resoluction typing and KIR genotyping using sequence-based testing(SBT)and PCR-SSP methods.Results A total of 224

  4. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong-Dan; Shen, Chun-Mei; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-wei; Qin, Hai-Xia; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2013-01-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus, which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS), in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Using capi...

  5. Thermal and single frequency counter-current ultrasound pretreatments of sodium caseinate: enzymolysis kinetics and thermodynamics, amino acids composition, molecular weight distribution and antioxidant peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdualrahman, Mohammed Adam Y; Ma, Haile; Zhou, Cunshan; Yagoub, Abu ElGasim A; Hu, Jiali; Yang, Xue

    2016-12-01

    Due to the disadvantages of traditional enzymolysis, pretreatments are crucial to enhance protein enzymolysis. Enzymolysis kinetics and thermodynamics, amino acids composition, molecular weight distribution, fluorescence spectroscopy and antioxidant activity of thermal (HT) and single frequency counter-current ultrasound (SCFU) pretreated sodium caseinate (NaCas) were studied. Enzymolysis of untreated NaCas (control) improved significantly (P Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. The Challenge of Developing Social Indicators for Cumulative Effects Assessment and Land Use Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Parkins

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a synopsis on social indicators as relevant to cumulative effects assessment and land use planning. Although much has been done to better understand the social dimensions of environmental assessment, empirical work has been lacking on social indicators that could be used either as measurable inputs or outputs for cumulative effects assessment and land use planning in different kinds of communities and regions. Cumulative effects models currently in practice often fail to address deeper issues of community and regional well-being. Against this gap, social scientists are being asked to make reliable generalizations about functional, measurable relationships between certain social indicators and land use change or scenarios. To address this challenge, the Alberta Research Council held a two-day workshop in 2005 with social scientists. The workshop resulted in a list of prioritized social indicators that could be included in cumulative effects modeling/assessments and land use planning. The top five social indicators included population growth rate, education attainment, self-assessed quality of life, equity, i.e., distribution of benefits, and locus of control. Although consensus on social indicators and social thresholds for cumulative effects models was not reached, the insight gained from the workshop will help inform future cumulative effects assessment and land use planning.

  7. Effect of driving frequency on the electron-sheath interaction and electron energy distribution function in a low pressure capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sarveshwar; Sirse, Nishant; Kaw, Predhiman; Turner, Miles; Ellingboe, Albert R.; InstitutePlasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat Team; School Of Physical Sciences; Ncpst, Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Ireland Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The effect of driving frequency (27.12-70 MHz) on the electron-sheath interaction and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is investigated in a low pressure capacitive discharges using a self-consistent particle-in-cell simulation. At a fixed discharge voltage the EEDF evolves from a strongly bi-Maxwellian at low frequency, 27.12 MHz, to a convex type distribution at an intermediate frequency, 50 MHz, and finally becomes a weak biMaxwellian above 50 MHz. The EEDF evolution leads to a two-fold increase in the effective electron temperature up to 50 MHz, whereas the electron density remains constant in this range. After 50MHz, the electron density increases rapidly and the electron temperature decreases. The transition is caused by the transient electric field excited by bursts of high energy electrons interacting strongly with the sheath edge. Above the transition frequency, high energy electrons are confined between two sheaths which increase the ionization probability and thus the plasma density increases.

  8. Prediction of maximum P- and S-wave amplitude distributions incorporating frequency- and distance-dependent characteristics of the observed apparent radiation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Manabu; Yoshimoto, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Frequency-dependent model of the apparent radiation pattern has been extensively incorporated into engineering and scientific applications for high-frequency seismic waves, but distance-dependent properties have not yet been fully taken into account. We investigated the unified characteristics of frequency and distance dependences in both apparent P- and S-wave radiation patterns during local crustal earthquakes. Observed distortions of the apparent P- and S-wave radiation patterns could be simply modeled by using a function of the normalized hypocentral distance, which is a product of the wave number and hypocentral distance. This behavior suggests that major cause of distortion of the apparent radiation pattern is seismic wave scattering and diffraction within the heterogeneous crust. On the basis of observed normalized hypocentral distance dependency, we proposed a method for prediction of spatial distributions of maximum P- and S-wave amplitudes. Our method incorporating normalized hypocentral distance dependence of the apparent radiation pattern reproduced the observed spatial distributions of maximum P- and S-wave amplitudes over a wide frequency and distance ranges successfully.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. General solution of cumulative second harmonic by Lamb wave propagation in a solid plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Mingxi

    2008-01-01

    A straightforward approach has been developed for the general solution of cumulative second harmonic by Lamb wave propagation in a solid plate. The present analyses of second-harmonic generation by Lamb waves focus on the cases where the phase velocity of the fundamental Lamb wave is exactly or approximately equal to that of the double frequency Lamb wave (DFLW). Based on the general solution obtained, the numerical analyses show that the cumulative second-harmonic fields are associated with the position of excitation source and the difference between the phase velocity of the fundamental Lamb wave and that of the dominant DFLW component.

  10. Cumulative risks of foster care placement for Danish children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fallesen, Peter; Emanuel, Natalia; Wildeman, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Although recent research suggests that the cumulative risk of foster care placement is far higher for American children than originally suspected, little is known about the cumulative risk of foster...

  11. Experiences with non-intrusive monitoring of distribution transformers based on the on-line frequency response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gomez Luna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The following article presents the results obtained in experiences that use the Impulse Frequency Response Analysis (IFRA method with a transformer in service. The IFRA method has been implemented in order to transform the transient signals to the frequency domain using Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT. However, it can be considered that the DFT is not the most suitable tool for this type of analysis, since, by definition, this tool is useful for processing stationary signals. Taking that into consideration, the analysis of transient signals could be hypothetically improved by using continuous wavelet transform (CWT, given their variable time/frequency resolution. The analysis of transient signals in Wavelet domain has improved the repeatability of the frequency response curves, as it has been observed in experimental results. The proposed on-line IFRA method, based on Wavelet transform, was validated under load and no-load conditions on a 150 kVA three-phase transformer 13200/225 Volts, in the Campus of the Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia.

  12. Climate mitigation: sustainable preferences and cumulative carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Simon

    2010-05-01

    We develop a stylized AK growth model with both climate damages to ecosystem goods and services and sustainable preferences that allow trade-offs between present discounted utility and long-run climate damages. The simplicity of the model permits analytical solutions. Concern for the long-term provides a strong driver for mitigation action. One plausible specification of sustainable preferences leads to the result that, for a range of initial parameter values, an optimizing agent would choose a level of cumulative carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions independent of initial production capital endowment and CO2 levels. There is no technological change so, for economies with sufficiently high initial capital and CO2 endowments, optimal mitigation will lead to disinvestment. For lower values of initial capital and/or CO2 levels, positive investment can be optimal, but still within the same overall level of cumulative emissions. One striking aspect of the model is the complexity of possible outcomes, in addition to these optimal solutions. We also identify a resource constrained region and several regions where climate damages exceed resources available for consumption. Other specifications of sustainable preferences are discussed, as is the case of a hard constraint on long-run damages. Scientists are currently highlighting the potential importance of the cumulative carbon emissions concept as a robust yet flexible target for climate policymakers. This paper shows that it also has an ethical interpretation: it embodies an implicit trade off in global welfare between present discounted welfare and long-term climate damages. We hope that further development of the ideas presented here might contribute to the research and policy debate on the critical areas of intra- and intergenerational welfare.

  13. Frequency sweep jitter and wander of a Vernier-Tuned Distributed Bragg Reflector (VT-DBR) laser at 1550 nm in OCT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens Biersach, R. C.; Derickson, Dennis; Ensher, Jason

    2015-07-01

    The short-term jitter and longer-term wander of the frequency sweep profile of a Vernier-Tuned Distributed Bragg Reflector (VT-DBR) laser at 1550 nm used in OCT applications is characterized in this work. The VT-DBR has demonstrated success in source-swept OCT (SSOCT), performing both intensity [1] and phase-sensitive [2] OCT. The purpose of this paper is to investigate one of the unique aspects of the VT-DBR laser that makes it successful in OCT: the stability of the linear optical frequency sweep of the source. Jitter measurements of the optical frequency sweep are recorded using a 3-cavity 100 GHz free spectral range (FSR) solid etalon. A gas absorption reference cell is used for wander characterization. We report that the VT-DBR jitters by no more than 82 MHz RMS in optical frequency while sweeping at an 8 kHz repetition rate. Longer-term wander provides insight into the accuracy of the VT-DBR selfcalibration routine which produces an intrinsically linear optical frequency sweep. Over an 8-hour data collection period, the system maintains a linear sweep with an optical frequency step of 105 MHz per 2.5 ns with +/- 3 kHz per 2.5 ns (+/- 0.03%) peak-to-peak deviation. We find that the absolute frequency drifts by 325 MHz (2.6pm) over the same 8- hour period with ambient temperature fluctuations of no more than 5 °C. Results show that using calibration with a gas reference cell, picometer absolute wavelength accuracy of the laser can be achieved at any time for a single sweep. Stability and accuracy limits are thought to be due to electronic drive circuitry in the current design.

  14. Long and Short Term Cumulative Structural Priming Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Kaschak, Michael P.; Kutta, Timothy J.; Coyle, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    We present six experiments that examine cumulative structural priming effects (i.e., structural priming effects that accumulate across many utterances). Of particular interest is whether (1) cumulative priming effects transfer across language production tasks and (2) the transfer of cumulative priming effects across tasks persists over the course of a week. Our data suggest that cumulative structural priming effects do transfer across language production tasks (e.g., from written stem complet...

  15. Preserved cumulative semantic interference despite amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Michael Oppenheim

    2015-05-01

    As predicted by Oppenheim et al’s (2010 implicit incremental learning account, WRP’s BCN RTs demonstrated strong (and significant repetition priming and semantic blocking effects (Figure 1. Similar to typical results from neurally intact undergraduates, WRP took longer to name pictures presented in semantically homogeneous blocks than in heterogeneous blocks, an effect that increased with each cycle. This result challenges accounts that ascribe cumulative semantic interference in this task to explicit memory mechanisms, instead suggesting that the effect has the sort of implicit learning bases that are typically spared in hippocampal amnesia.

  16. 中亚热带6种不同更新方式森林0-5mm根系直径频率分布%Diameter frequency distribution for 0-5mm roots in six mid-subtropical forests subject to different regeneration approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡双成; 熊德成; 黄锦学; 王韦韦; 黄超超; 邓飞; 陈云玉; 陈光水

    2015-01-01

    forest of Castanopsis carlesii through natural regeneration ( NR) , the secondary forest of Castanopsis carlesii through natural regeneration with anthropogenic promotion ( AR ) , the Castanopsis carlesii plantation ( CC ) , the Pinus massoniana plantation ( PM) , and the Cunninghamia lanceolata plantation ( CL) , in Sanming, Fujian Province. Because it is different to differentiate between the roots of different species, the study was conducted at the community level. There were three main conclusions in this study. First, root length density ( RLD) and root biomass density ( RBD) for all the three diameter ranges (≤1 mm,≤2 mm, and ≤5 mm) decreased from NF, NR, AR, to CC. Out of the three plantations, the highest RLD and RBD wereobtained in CC, while the lowest RLD and RBD was obtained in PM. Second, out of roots with 0—5mm diameter, 87%—98% and 65%—88% were represented by 0—2 mm and 0—1 mm diameter roots, respectively. The roots of NF, CC, and CL had the similar root diameter frequency distributions, with a maximum frequency of 0.7 mm diameter. The root diameter frequency distribution of AR, NR, and PM was also similar, with a maximum frequency of 0. 3mm diameter. The root diameter frequency distribution for all six stands was unimodal, and fitted well with the cumulative lognormal distribution function, with the determination coefficient R2 being above 0. 99 for all stands. Third, the fitting parameters of μ and σ in the cumulative lognormal distribution function represented different foraging strategies for soil resources in different stands. μandσwere strongly negatively correlated, which showed a trade-off in the fine root resource acquisition strategy. With the increasing tree species diversity,μtends to be smaller, whileσtends to be larger, reflecting the growing competition for nutrition and water among the roots of different trees species. μ and σ were distinctly different among different plantation tree species, showing differences in

  17. A Missing Link in the Evolution of the Cumulative Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Toshio; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2012-01-01

    A recently recovered cumulative recorder provides a missing link in the evolution of the cumulative recorder from a modified kymograph to a reliably operating, scientifically and commercially successful instrument. The recorder, the only physical evidence of such an early precommercial cumulative recorder yet found, was sent to Keio University in…

  18. Original and cumulative prospect theory: a discussion of empirical differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Wakker; H. Fennema

    1997-01-01

    This note discusses differences between prospect theory and cumulative prospect theory. It shows that cumulative prospect theory is not merely a formal correction of some theoretical problems in prospect theory, but it also gives different predictions. Experiments are described that favor cumulative

  19. FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS OF 90SR AND 137CS CONCENTRATIONS IN AN ECOSYSTEM OF THE 'RED FOREST' AREA IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Caldwell, E.

    2011-10-01

    In the most highly contaminated region of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone: the 'Red Forest' site, the accumulation of the major dose-affecting radionuclides ({sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs) within the components of an ecological system encompassing 3,000 m{sup 2} were characterized. The sampled components included soils (top 0-10 cm depth), Molina caerulea (blue moor grass), Camponotus vagus (carpenter ants) and Pelobates fuscus (spade-footed toad). In a comparison among the components of this ecosystem, the {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs concentrations measured in 40 separate grids exhibited significant differences, while the frequency distribution of the values were close to a logarithmically normal leptokurtic distribution with a significant right-side skew. While it is important to identify localized areas of high contamination or 'hot spots,' including these values in the arithmetic mean may overestimate the exposure risk. In component sample sets that exhibited logarithmically normal distribution, the geometrical mean more accurately characterizes a site. Ideally, risk assessment is most confidently achieved when the arithmetic and geometrical means are most similar, meaning the distribution approaches normal. Through bioaccumulation, the highest concentrations of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were measured in the blue moor grass and spade-footed toad. These components also possessed distribution parameters that shifted toward a normal distribution.

  20. Frequency distributions of 90Sr and 137Cs concentrations in an ecosystem of the "Red Forest" area in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschak, Sergey P; Makliuk, Yulia A; Maksimenko, Andrey M; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Chizhevsky, Igor; Caldwell, Eric F; Jannik, G Timothy; Farfán, Eduardo B

    2011-10-01

    In the most highly contaminated region of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, the "Red Forest" site, the accumulation of the major dose-affecting radionuclides (90Sr and 137Cs) within the components of an ecological system encompassing 3,000 m(2) was characterized. The sampled components included soils (top 0-10 cm depth), Molina caerulea (blue moor grass), Camponotus vagus (carpenter ants), and Pelobates fuscus (spade-footed toad). In a comparison among the components of this ecosystem, the 90Sr and 137Cs concentrations measured in 40 separate grids exhibited significant differences, while the frequency distribution of the values was close to a logarithmically-normal leptokurtic distribution with a significant right-side skew. While it is important to identify localized areas of high contamination or "hot spots," including these values in the arithmetic mean may overestimate the exposure risk. In component sample sets that exhibited logarithmically normal distribution, the geometric mean more accurately characterizes a site. Ideally, risk assessment is most confidently achieved when the arithmetic and geometric means are most similar, meaning the distribution approaches normal. Through bioaccumulation, the highest concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs were measured in the blue moor grass and spade-footed toad. These components also possessed distribution parameters that shifted toward a normal distribution.

  1. A probabilistic analysis of cumulative carbon emissions and long-term planetary warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyke, Jeremy; Damon Matthews, H.

    2015-11-01

    Efforts to mitigate and adapt to long-term climate change could benefit greatly from probabilistic estimates of cumulative carbon emissions due to fossil fuel burning and resulting CO2-induced planetary warming. Here we demonstrate the use of a reduced-form model to project these variables. We performed simulations using a large-ensemble framework with parametric uncertainty sampled to produce distributions of future cumulative emissions and consequent planetary warming. A hind-cast ensemble of simulations captured 1980-2012 historical CO2 emissions trends and an ensemble of future projection simulations generated a distribution of emission scenarios that qualitatively resembled the suite of Representative and Extended Concentration Pathways. The resulting cumulative carbon emission and temperature change distributions are characterized by 5-95th percentile ranges of 0.96-4.9 teratonnes C (Tt C) and 1.4 °C-8.5 °C, respectively, with 50th percentiles at 3.1 Tt C and 4.7 °C. Within the wide range of policy-related parameter combinations that produced these distributions, we found that low-emission simulations were characterized by both high carbon prices and low costs of non-fossil fuel energy sources, suggesting the importance of these two policy levers in particular for avoiding dangerous levels of climate warming. With this analysis we demonstrate a probabilistic approach to the challenge of identifying strategies for limiting cumulative carbon emissions and assessing likelihoods of surpassing dangerous temperature thresholds.

  2. Effect of cumulative strain on texture characteristics during wire drawing of eutectoid steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, F. [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, NanJing, 211189 (China)], E-mail: yangfan.hit@gmail.com; Ma, C.; Jiang, J.Q. [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, NanJing, 211189 (China); Feng, H.P.; Zhai, S.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-10-15

    The texture characteristics associated with plastic deformation of Fe-C steels near-eutectoid composition during a continuous cold drawing process were thoroughly investigated by orientation distribution function analysis based on X-ray diffraction. The effect of cumulative drawing strains on the <1 1 0> fiber texture in drawn hypereutectoid and hypoeutectoid steel wires was discussed.

  3. Multiplicity dependent and non-binomial efficiency corrections for particle number cumulants

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam; Koch, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In this note we extend previous work on efficiency corrections for cumulant measurements [1,2]. We will discuss the limitations of the methods presented in these papers. Specifically we will consider multiplicity dependent efficiencies as well as a non-binomial efficiency distributions. We will discuss the most simple and straightforward methods to implement those corrections.

  4. Dielectric permittivity tensor and low frequency instabilities of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastbood, E.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The dielectric permittivity tensor of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma is obtained by employing the kinetic theory based on the Vlasov equation and Lorentz transformation formulas with an emphasize on the q-nonextensive statistics. By deriving the q-generalized dispersion relation of the low frequency modes in this plasma system, the possibility and properties of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities are then studied. It is shown that the occurrence and the growth rate of these instabilities depend strongly on the nonextensive parameters, external magnetic field strength, and drift velocity. It is observed that the growth rate of ion acoustic instability is affected by the magnetic field strength much more than that of the filamentation instability in the low frequency range. The external magnetic field facilitates the development of the ion-acoustic instability. It is also shown that the filamentation is the dominant instability only for the high value of drift velocity.

  5. Application of Linear Quadratic Gaussian and Coefficient Diagram Techniques to Distributed Load Frequency Control of Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Hassan Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presented both the linear quadratic Gaussian technique (LQG and the coefficient diagram method (CDM as load frequency controllers in a multi-area power system to deal with the problem of variations in system parameters and load demand change. The full states of the system including the area frequency deviation have been estimated using the Kalman filter technique. The efficiency of the proposed control method has been checked using a digital simulation. Simulation results indicated that, with the proposed CDM + LQG technique, the system is robust in the face of parameter uncertainties and load disturbances. A comparison between the proposed technique and other schemes is carried out, confirming the superiority of the proposed CDM + LQG technique.

  6. Cumulative Environmental Management Association : Wood Buffalo Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, B. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The recently announced oil sands development of the Wood Buffalo Region in Alberta was the focus of this power point presentation. Both mining and in situ development is expected to total $26 billion and 2.6 million barrels per day of bitumen production. This paper described the economic, social and environmental challenges facing the resource development of this region. In addition to the proposed oil sands projects, this region will accommodate the needs of conventional oil and gas production, forestry, building of pipelines and power lines, municipal development, recreation, tourism, mining exploration and open cast mining. The Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA) was inaugurated as a non-profit association in April 2000, and includes 41 members from all sectors. Its major role is to ensure a sustainable ecosystem and to avoid any cumulative impacts on wildlife. Other work underway includes the study of soil and plant species diversity, and the effects of air emissions on human health, wildlife and vegetation. The bioaccumulation of heavy metals and their impacts on surface water and fish is also under consideration to ensure the quality and quantity of surface water and ground water. 3 figs.

  7. Cumulative environmental management and the oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    In response to concerns regarding the cumulative environmental impacts of oil sands development within the Athabasca oil sands deposit, the government of Alberta established a Regional Sustainable Development Strategy (RSDS) to balance development with environmental protection. The environmental issues identified through the RSDS were addressed by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA). CEMA's boundary is the Wood Buffalo region of northeastern Alberta. It identifies existing and future environmental effects in the region and proposes recommendations to regulatory bodies for reducing environmental impacts associated with oil sands development. This presentation outlined some of the 55 stakeholder representatives of CEMA, including Alberta government departments associated with resource development, oil sand developers within the region, and Aboriginal communities and First Nations. These stakeholders provide input on sector priorities and agree on environmental thresholds. Established working groups also address technical and scientific research issues identified in the RSDS such as sustainable ecosystems; surface waters; trace metals and air contaminants; nitrogen oxides and sulphur dioxides; and land reclamation. To date, CEMA has submitted more than 50 reports and has made 4 major environmental recommendations for trace metal management, ecosystem management tools, a framework for acid deposition management, and a landscape design checklist. tabs., figs.

  8. Higher Order Cumulants in Colorless Partonic Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Cherif, S; Ladrem, M

    2016-01-01

    Any physical system considered to study the QCD deconfinement phase transition certainly has a finite volume, so the finite size effects are inevitably present. This renders the location of the phase transition and the determination of its order as an extremely difficult task, even in the simplest known cases. In order to identify and locate the colorless QCD deconfinement transition point in finite volume $T_{0}(V)$, a new approach based on the finite-size cumulant expansion of the order parameter and the $\\mathscr{L}_{m,n}$-Method is used.We have shown that both cumulants of higher order and their ratios, associated to the thermodynamical fluctuations of the order parameter, in QCD deconfinement phase transition behave in a particular enough way revealing pronounced oscillations in the transition region. The sign structure and the oscillatory behavior of these in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition point might be a sensitive probe and may allow one to elucidate their relation to the QCD phase...

  9. Innovativeness, population size and cumulative cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yutaka; Aoki, Kenichi

    2012-08-01

    Henrich [Henrich, J., 2004. Demography and cultural evolution: how adaptive cultural processes can produce maladaptive losses-the Tasmanian case. Am. Antiquity 69, 197-214] proposed a model designed to show that larger population size facilitates cumulative cultural evolution toward higher skill levels. In this model, each newborn attempts to imitate the most highly skilled individual of the parental generation by directly-biased social learning, but the skill level he/she acquires deviates probabilistically from that of the exemplar (cultural parent). The probability that the skill level of the imitator exceeds that of the exemplar can be regarded as the innovation rate. After reformulating Henrich's model rigorously, we introduce an overlapping-generations analog based on the Moran model and derive an approximate formula for the expected change per generation of the highest skill level in the population. For large population size, our overlapping-generations model predicts a much larger effect of population size than Henrich's discrete-generations model. We then investigate by way of Monte Carlo simulations the case where each newborn chooses as his/her exemplar the most highly skilled individual from among a limited number of acquaintances. When the number of acquaintances is small relative to the population size, we find that a change in the innovation rate contributes more than a proportional change in population size to the cumulative cultural evolution of skill level.

  10. Effects of topography, soil type and forest age on the frequency and size distribution of canopy gap disturbances in a tropical forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lobo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Treefall gaps are the major source of disturbance in most tropical forests. The frequency and size of these gaps have important implications for forest ecosystem processes as they can influence the functional trait distribution of tree communities, stand-level above-ground biomass and productivity. However, we still know little about the relative importance of environmental drivers of gap disturbance regimes because existing studies vary greatly in criteria used for defining gaps, in the spatial extent of the study area, and the spatial resolution of canopy height measurements. Here we use LiDAR (light detecting and ranging to explore how forest age, topography and soil type affect canopy disturbance patterns across a 1500 ha tropical forest landscape in central Panama. We characterize disturbance based on the frequency distribution of gap sizes (the "gap size distribution", and the area of the forest affected by gaps (the "gap area fraction". We found that slope and forest age had significant effects on the gap size distribution, with a higher frequency of large gaps associated with old-growth forests and more gentle slopes. Slope and forest age had similar effects on the gap area fraction, however gap area fraction was also affected by soil type and by aspect. We conclude that variation in disturbance patterns across the landscape can be linked to factors that act at the fine scale (such as aspect or slope, and factors that show heterogeneity at coarser scales (such as forest age or soil type. Awareness of the role of different environmental factors influencing gap formation can help scale-up the impacts of canopy disturbance on forest communities measured at the plot scale to landscape and regional scales.

  11. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 allelic frequencies and identification of two new alleles in Iranian buffalo breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosafer, J; Heydarpour, M; Manshad, E; Russell, G; Sulimova, G E

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 ∗48, ∗20, ∗21, and obe) in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 ∗48 allele frequency (24.20%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 ∗20 and DRB3.2 ∗21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found.

  12. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 Allelic Frequencies and Identification of Two New Alleles in Iranian Buffalo Breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mosafer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles. Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 *48, *20, *21, and obe in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 *48 allele frequency (24.20% was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 *20 and DRB3.2 *21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found.

  13. Universal global imprints of genome growth and evolution--equivalent length and cumulative mutation density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Da Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Segmental duplication is widely held to be an important mode of genome growth and evolution. Yet how this would affect the global structure of genomes has been little discussed. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that equivalent length, or L(e, a quantity determined by the variance of fluctuating part of the distribution of the k-mer frequencies in a genome, characterizes the latter's global structure. We computed the L(es of 865 complete chromosomes and found that they have nearly universal but (k-dependent values. The differences among the L(e of a chromosome and those of its coding and non-coding parts were found to be slight. CONCLUSIONS: We verified that these non-trivial results are natural consequences of a genome growth model characterized by random segmental duplication and random point mutation, but not of any model whose dominant growth mechanism is not segmental duplication. Our study also indicates that genomes have a nearly universal cumulative "point" mutation density of about 0.73 mutations per site that is compatible with the relatively low mutation rates of (1-5 x 10(-3/site/Mya previously determined by sequence comparison for the human and E. coli genomes.

  14. Effect of Sertraline on Current-Source Distribution of the High Beta Frequency Band: Analysis of Electroencephalography under Audiovisual Erotic Stimuli in Healthy, Right-Handed Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hyun, Jae Seog; Kwon, Oh-Young

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cerebral changes in high beta frequency oscillations (22-30 Hz) induced by sertraline and by audiovisual erotic stimuli in healthy adult males. Scalp electroencephalographies (EEGs) were conducted twice in 11 healthy, right-handed males, once before sertraline intake and again 4 hours thereafter. The EEGs included four sessions recorded sequentially while the subjects were resting, watching a music video, resting, and watching an erotic video for 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes, respectively. We performed frequency-domain analysis using the EEGs with a distributed model of current-source analysis. The statistical nonparametric maps were obtained from the sessions of watching erotic and music videos (perotic stimuli decreased the current-source density of the high beta frequency band in the middle frontal gyrus, the precentral gyrus, the postcentral gyrus, and the supramarginal gyrus of the left cerebral hemisphere in the baseline EEGs taken before sertraline intake (perotic stimuli did not induce any changes in current-source distribution of the brain 4 hours after sertraline intake. It is speculated that erotic stimuli may decrease the function of the middle frontal gyrus, the precentral gyrus, the postcentral gyrus, and the supramarginal gyrus of the left cerebral hemisphere in healthy adult males. This change may debase the inhibitory control of the brain against erotic stimuli. Sertraline may reduce the decrement in inhibitory control.

  15. Impact of routine episodic emissions on the expected frequency distribution of emissions from oil and gas production sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N.; Blewitt, D.; Hebert, L. B.

    2015-12-01

    In coordination with oil and gas operators, we developed a high resolution (oil and gas emissions over a year. We include routine emissions from condensate tanks, dehydrators, pneumatic devices, fugitive leaks and liquids unloading. We explore the variability in natural gas emissions from these individual well-pad sources, and find that routine short-term episodic emissions such as tank flashing and liquids unloading result in the appearance of a skewed, or 'fat-tail' distribution of emissions, from an individual well-pad over time. Additionally, we explore the expected variability in emissions from multiple wells with different raw gas composition, gas/liquids production volumes and control equipment. Differences in well-level composition, production volume and control equipment translate into differences in well-level emissions leading to a fat-tail distribution of emissions in the absence of operational upsets. Our results have several implications for recent studies focusing on emissions from oil and gas sources. Time scale of emission estimates are important and have important policy implications. Fat tail distributions may not be entirely driven by avoidable mechanical failures, and are expected to occur under routine operational conditions from short-duration emissions (e.g., tank flashing, liquid unloading). An understanding of the expected distribution of emissions for a particular population of wells is necessary to evaluate whether the observed distribution is more skewed than expected. Temporal variability in well-pad emissions make comparisons to annual average emissions inventories difficult and may complicate the interpretation of long-term ambient fenceline monitoring data. Sophisticated change detection algorithms will be necessary to identify when true operational upsets occur versus routine short-term emissions.

  16. Effects of fade distribution on a mobile satellite downlink and uplink performance in a frequency reuse cellular configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Karl; Lecours, Michel; Pelletier, Marcel; Delisle, Gilles Y.

    1990-01-01

    In a mobile satellite system with a frequency reuse cellular configuration, significant co-channel interference can be experienced due to the antenna sidelobe level. The signal will be subjected not only to its own fading, but also to the effect of the varying degree of fading on co-channel interferer, and this interference will behave differently in the up and in the down link. This paper presents a quantitative evaluation of the combined effects of fades and co-channel interference on a mobile satellite link.

  17. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 Allelic Frequencies and Identification of Two New Alleles in Iranian Buffalo Breed

    OpenAIRE

    Mosafer, J.; Heydarpour, M.; Manshad, E.; Russell, G.; Sulimova, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 *48, ...

  18. Controlled Acoustic Bass System (CABS) A Method to Achieve Uniform Sound Field Distribution at Low Frequencies in Rectangular Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    The sound field produced by loudspeakers at low frequencies in small- and medium-size rectangular listening rooms is highly nonuniform due to the multiple reflections and diffractions of sound on the walls and different objects in the room. A new method, called controlled acoustic bass system (CABS......), is introduced. The system utilizes front loudspeakers and extra loudspeakers on the opposite wall of the room processed to cancel out the rear-wall reflections, which effectively conveys a more uniform sound field. The system works in the time domain and presents good performance over the loudspeaker low...

  19. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-dan; Shen, Chun-mei; Liu, Wen-juan; Zhang, Yu-dang; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-wei; Qin, Hai-xia; Zhu, Bo-feng

    2013-01-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus, which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS), in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Using capillary electrophoresis, the PCR products of the 21 STR loci were separated and genotyped. A total of 161 alleles were observed in the Russian ethnic minority group, and corresponding allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0044 to 0.5965. The 21 non-CODIS STR loci of the Russian ethnic minority group were characterized by high genetic diversity and therefore may be useful for elucidating the population’s genetic background, for individual identification, and for paternity testing in forensic practice. PMID:23733431

  20. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-dan; Shen, Chun-mei; Liu, Wen-juan; Zhang, Yu-dang; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-wei; Qin, Hai-xia; Zhu, Bo-feng

    2013-06-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus, which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS), in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Using capillary electrophoresis, the PCR products of the 21 STR loci were separated and genotyped. A total of 161 alleles were observed in the Russian ethnic minority group, and corresponding allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0044 to 0.5965. The 21 non-CODIS STR loci of the Russian ethnic minority group were characterized by high genetic diversity and therefore may be useful for elucidating the population's genetic background, for individual identification, and for paternity testing in forensic practice.

  1. Finite-time full counting statistics and factorial cumulants for transport through a quantum dot with normal and superconducting leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droste, Stephanie; Governale, Michele

    2016-04-01

    We study the finite-time full counting statistics for subgap transport through a single-level quantum dot tunnel-coupled to one normal and one superconducting lead. In particular, we determine the factorial and the ordinary cumulants both for finite times and in the long-time limit. We find that the factorial cumulants violate the sign criterion, indicating a non-binomial distribution, even in absence of Coulomb repulsion due to the presence of superconducting correlations. At short times the cumulants exhibit oscillations which are a signature of the coherent transfer of Cooper pairs between the dot and the superconductor.

  2. Automated SVD filtering of time-frequency distribution for enhancing the SNR of microseismic/microquake events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Naveed; Zerguine, Azzedine; Kaka, SanLinn; Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in continuous passive recording of passive microseismic experiments during reservoir fluid-injection monitoring, hydraulic-fracture monitoring and fault-movement monitoring, to name a few. The ability to accurately detect and analyze microseismic events generated by these activities is valuable in monitoring them. However, microseismic events usually have very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), especially when monitoring sensors (receivers) are located at the surface where coherent and non-coherent noise sources are overwhelming. Therefore, enhancing the SNR of the microseismic event will improve the localization process over the reservoir. In this study, a new method of enhancing the microseismic event is presented which relies on one trace per receiver record unlike other methods. The proposed method relies on a time-frequency representation and noise eliminating process which uses the singular-value decomposition (SVD) technique. Furthermore, the SVD is applied on the matrix representing the time-frequency decomposition of a trace. More importantly, an automated SVD filtering is proposed, so the SVD filtering becomes observation-driven instead of user-defined. Finally, it is shown that the proposed technique gives promising results with very low SNR, making it suitable to locate passive microseismic events even if the sensors are located on the surface.

  3. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene 4G/5G alleles frequency distribution in the Lebanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammaa, Dina M R; Sabbagh, Amira S; Taher, Ali T; Zaatari, Ghazi S; Mahfouz, Rami A R

    2008-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is an inhibitor of fibrinolysis. Increased plasma PAI-1 levels play an essential role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular risk and other diseases associated with thrombosis. The 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 promoter region has been extensively studied in different populations. We studied 160 healthy unrelated Lebanese individuals using a reverse hybridization PCR assay to detect the 5G/5G, 4G/5G and, 4G/4G genotypes of the PAI-1 gene and the frequencies of the 4G and 5G alleles. We found that 4G/5G genotype was the most prevalent (45.6%) followed by 5G/5G (36.9%) and 4G/4G (17.5%). The frequencies of the 4G and 5G alleles were calculated to be 0.403 and 0.597, respectively. Compared to other ethnic communities, the Lebanese population was found to harbour a relatively high prevalence of the rare 4G allele. This, in turn, may predispose this population to develop cardiovascular diseases and other thrombotic clinical conditions. This study aids to enhance our understanding of the genetic features of the Lebanese population.

  4. Disturbance frequency and vertical distribution of seeds affect long-term population dynamics: a mechanistic seed bank model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eager, Eric Alan; Haridas, Chirakkal V; Pilson, Diana; Rebarber, Richard; Tenhumberg, Brigitte

    2013-08-01

    Seed banks are critically important for disturbance specialist plants because seeds of these species germinate only in disturbed soil. Disturbance and seed depth affect the survival and germination probability of seeds in the seed bank, which in turn affect population dynamics. We develop a density-dependent stochastic integral projection model to evaluate the effect of stochastic soil disturbances on plant population dynamics with an emphasis on mimicking how disturbances vertically redistribute seeds within the seed bank. We perform a simulation analysis of the effect of the frequency and mean depth of disturbances on the population's quasi-extinction probability, as well as the long-term mean and variance of the total density of seeds in the seed bank. We show that increasing the frequency of disturbances increases the long-term viability of the population, but the relationship between the mean depth of disturbance and the long-term viability of the population are not necessarily monotonic for all parameter combinations. Specifically, an increase in the probability of disturbance increases the long-term viability of the total seed bank population. However, if the probability of disturbance is too low, a shallower mean depth of disturbance can increase long-term viability, a relationship that switches as the probability of disturbance increases. However, a shallow disturbance depth is beneficial only in scenarios with low survival in the seed bank.

  5. Asian population frequencies and haplotype distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes among Chinese, Malay, and Indian in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi Chuan; Chan, Soh Ha; Ren, Ee Chee

    2008-11-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) gene frequencies have been shown to be distinctly different between populations and contribute to functional variation in the immune response. We have investigated KIR gene frequencies in 370 individuals representing three Asian populations in Singapore and report here the distribution of 14 KIR genes (2DL1, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL4, 2DL5, 2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 2DS4, 2DS5, 3DL1, 3DL2, 3DL3, 3DS1) with two pseudogenes (2DP1, 3DP1) among Singapore Chinese (n = 210); Singapore Malay (n = 80), and Singapore Indian (n = 80). Four framework genes (KIR3DL3, 3DP1, 2DL4, 3DL2) and a nonframework pseudogene 2DP1 were detected in all samples while KIR2DS2, 2DL2, 2DL5, and 2DS5 had the greatest significant variation across the three populations. Fifteen significant linkage patterns, consistent with associations between genes of A and B haplotypes, were observed. Eighty-four distinct KIR profiles were determined in our populations, 38 of which had not been described in other populations. KIR haplotype studies were performed using nine Singapore Chinese families comprising 34 individuals. All genotypes could be resolved into corresponding pairs of existing haplotypes with eight distinct KIR genotypes and eight different haplotypes. The haplotype A2 with frequency of 63.9% was dominant in Singapore Chinese, comparable to that reported in Korean and Chinese Han. The A haplotypes predominate in Singapore Chinese, with ratio of A to B haplotypes of approximately 3:1. Comparison with KIR frequencies in other populations showed that Singapore Chinese shared similar distributions with Chinese Han, Japanese, and Korean; Singapore Indian was found to be comparable with North Indian Hindus while Singapore Malay resembled the Thai.

  6. Is uveitis associated with topiramate use? A cumulative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg JL

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey L Goldberg,1 Amy G Lau,2 Bo Fan,2 Lisa Ford,3 Howard E Greenberg3 1Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, 2Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Horsham, PA, 3Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA Abstract: Occasional reports of uveitis following topiramate use necessitated an investigation of relevant cases from safety databases and published biomedical literature. Data mining of the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System and cumulative review of cases from the global safety database (sponsor database and published literature were conducted to assess association between topiramate use and uveitis. The Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System search identified disproportional reporting of uveitis (n=23 and related terms (choroidal detachment, n=25; iridocyclitis, n=17. The postmarketing reporting frequency of uveitis and related events from the global safety database and based on an estimated topiramate exposure of 11,185,740 person-years from launch to April 2015 was 0.38 per 100,000 person-years and assigned as very rare. A total of 14 potential uveitis cases were identified from the cumulative review. Seven of these 14 cases were complicated by inadequate documentation, appearance of uveitic signs following drug withdrawal, or concurrent use of other sulfonamides. In acute angle-closure glaucoma and uveal effusions cases, insufficient evidence for underlying inflammation suggested that uveitis was not a component. Only seven of 14 cases were well documented, potentially topiramate-associated uveitis cases. Uveitis may occur in the setting of topiramate use only in very rare instances. Current evidence did not reveal a dose- or duration-dependent relationship between uveitis and topiramate use. Keywords: topiramate, uveitis, acute angle-closure glaucoma, drug safety, Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System, postmarketing 

  7. Ion cumulation by conical cathode electrolysis.

    CERN Document Server

    Grishin, V G

    2002-01-01

    Results of solid-state sodium stearate electrolysis with conical and cylindrical cathodes is presented here. Both electric measurement and conical samples destruction can be explained if a stress developing inside the conical sample is much bigger than in the cylindrical case and there is its unlimited amplification along cone slopes. OTHER KEYWORDS: ion, current, solid, symmetry, cumulation, polarization, depolarization, ionic conductor,superionic conductor, ice, crystal, strain, V-center, V-centre, doped crystal, interstitial impurity, intrinsic color center, high pressure technology, Bridgman, anvil, experiment, crowdion, dielectric, proton, layer, defect, lattice, dynamics, electromigration, mobility, muon catalysis, concentration, doping, dopant, conductivity, pycnonuclear reaction, permittivity, dielectric constant, point defects, interstitials, polarizability, imperfection, defect centers, glass, epitaxy, sodium hydroxide, metallic substrate, crystallization, point, tip, susceptibility, ferroelectric, ...

  8. [Cumulative trauma disorders: work or professional disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Marcus Vitor Diniz; Cavalcanti, Francisco Ivo Dantas; Soriano, Evelyne Pessoa; de Miranda, Hênio Ferreira

    2009-06-01

    This study aimed at reviewing the Brazilian legislation applied to occupational health. It refers to the diseases embodied in the Repetition Strain Injury (RSI) and Cumulative Trauma Disorders (CTD) regarded as work or professional diseases. This analysis allowed to perform the historical evolution of legislation concerning the issue, noting that the state of the art of regulation on RSI-CTD is anchored in specific regulation present in the Normative Instruction 98/2003, that establishes the diagnostic criteria and classification of RSI-CTD. It was concluded that according to the existing legislation in Brazil, the pathologies related to RSI-CTD are considered as work diseases and their legal effects are similar to the work-related accidents.

  9. Quasi-gaussian fixed points and factorial cumulants in nuclear multifragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroix, D

    1996-01-01

    We re-analyze the conditions for the phenomenon of intermittency (self-similar fluctuations) to occur in models of multifragmentation. Analyzing two different mechanisms, the bond-percolation and the ERW (Elattari, Richert and Wagner) statistical fragmentation models, we point out a common quasi-gaussian shape of the total multiplicity distribution in the critical range. The fixed-point property is also observed for the multiplicity of the second bin. Fluctuations are studied using scaled factorial cumulants instead of scaled factorial moments. The second-order cumulant displays the intermittency signal while higher order cumulants are equal to zero, revealing a large information redundancy in scaled factorial moments. A practical criterion is proposed to identify the gaussian feature of light-fragment production, distinguishing between a self-similarity mechanism (ERW) and the superposition of independent sources (percolation).

  10. Adaptive gamma correction based on cumulative histogram for enhancing near-infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenghua; Zhang, Tianxu; Li, Qian; Fang, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Histogram-based methods have been proven their ability in image enhancement. To improve low contrast while preserving details and high brightness in near-infrared images, a novel method called adaptive gamma correction based on cumulative histogram (AGCCH) is studied in this paper. This novel image enhancement method improves the contrast of local pixels through adaptive gamma correction (AGC), which is formed by incorporating a cumulative histogram or cumulative sub-histogram into the weighting distribution. Both qualitatively and quantitatively, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed image enhancement with the AGCCH method can perform well in brightness preservation, contrast enhancement, and detail preservation, and it is superior to previous state-of-the-art methods.

  11. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Hurst, Marc

    2016-07-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes.

  12. Energetic distribution of interface states in GaN metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector structure obtained from low-frequency noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungil; Oh, S. K.; Kim, Seonhee

    2011-12-01

    We show that the low-frequency noise characteristics in Gallium nitride metal-semiconductor-metal photodiode structures where the structure can be treated as two Shottky diodes connected head-to-head, can be used to give useful information about the energetic distribution of interface states. By considering different models for noise generation, we concluded the density of interface states increases towards the conduction band edge in the forbidden energy gap. The experimental results reported in the literature showed quadratic current dependence at low current regions and became super-quadratic at higher current region which can be explained by the random walk of electrons involving interface states at the metal-semiconductor interface which gives quadratic current dependence and linear dependence on the interface states density at the Fermi level. Thus the non-quadratic dependence can be analyzed to give energetic distribution of the interface states.

  13. Text mixing shapes the anatomy of rank-frequency distributions: A modern Zipfian mechanics for natural language

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jake Ryland; Danforth, Christopher M; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2014-01-01

    Natural languages are full of rules and exceptions. One of the most famous quantitative rules is Zipf's law which states that the frequency of occurrence of a word is approximately inversely proportional to its rank. Though this `law' of ranks has been found to hold across disparate texts and forms of data, analyses of increasingly large corpora over the last 15 years have revealed the existence of two scaling regimes. These regimes have thus far been explained by a hypothesis suggesting a separability of languages into core and non-core lexica. Here, we present and defend an alternative hypothesis, that the two scaling regimes result from the act of aggregating texts. We observe that text mixing leads to an effective decay of word introduction, which we show provides accurate predictions of the location and severity of breaks in scaling. Upon examining large corpora from 10 languages, we find emphatic empirical support for the universality of our claim.

  14. FREQUENCY AND DISTRIBUTION OF ABO & RH BLOOD GROUP IN BILASPUR DISTRICT OF CHHATTISGARH STATE : A STUDY FROM MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Pratap

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Approximate 30 blood group systems have discovered and more than 400 erythrocytes antigens are identified. Blood group ABO and Rh are most important among all other blood group systems in transfusion service practices. The frequency of four major blood gr oup s namely A, B, O, AB with Rh Positive and Negative varies in different population of the world and differ also in region and race wise. MATERIAL AND METHOD : This 5 years retrospective study was conducted at Blood Bank of a Medical college Hospital of Bi laspur in Northern Chhattisgarh, catering the 1/3 population of state. Data were collected from the Blood Bank Grouping record from the period of January 2010 to December 2014. Blood group of blood donors and patients were determined by Monoclonal Anti Ser a by slide agglutinations tests. Rare case and difficult case were examined by test tube agglutination method and Matrix Gel System of Tulip. RESULT AND CONCLUSIO N: 31973 subjects were examined for blood group during observation period, Out of these 31092( 97.25% were male and 881 (2.75% were female. The frequency of blood group B in these populations was 11007 (34.42% (33.36% Rh Positive and 1.06% Rh Negative Followed by O were 10864 (33.97% (33.33% Rh Positive and 0.64% Rh Negative, A was 9113 (28.50 % (27.99 % Rh Positive and 0.51% Rh Negative and AB was 989 (3.11% (3.01% Rh Positive and 0.1% Rh Negative. Rhesus group Rh Positive were 31242 (97.7 % and Rh Negative were 731 (2.3 %.

  15. Self-regulation of circumscribed brain activity modulates spatially selective and frequency specific connectivity of distributed resting state networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias eVukelić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of learning involved in brain self-regulation have still to be unveiled to exploit the full potential of this methodology for therapeutic interventions. This skill of volitionally changing brain activity presumably resembles motor skill learning which in turn is accompanied by plastic changes modulating resting state networks. Along these lines, we hypothesized that brain regulation and neurofeedback would similarly modify intrinsic networks at rest while presenting a distinct spatio-temporal pattern. High-resolution EEG preceded and followed a single neurofeedback training intervention of modulating circumscribed sensorimotor low β -activity by motor imagery in eleven healthy participants. They were kept in the deliberative phase of skill acquisition with high demands for learning self-regulation through stepwise increases of task difficulty. By applying the corrected imaginary part of the coherency function, we observed increased functional connectivity of both the primary motor and the primary somatosensory cortex with their respective contralateral homologous cortices in the low β-frequency band which was self-regulated during feedback. At the same time, the primary motor cortex - but none of the surrounding cortical areas - showed connectivity to contralateral supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas in the high β-band. Simultaneously, the neurofeedback target displayed a specific increase of functional connectivity with an ipsilateral fronto-parietal network in the α-band while presenting a de-coupling with contralateral primary and secondary sensorimotor areas in the very same frequency band.Brain self-regulating modifies resting state connections spatially selective to the neurofeedback target of the dominant hemisphere. These are anatomically distinct with regard to the cortico-cortical connectivity pattern and are functionally specific with regard to the time domain of coherent activity consistent with a Hebbian

  16. Molecular spectrum of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA gene mutation: determination of frequency, distribution pattern in Indian colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Swati; Ahmad, Firoz; Sawaimoon, Satyakam; Bhatia, Simi; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2014-09-01

    Molecular evaluation of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation has become an important part in colorectal carcinoma evaluation, and their alterations may determine the therapeutic response to anti-EGFR therapy. The current study demonstrates the evaluation of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation using direct sequencing in 204 samples. The frequency of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations was 23.5, 9.8, and 5.9 %, respectively. Five different substitution mutations at KRAS codon 12 (G12S, G12D, G12A, G12V, and G12C) and one substitution type at codon 13 (G13D) were observed. KRAS mutations were significantly higher in patients who were >50 years, and were associated with moderate/poorly differentiated tumors and adenocarcinomas. All mutations in BRAF gene were of V600E type, which were frequent in patients who were ≤ 50 years. Unlike KRAS mutations, BRAF mutations were more frequent in well-differentiated tumors and right-sided tumors. PIK3CA-E545K was the most recurrent mutation while other mutations detected were T544I, Q546R, H1047R, G1049S, and D1056N. No significant association of PIK3CA mutation with age, tumor differentiation, location, and other parameters was noted. No concomitant mutation of KRAS and BRAF mutations was observed, while, interestingly, five cases showed concurrent mutation of KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the PIK3CA mutation in Indian CRC patients. The frequency of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA was similar to worldwide reports. Furthermore, identification of molecular markers has unique strengths, and can provide insights into the pathogenic process and help optimize personalized prevention and therapy.

  17. Cumulative asbestos exposure for US automobile mechanics involved in brake repair (circa 1950s-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Brent L; Richter, Richard O; Mowat, Fionna S; Mlynarek, Steve; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Warmerdam, John M; Sheehan, Patrick J

    2007-11-01

    We analyzed cumulative lifetime exposure to chrysotile asbestos experienced by brake mechanics in the US during the period 1950-2000. Using Monte Carlo methods, cumulative exposures were calculated using the distribution of 8-h time-weighted average exposure concentrations for brake mechanics and the distribution of job tenure data for automobile mechanics. The median estimated cumulative exposures for these mechanics, as predicted by three probabilistic models, ranged from 0.16 to 0.41 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cm(3)) year for facilities with no dust-control procedures (1970s), and from 0.010 to 0.012 f/cm(3) year for those employing engineering controls (1980s). Upper-bound (95%) estimates for the 1970s and 1980s were 1.96 to 2.79 and 0.07-0.10 f/cm(3) year, respectively. These estimates for US brake mechanics are consistent with, but generally slightly lower than, those reported for European mechanics. The values are all substantially lower than the cumulative exposure of 4.5 f/cm(3) year associated with occupational exposure to 0.1 f/cm(3) of asbestos for 45 years that is currently permitted under the current occupational exposure limits in the US. Cumulative exposures were usually about 100- to 1,000-fold less than those of other occupational groups with asbestos exposure for similar time periods. The cumulative lifetime exposure estimates presented here, combined with the negative epidemiology data for brake mechanics, could be used to refine the risk assessments for chrysotile-exposed populations.

  18. Effect of particle size frequency distribution of the substratum on the burrowing ability of Chiridota rigida (semper) (Echinodermata: holothuroidea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.M.; Murdoch, J.

    1977-01-01

    Chiridota rigida (Semper) burrows easily into well-sorted substrata, moving between particles in coarse substrata and pushing aside particles in fine substrata. Chiridota rigida does not burrow easily into poorly sorted substrata because spaces which can be penetrated are not available and because the particles cannot be moved as a result of increased stability of the substratum. In poorly sorted substrata, burrowing ability increases with increases in the proportion of fine particles. It would appear that the distribution and abundance of chiridota rigida and other chiridotids would be affected by the effect of the substratum on their ability to burrow.

  19. Estimating the power law distribution of Earth electrical conductivity from low-frequency, controlled-source electromagnetic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskardes, G. D.; Weiss, C. J.; Everett, M. E.

    2016-11-01

    Electromagnetic responses reflect the interaction between applied electromagnetic fields and heterogeneous geoelectrical structures. Quantifying the relationship between multiscale electrical properties and the observed electromagnetic response is therefore important for meaningful geologic interpretation. We present here examples of near-surface electromagnetic responses whose spatial fluctuations appear on all length scales, are repeatable and fractally distributed, supporting the notion of a "rough geology" exhibiting multi-scale hierarchical structure. Bounded by end member cases from homogenized isotropic and anisotropic media, we present numerical modeling results of the electromagnetic responses of textured and spatially-correlated, stochastic geologic media, demonstrating that the electromagnetic response is a power law distribution, rather than a smooth response polluted with random, incoherent noise as commonly assumed. Our modeling results show that these electromagnetic responses due to spatially-correlated geologic textures are examples of fractional Brownian motion. Furthermore, our results suggest that the fractal behavior of the electromagnetic responses is correlated with degree of the spatial correlation, the contrasts in ground conductivity, and the preferred orientation of small-scale heterogeneity. In addition, the EM responses acquired across a fault zone comprising different lithological units and varying wavelengths of geologic heterogeneity also support our inferences from numerical modeling.

  20. Estimating the power-law distribution of Earth electrical conductivity from low-frequency, controlled-source electromagnetic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskardes, G. D.; Weiss, C. J.; Everett, M. E.

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic responses reflect the interaction between applied electromagnetic fields and heterogeneous geoelectrical structures. Quantifying the relationship between multiscale electrical properties and the observed electromagnetic response is therefore important for meaningful geologic interpretation. We present here examples of near-surface electromagnetic responses whose spatial fluctuations appear on all length scales, are repeatable and fractally distributed, supporting the notion of a `rough geology' exhibiting multiscale hierarchical structure. Bounded by end member cases from homogenized isotropic and anisotropic media, we present numerical modelling results of the electromagnetic responses of textured and spatially correlated, stochastic geologic media, demonstrating that the electromagnetic response is a power law distribution, rather than a smooth response polluted with random, incoherent noise as commonly assumed. Our modelling results show that these electromagnetic responses due to spatially correlated geologic textures are examples of fractional Brownian motion. Furthermore, our results suggest that the fractal behaviour of the electromagnetic responses is correlated with degree of the spatial correlation, the contrasts in ground conductivity, and the preferred orientation of small-scale heterogeneity. In addition, the EM responses acquired across a fault zone comprising different lithological units and varying wavelengths of geologic heterogeneity also support our inferences from numerical modelling.

  1. Frequency and distribution of winter melt events from passive microwave satellite data in the pan-Arctic, 1988-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Toose, Peter; Brown, Ross; Derksen, Chris

    2016-11-01

    This study presents an algorithm for detecting winter melt events in seasonal snow cover based on temporal variations in the brightness temperature difference between 19 and 37 GHz from satellite passive microwave measurements. An advantage of the passive microwave approach is that it is based on the physical presence of liquid water in the snowpack, which may not be the case with melt events inferred from surface air temperature data. The algorithm is validated using in situ observations from weather stations, snow pit measurements, and a surface-based passive microwave radiometer. The validation results indicate the algorithm has a high success rate for melt durations lasting multiple hours/days and where the melt event is preceded by warm air temperatures. The algorithm does not reliably identify short-duration events or events that occur immediately after or before periods with extremely cold air temperatures due to the thermal inertia of the snowpack and/or overpass and resolution limitations of the satellite data. The results of running the algorithm over the pan-Arctic region (north of 50° N) for the 1988-2013 period show that winter melt events are relatively rare, totaling less than 1 week per winter over most areas, with higher numbers of melt days (around two weeks per winter) occurring in more temperate regions of the Arctic (e.g., central Québec and Labrador, southern Alaska and Scandinavia). The observed spatial pattern is similar to winter melt events inferred with surface air temperatures from the ERA-Interim (ERA-I) and Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis datasets. There was little evidence of trends in winter melt event frequency over 1988-2013 with the exception of negative trends over northern Europe attributed to a shortening of the duration of the winter period. The frequency of winter melt events is shown to be strongly correlated to the duration of winter period. This must be taken into

  2. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demi, Libertario, E-mail: l.demi@tue.nl; Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo [Lab. of Biomedical Diagnostics, Dept. of Electrical Eng., Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Wijkstra, Hessel [Lab. of Biomedical Diagnostics, Dept. of Electrical Eng., Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Urology Dept., University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  3. Frequency and Distribution of Blood Groups in Blood Donors in Western Ahmedabad AND#8211; A Hospital Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Piyush A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Up till now about 400 red cells antigen have been identified. The majority are inherited by Mendelian fashion. The ABO and Rhesus (Rh blood group system are most important for blood transfusion purposes, parental testing, legal medicine and in population genetic study. Objective: This study was conducted to determine and compare the frequency of ABO and Rh blood groups in blood donors in secondary care teaching hospital at Western Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at Blood bank, GMERS Medical College, Sola, Ahmedabad over a period of seven years from 1st January 2005 to 31st December 2011. Blood group of the blood donors was determined by commercially available standard monoclonal antisera by test tube agglutination technique. Results & conclusion: Out of 5316 subjects, 5076 (95.48% were male and 240 (4.52% were female subjects. The commonest ABO blood group present was B (39.40 % followed by O (30.79 %, A (21.94 % and AB (7.86 % in blood donors; while in Rhesus system, 5053(95.05% donors were Rh-positive and 263(4.95% donors were Rh-negative. The study has a significant implication regarding the inventory management of blood bank and transfusion services for the patient admitted in our secondary care teaching hospital. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(2.000: 202-206

  4. The role of human demographic history in determining the distribution and frequency of transferase-deficient galactosaemia mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flanagan, J M

    2010-02-01

    Classical or transferase-deficient galactosaemia is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by mutation in the human Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene. Of some 170 causative mutations reported, fewer than 10% are observed in more than one geographic region or ethnic group. To better understand the population history of the common GALT mutations, we have established a haplotyping system for the GALT locus incorporating eight single nucleotide polymorphisms and three short tandem repeat markers. We analysed haplotypes associated with the three most frequent GALT gene mutations, Q188R, K285N and Duarte-2 (D2), and estimated their age. Haplotype diversity, in conjunction with measures of genetic diversity and of linkage disequilibrium, indicated that Q188R and K285N are European mutations. The Q188R mutation arose in central Europe within the last 20 000 years, with its observed east-west cline of increasing relative allele frequency possibly being due to population expansion during the re-colonization of Europe by Homo sapiens in the Mesolithic age. K285N was found to be a younger mutation that originated in Eastern Europe and is probably more geographically restricted as it arose after all major European population expansions. The D2 variant was found to be an ancient mutation that originated before the expansion of Homo sapiens out of Africa.

  5. Blastocystis spp.: frequency and subtype distribution in iron deficiency anemic versus non-anemic subjects from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Deeb, Hala K; Khodeer, Seham

    2013-08-01

    Many helminthic and protozoal infections have been implicated in iron deficiency anemia (IDA) but few reports have suggested a link between Blastocystis sp. infection and IDA. Herein, we investigated the frequency and the association of the Blastocystis sp. genotype with IDA. Two-hundred and six stool samples were examined for Blastocystis sp. Samples were obtained from 96 cases with a confirmed diagnosis of IDA and 110 matched non-anemic controls. The prevalence of the parasite was significantly higher in the IDA group (54.2%) when compared to controls (17.3%) and was 34.5% in all study subjects. Thus, a relationship between Blastocystis sp. infection and IDA was confirmed. PCR amplification of isolates from cases with IDA and controls using subtype-specific sequenced-tagged site primers found that subtype 3 was the most common (83.3%), followed by subtype 1 (16.7%), and both had similar prevalence in both groups. Therefore, there was no correlation found between the Blastocystis sp. genotype and the occurrence of IDA.

  6. Evaluate the frequency distribution of nonadhesive virulence factors in carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from clinical samples in Kermanshah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Parviz; Sharbati, Saba; Farahani, Abbas; Rezaei, Zhaleh

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii which is a Gram-negative bacterium can cause several different infections. The appearance of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii in recent years has made the treatment process more difficult. The identification of virulence factors (VFs), such as nonadhesives in A. baumannii, helps to fight against related infections. A total of 104 samples from teaching hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran, were collected during a 24 months period (2011-2013). Sample identification was first carried out by biochemical tests, and then their susceptibility to carbapenems was determined using the Kirby-Bauer method. For confirmation of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done for carbapenemase-encoding genes. In addition, the frequency of nonadhesive VFs in carbapenemase-producing isolates was determined by PCR. There were 50 isolates that were identified as carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii. The PCR results showed; 40 isolates (80%) for traT, 17 isolates (34%) for cvaC, and 8 isolates (16%) for iutA, and these encode serum resistance, colicin V and aerobactin, respectively. No significant correlation was observed between these three genes. The mechanism of A. baumannii virulence has always been in question. The role of VFs has also been recognized in other Gram-negative bacteria. According to the prevalence of traT, cvaC and iutA, as nonadhesive VFs, we can suggest that they could be the main mechanism of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii pathogenesis.

  7. Generalized multidimensional earthquake frequency distributions consistent with Non-Extensive Statistical Physics: An appraisal of the universality in the interdependence of magnitude, interevent time and interevent distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanis, Andreas; Vallianatos, Philippos; Efstathiou, Angeliki

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that earthquake frequency is related to earthquake magnitude via a simple linear relationship of the form logN = a - bM, where N is the number of earthquakes in a specified time interval; this is the famous Gutenberg - Richter (G-R) law. The generally accepted interpretation of the G-R law is that it expresses the statistical behaviour of a fractal active tectonic grain (active faulting). The relationship between the constant b and the fractal dimension of the tectonic grain has been demonstrated in various ways. The story told by the G-R law is, nevertheless, incomplete. It is now accepted that the active tectonic grain comprises a critical complex system, although it hasn't yet been established whether it is stationary (Self-Organized Critical), evolutionary (Self-Organizing Critical), or a time-varying blend of both. At any rate, critical systems are characterized by complexity and strong interactions between near and distant neighbours. This, in turn, implies that the self-organization of earthquake occurrence should be manifested by certain statistical behaviour of its temporal and spatial dependence. A strong line of evidence suggests that G-R law is a limiting case of a more general frequency-magnitude distribution, which is properly expressed in terms of Non-Extensive Statistical Physics (NESP) on the basis of the Tsallis entropy; this is a context natural and particularly suitable for the description of complex systems. A measure of temporal dependence in earthquake occurrence is the time lapsed between consecutive events above a magnitude threshold over a given area (interevent time). A corresponding measure of spatial dependence is the hypocentral distance between consecutive events above a magnitude threshold over a given area (interevent distance). The statistics of earthquake frequency vs. interevent time have been studied by several researchers and have been shown to comply with the predictions of the NESP formalism. There's also

  8. The frequency of distribution of cervical metastases according to the neck level in patients with larynx cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Şengül

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study we aimed to assess the frequencyof distribution for cervical metastases, according to the necklevel in patients with larynx cancer who underwent neck dissection.In addition, we also evaluated the safety of selectiveneck dissection compared to comprehensive neck dissectionespecially in preoperative N0 patients.Materials and methods: In our experience, to determine thefrequency of metastases in each level, the specimen is sentfor pathological examination by dividing each level separatelyafter neck dissection. In our study; we retrospectively analysedthe medical records of 145 laryngeal cancer patientswho were treated with surgery (total or partial laryngectomyas primary treatment and combined with neck dissectionbetween 2005 and 2010 in our Otolaryngology Department.The patients with the diagnosis of laryngeal cancer who underwentsurgery without neck dissection were excluded fromthe analysis.Results: Level I or level V involvement was not observedin preoperative N0 cases. In cases that had contralateralinvolvement, there was ipsilateral involvement too and allof these cases were preoperative N+ cases. The classificationbased on the distribution of levels of 145 cases’ cervicalmetastases revealed that among ipsilateral involvements, 1(0.6% was detected at level IA, 32 (22% at level IIA, 3 (2%at level IIB, 19 (13% at level III, 2 (1.3% at level IV and1 (1.3% at level V. When contralateral involvement considered,13 (8.9% were detected at level IIA and 1 (0.6% atlevel III.Conclusions: The neck specimen findings of 145 laryngealcancer patients treated with surgery as either total or partiallaryngectomy and combined with neck dissection revealedthat the most common metastases were observed at thelevel IIA and level III; however metastases at level I, levelIIB, level IV and level V were least common. Those findingsindicated that selective neck dissection was a safe surgicalapproach (levels II-IV in T1 T2 N0 cases. J Clin Exp

  9. Long and Short Term Cumulative Structural Priming Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschak, Michael P; Kutta, Timothy J; Coyle, Jacqueline M

    We present six experiments that examine cumulative structural priming effects (i.e., structural priming effects that accumulate across many utterances). Of particular interest is whether (1) cumulative priming effects transfer across language production tasks and (2) the transfer of cumulative priming effects across tasks persists over the course of a week. Our data suggest that cumulative structural priming effects do transfer across language production tasks (e.g., from written stem completion to picture description, and from picture description to written stem completion), but only when both tasks are presented in the same experimental session. When cumulative priming effects are established in one task, and the second (changed) task is not presented until a week later, the cumulative priming effects are not observed.

  10. Why Veterinary Medical Educators Should Embrace Cumulative Final Exams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth D

    2017-01-03

    The topic of cumulative final examinations often elicits polarizing opinions from veterinary medical educators. While some faculty prefer cumulative finals, there are many who perceive these types of examinations as problematic. Specifically, faculty often cite cumulative examinations are more likely to cause students' greater stress, which may in turn result in negative student evaluations of teaching. Cumulative finals also restrict the number of items one may present to students on most recent material. While these cited disadvantages may have some merit, the advantages of cumulative examinations far exceed the disadvantages. The purpose of this article is to discuss the advantages of cumulative examinations with respect to learning evidence, grade/score validity, fairness issues, and implications for academic policy.

  11. Origins and implications of the relationship between warming and cumulative carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, M. R.; Davis, S. J.; Peters, G. P.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J.; Le Quere, C.

    2014-12-01

    A near-linear relationship between warming (T) and cumulative carbon emissions (Q) is a robust finding from numerous studies. This finding opens biophysical questions concerning (1) its theoretical basis, (2) the treatment of non-CO2 forcings, and (3) uncertainty specifications. Beyond these biophysical issues, a profound global policy question is raised: (4) how can a quota on cumulative emissions be shared? Here, an integrated survey of all four issues is attempted. (1) Proportionality between T and Q is an emergent property of a linear carbon-climate system forced by exponentially increasing CO2 emissions. This idealisation broadly explains past but not future near-proportionality between T and Q: in future, the roles of non-CO2 forcings and carbon-climate nonlinearities become important, and trajectory dependence becomes stronger. (2) The warming effects of short-lived non-CO2 forcers depend on instantaneous rather than cumulative fluxes. However, inertia in emissions trajectories reinstates some of the benefits of a cumulative emissions approach, with residual trajectory dependence comparable to that for CO2. (3) Uncertainties arise from several sources: climate projections, carbon-climate feedbacks, and residual trajectory dependencies in CO2 and other emissions. All of these can in principle be combined into a probability distribution P(T|Q) for the warming T from given cumulative CO2 emissions Q. Present knowledge of P(T|Q) allows quantification of the tradeoff between mitigation ambition and climate risk. (4) Cumulative emissions consistent with a given warming target and climate risk are a finite common resource that will inevitably be shared, creating a tragedy-of-the-commons dilemma. Sharing options range from "inertia" (present distribution of emissions is maintained) to "equity" (cumulative emissions are distributed equally per-capita). Both extreme options lead to emissions distributions that are unrealisable in practice, but a blend of the two

  12. The use of the multi-cumulant tensor analysis for the algorithmic optimisation of investment portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Krzysztof

    2017-02-01

    The cumulant analysis plays an important role in non Gaussian distributed data analysis. The shares' prices returns are good example of such data. The purpose of this research is to develop the cumulant based algorithm and use it to determine eigenvectors that represent investment portfolios with low variability. Such algorithm is based on the Alternating Least Square method and involves the simultaneous minimisation 2'nd- 6'th cumulants of the multidimensional random variable (percentage shares' returns of many companies). Then the algorithm was tested during the recent crash on the Warsaw Stock Exchange. To determine incoming crash and provide enter and exit signal for the investment strategy the Hurst exponent was calculated using the local DFA. It was shown that introduced algorithm is on average better that benchmark and other portfolio determination methods, but only within examination window determined by low values of the Hurst exponent. Remark that the algorithm is based on cumulant tensors up to the 6'th order calculated for a multidimensional random variable, what is the novel idea. It can be expected that the algorithm would be useful in the financial data analysis on the world wide scale as well as in the analysis of other types of non Gaussian distributed data.

  13. Analysis of Memory Codes and Cumulative Rehearsal in Observational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of memory codes varying in meaningfulness and retrievability and cumulative rehearsal on retention of observationally learned responses over increasing temporal intervals. (Editor)

  14. Model-checking techniques based on cumulative residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D Y; Wei, L J; Ying, Z

    2002-03-01

    Residuals have long been used for graphical and numerical examinations of the adequacy of regression models. Conventional residual analysis based on the plots of raw residuals or their smoothed curves is highly subjective, whereas most numerical goodness-of-fit tests provide little information about the nature of model misspecification. In this paper, we develop objective and informative model-checking techniques by taking the cumulative sums of residuals over certain coordinates (e.g., covariates or fitted values) or by considering some related aggregates of residuals, such as moving sums and moving averages. For a variety of statistical models and data structures, including generalized linear models with independent or dependent observations, the distributions of these stochastic processes tinder the assumed model can be approximated by the distributions of certain zero-mean Gaussian processes whose realizations can be easily generated by computer simulation. Each observed process can then be compared, both graphically and numerically, with a number of realizations from the Gaussian process. Such comparisons enable one to assess objectively whether a trend seen in a residual plot reflects model misspecification or natural variation. The proposed techniques are particularly useful in checking the functional form of a covariate and the link function. Illustrations with several medical studies are provided.

  15. Molecular spectrum of somatic EGFR and KRAS gene mutations in non small cell lung carcinoma: determination of frequency, distribution pattern and identification of novel variations in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bibhu Ranjan; Bhaumik, Sangeet; Ahmad, Firoz; Mandsaurwala, Aziz; Satam, Heena

    2015-07-01

    Somatic mutations of EGFR and KRAS gene represent the most common alterations currently known in NSCLC patients. This study explored the frequency, distribution pattern of EGFR and KRAS mutations in Indian patients. The frequencies of EGFR and KRAS mutations were 29 % (116/400) and 4.5 % (6/132) respectively. Both EGFR and KRAS mutations were prevalent in females, and a trend towards higher mutation frequency was seen in patients under ≥ 60 years age. The presence of EGFR and KRAS mutations were higher in adenocarcinomas in comparison to other histological subtype. Sequencing analysis of EGFR exon 18 revealed Inframe deletion (G709_T710 > A) and missense mutation (K713R). Among exon 19 positive cases, 49.3 % (37/75) were in-frame deletions, of which E746_A750del was frequent. Similarly, ~47 % (35/75) cases showed complex mutation involving indel. Among mutations in exon 20 (N = 9), 8 were substitutions, one showed duplication, while all exon 21 mutations were of the missense types with L858R as the most recurrent type. Sequencing analysis of KRAS exon 1 revealed three different types codon 12 substitutions resulting in c34G > T (G12C) (n = 4), c.35G > A (G12D) (n = 1), and c.35G > T (G12V) (n = 1). In conclusion, the present study is an example of molecular diversity of EGFR and KRAS gene in Indian patients and further confirms that the frequency of EGFR and KRAS mutations varies considerably globally. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Indian study to evaluate KRAS mutation. The current study also served to identify novel variations that added new insights into the genetic heterogeneity of NSCLC.

  16. Continuously Cumulating Meta-Analysis and Replicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braver, Sanford L; Thoemmes, Felix J; Rosenthal, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The current crisis in scientific psychology about whether our findings are irreproducible was presaged years ago by Tversky and Kahneman (1971), who noted that even sophisticated researchers believe in the fallacious Law of Small Numbers-erroneous intuitions about how imprecisely sample data reflect population phenomena. Combined with the low power of most current work, this often leads to the use of misleading criteria about whether an effect has replicated. Rosenthal (1990) suggested more appropriate criteria, here labeled the continuously cumulating meta-analytic (CCMA) approach. For example, a CCMA analysis on a replication attempt that does not reach significance might nonetheless provide more, not less, evidence that the effect is real. Alternatively, measures of heterogeneity might show that two studies that differ in whether they are significant might have only trivially different effect sizes. We present a nontechnical introduction to the CCMA framework (referencing relevant software), and then explain how it can be used to address aspects of replicability or more generally to assess quantitative evidence from numerous studies. We then present some examples and simulation results using the CCMA approach that show how the combination of evidence can yield improved results over the consideration of single studies.

  17. Both size-frequency distribution and sub-populations of the main-belt asteroid population are consistent with YORP-induced rotational fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, S.; Scheeres, D.; Rossi, A.; Marzari, F.; Davis, D.

    2014-07-01

    From the results of a comprehensive asteroid-population-evolution model, we conclude that the YORP-induced rotational-fission hypothesis has strong repercussions for the small size end of the main-belt asteroid size-frequency distribution and is consistent with observed asteroid-population statistics and with the observed sub-populations of binary asteroids, asteroid pairs and contact binaries. The foundation of this model is the asteroid-rotation model of Marzari et al. (2011) and Rossi et al. (2009), which incorporates both the YORP effect and collisional evolution. This work adds to that model the rotational fission hypothesis (i.e. when the rotation rate exceeds a critical value, erosion and binary formation occur; Scheeres 2007) and binary-asteroid evolution (Jacobson & Scheeres, 2011). The YORP-effect timescale for large asteroids with diameters D > ˜ 6 km is longer than the collision timescale in the main belt, thus the frequency of large asteroids is determined by a collisional equilibrium (e.g. Bottke 2005), but for small asteroids with diameters D Morbidelli 2009). The binary-asteroid evolution model is highly constrained by the modeling done in Jacobson & Scheeres, and therefore the asteroid-population evolution model has only two significant free parameters: the ratio of low-to-high-mass-ratio binaries formed after rotational fission events and the mean strength of the binary YORP (BYORP) effect. Using this model, we successfully reproduce the observed small-asteroid sub-populations, which orthogonally constrain the two free parameters. We find the outcome of rotational fission most likely produces an initial mass-ratio fraction that is four to eight times as likely to produce high-mass-ratio systems as low-mass-ratio systems, which is consistent with rotational fission creating binary systems in a flat distribution with respect to mass ratio. We also find that the mean of the log-normal BYORP coefficient distribution B ≈ 10^{-2}.

  18. The southern hemisphere of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: Analysis of the preperihelion size-frequency distribution of boulders ≥7 m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, Maurizio; Lucchetti, Alice; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Oklay, Nilda; El-Maarry, Mohamed R.; Bertini, Ivano; Naletto, Giampiero; Lazzarin, Monica; Massironi, Matteo; Sierks, Holger; Barbieri, Cesare; Lamy, Philippe; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Rickman, Hans; Keller, Horst U.; Agarwal, Jessica; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Barucci, Maria A.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Boudreault, Steve; Cremonese, Gabriele; Da Deppo, Vania; Davidsson, Björn; Debei, Stefano; De Cecco, Mariolino; Deller, Jakob; Fornasier, Sonia; Fulle, Marco; Gicquel, Adeline; Groussin, Olivier; Gutierrez, Pedro J.; Güttler, Carsten; Hofmann, Marc; Höfner, Sebastian; Hviid, Stubbe F.; Ip, Wing-Huen; Jorda, Laurent; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kramm, J.-Rainer; Kührt, Ekkehard; Küppers, Michael; La Forgia, Fiorangela; Lara, Luisa M.; Lee, Jui-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lopez Moreno, Jose J.; Marzari, Francesco; Michalik, Harald; Mottola, Stefano; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Thomas, Nicholas; Toth, Imre; Tubiana, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We calculate the size-frequency distribution of the boulders on the southern hemisphere of comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P), which was in shadow before the end of April 2015. We compare the new results with those derived from the northern hemisphere and equatorial regions of 67P, highlighting the possible physical processes that lead to these boulder size distributions. Methods: We used images acquired by the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) on 2 May 2015 at a distance of 125 km from the nucleus. The scale of this dataset is 2.3 m/px; the high resolution of the images, coupled with the favorable observation phase angle of 62°, provided the possibility to unambiguously identify boulders ≥7 m on the surface of 67P and to manually extract them with the software ArcGIS. We derived the size-frequency distribution of the illuminated southern hemisphere. Results: We found a power-law index of -3.6 ± 0.2 for the boulders on the southern hemisphere with a diameter range of 7-35 m. The power-law index is equal to the one previously found on northern and equatorial regions of 67P, suggesting that similar boulder formation processes occur in both hemispheres. The power-law index is related to gravitational events triggered by sublimation and/or thermal fracturing causing regressive erosion. In addition, the presence of a larger number of boulders per km2 in the southern hemisphere, which is a factor of 3 higher with respect to the northern hemisphere, suggests that the southernmost terrains of 67P are affected by a stronger thermal fracturing and sublimating activity, hence possibly causing larger regressive erosion and gravitational events.

  19. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 allelic frequencies and identification of a new allele in the iranian cattle breed sistani (Bos indicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, A; Nassiry, M R; Mosafer, J; Mohammadabadi, M R; Sulimova, G E

    2009-02-01

    The distribution of the frequencies of BoLA-DRB3 gene alleles in the Iranian cattle breed Sistani was studied by the PCR-RFLP ("hemi-nested") assay using restriction endonucleases RsaI, HaeIII and BstYI. In the examined cattle breed (65 animals) 32 alleles have been identified one of which being described for the first time (6.15% frequency). The nucleotide sequence of the polymorphic region of exon 2 of this allele has been determined and submitted in the GeneBank database under accession number DQ486519. The submitted sequence has maximum homology (92%) with the previously described sequence DRB3-mRNA from Bos indicus (AccN X79346) and differs from it by 24 nucleotide substitutions which result in 16 amino acid substitutions. The peptide (on the basis of the reconstructed amino acid sequence) has 89% identity to the sequence encoded by the BIDRBF 188 locus (Bos indicus). The results obtained permit the sequence described by us to be considered as a new allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene (DRB3.2**X). The total frequency of the main six alleles (DRB3.2*X, *10, *11, *20, *34 and *X) occurring with a frequency of over 5% is about 60% in Iranian Sistani cattle. Fifteen alleles have DRB3.2*8 allele (21.54%) like in other previously described breeds of Bos indicus (up to 23.07%). The Iranian breed Sistani has a high level of similarity by the spectrum of BoLA-DRB3 alleles and their frequencies to other Bos indicus breeds and significantly differs by these criteria from the Bos taurus breeds. The Iranian Sistani herd under study includes alleles associated with to resistance to leukemia (DRB3.2*ll and *23) and to different forms of mastitis (DRB3.2*2, *7, *11, *23 and *24) although their frequencies are low (from 0.77 to 5.37%). On the whole, a high level of diversity of BoLA-DRB3 gene alleles and the availability of alleles associated with resistance to different diseases makes this breed of interest for breeding practice.

  20. Merging plot and Landsata data to estimate the frequency distribution of Central Amazon mortality event size for landscape-scale ecosystem simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vittorio, A. V.; Chambers, J. Q.

    2012-12-01

    Mitigation strategies and estimates of land use change emissions assume initial states of landscapes that respond to prescribed scenarios. The Amazon basin is a target for both mitigation (e.g. maintenance of old-growth forest) and land use change (e.g. agriculture), but the current states of its old-growth and secondary forest landscapes are uncertain with respect to carbon cycling. Contributing to this uncertainty in old-growth forest ecosystems is a mosaic of patches in different successional stages, with the areal fraction of any particular stage relatively constant over large temporal and spatial scales. Old-growth mosaics are generally created through ongoing effects of tree mortality, with the Central Amazon mosaic generated primarily by wind mortality. Unfortunately, estimation of generalizable frequency distributions of mortality event size has been hindered by limited spatial and temporal scales of observations. To overcome these limitations we merge field and remotely sensed tree mortality data and fit the top two candidate distributions (power law and exponential) to these data to determine the most appropriate statistical mortality model for use in landscape-scale ecosystem simulations. Our results show that the power law model better represents the distribution of mortality event size than the exponential model. We also use an individual-tree-based forest stand model to simulate a 100 ha landscape using the best fit of each candidate distribution to demonstrate the effects of different mortality regimes on above ground biomass in the Central Amazon forest mosaic. We conclude that the correct mortality distribution model is critical for robust simulation of patch succession dynamics and above ground biomass.

  1. Survey and analysis of microsatellites from transcript sequences in Phytophthora species: frequency, distribution, and potential as markers for the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto Emiliano

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the genus Phytophthora are notorious pathogens with world-wide distribution. The most devastating species include P. infestans, P. ramorum and P. sojae. In order to develop molecular methods for routinely characterizing their populations and to gain a better insight into the organization and evolution of their genomes, we used an in silico approach to survey and compare simple sequence repeats (SSRs in transcript sequences from these three species. We compared the occurrence, relative abundance, relative density and cross-species transferability of the SSRs in these oomycetes. Results The number of SSRs in oomycetes transcribed sequences is low and long SSRs are rare. The in silico transferability of SSRs among the Phytophthora species was analyzed for all sets generated, and primers were selected on the basis of similarity as possible candidates for transferability to other Phytophthora species. Sequences encoding putative pathogenicity factors from all three Phytophthora species were also surveyed for presence of SSRs. However, no correlation between gene function and SSR abundance was observed. The SSR survey results, and the primer pairs designed for all SSRs from the three species, were deposited in a public database. Conclusion In all cases the most common SSRs were trinucleotide repeat units with low repeat numbers. A proportion (7.5% of primers could be transferred with 90% similarity between at least two species of Phytophthora. This information represents a valuable source of molecular markers for use in population genetics, genetic mapping and strain fingerprinting studies of oomycetes, and illustrates how genomic databases can be exploited to generate data-mining filters for SSRs before experimental validation.

  2. Particle sizing by dynamic light scattering: non-linear cumulant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailer, Alastair G; Clegg, Paul S; Pusey, Peter N

    2015-04-15

    We revisit the method of cumulants for analysing dynamic light scattering data in particle sizing applications. Here the data, in the form of the time correlation function of scattered light, is written as a series involving the first few cumulants (or moments) of the distribution of particle diffusion constants. Frisken (2001 Appl. Opt. 40 4087) has pointed out that, despite greater computational complexity, a non-linear, iterative, analysis of the data has advantages over the linear least-squares analysis used originally. In order to explore further the potential and limitations of cumulant methods we analyse, by both linear and non-linear methods, computer-generated data with realistic 'noise', where the parameters of the distribution can be set explicitly. We find that, with modern computers, non-linear analysis is straightforward and robust. The mean and variance of the distribution of diffusion constants can be obtained quite accurately for distributions of width (standard deviation/mean) up to about 0.6, but there appears to be little prospect of obtaining meaningful higher moments.

  3. Cumulative Effect of Depression on Dementia Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olazarán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze a potential cumulative effect of life-time depression on dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD, with control of vascular factors (VFs. Methods. This study was a subanalysis of the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES study. Past and present depression, VFs, dementia status, and dementia due to AD were documented at study inception. Dementia status was also documented after three years. Four groups were created according to baseline data: never depression (nD, past depression (pD, present depression (prD, and present and past depression (prpD. Logistic regression was used. Results. Data of 1,807 subjects were investigated at baseline (mean age 74.3, 59.3% women, and 1,376 (81.6% subjects were evaluated after three years. The prevalence of dementia at baseline was 6.7%, and dementia incidence was 6.3%. An effect of depression was observed on dementia prevalence (OR [CI 95%] 1.84 [1.01–3.35] for prD and 2.73 [1.08–6.87] for prpD, and on dementia due to AD (OR 1.98 [0.98–3.99] for prD and OR 3.98 [1.48–10.71] for prpD (fully adjusted models, nD as reference. Depression did not influence dementia incidence. Conclusions. Present depression and, particularly, present and past depression are associated with dementia at old age. Multiple mechanisms, including toxic effect of depression on hippocampal neurons, plausibly explain these associations.

  4. Cumulative social disadvantage and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Laurie J; Silver, Ellen J; Stein, Ruth E K

    2006-04-01

    Disparities in child health are a major public health concern. However, it is unclear whether these are predominantly the result of low income, race, or other social risk factors that may contribute to their health disadvantage. Although others have examined the effects of the accumulation of risk factors, this methodology has not been applied to child health. We tested 4 social risk factors (poverty, minority race/ethnicity, low parental education, and not living with both biological parents) to assess whether they have cumulative effects on child health and examined whether access to health care reduced health disparities. We analyzed data on 57,553 children low parental education, and single-parent household) were consistently associated with child health. These were summed, generating the Social Disadvantage Index (range: 0-3). A total of 43.6% of children had no social disadvantages, 30.8% had 1, 15.6% had 2, and 10.0% had all 3. Compared with those with no social disadvantages, the odds ratios (ORs) of being in "good, fair, or poor health" (versus "excellent or very good") were 1.95 for 1 risk, 3.22 for 2 risks, and 4.06 for 3 risks. ORs of having a chronic condition increased from 1.25 (1 risk) to 1.60 (2 risks) to 2.11 (3 risks). ORs for activity limitation were 1.51 (1 risk) to 2.14 (2 risks) and 2.88 (3 risks). Controlling for health insurance did not affect these findings. The accumulation of social disadvantage among children was strongly associated with poorer child health and having insurance did not reduce the observed health disparities.

  5. A Framework for Treating Cumulative Trauma with Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative trauma is relatively undocumented in art therapy practice, although there is growing evidence that art therapy provides distinct benefits for resolving various traumas. This qualitative study proposes an art therapy treatment framework for cumulative trauma derived from semi-structured interviews with three art therapists and artistic…

  6. A Framework for Treating Cumulative Trauma with Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative trauma is relatively undocumented in art therapy practice, although there is growing evidence that art therapy provides distinct benefits for resolving various traumas. This qualitative study proposes an art therapy treatment framework for cumulative trauma derived from semi-structured interviews with three art therapists and artistic…

  7. Cumulative Estrogen Exposure and Prospective Memory in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at cumulative lifetime estrogen exposure, as estimated with a mathematical index (Index of Cumulative Estrogen Exposure (ICEE)) that included variables (length of time on estrogen therapy, age at menarche and menopause, postmenopausal body mass index, time since menopause, nulliparity and duration of breastfeeding) known to…

  8. Accuracy of the coherent potential approximation for a one-dimensional Frenkel exciton system with a Gaussian distribution of fluctuations in the optical transition frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgin, I.; Boukahil, A.; Huber, D. L.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the coherent potential approximation (CPA) for a one-dimensional Frenkel exciton system with nearest-neighbor interactions and a Gaussian distribution of fluctuations in the optical transition frequency. The CPA values of the integrated density of states and the inverse localization length are shown to be in excellent agreement with the results of mode-counting studies carried out on arrays of 10 7-10 8 sites. We also consider the asymptotic behavior of the inverse localization length and show that it can be approximated by the reciprocal of the decay length of an eigenstate localized about a single, strongly perturbed site in an otherwise perfect lattice.

  9. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milano (Italy); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Didcot (United Kingdom); Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Muraro, A. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milano (Italy); Binda, F.; Eriksson, J. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Sharapov, S. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Collaboration: (EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices.

  10. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocente, M; Cazzaniga, C; Tardocchi, M; Binda, F; Eriksson, J; Giacomelli, L; Muraro, A; Rebai, M; Sharapov, S; Gorini, G

    2015-10-01

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices.

  11. Discussion on Usage of Contactor in Distribution Circuit of Frequency Converter%变频器配电回路中接触器的用法探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王婧; 黄岩; 刘学忠; 张风友

    2015-01-01

    针对目前在变频器配电回路设计中,对接触器用法存在的一些争议进行分析讨论,包括在输入侧和输出侧使用接触器的原因,以及操作中需要注意的问题等,并结合实际案例进行分析,给出解决该问题的一般性原则。%Analysis and discussion have been made for some disputes about the usage of contactor in current design for distribution circuit of frequency converter, including the reason for using contactor at input side and output side and considerations during operation; actual cases are analyzed and general principles for solving such problem are offered.

  12. Frequency and geographic distribution of gyrA and gyrB mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Elisea; Catanzaro, Donald; Catanzaro, Antonino; Ganiats, Theodore; Brodine, Stephanie; Alcaraz, John; Rodwell, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The detection of mutations in the gyrA and gyrB genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome that have been demonstrated to confer phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones is the most promising technology for rapid diagnosis of fluoroquinolone resistance. In order to characterize the diversity and frequency of gyrA and gyrB mutations and to describe the global distribution of these mutations, we conducted a systematic review, from May 1996 to April 2013, of all published studies evaluating Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. The overall goal of the study was to determine the potential utility and reliability of these mutations as diagnostic markers to detect phenotypic fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to describe their geographic distribution. Forty-six studies, covering four continents and 18 countries, provided mutation data for 3,846 unique clinical isolates with phenotypic resistance profiles to fluoroquinolones. The gyrA mutations occurring most frequently in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, ranged from 21-32% for D94G and 13-20% for A90V, by drug. Eighty seven percent of all strains that were phenotypically resistant to moxifloxacin and 83% of ofloxacin resistant isolates contained mutations in gyrA. Additionally we found that 83% and 80% of moxifloxacin and ofloxacin resistant strains respectively, were observed to have mutations in the gyrA codons interrogated by the existing MTBDRsl line probe assay. In China and Russia, 83% and 84% of fluoroquinolone resistant strains respectively, were observed to have gyrA mutations in the gene regions covered by the MTBDRsl assay. Molecular diagnostics, specifically the Genotype MTBDRsl assay, focusing on codons 88-94 should have moderate to high sensitivity in most countries. While we did observe geographic differences in the frequencies of single gyrA mutations across countries, molecular diagnostics based on detection of all gyr

  13. Design aspects of a compact, single-frequency, permanent magnet ECR ion source with a large uniformly distributed resonant plasma volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Alton, G.D.; Mills, G.D.; Reed, C.A.; Haynes, D.L.

    1997-09-01

    A compact, all-permanent-magnet single-frequency ECR ion source with a large uniformly distributed ECR plasma volume has been designed and is presently under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The central region of the field is designed to achieve a flat-field (constant mod-B) which extends over the length of the central field region along the axis of symmetry and radially outward to form a uniformly distributed ECR plasma volume. The magnetic field design strongly contrasts with those used in conventional ECR ion sources where the central field regions are approximately parabolic and the consequent ECR zones are surfaces. The plasma confinement magnetic field mirror has a mirror ratio B{sub max}/B{sub ECR} of slightly greater than two. The source is designed to operate at a nominal RF frequency of 6 GHz. The central flat magnetic field region can be easily adjusted by mechanical means to tune the source to the resonant conditions within the limits of 5.5 to 6.8 GHz. The RF injection system is broadband to ensure excitation of transverse electric (TE) modes so that the RF power is largely concentrated in the resonant plasma volume which lies along and surrounds the axis of symmetry of the source. Because of the much larger ECR zone, the probability for absorption of microwave power is dramatically increased thereby increasing the probability for acceleration of electrons, the electron temperature of the plasma and, consequently, the hot electron population within the plasma volume of the source. The creation of an ECR volume rather than a surface is commensurate with higher charge states and higher beam intensities within a particular charge state.

  14. Frequency and geographic distribution of gyrA and gyrB mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisea Avalos

    Full Text Available The detection of mutations in the gyrA and gyrB genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome that have been demonstrated to confer phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones is the most promising technology for rapid diagnosis of fluoroquinolone resistance.In order to characterize the diversity and frequency of gyrA and gyrB mutations and to describe the global distribution of these mutations, we conducted a systematic review, from May 1996 to April 2013, of all published studies evaluating Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. The overall goal of the study was to determine the potential utility and reliability of these mutations as diagnostic markers to detect phenotypic fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to describe their geographic distribution.Forty-six studies, covering four continents and 18 countries, provided mutation data for 3,846 unique clinical isolates with phenotypic resistance profiles to fluoroquinolones. The gyrA mutations occurring most frequently in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, ranged from 21-32% for D94G and 13-20% for A90V, by drug. Eighty seven percent of all strains that were phenotypically resistant to moxifloxacin and 83% of ofloxacin resistant isolates contained mutations in gyrA. Additionally we found that 83% and 80% of moxifloxacin and ofloxacin resistant strains respectively, were observed to have mutations in the gyrA codons interrogated by the existing MTBDRsl line probe assay. In China and Russia, 83% and 84% of fluoroquinolone resistant strains respectively, were observed to have gyrA mutations in the gene regions covered by the MTBDRsl assay.Molecular diagnostics, specifically the Genotype MTBDRsl assay, focusing on codons 88-94 should have moderate to high sensitivity in most countries. While we did observe geographic differences in the frequencies of single gyrA mutations across countries, molecular diagnostics based on detection

  15. A new family of cumulative indexes for measuring scientific performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kozak

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a new family of cumulative indexes for measuring scientific performance which can be applied to many metrics, including h index and its variants (here we apply it to the h index, h(2 index and Google Scholar's i10 index. These indexes follow the general principle of repeating the index calculation for the same publication set. Using bibliometric data and reviewer scores for accepted and rejected fellowship applicants we examine how valid the cumulative variant is compared to the original variant. These analyses showed that the cumulative indexes result in higher correlations with the reviewer scores than their original variants. Thus, the cumulative indexes better reflect the assessments by peers than the original variants and are useful extensions of the original indexes. In contrast to many other measures of scientific performance proposed up to now, the cumulative indexes seem not only to be effective, but they are also easy to understand and calculate.

  16. Enhancing the secure key rate in a quantum-key-distribution system using discrete-variable, high-dimensional, time-frequency states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nurul T.; Cahall, Clinton; Aragoneses, Andrés.; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Allman, Michael S.; Verma, Varun; Nam, Sae Woo; Kim, Jungsang; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2016-10-01

    High-dimensional (dimension d > 2) quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols that encode information in the temporal degree of freedom promise to overcome some of the challenges of qubit-based (d = 2) QKD systems. In particular, the long recovery time of single-photon detectors and large channel noise at long distance both limit the rate at which a final secure key can be generated in a low-dimension QKD system. We propose and demonstrate a practical discrete-variable time-frequency protocol with d = 4 at a wavelength of 1550 nm, where the temporal states are secured by transmitting and detecting their dual states under Fourier transformation, known as the frequency-basis states, augmented by a decoy-state protocol. We show that the discrete temporal and frequency states can be generated and detected using commercially-available equipment with high timing and spectral efficiency. In our initial experiments, we only have access to detectors that have low efficiency (1%) at 1550 nm. Together with other component losses, our system is equivalent to a QKD system with ideal components and a 50-km-long optical-fiber quantum channel. We find that our system maintains a spectral visibility of over 99.0% with a quantum bit error rate of 2.3%, which is largely due to the finite extinction ratio of the intensity modulators used in the transmitter. The estimated secure key rate of this system is 7.7×104 KHz, which should improve drastically when we use detectors optimized for 1550 nm.

  17. EEG-Based Brain-Computer Interface for Decoding Motor Imagery Tasks within the Same Hand Using Choi-Williams Time-Frequency Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Alazrai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an EEG-based brain-computer interface system for classifying eleven motor imagery (MI tasks within the same hand. The proposed system utilizes the Choi-Williams time-frequency distribution (CWD to construct a time-frequency representation (TFR of the EEG signals. The constructed TFR is used to extract five categories of time-frequency features (TFFs. The TFFs are processed using a hierarchical classification model to identify the MI task encapsulated within the EEG signals. To evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, EEG data were recorded for eighteen intact subjects and four amputated subjects while imagining to perform each of the eleven hand MI tasks. Two performance evaluation analyses, namely channel- and TFF-based analyses, are conducted to identify the best subset of EEG channels and the TFFs category, respectively, that enable the highest classification accuracy between the MI tasks. In each evaluation analysis, the hierarchical classification model is trained using two training procedures, namely subject-dependent and subject-independent procedures. These two training procedures quantify the capability of the proposed approach to capture both intra- and inter-personal variations in the EEG signals for different MI tasks within the same hand. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the approach for classifying the MI tasks within the same hand. In particular, the classification accuracies obtained for the intact and amputated subjects are as high as 88 . 8 % and 90 . 2 % , respectively, for the subject-dependent training procedure, and 80 . 8 % and 87 . 8 % , respectively, for the subject-independent training procedure. These results suggest the feasibility of applying the proposed approach to control dexterous prosthetic hands, which can be of great benefit for individuals suffering from hand amputations.

  18. EEG-Based Brain-Computer Interface for Decoding Motor Imagery Tasks within the Same Hand Using Choi-Williams Time-Frequency Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwanni, Hisham; Baslan, Yara; Alnuman, Nasim; Daoud, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an EEG-based brain-computer interface system for classifying eleven motor imagery (MI) tasks within the same hand. The proposed system utilizes the Choi-Williams time-frequency distribution (CWD) to construct a time-frequency representation (TFR) of the EEG signals. The constructed TFR is used to extract five categories of time-frequency features (TFFs). The TFFs are processed using a hierarchical classification model to identify the MI task encapsulated within the EEG signals. To evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, EEG data were recorded for eighteen intact subjects and four amputated subjects while imagining to perform each of the eleven hand MI tasks. Two performance evaluation analyses, namely channel- and TFF-based analyses, are conducted to identify the best subset of EEG channels and the TFFs category, respectively, that enable the highest classification accuracy between the MI tasks. In each evaluation analysis, the hierarchical classification model is trained using two training procedures, namely subject-dependent and subject-independent procedures. These two training procedures quantify the capability of the proposed approach to capture both intra- and inter-personal variations in the EEG signals for different MI tasks within the same hand. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the approach for classifying the MI tasks within the same hand. In particular, the classification accuracies obtained for the intact and amputated subjects are as high as 88.8% and 90.2%, respectively, for the subject-dependent training procedure, and 80.8% and 87.8%, respectively, for the subject-independent training procedure. These results suggest the feasibility of applying the proposed approach to control dexterous prosthetic hands, which can be of great benefit for individuals suffering from hand amputations. PMID:28832513

  19. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-dan WANG; Chun-mei SHEN; Wen-juan LIU; Yu-dang ZHANG; Guang YANG; Jiang-wei YAN; Hai-xia QIN

    2013-01-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus,which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS),in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region,China.A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system.Using capillary electrophoresis,the PCR products of the 21 STR loci were separated and genotyped.A total of 161 alleles were observed in the Russian ethnic minority group,and corresponding allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0044 to 0.5965.The 21 non-CODIS STR loci of the Russian ethnic minority group were characterized by high genetic diversity and therefore may be useful for elucidating the population's genetic background,for individual identification,and for paternity testing in forensic practice.

  20. Cumulative t-link threshold models for the genetic analysis of calving ease scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tempelman Robert J

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a hierarchical threshold mixed model based on a cumulative t-link specification for the analysis of ordinal data or more, specifically, calving ease scores, was developed. The validation of this model and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm was carried out on simulated data from normally and t4 (i.e. a t-distribution with four degrees of freedom distributed populations using the deviance information criterion (DIC and a pseudo Bayes factor (PBF measure to validate recently proposed model choice criteria. The simulation study indicated that although inference on the degrees of freedom parameter is possible, MCMC mixing was problematic. Nevertheless, the DIC and PBF were validated to be satisfactory measures of model fit to data. A sire and maternal grandsire cumulative t-link model was applied to a calving ease dataset from 8847 Italian Piemontese first parity dams. The cumulative t-link model was shown to lead to posterior means of direct and maternal heritabilities (0.40 ± 0.06, 0.11 ± 0.04 and a direct maternal genetic correlation (-0.58 ± 0.15 that were not different from the corresponding posterior means of the heritabilities (0.42 ± 0.07, 0.14 ± 0.04 and the genetic correlation (-0.55 ± 0.14 inferred under the conventional cumulative probit link threshold model. Furthermore, the correlation (> 0.99 between posterior means of sire progeny merit from the two models suggested no meaningful rerankings. Nevertheless, the cumulative t-link model was decisively chosen as the better fitting model for this calving ease data using DIC and PBF.