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Sample records for cultured human gingival

  1. Effect of three commercial mouth rinses on cultured human gingival fibroblast: An in vitro study

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    Flemingson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To examine the effect of three commercial mouth rinses (Hexidine 0.2%, Listerine Cool Mint, Betadine 1% upon cultured human gingival fibroblast proliferation. Materials and Methods: Human gingival fibroblasts were cultured and incubated in Dulbecco′s Minimum Eagle′s Medium containing Chlorhexidine, Listerine, Povidone-Iodine at varying concentrations (1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 20% and 100% of the given solution at 37°C for 1, 5 and 15 min. Control cells received an equal volume of Dulbecco′s Minimum Eagle′s Medium without adding mouth rinses, for similar duration of exposure at 37°C. Following incubation the media were removed, cells were washed twice with medium, supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum, and fibroblasts in the test and control group were allowed to recover in the same media for 24 h. Results: In all the three groups, the proliferation inhibition was dependent on the concentration of solublized mouth rinses in the cell culture but independent of the duration of exposure to all three mouth rinses. The results showed that all three solutions were toxic to cultured human gingival fibroblasts, Chlorhexidine being the most cytotoxic. It was seen that at dilute concentrations (1% and 2% of given solutions Listerine was more cytotoxic than Chlorhexidine and Povidone-Iodine. Conclusion: These results suggest that Chlorhexidine, Listerine and Povidone-Iodine are capable of inducing a dose-dependent reduction in cellular proliferation of fibroblasts. The results presented are interesting, but to know the clinical significance, further studies are needed.

  2. The effect of exposure duration of self etch dentin bonding on the toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture

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    Sri Lestari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Self etch dentin bonding created to make light easily activate the application of composite resin on tooth surface. The monomer content has acid effect that could irritate tooth pulp. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light exposure duration of self etch dentin bonding on toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture by MTT assay. Self etch dentin bonding was used as on experimental unit and the sample was exposed by visible light curing in different duration: 10, 20, 30 seconds and immerged in artificial saliva in pH 7 for 24 hours. 100 µl artificial saliva was exposed to human gingival fibroblast of cell culture 20.000 cells/100 µl RPMI for 24 hours. Toxicity was evaluated by MTT assay, optical density was measured using 550 nm spectrophotometer. The data was analyzed using Kruskal Wallis in 5% degree of significance. The result showed that increasing exposure duration (10, 20, 30 seconds of self etch dentin bonding will reduce the toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture. It is concluded that 30 seconds-exposure of self etch dentin bonding will reduce the toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture.

  3. High-frequency low-level diode laser irradiation promotes proliferation and migration of primary cultured human gingival epithelial cells.

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    Ejiri, Kenichiro; Aoki, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Izumi, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    In periodontal therapy, the use of low-level diode lasers has recently been considered to improve wound healing of the gingival tissue. However, its effects on human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs) remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine whether high-frequency low-level diode laser irradiation stimulates key cell responses in wound healing, proliferation and migration, in primary cultured HGECs in vitro. HGECs were derived from seven independent gingival tissue specimens. Cultured HGECs were exposed to a single session of high-frequency (30 kHz) low-level diode laser irradiation with various irradiation time periods (fluence 5.7-56.7 J/cm(2)). After 20-24 h, cell proliferation was evaluated by WST-8 assay and [(3)H]thymidine incorporation assay, and cell migration was monitored by in vitro wound healing assay. Further, phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways after irradiation was investigated by Western blotting. The high-frequency low-level irradiation significantly increased cell proliferation and [(3)H]thymidine incorporation at various irradiation time periods. Migration of the irradiated cells was significantly accelerated compared with the nonirradiated control. Further, the low-level diode laser irradiation induced phosphorylation of MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) at 5, 15, 60, and 120 min after irradiation. Stress-activated protein kinases/c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK remained un-phosphorylated. The results show that high-frequency low-level diode laser irradiation promotes HGEC proliferation and migration in association with the activation of MAPK/ERK, suggesting that laser irradiation may accelerate gingival wound healing.

  4. Apoptotic and necrotic influence of dental resin polymerization initiators in human gingival fibroblast cultures.

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    Masuki, Kouhei; Nomura, Yuji; Bhawal, Ujjal Kumar; Sawajiri, Masahiko; Hirata, Isao; Nahara, Yukinori; Okazaki, Masayuki

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic and necrotic influence of four dental resin polymerization initiators--namely benzoyl peroxide (BPO), camphorquinone (CQ), dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and dimethyl-para-toluidine (DMPT)--on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. To this end, the growth inhibition of HGF cells with 1 mM BPO, CQ, and DMAEMA, and 500 microM DMPT was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8. Then, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry was used to assess propidium iodide-stained cells (distribution of cells in G0/G1, S, G2/M phases). All four dental resin polymerization initiators induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. As for the patterns of cell death (necrosis and/or apoptosis), they were analyzed using Annexin V-FITC/PI staining with flow cytometry. All four dental resin polymerization initiators most likely induced necrosis.

  5. Comparative systems toxicology analysis of cigarette smoke and aerosol from a candidate modified risk tobacco product in organotypic human gingival epithelial cultures: A 3-day repeated exposure study.

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    Zanetti, Filippo; Titz, Bjoern; Sewer, Alain; Lo Sasso, Giuseppe; Scotti, Elena; Schlage, Walter K; Mathis, Carole; Leroy, Patrice; Majeed, Shoaib; Torres, Laura Ortega; Keppler, Brian R; Elamin, Ashraf; Trivedi, Keyur; Guedj, Emmanuel; Martin, Florian; Frentzel, Stefan; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Smoking is one of the major lifestyle-related risk factors for periodontal diseases. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) offer a promising alternative in the harm reduction strategy for adult smokers unable to quit. Using a systems toxicology approach, we investigated and compared the exposure effects of a reference cigarette (3R4F) and a heat-not-burn technology-based candidate MRTP, the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2. Human gingival epithelial organotypic cultures were repeatedly exposed (3 days) for 28 min at two matching concentrations of cigarette smoke (CS) or THS2.2 aerosol. Results showed only minor histopathological alterations and minimal cytotoxicity upon THS2.2 aerosol exposure compared to CS (1% for THS2.2 aerosol vs. 30% for CS, at the high concentration). Among the 14 proinflammatory mediators analyzed, only 5 exhibited significant alterations with THS2.2 exposure compared with 11 upon CS exposure. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis indicated a general reduction of the impact in THS2.2 aerosol-exposed samples with respect to CS (∼79% lower biological impact for the high THS2.2 aerosol concentration compared to CS, and 13 metabolites significantly perturbed for THS2.2 vs. 181 for CS). This study indicates that exposure to THS2.2 aerosol had a lower impact on the pathophysiology of human gingival organotypic cultures than CS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Gingivitis

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001056.htm Gingivitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Gingivitis is inflammation of the gums. Causes Gingivitis is ...

  7. 改良人牙龈上皮细胞原代培养方法%An modified culture method of primary human gingival epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余婧婷; 孟焕新; 刘凯宁

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To establish a stable primary culture method of human gingival epithelial cells, with a higher successful rate and shorter culture time.Methods:Nine patients who received “crown-lengthening surgery”with relatively healthy periodontal conditions were selected (n =9).Gingival sam-ples were collected from the 9 donors during gingivectomy.Gingival epithelial cells were isolated and cul-tured by both an advanced enzyme digestion method and a tissue explant method.In the advanced enzyme digestion culture process,2.5 g/L DispaseⅡwas used to separate the epithelial tissue part from the con-nective tissue part,which lasted for one night.Then the epithelial tissues were digested by 0.025% tryp-sin without EDTA for 10 minutes,and centrifuged by keeping the digested epithelial tissues that re-mained.This advanced method not only decreased the concentration and digesting time of the two above-mentioned enzymes,but also simplified the centrifugel process.The tissue explant method was not changed too much compared with the original method.Growing processes of the primary cells cultured by the two methods were observed and recorded respectively,and indirect immunocytochemical staining was used to identify the type of cultured cells.At the same time,successful rates and cell culture time were also compared between the two methods.Results:Human gingival epithelial cells with typical morpholo-gy could be cultured within a shorter period by the advanced enzyme digestion method with a successful rate of 88.9%,and proliferated rapidly as sheets.After 10 -14 d cells could be passaged,gradually turned to be like fibroblasts when passaged to the third generation,and eventually went to apoptosis.The primary culture time was longer by using the tissue explant method,and approximately after 17 -22 d cells could be passaged,although the successful rate was the same as the enzyme digestion method.Cy-tokeratin staining was both positive by indirect immunocytochemical staining of

  8. In vitro effects of Choukroun's PRF (platelet-rich fibrin) on human gingival fibroblasts, dermal prekeratinocytes, preadipocytes, and maxillofacial osteoblasts in primary cultures.

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    Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Diss, Antoine; Odin, Guillaume; Doglioli, Pierre; Hippolyte, Marie-Pascale; Charrier, Jean-Baptiste

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of Choukroun's PRF (platelet-rich fibrin), a leucocyte and platelet concentrate clinically usable as fibrin membrane or clot, on human primary cultures of gingival fibroblasts, dermal prekeratinocytes, preadipocytes, and maxillofacial osteoblasts. For the proliferation study, these cells were cultivated with or without a PRF membrane originating from the same donor as for the cells. For osteoblasts and fibroblasts, dose-dependent effect was assessed (using 2 membranes). Cell counts and cytotoxicity tests were performed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days, and even 28 days for osteoblasts. More osteoblast cultures were prepared in differentiation conditions according to 3 modalities (without PRF, with PRF, with PRF the first day and differentiation medium applied only after the first week of culture). Osteoblast differentiation was analyzed using Von Kossa staining and alkaline phosphatase, DNA and total cell proteins dosage. PRF induced a significant and continuous stimulation of proliferation in all cell types. It was dose dependent during all the experiment with osteoblasts, but only on day 14 with fibroblasts. Moreover, PRF induced a strong differentiation in the osteoblasts, whatever the culture conditions. The analysis of osteoblast cultures in differentiation conditions with PRF, using light and scanning electron microscopy, revealed a starting mineralization process in the PRF membrane itself after 14 days. Moreover, PRF leucocytes seemed to proliferate and interact with osteoblasts. Cultures with PRF are always cocultures with leucocytes. These "chaperone leucocytes" could be the source of differential geographic regulation within the culture and explain the double contradictory effect proliferation/differentiation observed on osteoblasts.

  9. Cytotoxicity of HBD3 for dendritic cells, normal human epidermal keratinocytes, hTERT keratinocytes, and primary oral gingival epithelial keratinocytes in cell culture conditions.

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    Leelakanok, Nattawut; Fischer, Carol L; Bates, Amber M; Guthmiller, Janet M; Johnson, Georgia K; Salem, Aliasger K; Brogden, Kim A; Brogden, Nicole K

    2015-12-03

    Human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) is a prominent host defense peptide. In our recent work, we observed that HBD3 modulates pro-inflammatory agonist-induced chemokine and cytokine responses in human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), often at 20.0 μM concentrations. Since HBD3 can be cytotoxic in some circumstances, it is necessary to assess its cytotoxicity for DCs, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) keratinocytes, and primary oral gingival epithelial (GE) keratinocytes in different cell culture conditions. Cells, in serum free media with resazurin and in complete media with 10% fetal bovine serum and resazurin, were incubated with 5, 10, 20, and 40 μM HBD3. Cytotoxicity was determined by measuring metabolic conversion of resazurin to resorufin. The lethal dose 50 (LD50, mean μM±Std Err) values were determined from the median fluorescent intensities of test concentrations compared to live and killed cell controls. The LD50 value range of HBD3 was 18.2-35.9 μM in serum-free media for DCs, NHEKs, hTERT keratinocytes, and GE keratinocytes, and >40.0 μM in complete media. Thus, HBD3 was cytotoxic at higher concentrations, which must be considered in future studies of HBD3-modulated chemokine and cytokine responses in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

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    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  11. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures

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    Schlage, Walter K.; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air–liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products. PMID:25046638

  12. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures.

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    Schlage, Walter K; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-10-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air-liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products.

  13. Biological responses of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs in an innovative co-culture model with Streptococcus mitis to thermosets coated with a silver polysaccharide antimicrobial system.

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    Silvia Sancilio

    Full Text Available This study sought to evaluate the in vitro biological response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs co-coltured with Streptococcus mitis to bisphenol A glycidylmethacrylate/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (BisGMA/TEGDMA thermosets coated with Chitlac-nAg, a nanocomposite system with antimicrobial properties. To avoid bacterial adhesion to dental devices and to reduce cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells, we coated BisGMA/TEGDMA methacrylic thermosets with a new material, Chitlac-nAg, formed by stabilizing silver nanoparticles, which have well-known antimicrobial properties, with a polyelectrolyte solution containing Chitlac. Cytotoxicity, cell morphology, cell migration and inflammatory interleukine-6 (IL-6 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 secretion were evaluated. Our results showed that the cytotoxicity exerted on HGFs by our nanocomposite material was absent in our co-culture model, where fibroblasts are able to adhere and migrate. After 24 h thermosets coated with Chitlac as well as those coated with Chitlac-nAg exerted a minimal cytotoxic effect on HGFs, while after 48 h LDH release rises up 20%. Moreover the presence of S. mitis reduced this release in a greater amount with Chitlac-nAg coated thermosets. The secretion of IL-6 was significant in both Chitlac and Chitlac-nAg coated thermosets, but PGE2 production was minimal, suggesting that the IL-6 production was not related to an inflammatory response. Co-culture and the addiction of saliva did not influence IL-6 and PGE2 secretion. Data obtained in the present work suggest that Chitlac n-Ag coated thermosets could significantly improve the success rates of restorative dentistry, since they limit bacterial adhesion and are not toxic to HGFs.

  14. Leptin and Pro-Inflammatory Stimuli Synergistically Upregulate MMP-1 and MMP-3 Secretion in Human Gingival Fibroblasts.

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    Rachel C Williams

    Full Text Available Gingival fibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, yet the stimuli that regulate this response are not fully understood. The immunoregulatory adipokine leptin is detectable in the gingiva, human gingival fibroblasts express functional leptin receptor mRNA and leptin is known to regulate extracellular matrix remodelling responses in cardiac fibroblasts. We therefore hypothesised that leptin would enhance matrix metalloproteinase secretion in human gingival fibroblasts.We used in vitro cell culture to investigate leptin signalling and the effect of leptin on mRNA and protein expression in human gingival fibroblasts. We confirmed human gingival fibroblasts expressed cell surface leptin receptor, found leptin increased matrix metalloproteinase-1, -3, -8 and -14 expression in human gingival fibroblasts compared to unstimulated cells, and observed that leptin stimulation activated MAPK, STAT1/3 and Akt signalling in human gingival fibroblasts. Furthermore, leptin synergised with IL-1 or the TLR2 agonist pam2CSK4 to markedly enhance matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3 production by human gingival fibroblasts. Signalling pathway inhibition demonstrated ERK was required for leptin-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in human gingival fibroblasts; whilst ERK, JNK, p38 and STAT3 were required for leptin+IL-1- and leptin+pam2CSK4-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression. A genome-wide expression array and gene ontology analysis confirmed genes differentially expressed in leptin+IL-1-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts (compared to unstimulated cells were enriched for extracellular matrix organisation and disassembly, and revealed that matrix metalloproteinase-8 and -12 were also synergistically upregulated by leptin+IL-1 in human gingival fibroblasts.We conclude that leptin selectively enhances the expression and secretion of certain matrix metalloproteinases in human gingival

  15. Cytotoxic Evaluation of Elastomeric Dental Impression Materials on a Permanent Mouse Cell Line and on a Primary Human Gingival Fibroblast Culture

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    Roberta Tiozzo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The need for clinically relevant in vitro tests of dental materials is widely recognized. Nearly all dental impression materials are introduced into the mouth just after mixing and allowed to set in contact with the oral tissues. Under these conditions, the materials may be toxic to cells or may sensitize the tissues. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential cytotoxicity of new preparations of elastomeric dental impression materials: A four vinylpolysiloxanes: Elite H-D Putty and Elite H-D Light Body (Zhermack, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy; Express Putty and Express Light Body (3M ESPE AG Seefeld, Germany and B two polyethers: Impregum Penta and Permadyne Penta L (3M ESPE AG Seefeld, Germany. The cytotoxicity of these impression materials were examined using two different cell lines: Balb/c 3T3 (permanent cell line and human gingival fibroblasts (primary cell line and their effects were studied by indirect and direct tests. The direct tests are performed by placing one sample of the impression materials in the centre of the Petri dishes at the time of the seeding of cells. The cell growth was evaluated at the 12th and 24th hours by cell number. The indirect tests were performed by incubating a square of 1 cm diameter impression material in 5 mL of medium at 37 °C for 24 hours (“eluates”. Subconfluent cultures are incubated with “eluates” for 24 hours. The MTT-formazan production is the method used for measuring the cell viability. The results indicate that: a polyether materials are cytotoxic under both experimental conditions; b among vinylpolysiloxanes, only Express Light Body (3M ESPE AG Seefeld, Germany induces clear inhibition of cellular viability of Balb/c 3T3 evaluated by direct and indirect tests and c the primary cell line is less sensitive to the toxic effect than the permanent cell line.

  16. Synergistic anti-inflammatory activity of the antimicrobial peptides human beta-defensin-3 (hBD-3 and cathelicidin (LL-37 in a three-dimensional co-culture model of gingival epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

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    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    Full Text Available Given the spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens, antimicrobial peptides that can also modulate the immune response may be a novel approach for effectively controlling periodontal infections. In the present study, we used a three-dimensional (3D co-culture model of gingival epithelial cells and fibroblasts stimulated with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide (LPS to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of human beta-defensin-3 (hBD-3 and cathelicidin (LL-37 and to determine whether these antimicrobial peptides can act in synergy. The 3D co-culture model composed of gingival fibroblasts embedded in a collagen matrix overlaid with gingival epithelial cells had a synergistic effect with respect to the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in response to LPS stimulation compared to fibroblasts and epithelial cells alone. The 3D co-culture model was stimulated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of hBD-3 (10 and 20 µM and LL-37 (0.1 and 0.2 µM individually and in combination in the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS. A multiplex ELISA assay was used to quantify the secretion of 41 different cytokines. hBD-3 and LL-37 acted in synergy to reduce the secretion of GRO-alpha, G-CSF, IP-10, IL-6, and MCP-1, but only had an additive effect on reducing the secretion of IL-8 in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS stimulation. The present study showed that hBD-3 acted in synergy with LL-37 to reduce the secretion of cytokines by an LPS-stimulated 3D model of gingival mucosa. This combination of antimicrobial peptides thus shows promising potential as an adjunctive therapy for treating inflammatory periodontitis.

  17. HEMA but not TEGDMA induces autophagy in human gingival fibroblasts

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    Teti, Gabriella; Orsini, Giovanna; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Mazzotti, Maria C.; Ruggeri, Alessandra; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Falconi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Polymerized resin-based materials are successfully used in restorative dentistry. Despite their growing popularity, one drawback is the release of monomers from the polymerized matrix due to an incomplete polymerization or degradation processes. Released monomers are responsible for several adverse effects in the surrounding biological tissues, inducing high levels of oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species are important signaling molecules that regulate many signal-trasduction pathways and play critical roles in cell survival, death, and immune defenses. Reactive oxygen species were recently shown to activate autophagy as a mechanism of cell survival and cell death. Although the toxicity induced by dental resin monomers is widely studied, the cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are still unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the behavior of human gingival cells exposed to 2-hydroxy-ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) to better elucidate the mechanisms of cell survival and cell death induced by resin monomers. Primary culture of human gingival cells were exposed to 3 mmol/L of HEMA or 3 mmol/L of TEGDMA for 24, 48, and 72 h. Morphological investigations were performed by transmission electron microscopy to analyze the ultrastructure of cells exposed to the monomers. The expression of protein markers for apoptosis (caspase – 3 and PARP) and autophagy (beclin – 1 and LC3B I/II) were analyzed by western blot to investigate the influence of dental resin monomers on mechanisms underlying cell death. Results showed that HEMA treatment clearly induced autophagy followed by apoptosis while the lack of any sign of autophagy activation is observed in HGFs exposed to TEGDMA. These data indicate that cells respond to monomer-induced stress by the differential induction of adaptive mechanisms to maintain cellular homeostasis. PMID:26483703

  18. HEMA but not TEGDMA Induces Autophagy in Human Gingival Fibroblasts.

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    gabriella eteti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymerized resin-based materials are successfully used in restorative dentistry. Despite their growing popularity, one drawback is the release of monomers from the polymerized matrix due to an incomplete polymerization or degradation processes. Released monomers are responsible for several adverse effects in the surrounding biological tissues, inducing high levels of oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species are important signaling molecules that regulate many signal-trasduction pathways and play critical roles in cell survival, death, and immune defenses. Reactive oxygen species were recently shown to activate autophagy as a mechanism of cell survival and cell death. Although the toxicity induced by dental resin monomers is widely studied, the cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are still unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the behavior of human gingival cells exposed to 2-hydroxy-ethyl methacrylate (HEMA and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA to better elucidate the mechanisms of cell survival and cell death induced by resin monomers. Primary culture of human gingival cells were exposed to 3mmol/L of HEMA or 3mmol/L of TEGDMA for 24 h, 48h, and 72 h. Morphological investigations were performed by transmission electron microscopy to analyze the ultrastructure of cells exposed to the monomers. The expression of protein markers for apoptosis (caspase – 3 and PARP and autophagy (beclin – 1 and LC3B I/II were analyzed by western blot to investigate the influence of dental resin monomers on mechanisms underlying cell death. Results showed that HEMA treatment clearly induced autophagy followed by apoptosis while the lack of any sign of autophagy activation is observed in HGFs exposed to TEGDMA. These data indicate that cells respond to monomer-induced stress by the differential induction of adaptive mechanisms to maintain cellular homeostasis.

  19. Effect of Cyclosporin A and Angiotensin II on cytosolic calcium levels in primary human gingival fibroblasts

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    Ajitkumar Supraja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the effect of Cyclosporin A (CsA and angiotensin II (Ang II on cytosolic calcium levels in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs. Materials and Methods: Healthy gingival samples from six volunteers were obtained, and primary HGFs were cultured. Cell viability and proliferation assay were performed to identify the ideal concentrations of CsA and Ang II. Cytosolic calcium levels in cultured gingival fibroblasts treated with CsA and Ang II were studied using colorimetric assay, confocal and fluorescence imaging. Statistical analyses were done using SPSS software and GraphPad Prism. Results: Higher levels of cytosolic levels were evident in cells treated with CsA and Ang II when compared to control group and was statistically significant (P < 0.05 in both colorimetric assay and confocal imaging. Fluorescent images of the cultured HGFs revealed the same. Conclusion: Thus calcium being a key player in major cellular functions, plays a major role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth.

  20. Binding, uptake, and release of nicotine by human gingival fibroblasts

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    Hanes, P.J.; Schuster, G.S.; Lubas, S. (Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of the effects of nicotine on fibroblasts have reported an altered morphology and attachment of fibroblasts to substrates and disturbances in protein synthesis and secretion. This altered functional and attachment response may be associated with changes in the cell membrane resulting from binding of the nicotine, or to disturbances in cell metabolism as a result of high intracellular levels of nicotine. The purpose of the present study, therefore, was to (1) determine whether gingival fibroblasts bound nicotine and if any binding observed was specific or non-specific in nature; (2) determine whether gingival fibroblasts internalized nicotine, and if so, at what rate; (3) determine whether gingival fibroblasts also released nicotine back into the extracellular environment; and (4) if gingival fibroblasts release nicotine intact or as a metabolite. Cultures of gingival fibroblasts were prepared from gingival connective tissue biopsies. Binding was evaluated at 4{degree}C using a mixture of {sup 3}H-nicotine and unlabeled nicotine. Specific binding was calculated as the difference between {sup 3}H-nicotine bound in the presence and absence of unlabeled nicotine. The cells bound 1.44 (+/- 0.42) pmols/10(6) cells in the presence of unlabeled nicotine and 1.66 (+/- 0.55) pmols/10(6) cells in the absence of unlabeled nicotine. The difference was not significant. Uptake of nicotine was measured at 37{degree}C after treating cells with {sup 3}H-nicotine for time periods up to 4 hours. Uptake in pmols/10(6) cells was 4.90 (+/- 0.34) at 15 minutes, 8.30 (+/- 0.75) at 30 minutes, 12.28 (+/- 2.62) at 1 hour and 26.31 (+/- 1.15) at 4 hours.

  1. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

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    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B. (Univ. of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-10-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients.

  2. Resinous perforation-repair materials inhibit the growth, attachment, and proliferation of human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Tai, Kuo-Wei; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2002-04-01

    The choice of repair material is one of the important factors in the prognosis of the endodontically treated tooth with a perforation defect. The cytotoxicity of perforation-repair materials must be investigated to ensure a safe biological response. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of resin-modified, glass-ionomer cement, compomer, and resin on human-gingival fibroblasts. Human gingival fibroblasts from crown lengthening surgery were cultured by using an explant technique with the consent of the patient. Cytotoxicity was judged by using an assay of tetrazolium bromide reduction. The results showed that resin-modified, glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC, compomer Compoglass, and resin SpectrumTPH (TPH) were cytotoxic to primary human gingival fibroblast cultures by inhibiting cell growth and proliferation. TPH alone had an effect on cell attachment. It was found that TPH was the most cytotoxic repair material among those tested in all cultures. The toxicity decreased in the order of TPH>FLC>CG.

  3. Assessment of human gingival fibroblast interaction with dental implant abutment materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Bukelskiene, Virginija; Sabaliauskas, Vaidotas; Balciunas, Evaldas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Baltriukiene, Daiva

    2015-04-01

    The biocompatibility of dental implant abutment materials depends on numerous factors including the nature of the material, its chemical composition, roughness, texture, hydrophilicity and surface charge. The aim of the present study was to compare the viability and adhesion strength of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) grown on several dental materials used in implant prosthodontics. Surfaces of the tested materials were assessed using an optical imaging profiler. For material toxicity and cellular adhesion evaluation, primary human gingival fibroblast cells were used. To evaluate the strength of cellular adhesion, gingival fibroblasts were cultured on the tested materials and subjected to lateral shear forces by applying 300 and 500 rpm shaking intensities. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression and phosphorylation in cells grown on the specimens were registered by cell-based ELISA. There was a tendency of fibroblast adhesion strength to decrease in the following order: sandblasted titanium, polished titanium, sandblasted zirconium oxide, polished zirconium oxide, gold-alloy, chrome-cobalt alloy. Higher levels of total as well as phospho-FAK protein were registered in HGFs grown on roughened titanium. Material type and surface processing technique have an impact on gingival fibroblast interaction with dental implant abutment materials.

  4. The effectiveness of potent dental adhesives on the viability of LPS challenged human gingival fibroblasts.

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    Garner, Angelia D; Tucci, Michelle A; Benghuzzi, Hamed A

    2014-01-01

    Dental adhesives are necessary for the retention of specific dental restorations utilized to repair the anatomy of the tooth after dental decay is removed. Adhesives come into contact with healthy and diseased periodontal tissues. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram negative bacterial pathogen, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) is an endotoxin found in gingival connective tissues of patients who suffer from periodontal disease. The presence of the endotoxin causes inflammation. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of potent dental adhesives when human gingival fibroblasts are challenged with LPS-PG. The fibroblasts were exposed to the dental adhesives polymethly methacrylate (PMMA), OptiBond®, and Prime & Bond® which were purchased from Patterson Dental, a national dental materials supplier. The human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1, ATCC® CRL-2014™) were purchased from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). The porphyromonas gingival lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) was purchased from Fisher Scientific (Pittsburg, PA). No significant differences in metabolic behavior was detected among the groups (padhesives and LPS-PG at 48 hour intervals (p<0.003). No significant changes were noted in cellular morphology at any phases, and all cells demonstrated typical fibroblast spindle shape.

  5. Characterization of the autocrine/paracrine function of vitamin D in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells.

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    Kaining Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated that 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3, the precursor of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3, is abundant around periodontal soft tissues. Here we investigate whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3 is converted to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 in periodontal soft tissue cells and explore the possibility of an autocrine/paracrine function of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 in periodontal soft tissue cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established primary cultures of human gingival fibroblasts and human periodontal ligament cells from 5 individual donors. We demonstrated that 1α-hydroxylase was expressed in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells, as was cubilin. After incubation with the 1α-hydroxylase substrate 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3, human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells generated detectable 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 that resulted in an up-regulation of CYP24A1 and RANKL mRNA. A specific knockdown of 1α-hydroxylase in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells using siRNA resulted in a significant reduction in both 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 production and mRNA expression of CYP24A1 and RANKL. The classical renal regulators of 1α-hydroxylase (parathyroid hormone, calcium and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 and Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide did not influence 1α-hydroxylase expression significantly, however, interleukin-1β and sodium butyrate strongly induced 1α-hydroxylase expression in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, the expression, activity and functionality of 1α-hydroxylase were detected in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells, raising the possibility that vitamin D acts in an autocrine/paracrine manner in these cells.

  6. Metallothionein in human gingival amalgam tattoos.

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    Lau, J C; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Wysocki, G P; Cherian, M G

    2001-11-01

    Amalgam tattoos occur when small particles of dental amalgam, composed largely of silver (Ag) and mercury (Hg), are inadvertently implanted into oral soft tissues during dental procedures. Metallothioneins (MTs) are ubiquitous, low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, metal-binding proteins that are inducible by many agents including metals and may be involved in the detoxification of toxic metals such as Hg. In this study, the correlation between MT expression and amalgam tattoos in human gingiva was investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and immunohistochemical techniques. Light microscopically, amalgam tattoos presented as either fine granular particles or larger discrete opaque globular particles in connective tissues. EDX revealed the smaller particles to be silver sulphide (Ag(2)S), while the larger particles exhibited a shell of Ag(2)S that contained irregularly distributed masses of Ag and Hg. Particles of tin (Sn) were also found. No MT staining was observed in collagen, fibroblasts or blood vessels in areas exhibiting abundant amounts of embedded fine granular Ag(2)S particles. Blood vessels exhibiting relatively few amalgam particles stained positively for MT. Cells with the morphological features of histiocytes located directly adjacent to larger pieces of amalgam showed intense MT staining. These results indicate that amalgam tattoos contain no Hg or free Ag except in large globular pieces of amalgam, which still contain Hg and which induce MT expression in adjacent histiocytes. This suggests that Hg leaching from impacted dental amalgam particles induces MT, while residual Ag(2)S and Sn particles do not. MT may therefore act to reduce Hg exposure in patients with amalgam tattoos.

  7. Long-term exposure of human gingival fibroblasts to cigarette smoke condensate reduces cell growth by modulating Bax, caspase-3 and p53 expression.

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    Alamri, A; Semlali, A; Jacques, É; Alanazi, M; Zakrzewski, A; Chmielewski, W; Rouabhia, M

    2015-08-01

    Smoking cigarettes increases the risk of oral tissue damage leading to periodontal disease. Gingival fibroblasts, the predominant cell type inhabiting gingival connective tissue, play a critical role in remodeling and maintaining gingival structure. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term exposure to cigarette smoke on human gingival fibroblast survival/apoptosis and the molecular pathways involved in these cell responses. Human gingival fibroblasts were extracted from healthy non-smokers and cultured in the presence of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). At the end of each time point, cell growth was evaluated by means of MTT assay. Apoptotic and necrotic gene's expression was investigated by polymerase chain reaction array and by annexin V/propidium iodide staining and cell cycle assays. Western blot was used to investigate Bax and p53 proteins. These tests were supported by caspase 3 activity analyses. High levels of CSC decreased cell growth and deregulated cell cycle progression by increasing the G(0)/G(1) and reducing the S and G(2)/M phases of the gingival fibroblasts. Polymerase chain reaction arrays revealed the activation of several apoptotic genes by CSC, including TNF receptors, caspases, Bax and p53. This was supported by increases in the Bax and p53 protein levels as well as by an elevated activity of caspase-3 in the CSC-exposed cells. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that both Bax and caspase-3 displayed a cytosolic and mitochondrial distribution in the CSC-exposed gingival fibroblasts, compared to controls. The damaging effect of CSC on gingival fibroblast growth was also supported by the decrease in interleukin 6 and 8 secretion by the gingival fibroblasts. These results suggest that CSC may contribute to deregulating fibroblast functions. This can compromise fibroblast-epithelial cell interactions, which ultimately increases the risk of gingival tissue damage and the onset of periodontitis. © 2014 John Wiley

  8. Hydrogen-rich water achieves cytoprotection from oxidative stress injury in human gingival fibroblasts in culture or 3D-tissue equivalents, and wound-healing promotion, together with ROS-scavenging and relief from glutathione diminishment.

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    Xiao, Li; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate protective effects of hydrogen-rich water (HW) against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced cellular harmful events and cell death in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and three-dimensional (3D-) gingival tissue equivalents. HW was prepared with a magnesium stick in 600-mL double distilled water (DDW) overnight. Dissolved hydrogen was about 1460 ± 50 μg/L versus approximately 1600 μg/L for the saturated hydrogen. Under cell-free conditions, HW, dose-dependently, significantly scavenged peroxyl radicals (ROO·) derived from 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Extract from HW-treated HGF cells scavenged ROO· more markedly than that from DDW-treated cells, suggesting that HW can increase the intracellular antioxidant capacity. Hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently increased the intracellular ROS generation, which was significantly repressed by HW, both in the cytoplasm and nuclei. LIVE/DEAD staining and our original cell viability dye-extraction assay showed that HW significantly protected HGF cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Hydrogen peroxide also diminished the contents of intracellular glutathione, which were appreciably relieved by HW-pretreatment. Additionally, HW noticeably prevented cumene hydroperoxide-induced generation of cellular ROS in epidermis parts of 3D-gingival equivalents. The in vitro scratch assay showed that HW was able to diminish physical injury-induced ROS generation and promote wound healing in HGF cell monolayer sheets. In summary, HW was able to increase intracellular antioxidative capacity and to protect cells and tissue from oxidative damage. Thus, HW might be used for prevention/treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases.

  9. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens:a co-culture study in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingran Zhao; Henny C van der Mei; Minie Rustema-Abbing; Henk J Busscher; Yijin Ren

    2015-01-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration or bacterial colonization. Co-culture models, in which tissue cells and bacteria battle simultaneously for estate on an implant surface, have been demonstrated to provide a better in vitro mimic of the clinical situation. Here we aim to compare the surface coverage by U2OS osteoblasts cells prior to and after challenge by two anaerobic sub-gingival pathogens in a co-culture model on differently modified titanium (Ti), titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloys and zirconia surfaces. Monoculture studies with either U2OS osteoblasts or bacteria were also carried out and indicated significant differences in biofilm formation between the implant materials, but interactions with U2OS osteoblasts were favourable on all materials. Adhering U2OS osteoblasts cells, however, were significantly more displaced from differently modified Ti surfaces by challenging sub-gingival pathogens than from TiZr alloys and zirconia variants. Combined with previous work employing a co-culture model consisting of human gingival fibroblasts and supra-gingival oral bacteria, results point to a different material selection to stimulate the formation of a soft tissue seal as compared to preservation of osseointegration under the unsterile conditions of the oral cavity.

  10. Response of a co-culture model of epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts to zoledronic acid

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    Fernanda Gonçalves BASSO

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteonecrosis of the jaw is an adverse effect of bisphosphonates. While the etiopathogenesis of this condition has been investigated, the interactions and effects of bisphosphonates on oral mucosa cells remain unclear. It is hypothesized that cell culture models, such as co-culture or three-dimensional cell culture models, can provide valuable insight. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA on epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts in a co-culture model. Briefly, epithelial cells were seeded on transwell inserts and gingival fibroblasts were seeded in the lower well of 24-well plates. The latter were treated with ZA (5 μM for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability and synthesis of the inflammatory chemokine, CCL2, were subsequently assessed. Data were subjected to statistical analysis with a 5% significance level. In the presence of ZA, the epithelial cells exhibited significant toxicity in both cell culture models and at both time points. However, greater cytotoxicity was observed in the co-culture model. Greater viability for the gingival fibroblasts was also associated with the co-culture model, and ZA-mediated toxicity was observed for the 48 h time point. ZA promoted a significant increase in CCL2 synthesis in both sets of cells, with greater CCL2 synthesis detected in the gingival fibroblasts. However, this effect was diminished in the co-culture model. Taken together, these results confirm the specific response patterns of the cells seeded in the co-culture model and also demonstrate the protective mechanism that is mediated by epithelial/mesenchymal cell interactions upon exposure to ZA.

  11. Response of a co-culture model of epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts to zoledronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Pansani, Taisa Nogueira; Turrioni, Ana Paula Silveira; Scheffel, Débora Lopes; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2016-11-28

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw is an adverse effect of bisphosphonates. While the etiopathogenesis of this condition has been investigated, the interactions and effects of bisphosphonates on oral mucosa cells remain unclear. It is hypothesized that cell culture models, such as co-culture or three-dimensional cell culture models, can provide valuable insight. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts in a co-culture model. Briefly, epithelial cells were seeded on transwell inserts and gingival fibroblasts were seeded in the lower well of 24-well plates. The latter were treated with ZA (5 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability and synthesis of the inflammatory chemokine, CCL2, were subsequently assessed. Data were subjected to statistical analysis with a 5% significance level. In the presence of ZA, the epithelial cells exhibited significant toxicity in both cell culture models and at both time points. However, greater cytotoxicity was observed in the co-culture model. Greater viability for the gingival fibroblasts was also associated with the co-culture model, and ZA-mediated toxicity was observed for the 48 h time point. ZA promoted a significant increase in CCL2 synthesis in both sets of cells, with greater CCL2 synthesis detected in the gingival fibroblasts. However, this effect was diminished in the co-culture model. Taken together, these results confirm the specific response patterns of the cells seeded in the co-culture model and also demonstrate the protective mechanism that is mediated by epithelial/mesenchymal cell interactions upon exposure to ZA.

  12. Anti-inflammatory changes of gene expression by Artemisia iwayomogi in the LPS-stimulated human gingival fibroblast: microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeong-Gon; Yeo, Sujung; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2012-03-01

    The leaves and stems of Asteraceae Artemisia iwayomogi (Ai) for a long time have been known to inhibit inflammatory cytokine production and allergic reactions, and have been used to treat liver diseases. It needs to be elucidated in terms of global gene expression whether Ai has an influence as an anti-inflammatory agent on the cultured human gingival fibroblast stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This study investigated the anti-inflammatory changes of the genes by Ai using the Affymetrix genechip human gene 1.0 ST array when the cultured human gingival fibroblast was treated with LPS. It was observed that the inflammation- and immune response-related genes were activated by LPS challenge in the cultured human gingival fibroblast. The array analysis showed that 65 of the 344 genes up-regulated by LPS stimulation, when compared to the control, were down-regulated by the Ai treatment. A number of inflammation- and immune response-related genes of the 65 genes were found. In addition, 78 of the 164 genes down-regulated by the LPS, when compared to the control, were up-regulated by the Ai treatment. The regulatory patterns of the representative genes were correlated with the real-time RT-PCR analysis. The Ai extract and its specific components, scopolin and scopoletin, significantly hindered the production of inflammatory mediators such as IL-6, TNF-α and nitrite in the LPS-challenged fibroblast. This study suggests that Ai can comprehensively inhibit the activation of the inflammation- and immune response-related genes and the inflammatory mediators in the human gingival fibroblast.

  13. Regulation of NAMPT in Human Gingival Fibroblasts and Biopsies

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    Anna Damanaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipokines, such as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT, are molecules, which are produced in adipose tissue. Recent studies suggest that NAMPT might also be produced in the tooth-supporting tissues, that is, periodontium, which also includes the gingiva. The aim of this study was to examine if and under what conditions NAMPT is produced in gingival fibroblasts and biopsies from healthy and inflamed gingiva. Gingival fibroblasts produced constitutively NAMPT, and this synthesis was significantly increased by interleukin-1β and the oral bacteria P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. Inhibition of the MEK1/2 and NFκB pathways abrogated the stimulatory effects of F. nucleatum on NAMPT. Furthermore, the expression and protein levels of NAMPT were significantly enhanced in gingival biopsies from patients with periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory infectious disease of the periodontium, as compared to gingiva from periodontally healthy individuals. In summary, the present study provides original evidence that gingival fibroblasts produce NAMPT and that this synthesis is increased under inflammatory and infectious conditions. Local synthesis of NAMPT in the inflamed gingiva may contribute to the enhanced gingival and serum levels of NAMPT, as observed in periodontitis patients. Moreover, local production of NAMPT by gingival fibroblasts may represent a possible mechanism whereby periodontitis may impact on systemic diseases.

  14. Effects of Calendula officinalis on human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Pragtipal; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Sun, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Song, Fengyu; Gregson, Karen S; Windsor, L Jack

    2012-04-01

    Calendula officinalis is commonly called the marigold. It is a staple topical remedy in homeopathic medicine. It is rich in quercetin, carotenoids, lutein, lycopene, rutin, ubiquinone, xanthophylls, and other anti-oxidants. It has anti-inflammatory properties. Quercetin, one of the active components in Calendula, has been shown to inhibit recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and decrease the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL), IL-6 and IL-8 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore-stimulated human mast cells. To examine the effects of Calendula on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) mediated collagen degradation and MMP activity. Lactate dehydrogenate assays were performed to determine the non-toxic concentrations of Calendula, doxycycline and quercetin. Cell-mediated collagen degradation assays were performed to examine the inhibitory effect on cell-mediated collagen degradation. Gelatin zymography was performed to examine their effects on MMP-2 activity. The experiments were repeated three times and ANOVA used for statistical analyses. Calendula at 2-3% completely inhibited the MMP-2 activity in the zymograms. Doxycycline inhibited HGF-mediated collagen degradation at 0.005, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.05%, and MMP-2 activity completely at 0.05%. Quercetin inhibited HGF-mediated collagen degradation at 0.005, 0.01 and 0.02%, and MMP-2 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Calendula inhibited HGF-mediated collagen degradation and MMP-2 activity more than the same correlated concentration of pure quercetin. Calendula inhibits HGF-mediated collagen degradation and MMP-2 activity more than the corresponding concentration of quercetin. This may be attributed to additional components in Calendula other than quercetin. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Inhibition of the differentiation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells by human gingival fibroblasts.

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    Sylvie Séguier

    Full Text Available We investigated whether gingival fibroblasts (GFs can modulate the differentiation and/or maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs and analyzed soluble factors that may be involved in this immune modulation. Experiments were performed using human monocytes in co-culture with human GFs in Transwell® chambers or using monocyte cultures treated with conditioned media (CM from GFs of four donors. The four CM and supernatants from cell culture were assayed by ELISA for cytokines involved in the differentiation of dendritic cells, such as IL-6, VEGF, TGFβ1, IL-13 and IL-10. The maturation of monocyte-derived DCs induced by LPS in presence of CM was also studied. Cell surface phenotype markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. In co-cultures, GFs inhibited the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs and the strength of this blockade correlated with the GF/monocyte ratio. Conditioned media from GFs showed similar effects, suggesting the involvement of soluble factors produced by GFs. This inhibition was associated with a lower stimulatory activity in MLR of DCs generated with GFs or its CM. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and VEGF significantly (P<0.05 inhibited the inhibitory effect of CM on the differentiation of monocytes-derived DCs and in a dose dependent manner. Our data suggest that IL-6 is the main factor responsible for the inhibition of DCs differentiation mediated by GFs but that VEGF is also involved and constitutes an additional mechanism.

  16. Growth inhibitory effects of endotoxins from Bacteroides gingivalis and intermedius on human gingival fibroblasts in vitro

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    Layman, D.L.; Diedrich, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Purified endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide from Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius caused a similar dose-dependent inhibition of growth of cultured human gingival fibroblasts as determined by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell count. Approximately 200 micrograms/ml endotoxin caused a 50% reduction in /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake of logarithmically growing cells. Inhibition of growth was similar in cultures of fibroblasts derived from either healthy or diseased human gingiva. When examining the change in cell number with time of exposure in culture, the rate of proliferation was significantly suppressed during the logarithmic phase of growth. However, the cells recovered so that the rate of proliferation, although reduced, was sufficient to produce a cell density similar to the control cells with prolonged culture. The endotoxins were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The profiles of the Bacteroides endotoxins were different. B. gingivalis endotoxin showed a wide range of distinct bands indicating a heterogeneous distribution of molecular species. Endotoxin from B. intermedius exhibited a few discrete low molecular weight bands, but the majority of the lipopolysaccharides electrophoresed as a diffuse band of high molecular weight material. The apparent heterogeneity of the two Bacteroides endotoxins and the similarity in growth inhibitory capacity suggest that growth inhibitory effects of these substances cannot be attributed to any polysaccharide species of endotoxin.

  17. Expression and function of connexin 43 in human gingival wound healing and fibroblasts.

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    Rana Tarzemany

    Full Text Available Connexins (C×s are a family of transmembrane proteins that form hemichannels and gap junctions (GJs on the cell membranes, and transfer small signaling molecules between the cytoplasm and extracellular space and between connecting cells, respectively. Among C×s, suppressing C×43 expression or function promotes skin wound closure and granulation tissue formation, and may alleviate scarring, but the mechanisms are not well understood. Oral mucosal gingiva is characterized by faster wound closure and scarless wound healing outcome as compared to skin wounds. Therefore, we hypothesized that C×43 function is down regulated during human gingival wound healing, which in fibroblasts promotes expression of genes conducive for fast and scarless wound healing. Cultured gingival fibroblasts expressed C×43 as their major connexin. Immunostaining of unwounded human gingiva showed that C×43 was abundantly present in the epithelium, and in connective tissue formed large C×43 plaques in fibroblasts. At the early stages of wound healing, C×43 was strongly down regulated in wound epithelial cells and fibroblasts, returning to the level of normal tissue by day 60 post-wounding. Blocking of C×43 function by C×43 mimetic peptide Gap27 suppressed GJ-mediated dye transfer, promoted migration, and caused significant changes in the expression of wound healing-associated genes in gingival fibroblasts. In particular, out of 54 genes analyzed, several MMPs and TGF-β1, involved in regulation of inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM turnover, and VEGF-A, involved in angiogenesis, were significantly upregulated while pro-fibrotic ECM molecules, including Collagen type I, and cell contractility-related molecules were significantly down regulated. These responses involved MAPK, GSK3α/β and TGF-β signaling pathways, and AP1 and SP1 transcription factors. Thus, suppressed function of C×43 in fibroblasts promotes their migration, and regulates expression of

  18. In Vitro Wound Healing Improvement by Low-Level Laser Therapy Application in Cultured Gingival Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G. Basso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine adequate energy doses using specific parameters of LLLT to produce biostimulatory effects on human gingival fibroblast culture. Cells (3×104 cells/cm2 were seeded on 24-well acrylic plates using plain DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. After 48-hour incubation with 5% CO2 at 37°C, cells were irradiated with a InGaAsP diode laser prototype (LASERTable; 780±3 nm; 40 mW with energy doses of 0.5, 1.5, 3, 5, and 7 J/cm2. Cells were irradiated every 24 h totalizing 3 applications. Twenty-four hours after the last irradiation, cell metabolism was evaluated by the MTT assay and the two most effective doses (0.5 and 3 J/cm2 were selected to evaluate the cell number (trypan blue assay and the cell migration capacity (wound healing assay; transwell migration assay. Data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney nonparametric tests with statistical significance of 5%. Irradiation of the fibroblasts with 0.5 and 3 J/cm2 resulted in significant increase in cell metabolism compared with the nonrradiated group (P<0.05. Both energy doses promoted significant increase in the cell number as well as in cell migration (P<0.05. These results demonstrate that, under the tested conditions, LLLT promoted biostimulation of fibroblasts in vitro.

  19. The function of TLR4 in interferon gamma or interleukin-13 exposed and lipopolysaccharide stimulated gingival epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beklen, A; Sarp, A S; Uckan, D; Tsaous Memet, G

    2014-10-01

    Gingival epithelial cells are part of the first line of host defense against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) serve important immune and nonimmune functions. We investigated how interferon gamma (INF-γ) and interleukin 13 (IL-13) are involved in the TLR4 ligand-induced regulation of interleukin-8 (IL-8) effects on gingival epithelial cells. We used immunohistochemistry to localize TLR4 in ten healthy and ten periodontitis tissue specimens. Gingival epithelial cells then were primed with Th1 cytokine (INF-γ) or Th2 cytokine (IL-13) before stimulation with Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect the level of IL-8 secretion in cell culture supernatants. Although both healthy and periodontitis gingival tissue samples expressed TLR4, the periodontitis samples showed more intense expression on gingival epithelial cells. Gingival epithelial cell cultures were primed with either INF-γ or IL-13 before stimulation with TLR4 ligand. Supernatants from co-stimulated epithelial cells exhibited IL-8 production in opposite directions, i.e., as one stimulates the release, the other reduces the release. INF-γ significantly increased TLR4 function, whereas IL-13 significantly decreased TLR4 function, i.e., production of IL-8. Pathogen associated molecular pattern-LPS, shared by many different periodonto-pathogenic bacteria, activates the gingival epithelial cells in a TLR-dependent manner. Diminished or increased TLR function in gingival epithelial cells under the influence of different Th cell types may protect or be harmful due to the altered TLR signaling.

  20. The influence of SrO and CaO in silicate and phosphate bioactive glasses on human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massera, J; Kokkari, A; Närhi, T; Hupa, L

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of substituting SrO for CaO in silicate and phosphate bioactive glasses on the human gingival fibroblast activity. In both materials the presence of SrO led to the formation of a CaP layer with partial Sr substitution for Ca. The layer at the surface of the silicate glass consisted of HAP whereas at the phosphate glasses it was close to the DCPD composition. In silicate glasses, SrO gave a faster initial dissolution and a thinner reaction layer probably allowing for a continuous ion release into the solution. In phosphate glasses, SrO decreased the dissolution process and gave a more strongly bonded reaction layer. Overall, the SrO-containing silicate glass led to a slight enhancement in the activity of the gingival fibroblasts cells when compared to the SrO-free reference glass, S53P4. The cell activity decreased up to 3 days of culturing for all phosphate glasses containing SrO. Whereas culturing together with the SrO-free phosphate glass led to complete cell death at 7 days. The glasses containing SrO showed rapid cell proliferation and growth between 7 and 14 days, reaching similar activity than glass S53P4. The addition of SrO in both silicate and phosphate glasses was assumed beneficial for proliferation and growth of human gingival fibroblasts due to Sr incorporation in the reaction layer at the glass surface and released in the cell culture medium.

  1. Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Cell Viability and PGE2 Production in Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castiblanco, Gina A.; Yucel-Lindberg, Tulay; Roos, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that probiotic therapy can play a role in the prevention and management of oral inflammatory diseases through immunomodulation and down-regulation of the inflammatory cascade. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the viability of human gingival fibroblasts...... immune assay kits. Our findings showed that none of the L. reuteri supernatants were cytotoxic or affected the viability of HGF. The most concentrated bacterial supernatant stimulated the production of PGE2 by the gingival cells in a significant way in the presence of IL-1β (p ... that bacterial products secreted from L. reuteri might play a role in the resolution of inflammation in HGF. Thus, our findings justify further investigations on the influence of probiotic bacteria on gingival inflammatory reactions....

  2. Characterization of Human Gingival Fibroblasts on Zirconia Surfaces Containing Niobium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Dan Cho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It was indicated that tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP containing yttria (Y2O3 and niobium oxide (Nb2O5 ((Y,Nb-TZP could be an adequate dental material to be used at esthetically important sites. The (Y,Nb-TZP was also proved to possess its osteogenic potential comparable with those conventional dental implant material, titanium (Ti. The objective of the current study was to characterize cellular response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs to smooth and rough surfaces of the (Y,Nb-TZP disc, which were obtained by polishing and sandblasting, respectively. Various microscopic, biochemical, and molecular techniques were used to investigate the disc surfaces and cellular responses for the experimental (Y,Nb-TZP and the comparing Ti groups. Sandblasted rough (Y,Nb-TZP (Zir-R discs had the highest surface roughness. HGFs cultured on polished (Y,Nb-TZP (Zir showed a rounded cell morphology and light spreading at 6 h after seeding and its proliferation rate significantly increased during seven days of culture compared to other surfaces. The mRNA expressions of type I collagen, integrin α2 and β1 were significantly stimulated for the Zir group at 24 h after seeding. The current findings, combined with the previous results, indicate that (Y,Nb-TZP provides appropriate surface condition for osseointegration at the fixture level and for peri-implant mucosal sealing at the abutment level producing a suitable candidate for dental implantation with an expected favorable clinical outcome.

  3. Attachment and growth behaviour of human gingival fibroblasts on titanium and zirconia ceramic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pae, Ahran; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Woo, Yi-Hyung [Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heesu [Department of Oral Anatomy, School of Dentistry, Kangnung National University, Gibyun-dong, Kangnung 210-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Yong-Dae, E-mail: ahranp@hotmail.co, E-mail: nightsu@kangnung.ac.k, E-mail: odontopia@khu.ac.k, E-mail: yongdae.kwon@gmail.co, E-mail: yhwoo@khu.ac.k [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    The attachment, growth behaviour and the genetic effect of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) cultured on titanium and different zirconia surfaces were investigated. HGF cells were cultured on (1) titanium discs with a machined surface, (2) yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) with a smooth surface and (3) Y-TZP with 100{mu}m grooves. The cell proliferation activity was evaluated through a MTT assay at 24 h and 48 h, and the cell morphology was examined by SEM. The mRNA expression of integrin-beta1, type I and III collagen, laminin and fibronectin in HGF were evaluated by RT-PCR after 24 h. From the MTT assay, the mean optical density values for the titanium and grooved zirconia surfaces after 48 h of HGF adhesion were greater than the values obtained for the smooth zirconia surfaces. SEM images showed that more cells were attached to the grooves, and the cells appeared to follow the direction of the grooves. The results of RT-PCR suggest that all groups showed comparable fibroblast-specific gene expression. A zirconia ceramic surface with grooves showed biological responses that were comparable to those obtained with HGF on a titanium surface.

  4. Biocompatibility of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with TiO2 Nanoparticles on Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Marzieh; Divband, Baharak; Akbarzadeh, Farzaneh

    2017-01-01

    Background The New compositions of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) or use of various additives like nanoparticles might affect MTA’s ideal characteristics This study was performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of WMTA and WMTA with Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (1% weight ratio) at different storage times after mixing on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Material and Methods HGFs were obtained from the attached gingiva of human premolars. HGFs were cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle medium, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin and streptomycin. The cells were exposed to WMTA (groups 1 and 2) and WMTA+TiO2 (groups 3 and 4). The fifth and sixth groups served as controls. Each group contained 15 wells. After 24h (groups 1, 3 and 5) and 48 h (groups 2, 4 and 6) of exposure, HGF viability was determined by Mosmann’s tetrazolium toxicity (MTT) assay. Statistical analysis of the data was performed by using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test, with significance of p 0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, incorporation of TiO2 nanoparticles into MTA at 1 wt% had no negative effect on its biocompatibility. Key words:Cytotoxicity, fibroblast, MTA, MTT assay, nanoparticle, TiO2. PMID:28210432

  5. Gingival Enlargement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2) medication-induced gingival enlargement, 3) hereditary gingival fibromatosis, and 4) systemic causes of gingival enlargement. Inflammatory ... hygiene measures will reduce the severity. Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis This is a rare hereditary condition that usually ...

  6. Morphological evaluations of human gingival fibroblasts exposed to novel dental adhesives in combination with glucocorticoids or dihydropridines - biomed 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Angelia D; Tucci, Michelle A; Benghuzzi, Hamed A

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the morphology of human gingival fibroblasts when exposed to dental adhesives in combination with glucocorticoids or dihydropridines in an in vitro environment. The cultured gingival fibroblasts used were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). The three dental adhesives used were Polymethyl methacrylate, OptiBond®, and Prime & Bond®. The glucocorticoid of choice was Cortisol along with the dihydropridine (Nifedipine). Fibroblasts were treated with each bonding agent, Cortisol, or Nifedipine for durations of 24, 48, and 72 hours. Morphological evaluation revealed that at 24 and 48 hour phases, there were no observable differences between the control and groups exposed to a combination of an adhesive and Cortisol. However, at 72 hours the cells exposed to combinations of OptiBond® with Cortisol and Prime & Bond® with Cortisol displayed predominantly spindle shaped cells compared to the predominantly round cells observed in the other samples. Cells exposed to a combination of adhesives with Nifedipine at 24 hour phase did not display any significant morphological alterations. In contrast, cells exposed to Prime & Bond® in combination with Nifedipine at the 48 hour phase revealed occasional morphological changes compared to control group. Likewise and at the end of 72 hour phase, the OptiBond®/Nifedipine and Prime & Bond®/Nifedipine groups displayed morphological differences such as clustering compared to the control. Biochemical analysis determined that there was a significant difference among the groups exposed to adhesives with Cortisol at 48 (Pdental adhesives and Cortisol at all phases. There were no differences in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels among the groups exposed to combinations of adhesives and Cortisol or adhesives and Nifedipine. It is concluded that there were minor structural (morphological) alterations and major functional (biomarkers) changes observed upon exposing the gingival fibroblasts in

  7. The effect of laser-treated titanium surface on human gingival fibroblast behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltriukienė, D; Sabaliauskas, V; Balčiūnas, E; Melninkaitis, A; Liutkevičius, E; Bukelskienė, V; Rutkūnas, V

    2014-03-01

    Surface modification, as a means of enhancing soft tissue integration in titanium would have significant advantages including less marginal bone resorption, predictable esthetic outcome, improved soft tissue stability, and seal against bacterial leakage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of laser-roughened titanium surfaces on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) viability, proliferation, and adhesion. Titanium discs were ablated with impulse laser in four different patterns. Polished and sand-blasted titanium discs were used as control groups. Specimen surface properties were determined using optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy. HGF behavior on modified surfaces was analyzed using cell adhesion, viability, proliferation, and ELISA assays. Results suggested that modified Ti surfaces did not affect the viability of HGFs and improved adhesion was measured in laser treatment groups after 24 h. However, proliferation study showed that the adsorbance of fibroblast cells after 72 h cultured on polished titanium was higher and comparable with that of control cells. As for focal adhesion kinase (FAK), cells grown on laser modified surfaces had higher expression of FAK as compared with polished titanium. In conclusion, tested laser-treated surfaces seem to favor HGF adhesion. There were no significant differences between different laser treatment groups. Copyright © 2013 Society of Plastics Engineers.

  8. Enhanced Biological Behavior of In Vitro Human Gingival Fibroblasts on Cold Plasma-Treated Zirconia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Zheng

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma treatment of zirconia enhances its biocompatibility with human gingival fibroblasts.The zirconia disks were divided into four groups and treated using helium atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier-discharge plasmas for 30, 60 or 90 s or left untreated. The surface morphology, wettability and chemical elements were analyzed. Fibroblasts density, morphology, morphometry and attachment-related genes expression were measured at different time points from 3 to 72 h.After plasma treatment, the surface morphology and roughness remained the same, while the contact angle decreased from 78.31° to 43.71°, and the surface C/O ratio decreased from 3.17 to 0.89. The surficial areas and perimeters of HGFs were increased two-fold in the treated groups at 3 h. Fibroblasts density increased on treated disks at all time points, especially the ones treated for 60 s. Attachment-related genes in the groups treated for 30 and 60 s were significantly higher at 3 and 24 h.The helium atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma treatment enhances the biological behavior of fibroblasts on zirconia by increasing the expression of attachment-related genes within 24 h and promoting the cell density during longer culture times. Wettability of zirconia, an important physicochemical property, has a vital influence on the cell behaviors.

  9. Alteration of metabolomic profiles by titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human gingivitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Contreras, Rene; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Umemura, Naoki; Kaneko, Miku; Hatakeyama, Yoko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalia; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Although nanoparticles (NPs) has afforded considerable benefits in various fields of sciences, several reports have shown their harmful effects, suggesting the necessity of adequate risk assessment. To clarify the mechanism of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs)-enhanced gingival inflammation, we conducted the full-scale metabolomic analyses of human gingival fibroblast cells treated with IL-1β alone or in combination with TiO2 NPs. Observation with transmission electron microscope demonstrated the incorporation of TiO2 NPs into vacuoles of the cells. TiO2 NPs significantly enhanced the IL-1β-induced prostaglandin E2 production and COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression. IL-1β reduced the intracellular concentrations of overall primary metabolites especially those of amino acid, urea cycle, polyamine, S-adenosylmethione and glutathione synthetic pathways. The addition of TiO2 NPs further augmented these IL-1β-induced metabolic changes, recommending careful use of dental materials containing TiO2 NPs towards patients with gingivitis or periodontitis. The impact of the present study is to identify the molecular targets of TiO2 NPs for the future establishment of new metabolic markers and therapeutic strategy of gingival inflammation.

  10. Normal Human Gingival Epithelial Cells Sense C. parapsilosis by Toll-Like Receptors and Module Its Pathogenesis through Antimicrobial Peptides and Proinflammatory Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf Bahri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the interaction between C. parapsilosis and human epithelial cells using monolayer cultures and an engineered human oral mucosa (EHOM. C. parapsilosis was able to adhere to gingival epithelial cells and to adopt the hyphal form in the presence of serum. Interestingly, when cultured onto the engineered human oral mucosa (EHOM, C. parapsilosis formed small biofilm and invaded the connective tissue. Following contact with C. parapsilosis, normal human gingival epithelial cells expressed high levels of Toll-like receptors (TLR-2, -4, and -6, but not TLR-9 mRNA. The upregulation of TLRs was paralleled by an increase of IL-1β, TNFα, and IFNγ mRNA expression, suggesting the involvement of these cytokines in the defense against infection with C. parapsilosis. The active role of epithelial cells in the innate immunity against C. parapsilosis infection was enhanced by their capacity to express high levels of human beta-defensin-1, -2, and -3. The upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptide expression may explain the growth inhibition of C. parapsilosis by the gingival epithelial cells. Overall results provide additional evidence of the involvement of epithelial cells in the innate immunity against C. parapsilosis infections.

  11. Gingival Recessions and Biomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Morten Godtfredsen

    Gingival recessions and biomechanics “Tissue is the issue, but bone sets the tone.“ A tooth outside the cortical plate can result in loss of bone and development of a gingival recession. The presentation aims to show biomechanical considerations in relation to movement of teeth with gingival...... recessions. Gingival recession is a problem often in the region of the lower incisors. A micro-CT study on human autopsy material, performed at the University of Aarhus, confirmed that the anterior mandibular alveolar envelope is indeed very thin. The prognosis of a gingival recession can be improved...

  12. Elevated Snail expression in human gingival fibroblasts by cyclosporine A as the possible pathogenesis for gingival overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Lin

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: CsA stimulated Snail expression and cell proliferation in HGFs, while silencing Snail could effectively reverse these phenomena. These results may provide new avenues for the design of novel antifibrotic therapies for CsA-induced gingival overgrowth through targeting Snail.

  13. Preferential attachment of human gingival fibroblasts to the resin ionomer Geristore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabek, Fuwad; Shostad, Sandra; Kirkwood, Keith L

    2005-03-01

    The resin ionomer Geristore has been used extensively for root perforation repairs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oral in vitro biocompatibility of the resin ionomer Geristore compared to two other dental perforation repair materials, Ketac-Fil and Immediate Restorative Material (IRM). Growth and morphology of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of HGFs cells grown on test materials as well as cytotoxicity assays using eluates from test materials. SEM analysis showed that HGFs attached and spread well over Geristore with relatively normal morphology. SEM showed that fibroblasts did not attach and spread well over Ketac-Fil or IRM as cells appeared much fewer with rounded and different morphology than fibroblasts grown on Geristore. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that HGFs proliferated in the presence of Geristore eluates and not in the presence of Ketac-Fil or IRM eluates. In vitro interpretation indicates that Geristore is less cytotoxic to gingival fibroblasts.

  14. Comparison of cytotoxicity among three gingival retraction cords on human gingival fibroblasts in vitro%三种排龈线对体外培养人牙龈成纤维细胞毒性的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪莹; 张晓明; 惠敏; 刘健

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, the gingival retraction effect of gingival retraction drugs is a hot topic for domestic and foreign scholars, while the biocompatibility of the commercial gingival retraction cord is less involved. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cytotoxicity effect of three kinds of gingival retraction cords on human gingival fibroblasts, and to provide theoretical basis for choosing proper gingival retraction cords in clinic. METHODS: Three kinds of gingival retraction cords (epinephrine-impregnated cord, aluminium sulphate-impregnated cord and non-drug-impregnated cord) were incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum for 24 hours, according to 1:1 and 1:4 dilution, and then the cords acted on gingival fibroblasts cultured in vitro. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum was used as negative control group. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The results of MTT assay demonstrated that the three kinds of gingival retraction cords all could inhibit human gingival fibroblasts growth and proliferation. The cytotoxicity of the three kinds of gingival retraction cords in the leaching liquor with 1:1 dilution was significantly higher than that of 1:4 dilution and control groups (P< 0.05). The cytotoxicity of epinephrine-impregnated cord in the leaching liquor with 1:4 dilution was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). The results of transmission electron microscope showed that some cells in the epinephrine-impregnated cord group were found apoptosis. These findings suggest that the three kinds of gingival retraction cords all have certain cytotoxicity to gingival fibroblasts. The cytotoxicity of epinephrine-impregnated cord is the biggest, followed by aluminium sulphate-impregnated cord, and the cytotoxicity of the non-drug-impregnated cord is the smallest.%背景:近年来,国内外学者研究热点主要集中在排龈药物的排龈效果,而对商品化排龈线的生物相

  15. 人结合上皮和牙龈上皮细胞的培养及生物学特性比较%Culture and comparison of the biological characteristics of human junctional epithelium and gingival epithelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜茜; 李德懿; 葛锡锐; 张秀丽; 陈松华

    2005-01-01

    目的:比较人结合上皮(junctional epithelium,JE)与牙龈上皮(gingival epithelium,GE)的生物学特性.方法:采用细胞培养和免疫组化方法培养鉴定人JE细胞,研究其生物学性质,并与培养的人GE细胞进行比较.结果:人JE细胞形态多样,大小不等,连接疏松,核分裂像多见;而人GE细胞呈典型的角质细胞形态,大小均匀,排列紧密,呈"铺路石"状.免疫组化CK-Pan染色,2种细胞均为阳性,CK19染色JE细胞为阳性,而GE仅见少量散在阳性细胞.生长曲线显示,JE细胞潜伏期(约7d)较CE细胞(约3d)长;进入指数增生期后,JE细胞迅速增殖达高峰(约4d),衰退较快;而GE细胞则匀速增殖达顶点(约7d),平缓下降.JE细胞倍增时间48~60h,可传5代;GE细胞倍增时间72~96h,可传7代.结论:人JE细胞是一种不同于GE细胞的分化程度较低的独特细胞,在本实验培养条件下,人JE细胞的代数少于GE,影响对其深入研究,有待改进培养条件和方法.

  16. Proliferación de células madres mesenquimales obtenidas de tejido gingival humano sobre una matriz de quitosano: estudio in vitro Proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells from human gingival tissue on chitosan scaffold: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B M Hernández

    2011-08-01

    medio de cultivo.Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human gingival tissue on chitosan matrix. Methods: Experimental study in vitro. Gingival connective tissue samples were obtained from healthy volunteers from the maxillary tuberosity. The explants were minced and cultured on tissue culture dishes. MSC were characterized by flow cytometry using markers for CD34, CD45, CD73, CD90, CD105 and for differentiation into, adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. The tissue differentiated was analyzed with light microscopy and evaluated by culture staining using Oil Red, Alizarin Red y Safranina O respectively. MSC from passage 5 were cultured with chitosan scaffold. Proliferation of MSC was analyzed with light microscopy and crystal violet staining. Results: MSCs were obtained from gingival explants, and developed the standard of the morphologic and phenotypic characterization as a stem cell. The MSC adopted a fibroblastoid morphology, adherence to plastic, confluence of 80% and over 90% were consistently positive for CD90, CD105, CD73 markers and under 10% were negative for hematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45 by flow cytometry analysis. The MSC cultured in presence of chitosan matrix proliferated, however complete medium, it was dissolved forming a gel structure. We also observed that at higher concentrations of chitosan, MSC has less density and growth. Chitosan matrix in presence of cell culture medium loses physical properties, dissolving and forming a non-transportable gel. Conclusions: Despite the existence of proliferation of MSCs from human gingival tissue with chitosan matrix, its ability to act as a cell carrier and scaffold is deficient, since its physical properties are altered, dissolving and forming a non-transportable gel in contact with cell culture medium.

  17. Effects of a Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet on Human Gingival Fibroblasts for Biomedical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwan Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ have been developed and applied in biomedical research as a cancer treatment or bacterial sterilization. However, the drawback of APPJ on normal oral cells during plasma treatment and underlying cell death mechanisms have not been studied and clearly explained, although there is known to be an influence from reactive oxygen species (ROS. Hence, this study investigates whether and how a nonthermal atmospheric pressure air plasma jet kills human normal gingival cells using immortalized human gingival fibroblasts (hTERT-hNOF cells. In this study, a set of physicochemical or biological methods were used to illuminate the killing mechanisms. It was found that ROS were induced intracellularly without a breakdown of the cell wall and apoptosis was involved in cell death when an air APPJ treatment was performed on the cells directly without media; the air treatment only supported a detachment of the cells without increase of ROS. It was also revealed that a correlation between intracellular ROS concentration and cells viability existed. These results indicated that the direct air APPJ treatment possibly raises safety issue to normal tissue and thereby APPJ application in biomedical field needs more in vitro and in vivo study to optimize it.

  18. Human Gingival Integration-Free iPSCs; a Source for MSC-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Umezaki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are considered a potential autologous therapy for tissue engineering. The available procedures for MSC retrieval from patients are invasive, and their limited in vitro proliferation restricts their use in the treatment of damaged tissues. Therefore, it is important to establish an alternative and safe source of MSCs. The objective of this study was to demonstrate induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC generation from a combination of an accessible source tissue and an integration-free method; we also attempted the differentiation of iPSCs into MSC-like cells (MSLCs for future autologous tissue engineering. iPSCs were derived from human gingival tissues, which are easily accessible in the field of dentistry, via the use of non-integrating episomal plasmids. Established iPSCs expressed embryonic stem (ES cell-specific markers, as assessed by gene analysis and immunocytochemistry. Embryoid bodies and teratoma formation were formed from iPSCs, showing their capacity to differentiate into three germ layers. Furthermore, we were successful in differentiating iPSCs into MSLCs. They tested positively for their capacity of trilineage differentiation. Our results demonstrate that human gingival integration-free iPSCs, readily accessible stem cells generated using episomal plasmid vectors, are a promising source of MSLCs, which can be used in tissue regeneration.

  19. Effects of a Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet on Human Gingival Fibroblasts for Biomedical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ) have been developed and applied in biomedical research as a cancer treatment or bacterial sterilization. However, the drawback of APPJ on normal oral cells during plasma treatment and underlying cell death mechanisms have not been studied and clearly explained, although there is known to be an influence from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, this study investigates whether and how a nonthermal atmospheric pressure air plasma jet kills human normal gingival cells using immortalized human gingival fibroblasts (hTERT-hNOF cells). In this study, a set of physicochemical or biological methods were used to illuminate the killing mechanisms. It was found that ROS were induced intracellularly without a breakdown of the cell wall and apoptosis was involved in cell death when an air APPJ treatment was performed on the cells directly without media; the air treatment only supported a detachment of the cells without increase of ROS. It was also revealed that a correlation between intracellular ROS concentration and cells viability existed. These results indicated that the direct air APPJ treatment possibly raises safety issue to normal tissue and thereby APPJ application in biomedical field needs more in vitro and in vivo study to optimize it.

  20. Increased Advanced Oxidation Protein Products Generation by Cyclosporine-A and Angiotensin II in Human Gingival Fibroblasts – Ex-vivo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarayan, Rajasekaran; Ajitkumar, Supraja; Murugan Girija, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cyclosporin-A (CsA), an immunosuppressant, induces renal fibrosis and Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is known to play a major role. CsA has the potential to increase the oxidative stress; specifically through the Advanced Oxidation Protein Products (AOPP) which could possibly stimulate fibrosis. A similar type of pathology occurs even in the gingiva known as CsA Induced Gingival Overgrowth (CIGO). Aim This study was undertaken to estimate the AOPP generation by Human Gingival Fibroblasts (HGF) under the influence of CsA and Angiotensin II (Ang II). Materials and Methods Six healthy gingival tissue samples were obtained during crown lengthening procedure and primary HGF were cultured using enzymatic digestion method. The ideal non-cytotoxic concentrations of CsA and Ang II were identified using cytotoxicity assay. Later, HGF were incubated with CsA and Ang II for 12 hours and AOPP assay was performed at zero and one hour interval. Results There was a statistically significant increase in AOPP production in both the CsA and Ang II when compared to the control group with a p value<0.05. Conclusion CsA can induce oxidative stress and preventing/controlling it may be necessary to prevent untoward effect of the drug. PMID:28274044

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA 18:1 transcriptional regulation of primary human gingival fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Roselyn Cerutis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The pleiotropic, bioactive lipid lysophosphatidic acid [(LPA, 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate] exerts critical regulatory actions in physiology and pathophysiology in many systems. It is present in normal bodily fluids, and is elevated in pathology (1. In vivo, “LPA” exists as distinct molecular species, each having a single fatty acid of varying chain length and degree of unsaturation covalently attached to the glycerol backbone via an acyl, alkyl, or alkenyl link. These species differ in affinities for the individual LPA receptors [(LPARs, LPA1-6] and coupling to G proteins (2. However, LPA 18:1 has been and continues to be the most commonly utilized species in reported studies. The actions of “LPA” remain poorly defined in oral biology and pathophysiology. Our laboratory has addressed this knowledge gap by studying in vitro the actions of the major human salivary LPA species [18:1, 18:0, and 16:0 (3] in human oral cells (4–7. This includes gingival fibroblasts (GF, which our flow cytometry data from multiple donors found that they express LPA1-5 (6. We have also reported that these species are ten-fold elevated to pharmacologic levels in the saliva and gingival crevicular fluid obtained from patients with moderate–severe periodontitis (8. As the potential of LPA to regulate transcriptional activity had not been examined in the oral system, this study used whole human genome microarray analysis to test the hypothesis that LPA 18:1-treated human GF would show significant changes in gene transcripts relevant to their biology, wound-healing, and inflammatory responses. LPA 18:1 was found to significantly regulate a large, complex set of genes critical to GF biology in these categories and to periodontal disease. The raw data has been deposited at NCBI's GEO database as record GSE57496.

  2. Gingival tissue transcriptomes in experimental gingivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Daniel; Ramberg, Per; Demmer, Ryan T.; Kebschull, Moritz; Dahlén, Gunnar; Papapanou, Panos N.

    2012-01-01

    Aims We investigated the sequential gene expression in the gingiva during the induction and resolution of experimental gingivitis. Methods Twenty periodontally and systemically healthy non-smoking volunteers participated in a 3-week experimental gingivitis protocol, followed by debridement and 2-week regular plaque control. We recorded clinical indices and harvested gingival tissue samples from 4 interproximal palatal sites in half of the participants at baseline, Day 7, 14 and 21 (‘induction phase’), and at day 21, 25, 30 and 35 in the other half (‘resolution phase’). RNA was extracted, amplified, reversed transcribed, amplified, labeled and hybridized with Affymetrix Human Genome U133Plus2.0 microarrays. Paired t-tests compared gene expression changes between consecutive time points. Gene ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results The median gingival index was 0 at baseline, 2 at Day 21 and 1 at Day 35. Differential gene regulation peaked during the third week of induction and the first four days of resolution. Leukocyte transmigration, cell adhesion and antigen processing/presentation were the top differentially regulated pathways. Conclusions Transcriptomic studies enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of the reversible inflammatory gingival lesion and provide a detailed account of the dynamic tissue responses during induction and resolution of experimental gingivitis. PMID:21501207

  3. Effects of titania nanotubes with or without bovine serum albumin loaded on human gingival fibroblasts

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    Liu X

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiangning Liu,1,* Xiaosong Zhou,2,* Shaobing Li,3 Renfa Lai,1 Zhiying Zhou,1 Ye Zhang,1 Lei Zhou3 1The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, 2Chemistry Science and Technology School, Zhanjiang Normal University, Zhanjiang, 3Guangdong Provincial Stomatological Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Modifying the surface of the transmucosal area is a key research area because this process positively affects the three functions of implants: attachment to soft tissue, inhibiting bacterial biofilm adhesion, and the preservation of the crestal bone. To exploit the potential of titania nanotube arrays (TNTs with or without using bovine serum albumin (BSA to modify the surface of a dental implant in contact with the transmucosal area, BSA was loaded into TNTs that were fabricated by anodizing Ti sheets; the physical characteristics of these arrays, including their morphology, chemical composition, surface roughness, contact angle, and surface free energy (SFE, were assessed. The effect of Ti surfaces with TNTs or TNTs-BSA on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs was determined by analyzing cell morphology, early adhesion, proliferation, type I collagen (COL-1 gene expression, and the extracellular secretion of COL-1. The results indicate that early HGF adhesion and spreading behavior is positively correlated with surface characteristics, including hydrophilicity, SFE, and surface roughness. Additionally, TNT surfaces not only promoted early HGF adhesion, but also promoted COL-1 secretion. BSA-loaded TNT surfaces promoted early HGF adhesion, while suppressing late proliferation and COL-1 secretion. Therefore, TNT-modified smooth surfaces are expected to be applicable for uses involving the transmucosal area. Further study is required to determine whether BSA-loaded TNT surfaces actually affect closed loop formation of connective tissue because

  4. [Detection of human papillomavirus in gingival fluid of Venezuelan HIV patients with periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona, Laura; Correnti, María; Veitía, Dayahindira; Perrone, Marianella

    2011-09-01

    Evidence suggests that viruses may be involved in the activation of periodontal disease, allowing the overgrowth of periodontal pathogens. The purpose of the present study was to detect the presence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in HIV+ Venezuelan patients with periodontal disease. We evaluated GCF samples from 20 HIV+ patients with periodontal disease from the Infectious Disease Center, Faculty of Dentistry, Central University of Venezuela, and were clinically examined to establish their periodontal conditions, 13 under HAART (antiretroviral therapy) and 7 without HAART. Seven seronegative patients with chronic periodontitis and 7 seronegative patients, without periodontal disease were included. DNA extraction was performed, the consensus primers MY09 and MY11 for the HPV L1 region were used for PCR amplification. Genotipification was made for the 6, 11, 16, 18, 31 and 45 genotypes. HPV were detected in 46% of HIV+ patients under therapy. The CD4 cell counts in the IIPV+ patients were not significantly different from the HPV-group. The viral load in the HPV+ group was significantly higher (200,470 +/- 324,244 copy/mL) than in the HPV-patients (10,246 +/- 23,805 copy/mL). Genotypes 6 and 11 were observed in the HPV positive samples, of which 4/6 (66.6%) presented coinfection with both types. No significant differences in the periodontal conditions were observed between patients with IIPV-HIV infection related to patients with only HIV. HPV was detected only in the gingival crevicular fluid of HIV+ patients under HAART independently of the periodontal conditions.

  5. Evaluation in vitro of cytotoxicity of dentinal desensitizing on human gingival fibroblasts.

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    Diego Antonio Vergara

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The purpose of this study is to compare the cytotoxic effect of three materials which have been used for the treatment of dental hypersensitivity. Material and method: In-vitro study. Dentinal desensitizing Clinpro (3M ESPE, Seal&Protect (Dentsply and UltraEZ (Ultradent were used at concentrations of 0.1; 0.05; 0.01 and 0.001 g/ml against human gingival fibroblasts. Furthermore, Clinpro and Seal&Protect were applied to this cell culture as polymerized discs. Toxicity was assessed at 24 and 48 hours by cell viability assay (MTT. Statistical analysis for cell viability was performed using ANOVA two-ways and Tukey's post hoc test. Statistical significance was set at 5%. Results: Seal&Protect and Clinpro happened to be highly toxic at 24 and 48 hours, reaching 70% toxicity at concentrations over 0,01 g/ml. Seal&Protect and Clinpro polymerized discs were toxic after 24 and 48 hours. UltraEZ was increase of the cell viability between a 46% and 67% at 24 hours and between an 8% and 45% at 48 hours. Statistical analysis showed differences between these three desensitizing comparing concentration and control group (p RESUMEN. Introducción: El propósito de este estudio es comparar el efecto citotóxico de tres materiales que se han utilizado para el tratamiento de la hipersensibilidad dental. Material y método: Estudio in- vitro. Los desensibilizantes dentinarios Clinpro (3M ESPE, Seal&Protect (Dentsply y UltraEZ (Ultradent fueron utilizados a concentraciones de 0,1; 0,05; 0,01 y 0,001 g/ml sobre cultivos celulares de fibroblastos gingivales humanos. Además, Clinpro y Seal&Protect se aplicaron a este cultivo celular como discos polimerizados. La toxicidad se evaluó a 24 y 48 horas mediante ensayo de viabilidad (MTT. El análisis estadístico para la viabilidad celular se realizó mediante ANOVA de dos vías seguido de análisis Tukey. La significancia estadística se fijó al 5%. Resultados: Clinpro y Seal&Protect resultaron

  6. Cannabidiol Modulates the Immunophenotype and Inhibits the Activation of the Inflammasome in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libro, Rosaliana; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Marchisio, Marco; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2016-01-01

    Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hGMSCs) are multipotential cells that can expand and differentiate in culture under specific and standardized conditions. In the present study, we have investigated whether in vitro pre-treatment of hGMSCs with Cannabidiol (CBD) can influence their expression profile, improving the therapeutic potential of this cell culture. Following CBD treatment (5 μM) for 24 h, gene expression analysis through Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has revealed several genes differentially expressed between CBD-treated hGMSCs (CBD-hGMSCs) and control cells (CTR-hGMSCs) that were linked to inflammation and apoptosis. In particular, we have demonstrated that CBD treatment in hGMSCs prevented the activation of the NALP3-inflammasome pathway by suppressing the levels of NALP3, CASP1, and IL18, and in parallel, inhibited apoptosis, as demonstrated by the suppression of Bax. CBD treatment was also able to modulate the expression of the well-known mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD13, CD29, CD73, CD44, CD90, and CD166), and other surface antigens. Specifically, CBD led to the downregulation of genes codifying for antigens involved in the activation of the immune system (CD109, CD151, CD40, CD46, CD59, CD68, CD81, CD82, CD99), while it led to the upregulation of those implicated in the inhibition of the immune responses (CD47, CD55, CD276). In conclusion, the present study will provide a new simple and reproducible method for preconditioning hGMSCs with CBD, before transplantation, as an interesting strategy for improving the hGMSCs molecular phenotype, reducing the risk of immune or inflammatory reactions in the host, and in parallel, for increasing their survival and thus, their long-term therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Cannabidiol Modulates the Immunophenotype and Inhibits the Activation of the Inflammasome in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libro, Rosaliana; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Marchisio, Marco; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2016-01-01

    Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hGMSCs) are multipotential cells that can expand and differentiate in culture under specific and standardized conditions. In the present study, we have investigated whether in vitro pre-treatment of hGMSCs with Cannabidiol (CBD) can influence their expression profile, improving the therapeutic potential of this cell culture. Following CBD treatment (5 μM) for 24 h, gene expression analysis through Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has revealed several genes differentially expressed between CBD-treated hGMSCs (CBD-hGMSCs) and control cells (CTR-hGMSCs) that were linked to inflammation and apoptosis. In particular, we have demonstrated that CBD treatment in hGMSCs prevented the activation of the NALP3-inflammasome pathway by suppressing the levels of NALP3, CASP1, and IL18, and in parallel, inhibited apoptosis, as demonstrated by the suppression of Bax. CBD treatment was also able to modulate the expression of the well-known mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD13, CD29, CD73, CD44, CD90, and CD166), and other surface antigens. Specifically, CBD led to the downregulation of genes codifying for antigens involved in the activation of the immune system (CD109, CD151, CD40, CD46, CD59, CD68, CD81, CD82, CD99), while it led to the upregulation of those implicated in the inhibition of the immune responses (CD47, CD55, CD276). In conclusion, the present study will provide a new simple and reproducible method for preconditioning hGMSCs with CBD, before transplantation, as an interesting strategy for improving the hGMSCs molecular phenotype, reducing the risk of immune or inflammatory reactions in the host, and in parallel, for increasing their survival and thus, their long-term therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27932991

  8. Cannabidiol modulates the immunophenotype and inhibits the activation of the inflammasome in human gingival mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaliana Libro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hGMSC are multipotential cells that can expand and differentiate in culture under specific and standardized conditions. In the present study, we have investigated whether in vitro pre-treatment of hGMCs with Cannabidiol (CBD can influence their expression profile, improving the therapeutic potential of this cell culture. Following CBD treatment (5μM for 24 h, gene expression analysis through Next Generation Sequencing (NGS has revealed several genes differentially expressed between CBD-treated hGMCs (CBD-hGMCs and control cells (CTR-hGMCs that were linked to inflammation and apoptosis. In particular, we have demonstrated that CBD treatment in hGMCs prevented the activation of the NALP3-inflammasome pathway by suppressing the levels of NALP3, CASP1 and IL18, and in parallel, inhibited apoptosis, as demonstrated by the suppression of Bax.CBD treatment was also able to modulate the expression of the well-known mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD13, CD29, CD73, CD44, CD90 and CD166, and other surface antigens. Specifically, CBD led to the downregulation of genes codifying for antigens involved in the activation of the immune system (CD109, CD151, CD40, CD46, CD59, CD68, CD81, CD82, CD99, while it led to the upregulation of those implicated in the inhibition of the immune responses (CD47, CD55, CD276.In conclusion, the present study will provide a new simple and reproducible method for preconditioning hGMSCs with CBD, before transplantation, as an interesting strategy for improving the hGMCs molecular phenotype, reducing the risk of immune or inflammatory reactions in the host, and in parallel, for increasing their survival and thus, their long-term therapeutic efficacy.

  9. Evaluation of resorbable membrane in treatment of human gingival isolated buccal recession

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    Sumit Narang

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Resorbable membrane is a versatile treatment modality for coverage of isolated buccal gingival recession. Although membrane exposure occurred in four patients, it did not interfere with post operative healing.

  10. Characterization of proteoglycan metabolites in human gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, R J; Embery, G; Samuels, R H

    1994-05-01

    Previous studies have identified glycosaminoglycans in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) associated with a variety of clinical conditions, notably those involving bone resorptive activity. GCF was here collected from around teeth undergoing active orthodontic movement. Proteoglycan metabolites were purified from GCF by anion-exchange chromatography using fast performance liquid chromatography. Sulphated glycosaminoglycan was associated with the most highly anionic protein fractions IV, V and VI, and biochemical analysis was restricted to these fractions. Analysis included glycosaminoglycan content by cellulose acetate electrophoresis, molecular size by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting and amino acid analyses. Fraction IV contained hyaluronan (18.7%) and chondroitin sulphate (10.9%), fraction V heparan sulphate (29.5%) and chondroitin sulphate (19.6%) and fraction VI chondroitin sulphate only (21.3%). SDS-PAGE revealed two Coomassie blue bands in fraction V of 72 and 60 kDa and two further bands in fraction VI of 71 and 56 kDa. These proteoglycans appeared resistant to digestion by chondroitinase ABC or heparinase III, although the glycosaminoglycan chains underwent degradation after protein-core removal. The molecular mass and amino acid composition of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan fractions showed a close similarity to those of human alveolar bone proteoglycan. The presence of heparan sulphate proteoglycan in GCF in association with orthodontic movement is in accord with previous reports. The findings support the view that proteoglycans in GCF are 'biomarkers', notably those associated with active resorption of alveolar bone.

  11. Antimicrobial effects and human gingival biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite sol-gel coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ren-Jei; Hsieh, Ming-Fa; Huang, Chine-Wen; Perng, Li-Hsiang; Wen, Hsiao-Wei; Chin, Tsung-Shune

    2006-01-01

    The sol-gel method was employed to synthesize hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings modified with Ag or Zn ions onto Ti-6Al-4V substrate. A bacterial strain Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and a human gingival fibroblast (HGF-1) cell line were used to investigate the antimicrobial effect and biocompatibility, respectively. HAp coatings containing 100 ppm Ag(+) ions suppressed the growth of S. mutans. An apparent inhibition zone around the HAp coating was further observed at Ag(+) concentration up to 10,000 ppm. However, for coatings containing Zn(2+) ions, a clear inhibition zone was observed at Zn(2+) concentration of 10,000 ppm. Nevertheless, the results of HGF-1 cultivation demonstrated that the Zn(2+)-modified HAp coatings exhibited better attachment and spread of HGF-1 than did the Ag(+)-modified coatings. Zn(2+) modified HAp coatings also increased the plating efficiency of HGF-1 cells. The cytotoxicity associated with the addition of Ag and the cell-conductive capacity associated with the addition of Zn are proportional to the added concentration, from 100 to 10,000 ppm. The dosages of both Ag(+) and Zn(2+) ions that should be added to HAp coatings were considered to prevent infection and improve biocompatibility. The results of this study ensure that HAp coatings modified with a moderate amount of Ag/Zn efficiently resist microorganisms and improve biocompatibility.

  12. Surface hydride on titanium by cathodic polarization promotes human gingival fibroblast growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Rui; Salou, Laëtitia; Taxt-Lamolle, Sébastien; Reseland, Janne E; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P; Haugen, Håvard J

    2014-05-01

    Connective tissue seal to dental abutment is crucial for peri-implant health. Several efforts have been made previously to optimize abutment surfaces, but no consensus has been reached regarding the optimal surface architecture and/or composition for soft tissue seal. Here, we report on experiments using cathodic polarization in organic acids to optimize titanium (Ti) surfaces for use as abutments. The three main factors affecting surface topography and chemistry were electrolyte composition, current density, and polarization time. Under identical conditions, oxalic acid created rougher surfaces than tartaric acid and acetic acid, and acetic acid produced more surface hydride. Surface hydride amount was suggested to first increase and then decrease with current density from 1 mA/cm(2) to 15 mA/cm(2) . The complexity of the surface topography and hydride production both increased with polarization time. Proliferation rate of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was positively correlated with surface hydride content, suggesting the positive effect of surface hydride on connective tissue growth around dental abutment. Changes in surface topography and hydrophilicity did not significantly influence HGF growth.

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of fisetin in human gingival fibroblasts treated with lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Sánchez, Anabel; Ventura-Arroyo, Jairo Agustín

    2014-10-01

    Fisetin is an anti-inflammatory flavonoid; however, its anti-inflammatory mechanism is not yet understood. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of fisetin and its association with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa-beta pathways in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis. The cell signaling, cell viability, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression of HGFs treated with various concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10, and 15 μM) of fisetin were measured by cell viability assay (MTT), Western blotting, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis on COX-2. We found that fisetin significantly reduced the synthesis and expression of prostaglandin E2 in HGFs treated with LPS. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK was suppressed consistently by fisetin in HGFs treated with LPS. The data indicate that fisetin inhibits MAPK activation and COX-2 expression without affecting cell viability. These findings may be valuable for understanding the mechanism of the effect of fisetin on periodontal disease.

  14. Arecoline stimulated Cyr61 production in human gingival epithelial cells: inhibition by lovastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi-Ting; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Chieng; Yeh, Cheng-Chang; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Cyr61 is associated with growth and progression of many types of tumors and is an independent poor prognostic indicator for oral cancer patients. Areca nut (AN) chewing is the most important etiological factor in the pathogenesis of oral cancer in India and many Southeast Asian countries. Yet, the molecular mechanisms involved in the AN-induced oral cancer remain largely unknown. In this study, we show that arecoline, a main alkaloid found in AN, stimulated Cyr61 synthesis in human gingival epithelial S-G cells. Constitutive overexpression of Cyr61 protein in oral epithelial cells during AN chewing may play a role in the pathogenesis of oral cancer. ERK inhibitor PD98059, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) selective inhibitor Y-27632 and a geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor reduced the arecoline-stimulated levels of Cyr61 protein by ∼31%, 47%, 65% and 100%, respectively. Lovastatin also completely inhibited arecoline-induced Cyr61 synthesis and the inhibition is dose-dependent. Decreased of geranylgeranylated proteins could be the mechanism that lovastatin regulates Cyr61 synthesis and lovastatin could serve as a useful agent in controlling AN-induced oral cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cytotoxicity of two available mineral trioxide aggregate cements and a new formulation on human gingival fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torshabi, Maryam; Amid, Reza; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi; Shahrbabaki, Sara Eslami; Tabatabaei, Fahimeh S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of nanohybrid mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in comparison with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and MTA-Angelus, using human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Materials and Methods: Nine disc-shaped specimens of each material (in 2 set stat: A, set for 24 h; B, set for 30 min; and C, fresh stat) were prepared. HGFs were exposed to tested materials’ extracts or control media. Cytotoxicity testing was performed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assay in two time intervals. Statistical Analysis: Results were evaluated by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: CEM cement demonstrated favorable cell viability values when completely set (24 h set MTA = 24 h set CEM) at both time intervals. Interestingly, 24 h after incubation, CEM in Groups B and C demonstrated higher cell viability values than MTA (P < 0.05). However, after 72 h of incubation, these groups of CEM and MTA showed equal cell viability. All samples of nanohybrid MTA had slight cytotoxic effects after 24 h of incubation, and moderate cytotoxic effects after 72 h of incubation. Conclusion: Set CEM and set MTA-Angelus exerted similar, favorable effects on cell viability. However, within the limitations of this in vitro study, the results suggest that nanohybrid MTA could not be recommended as a material of choice for cervical root resorption. PMID:27994312

  16. Effects of titania nanotubes with or without bovine serum albumin loaded on human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangning; Zhou, Xiaosong; Li, Shaobing; Lai, Renfa; Zhou, Zhiying; Zhang, Ye; Zhou, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Modifying the surface of the transmucosal area is a key research area because this process positively affects the three functions of implants: attachment to soft tissue, inhibiting bacterial biofilm adhesion, and the preservation of the crestal bone. To exploit the potential of titania nanotube arrays (TNTs) with or without using bovine serum albumin (BSA) to modify the surface of a dental implant in contact with the transmucosal area, BSA was loaded into TNTs that were fabricated by anodizing Ti sheets; the physical characteristics of these arrays, including their morphology, chemical composition, surface roughness, contact angle, and surface free energy (SFE), were assessed. The effect of Ti surfaces with TNTs or TNTs-BSA on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was determined by analyzing cell morphology, early adhesion, proliferation, type I collagen (COL-1) gene expression, and the extracellular secretion of COL-1. The results indicate that early HGF adhesion and spreading behavior is positively correlated with surface characteristics, including hydrophilicity, SFE, and surface roughness. Additionally, TNT surfaces not only promoted early HGF adhesion, but also promoted COL-1 secretion. BSA-loaded TNT surfaces promoted early HGF adhesion, while suppressing late proliferation and COL-1 secretion. Therefore, TNT-modified smooth surfaces are expected to be applicable for uses involving the transmucosal area. Further study is required to determine whether BSA-loaded TNT surfaces actually affect closed loop formation of connective tissue because BSA coating actions in vivo are very rapid.

  17. Effects of Plasma Rich in Growth Factors and Platelet-Rich Fibrin on Proliferation and Viability of Human Gingival Fibroblasts

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    Surena Vahabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Platelet preparations are commonly used to enhance bone and soft tissue regeneration. Considering the existing controversies on the efficacy of platelet products for tissue regeneration, more in vitro studies are required. The aim of the present study was to compare the in vitro effects of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF on proliferation and viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs.Materials and Methods: Anitua's PRGF and Choukran's PRF were prepared according to the standard protocols. After culture periods of 24, 48 and 72 hours, proliferation of HGFs was evaluated by the methyl thiazol tetrazolium assay. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer’s multiple comparisons and P-values<0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: PRGF treatment induced statistically significant (P<0.001 proliferation of HGF cells compared to the negative control (100% viability at 24, 48 and 72 hours in values of 123%±2.25%, 102%±2.8% and 101%±3.92%, respectively. The PRF membrane treatment of HGF cells had a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation (21%±1.73%, P<0.001 at 24 hours compared to the negative control. However, at 48 and 72 hours after treatment, PRF had a negative effect on HGF cell proliferation and caused 38% and 60% decrease in viability and proliferation compared to the negative control, respectively. The HGF cell proliferation was significantly higher in PRGF than in PRF group (P< 0.001.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that PRGF had a strong stimulatory effect on HGF cell viability and proliferation compared to PRF.

  18. Isolation and characterisation of human gingival margin-derived STRO-1/MACS1 and MACS2 cell populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karim M Fawzy El-Sayed; Sebastian Paris; Christian Graetz; Neemat Kassem; Mohamed Mekhemar; Hendrick Ungefroren; Fred Fandrich; Christof Dorfer

    2015-01-01

    Recently, gingival margin-derived stem/progenitor cells isolated via STRO-1/magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) showed remarkable periodontal regenerative potential in vivo. As a second-stage investigation, the present study’s aim was to perform in vitro characterisation and comparison of the stem/progenitor cell characteristics of sorted STRO-1-positive (MACS1) and STRO-1-negative (MACS2) cell populations from the human free gingival margin. Cells were isolated from the free gingiva using a minimally invasive technique and were magnetically sorted using anti-STRO-1 antibodies. Subsequently, the MACS1 and MACS2 cell fractions were characterized by flow cytometry for expression of CD14, CD34, CD45, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146/MUC18 and STRO-1. Colony-forming unit (CFU) and multilineage differentiation potential were assayed for both cell fractions. Mineralisation marker expression was examined using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). MACS1 and MACS2 cell fractions showed plastic adherence. MACS1 cells, in contrast to MACS2 cells, showed all of the predefined mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell characteristics and a significantly higher number of CFUs (P,0.01). More than 95%of MACS1 cells expressed CD105, CD90 and CD73;lacked the haematopoietic markers CD45, CD34 and CD14, and expressed STRO-1 and CD146/MUC18. MACS2 cells showed a different surface marker expression profile, with almost no expression of CD14 or STRO-1, and more than 95%of these cells expressed CD73, CD90 and CD146/MUC18, as well as the haematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45 and CD105. MACS1 cells could be differentiated along osteoblastic, adipocytic and chondroblastic lineages. In contrast, MACS2 cells demonstrated slight osteogenic potential. Unstimulated MACS1 cells showed significantly higher expression of collagen I (P,0.05) and collagen III (P,0.01), whereas MACS2 cells demonstrated higher expression of osteonectin (P,0.05;Mann–Whitney). The present study is the first to compare gingival

  19. Butyrate induces reactive oxygen species production and affects cell cycle progression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M-C; Tsai, Y-L; Chen, Y-W; Chan, C-P; Huang, C-F; Lan, W-C; Lin, C-C; Lan, W-H; Jeng, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acids, such as butyric acid and propionic acid, are metabolic by-products generated by periodontal microflora such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, and contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, the effects of butyrate on the biological activities of gingival fibroblasts (GFs) are not well elucidated. Human GFs were exposed to various concentrations of butyrate (0.5-16 mm) for 24 h. Viable cells that excluded trypan blue were counted. Cell cycle distribution of GFs was analyzed by propidium iodide-staining flow cytometry. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). Total RNA and protein lysates were isolated and subjected to RT-PCR using specific primers or to western blotting using specific antibodies, respectively. Butyrate inhibited the growth of GFs, as indicated by a decrease in the number of viable cells. This event was associated with an induction of G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest by butyrate (4-16 mm) in GFs. However, no marked apoptosis of GFs was noted in this experimental condition. Butyrate (> 2 mm) inhibited the expression of cdc2, cdc25C and cyclinB1 mRNAs and reduced the levels of Cdc2, Cdc25C and cyclinB1 proteins in GFs, as determined using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. This toxic effect of butyrate was associated with the production of ROS. These results suggest that butyrate generated by periodontal pathogens may be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases via the induction of ROS production and the impairment of cell growth, cell cycle progression and expression of cell cycle-related genes in GFs. These events are important in the initiation and prolongation of inflammatory processes in periodontal diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. The capsule of Porphyromonas gingivalis reduces the immune response of human gingival fibroblasts

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    van Winkelhoff Arie J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is a bacterial infection of the periodontal tissues. The Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a major causative agent. One of the virulence factors of P. gingivalis is capsular polysaccharide (CPS. Non-encapsulated strains have been shown to be less virulent in mouse models than encapsulated strains. Results To examine the role of the CPS in host-pathogen interactions we constructed an insertional isogenic P. gingivalis knockout in the epimerase-coding gene epsC that is located at the end of the CPS biosynthesis locus. This mutant was subsequently shown to be non-encapsulated. K1 capsule biosynthesis could be restored by in trans expression of an intact epsC gene. We used the epsC mutant, the W83 wild type strain and the complemented mutant to challenge human gingival fibroblasts to examine the immune response by quantification of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 transcription levels. For each of the cytokines significantly higher expression levels were found when fibroblasts were challenged with the epsC mutant compared to those challenged with the W83 wild type, ranging from two times higher for IL-1β to five times higher for IL-8. Conclusions These experiments provide the first evidence that P. gingivalis CPS acts as an interface between the pathogen and the host that may reduce the host's pro-inflammatory immune response. The higher virulence of encapsulated strains may be caused by this phenomenon which enables the bacteria to evade the immune system.

  1. Identification of an anti-inflammatory potential of Eriodictyon angustifolium compounds in human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jessica; Reichelt, Katharina V; Obst, Katja; Widder, Sabine; Hans, Joachim; Krammer, Gerhard E; Ley, Jakob P; Somoza, Veronika

    2016-07-13

    Polyphenol-rich plant extracts have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory activity against oral pathogen-induced cytokine release in model systems of inflammation. Here, it was hypothesized that a flavanone-rich extract of E. angustifolium exhibits an anti-inflammatory potential against endotoxin-induced inflammatory response in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1). HGF-1 cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (pg-LPS) to release pro-inflammatory cytokines. Concentrations of interleukins IL-6 and IL-8 and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 in the incubation media upon stimulation were determined by means of magnetic bead analysis. A crude ethanol/water extract of E. angustifolium (EE) was fractionated via gel permeation chromatography into a flavanone-rich fraction (FF) and an erionic acid-rich fraction (EF). Individual flavanones and erionic acids as well as EE, EF and FF were tested in the pg-LPS-stimulated HGF-1 cells for their anti-inflammatory potential. The E. angustifolium extract possessed anti-inflammatory potential in this model system, attenuating the pg-LPS-induced release of IL-6 by up to 52.0 ± 15.5%. Of the individual flavanones, eriodictyol and naringenin had the most pronounced effect. However, a mixture of the flavanones did not possess the same effect as the entire flavanoid fraction, indicating that other compounds may contribute to the anti-inflammatory potential of E. angustifolium. For the first time, an anti-inflammatory potential of E. angustifolium and containing erionic acids has been determined.

  2. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase-7 and osteopontin in human gingival crevicular fluid during initial tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Oswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: During orthodontic treatment, the early response of periodontal tissues to mechanical stress involves several metabolic changes that allow tooth movement. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate osteopontin (OPN and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7 in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of human teeth exposed to orthodontic force. Materials and Methods: GCF samples were obtained from 15 healthy orthodontic patients (age, 12-22 years. In each patient, the left maxillary canine having the fixed orthodontic appliance was used as the test tooth, and its antagonist, with no appliance, was the control. Orthodontic force, 75 g was applied using a 16 × 22 beta titanium closing loop. The GCF sampling on the disto-buccal aspects of experimental and control tooth was performed at specific time interval with sterilized absorbent paper point. Processing was carried out with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect OPN and MMP-7 levels. Results: The peak level of OPN was seen after 1 h application of orthodontic force which was 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02. The peak level of MMP-7 was seen at 0 h which was 598.3 pg/ml ± 107.5. The levels of OPN after 1 h increased to 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02, and they decreased at 24 h to 1012.86 pg/ml ± 168.47 (P = 0.001. The levels of MMP-7 after 1 h decreased to 478 pg/ml ± 99.7 which increased at 24 h to 526.9 pg/ml ± 99.2. Conclusions: Orthodontic forces affect both OPN and MMP-7 protein levels on the compression side in a time-dependent fashion.

  3. Cell death effects of resin-based dental material compounds and mercurials in human gingival fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Franz-Xaver [Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Munich (Germany); Esters, Magali; Simon, Sabine; Seiss, Mario [Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kehe, Kai [Bundeswehr Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kleinsasser, Norbert [University of Regensburg, Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Regensburg (Germany); Folwaczny, Matthias; Glas, Juergen; Hickel, Reinhard [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Munich (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    In order to test the hypothesis that released dental restorative materials can reach toxic levels in human oral tissues, the cytotoxicities of the resin-based dental (co)monomers hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisglycidylmethacrylate (BisGMA) compared with methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) and the amalgam component mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) were investigated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) using two different test systems: (1) the modified XTT-test and (2) the modified H 33342 staining assay. The HGF were exposed to various concentrations of the test-substances in all test systems for 24 h. All tested (co)monomers and mercury compounds significantly (P<0.05) decreased the formazan formation in the XTT-test. EC{sub 50} values in the XTT assay were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. Following EC{sub 50} values were found (mean [mmol/l]; s.e.m. in parentheses; n=12; * significantly different to HEMA): HEMA 11.530 (0.600); TEGDMA* 3.460 (0.200); UDMA* 0.106 (0.005); BisGMA* 0.087 (0.001); HgCl{sub 2}* 0.013 (0.001); MeHgCl* 0.005 (0.001). Following relative toxicities were found: HEMA 1; TEGDMA 3; UDMA 109; BisGMA 133; HgCl{sub 2} 887; MeHgCl 2306. A significant (P<0.05) increase of the toxicity of (co)monomers and mercurials was found in the XTT-test in the following order: HEMA < TEGDMA < UDMA < BisGMA < HgCl{sub 2} < MeHgCl. TEGDMA and MeHgCl induced mainly apoptotic cell death. HEMA, UDMA, BisGMA, and HgCl{sub 2} induced mainly necrotic cell death. The results of this study indicate that resin composite components have a lower toxicity than mercury from amalgam in HGF. HEMA, BisGMA, UDMA, and HgCl{sub 2} induced mainly necrosis, but it is rather unlikely that eluted substances (solely) can reach concentrations, which might induce necrotic cell death in the human physiological situation, indicating that other (additional) factors may be involved in

  4. The phylum Synergistetes in gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Angelica; Thurnheer, Thomas; Lüthi-Schaller, Helga; Gmür, Rudolf; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2012-11-01

    The clinical manifestation of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is distinct from that of common gingivitis in that it is characterized by local necrosis of the gingival tissues, rapid onset, pain and extensive bleeding. The phylum Synergistetes is a novel bacterial phylum consisting of Gram-negative anaerobes, with evidence of presence in biofilms associated with periodontal and endodontic infections. To date, the involvement of members of this phylum in NUG has not been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate the presence and levels of known human oral Synergistetes bacterial clusters in dental plaque from patients with NUG and compare them with those found in gingivitis. Marginal dental plaque samples from 21 NUG and 21 gingivitis patients were analysed quantitatively by fluorescent in situ hybridization and microscopy for members of two oral Synergistetes clusters (A and B) and for Jonquetella anthropi. Synergistetes cluster A bacteria were detected in all samples but at higher levels (9.4-fold) and proportions (2.5-fold) in NUG patients than in gingivitis patients. However, with regard to Synergistetes cluster B bacteria, there were no differences between NUG and gingivitis patients. J. anthropi was detected in only half of the samples and at lower levels than the other taxa. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that Synergistetes cluster A bacteria, but not cluster B bacteria or J. anthropi, are more strongly associated with NUG than with gingivitis.

  5. Human dental pulp stem cells and gingival fibroblasts seeded into silk fibroin scaffolds have the same ability in attracting vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eWoloszyk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neovascularization is one of the most important processes during tissue repair and regeneration. Current healing approaches based on the use of biomaterials combined with stem cells in critical-size bone defects fail due to the insufficient implant vascularization and integration into the host tissues. Therefore, here we studied the attraction, ingrowth, and distribution of blood vessels from the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane into implanted silk fibroin scaffolds seeded with either human dental pulp stem cells or human gingival fibroblasts. Perfusion capacity was evaluated by non-invasive in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging while the number and density of blood vessels were measured by histomorphometry. Our results demonstrate that human dental pulp stem cells and gingival fibroblasts possess equal abilities in attracting vessels within silk fibroin scaffolds. Additionally, the prolonged in vitro pre-incubation period of these two cell populations favors the homogeneous distribution of vessels within silk fibroin scaffolds, which further improves implant survival and guarantees successful healing and regeneration.

  6. ETM study of electroporation influence on cell morphology in human malignant melanoma and human primary gingival fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nina Skolucka; Malgorzata Daczewska; Jolanta Saczko; Agnieszka Chwilkowska; Anna Choromanska; Malgorzata Kotulska; Iwona Kaminska; Julita Kulbacka

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To estimate electroporation (EP) influence on malignant and normal cells.Methods:Two cell lines including human malignant melanoma (Me-45) and normal human gingival fibroblast (HGFs) were used. EP parameters were the following:250,1000,1750,2500 V/cm;50 μs by5 impulses for every case. The viability of cells after EP was estimated byMTT assay. The ultrastructural analysis was observed by transmission electron microscope (ZeissEM900). Results:In the current study we observed the intracellular effect followingEP on Me-45 and HGF cells. At the conditions applied, we did not observe any significant damage of mitochondrial activity in both cell lines treated byEP. Conversely, we showed thatEP in some conditions can stimulate cells to proliferation. Some changes induced byEP were only visible in electron microscopy. In fibroblast cells we observed significant changes in lower parameters ofEP (250 and1000 V/cm). After applying higher electric field intensities (2500 V/cm) we detected many vacuoles, myelin-like bodies and swallowed endoplasmic reticulum. In melanoma cells such strong pathological modifications afterEP were not observed, in comparison with control cells. The ultrastructure of both treated cell lines was changed according to the applied parameters ofEP.Conclusions:We can claim thatEP conditions are cell line dependent. In terms of the intracellular morphology, human fibroblasts are more sensitive to electric field as compared with melanoma cells. Optimal conditions should be determined for each cell line. Summarizing our study, we can conclude thatEP is not an invasive method for human normal and malignant cells. This technique can be safely applied in chemotherapy for delivering drugs into tumor cells.

  7. ETM study of electroporation influence on cell morphology in human malignant melanoma and human primary gingival fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolucka, Nina; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta; Chwilkowska, Agnieszka; Choromanska, Anna; Kotulska, Malgorzata; Kaminska, Iwona; Kulbacka, Julita

    2011-04-01

    To estimate electroporation (EP) influence on malignant and normal cells. Two cell lines including human malignant melanoma (Me-45) and normal human gingival fibroblast (HGFs) were used. EP parameters were the following: 250, 1 000, 1 750, 2 500 V/cm; 50 µs by 5 impulses for every case. The viability of cells after EP was estimated by MTT assay. The ultrastructural analysis was observed by transmission electron microscope (Zeiss EM 900). In the current study we observed the intracellular effect following EP on Me-45 and HGF cells. At the conditions applied, we did not observe any significant damage of mitochondrial activity in both cell lines treated by EP. Conversely, we showed that EP in some conditions can stimulate cells to proliferation. Some changes induced by EP were only visible in electron microscopy. In fibroblast cells we observed significant changes in lower parameters of EP (250 and 1 000 V/cm). After applying higher electric field intensities (2 500 V/cm) we detected many vacuoles, myelin-like bodies and swallowed endoplasmic reticulum. In melanoma cells such strong pathological modifications after EP were not observed, in comparison with control cells. The ultrastructure of both treated cell lines was changed according to the applied parameters of EP. We can claim that EP conditions are cell line dependent. In terms of the intracellular morphology, human fibroblasts are more sensitive to electric field as compared with melanoma cells. Optimal conditions should be determined for each cell line. Summarizing our study, we can conclude that EP is not an invasive method for human normal and malignant cells. This technique can be safely applied in chemotherapy for delivering drugs into tumor cells.

  8. Human Rights and Cultural Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John-Stewart Gordon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Universal human rights and particular cultural identities, which are relativistic by nature, seem to stand in conflict with each other. It is commonly suggested that the relativistic natures of cultural identities undermine universal human rights and that human rights might compromise particular cultural identities in a globalised world. This article examines this supposed clash and suggests that it is possible to frame a human rights approach in such a way that it becomes the starting point and constraining framework for all non-deficient cultural identities. In other words, it is possible to depict human rights in a culturally sensitive way so that universal human rights can meet the demands of a moderate version of meta-ethical relativism which acknowledges a small universal core of objectively true or false moral statements and avers that, beyond that small core, all other moral statements are neither objectively true nor false.

  9. Effects of resolvin D1 on cell survival and cytokine expression of human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Mohamed; Shibani, Nouf-Al; Labban, Nawaf; Batarseh, Ghada; Song, Fengyu; Ruby, John; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-12-01

    Tissue breakdown in periodontitis is initiated by bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, and is caused largely by host responses. Resolvins protect the host against acute inflammation by blocking the migration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to initiate resolution. The effects of resolvins on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) are unknown. This study examines the effects of resolvin D1 on HGF survival and cytokine expression when treated with or without P. gingivalis supernatant. Cytotoxicity of resolvin D1 on HGFs with or without a toxic level of P. gingivalis supernatant was measured with lactate dehydrogenase assays. Cytokine arrays were performed on HGF-conditioned media treated with or without resolvin D1 and with or without P. gingivalis supernatant. Resolvin D1 had no cytotoxic effects on HGFs at concentrations between 1 and 1,000 nM (all P > 0.05). Resolvin D1 (1,000 nM) significantly inhibited the toxic effects of 13.5% (v/v) P. gingivalis supernatant on HGFs (P = 0.002). Resolvin D1 significantly reduced the expression of interleukin (IL)-6 (P = 0.010) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (P = 0.04) in untreated fibroblasts. P. gingivalis (10%) supernatant significantly increased the expression levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF), granulocyte CSF, growth-regulated oncogene (GRO), IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, MCP-2, MCP-3, and monokine induced by γ-interferon. Resolvin D1 significantly reduced the expression of GRO (P = 0.04), marginally reduced the levels of MCP-1 (P = 0.10), and marginally increased the levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 (P = 0.07) from HGFs treated with P. gingivalis supernatant. Resolvin D1 altered the cytotoxicity of P. gingivalis supernatant on HGFs. Resolvin D1 significantly reduced GRO, marginally reduced MCP-1, and marginally increased TGF-β1 from P. gingivalis-treated HGFs, which could alter the ability of P. gingivalis to induce inflammation.

  10. Non-plaque-induced gingival lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, P

    1999-01-01

    The origin of gingival inflammation is occasionally different from that of routine plaque-associated gingivitis, and such non-plaque-associated types of gingivitis often present characteristic clinical features. Examples of such forms of gingivitis are specific bacterial, viral, and fungal......, a confirmed diagnosis may require histopathologic examination and/or culture. Atypical gingivitis may also occur as gingival manifestations of dermatological diseases, the most relevant of these being lichen planus, pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, erythema multiforme, and lupus erythematosus. Non-plaque......, the most important of these being Candida species including C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guillermondii. Gingival histoplasmosis is a granulomatous disease caused by the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum and, as for the other specific infections of gingiva...

  11. Impact of Dilution and Polymerization on Cytotoxicity of Dentin Adhesives to Human Gingival Fibroblasts: Early Exposure Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banava, Sepideh; Najibfard, Kaveh; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dilution and curing methods of an etch-and-rinse adhesive and a self-etching primer from the same manufacturer at early exposure time on cytotoxicity of primary human gingival fibroblasts. Materials and methods. Primary human gingival fibroblasts were exposed to different dilutions of Adper Single Bond (ASB) and Adper Prompt L-Pop (APL) (3M ESPE, USA). They were evaluated in unpolymerized mode for 20 s, 5 min and 24 h and in polymerized mode for 24 h and 48 h. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using three cytotoxic tests (MTT, cell counting and DNA condensation). Data was analyzed by a one-way ANOVA and Post Hoc Tukey HSD test. Results. Cytotoxicity tests revealed that unpolymerized APL was more cytotoxic compared to ASB after 20 s (Pcytotoxic than APL with lower dilutions. Polymerized ASB was more toxic than APL. Conclusion. Both adhesives were cytotoxic in different dilutions, times and curing modes. Cytotoxicity of the unpolymerized self-etching primer (APL) was more than etch-and-rinse adhesive (ASB) in 20 s, which is important clinically and dentists should be aware of the harmful effects and try to minimize it by curing and rinsing soon after composite resin insertion. ASB was more cytotoxic at 5 min and 24h.

  12. The effects of enamel matrix derivative and cyclic mechanical strain on human gingival fibroblasts in an in vitro defect healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jill E; Chuang, Augustine; Swiec, Gary D; Bisch, Fredrick C; Herold, Robert W; Buxton, Thomas B; McPherson, James C

    2011-01-01

    Gingival fibroblasts (GFs) play a considerable role in the maintenance of the gingival apparatus as well as in connective tissue repair. Mobility of a periodontal wound or soft tissue graft can impair connective tissue healing from the GFs. Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) is an enamel matrix protein used clinically for periodontal regeneration of intrabony defects and furcations, as well as treatment of gingival margin recessions. The goal of this project was to compare the effects of varying concentrations of EMD, with and without cyclic mechanical strain, on cellular wound fill of human GFs using an in vitro defect healing model. GFs were seeded and cultured in six-well flexible-bottomed plates. A 3-mm wound was created in the central portion of each confluent well. Three wells were treated with each EMD concentration of 0 Μg/mL (control), 30 Μg/mL, 60 Μg/mL, or 120 Μg/mL. The plates were placed in an incubator containing a strain unit to subject test plates to cyclic strain. An identical set of control plates were not flexed. Cells were examined on days 4, 8, 12, and 16. Microphotographs were taken and wound fill measurements made using image analysis software. The percent wound fill was calculated. All nonflexed plates, regardless of EMD concentration, reached > 90% defect fill at similar rates by day 16. However, in the flexed plates, EMD had a significant negative effect on defect fill. The defect fill was 55.7% for 0 Μg/mL EMD, 48.2% for 30 Μg/mL EMD, 36.7% for 60 Μg/mL EMD, and 34.1% for 120 Μg/mL EMD on day 16 for the flexed GFs. EMD, in concentrations as high as 120 Μg/mL, did not significantly affect the amount of defect fill with nonflexed GFs. However, when the GFs were flexed, the addition of EMD had a significant negative effect on defect fill in a dose-dependent manner.

  13. Detection of (Leu-7)-positive cells with NK activity in human gingival tissues from patients with periodontitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, K.; Hirsch, H.Z.; Mestecky, J.; Moro, I.

    1986-03-05

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been identified in peripheral blood, lymphoid tissue and more recently in gut mucosa and may be involved in the regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis. They have assayed gingival tissues obtained from 25 periodontitis patients, for the presence and activity of NK cells. Routine histological techniques demonstrated an inflammatory infiltrate dominated by plasma cells and B lymphocytes. Indirect staining procedures with a biotin-labeled mouse anti-human, Leu-7 antibody revealed the presence of numerous positive cells accompanying the inflammatory cellular infiltrate in perivascular areas. Several specimens demonstrated positive-staining cells in the epithelium as well. Few cells were observed in histologically uninflammed areas. Single cell suspension obtained by collagenase digestion of 5 gingival samples were used in /sup 51/Cr release cytotoxicity assay against K562 cells. Three of the five samples were positive in this assay. The finding of Leu-7-positive cells in areas of intense plasma cell foci but not in uninflammed areas, may support a role for these cells in the regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis in oral mucosal tissues.

  14. Differential cytotoxicity of long-chain bases for human oral gingival epithelial keratinocytes, oral fibroblasts, and dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie A. Mehalick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-chain bases, found in the oral cavity, have potent antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens. In an article associated with this dataset, Poulson and colleagues determined the cytotoxicities of long-chain bases (sphingosine, dihydrosphingosine, and phytosphingosine for human oral gingival epithelial (GE keratinocytes, oral gingival fibroblasts (GF, dendritic cells (DC, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cell lines [1]. Poulson and colleagues found that GE keratinocytes were more resistant to long-chain bases as compared to GF, DC, and SCC cell lines [1]. In this study, we assess the susceptibility of DC to lower concentrations of long chain bases. 0.2–10.0 µM long-chain bases and GML were not cytotoxic to DC; 40.0–80.0 µM long-chain bases, but not GML, were cytotoxic for DC; and 80.0 µM long-chain bases were cytotoxic to DC and induced cellular damage and death in less than 20 mins. Overall, the LD50 of long-chain bases for GE keratinocytes, GF, and DC were considerably higher than their minimal inhibitory concentrations for oral pathogens, a finding important to pursuing their future potential in treating periodontal and oral infections.

  15. Essential Oils from Ugandan Medicinal Plants: In Vitro Cytotoxicity and Effects on IL-1β-Induced Proinflammatory Mediators by Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay; Obua, Celestino

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated cytotoxicity of essential oils from four medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon nardus, and Zanthoxylum chalybeum) on human gingival fibroblasts and their effects on proinflammatory mediators' secretion. Cytotoxicity of essential oils was investigated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Effects of essential oils at subcytotoxicity concentrations on interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretions by gingival fibroblasts treated with IL-1β (300 pg/mL) were evaluated by ELISA and EIA. IC50 values of the essential oils ranged from 26 μg/mL to 50 μg/mL. Baseline and IL-1β-induced secretion of PGE2 was inhibited by treatment with essential oil from O. gratissimum. Essential oils from B. pilosa and C. nardus had synergistic effects with IL-1β on PGE2 seceretion. In conclusion, the study suggests that essential oil from O. gratissimum decreases gingival fibroblasts secretion of PGE2, while essential oils from B. pilosa and C. nardus increase PGE2 secretion. Essential oil from Z. chalybeum was the most cytotoxic, while oil from C. nardus was the least cytotoxic. Although the clinical significance of these findings remains to be determined, it may be suggested that essential oil from O. gratissimum, applied at subcytotoxicity concentrations, could reduce the participation of gingival fibroblasts in the gingival inflammation and tissue destruction associated with periodontitis. PMID:27807462

  16. Essential Oils from Ugandan Medicinal Plants: In Vitro Cytotoxicity and Effects on IL-1β-Induced Proinflammatory Mediators by Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Ocheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated cytotoxicity of essential oils from four medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon nardus, and Zanthoxylum chalybeum on human gingival fibroblasts and their effects on proinflammatory mediators’ secretion. Cytotoxicity of essential oils was investigated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Effects of essential oils at subcytotoxicity concentrations on interleukin- (IL- 6, IL-8, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 secretions by gingival fibroblasts treated with IL-1β (300 pg/mL were evaluated by ELISA and EIA. IC50 values of the essential oils ranged from 26 μg/mL to 50 μg/mL. Baseline and IL-1β-induced secretion of PGE2 was inhibited by treatment with essential oil from O. gratissimum. Essential oils from B. pilosa and C. nardus had synergistic effects with IL-1β on PGE2 seceretion. In conclusion, the study suggests that essential oil from O. gratissimum decreases gingival fibroblasts secretion of PGE2, while essential oils from B. pilosa and C. nardus increase PGE2 secretion. Essential oil from Z. chalybeum was the most cytotoxic, while oil from C. nardus was the least cytotoxic. Although the clinical significance of these findings remains to be determined, it may be suggested that essential oil from O. gratissimum, applied at subcytotoxicity concentrations, could reduce the participation of gingival fibroblasts in the gingival inflammation and tissue destruction associated with periodontitis.

  17. Essential Oils from Ugandan Medicinal Plants: In Vitro Cytotoxicity and Effects on IL-1β-Induced Proinflammatory Mediators by Human Gingival Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Almer Boström, Elisabeth; Joloba, Moses; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated cytotoxicity of essential oils from four medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon nardus, and Zanthoxylum chalybeum) on human gingival fibroblasts and their effects on proinflammatory mediators' secretion. Cytotoxicity of essential oils was investigated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Effects of essential oils at subcytotoxicity concentrations on interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretions by gingival fibroblasts treated with IL-1β (300 pg/mL) were evaluated by ELISA and EIA. IC50 values of the essential oils ranged from 26 μg/mL to 50 μg/mL. Baseline and IL-1β-induced secretion of PGE2 was inhibited by treatment with essential oil from O. gratissimum. Essential oils from B. pilosa and C. nardus had synergistic effects with IL-1β on PGE2 seceretion. In conclusion, the study suggests that essential oil from O. gratissimum decreases gingival fibroblasts secretion of PGE2, while essential oils from B. pilosa and C. nardus increase PGE2 secretion. Essential oil from Z. chalybeum was the most cytotoxic, while oil from C. nardus was the least cytotoxic. Although the clinical significance of these findings remains to be determined, it may be suggested that essential oil from O. gratissimum, applied at subcytotoxicity concentrations, could reduce the participation of gingival fibroblasts in the gingival inflammation and tissue destruction associated with periodontitis.

  18. Modulation of human gingival fibroblast adhesion, morphology, tyrosine phosphorylation, and ERK 1/2 localization on polished, grooved and SLA substratum topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Eitoyo; Hamilton, Douglas W; Inoue, Takashi; Brunette, Donald M

    2009-12-01

    Attachment of connective tissue to dental implants, which is influenced by surface topography, is an important determinant of implant success. Approaches employed to alter topography include acid etching or blasting to produce roughened surfaces, and production of precisely defined topographies using microfabrication techniques. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of polished, microgrooved, and sand-blasted, large grit, acid-etched (SLA) topographies on fibroblast adhesion, morphology, activation, and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and localization. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) spread on all tested surfaces within 2 h, and topography influenced the pattern of phosphotyrosine localization. Fibrillar adhesion formation was prominent in HGFs cultured on microgrooves and SLA at 24 h compared with smooth. No significant difference in ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was observed at 2 or 24 h, but nuclear localization depended on culture time and substratum topography. Nuclear localization of ERK 1/2 occurred at 2 h on polished surfaces, but was not evident at 1 week. In contrast, cells on SLA and grooved surfaces did not exhibit nuclear localization of ERK 1/2 at early times, but did at 1 week. The results of this study suggest that rough and microfabricated topographies influence fibroblast adhesion and intracellular signaling through focal adhesion/integrin-dependent mechanisms in a time-dependent manner. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cleavage of host cytokeratin-6 by lysine-specific gingipain induces gingival inflammation in periodontitis patients.

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    Salunya Tancharoen

    Full Text Available Lysine-specific gingipain (Kgp is a virulence factor secreted from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis, a major etiological bacterium of periodontal disease. Keratin intermediate filaments maintain the structural integrity of gingival epithelial cells, but are targeted by Kgp to produce a novel cytokeratin 6 fragment (K6F. We investigated the release of K6F and its induction of cytokine secretion.K6F present in the gingival crevicular fluid of periodontal disease patients and in gingipain-treated rat gingival epithelial cell culture supernatants was measured by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer-based rapid quantitative peptide analysis using BLOTCHIP. K6F in gingival tissues was immunostained, and cytokeratin 6 protein was analyzed by immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry. Activation of MAPK in gingival epithelial cells was evaluated by immunoblotting. ELISA was used to measure K6F and the cytokines release induced by K6F. Human gingival fibroblast migration was assessed using a Matrigel invasion chamber assay.We identified K6F, corresponding to the C-terminus region of human cytokeratin 6 (amino acids 359-378, in the gingival crevicular fluid of periodontal disease patients and in the supernatant from gingival epithelial cells cultured with Kgp. K6F antigen was distributed from the basal to the spinous epithelial layers in gingivae from periodontal disease patients. Cytokeratin 6 on gingival epithelial cells was degraded by Kgp, but not by Arg-gingipain, P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide or Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide. K6F, but not a scrambled K6F peptide, induced human gingival fibroblast migration and secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. These effects of K6F were mediated by activation of p38 MAPK and Jun N-terminal kinase, but not p42/44 MAPK or p-Akt.Kgp degrades gingival epithelial cell cytokeratin 6 to K6F that, on

  20. TLR expression profile of human gingival margin-derived stem progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhemar, Mohamed; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Kabelitz, Dietrich; Dörfer, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Background Gingival margin-derived stem/progenitor cells (G-MSCs) show remarkable periodontal regenerative potential in vivo. During regeneration, G-MSCs may interact with their inflammatory environment via toll-like-receptors (TLRs). The present study aimed to depict the G-MSCs TLRs expression profile. Material and Methods Cells were isolated from free gingival margins, STRO-1-immunomagnetically sorted and seeded to obtain single colony forming units (CFUs). G-MSCs were characterized for CD14, CD34, CD45, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146 and STRO-1 expression, and for multilineage differentiation potential. Following G-MSCs’ incubation in basic or inflammatory medium (IL-1β, IFN-γ, IFN-α, TNF-α) a TLR expression profile was generated. Results G-MSCs showed all stem/progenitor cells’ characteristics. In basic medium G-MSCs expressed TLRs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 10. The inflammatory medium significantly up-regulated TLRs 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 10 and diminished TLR 6 (p≤0.05, Wilcoxon-Signed-Ranks-Test). Conclusions The current study describes for the first time the distinctive TLRs expression profile of G-MSCs under uninflamed and inflamed conditions. Key words:Stem cells, TLR, gingiva, polymerase chain reaction, FACS. PMID:26615501

  1. Human Rights and Cultural Identity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gordon John-Stewart

    2015-01-01

    ...-deficient cultural identities. In other words, it is possible to depict human rights in a culturally sensitive way so that universal human rights can meet the demands of a moderate version of meta-ethical relativism which acknowledges a small universal core of objectively true or false moral statements and avers that, beyond that small core, all other moral statements are neither objectively true nor false.

  2. Pharmacological and toxicological effects of co-exposure of human gingival fibroblasts to silver nanoparticles and sodium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona; Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Medina, Carlos; Radomski, Marek W

    2014-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and fluoride (F) are pharmacological agents widely used in oral medicine and dental practice due to their anti-microbial/anti-cavity properties. However, risks associated with the co-exposure of local cells and tissues to these xenobiotics are not clear. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of AgNPs and F co-exposure on human gingival fibroblast cells. Methods Human gingival fibroblast cells (CRL-2014) were exposed to AgNPs and/or F at different concentrations for up to 24 hours. Cellular uptake of AgNPs was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Downstream inflammatory effects and oxidative stress were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and real-time quantitative PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Finally, the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) was studied using Western blot. Results We found that AgNPs penetrated the cell membrane and localized inside the mitochondria. Co-incubation experiments resulted in increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. In addition, we found that co-exposure to both xenobiotics phosphorylated MAPK, particularly p42/44 MAPK. Conclusion A combined exposure of human fibroblasts to AgNPs and F results in increased cellular damage. Further studies are needed in order to evaluate pharmacological and potentially toxicological effects of AgNPs and F on oral health. PMID:24729703

  3. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens : a co-culture study in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C.; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J.; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration

  4. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens : a co-culture study in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration

  5. TECHNICAL CULTURE AND HUMAN AXJOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ­Krystyna Chałas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Technical culture is the value of each historical period. It is the subject of the ongoing development. While it is a value which is associated with different categories of values, mainly material, cognitive, social. Between culture and these three categories of values ​ there is a cognitive effect. Technical culture determines the quality of human axjosphere. The aim of this study is to show the relationships and dependencies between technical culture and the structures in which a person lives and works. It is mainly about the answer to the question of which values of technical culture are closely related to and what are the inter dependencies? The primary task is to define the concept of the technical culture and to show its teaching essence. The second task boils down to indicate the range of values ​​inherent in the culture of technology, determining the value of the technological culture and values, which are developed by the technical culture. Indication of the interaction between the technical culture and values ​​is the third task.

  6. [Gingival recessions and orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkema, A M; Padmos, J A D; de Quincey, G de

    2015-11-01

    Gingival recessions represent the most visible periodontal disease. The prevalence of gingival recessions is high. The root surface is literally exposed to negative influences such as erosion, abrasion, discoloration and decay. Moreover, gingival recessions can affect the quality of life by increased thermal sensitivity and reduced dento-gingival aesthetics. The aetiology of gingival recessions is complex and considered to be multifactorial. In order to prevent the development of gingival recessions during and after orthodontic treatment, several factors should be taken into account, among which maintenance of optimal oral hygiene and respect for the 'biological envelope' are decisive. Once gingival recessions have developed, orthodontic therapy can play a positive role in their treatment.

  7. Extensive description and comparison of human supra-gingival microbiome in root caries and health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the polymicrobial etiology of root caries is limited. To conduct a comprehensive research study on root caries, we utilized 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries and quantitative PCR to compare supra-gingival bacterial communities from healthy sites and carious sites of 21 patients with root caries (Patient-controls and Patient-cases and the sites of 21 healthy individuals (Healthy-controls from two nursing homes. Healthy-controls and Patient-cases showed no significant differences in terms of biomass, species richness, and species diversity. However, as for beta diversity based on either community membership metric (unweighted UniFrac or community structure metric (weighted UniFrac, Healthy-controls and Patient-cases were clearly distinguished from each other, appearing more variable in the community membership and structure in root caries microbiome but relatively conserved in the health microbiome. The Patient-controls group was at an intermediate stage between Healthy-controls and Patient-cases, but was more inclined to the former. Demonstrated in both relative abundance and prevalence of species in health and root caries, Propionibacterium acidifaciens, Streptococcus mutans, Olsenella profusa, Prevotella multisaccharivorax, and Lactobacillus crispatus were found to be most associated with root caries, whereas Delftia acidovorans, Bacteroidetes[G-2] sp., Lachnospiraceae[G-3] sp., and Prevotella intermedia are most associated with health. Our study provides a basis for further elucidating the microbial etiology of root caries in the elderly.

  8. Isolation and Multiple Differentiation Potential Assessment of Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Yuan Gao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from the gingiva (GMSCs and confirm their multiple differentiation potentials, including the odontogenic lineage. GMSCs, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and dermal stem cells (DSCs cultures were analyzed for cell shape, cell cycle, colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F and stem cell markers. Cells were then induced for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation and analyzed for differentiation markers (alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mineralization nodule formation and Runx2, ALP, osteocalcin (OCN and collagen I expressions for the osteogenic differentiation, and lipid vacuole formation and PPARγ-2 expression for the adipogenic differentiation. Besides, the odontogenic differentiation potential of GMSCs induced with embryonic tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (ETGC-CM was observed. GMSCs, PDLSCs and DSCs were all stromal origin. PDLSCs showed much higher osteogenic differentiation ability but lower adipogenic differentiation potential than DSCs. GMSCs showed the medial osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potentials between those of PDLSCs and DSCs. GMSCs were capable of expressing the odontogenic genes after ETGC-CM induction. This study provides evidence that GMSCs can be used in tissue engineering/regeneration protocols as an approachable stem cell source.

  9. Explant cultures of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Barrett, L.A.; Jackson, F.E.

    1978-01-01

    Human colonic epithelium has been cultured as explants in a chemically defined medium for periods of 1 to 20 days. The viability of the explants was shown by the preservation of the ultrastructural features of the colonic epithelial cells and by active incorporation of radioactive precursors into...

  10. Expression levels of novel cytokine IL-32 in periodontitis and its role in the suppression of IL-8 production by human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Ouhara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:IL-32 was recently found to be elevated in the tissue of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by polymicrobial infections that result in soft tissue destruction and alveolar bone loss. Although IL-32 is also thought to be associated with periodontal disease, its expression and possible role in periodontal tissue remain unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the expression patterns of IL-32 in healthy and periodontally diseased gingival tissue. The expression of IL-32 in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF as well as effects of autocrine IL-32 on IL-8 production from HGF were also examined.Methods:Periodontal tissue was collected from both healthy volunteers and periodontitis patients, and immunofluorescent staining was performed in order to determine the production of IL-32. Using real-time PCR and ELISA, mRNA expression and protein production of IL-32 in HGF, stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, were also investigated.Results:Contrary to our expectation, the production of IL-32 in the periodontitis patients was significantly lower than in the healthy volunteers. According to immunofluorescent microscopy, positive staining for IL-32 was detected in prickle and basal cell layers in the epithelium as well as fibroblastic cells in connective tissue. Addition of fixed Pg in vitro was found to suppress the otherwise constitutive expression of IL-32 mRNA and protein in HGF. However, recombinant IL-32 in vitro inhibited the expression of IL-8 mRNA by HGF stimulated with Pg. Interestingly, anti-IL-32 neutralizing antibody upregulated the IL-8 mRNA expression in non-stimulated HGF, indicating that constitutive expression of IL-32 in HGF suppressed IL-8 mRNA expression in the absence of bacterial stimulation.Conclusion:These results indicate that IL-32 is constitutively produced by HGF which can be suppressed by Pg and may play a role in the downregulation

  11. Dentin bonding agents induce c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes expression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2003-01-01

    An important requirement for a dentin bonding agent is biologic compatibility; the bonding agent usually remains in close contact with living dental tissues over a long period of time. Information on the genotoxicity/mutagenicity and cacinogenicity potentials of dentin bonding agents is rare. It has been shown that c-fos and c-jun are induced rapidly by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli. Little is known about the induction of cellular signaling events and specific gene expression after cell exposure to dentin bonding agents. Therefore, we used primary human gingival fibroblasts to examine the effect of six dentin bonding agents on the expression of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes to evaluate the genotoxicity/mutagenicity and cacinogenicity potential of the dentin bonding agents. The levels of mRNA were measured by the quantitative RT-PCR analysis. c-fos and c-jun mRNA expression in dentin bonding agents-treated cells revealed a rapid accumulation of the transcript, a significant signal first was detectable after 1h of exposure. Persistent induction of c-jun and c-fos protooncogenes by dentine bonding agents may distribute systemically to cause some unexpected adverse effects on human beings. It would be necessary to identify the severely toxic compounds and replace these substances by better biocompatible components. Otherwise, leaching of those genotoxicity/mutagenicity and cacinogenicity components must be minimized or prevented.

  12. Characterization of arecoline-induced effects on cytotoxicity in normal human gingival fibroblasts by global gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shang-Lun; Jiang, Shih-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Jou; Chiang, Horn-Che; Chen, Ping-Ho; Tu, Hung-Pin; Ho, Kun-Yen; Tsai, Yu-Shan; Chang, I-Shou; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2007-11-01

    Areca nut is the most widely used psychoactive substance and an important environmental risk factor for development of oral premalignant lesions and cancer. Arecoline, the major alkaloid of areca nut, has been known to cause cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in mammalian cells in vivo and in vitro and even contributes to carcinogenicity. However, the susceptible genes accounting for arecoline-induced damage in normal human oral cells are still lacking, which possibly involves in initial molecular damage via alternation of gene expression level on biological pathways. The present study was undertaken to characterize the toxic effects of arecoline in gene expression profiling on normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) using cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. The cytotoxicity of arecoline on HGF-1 cell line was elevated in a dose-dependent manner (p arecoline determined from dose-response curve of the cytotoxicity, a large number of genes were significantly repressed than induced by arecoline in global gene expression profiling. Five induced- and seven repressed genes including glutathione synthetase were further validated, and their gene expression changes were increased in a dose-dependent manner in a concentration range of 50-150 microg/ml. In conclusion, we proposed a tentative model to explain arecoline-induced effects on contribution of oral pathogenesis. The findings identified that 12 susceptible genes can potentially serve as biomarkers of arecoline-induced damage in betel chewers.

  13. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities...

  14. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide KSL-W on Human Gingival Tissue and C. albicans Growth, Transition and Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase (SAPS) 2, 4, 5 and 6 Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    fungi resistance , antimicrobial peptides, cationic peptides, chemical peptides, KSL-W. 3-ACCOMPLISHMENTS: There was no change as to the original...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-2-0025 TITLE: Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide KSL-W on Human Gingival Tissue and C. albicans Growth, Transition...of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188

  15. Effect of a dentifrice containing aloe vera on plaque and gingivitis control: a double-blind clinical study in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Morgana Araújo de Oliveira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Aloe vera on the reduction of plaque and gingivitis was evaluated in a randomized, parallel and double-blind clinical trial. Subjects were randomly allocated to the test group (n=15 - dentifrice containing Aloe vera - or the control group (n=15 - fluoridated dentifrice. Plaque index (PI and gingival bleeding index (GBI were assessed at days 0 and 30. Subjects were asked to brush their teeth with the control or test dentifrice, three times a day, during a 30-day period. There was a significant reduction on plaque and gingivitis in both groups, but no statistically significant difference was observed among them (p>0.01. The dentifrice containing Aloe vera did not show any additional effect on plaque and gingivitis control compared to the fluoridated dentifrice.

  16. EFFECT OF A DENTIFRICE CONTAINING ALOE VERA ON PLAQUE AND GINGIVITIS CONTROL. A DOUBLE-BLIND CLINICAL STUDY IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Sílvia Morgana Araújo; Torres, Ticiana Carneiro; Pereira, Sérgio Luís da Silva; Mota, Olívia Morais de Lima; Carlos, Márlio Ximenes

    2008-01-01

    The effect of Aloe vera on the reduction of plaque and gingivitis was evaluated in a randomized, parallel and double-blind clinical trial. Subjects were randomly allocated to the test group (n=15) – dentifrice containing Aloe vera - or the control group (n=15) – fluoridated dentifrice. Plaque index (PI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI) were assessed at days 0 and 30. Subjects were asked to brush their teeth with the control or test dentifrice, three times a day, during a 30-day period. There was a significant reduction on plaque and gingivitis in both groups, but no statistically significant difference was observed among them (p>0.01). The dentifrice containing Aloe vera did not show any additional effect on plaque and gingivitis control compared to the fluoridated dentifrice. PMID:19089263

  17. Whole cigarette smoke increased the expression of TLRs, HBDs, and proinflammory cytokines by human gingival epithelial cells through different signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhabib Semlali

    Full Text Available The gingival epithelium is becoming known as a regulator of the oral innate immune responses to a variety of insults such as bacteria and chemicals, including those chemicals found in cigarette smoke. We investigated the effects of whole cigarette smoke on cell-surface-expressed Toll-like receptors (TLR-2, -4 and -6, human β-defensin (HBD and proinflammatory cytokine expression and production in primary human gingival epithelial cells. Whole cigarette smoke was shown to increase TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 expression. Cigarette smoke led to ERK1/2, p38 and JNK phosphorylation in conjunction with nuclear factor-κB (NFκB translocation into the nucleus. TLR expression following cigarette smoke exposure was down regulated by the use of ERK1/2, p38, JNK MAP kinases, and NFκB inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of these signaling pathways in the cellular response against cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke also promoted HBD2, HBD3, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression through the ERK1/2 and NFκB pathways. Interestingly, the modulation of TLR, HBD, and cytokine expression was maintained long after the gingival epithelial cells were exposed to smoke. By promoting TLR, HBDs, and proinflammatory cytokine expression and production, cigarette smoke may contribute to innate immunity dysregulation, which may have a negative effect on human health.

  18. Whole Cigarette Smoke Increased the Expression of TLRs, HBDs, and Proinflammory Cytokines by Human Gingival Epithelial Cells through Different Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semlali, Abdelhabib; Witoled, Chmielewski; Alanazi, Mohammed; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The gingival epithelium is becoming known as a regulator of the oral innate immune responses to a variety of insults such as bacteria and chemicals, including those chemicals found in cigarette smoke. We investigated the effects of whole cigarette smoke on cell-surface-expressed Toll-like receptors (TLR)-2, −4 and −6, human β-defensin (HBD) and proinflammatory cytokine expression and production in primary human gingival epithelial cells. Whole cigarette smoke was shown to increase TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 expression. Cigarette smoke led to ERK1/2, p38 and JNK phosphorylation in conjunction with nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) translocation into the nucleus. TLR expression following cigarette smoke exposure was down regulated by the use of ERK1/2, p38, JNK MAP kinases, and NFκB inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of these signaling pathways in the cellular response against cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke also promoted HBD2, HBD3, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression through the ERK1/2 and NFκB pathways. Interestingly, the modulation of TLR, HBD, and cytokine expression was maintained long after the gingival epithelial cells were exposed to smoke. By promoting TLR, HBDs, and proinflammatory cytokine expression and production, cigarette smoke may contribute to innate immunity dysregulation, which may have a negative effect on human health. PMID:23300722

  19. Cytotoxic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium enriched mixture cement, Biodentine and octacalcium pohosphate on human gingival fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshagh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. This in vitro study compared the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, Biodentine (BD and octacalcium phosphate (OCP on the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs. Methods. After completion of the setting time of the materials under study, fibroblasts were placed in 24-well insert plates and 1 mg of each material was added to the respective wells. The plates were then incubated at 37°C. The inserts were removed at 24, 48 and 168 hours and 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was added to assess cytotoxicity via the MTT colorimetric assay. Data were analyzed at different time intervals using repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Bonferroni test at three levels of significance of P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. Results. Cytotoxicity of the materials under study was not significantly different at 24 and 48 hours compared to the control group. However, at 168 hours, a significant difference was noted between MTA (P< 0.05 and Biodentine (P < 0.01 and the control group. Conclusion. Cytotoxicity of MTA, CEM, Biodentine and OCP against HGFs was similar to that of the control group at 24 and 48 hours. Over time, MTA and Biodentine exhibited less cytotoxicity than other materials.

  20. Selective responses of human gingival fibroblasts and bacteria on carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone with multilevel nanostructured TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Lu, Tao; Wen, Jin; Xu, Lianyi; Zeng, Deliang; Wu, Qianju; Cao, Lingyan; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-03-01

    The long-term success of dental implants relies not only on stable osseointegration but also on the integration of implant surfaces with surrounding soft tissues. In our previous work, titanium plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique was applied to modify the carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) surface, constructing a unique multilevel TiO2 nanostructure thus enhancing certain osteogenic properties. However, the interactions between the modified surface and soft-tissue cells are still not clear. Here, we fully investigate the biological behaviors of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and oral pathogens on the structured surface, which determine the early peri-implant soft tissue integration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the formation of nanopores with TiO2 nanoparticles embedded on both the sidewall and bottom. In vitro studies including cell adhesion, viability assay, wound healing assay, real-time PCR, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) disclose improved adhesion, migration, proliferation, and collagen secretion ability of HGFs on the modified CFRPEEK. Moreover, the structured surface exhibits sustainable antibacterial properties towards Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Our results reveal that the multilevel TiO2 nanostructures can selectively enhance soft tissue integration and inhibit bacterial reproduction, which will further support and broaden the adoption of CFRPEEK materials in dental fields.

  1. Gold Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of Molecules into Primary Human Gingival Fibroblasts Using ns-Laser Pulses: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Krawinkel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs in the vicinity of cells’ membrane with a pulsed laser (λ = 532 nm, τ = 1 ns leads to perforation of the cell membrane, thereby allowing extracellular molecules to diffuse into the cell. The objective of this study was to develop an experimental setting to deliver molecules into primary human gingival fibroblasts (pHFIB-G by using ns-laser pulses interacting with AuNPs (study group. To compare the parameters required for manipulation of pHFIB-G with those needed for cell lines, a canine pleomorphic adenoma cell line (ZMTH3 was used (control group. Non-laser-treated cells incubated with AuNPs and the delivery molecules served as negative control. Laser irradiation (up to 35 mJ/cm2 resulted in a significant proportion of manipulated fibroblasts (up to 85%, compared to non-irradiated cells: p < 0.05, while cell viability (97% was not reduced significantly. pHFIB-G were perforated as efficiently as ZMTH3. No significant decrease of metabolic cell activity was observed up to 72 h after laser treatment. The fibroblasts took up dextrans with molecular weights up to 500 kDa. Interaction of AuNPs and a pulsed laser beam yields a spatially selective technique for manipulation of even primary cells such as pHFIB-G in high throughput.

  2. RP-HPLC assay of doxycycline in human saliva and gingival crevicular fluid in patients with chronic periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denić, Marko S; Sunarić, Slavica M; Kesić, Ljiljana G; Minić, Ivan Z; Obradović, Radmila R; Denić, Marija S; Petrović, Milica S

    2013-05-05

    A reversed-phased HPLC method with fluorescence detection was optimized and validated for determination of DOXY in human saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) with tetracycline as internal standard. Single step extraction with acetonitrile for both types of samples was performed. The separation was achieved at Zorbax Extend-C18 analytical column at 30°C. Mobile phase was consisted of an aqueous phase containing magnesium acetate, ammonium acetate, Na₂EDTA, triethyl-ammonium acetate buffered to pH 7.5 with ammonium hydroxide solution and acetonitrile. The volume ratio of the buffered water mixture of salts and acetonitrile was 86:14. Fluorescence detector was set at λex=380 nm and λem=520 nm. Under the optimized experimental conditions, good linearity was found in the range of 5.0-250.0 ng/mL for GCF with LOD of 1.63 ng/mL and LOQ of 4.93 ng/mL and 20.0-500.0 ng/mL for saliva with LOD of 6.36 ng/mL and LOQ of 19.28 ng/mL. This method was successfully applied for determination of DOXY in saliva and GCF obtained from patients with chronic periodontal disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the metabolism of /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid by human gingival tissue in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elattar, T.M.; Lin, H.S.; Tira, D.E.

    1983-09-01

    We investigated the effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on prostaglandins (PGs) and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) formation by inflamed human gingival tissues. Gingival tissue homogenates were incubated with /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid in the presence of indomethacin, piroxicam, or ibuprofen, and the organic solvent extracts were chromatographed on silica gel plates with standards for radiometric assay. There was a significant negative trend between the doses (10(-7)-10(-3) M) of each of indomethacin, piroxicam, and ibuprofen, and the amounts of PGF2 alpha, PGE2, PGD2, and 15-keto-PGE2 produced. All three drugs have a significant inhibitory effect on PGs and 12-HETE production at 10(-3) M when compared with the control. The rank order effectiveness of the drugs, at 10(-3) M, on PG inhibition was indomethacin greater than piroxicam greater than ibuprofen, and on 12-HETE inhibition was indomethacin greater than ibuprofen greater than piroxicam.

  4. Temporal activation of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors in human gingival fibroblasts infected with the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis: potential role of bacterial proteases in host signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehara Tadamichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is the foremost oral pathogen of adult periodontitis in humans. However, the mechanisms of bacterial invasion and the resultant destruction of the gingival tissue remain largely undefined. Results We report host-P. gingivalis interactions in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF cells. Quantitative immunostaining revealed the need for a high multiplicity of infection for optimal infection. Early in infection (2–12 h, P. gingivalis activated the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappa B, partly via the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. This was accompanied by the induction of cellular anti-apoptotic genes, including Bfl-1, Boo, Bcl-XL, Bcl2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Survivin. Late in infection (24–36 h the anti-apoptotic genes largely shut down and the pro-apoptotic genes, including Nip3, Hrk, Bak, Bik, Bok, Bax, Bad, Bim and Moap-1, were activated. Apoptosis was characterized by nuclear DNA degradation and activation of caspases-3, -6, -7 and -9 via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Use of inhibitors revealed an anti-apoptotic function of NF-kappa B and PI3 kinase in P. gingivalis-infected HGF cells. Use of a triple protease mutant P. gingivalis lacking three major gingipains (rgpA rgpB kgp suggested a role of some or all these proteases in myriad aspects of bacteria-gingival interaction. Conclusion The pathology of the gingival fibroblast in P. gingivalis infection is affected by a temporal shift from cellular survival response to apoptosis, regulated by a number of anti- and pro-apoptotic molecules. The gingipain group of proteases affects bacteria-host interactions and may directly promote apoptosis by intracellular proteolytic activation of caspase-3.

  5. Wild Cultures: A Comparison between Chimpanzee and Human Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Rocío Carvajal Contreras

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Review of Wild Cultures: A Comparison between Chimpanzee and Human Cultures. Christophe Boesch. 2012. Cambridge University Press. Pp. 276, 68 b & w illustrations, 11 tables. £60 (hardback. ISBN 9781109025370.

  6. Effect of phenytoin and age on gingival fibroblast enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surena Vahabi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The alteration of cytokine balance is stated to exert greater influence on gingival overgrowth compared to the direct effect of the drug on the regulation of extracellular matrix metabolism. The current study evaluated the effect of phenytoin on the regulation of collagen, lysyl oxidase and elastin in gingival fibroblasts.Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs were obtained from 4 healthy children and 4 adults. Samples were cultured with phenytoin. MTT test was used to evaluate the proliferation and ELISA was performed to determine the level of IL1β and PGE2 production by HGFs. Total RNA of gingival fibroblasts was extracted and RT-PCR was performed on samples. Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the data with an alpha error level less than 0.05.There was a significant difference in the expression of elastin between the controls and treated samples in both adult and pediatric groups and also in the lysyl oxidase expression of adult controls and treated adults. No significant difference was found between collagen expression in adults.The significant difference in elastin and lysyl oxidase expression between adult and pediatric samples indicates the significant effect of age on their production.

  7. [Gingival recessions and orthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, A.M.; Padmos, J.A.; Quincey, G. de

    2015-01-01

    Gingival recessions represent the most visible periodontal disease. The prevalence of gingival recessions is high. The root surface is literally exposed to negative influences such as erosion, abrasion, discoloration and decay. Moreover, gingival recessions can affect the quality of life by increase

  8. The use of a biostatic fascia lata thigh allograft as a scaffold for autologous human culture of fibroblasts--An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żurek, Jarek; Dominiak, Marzena; Botzenhart, Ute; Bednarz, Wojciech

    2015-05-01

    The method for covering gingival recession defects and augmenting keratinized gingiva involves the use of autogenuous connective tissue grafts obtained from palatal mucosa in combination with various techniques of flap repositioning or tunnel techniques. In the case of multiple gingival recession defects the amount of connective tissue available for grafting is insufficient. Therefore, the use of substitutes is necessary. The most widely used material in recent years has been the acellular dermal matrix allograft. The disadvantage of its application lies in the absence of cells and blood vessels, which increases incorporation time. Primary cultured human autologic fibroblasts are commonly used to optimize the healing process. The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro biocompatibility of human fascia lata allograft as a new scaffold for primary cultured human autologic fibroblasts. For that, a fibroblast culture obtained from a fragment of gingival tissue taken from the hard palate mucosa of a subject was used. After 14 days the colony cells were inoculated on a fragment of human fascia lata allograft. After a further 7 days of incubation the material was frozen, cut and prepared for histochemical examination. After two weeks of incubation, and 7 days after inoculation on a fragment of fascia lata allograft numerous accumulations of the cultured fibroblast were found that had a typical structure and produced collagen fibres. A human fascia lata allograft can be used as a scaffold for primary cultured human autologic fibroblasts. Further studies should confirm the clinical efficacy of this solution.

  9. Vitamin D reduces the inflammatory response by Porphyromonas gingivalis infection by modulating human β-defensin-3 in human gingival epithelium and periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Anna; Fiorentino, Margherita; Guida, Luigi; Annunziata, Marco; Nastri, Livia; Rizzo, Antonietta

    2017-04-03

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial polymicrobial infection characterized by a destructive inflammatory process. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative black-pigmented anaerobe, is a major pathogen in the initiation and progression of periodontitis; it produces several virulence factors that stimulate human gingival epithelium (HGE) cells and human periodontal ligament (HPL) cells to produce various inflammatory mediators. A variety of substances, such as vitamin D, have growth-inhibitory effects on some bacterial pathogens and have shown chemo-preventive and anti-inflammatory activity. We used a model with HGE and HPL cells infected with P. gingivalis to determine the influence of vitamin D on P. gingivalis growth and adhesion and the immunomodulatory effect on TNF-α, IL-8, IL-12 and human-β-defensin 3 production. Our results demonstrated, firstly, the lack of any cytotoxic effect on the HGE and HPL cells when treated with vitamin D; in addition, vitamin D inhibited P. gingivalis adhesion and infectivity in HGE and HPL cells. Our study then showed that vitamin D reduced TNF-α, IL-8, IL-12 production in P. gingivalis-infected HGE and HPL cells. In contrast, a significant upregulation of the human-β-defensin 3 expression in HGE and HPL cells induced by P. gingivalis was demonstrated. Our results indicate that vitamin D specifically enhances the production of the human-β-defensin 3 antimicrobial peptide and exerts an inhibitory effect on the pro-inflammatory cytokines, thus suggesting that vitamin D may offer possible therapeutic applications for periodontitis.

  10. Effects of miR-223 on expression of IL-1β and IL-6 in human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Sari; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate post-transcriptional expression by translational inhibition or mRNA degradation. miRNAs bind to target mRNAs through partial complementarity, and can regulate many genes. In the present study, we investigated the effects of miR-223 on the expression of inflammatory cytokines in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). To determine the effects of miR-223 on the expressions of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6, HGF were stimulated by IL-1β (1 ng/mL) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; 10 ng/mL) and transfected with a miR-223 expression plasmid. Levels of mRNA for IL-1β, IL-6, inhibitor of kappa-B kinase α (IKKα) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-5 (MKP-5) were measured by real-time PCR, and levels IL-1β, IL-6 and IKKα protein were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. Expression of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNAs was induced by IL-1β and TNF-α and further increased by miR-223 overexpression. IL-1β and TNF-α induced the expression of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNAs, and this was reduced by miR-223 inhibitor. Overexpression of miR-223 decreased the levels of IKKα protein and MKP-5 mRNA in HGF. These findings indicate that miR-223 might control the inflammatory response via IKKα and MKP-5 in periodontal tissue. (J Oral Sci 58, 101-108, 2016).

  11. Generation and periodontal differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts-derived integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Xiaohui [Department of Periodontology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, 22 South Avenue Zhong-Guan-Cun, Beijing 100081 (China); Peking University Stem Cell Research Center and Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Yang [Peking University Stem Cell Research Center and Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Jingwen [Department of Periodontology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, 22 South Avenue Zhong-Guan-Cun, Beijing 100081 (China); Li, Peng [Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, 34 Hospital Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); Liu, Yinan [Peking University Stem Cell Research Center and Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Wen, Jinhua, E-mail: jhwen@bjmu.edu.cn [Peking University Stem Cell Research Center and Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Luan, Qingxian, E-mail: kqluanqx@126.com [Department of Periodontology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, 22 South Avenue Zhong-Guan-Cun, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-05-06

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been recognized as a promising cell source for periodontal tissue regeneration. However, the conventional virus-based reprogramming approach is associated with a high risk of genetic mutation and limits their therapeutic utility. Here, we successfully generated iPSCs from readily accessible human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) through an integration-free and feeder-free approach via delivery of reprogramming factors of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, L-myc, Lin28 and TP53 shRNA with episomal plasmid vectors. The iPSCs presented similar morphology and proliferation characteristics as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and expressed pluripotent markers including Oct4, Tra181, Nanog and SSEA-4. Additionally, these cells maintained a normal karyotype and showed decreased CpG methylation ratio in the promoter regions of Oct4 and Nanog. In vivo teratoma formation assay revealed the development of tissues representative of three germ layers, confirming the acquisition of pluripotency. Furthermore, treatment of the iPSCs in vitro with enamel matrix derivative (EMD) or growth/differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) significantly up-regulated the expression of periodontal tissue markers associated with bone, periodontal ligament and cementum respectively. Taken together, our data demonstrate that hGFs are a valuable cell source for generating integration-free iPSCs, which could be sequentially induced toward periodontal cells under the treatment of EMD and GDF-5. - Highlights: • Integration-free iPSCs are successfully generated from hGFs via an episomal approach. • EMD promotes differentiation of the hGFs-derived iPSCs toward periodontal cells. • GDF-5 promotes differentiation of the hGFs-derived iPSCs toward periodontal cells. • hGFs-derived iPSCs could be a promising cell source for periodontal regeneration.

  12. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP) scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new therapeutic approaches

  13. [Comparison of the biological tolerance of titanium and titanium alloys in human gingiva cell cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehner, B; Heidemann, D

    1989-01-01

    Mirror-finished solid specimens of pure titanium and the titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V as well as Ti-5Al-2.5Fe showed no effects on the growth behavior and cell morphology of human gingival epithelial cell and fibroblast cultures. The growth of the cells contacting all three materials was uninhibited. SEM revealed growth of fibroblasts on the surfaces of the specimens, too. No differences could be found between the biocompatibility of titanium alloys and that of pure titanium. The formation of a stable surface oxide layer providing resistance to corrosion may be decisive.

  14. Cannabidiol Activates Neuronal Precursor Genes in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2016-12-05

    In the last years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from oral tissues have received considerable interest in regenerative medicine since they can be obtained with minimal invasive procedure and exhibit immunomodulatory properties. This study was aimed to investigate whether in vitro pre-treatment of MSCs obtained from human gingiva (hGMSCs) with Cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid component produced by the plant Cannabis sativa, may promote human gingiva derived MSCs to differentiate toward neuronal precursor cells. Specifically, we have treated the hGMSCs with CBD (5 µM) for 24 h in order to evaluate the expression of genes involved in cannabidiol signaling, cell proliferation, self-renewal and multipotency, and neural progenitor cells differentiation. Next generation sequencing (NGS) demonstrated that CBD activates genes associated with G protein coupled receptor signaling in hGMSCs. Genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis were regulated. Moreover, genes associated with the biological process of neuronal progenitor cells (NCPs) proliferation, neuron differentiation, neurogenesis, and nervous system development were significantly modulated. From our results, we hypothesize that human gingiva-derived MSCs conditioned with CBD could represent a valid method for improving the hGMSCs phenotype and thus might be a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-16, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Three-Dimensional Scaffold from Decellularized Human Gingiva for Cell Cultures: Glycoconjugates and Cell Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Banihashem Rad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We studied both the presence of some carbohydrate compounds in a three-dimensional (3D matrix harvested from human gingiva and the cell behavior in this matrix.Materials and Methods: In this experimental research, in order to prepare 3D scaffolds, human palatal gingival biopsies were harvested and physically decellularized by freeze-thawing and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. The scaffolds were placed within the rings of blastema tissues obtained from a pinna rabbit, in vitro. We evaluated the presence of glycoconjugatesand cellular behavior according to histological, histochemical and spectrophotometry techniques at one, two and three weeks after culture. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVAcomparedthe groups.Results: Extracellular matrix (ECM remained after decellularization of tissue with 1% SDS. Glycoconjugate contents decreased meaningfully at a higher SDS concentration (p<0.0001. After culture of the ECM scaffold with blastema, we observed increased staining of alcian blue, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS and toluidine blue in the scaffold and a number of other migrant cells which was caused by cell penetrationinto the scaffold. Spectrophotometry results showed an increase in glycosaminoglycans (GAGs of the decellularized scaffolds at three weeks after culture.Conclusion: The present study has shown that a scaffold generated from palatal gingival tissue ECM is a suitable substrate for blastema cell migration and activity.This scaffold maypotentially be useful as a biological scaffold in tissue engineering applications.

  16. The phylum Synergistetes in gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baumgartner, Angelica; Thurnheer, Thomas; Lüthi-Schaller, Helga; Gmür, Rudolf; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2012-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is distinct from that of common gingivitis in that it is characterized by local necrosis of the gingival tissues, rapid onset, pain and extensive bleeding...

  17. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Marta S; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol–gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior. PMID:27877662

  18. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta S Laranjeira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol–gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves. Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1 and collagen type I (COL I on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  19. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  20. Cytotoxicity of dental composite (co)monomers and the amalgam component Hg(2+) in human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Simon, Sabine; Esters, Magalie; Seiss, Mario; Kehe, Kai; Kleinsasser, Norbert; Hickel, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    Unpolymerized resin (co)monomers or mercury (Hg) can be released from restorative dental materials (e.g. composites and amalgam). They can diffuse into the tooth pulp or the gingiva. They can also reach the gingiva and organs by the circulating blood after the uptake from swallowed saliva. The cytotoxicity of dental composite components hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisglycidylmethacrylate (Bis-GMA) as well as the amalgam component Hg(2+) (as HgCl(2)) and methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) was investigated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) at two time intervals. To test the cytotoxicity of substances, the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay were used. The test substances were added in various concentrations and cells were incubated for 24 or 48 h. The EC(50) values were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. Following EC(50) values were found [BrdU: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 8.860 (0.440)/6.600(0.630), TEGDMA 1.810(0.130)/1.220(0.130), UDMA 0.120(0.010)/0.140(0.010), BisGMA 0.060(0.004)/0.040(0.002), HgCl(2) 0.015(0.001)/0.050(0.006), and MeHgCl 0.004(0.001)/0.005(0.001). Following EC(50) values were found [LDH: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 9.490(0.300)/7.890(1.230), TEGDMA 2.300(0.470)/1.950(0.310), UDMA 0.200(0.007)/0.100(0.007), BisGMA 0.070(0.005)/0.100(0.002), and MeHgCl 0.014(0.006)/0.010(0.003). In both assays, the following range of increased toxicity was found for composite components (24 and 48 h): HEMA < TEGDMA < UDMA < BisGMA. In both assays, MeHgCl was the most toxic substance. In the BrdU assay, Hg(2+) was about fourfold less toxic than MeHgCl but Hg(2+) was about fourfold more toxic than BisGMA. In the BrdU test, a significantly (P<0.05) decreased toxicity was observed for Hg(2+) at 48 h, compared to the 24 h Hg(2+)-exposure. A time depending

  1. Protein kinase A enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6, IL-8, and PGE2 production by human gingival fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara Toshiaki

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Periodontal disease is accompanied by inflammation of the gingiva and destruction of periodontal tissues, leading to alveolar bone loss in severe clinical cases. Interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and the chemical mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 are known to play important roles in inflammatory responses and tissue degradation. Recently, we reported that the protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor H-89 suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced IL-8 production by human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs. In the present study, the relevance of the PKA activity and two PKA-activating drugs, aminophylline and adrenaline, to LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-8 and PGE2 by HGFs were examined. Methods HGFs were treated with LPS from Porphyromonas gingivalis and H-89, the cAMP analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP, aminophylline, or adrenaline. After 24 h, IL-6, IL-8, and PGE2 levels were evaluated by ELISA. Results H-89 did not affect LPS-induced IL-6 production, but suppressed IL-8 and PGE2 production. In contrast, dbcAMP significantly increased LPS-induced IL-6, IL-8, and PGE2 production. Up to 10 μg/ml of aminophylline did not affect LPS-induced IL-6, IL-8, or PGE2 production, but they were significantly increased at 100 μg/ml. Similarly, 0.01 μg/ml of adrenaline did not affect LPS-induced IL-6, IL-8, or PGE2 production, but they were significantly increased at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 μg/ml. In the absence of LPS, H-89, dbcAMP, aminophylline, and adrenaline had no relevance to IL-6, IL-8, or PGE2 production. Conclusion These results suggest that the PKA pathway, and also PKA-activating drugs, enhance LPS-induced IL-6, IL-8, and PGE2 production by HGFs. However, aminophylline may not have an effect on the production of these molecules at concentrations used in clinical settings (8 to 20 μg/ml in serum. These results suggest that aminophylline does not affect inflammatory responses in periodontal disease.

  2. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dani, Nitin Hemchandra; Khanna, Dinkar Parveen; Bhatt, Vaibhavi Hitesh; Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective...

  3. Identification of 1,8-cineole, borneol, camphor, and thujone as anti-inflammatory compounds in a Salvia officinalis L. infusion using human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrnhöfer-Ressler, Miriam M; Fricke, Kristina; Pignitter, Marc; Walker, Joel M; Walker, Jessica; Rychlik, Michael; Somoza, Veronika

    2013-04-10

    Drinking or gargling Salvia officinalis L. infusion (sage infusion) is thought to soothe a sore throat, tonsillitis, and inflamed, red gums, although structure-based scientific evidence for the key anti-inflammatory compounds in sage infusion is scarce. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1) were treated with sage infusion (SI) or SI fractions containing either its volatile components and water (aqueous distillate, AD) or its dry matter (DM) for six hours. SI, AD, and DM reduced a mean phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate/ionomycin (PMA/I)-stimulated release of the pro-inflammatory interleukins IL-6 and IL-8 by more than 50% (p < 0.05). Cellular uptake experiments and subsequent GC-MS analysis using stable-isotope-labeled internal standards revealed the presence of 1,8-cineole, borneol, camphor, and α-/β-thujone in SI-treated cells; LC-MS analysis demonstrated the presence of rosmarinic acid. A significant, more than 50% mean inhibition of PMA/I-induced IL-6 and IL-8 release was demonstrated for the volatile compounds 1,8-cineole, borneol, camphor, and thujone, but not for the nonvolatile rosmarinic acid when applied in concentrations representative of sage infusion. Therefore, the volatile compounds were found to be more effective than rosmarinic acid. 1,8-Cineole, borneol, camphor, and α-/β-thujone chiefly contribute to the anti-inflammatory activity of sage infusion in human gingival fibroblasts.

  4. Humanizing the Writing in Cultural Geography Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimore, Ann E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses how cultural geography textbooks can be written to improve the portrayal of people and cultures. Author's criticism is based on a study of cultural and human geography textbooks current in 1976 which revealed a predominance of male images and an abstract style of presentation. (Author/AV)

  5. National Cultures and Human Development Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvard Konrad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationships between basic cultural characteristics of countries and some economic indexes. As cultural characteristics, the data from The Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness Research Program (GLOBE about the 9 cultural dimensions for 60 countries were used. Two facets of cultural dimensions were measured: the perceptions of actual practices and the perceptions of preferred values. On the other hand, the data about different economic indexes were taken from archival sources such as Human Development Report. Results show that some cultural practices and preferences are related to the development of countries as measured by Human Development Index (HDI. The implications of these results are discussed.

  6. Culture Representation in Human Reliability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gertman; Julie Marble; Steven Novack

    2006-12-01

    Understanding human-system response is critical to being able to plan and predict mission success in the modern battlespace. Commonly, human reliability analysis has been used to predict failures of human performance in complex, critical systems. However, most human reliability methods fail to take culture into account. This paper takes an easily understood state of the art human reliability analysis method and extends that method to account for the influence of culture, including acceptance of new technology, upon performance. The cultural parameters used to modify the human reliability analysis were determined from two standard industry approaches to cultural assessment: Hofstede’s (1991) cultural factors and Davis’ (1989) technology acceptance model (TAM). The result is called the Culture Adjustment Method (CAM). An example is presented that (1) reviews human reliability assessment with and without cultural attributes for a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system attack, (2) demonstrates how country specific information can be used to increase the realism of HRA modeling, and (3) discusses the differences in human error probability estimates arising from cultural differences.

  7. Visual Culture, Art History and the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    This essay will discuss the need for the humanities to address visual culture studies as part of its interdisciplinary mission in today's university. Although mostly unnoticed in recent debates in the humanities over historical and theoretical frameworks, the relatively new field of visual culture has emerged as a corrective to a growing…

  8. Human nature, cultural diversity and evolutionary theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Henry

    2011-02-12

    Incorporating culture into an expanded theory of evolution will provide the foundation for a universal account of human diversity. Two requirements must be met. The first is to see learning as an extension of the processes of evolution. The second is to understand that there are specific components of human culture, viz. higher order knowledge structures and social constructions, which give rise to culture as invented knowledge. These components, which are products of psychological processes and mechanisms, make human culture different from the forms of shared knowledge observed in other species. One serious difficulty for such an expanded theory is that social constructions may not add to the fitness of all humans exposed to them. This may be because human culture has existed for only a relatively short time in evolutionary terms. Or it may be that, as some maintain, adaptation is a limited, even a flawed, aspect of evolutionary theory.

  9. Human nature, cultural diversity and evolutionary theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating culture into an expanded theory of evolution will provide the foundation for a universal account of human diversity. Two requirements must be met. The first is to see learning as an extension of the processes of evolution. The second is to understand that there are specific components of human culture, viz. higher order knowledge structures and social constructions, which give rise to culture as invented knowledge. These components, which are products of psychological processes and mechanisms, make human culture different from the forms of shared knowledge observed in other species. One serious difficulty for such an expanded theory is that social constructions may not add to the fitness of all humans exposed to them. This may be because human culture has existed for only a relatively short time in evolutionary terms. Or it may be that, as some maintain, adaptation is a limited, even a flawed, aspect of evolutionary theory. PMID:21199849

  10. Jatropha curcas latex inhibits the release of collagenase by gingival fibroblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazwishni Siregar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Folkloric use of J. curcas latex among others are to cure tooth pain, bleeding gum and as anti-inflammatory drug. Collagenase is a neutral protease released by activated macrophage and also by fibroblasts in small amounts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of J. curcas latex on collagenase released by fibroblasts. Four doses of J. curcas latex from 37.5-300 g/ml were added to 3 human gingival primary fibroblast cell culture. After 1 to 4 days of incubation, collagenase in the supernatant was assayed with collagen. The degradation products were then separated by SDS-PAGE and the density of ¾ A bands were measured semi quantitatively by Adobe Photo computer program. Result showed that J. curcas latex decreased collagenase released by human gingival fibroblast, and increasing dose inhibits more. It may be concluded that the latex of J. curcas inhibits the release of collagenase by human gingival fibroblast. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:219-23Keywords: Jatropha curcas, collagenase, human gingival fibroblast, collagenase assay, SDS-PAGE

  11. Cytotoxicity of dental composite (co)monomers and the amalgam component Hg{sup 2+} in human gingival fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Simon, Sabine; Esters, Magalie; Seiss, Mario [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kehe, Kai [Bundeswehr Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kleinsasser, Norbert [University of Regensburg, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Regensburg (Germany); Hickel, Reinhard [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Munich (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Unpolymerized resin (co)monomers or mercury (Hg) can be released from restorative dental materials (e.g. composites and amalgam). They can diffuse into the tooth pulp or the gingiva. They can also reach the gingiva and organs by the circulating blood after the uptake from swallowed saliva. The cytotoxicity of dental composite components hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisglycidylmethacrylate (Bis-GMA) as well as the amalgam component Hg{sup 2+} (as HgCl{sub 2}) and methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) was investigated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) at two time intervals. To test the cytotoxicity of substances, the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay were used. The test substances were added in various concentrations and cells were incubated for 24 or 48 h. The EC{sub 50} values were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. Following EC{sub 50} values were found [BrdU: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 8.860 (0.440)/6.600(0.630), TEGDMA 1.810(0.130)/1.220(0.130), UDMA 0.120(0.010)/0.140(0.010), BisGMA 0.060(0.004)/0.040(0.002), HgCl{sub 2} 0.015(0.001)/0.050(0.006), and MeHgCl 0.004(0.001)/0.005(0.001). Following EC{sub 50} values were found [LDH: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 9.490(0.300)/7.890(1.230), TEGDMA 2.300(0.470)/1.950(0.310), UDMA 0.200(0.007)/0.100(0.007), BisGMA 0.070(0.005)/0.100(0.002), and MeHgCl 0.014(0.006)/0.010(0.003). In both assays, the following range of increased toxicity was found for composite components (24 and 48 h): HEMA < TEGDMA < UDMA < BisGMA. In both assays, MeHgCl was the most toxic substance. In the BrdU assay, Hg{sup 2+} was about fourfold less toxic than MeHgCl but Hg{sup 2+} was about fourfold more toxic than BisGMA. In the BrdU test, a significantly (P<0.05) decreased toxicity was observed for Hg{sup 2+} at 48 h, compared to the 24 h

  12. Effect of platelet rich fibrin on proliferation and differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts on rough titanium surface%富血小板纤维蛋白对粗糙钛板表面牙龈成纤维细胞增殖和分化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of platelet rich fibrin (PRF) on proliferation and differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts on rough titanium surface. Methods Human gingival fibroblasts were cultured in vitro, and their fourth generation was co-cultured with rough titanium. The cells were then cultured in common medium and PRF medium respectively, and detected by MTT, RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. Results MTT showed that PRF could promote the proliferation of human gingival fibroblasts(P < 0.05). RT-PCR demonstrated that the expression level of typeⅠcollagen mRNA was higher than that of bFGF mRNA in PRF medium than in common medium(P<0.05). Western blot displayed that the expression level of typeⅠcollagen was higher in PRF medium than in common medium(P<0.05). Conclusion PRF can accelerate the proliferation and differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts on rough titanium surface.%  目的探讨富血小板纤维蛋白对粗糙钛板表面人牙龈成纤维细胞增殖和分化的影响。方法体外培养人牙龈成纤维细胞,传至第4代与粗糙钛板联合培养用于实验。分别在普通培养基和含富血小板纤维蛋白的培养基中培养,MTT、RT-PCR、蛋白印迹技术进行检测。结果 MTT结果显示含加入富血小板纤维蛋白能明显促进粗糙钛板表面人牙龈成纤维细胞的增殖,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。RT-PCR提示两组均有Type(Ⅰ)collagen和bFGF的mRNA表达,含富血小板纤维蛋白组mRNA表达比普通组明显增强。WB提示,Ⅰ型胶原蛋白表达在含富血小板纤维蛋白组中明显增强。结论富血小板纤维蛋白能促进粗糙钛板表面人牙龈成纤维细胞的增殖和分化。

  13. The relationship between two kinds of human herpesviruses and experimental gingivitis%两种人类疱疹病毒与实验性龈炎的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亦兵; 孟焕新

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus-type 1 (EBV-1) in GCF and saliva during experimental gingivitis in Chinese young subjects and to evaluate the effect of the virus in the initial stage of gingival inflammation.Methods GCF of 14 and 45 and saliva without stimulating in 11 Chinese young males with healthy gingiva were collected at baseline (day 0),day 7,14 and 21 after stopping oral hygiene and day7 after reestablishing oral hygiene(day 28).DNA of HCMV and EBV-1 were detected by nested-polymerase chain reaction (n-PCR) at the times mentioned above.Results HCMV was detected in GCF of 4 subjects at baseline,4 subjects at day 7,3 subjects at day 14 and 2 subjects at day 21 while the subjects were different.At day 28 HCMV could not be detected.EBV-1 was not detectable in GCF during the experimental gingivitis.HCMV was detected in saliva in 4 subjects and EBV-1 was in 3 subjects.And there is no relationship between the detection of the herpesviruses and the clinical parameters as well.Conclusion We suggest that HCMV and EBV-1 are not the important factors during the initial stage of gingival inflammation.%目的 检测人类巨细胞病毒(human cytomegalovirus,HCMV)和Epstein-Barr病毒-1型(Epstein-Barr virus-type1,EBV-1))在实验性龈炎过程中龈沟液(gingival crevicular fluid,GCF)和唾液中的检出变化,探讨病毒在牙龈炎症发生发展过程中的作用.方法 选取11名牙龈健康,无全身疾病的年轻男性受试者,在停止口腔卫生措施后21天内(第0、7、14、21天)和恢复口腔卫生措施一周后(第28天)收集14,45两颗牙的GCF以及受试者的唾液,使用巢式PCR技术检测HCMV和EBV-1在不同时间点的检出情况.结果 GCF中HCMV在基线、7、14 d和21 d时分别有4个、4个、3个和2个受试者检出,但检出的受试者在该过程中不一致,第28天时无受试者检出;EBV-1在GCF中均未检出.在唾液中,实验过程中不同时间点共仅有4名和3

  14. 人特异性蛋白激酶-15基因在增生牙龈组织中表达的研究%The expression of human-specific protein kinase-15 in the hyperplastic gingival tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅幼敏; 宦泓; 周艳; 谢海燕; 张汝阳; 徐艳

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To detect the human-specific protein kinase-15(NYD-SP15)gene expression in normal gingival tissue and hyperplastic gingival tissues,observe the expression of NYD-SP15 protein in gingival tissues,and to explore the relationship of NYD- SP15 and gingival hyperplasia initially. Methods:Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)and immunohistochemical method were applicated to detect the expression of NYD-SP15 gene in gingival tissues of 27 cases of normal people and 40 cases of gingival hyperplasia patients. The normal gingival tissues were the excision of gingival tissue during crown lengthening surgery(the teeth were traumatic crown fractures),recorded as normal control group. The hyperplasia samples were the excision of gingival tissue during gingivectomy, recorded as hyperplasia group. The half of all specimens were removed and stored in nitrogen liquid immediately. The remaining half of the tissues with formalin, embedded in paraffin storage. Staining positive cells were counted under the microscope and classificated by positive degree. The data of the experiment was analyzed by Stata 9.2(StataCorporation College Station,TX)software. Results:The expression of NYD-SP15 mRNA in tissues of hyperplasia group was significantly higher than that of control group(P < 0.05). The immunohistochemistry results showed that the NYD-SP15 protein was highly expression in the cytoplasm in normal gingival tissue. But,in the hyplasia gingival tissues,the expression of NYD-SP15 protein was highly in the nucleus. Conclusion;The level of NYD-SP15 expression and location in the gingival tissues may be associated with the gingival hyperplasia. However,the relationship between them remains to be further studied.%目的:检测细胞增殖相关基因人特异性蛋白激酶-15(specific protein kinase 15,NYD-SP15)基因在增生牙龈及正常牙龈组织中的表达,初步探讨该基因与牙龈增生发生的关系.方法:应用RT-PCR及免疫组化法检测27例

  15. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Hemchandra Dani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective tissue elements, mostly associated with some syndrome. This case report describes a case of nonsyndromic generalized IGF in an 18-year-old male patient who presented with generalized gingival enlargement. The enlarged tissue was surgically removed by internal bevel gingivectomy and ledge and wedge procedure. The patient was regularly monitored clinically for improvement in his periodontal condition as well as for any recurrence of gingival overgrowth.

  16. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Nitin Hemchandra; Khanna, Dinkar Parveen; Bhatt, Vaibhavi Hitesh; Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective tissue elements, mostly associated with some syndrome. This case report describes a case of nonsyndromic generalized IGF in an 18-year-old male patient who presented with generalized gingival enlargement. The enlarged tissue was surgically removed by internal bevel gingivectomy and ledge and wedge procedure. The patient was regularly monitored clinically for improvement in his periodontal condition as well as for any recurrence of gingival overgrowth. PMID:26941525

  17. Expression of Human β-defensin-2 in Gingival Epithelial Cell%牙龈上皮细胞中人β2——防御素mRNA的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏洪涛; 罗云纲; 王国珍; 李美华

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To examine the expression of human β-defensin-2(hBD-2) in gingival epithelial cell of normal subjects and patients with gingival hyperplasia,and to investigate the role of β-defensin 2 in the innate immunity.Methods:Gingival tissues were obtained from 10 normal subjects and from 12 patients undergoing surgery for gingival hyperplasia.Isolated epithelial cells were used for total RNA isolation by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR).Results:β-defensin-2 mRNA was detected in the gingival epithelium of patients with gingival hyperplasia normal gingival tissue.Its expression level was significantly higher in diseased epithelium than in normal turbinate epithelium (P<0.05).Conclusion:These results suggest that beta-defensin 2 may play a constitutive role in gingival defenses.It may be induced in response to local infection or inflammation.%目的:检测人β防御素(human β defensin,hBD)2 mRNA在牙龈增生病人和正常人的牙龈上皮细胞中的表达,分析hBD=2mRNA在牙龈组织天然免疫中的作用.方法:应用逆转录一聚合酶链反应技术(reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction,RT-PCR)检测12例牙龈增生病人和10例正常牙龈上皮细胞中hBD-2mRNA的表达.结果:hBD-2 mRNA在12例牙龈增生和10例正常对照牙龈上皮细胞中均有表达,且两组间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:牙龈上皮细胞中hBD-2在天然免疫中发挥重要作用,hBD-2的表达增加可能与牙龈增生中的细胞因子有关.

  18. Human epithelial tissue culture study on restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, András; Ungvári, Krisztina; Györgyey, Ágnes; Kukovecz, Ákos; Turzó, Kinga; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Health condition of the gingival tissues contacting the surfaces of fixed prostheses is a result of multiple etiologic factors. The aim of the investigation discussed here was to evaluate the attachment and proliferation rate of cultured human epithelial cells on three commonly used restorative materials under in vitro conditions. Morphological and chemical structure of polished lithium-disilicate (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Germany), yttrium modified zirconium dioxide (5-TEC ICE Zirkon Translucent, Zirkonzahn GmbH Srl, Germany) and cobalt chromium alloy (Remanium star, Dentaurum GmbH & Co. KG, Germany) discs were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human epithelial cells harvested and cultured from one donor, were applied to investigate cell attachment (24h observation) and proliferation (72h observation) via dimethylthiazol-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and AlamarBlue(®) (AB) assays on control surface (cell-culture plate) and on the restorative materials (n=3×20 specimens/material). SEM and AFM revealed typical morphology and roughness features for the materials. Zirconia presented significantly higher Ra value. EDS confirmed typical elements on the investigated restorative materials: lithium-disilicate (Si, O); Zirconia (Zi, Y, O); CoCr (Co, Cr, W). All surfaces except CoCr exhibited significant cell proliferation according to MTT and AB assays after 72h compared to 24h. Among the restorative materials, CoCr samples showed the highest cell attachment as indicated by MTT assay. AB results showed that attachment and proliferation of human epithelial cells is supported more on lithium-disilicate. Both assays indicated the lowest value for zirconia. The results indicate that the restorative materials examined are equally suitable for subgingival restorations. Lithium-disilicate exhibited the best biocompatibility. The examined materials are indicated for use

  19. Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, N. C.

    1971-01-01

    Case studies of two siblings suffering from a gum disorder in which enlargement of the gingival mucosa is caused by a fibrosis. The disorder in the two children was felt to be an hereditary recessive trait. (CD)

  20. Human cumulative culture: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lewis G; Vale, Gill L; Laland, Kevin N; Flynn, Emma; Kendal, Rachel L

    2014-05-01

    Many animals exhibit social learning and behavioural traditions, but human culture exhibits unparalleled complexity and diversity, and is unambiguously cumulative in character. These similarities and differences have spawned a debate over whether animal traditions and human culture are reliant on homologous or analogous psychological processes. Human cumulative culture combines high-fidelity transmission of cultural knowledge with beneficial modifications to generate a 'ratcheting' in technological complexity, leading to the development of traits far more complex than one individual could invent alone. Claims have been made for cumulative culture in several species of animals, including chimpanzees, orangutans and New Caledonian crows, but these remain contentious. Whilst initial work on the topic of cumulative culture was largely theoretical, employing mathematical methods developed by population biologists, in recent years researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including psychology, biology, economics, biological anthropology, linguistics and archaeology, have turned their attention to the experimental investigation of cumulative culture. We review this literature, highlighting advances made in understanding the underlying processes of cumulative culture and emphasising areas of agreement and disagreement amongst investigators in separate fields.

  1. Gingival Cyst of Newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Aman

    2011-01-01

    Gingival cyst of newborn is an oral mucosal lesion of transient nature. Although it is very common lesion within 3 to 6 weeks of birth, it is very rare to visualize the lesion thereafter. Presented here is a case report of gingival cyst, which was visible just after 15 days of birth. Clinical diagnoses of these conditions are important in order to avoid unnecessary therapeutic procedure and provide suitable information to parents about the nature of the lesion.

  2. Ex vivo culture of human fetal gonads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Nielsen, J.E.; Perlman, S

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What are the effects of experimentally manipulating meiosis signalling by addition of retinoic acid (RA) in cultured human fetal gonads? SUMMARY ANSWER: RA-treatment accelerated meiotic entry in cultured fetal ovary samples, while addition of RA resulted in a dysgenetic gonadal...... phenotype in fetal testis cultures. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: One of the first manifestations of sex differentiation is the initiation of meiosis in fetal ovaries. In contrast, meiotic entry is actively prevented in the fetal testis at this developmental time-point. It has previously been shown that RA......-treatment mediates initiation of meiosis in human fetal ovary ex vivo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This was a controlled ex vivo study of human fetal gonads treated with RA in 'hanging-drop' tissue cultures. The applied experimental set-up preserves germ cell-somatic niche interactions and the investigated...

  3. Effection of enamel matrix proteins on proliferation and Type I collagen synthesis of human gingival mesenchymal stem cells%EMP对人牙龈间充质干细胞增殖和Ⅰ型胶原合成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常秀梅; 张克荣; 蔡洁琛; 齐香薇; 王书文

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of enamel matrix proteins on proliferation and type I colla⁃gen synthesis of human gingival mesenchymal stem cells(hGMSCs). Methods The primary gingival fi⁃broblasts were cultured and then mesenchymal stem cell surface markers STRO-1 were characterized by Immunocytochemistry.hGMSCs was cultured in concentrations of enamel matrix protein 25 mg/L (A1 group),50 mg/L (A2 group),100 mg/L (A3 group),200 mg/L (groupA4),control group (group A0) DMEM solution of 2%FCS training,The cell proliferation was detected by MTT. Immunocytochemistry and image analysis of type I collagen synthesis. Results 50-200mg/L showed hGMSCs proliferation promoting effect,50 mg/L EMPs that can significantly promote the growth of hGMSCs,but to promote proliferation of the strongest 100 mg/L EMPs.(Compared with other groups,P<0.01) in experimental group was better than control group,collagen synthesis.Among them,the most obvious 100mg/L pro⁃mote the synthesis of collagen type I,and changing with time. Conclusion The enamel matrix protein can promote the proliferation of hGMSCs and type I collagen synthesis.%目的:观察釉基质蛋白(enamel matrix proteins,EMPs)对牙龈间充质干细胞(human gingival mesenchymal stem cells,hGMSCs)增殖和Ⅰ型胶原合成的影响。方法:分离培养人牙龈成纤维细胞,免疫细胞化学方法检测其间充质干细胞特性STRO-1的表达,不同浓度EMPs,25 mg/L(A1组)、50 mg/L(A2组)、100 mg/L(A3组)、200 mg/L(A4组),对照组(A0组)10%FCS的DMEM溶液培养,MTT检测EMPs对细胞增殖活性的影响。免疫细胞化学方法鉴定细胞Ⅰ型胶原合成和图像分析。结果:50~200mg/L表现出促hGMSCs增殖的作用,50 mg/L EMPs即可以显著促进hGMSCs的生长,但以100 mg/L EMPs的促增殖作用最强(与其余各组相比P<0.01),实验组胶原合成明显强于对照组。其中,100mg/L促 I型胶原(collagen typeⅠ,COLⅠ—合成

  4. Increased Eotaxin and MCP-1 Levels in Serum from Individuals with Periodontitis and in Human Gingival Fibroblasts Exposed to Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulniute, Rima; Palmqvist, Py; Majster, Mirjam; Holm, Cecilia Koskinen; Zwicker, Stephanie; Clark, Reuben; Önell, Sebastian; Johansson, Ingegerd; Lerner, Ulf H.; Lundberg, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of tooth supporting tissues resulting in periodontal tissue destruction, which may ultimately lead to tooth loss. The disease is characterized by continuous leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated by local chemokine production but the pathogenic mechanisms are not fully elucidated. There are no reliable serologic biomarkers for the diagnosis of periodontitis, which is today based solely on the degree of local tissue destruction, and there is no available biological treatment tool. Prompted by the increasing interest in periodontitis and systemic inflammatory mediators we mapped serum cytokine and chemokine levels from periodontitis subjects and healthy controls. We used multivariate partial least squares (PLS) modeling and identified monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and eotaxin as clearly associated with periodontitis along with C-reactive protein (CRP), years of smoking and age, whereas the number of remaining teeth was associated with being healthy. Moreover, body mass index correlated significantly with serum MCP-1 and CRP, but not with eotaxin. We detected higher MCP-1 protein levels in inflamed gingival connective tissue compared to healthy but the eotaxin levels were undetectable. Primary human gingival fibroblasts displayed strongly increased expression of MCP-1 and eotaxin mRNA and protein when challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), key mediators of periodontal inflammation. We also demonstrated that the upregulated chemokine expression was dependent on the NF-κΒ pathway. In summary, we identify higher levels of CRP, eotaxin and MCP-1 in serum of periodontitis patients. This, together with our finding that both CRP and MCP-1 correlates with BMI points towards an increased systemic inflammatory load in patients with periodontitis and high BMI. Targeting eotaxin and MCP-1 in periodontitis may result in reduced leukocyte infiltration and inflammation in

  5. Pitanga (Eugenia uniflora L.) fruit juice and two major constituents thereof exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in human gingival and oral gum epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josino Soares, Denise; Walker, Jessica; Pignitter, Marc; Walker, Joel Michael; Imboeck, Julia Maria; Ehrnhoefer-Ressler, Miriam Margit; Montenegro Brasil, Isabella; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-11-01

    Pitanga, Eugenia uniflora L., is a tropical fruit, which may be consumed as juice. While beneficial health effects of Eugenia uniflora L. leaf extracts have extensively been studied, limited data are available on an anti-inflammatory potential of pitanga juice. The aim of the presented study was to investigate anti-inflammatory properties of pitanga juice with regards to a prevention of inflammation-related periodontal diseases. For this purpose, six healthy volunteers swirled pitanga juice, containing 35% pitanga pulp, for 10 min. Thereafter, oral gum epithelial cells were harvested using a sterile brush and stimulated with lipopolysaccharides from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG-LPS) for 6 h. Furthermore, human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1) were used to elucidate the anti-inflammatory potential of pitanga juice constituents, cyanidin-3-glucoside and oxidoselina-1,3,7(11)-trien-8-one, in juice representative concentrations of 119 μg ml(-1) and 30 μg ml(-1), respectively. For the first time, an anti-inflammatory impact of pitanga juice on gingival epithelial cells was shown by means of an attenuation of IL-8 release by 55 ± 8.2% and 52 ± 11% in non-stimulated and PG-LPS-stimulated cells, respectively. In addition, both cyanidin-3-glucoside and oxidoselina-1,3,7(11)-trien-8-one reduced the LPS-stimulated CXCL8 mRNA expression by 50 ± 15% and 37 ± 18% and IL-8 release by 52 ± 9.9% and 45 ± 3.7% in HGF-1 cells, when concomitantly incubated with 10 μg ml(-1)PG-LPS for 6 h, revealing an anti-inflammatory potential of the volatile compound oxidoselina-1,3,7(11)-trien-8-one for the first time.

  6. Increased Eotaxin and MCP-1 Levels in Serum from Individuals with Periodontitis and in Human Gingival Fibroblasts Exposed to Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Elisabeth A; Kindstedt, Elin; Sulniute, Rima; Palmqvist, Py; Majster, Mirjam; Holm, Cecilia Koskinen; Zwicker, Stephanie; Clark, Reuben; Önell, Sebastian; Johansson, Ingegerd; Lerner, Ulf H; Lundberg, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of tooth supporting tissues resulting in periodontal tissue destruction, which may ultimately lead to tooth loss. The disease is characterized by continuous leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated by local chemokine production but the pathogenic mechanisms are not fully elucidated. There are no reliable serologic biomarkers for the diagnosis of periodontitis, which is today based solely on the degree of local tissue destruction, and there is no available biological treatment tool. Prompted by the increasing interest in periodontitis and systemic inflammatory mediators we mapped serum cytokine and chemokine levels from periodontitis subjects and healthy controls. We used multivariate partial least squares (PLS) modeling and identified monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and eotaxin as clearly associated with periodontitis along with C-reactive protein (CRP), years of smoking and age, whereas the number of remaining teeth was associated with being healthy. Moreover, body mass index correlated significantly with serum MCP-1 and CRP, but not with eotaxin. We detected higher MCP-1 protein levels in inflamed gingival connective tissue compared to healthy but the eotaxin levels were undetectable. Primary human gingival fibroblasts displayed strongly increased expression of MCP-1 and eotaxin mRNA and protein when challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), key mediators of periodontal inflammation. We also demonstrated that the upregulated chemokine expression was dependent on the NF-κΒ pathway. In summary, we identify higher levels of CRP, eotaxin and MCP-1 in serum of periodontitis patients. This, together with our finding that both CRP and MCP-1 correlates with BMI points towards an increased systemic inflammatory load in patients with periodontitis and high BMI. Targeting eotaxin and MCP-1 in periodontitis may result in reduced leukocyte infiltration and inflammation in

  7. microRNA-142 is upregulated by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and triggers apoptosis in human gingival epithelial cells by repressing BACH2 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Song, Zhongchen; Dong, Jiachen; Shu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been shown to cause apoptosis of gingival epithelial cells (GECs) in periodontitis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we showed that miR-142 expression was significantly elevated in human GECs after exposure to TNF-α. Such induction was in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Serum miR-142 levels were positively correlated with serum TNF-α levels in patients with chronic periodontitis (r = 0.314, P = 0.0152). Depletion of miR-142 was found to attenuate TNF-α-induced apoptosis, as determined by TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activity assays. In contrast, overexpression of miR-142 significantly reduced viability and induced apoptosis in GECs. Basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 (BACH2) was identified to be a functional target of miR-142. Overexpression of miR-142 caused a 3-fold reduction of BACH2 protein in primary GECs. Overexpression of BACH2 significantly reversed miR-142- or TNF-α-induced apoptosis of GECs. Similar to the findings with miR-142 mimic, depletion of BACH2 significantly promoted apoptosis in GECs, which was accompanied by decreased expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and increased expression of Bax and Bim. Overall, miR-142 mediates TNF-α-induced apoptosis in gingival epithelial cells by targeting BACH2 and may represent a potential therapeutic target for periodontitis. PMID:28123644

  8. Culture, Urbanism and Changing Human Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Schell, L M

    2014-01-01

    Anthropologists have long known that human activity driven by culture changes the environment. This is apparent in the archaeological record and through the study of the modern environment. Perhaps the largest change since the paleolithic era is the organization of human populations in cities. New environments can reshape human biology through evolution as shown by the evolution of the hominid lineage. Evolution is not the only process capable of reshaping our biology. Some changes in our hum...

  9. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced periodontal inflammation is associated with the up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin synthase 1 in human gingival epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahama, Yu [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University Dental Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Biological Chemistry, Showa University School of Pharmacy, Tokyo (Japan); Obama, Takashi [Department of Biological Chemistry, Showa University School of Pharmacy, Tokyo (Japan); Usui, Michihiko [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University Dental Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kanazawa, Yukari [Department of Biological Chemistry, Showa University School of Pharmacy, Tokyo (Japan); Iwamoto, Sanju [Department of Biochemistry, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Kazushige [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University Dental Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Miyazaki, Akira [Department of Biochemistry, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, Tomohiro [Department of Biological Chemistry, Showa University School of Pharmacy, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Matsuo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University Dental Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Itabe, Hiroyuki, E-mail: h-itabe@pharm.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Chemistry, Showa University School of Pharmacy, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} OxLDL-induced responses in human gingival epithelial cells were studied. {yields} OxLDL enhanced the production of IL-8, IL-1{beta} and PGE{sub 2} in Ca9-22 cells. {yields} An NF-{kappa}B inhibitor suppressed the expression of COX-2 and mPGES1 induced by oxLDL. {yields} Unlike the case in macrophages, oxLDL did not increase the CD36 level. -- Abstract: Periodontitis is characterized by chronic gingival tissue inflammation, and inflammatory mediators such as IL-8 and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) are associated with disease progression. Previously we showed that oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) was present in gingival crevicular fluid. In this study, the role of oxLDL in the gingival epithelial cell inflammatory response was further investigated using Ca9-22 cells and primary human oral keratinocytes (HOK). Treatment of Ca9-22 cells and HOK with oxLDL induced an up-regulation of IL-8 and the PGE{sub 2}-producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthase-1. These responses induced by oxLDL were significantly suppressed by a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) inhibitor. However, unlike the result in macrophages, oxLDL did not lead to an increase in CD36 expression in these two cells. These results suggest that oxLDL elicits gingival epithelial cell inflammatory responses through an activation of the NF-{kappa}B pathway. These data suggest a mechanistic link between periodontal disease and lipid metabolism-related disorders, including atherosclerosis.

  10. A comparative study on EDTA and coronaliy advanced flap technique in the treatment of human gingival recessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshkhoo Nejad AA

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Treatment of gingival recession defect and covering denuded root surfaces is one of the goals in periodontal therapy and several surgical techniques have been suggested in this field."nPurpose: The aim of this study was to perform a comparison on coronaliy repositioned flap procedure with and without the use of ethylenediaminoteraacetic acid (EDTA. 24%, pH=7 in the treatment of"nrecession defects."nMaterial and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial study, 16 patients, aged 17-60 years, with a total of 27 miller class 1 isolated buccal gingival recession type defects of at least 2mm depth, and based"non special criteria were investigated. After initial therapy, surgical recession coverage was performed as coronaliy advanced flap technique and EDTA gel conditioning (test or coronaliy advanced flap alone"n(control. Clinical examination including assessments of oral hygiene, recession depth (RD, recession width (RW, width of keratinized tissue (KT, probing depth (PD and probing attachment level (PAL"nwere performed before and 1, 2, 3 months after surgical treatment."nResults: The mean of initial RD, RW, KT, PT and PAL in the test group was 2.73, 3.17, 3.13, 1.1 and 3.83mm respectively and in the control group was 2.56, 3.03, 3.67, 1.25, 3.92mm respectively. The mean of these parameters 3 months after treatment in the test group were changed to 0.46, 1.97, 2.65, 0.67, 1.1 mm, corresponding figures for control teeth were 0.85, 2.98, 2.75, 1, 1.94, respectively. At 3 months after treatment the mean root coverage amounted to 83% (test and 67% (control which was a statistically significant difference (P=0.0067. Although a significant clinical difference was observed regarinding root coverage level, all other clinical variables were not statistically different, with the exception of probing attachment level (P=0.005."nConclusion: It was suggested that EDTA gel (24%, PLT=7 for 3 minutes as root conditioner and the coronaliy

  11. From cultural traditions to cumulative culture: parameterizing the differences between human and nonhuman culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Marius; Lycett, Stephen J; Mesoudi, Alex

    2014-10-21

    Diverse species exhibit cultural traditions, i.e. population-specific profiles of socially learned traits, from songbird dialects to primate tool-use behaviours. However, only humans appear to possess cumulative culture, in which cultural traits increase in complexity over successive generations. Theoretically, it is currently unclear what factors give rise to these phenomena, and consequently why cultural traditions are found in several species but cumulative culture in only one. Here, we address this by constructing and analysing cultural evolutionary models of both phenomena that replicate empirically attestable levels of cultural variation and complexity in chimpanzees and humans. In our model of cultural traditions (Model 1), we find that realistic cultural variation between populations can be maintained even when individuals in different populations invent the same traits and migration between populations is frequent, and under a range of levels of social learning accuracy. This lends support to claims that putative cultural traditions are indeed cultural (rather than genetic) in origin, and suggests that cultural traditions should be widespread in species capable of social learning. Our model of cumulative culture (Model 2) indicates that both the accuracy of social learning and the number of cultural demonstrators interact to determine the complexity of a trait that can be maintained in a population. Combining these models (Model 3) creates two qualitatively distinct regimes in which there are either a few, simple traits, or many, complex traits. We suggest that these regimes correspond to nonhuman and human cultures, respectively. The rarity of cumulative culture in nature may result from this interaction between social learning accuracy and number of demonstrators.

  12. Analysis of proliferative activity in oral gingival epithelium in immunosuppressive medication induced gingival overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özdemir B Handan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is a frequent adverse effect associated principally with administration of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A and also certain antiepileptic and antihypertensive drugs. It is characterized by a marked increase in the thickness of the epithelial layer and accumulation of excessive amounts of connective tissue. The mechanism by which the drugs cause gingival overgrowth is not yet understood. The purpose of this study was to compare proliferative activity of normal human gingiva and in cyclosporine A-induced gingival overgrowth. Methods Gingival samples were collected from 12 generally healthy individuals and 22 Cyclosporin A-medicated renal transplant recipients. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen was evaluated in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gingival samples using an immunoperoxidase technique and a monoclonal antibody for this antigen. Results There were differences between the Cyclosporin A group and control group in regard to proliferating cell nuclear antigen and epithelial thickness. In addition, the degree of stromal inflammation was higher in the Cyclosporin A group when compared with the control group. Conclusion The results suggest that the increased epithelial thickness observed in Cyclosporin A-induced gingival overgrowth is associated with increased proliferative activity in keratinocytes.

  13. Amlodipine induced gingival enlargement

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    Shankar Gittaboyina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced gingival overgrowth or enlargement is an abnormal growth of the gingiva due to an adverse drug reaction in patients treated with anticonvulsants, immunosuppressants, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs. CCBs are considered as one of the etiologic factors among patients seeking dental care for drug-induced gingival enlargement or overgrowth. This enlargement can be localized or generalized and can range from mild to extremely severe, affecting patient's appearance, and function. CCBs are one of the most commonly used drugs for the management of cardiovascular disorders and are known for causing gingival over growth. Amlodipine is a new CCB and has been used with increasing frequency in the management of hypertension and angina. Although amlodipine is considered as a safe drug, very rarely it may induce gingival overgrowth. A rare case of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth has been reported herein a 45-year-old female patient. The treatment aspect included scaling and root planing, substitution of the drug, the surgical excision, and the maintenance and supportive therapy resulting in an excellent clinical outcome.

  14. Biocompatibility of three bioabsorbable membranes assessed in FGH fibroblasts and human osteoblast like cells culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Michelle Pereira Costa Mundim; Soares, Paulo Vinícius; Pereira, Analice Giovani; Moura, Camilla Christian Gomes; Soares, Priscila Barbosa Ferreira; Naves, Lucas Zago; de Magalhães, Denildo

    2014-08-06

    Specific physical and chemical features of the membranes may influence the healing of periodontal tissues after guided tissue regeneration (GTR). The aim of the present investigation was to analyze the biological effects of three bioabsorbable membranes. The hypothesis is that all tested membranes present similar biological effects. Human osteoblast like-cells (SaOs-2) and gingival fibroblasts FGH (BCRJ -RJ) were cultured in DMEM medium. The viability of the cells cultured on the membranes was assesses using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). Quantitative determination of activated human Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) on the supernatants of the cell culture was observed. Samples were examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM). SaOs2, in 24 hours, PLA group showed higher values when compared to other groups (P statistical significance values when compared two times. In 4 h and 24 h, for the fibroblasts group, significantly difference was found to PLA membrane, when compared with the other groups (p statistically significant difference (p analysis of culture supernatants of fibroblasts, in 24 hours, only PLA group presented significant difference (p = 0,008). The biomaterials analyzed did not show cytotoxicity, since no membrane presented lower results than the control group. PLA membrane presented the best performance due to its higher cell viability and absorbance levels of proliferation. Both collagen membranes showed similar results either when compared to each other or to the control group.

  15. Gingival Recessions and Biomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Morten Godtfredsen

    Gingival recessions and biomechanics “Tissue is the issue, but bone sets the tone.“ A tooth outside the cortical plate can result in loss of bone and development of a gingival recession. The presentation aims to show biomechanical considerations in relation to movement of teeth with gingival...... by moving the root back in the alveolus. The tooth movement is accompanied by bone gain and thus increase the success rate for soft tissue augmentation. The choice of biomechanical system influences the treatment outcome. If a standard straight wire appliance is used, a biomechanical dilemma can arise....... The forces applied to bring the tooth back into the alveolar process generate opposite reactive forces, which can direct the adjacent teeth out towards the boundary of the bony envelope. A different force system can be achieved with a segmented appliance: The reaction forces from the root movement...

  16. Cultural Development through Human Resource Systems Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the framework for developing a cultural human resources management (HRM) perspective. Central to this framework is modifying HRM programs to reinforce the organization's preferred practices. Modification occurs through selection, orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, career development, and compensation and…

  17. Human rights: eye for cultural diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Donders

    2012-01-01

    The relationship and interaction between international human rights law and cultural diversity is a current topic, as is shown by the recent debates in The Netherlands on, for instance, the proposed ban on wearing facial coverage, or burqas, and the proposed ban on ritual slaughter without anaesthes

  18. Cultural Development through Human Resource Systems Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the framework for developing a cultural human resources management (HRM) perspective. Central to this framework is modifying HRM programs to reinforce the organization's preferred practices. Modification occurs through selection, orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, career development, and compensation and…

  19. DESQUAMATIVE GINGIVITIS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem KARAGÖZ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Desquamative gingivitis (DG is characterized by the erythematous gingiva, desquamation and erosion of the gingival epithelium, and blister formation. It is a common clinical manifestation in several diseases. Contact allergic reactions to various oral hygiene products and chemical agents have also been reported to represent as DG. The management of DG has been a major problem, largely because the etiology of the disease has been elusive. In this paper, we aimed to review the current literature on the pathogenesis, diagnosis management and prognosis of DG.

  20. Effects of bFGF on the Modulation of Apoptosis in Gingival Fibroblasts with Different Host Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Tanimoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF treatment on the proliferation and apoptosis of cultured gingival fibroblasts (GFs. Human GFs were isolated from the palatal gingival tissues of 16 healthy volunteers ranging in the age from 9 to 35 years old. Cultured GFs were subjected to the analyses for cell proliferation by ELISA assay, gene expression by RT-PCR analysis, and apoptosis potency by caspase-3 assay. The cell proliferation activity and gene expression of type-I collagen and caspase-3 activity were enhanced significantly by the treatment with bFGF in cultured GFs. Furthermore, the activity of caspase-3 in cultured GFs from young subjects was significantly higher than that in GFs from adults. It is shown that bFGF significantly enhances the gene expression of type-I collagen in cultured fibroblasts from human gingival tissues. It also demonstrated that bFGF modulates the apoptosis of periodontal fibroblasts, and the effect is higher in young subjects, indicating a significant role of bFGF in the prevention of scar formation during wound healing.

  1. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  2. Evaluation of Wound Closure Activity of Nigella sativa, Melastoma malabathricum, Pluchea indica, and Piper sarmentosum Extracts on Scratched Monolayer of Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mas Rizal Ab Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa, Melastoma malabathricum, Pluchea indica, and Piper sarmentosum are common Asian traditional medicines to treat minor wounds. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro wound healing properties of aqueous extracts of these plants using human gingival fibroblast (HGF monolayer as study model. DPPH scavenging activity of the extracts was evaluated and effect on HGF proliferation was determined. Their effect on HGF’s function to synthesize collagen was indicated by the level of hydroxyproline produced and effect on wound healing activity was assessed using an in vitro scratch assay. The influence of the extracts on expression of bFGF and TGF-β was also determined. Results revealed all four extracts to exhibit low free radical scavenging activity. The extract from N. sativa (NSSE compared to the others showed favourable enhancement of HGF proliferation with EC50 of 22.67±3.06 µg/mL (P<0.05 with accelerated wound closure activity despite its nonsignificant effect on collagen synthesis. In addition to the elevated level of bFGF by up to 15% at 100 µg/mL of NSSE, a slightly better effect was observed on the expression of TGF-β. NSSE thus showed that promising wound healing properties and data obtained may contribute towards validation of its traditional use for the healing of oral wounds.

  3. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  4. Gender, human rights and cultural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Marianne C

    2011-01-01

    The three issues of gender equality, human rights and cultural diversity have dominated my organizational commitments, research, and clinical practice in transcultural psychiatry. These issues are intertwined in many ways and have broad implications for transcultural psychiatry. With increasing...... and the elucidation of their symptom manifestations, as well as effective therapeutic interventions, which clearly show how human rights issues are linked to research and clinical psychiatry. The analyses of how different ethnic groups use psychiatric services, epitomize how important it is to pay attention to gender...

  5. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  6. Increased cell proliferation and differential protein expression induced by low-level Er:YAG laser irradiation in human gingival fibroblasts: proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Mayumi; Tsuchida, Sachio; Aoki, Akira; Satoh, Mamoru; Kado, Sayaka; Sawabe, Masanori; Nanbara, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Mizutani, Koji; Sasaki, Yoshiyuki; Nomura, Fumio; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-09-01

    Erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser treatment has demonstrated favorable wound healing effect after periodontal therapy. One of the reasons may be the positive biological effect of the low-level laser on the irradiated tissues, although the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level Er:YAG laser irradiation on cell proliferation and laser-induced differential expression of proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) by proteomic analysis. In the first experiment, HGFs were exposed to low-level Er:YAG laser irradiation and the laser-induced cell proliferation and damage were evaluated on day 3. In the second experiment, proteomic analysis was performed on day 1 after irradiation. The peptides prepared from HGFs were analyzed by a hybrid ion trap-Fourier transform mass spectrometer, Mascot search engine, and UniProtKB database. A significant increase in cell proliferation without cell damage after irradiation was observed. Among the total identified 377 proteins, 59 proteins, including galectin-7, which was associated with the process of wound healing, were upregulated and 15 proteins were downregulated in laser-treated HGFs. In the third experiment, the increase in messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of galectin-7 in the irradiated HGFs was validated by various analytical techniques. In addition, the effect of recombinant human galectin-7 on the modulation of HGFs proliferation was confirmed. The results indicate that low-level Er:YAG laser irradiation can promote HGF proliferation and induce a significant change in protein expression and the upregulation of galectin-7 expression may partly contribute to the increase in cell proliferation.

  7. CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavian Clipa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available When the multinational firms employ human resources from different countries they have to submit to the restrictions concerning cultural differences. The paper is an attempt to show how the human resource management administrates these cultural differences.

  8. Treatment of gingival recession using free gingival graft with fibrin fibronectin sealing system: A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B V V; Rupa, N; Halini Kumari, K V; Rajender, A; Reddy, M Narendra

    2015-08-01

    Periodontal plastic surgery is the branch of periodontology that is focused mainly on the correction or elimination of mucogingival problems associated with lack of attached gingiva, a shallow vestibule and aberrant frenum. Various mucogingival surgical procedures are used to halt the progression of the gingival recession and to correct poor esthetic appearance. Free gingival autograft is one of the most common techniques used for a gingival recession in areas of inadequate attached gingiva in the mandibular anterior region. Fibrin sealants are human plasma derivatives that mimic the final stages of blood coagulation, forming a fibrin clot. Fibrin Sealants enhances the overall outcome of surgical intervention because of their hemostatic, adhesive, and healing properties. These properties of fibrin sealants may reduce operating time, prevent complications, and enhance the overall outcome of many surgical interventions. Hence, this case report aims to investigate the clinical effectiveness of free gingival graft along with the commercially available fibrin-fibronectin sealing system (Tissucol(®)) in the treatment of Miller's class II gingival recession.

  9. Do cultural diversity and human rights make a good match?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The link between cultural diversity and human rights was clearly established by the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity, adopted by the member states of UNESCO in 2001, which holds that "the defence of cultural diversity is … inseparable from respect for human dignity" and that it "implies a commitment to human rights and fundamental freedoms." The UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, adopted in 2005, states that "cultural diversity can be protected and promoted only if human rights and fundamental freedoms … are guaranteed" (Article 2[1]). The precise relationship between cultural diversity and human rights, however, is not clarified and thus leaves room for further exploration. This contribution analyses the issues surrounding the relationship between cultural diversity and human rights, in particular cultural rights. Firstly, it addresses general human rights issues such as universality and cultural relativism and the principles of equality and non-discrimination. Secondly, it explores the scope of cultural rights, as well as the cultural dimension of human rights. Thirdly, several cases are discussed in which human rights were invoked to protect cultural interests, confirming the value of cultural diversity. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented, indicating which areas require attention in order to further improve the promotion and protection of human rights in relation to cultural diversity.

  10. Worldwide genetic and cultural change in human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanza, Nicole; Feldman, Marcus W

    2016-12-01

    Both genetic variation and certain culturally transmitted phenotypes show geographic signatures of human demographic history. As a result of the human cultural predisposition to migrate to new areas, humans have adapted to a large number of different environments. Migration to new environments alters genetic selection pressures, and comparative genetic studies have pinpointed numerous likely targets of this selection. However, humans also exhibit many cultural adaptations to new environments, such as practices related to clothing, shelter, and food. Human culture interacts with genes and the environment in complex ways, and studying genes and culture together can deepen our understanding of human evolution.

  11. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitkumar B Pandav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor is a tumor-like lesion that manifests primarily in the lungs. But it may occur in various other anatomic locations like orbit, head and neck, liver and rarely in the oral cavity. We here report an exceedingly rare case of gingival plasma cell granuloma in a 58 year old woman who presented with upper gingival polypoidal growth. The histopathological examination revealed a mass composed of proliferation of benign spindle mesenchymal cells in a loose myxoid and fibrocollagenous stroma along with dense infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells predominantly containing plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  12. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Rath

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a case report of a 14-year-old female patient with idiopathic gingival fibromatosis in the maxillary region with radiographic feature of congenitally missing maxillary permanent left lateral incisor, maxillary left and right permanent canine, mandibular right second premolar, all third molars along with overretained primary maxillary left lateral incisor and primary mandibular second molar. The treatment rendered in this patient comprised of surgical excision of the hyperplasia under general anesthesia.

  13. A Culture Of Health And Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariner, Wendy K; Annas, George J

    2016-11-01

    A culture of health can be seen as a social norm that values health as the nation's priority or as an appeal to improve the social determinants of health. Better population health will require changing social and economic policies. Effective changes are unlikely unless health advocates can leverage a framework broader than health to mobilize political action in collaboration with non-health sector advocates. We suggest that human rights-the dominant international source of norms for government responsibilities-provides this broader framework. Human rights, as expressed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and enforceable treaties, require governments to assure their populations nondiscriminatory access to food, water, education, work, social security, and a standard of living adequate for health and well-being. The policies needed to realize human rights also improve population health, well-being, and equity. Aspirations for human rights are strong enough to endure beyond inevitable setbacks to specific causes. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  14. Euthanasia: reconciling culture and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolam, N M

    1996-01-01

    The constitutional justifiability of euthanasia will depend upon interpretation of the right to life and the right to respect for and protection of one's dignity. Pertinent issues arising hereto are: In our new value-based constitutional interpretation, what are the values underlying our multi-cultural society? Issues of death and dying are inter-linked to a civilization's world view and its approach to human dignity. Western, African and Islamic approaches will be compared. Does euthanasia negate the essential content of the right to life and is its limitation on such right reasonable/justifiable in an open and democratic society based on freedom and equality.

  15. Engineered collagen hydrogels for the sustained release of biomolecules and imaging agents: promoting the growth of human gingival cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghoon; Park, Hoyoung; Kim, Taeho; Jeong, Yoon; Oh, Myoung Hwan; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Gilad, Assaf A; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2014-01-01

    We present here the in vitro release profiles of either fluorescently labeled biomolecules or computed tomography contrast nanoagents from engineered collagen hydrogels under physiological conditions. The collagen constructs were designed as potential biocompatible inserts into wounded human gingiva. The collagen hydrogels were fabricated under a variety of conditions in order to optimize the release profile of biomolecules and nanoparticles for the desired duration and amount. The collagen constructs containing biomolecules/nanoconstructs were incubated under physiological conditions (ie, 37°C and 5% CO2) for 24 hours, and the release profile was tuned from 20% to 70% of initially loaded materials by varying the gelation conditions of the collagen constructs. The amounts of released biomolecules and nanoparticles were quantified respectively by measuring the intensity of fluorescence and X-ray scattering. The collagen hydrogel we fabricated may serve as an efficient platform for the controlled release of biomolecules and imaging agents in human gingiva to facilitate the regeneration of oral tissues.

  16. Interleukin-8 responses of multi-layer gingival epithelia to subgingival biofilms: role of the "red complex" species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios N Belibasakis

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal tissues. The Gram-negative anaerobic species Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, (also known as the "red complex" species are highly associated with subgingival biofilms at periodontitis-affected sites. A major chemokine produced by the gingival epithelium in response to biofilm challenge, is interleukin (IL-8. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the relative effect of the "red complex" species as constituents of subgingival biofilms, on the regulation of IL-8 by gingival epithelia. Multi-layered organotypic human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its 7-species variant, excluding the "red complex". IL-8 gene expression and secretion analyses were performed by qPCR and ELISA, respectively. After 3 h, both biofilms up-regulated IL-8 gene expression, but the presence of the "red complex" resulted in 3-fold greater response. IL-8 secretion was also up-regulated by both biofilms, with no differences between them. After 24 h, the 10-species biofilm reduced IL-8 secretion to 50% of the control, but this was not affected when the "red complex" was absent. In conclusion, as part of biofilms, "red complex" species differentially regulate IL-8 in gingival epithelia, potentially affecting the chemotactic responses of the tissue.

  17. Comparative analysis of gingival phenotype in animal and human experimental models using optical coherence tomography in a non-invasive approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Fernandes, Luana O.; Melo, Luciana S. A.; Feitosa, Daniela S.; Cimões, Renata; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2015-06-01

    Imaging methods are widely used in diagnostic and among the diversity of modalities, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is nowadays commercially available and considered the most innovative technique used for imaging applications, in both medical and non-medical applications. In this study, we exploit the OCT technique in the oral cavity for identification and differentiation between free and attached gingiva, as well as determining the gingival phenotype, an important factor to determination of periodontal prognosis in patients. For the animal studies, five porcine jaws were analyzed using a Swept Source SS-OCT system operating at 1325nm and stereomicroscope, as gold pattern. The SSOCT at 1325nm was chosen due to the longer central wavelength, that allows to deeper penetration imaging, and the faster image acquisition, an essential factor for clinical setting. For the patient studies, a total of 30 males and female were examined using the SS-OCT at 1325nm and computer controlled periodontal probing. 2D and 3D images of tooth/gingiva interface were performed, and quantitative measurements of the gingival sulcus could be noninvasively obtained. Through the image analysis of the animals jaws, it was possible to quantify the free gingiva and the attached gingiva, the calculus deposition over teeth surface and also the subgingival calculus. For the patient's studies, we demonstrated that the gingival phenotype could be measured without the periodontal probe introduction at the gingival sulcus, confirming that OCT can be potentially useful in clinic for direct observation and quantification of gingival phenotype in a non-invasive approach.

  18. The human nature of culture and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevarthen, Colwyn; Gratier, Maya; Osborne, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Human cultures educate children with different strategies. Ancient hunter-gatherers 200,000 years ago, with bodies and brains like our own, in bands of a hundred well-known individuals or less, depended on spontaneous cooperative practice of knowledge and skills in a natural world. Before creating language, they appreciated beautiful objects and music. Anthropologists observe that similar living cultures accept that children learn in playful 'intent participation'. Large modern industrial states with millions of citizens competing in a global economy aim to instruct young people in scientific concepts and the rules of literacy and numeracy deemed important for employment with elaborate machines. Our psychobiological theories commonly assume that an infant starts with a body needing care and emotional regulation and a mind that assimilates concepts of objects by sensorimotor action and requires school instruction in rational principles after several years of cognitive development. Evidence from archeology and evolutionary anthropology indicates that Homo sapiens are born with an imaginative and convivial brain ready for the pleasure of shared invention and with a natural sense of beauty in handmade objects and music. In short, there are innate predispositions for culture for practicing meaningful habits and artful performances that are playfully inventive and seductive for companionship in traditions, and soon capable of grasping the clever purpose of shared tasks and tools. This knowledge of inventive human nature with esthetic and moral sensibilities has important implications for educational policy in our schools. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:173-192. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1276 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  19. LACK OF ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HERPESVIRUS DETECTION IN SALIVA AND GINGIVITIS IN HIV‑INFECTED CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    OTERO, Renata A.; Flávia N.N. NASCIMENTO; SOUZA,Ivete P.R.; SILVA,Raquel C.; LIMA,Rodrigo S.; ROBAINA,Tatiana F.; CÂMARA, Fernando P.; Santos, Norma; CASTRO,Gloria F.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the detection of human herpesviruses (HHVs) in the saliva of HIV-infected and healthy control children, and to evaluate associations between viral infection and gingivitis and immunodeficiency. Saliva samples were collected from 48 HIV-infected and 48 healthy control children. Clinical and laboratory data were collected during dental visits and from medical records. A trained dentist determined gingival indices and extension of gingivitis. Saliva samples...

  20. The Role of Cultural Exchange in Human Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    Cultural exchanges are an important part of oursocial activities and have a great effect on theprogress and development of human society.In the process of human social development differ-ent nationalities created their own unique cultures.Be-cause of the development of different cultures in differ-ent countries,cultural exchanges become an attractiveproposition.Cultural exchanges have a positive and salubriouseffect on all nationalities,encouraging social develop-ment,economic prosperity and scientific and techno-logical progress.During cultural exchanges differentcountries in the world learn from each other,helpingthe different cultures develop and mature.

  1. Integration of culture and biology in human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    The challenge of integrating biology and culture is addressed in this chapter by emphasizing human development as involving mutually constitutive, embodied, and epigenetic processes. Heuristically rich constructs extrapolated from cultural psychology and developmental science, such as embodiment, action, and activity, are presented as promising approaches to the integration of cultural and biology in human development. These theoretical notions are applied to frame the nascent field of cultural neuroscience as representing this integration of culture and biology. Current empirical research in cultural neuroscience is then synthesized to illustrate emerging trends in this body of literature that examine the integration of biology and culture.

  2. Do cultural diversity and human rights make a good match?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The link between cultural diversity and human rights was clearly established by the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity, adopted by the member states of UNESCO in 2001, which holds that "the defence of cultural diversity is … inseparable from respect for human dignity" and that it " implies

  3. Do cultural diversity and human rights make a good match?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The link between cultural diversity and human rights was clearly established by the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity, adopted by the member states of UNESCO in 2001, which holds that "the defence of cultural diversity is … inseparable from respect for human dignity" and that it " implies

  4. Gingival changes during pregnancy: III. Impact of clinical, microbiological, immunological and socio-demographic factors on gingival inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-de-Albornoz, Ana; Figuero, Elena; Herrera, David; Cuesta, Pedro; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    To identify predictor variables involved in exacerbated gingival inflammation associated with pregnancy. In this cohort study, 48 pregnant and 28 non-pregnant women without periodontitis were included. The pregnant women were evaluated in the first, second and third trimester and at 3 months postpartum, whilst the non-pregnant women were evaluated twice, with a 6-month interval. At each visit, clinical [plaque index (PlI) and gingival index (GI)], hormonal (salivary progesterone and estradiol), immunological [gingival crevicular fluid interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and prostaglandin-E(2) ] and microbiological (periodontal pathogens culture) evaluations were performed. Statistical analysis was undertaken using exhaustive chi-square automatic interaction detection (exhaustive CHAID) to analyse the predictive value of the independent outcomes to develop pregnancy GI. PlI was the strongest predictor implicated in the GI throughout pregnancy and after delivery. During the second and third trimesters the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis significantly contributed to the worsening of gingival inflammation. When compared with the non-pregnant group, significant differences were found in TNF-α amounts and concentrations and in the third trimester site-specific GI. Bacterial challenge to the gingival tissues, both quantitatively (PlI) and qualitatively (harbouring P. gingivalis) appears to affect the level of gingival inflammation observed during pregnancy. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Gingivitis ulceronecrosante aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de la Teja-Ángeles

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available La gingivitis ulcerativa necrosante, conocida por sus siglas en inglés como GUN (anteriormente se le conocía como enfermedad de Vincent o “boca de trinchera” por afectar a soldados en guerra, es una enfermedad poco frecuente.1-6 Se caracteriza por ser una infección aguda y dolorosa en la que las encías sangran, hay necrosis de las papilas interdentales y ataque al estado general.

  6. Insulin catalyzes the curcumin-induced wound healing: an in vitro model for gingival repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neetu; Ranjan, Vishal; Zaidi, Deeba; Shyam, Hari; Singh, Aparna; Lodha, Divya; Sharma, Ramesh; Verma, Umesh; Dixit, Jaya; Balapure, Anil K

    2012-01-01

    Human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) play a major role in the maintenance and repair of gingival connective tissue. The mitogen insulin with IGFs etc. synergizes in facilitating wound repair. Although curcumin (CUR) and insulin regulate apoptosis, their impact as a combination on hGF in wound repair remains unknown. Our study consists of: 1) analysis of insulin-mediated mitogenesis on CUR-treated hGF cells, and 2) development of an in vitro model of wound healing. Apoptotic rate in CUR-treated hGF cells with and without insulin was observed by AnnexinV/PI staining, nuclear morphological analysis, FACS and DNA fragmentation studies. Using hGF confluent cultures, wounds were mechanically created in vitro and incubated with the ligands for 48 h in 0.2% fetal bovine serum DMEM. CUR alone showed dose-dependent (1-50 μM) effects on hGF. Insulin (1 μg/ml) supplementation substantially enhanced cell survival through up-regulation of mitogenesis/anti-apoptotic elements. The in vitro model for gingival wound healing establishes that insulin significantly enhanced wound filling faster than CUR-treated hGF cells over 48 h. This reinforces the pivotal role of insulin in supporting CUR-mediated wound repair. The findings have significant bearing in metabolic dysfunctions, e.g. diabetes, atherosclerosis, etc., especially under Indian situations.

  7. Interleukin-4 inhibition of interleukin-1-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3 is independent of lipoxygenase and PPARγ activation in human gingival fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorski Grzegorz

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin 4 (IL-4 has been shown to suppress interleukin-1 (IL-1 induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3 in human synovial and gingival fibroblasts, but the mechanism of suppression has not been determined. Activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ have been shown to inhibit cytokine induced expression of MMPs in other cell types, and IL-4 has been shown to activate PPARγ by stimulating production of ligands through the lipoxygenase pathway. It has been suggested that PPARγ may inhibit expression of MMPs by competing with transcription factor AP-1 for binding to a putative composite binding element in the promoters. The objective of this study was to determine whether the suppressive effects of IL-4 on the IL-1 induced expression of MMP-3 involve activation of lipoxygenase and/or PPARγ. Results Western blotting revealed the presence of PPARγ in nuclear extract of HGF. IL-1 induced binding of nuclear extract to the putative composite PPRE/AP-1 site was diminished in the presence of pioglitazone, but there was no evidence of any change in the composition of the retarded complexes, and no evidence of PPARγ binding to this site. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA, a non-selective lipoxygenase inhibitor, and MK886, a specific inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, induced MMP-3 expression synergistically with IL-1. However IL-4 was still able to inhibit MMP-3 expression in the presence of NDGA or MK886 and IL-1. Activation of PPARγ with pioglitazone not only failed to inhibit IL-1 induced expression of MMP-3 mRNA, but rather super-induced MMP-3 in the presence of IL-1. PPARγ antagonist GW9662 failed to abolish the suppressive effects of IL-4. Another PPARγ activator, 15-deoxy-Delta12,14prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2, also super-induced MMP-3 mRNA, and this was due at least in part to increased transcription. Conclusion IL-4 suppression of IL-1-induced MMP-3 expression in HGF is independent of

  8. Cultural Carrying Capacity: A Biological Approach to Human Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Garrett

    1992-01-01

    In discussing the human and cultural implications of scientific discoveries and knowledge, the biological concept of carrying capacity is explored. Maintaining that human beings are truly animals answering to principles that govern all animals, the author addresses the need for human populations to work within the context of culture and carrying…

  9. Gene–culture coevolution and the nature of human sociality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintis, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Human characteristics are the product of gene–culture coevolution, which is an evolutionary dynamic involving the interaction of genes and culture over long time periods. Gene–culture coevolution is a special case of niche construction. Gene–culture coevolution is responsible for human other-regarding preferences, a taste for fairness, the capacity to empathize and salience of morality and character virtues. PMID:21320901

  10. Predictive modeling of gingivitis severity and susceptibility via oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi; Li, Rui; Zeng, Xiaowei; He, Tao; Zhao, Helen; Chang, Alice; Bo, Cunpei; Chen, Jie; Yang, Fang; Knight, Rob; Liu, Jiquan; Davis, Catherine; Xu, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Predictive modeling of human disease based on the microbiota holds great potential yet remains challenging. Here, 50 adults underwent controlled transitions from naturally occurring gingivitis, to healthy gingivae (baseline), and to experimental gingivitis (EG). In diseased plaque microbiota, 27 bacterial genera changed in relative abundance and functional genes including 33 flagellar biosynthesis-related groups were enriched. Plaque microbiota structure exhibited a continuous gradient along the first principal component, reflecting transition from healthy to diseased states, which correlated with Mazza Gingival Index. We identified two host types with distinct gingivitis sensitivity. Our proposed microbial indices of gingivitis classified host types with 74% reliability, and, when tested on another 41-member cohort, distinguished healthy from diseased individuals with 95% accuracy. Furthermore, the state of the microbiota in naturally occurring gingivitis predicted the microbiota state and severity of subsequent EG (but not the state of the microbiota during the healthy baseline period). Because the effect of disease is greater than interpersonal variation in plaque, in contrast to the gut, plaque microbiota may provide advantages in predictive modeling of oral diseases.

  11. ASSOCIATION OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS (EBV) BUT NOT HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS (HPV) WITH GINGIVITIS AND/OR PERIODONTITIS IN TRANSPLANTED INDIVIDUALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Camila Freze; Savassi-Ribas, Flavia; Rocha, Wilker Menezes da; Almeida, Stéphanie G S; Gonçalves, Marianna T V; Guimarães, Maria Angelica A M; Cavalcanti, Silvia Maria B; Varella, Rafael B

    2016-07-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of EBV and HPV with gingivitis and/or periodontitis according to the immunologic status. To this end, 74 oral biopsies from transplanted and non-transplanted individuals with the abovementioned oral manifestations were submitted to a screening by PCR for both viruses. According to the results, EBV was strongly associated with gingivitis and/or periodontitis in transplanted individuals (p = 0.011) but not HPV (p = 0.766). EBV-HPV co-detections did not enhance the presence of tissue injury as well. Although a causal relationship was not investigated in this study, the higher frequency of these two oncoviruses in lesion tissues must be investigated in follow-up studies, especially among immunocompromised individuals.

  12. ASSOCIATION OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS (EBV) BUT NOT HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS (HPV) WITH GINGIVITIS AND/OR PERIODONTITIS IN TRANSPLANTED INDIVIDUALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAEZ, Camila Freze; SAVASSI-RIBAS, Flavia; da ROCHA, Wilker Menezes; ALMEIDA, Stéphanie G. S.; GONÇALVES, Marianna T. V.; GUIMARÃES, Maria Angelica A. M.; CAVALCANTI, Silvia Maria B.; VARELLA, Rafael B.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this study was to investigate the association of EBV and HPV with gingivitis and/or periodontitis according to the immunologic status. To this end, 74 oral biopsies from transplanted and non-transplanted individuals with the abovementioned oral manifestations were submitted to a screening by PCR for both viruses. According to the results, EBV was strongly associated with gingivitis and/or periodontitis in transplanted individuals (p = 0.011) but not HPV (p = 0.766). EBV-HPV co-detections did not enhance the presence of tissue injury as well. Although a causal relationship was not investigated in this study, the higher frequency of these two oncoviruses in lesion tissues must be investigated in follow-up studies, especially among immunocompromised individuals. PMID:27410918

  13. Assesment of gingival microcirculation in anterior teeth using laser Doppler flowmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canjau, Silvana; Miron, Mariana I.; Todea, Carmen D.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: Evaluating the health status of the gingival tissue represents an important objective in the daily practice. Inflammation changes the microcirculatory and micromorphological dynamics of human gingiva. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microcirculation in subjects with moderate gingivitis and healthy gingiva by using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Material and Methods: Recordings of the gingival microcirculation (GM) were taken from 20 healthy gingival sites and from 20 sites with moderate gingivitis. The gingival blood flows in the gingivitis group before treatment was significantly different from those in the healthy gingiva group. Signals were recorded with the aid of a laser Doppler MoorLab instrument VMS-LDF2 probe VP3 10 mm S/N 2482. Three consecutive determinations of the GM were registered for each site, as follows: before the initial therapy, at 24 hours after the initial therapy and then, 7 days after the initial therapy. The data were processed using the statistical analysis software SPSS v16.0.1. Results: The results of this preliminary study showed statistically significant differences among the GM values recorded before and after the initial therapy. Conclusions: LDF could be a useful, noninvasive, sensitive, reproducible, and harmless method for measuring gingival blood flow (gingival microcirculation) in humans.

  14. Immunohistological analysis of CD1a + langerhans cells and CD57 + natural killer cells in healthy and diseased human gingival tissue: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelin Sahaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cell interaction between dendritic cells (DC and natural killer (NK cells in the periodontal milieu is not yet fully known, although these cells are individually known to contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: Fifty subjects (25 males and 25 females were included in the study. The subjects were divided into three groups: Group A comprised 16 subjects with clinically healthy gingiva; group B 17 subjects with gingivitis; and group C 17 subjects with gingivitis; and group C 17 subjects with moderate periodontitis (PPD ≥ 5 mm and CAL ≥ 3 mm in at least six sites. Gingival samples were collected and immunohistochemical study was done using CD57 and CD1a antibody. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance (ANOVA, followed by Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison for CD1a and Tukey′s highly significant difference (HSD test for CD57. Results and Conclusion: The study showed an inverse relationship between the CD1a+ (langerhans cells and CD57+ (natural killer cells. There was a significant increase in CD57+ cells and reduction in CD1a levels as periodontal disease progressed. The significant reduction in CD1a levels in periodontal disease when compared to health could possibly be a result of NK cells down regulating it. Reduction in CD1a levels may result in a low inflammatory response subsequently resulting in tissue destruction.

  15. Human Sexual Conflict from Molecules to Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Gorelik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Coevolutionary arms races between males and females have equipped both sexes with mutually manipulative and defensive adaptations. These adaptations function to benefit individual reproductive interests at the cost of the reproductive interests of opposite-sex mates, and arise from evolutionary dynamics such as parental investment (unequal reproductive costs between the sexes and sexual selection (unequal access to opposite-sex mates. Individuals use these adaptations to hijack others' reproductive systems, psychological states, and behaviors—essentially using other individuals as extended phenotypes of themselves. Such extended phenotypic manipulation of sexual rivals and opposite-sex mates is enacted by humans with the aid of hormones, pheromones, neurotransmitters, emotions, language, mind-altering substances, social institutions, technologies, and ideologies. Furthermore, sexual conflict may be experienced at an individual level when maternal genes and paternal genes are in conflict within an organism. Sexual conflict may be physically and emotionally destructive, but may also be exciting and constructive for relationships. By extending the biological concept of sexual conflict into social and cultural domains, scholars may successfully bridge many of the interdisciplinary gaps that separate the sciences from the humanities.

  16. RISIKO PEROKOK TERHADAP KEJADIAN GINGIVITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niniek L. Pratiwi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was done inorder to understand risk increasing coverage gingivitis at smokers. A crossectional study is conducted at Tambakrejo Surabaya Community Health Center. The sample of the study are patients that visit the Dental clinic of the Community Health Center, men aged between 18-45 years old and were not yet treated for scaling before. The number of sample are 191 respondents. The data analyzed by Chisquare For Trends. The result of this study showed that the risk of gingivitis among smokers increase as the quantity of cigarettes sucked per day increase.   Key  words: Smokers;Risk factor of Gingivitis

  17. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-18

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS

  18. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phadnaik Mangesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive lesion composed of polyclonal plasma cells. It manifests primarily in the lungs, but may occur in various other anatomic locations like the oral cavity. Intraoral plasma cell granulomas involving the tongue, lip, oral mucosa and gingiva have been reported in the past. This case presents a 54-year-old female with chronic periodontitis and mandibular anterior gingival overgrowth treated by Phase I therapy (scaling and root planing and excisional biopsy. Histological examination revealed inflammatory cell infiltrate containing sheets of plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma. This case highlights the need to biopsy for unusual lesions to rule out potential neoplasms.

  19. Amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triveni M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival overgrowth represents an over-exuberant response to a variety of local and systemic conditions. Certain anticonvulsants, immuno-suppressive drugs and a number of calcium channel blockers have been shown to produce similar gingival overgrowths in certain susceptible patients. Amlodipine is a comparatively new calcium channel blocker and has been used with increasing frequency in the management of hypertension and angina. Although amlodipine is considered as a safe drug, very rarely it may induce gingival overgrowth also. A rare case of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth has been reported herein in a 50-year-old female patient. The treatment aspect included Phase-1 therapy, substitution of the drug, the surgical excision and the maintenance and supportive therapy resulting in excellent clinical outcome.

  20. Microfluidic protocol for in vitro culture of human embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, Zhenxia; Kieslinger, D.C.; Vergouw, C.; Kostelijk, H.; Lambalk, C.B.; Le Gac, S.; Zengerle, R.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro culture of pre-implantation embryos is a key-step in Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) protocols. In present work we examine the potential of microfluidic devices for pre-implantation human embryo culture, in comparison with conventional droplet-based culture (control). Donated froze

  1. A Reply to Hansen's Cultural Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    Hansen (2012b) responds to the author's (Lemberger, 2012) critique of his humanistic vision by dividing their arguments as either individual or cultural in design. In this reply, the author contends that the individual cannot be extracted from her or his culture and, therefore, what is sufficient for a humanistic counseling culture must also be…

  2. A Reply to Hansen's Cultural Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    Hansen (2012b) responds to the author's (Lemberger, 2012) critique of his humanistic vision by dividing their arguments as either individual or cultural in design. In this reply, the author contends that the individual cannot be extracted from her or his culture and, therefore, what is sufficient for a humanistic counseling culture must also be…

  3. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  4. Cultural Transformations in China and Progresses in Human Rights Cause

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JUNRU

    2011-01-01

    Human rights refer to the rights that should be enjoyed by anyone as human beings.However,human beings have not only the natural attributes,but also social attributes,including such high-level social attributes as thinking capability and culture.The role of culture on human beings can be seen in people's understandings on human rights connotation and human rights value.In fact,the different views on human rights issue of various countries worldwide are linked with their different cultures.We cannot change the differences of various countries in cultures,but we can learn about and understand the differences through cultural exchanges so as to enhance recognition on human rights issue.On the issue of human rights,we always insist on dialogue,not confrontation.Practices in the past years prove that in order to make such dialogues more effective,we must enhance cultural exchanges and mutual understandings among various countries.Here,I would like to introduce how the Chinese people deepen their understandings on human rights in the process of cultural transformation.

  5. Bir Olgu Nedeniyle Deskuamatif Gingivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Baloş, Köksal; ARPAK, Nejat

    2013-01-01

    ÖZETBu yazıda Deskuamatif gingivitis ve bu tanı konan hcsta gözden geçirilmiştir. Tedavi olarak gingivektomi işleminin etkinliği ortaya konmuştur.SUMMARYIn this article, desquamative gingivitis and an interesting a case have been reported. The effect of gingivectomy procedure has been demostrated.

  6. Foundations of Collective Cultural Rights in International Human Rights Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.; Jakubowski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Although collective cultural rights are included in international human rights law, their place and their nature and significance are not well-explored or understood. This chapter aims to classify collective cultural rights in international human rights instruments and to explore how these rights

  7. Binding of chemical carcinogens to macromolecules in cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic activation of different chemical classes of carcinogens was studied in cultured human colon epithelia. Human colon epithelia were maintained in explant culture up to 4 days. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine, and 1,2- dimethylhydrazine was found in both cell DNA and protein....... 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine methylated DNA at both N·7 and 0-6 positions of guanin....

  8. International human rights and cultural diversity: a balancing act

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.

    2013-01-01

    It is broadly agreed that international human rights law and cultural diversity have a mutually interdependent and beneficial relationship. Many human rights, such as the rights to freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of assembly, as well as the rights to take part in cultural life an

  9. Introduction. Cultural transmission and the evolution of human behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenny; Kalish, Michael L; Griffiths, Thomas L; Lewandowsky, Stephan

    2008-11-12

    The articles in this theme issue seek to understand the evolutionary bases of social learning and the consequences of cultural transmission for the evolution of human behaviour. In this introductory article, we provide a summary of these articles (seven articles on the experimental exploration of cultural transmission and three articles on the role of gene-culture coevolution in shaping human behaviour) and a personal view of some promising lines of development suggested by the work summarized here.

  10. Gingivitis/stomatitis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C A; Aller, M S

    1992-11-01

    Any alteration in the balance of bacterial challenge versus the host's ability to resist and repair will result in oral lesions that are similar in appearance. The bacterial cause of gingivitis and periodontitis in humans and in all other animals in which it has been studied is firmly established, and specific species of predominantly gram-negative anaerobes have been implicated. Naturally occurring or acquired immunopathologies are likely to result in premature dental disease. When oral disease is associated with the accumulation of plaque, a positive response can be achieved by reducing the bacterial challenge to the host through the maintenance of oral hygiene by timely professional dental prophylaxis and home care. Disease that is the result of atypical immune responses, however, can be much more difficult to manage. Such oral disease can occur with either immune deficiencies or exaggerated immune responses, and it is likely that multiple mechanisms are active concurrently. In any case, gram-negative anaerobes present in plaque are likely to be a major contributing factor. Therefore patients with chronic refractory gingivitis-stomatitis must be considered to be plaque intolerant. Only with a frequent regimen of aggressive and thorough professional dental treatment plus meticulous oral home care on a daily basis can one expect to keep these cases in remission. Because this is often unrealistic, the only other way to keep these patients free of disease is by total dental extraction. The tissues that are colonized by the causative organisms must be eliminated. All root tips and bony sequestra must be removed and healing with intact epithelium accomplished before these cases will go into remission. Edentulous feline patients that continue to have signs of gingivostomatitis have been found to have an area of nonhealed bony sequestrum and chronic osteomyelitis. Once effective debridement has been accomplished and epithelial healing completed, nonresponsive cases can

  11. Disruption of the ECM33 Gene in Candida albicans Prevents Biofilm Formation, Engineered Human Oral Mucosa Tissue Damage and Gingival Cell Necrosis/Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rouabhia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen. We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida.

  12. Differences in gene expression profiles between human preimplantation embryos cultured in two different IVF culture media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijkers, S.H.M.; Eijssen, L.M.T.; Coonen, E.; Derhaag, J.G.; Mantikou, E.; Jonker, M.J.; Mastenbroek, S.; Repping, S.; Evers, J.L.H.; Dumoulin, J.C.M.; van Montfoort, A.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is gene expression in human preimplantation embryos affected by the medium used for embryo culture in vitro during an IVF treatment? SUMMARY ANSWER: Six days of in vitro culture of human preimplantation embryos resulted in medium-dependent differences in expression level of genes inv

  13. Cetylpyridinium chloride mouth rinses alleviate experimental gingivitis by inhibiting dental plaque maturation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Teng; Rui Li; Jun-Qi Ling; Tao He; Shi Huang; Cun-Pei Bo; Zhen Li; Jin-Lan Chang; Ji-Quan Liu; Duane Charbonneau; Jian Xu

    2016-01-01

    Oral rinses containing chemotherapeutic agents, such as cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), can alleviate plaque-induced gingival infections, but how oral microbiota respond to these treatments in human population remains poorly understood. Via a double-blinded, randomised controlled trial of 91 subjects, the impact of CPC-containing oral rinses on supragingival plaque was investigated in experimental gingivitis, where the subjects, after a 21-day period of dental prophylaxis to achieve healthy gingivae, received either CPC rinses or water for 21 days. Within-subject temporal dynamics of plaque microbiota and symptoms of gingivitis were profiled via 16S ribosomal DNA gene pyrosequencing and assessment with the Mazza gingival index. Cetylpyridinium chloride conferred gingival benefits, as progression of gingival inflammation resulting from a lack of dental hygiene was significantly slower in the mouth rinse group than in the water group due to inhibition of 17 gingivitis-enriched bacterial genera. Tracking of plaqueα andβ diversity revealed that CPC treatment prevents acquisition of new taxa that would otherwise accumulate but maintains the original biodiversity of healthy plaques. Furthermore, CPC rinses reduced the size, local connectivity and microbiota-wide connectivity of the bacterial correlation network, particularly for nodes representing gingivitis-enriched taxa. The findings of this study provide mechanistic insights into the impact of oral rinses on the progression and maturation of dental plaque in the natural human population.

  14. A Culture-Behavior-Brain Loop Model of Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shihui; Ma, Yina

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cultural influences on brain activity are associated with multiple cognitive and affective processes. These findings prompt an integrative framework to account for dynamic interactions between culture, behavior, and the brain. We put forward a culture-behavior-brain (CBB) loop model of human development that proposes that culture shapes the brain by contextualizing behavior, and the brain fits and modifies culture via behavioral influences. Genes provide a fundamental basis for, and interact with, the CBB loop at both individual and population levels. The CBB loop model advances our understanding of the dynamic relationships between culture, behavior, and the brain, which are crucial for human phylogeny and ontogeny. Future brain changes due to cultural influences are discussed based on the CBB loop model.

  15. Human nature and culture: an evolutionary psychological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, D M

    2001-12-01

    Personality psychology is the broadest of all psychological subdisciplines in that it seeks a conceptually integrated understanding of both human nature and important individual differences. Cultural differences pose a unique set of problems for any comprehensive theory of personality-how can they be reconciled with universals of human nature on the one hand and within-cultural variation on the other? Evolutionary psychology provides one set of conceptual tools by which this conceptual integration can be made. It requires jettisoning the false but still-pervasive dichotomy of culture versus biology, acknowledging a universal human nature, and recognizing that the human mind contains many complex psychological mechanisms that are selectively activated, depending on cultural contexts. Culture rests on a foundation of evolved psychological mechanisms and cannot be understood without those mechanisms.

  16. Practice-based preclinical instruction for gingival displacement with animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, He; Yang, Shuying; Pei, Xibo; Qing, Hai; Wang, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Gingival displacement is recognized as a substantive and difficult procedure in fixed prosthodontics. However, a realistic simulation of gingival displacement is unavailable for preclinical dental students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether practice-based preclinical instruction of gingival displacement with animal models could improve students' skill in patient care. Isolated bovine mandibles (calves were younger than 6 months of age) and isolated porcine hemimandibles were prepared for this study. Twenty-two general dental practitioners with at least 5 years of experience were randomly selected and assigned to perform gingival displacement on both bovine and porcine jaws. Those practitioners were then asked to assess the clinical similarity of gingival displacement between human teeth and animal teeth. The data were analyzed with the paired t test (α=.05). Upon confirmation that the animal jaw provided a similar gingival displacement environment to that of human teeth, 80 predoctoral dental students were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups. Half of them underwent the new practice-based instruction, while the others underwent traditional preclinical teaching only (lectures, online video, or live demonstration). After preclinical learning, clinical performance in gingival displacement was evaluated for all students in terms of the effect of gingival displacement and quality of impression. The data were analyzed with the chi-square test (α=.05). The dentogingival environments of porcine and bovine jaws were similar to those of human jaws, and no significant difference was detected between these 2 animal models (P=.178). A significant increase occurred in the acceptable rate of the effect of gingival displacement (Pdisplacement with animal models is an effective method of promoting dental students' learning of gingival displacement. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Gingival prosthesis: A treatment modality for recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Samatha Yalamanchili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival recession caused due to periodontal disease disturbs patients because of sensitivity and esthetics. Gingival prosthesis may be fixed or removable and can be made from silicones, acrylics, composite resins or ceramics according to what is best suited for the case. The gingival veneer is esthetically appealing and easy to maintain. This case report describes the use of gingival veneer as a treatment modality for recession.

  18. Gingival prosthesis: A treatment modality for recession

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavi Samatha Yalamanchili; Hemchand Surapaneni; Arunima Padmakumar Reshmarani

    2013-01-01

    Gingival recession caused due to periodontal disease disturbs patients because of sensitivity and esthetics. Gingival prosthesis may be fixed or removable and can be made from silicones, acrylics, composite resins or ceramics according to what is best suited for the case. The gingival veneer is esthetically appealing and easy to maintain. This case report describes the use of gingival veneer as a treatment modality for recession.

  19. Bone regeneration with cultured human bone grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, T.; Nakajima, H. [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara City (Japan). Dept. of Pathology; Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara City (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Ohgushi, H.; Ueda, Y.; Takakura, Y. [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara City (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Uemura, T.; Tateishi, T. [National Inst. for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research (NAIR), Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Research Center; Enomoto, Y.; Ichijima, K. [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara City (Japan). Dept. of Pathology

    2001-07-01

    From 73 year old female patient, 3 ml of bone marrow was collected from the ilium. The marrow was cultured to concentrate and expand the marrow mesenchymal cells on a culture dish. The cultured cells were then subculturedeither on another culture dish or in porous areas of hydroxyapatite ceramics in the presence of dexamethasone and beta-glycerophosphate (osteo genic medium). The subculturedtissues on the dishes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and subculturedtissues in the ceramics were implanted intraperitoneally into athymic nude mice. Vigorous growth of spindle-shaped cells and a marked formation of bone matrix beneath the cell layers was observed on the subculture dishes by SEM. The intraperitoneally implanted ceramics with cultured tissues revealed thick layer of lamellar bone together with active osteoblasts lining in many pore areas of the ceramics after 8 weeks. The in vitro bone formations on the culture dishes and in vivo bone formation in porous ceramics were detected. These results indicate that we can assemble an in vitro bone/ceramic construct, and due to the porous framework of the ceramic, the construct has osteogenic potential similar to that of autologous cancellous bone. A significant benefit of this method is that the construct can be made with only a small amount of aspirated marrow cells from aged patients with little host morbidity. (orig.)

  20. CULTURAL DIMENSIONS IN GLOBAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As enterprise operations continue to be globalized through overseas expansions, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions as well as strategic relationships and partnerships transnational organizations need to give attention to issues of culture in human resource management practices as a panacea for prosperity. The global organization is competent if only it is able to bridge the gap between management and culture so that personal relationships with other peoples in the organization and society become in harmony. This is critical because cultural relativity and reality in organizations influence operations. The study was designed to explore possible relationships between cultural dimensions and global human resource management. The survey research design was employed and data generated through primary and secondary sources. The participants comprised of 385 respondents from a cross-section of the population in Nigeria. By Chi-Square test, it was found that culture has a significant positive relationship with global human resource management.

  1. Adult human brain cell culture for neuroscience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Hannah M; Dragunow, Mike

    2010-06-01

    Studies of the brain have progressed enormously through the use of in vivo and in vitro non-human models. However, it is unlikely such studies alone will unravel the complexities of the human brain and so far no neuroprotective treatment developed in animals has worked in humans. In this review we discuss the use of adult human brain cell culture methods in brain research to unravel the biology of the normal and diseased human brain. The advantages of using adult human brain cells as tools to study human brain function from both historical and future perspectives are discussed. In particular, studies using dissociated cultures of adult human microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons are described and the applications of these types of study are evaluated. Alternative sources of human brain cells such as adult neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and slice cultures of adult human brain tissue are also reviewed. These adult human brain cell culture methods could benefit basic research and more importantly, facilitate the translation of basic neuroscience research to the clinic for the treatment of brain disorders. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Review. The multiple roles of cultural transmission experiments in understanding human cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; Whiten, Andrew

    2008-11-12

    In this paper, we explore how experimental studies of cultural transmission in adult humans can address general questions regarding the 'who, what, when and how' of human cultural transmission, and consequently inform a theory of human cultural evolution. Three methods are discussed. The transmission chain method, in which information is passed along linear chains of participants, has been used to identify content biases in cultural transmission. These concern the kind of information that is transmitted. Several such candidate content biases have now emerged from the experimental literature. The replacement method, in which participants in groups are gradually replaced or moved across groups, has been used to study phenomena such as cumulative cultural evolution, cultural group selection and cultural innovation. The closed-group method, in which participants learn in groups with no replacement, has been used to explore issues such as who people choose to learn from and when they learn culturally as opposed to individually. A number of the studies reviewed here have received relatively little attention within their own disciplines, but we suggest that these, and future experimental studies of cultural transmission that build on them, can play an important role in a broader science of cultural evolution.

  3. Resistin in serum and gingival crevicular fluid as a marker of periodontal inflammation and its correlation with single-nucleotide polymorphism in human resistin gene at −420

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Pradeep Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Resistin is an adipocytokine, which have been studied for its role in insulin resistance and recently in inflammation. The aim of the present study is to assess the concentration of resistin in serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF and to compare the levels between subjects with and without periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and to further correlate the resistin levels with the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at −420. Setting and Designs: A total of 96 subjects (48 males and 48 females were divided on the basis of gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PD, clinical attachment level (CAL and hemoglobin A 1c levels into healthy (group 1, n = 24, uncontrolled-diabetes related periodontitis (group 2, n = 24, controlled-diabetes related periodontitis (group 3, n = 24 and chronic periodontitis without T2DM (group 4, n = 24. Materials and Methods: The GCF and serum levels of resistin were quantified using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and compared among the study groups. Further, the association of the resistin levels with periodontal inflammation and SNP at −420 was studied. Results and Conclusion: The resistin levels in GCF and serum from patients with periodontitis or diabetes mellitus related periodontitis (controlled or uncontrolled were higher than that of healthy subjects and correlated positively with GI. Further, subjects with GG genotype at −420 showed significantly higher GI, PD, CAL as compared with genotype group CC. Resistin was detected in all serum and GCF samples and was significantly higher in periodontitis. Further, GG genotype at −420 was associated significantly with periodontal inflammation and resistin levels.

  4. Integrating Chinese and African Culture into Human Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrating Chinese and African Culture into Human Resource Management Practice to ... Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa ... both economically and politically in her endeavour to foster international relationships.

  5. Gingival enlargement in myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navia George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias and increased risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. This syndrome affects blood cell production and behavior. MDS is difficult to diagnose because of the absence of symptoms in the early stage of the disease. Often it is accidentally discovered during a routine physical exam/blood test. Till date, only a few cases of gingival enlargement associated with MDS are reported in the literature. Here is a remarkable case of gingival enlargement heralding the presence of MDS.

  6. Cytotoxicity of Co-Cr Ceramic Alloys after Recasting on Human gingival Fibroblasts in Vitro%反复熔铸钴铬烤瓷合金对人牙龈成纤维细胞的体外细胞毒性实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林泓磊; 张长源; 郑明; 林东红; 程辉

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cytotoxicity of Co-Cr ceramic alloys after recasting in vitro. Methods: Human gingival fibroblasts ( HGFs) were cultured by the gingival tissue from teenagers. According to ISO 10993, HGFs were cultured with extractions of Co-Cr ceramic alloys after casting for 1-3 times. Relative growth rate (RGR) was analyzed using cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and the shape of HGFs was observed by an inverted phase contrast microscope. Results: Cytotoxical grades of Co-Cr ceramic alloys after casting 1-3 times were grade 1 or 2. No statistically differences in the optical density (OD) value were found for Co-Cr alloys between the samples cast for 1 time and for 2 - 3 times. Conclusion: Co -Cr ceramic alloys after casting for 1 - 3 times have good biocompatibilities.%目的:评价反复熔铸后钴铬合金的细胞毒性.方法:原代培养人牙龈成纤维细胞(HGFs),按照ISO10993标准,制备经1~3次熔铸钴铬烤瓷合金浸提液,CCK-8法测定其对HGFs增殖的影响,倒置相差显微镜观察HGFs生长情况,初步评价经1~3次熔铸后钴铬烤瓷合金的生物相容性.结果:经1~3次熔铸后的钴铬烤瓷合金细胞毒性级为1~2级,各实验组细胞形态良好,经2、3次熔铸的钴铬烤瓷合金A值与经1次熔铸的钴铬烤瓷合金差异无统计学意义.结论:初步认为经1~3次后熔铸的钴铬烤瓷合金具有较好的生物相容性.

  7. Gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts differ in their inflammatory response to viable Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, N; Laine, M L; de Vries, T J; Everts, V; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral pathogen strongly associated with destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues in human periodontitis. Gingival fibroblasts (GF) and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF) are functionally different cell types in the periodontium that can

  8. Cultural Change, Human Activity, and Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvain, Mary; Munroe, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cognitive performance across cultural contexts has been a standard result in comparative research. Here we discuss how societal changes occurring when a small-scale traditional community incorporates elements from industrialized society may contribute to cognitive development, and we illustrate this with an analysis of the cognitive…

  9. Cultural Change, Human Activity, and Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvain, Mary; Munroe, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cognitive performance across cultural contexts has been a standard result in comparative research. Here we discuss how societal changes occurring when a small-scale traditional community incorporates elements from industrialized society may contribute to cognitive development, and we illustrate this with an analysis of the cognitive…

  10. [A case of gingival myiasis caused by Wohlfahrtia magnifica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetın Özdemır, Eda; Ekşi, Fahriye; Şenyurt, Süleyman Ziya; Üstün, Kemal; Karaoğlan, İlkay; Ercıyas, Kamile

    2014-07-01

    Myiasis is an infestation of living or dead tissue of humans and animals by diptera larvae. Gingival myiasis is a rare pathology and is mainly associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurative lesions, mouth breathing, mental retardation and hemiplegia. Myiasis is most common during summer since the fly population increases during this season. Mostly it occurs in farmers and people who live in tropical climates. Gingival myiasis in humans in Turkey is limited to only a few cases. According to our literature research, this is the first case of gingival myiasis produced by larvae of Wohlfahrtia magnifica in a Turkish adult. According to our best knowledge, it is also the first gingival myiasis case that one of the causative larva had grown to the adult stage in Turkey. A 43 years old male patient who perceived the presence of live maggots in his mouth was referred to our clinic. Clinical findings of gingival myiasis were observed. The patient had no history of systemic disease but oral hygiene was poor. Clinical and radiographic examination indicated that he had chronic periodontitis. Before the dental treatment seven larvae and during the scalling five larvae were elevated from the gingival sulcus. The body of the larvae composed of 12 segments and they were 8-10 mm in length. One of the larvae which was sent to the microbiology laboratory were placed into sheep liver to resume life and the other larvae were placed into 70% alcohol solution. After 9-10 days, the larva which was placed in the liver became pupa. Approximately 15 days later, the pupa became an adult fly. The larvae were identified as the second stage larvae of Wohlfahrtia magnifica. Treatment consisted of removal of the maggots from the gingival sulcus, followed by scaling and oral hygiene instruction. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was applied and the patient was followed-up for 3 months. After non-surgical periodontal treatment, patient didn't accept the flap operation. The

  11. A rare clinical presentation of sarcoidosis; gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzel, Aygül; Köksal, Nurhan; Aydın, Davut; Aslan, Kerim; Gören, Fikret; Karagöz, Filiz

    2013-10-01

    Gingivitis due to sarcoidosis is a relatively rare condition. Gingivitis or isolated gingival involvement may be the first sign of systemic sarcoidosis. We report the case of a 37 year-old woman with isolated gingivitis due to sarcoidosis confirmed by biopsy. Following treatment with a systemic corticosteroid (prednisolone 40 mg/day), all clinical and radiologic findings were completely improved. In cases of chronic and intractable gingivitis, systemic sarcoidosis should be suspected. It should be confirmed with a biopsy, and the patient should be referred to a chest disease clinic to exclude other organ involvement.

  12. Characterization of human myoblast cultures for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bran, Gregor; Riedel, Frank; Sauter, Alexander; Hörmann, Karl; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering, a promising specialty, aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss. In vitro tissue engineering attempts to achieve this goal by creating differentiated, functional muscle tissue through a process in which stem cells are extracted from the patient, e.g. by muscle biopsies, expanded and differentiated in a controlled environment, and subsequently re-implanted. A prerequisite for this undertaking is the ability to cultivate and differentiate human skeletal muscle cell cultures. Evidently, optimal culture conditions must be investigated for later clinical utilization. We therefore analysed the proliferation of human cells in different environments and evaluated the differentiation potential of different culture media. It was shown that human myoblasts have a higher rate of proliferation in the alamarBlue assay when cultured on gelatin-coated culture flasks rather than polystyrene-coated flasks. We also demonstrated that myoblasts treated with a culture medium with a high concentration of growth factors [growth medium (GM)] showed a higher proliferation compared to cultures treated with a culture medium with lower amounts of growth factors [differentiation medium (DM)]. Differentiation of human myoblast cell cultures treated with GM and DM was analysed until day 16 and myogenesis was verified by expression of MyoD, myogenin, alpha-sarcomeric actin and myosin heavy chain by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining for desmin, Myf-5 and alpha-sarcomeric actin was performed to verify the myogenic phenotype of extracted satellite cells and to prove the maturation of cells. Cultures treated with DM showed positive staining for alpha-sarcomeric actin. Notably, markers of differentiation were also detected in cultures treated with GM, but there was no formation of myotubes. In the enzymatic assay of creatine phosphokinase, cultures treated with DM showed a higher activity, evidencing a higher degree of differentiation

  13. On culture and human development: Interview with Barbara Rogoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2011-01-01

    child and participating, from early on, in their various rituals and practices. Building on and enriching cultural psychological sources, Professor Rogoff offers us a comprehensive framework with which to understand both cultural and developmental phenomena and, above all, their multiple intersections......In this interview Professor Barbara Rogoff explores the many ways in which culture shapes the course of human development, and illustrates this with several findings from her past as well as most recent work. These reveal the vital importance of growing up in a family and a community for the human...

  14. Workshop on cultural usability and human work interaction design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Ørngreen, Rikke; Roese, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    This workshop analyzes the use of techniques to connect empirical work analysis and interaction design in different cultural contexts. In industry, a wealth of usability evaluation methods is used to evaluate computer software user interfaces and other interactive products: Inspection methods...... it into interaction design. The workshop will present current research into cultural usability and human work interaction design. Cultural usability is a comprehensive concept, which adheres to all kinds of contexts in which humans are involved (private family, work, public and private organizations, nature...

  15. Pharm GKB: Acute ulcerative gingivitis [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym ANUG - Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis; ANUG - Acute... necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis; AUG - Acute ulcerative gingivitis; Vincent's disease; Vincent...g] (N0000001343) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute ulcerative gingivitis ... ...ive (D005892) SnoMedCT: Acute ulcerative gingivitis (172697005) UMLS: C0017575 (C...'s gingivitis PharmGKB Accession Id: PA165109110 External Vocabularies MeSH: Gingivitis, Necrotizing Ulcerat

  16. Lidocaine-induced apoptosis of gingival fibroblasts: participation of cAMP and PKC activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarruel, Emmanuel Quinteros; Borda, Enri; Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Orman, Betina

    2011-08-01

    Local anaesthetics are drugs that prevent or relieve pain by interrupting nervous conduction and are the most commonly used drugs in dentistry. Their main targets of action are voltage-dependent Na+ channels. The Na+ channel is modulated by phosphorylation of two enzymes: PKA (protein kinase A) and PKC (protein kinase C). We studied the ability of lidocaine to modulate programmed cell death of human gingival fibroblasts and the mechanisms involved in this process. Lidocaine (10-5 to 10-7 M) stimulated apoptosis in primary cultures and the caspase-3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effect of lidocaine on apoptosis was attenuated in the presence of HA 1004 (PKA inhibitor) and stimulated by staurosporine and Go 6976 (PKC inhibitors). Lidocaine-induced apoptotic nuclei correlated positively with cAMP accumulation and negatively with PKC activity. These results show that lidocaine promotes apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts at concentrations used for local anaesthesia. The mechanism involves PKA stimulation and PKC inhibition, which in turn stimulates caspase-3 and leads to programmed cell death.

  17. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  18. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  19. Nonsurgical Management of Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Sam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is frequently associated with three particular drugs: phenytoin, cyclosporin, and nifedipine. As gingival enlargement develops, it affects the normal oral hygiene practice and may interfere with masticatory functions. The awareness in the medical community about this possible side effect of nifedipine is less when compared to the effects of phenytoin and cyclosporin. The frequency of gingival enlargement associated with chronic nifedipine therapy remains controversial. Within the group of patients that develop this unwanted effect, there appears to be variability in the extent and severity of the gingival changes. Although gingival inflammation is considered a primary requisite in their development, few cases with minimal or no plaque induced gingival inflammation have also been reported. A case report of gingival overgrowth induced by nifedipine in a patient with good oral hygiene and its nonsurgical management with drug substitution is discussed in this case report.

  20. Oriental Culture and Human Rights Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leon Wessels

    DETERMINED? This speech is an attempt to offer á perspective, given the particular .... The universal nature of these rights and freedoms is beyond question…19. ▫ All human ... Islamic Middle East” Policial Studies (1995), XLIII, 155. 25 Espiell ...

  1. Enhanced casein kinase II activity in human tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowald, K; Fischer, H; Issinger, O G

    1984-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity is enhanced as much as 2-3 fold in established and 4-5-fold in transformed human cell lines when compared to that of fibroblasts and primary human tumour cell cultures where CKII activity never exceeded a basic level. The high activity of CKII in transformed cells...

  2. Cultural Difference and Human Rights : A Philosophical-Anthropological Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kloeg (Julien)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIn ‘Cultural Difference and Human Rights’, Julien Kloeg claims, with Pablo Gilabert, that theoretical attempts to justify human rights should move beyond the dichotomy of providing either a humanist or a political justification. Kloeg demonstrates how philosophical anthropology could gro

  3. Cultural Difference and Human Rights : A Philosophical-Anthropological Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kloeg (Julien)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIn ‘Cultural Difference and Human Rights’, Julien Kloeg claims, with Pablo Gilabert, that theoretical attempts to justify human rights should move beyond the dichotomy of providing either a humanist or a political justification. Kloeg demonstrates how philosophical anthropology could

  4. Prevalence of herpesviruses in gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: relationship to clinical parameters and effect of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucha Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assess the prevalence of herpesviruses in healthy subjects, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis patients, to assess the relationship between the prevalence of herpesviruses and periodontal clinical parameters, and to evaluate the effect of phase-I therapy on the level of viral detection. Materials and Methods: Hundred patients consisting of 20 healthy subjects, 40 gingivitis, and 40 chronic periodontitis were included in the study. Clinical parameters recorded included plaque index, gingival index, sulcus bleeding index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. The gingivitis and chronic periodontitis patients received phase-I periodontal therapy including oral hygiene instructions, full mouth scaling for gingivitis patients and scaling and root planing for chronic periodontitis patients. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF was collected, and the presence of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1, HSV-2, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Recording of periodontal parameters as well as GCF collection was performed at baseline and 6 weeks postphase-I therapy. Results: At baseline, the levels of HSV-1 and EBV detection were lower in healthy controls as compared to gingivitis (P < 0.05 and chronic periodontitis cases (P < 0.001. Phase-I therapy led to reduction in the amount of HSV-1 and EBV in gingivitis patients (P < 0.05 and for HSV-1, human cytomegalovirus and EBV in chronic periodontitis patients (P < 0.05 in comparison to baseline. The prevalence of EBV in chronic periodontitis patients was positively associated with increased gingival index, probing depth and loss of clinical attachment (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Higher prevalence of HSV-1 and EBV viruses in GCF of gingivitis and chronic periodontitis suggests a strong association between these viruses and periodontal diseases and periodontal therapy can lead to a reduction in herpesviruses at infected sites.

  5. Analysis of Integration Mode of Human Resources Development and Cultural Ecology in Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peihong; Zhang Shiqi

    2012-01-01

    People and culture coexist and human resources development and regional cultural ecology integrate, The present thesis for the first time puts forward the integration mode of human resources development and cultural ecology, argues that personnel innovation should be attracted by motive injection, open culture, resources integration, culture dilution, thinking blending and people-orientation and discusses the transmission mechanism for functions of integration mode of human resources development and cultural ecology from the aspects of cultural values, living styles and cultural industry.

  6. Radiosensitivity of cultured human and mouse keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkinson, E.K.; Hume, W.J.; Potten, C.S.

    1986-10-01

    Clonogenic survival assays after ..gamma..-radiation in vitro were performed on freshly isolated and subcultured keratinocytes from mouse skin, mouse tongue and human skin. Survival curves were constructed by fitting the data to a multi-target model of cell survival. When subcultured, keratinocytes from all sites produced survival curves which showed a reduced shoulder region and an increased D/sub 0/ when compared with their freshly isolated counterparts. Freshly isolated human skin keratinocytes were more radiosensitive than mouse keratinocytes from either skin or tongue.

  7. Schwann cell cultures from human fetal dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaping Feng; Hui Zhu; Jiang Hao; Xinmin Wang; Shengping Wu; Li Bai; Xiangming Li; Yun Zha

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous studies have used many methods for in vitro Schwann cells (SCs) cul-tures and purification,such as single cell suspension and cytosine arabinoside.However,it has been difficult to obtain sufficient cellular density,and the procedures have been quite tedious.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the feasibility of culturing high-density SCs using fetal human dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:Cell culture and immunohistochemistry were performed at the Cen-tral Laboratory of Kunming General Hospital of Chinese PLA between March 2001 and October 2008.MATERIALS:Culture media containing 10% fetal bovine serum,as well as 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin were purchased from Gibco,USA;mouse anti-human S-100 monoclonal antibody and goat anti-mouse IgG labeled with horseradish peroxidase were provided by Beijing Institute of Bi-ological Products,China.METHODS:Primarily cultured SCs were dissociated from dorsal root ganglia of human aborted fe-tuses at 4-6 months pregnancy.Following removal of the dorsal root ganglion perineurium,the gan-glia were dissected into tiny pieces and digested with 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin (volume ratio 1:1),then explanted and cultured.SC purification was performed with 5 mL 10% fetal bovine serum added to the culture media,followed by differential adhesion.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:SCs morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast light microscopy.SC purity was evaluated according to percentage of S-100 immunostained cells.RESULTS:SCs were primarily cultured for 5-6 days and then subcultured for 4-5 passages.The highly enriched SC population reached > 95% purity and presented with normal morphology.CONCLUSION:A high purity of SCs was obtained with culture methods using human fetal dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.

  8. [Characterization of epithelial primary culture from human conjunctiva].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, L; Blázquez, A; Muñoz-Negrete, F J; López, S; Rebolleda, G; Domínguez, F; Pérez-Esteban, A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate primary cultures from human conjunctiva supplemented with fetal bovine serum, autologous serum, and platelet-rich autologous serum, over human amniotic membrane and lens anterior capsules. One-hundred and forty-eight human conjunctiva explants were cultured in CnT50(®) supplemented with 1, 2.5, 5 and 10% fetal bovine serum, autologous serum and platelet-rich autologous serum. Conjunctival samples were incubated at 37°C, 5% CO2 and 95% HR, for 3 weeks. The typical phenotype corresponding to conjunctival epithelial cells was present in all primary cultures. Conjunctival cultures had MUC5AC-positive secretory cells, K19-positive conjunctival cells, and MUC4-positive non-secretory conjunctival cells, but were not corneal phenotype (cytokeratin K3-negative) and fibroblasts (CD90-negative). Conjunctiva epithelial progenitor cells were preserved in all cultures; thus, a cell culture in CnT50(®) supplemented with 1 to 5% autologous serum over human amniotic membrane can provide better information of epithelial cell differentiation for the conjunctival surface reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B;

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long...

  10. The cultural dimension of economic activities in international human right jurisprudence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.; Vadi, V.; de Witte, B.

    2015-01-01

    Cultural diversity and human rights are mutually linked: human rights protect and promote cultural diversity while cultural diversity also forms an important aspect of the enjoyment of human rights. Cultural diversity and the economy are also increasingly connected, for example through cultural indu

  11. Thermolysin in human cultured keratinocyte isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gragnani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When treating extensively burned patients using cultured epidermal sheets, the main problem is the time required for its production. Conventional keratinocyte isolation is usually done using Trypsin. We used a modification of the conventional isolation method in order to improve this process and increase the number of colonies from the isolated epidermal cell population. PURPOSE: To compare the action of trypsin and thermolysin in the keratinocyte isolation using newborn foreskin. METHODS: This method used thermolysin as it selectively digests the dermo-epidermal junction. After dermis separation, the epidermis was digested by trypsin in order to obtain a cell suspension. RESULTS: Compared to the conventional procedure, these experiments demonstrated that in the thermolysin group, the epidermis was easily detached from the dermis, there was no fibroblast contamination and there were a larger number of keratinocyte colonies which had a significant statistical difference. CONCLUSION: The number of colonies in the thermolysin group was significantly greater than in the trypsin group.

  12. Microplastics in bivalves cultured for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Janssen, Colin R

    2014-10-01

    Microplastics are present throughout the marine environment and ingestion of these plastic particles (microplastics in two species of commercially grown bivalves: Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Microplastics were recovered from the soft tissues of both species. At time of human consumption, M. edulis contains on average 0.36 ± 0.07 particles g(-1) (wet weight), while a plastic load of 0.47 ± 0.16 particles g(-1) ww was detected in C. gigas. As a result, the annual dietary exposure for European shellfish consumers can amount to 11,000 microplastics per year. The presence of marine microplastics in seafood could pose a threat to food safety, however, due to the complexity of estimating microplastic toxicity, estimations of the potential risks for human health posed by microplastics in food stuffs is not (yet) possible.

  13. Ultrastructural study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, M

    1989-01-01

    An electron microscopical study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium is presented. Biopsy samples were collected from four patients with full thickness burns at 9 days, 6 weeks and 5-21 months after grafting of the cultured epithelium. By the sixth week after transplantation, grafted cultured epithelial sheets had developed to consist of 10 to 20 layers of cells and the epithelium showed distinct basal, spinous, granular and horny layers, and a patchy basement membrane had formed. Langerhans cells and melanocytes were identifiable. From 5 months onwards flat basal cells became oval, and oval keratohyalin granules in the keratinocytes also assumed a normal irregular shape. Membrane-coating granules in the keratinocytes increased in number. The fine structures of desmosomes also showed a normal mature appearance. Furthermore, complete extension of the basement membrane could be observed. The maturation of cultured human epithelium is complete by 5 months after grafting.

  14. Glucose metabolism in cultured trophoblasts from human placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, A.J.; Farmer, D.R.; Nelson, D.M.; Smith, C.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1990-02-26

    The development of appropriate placental trophoblast isolation and culture techniques enables the study of pathways of glucose utilization by this important cell layer in vitro. Trophoblasts from normal term placentas were isolated and cultured 24 hours and 72 hours in uncoated polystyrene culture tubes or tubes previously coated with a fibrin matrix. Trophoblasts cultured on fibrin are morphologically distinct from those cultured on plastic or other matrices and generally resemble in vivo syncytium. Cells were incubated up to 3 hours with {sup 14}C-labeled glucose and reactions were stopped by addition of perchloric acid. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production by trophoblasts increased linearly with time however the largest accumulation of label was in organic acids. Trophoblasts cultured in absence of fibrin utilized more glucose and accumulated more {sup 14}C in metabolic products compared to cells cultured on fibrin. Glucose oxidation to CO{sub 2} by the phosphogluconate (PG) pathway was estimated from specific yields of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)-D-glucose and (6-{sup 14}C)-D-glucose. Approximately 6% of glucose oxidation was by the PG pathway when cells were cultured on fibrin compared to approximately 1% by cells cultured in the absence of fibrin. The presence of a fibrin growth matrix appears to modulate the metabolism of glucose by trophoblast from human placenta in vitro.

  15. Study on the Expression of MMP-2 and MMP-13 in Human Gingival Fibroblast Cells of Porcelain Fused to Metal Crown%烤瓷冠基底合金影响人牙龈成纤维细胞MMP-2、MMP-13表达实验探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽梅

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of different kinds of porcelain fused to metal crown on the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-13 in human gingival fibroblast cells.Methods The preparation of pure titanium and cobalt chromium, nickel chromium alloy and gold extraction, by means of a modiifed tissue to ifbroblast cells were cultured on the gums around, after leaching liquid immersion, were collected on a sample cell supernatant, the expression level of MMP-13 was determined as the sample determination method for ILISA determination. Results The expression of CO Cr alloy and Ni Cr alloy MKMP-13 was higher than the negative control group and experimental group, comparison of various indexes, the difference was statistically signiifcant (P0.05) in the gold and pure titanium alloy group.Conclusion Co Cr alloy and Ni Cr alloy MKMP-13 high expression level, to a certain extent will damage the gingival ifbroblast; gold, pure titanium alloy biocompatibility is good.%目的:观察不同种类烤瓷牙金属基底冠浸提液对人牙龈成纤维细胞中 MMP-2、MMP-13表达水平的影响。方法制备纯钛、钴铬、镍铬和金合金提取液,通过组织块改良的方法来对牙龈周围的纤维细胞进行培养,经过浸提液浸泡之后,分别收集样本上的细胞清液,作为MMP-13表达水平的测定样本,测定方法为ILISA测定法。结果钴铬合金和镍铬合金MKMP-13表达水平高于阴性对照组和其他实验组,各项指标对比,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);金、纯钛合金组MMP-13表达水平与阴性对照组比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论钴铬合金和镍铬合金MKMP-13表达水平较高,一定程度上会损伤牙龈成纤维细胞;金、纯钛合金生物相容性比较好。

  16. Cultural dimensions in global human resource management: implications for Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-01-01

    As enterprise operations continue to be globalized through overseas expansions, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions as well as strategic relationships and partnerships transnational organizations need to give attention to issues of culture in human resource management practices as a panacea for prosperity. The global organization is competent if only it is able to bridge the gap between management and culture so that personal relationships with other peoples in the organization and socie...

  17. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-07

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  18. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  19. Viability of human corneal keratocytes during organ culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Pedersen, T; Møller, H J

    1996-01-01

    The viability of human corneal keratocytes was assessed during four weeks of 'closed system' organ culture at 31 degrees C. After 28 days of culturing, the entire keratocyte population was still alive and viable because all cells incorporated uridine; a parameter for RNA-synthesis. During the first...... of keratan sulphate proteoglycan suggested that approximately 1% of the total content was lost during the period. In conclusion, our current organ culture technique can maintain a viable keratocyte population for four weeks; a viable stroma can be grafted within this period....

  20. Potential Immune Modularly Role of Glycine in Oral Gingival Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Schaumann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival epithelial cells (GECs represent a physical barrier against bacteria and are involved in the processes of innate immunity. Recently, an anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory effect of the amino acid glycine has been demonstrated. However, there is only little information about the immune-modulatory effects of glycine in oral tissues. This study aimed to investigate the existence and role of the glycine receptor in gingival tissue analyzing tissues/cells from extracted human molars via immunohistochemical analysis. In vitro, GECs were challenged by inflammatory conditions with IL-1β alone or in combination with glycine and analyzed for cytokine expression of IL6/IL8 via real-time PCR. On protein level, the effect of nuclear translocalization of NFκB protein p65 was analyzed using immunofluorescence analysis. A distinct proof of the GlyR in oral gingival tissue and keratinocytes could be demonstrated. Isolated challenge of the keratinocytes with IL-1β as well as with glycine resulted in an upregulation of IL6 and IL8 mRNA expression and activation of NFκB pathway. The presence of glycine in combination with the inflammatory stimulus led to a significant decrease in inflammatory parameters. These results indicate a possible anti-inflammatory role of glycine in gingival inflammation and encourage further research on the utility of glycine in the prevention or therapy of inflammatory periodontitis.

  1. Xeno-free culture of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Rosita; Ström, Susanne; Holm, Frida; Feki, Anis; Hovatta, Outi

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell culture systems that rely on undefined animal-derived components introduce variability to the cultures and complicate their therapeutic use. The derivation of human embryonic stem cells and the development of methods to produce induced pluripotent stem cells combined with their potential to treat human diseases have accelerated the drive to develop xenogenic-free, chemically defined culture systems that support pluripotent self-renewal and directed differentiation. In this chapter, we describe four xeno-free culture systems that have been successful in supporting undifferentiated growth of hPSCs as well as methods for xeno-free subculture and cryopreservation of hPSCs. Each culture system consists of a xeno-free growth medium and xeno-free substratum: (1) TeSR2™ with human recombinant laminin (LN-511); (2) NutriStem™ with LN-511; (3) RegES™ with human foreskin fibroblasts (hFFs); (4) KO-SR Xeno-Free™/GF cocktail with CELLstart™ matrix.

  2. Induction of prostaglandin E(2) and interleukin-6 in gingival fibroblasts by oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Guggenheim, Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Polymicrobial oral biofilms attaching on tooth surfaces can trigger inflammatory responses by the neighbouring tooth-supporting periodontal tissues. An excessive inflammatory response can cause destruction of the periodontal tissues, including the alveolar bone, thus resulting in periodontitis. Mediators of inflammation, such as prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) and interleukin-6, are primary regulators of alveolar bone destruction in periodontitis. The present study aimed to comparatively investigate the effects of in vitro supragingival and subgingival biofilms, on the regulation of PGE(2) and interleukin-6 in human gingival fibroblasts. The cells were challenged with culture supernatants of the two biofilms for 6 h. Cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2, an enzyme responsible for the conversion of PGE(2) , and interleukin-6 gene expression were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR. The production of PGE(2) and interleukin-6 by the cells was analysed by ELISA. While the supragingival biofilm did not induce significant changes, the subgingival biofilm caused an 8.6- and 2.9-fold enhancement of COX-2 and interleukin-6 gene expression, respectively, and a 72.5- and 1.5-fold enhancement of PGE(2) and interleukin-6 production, respectively. In conclusion, subgingival biofilms are potent inducers of PGE(2) in gingival fibroblasts, providing further mechanistic insights into the association of subgingival biofilms with bone resorption periodontitis.

  3. Preservation of human skin structure and function in organ culture

    OpenAIRE

    Varani, J.

    1998-01-01

    Human keratinocytes can be maintained in monolayer culture under serum-free conditions for an extended period of time. Under low ca2+ conditions (e.g., 0.05-0.15 mM), an undifferentiated state is maintained and the cells proliferate optimally. When the ca2+ concentration is raised to approximately 1.0 mM, differentiation occurs and growth slows. Human dermal fibroblasts can also be maintained in monolayer culture under serum-free conditions, but in contrast to ...

  4. Evaluating human, social and cultural capital in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Jan

    2012-07-01

    Using the concepts of human, social and cultural capital this paper will review the literature on these theories and evaluate their application to nurse education in the United Kingdom (UK). Each concept will be explored before considering the impact and application within nurse education. Issues of sponsorship via mentoring and increased skills and contribution to the knowledge economy alongside the delivery of quality care by nursing students will be discussed with reference to theory and current policy drivers. As nursing education moves to a graduate profession in the UK this paper evaluates the drivers of human, social and cultural capital that affect this development.

  5. Phylogeny, culturing, and metagenomics of the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alan W; Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2014-05-01

    The human intestinal tract is colonised by a complex community of microbes, which can have major impacts on host health. Recent research on the gut microbiota has largely been driven by the advent of modern sequence-based techniques, such as metagenomics. Although these are powerful and valuable tools, they have limitations. Traditional culturing and phylogeny can mitigate some of these limitations, either by expanding reference databases or by assigning functionality to specific microbial lineages. As such, culture and phylogeny will continue to have crucially important roles in human microbiota research, and will be required for the development of novel therapeutics.

  6. Human-Computer Interaction, Tourism and Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla Ficarra, Francisco V.

    We present a state of the art of the human-computer interaction aimed at tourism and cultural heritage in some cities of the European Mediterranean. In the work an analysis is made of the main problems deriving from training understood as business and which can derail the continuous growth of the HCI, the new technologies and tourism industry. Through a semiotic and epistemological study the current mistakes in the context of the interrelations of the formal and factual sciences will be detected and also the human factors that have an influence on the professionals devoted to the development of interactive systems in order to safeguard and boost cultural heritage.

  7. Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; MacEachern, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Gingival recession represents a clinical condition in adults frequently encountered in the general dental practice. It is estimated that 23% of adults in the US have one or more tooth surfaces with ≥ 3 mm gingival recession. Clinicians often time face dilemmas of whether or not to treat such a condition surgically. Therefore, we were charged by the editorial board to answer this critical question: “Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?” An initial condensed literature search was performed using a combination of gingival recession and surgery controlled terms and keywords. An analysis of the search results highlights our limited understanding of the factors that often guide the treatment of gingival recession. Understanding the etiology, prognosis and treatment of gingival recession continues to offer many unanswered questions and challenges in the field of periodontics as we strive to provide the best care possible for our patients. PMID:26427577

  8. Idiopathic gingival enlargement and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic gingival enlargement is a proliferative fibrous lesion of the gingival tissue that causes esthetic and functional problems. Both genetically and pharmacologically induced forms of gingival enlargement exist. This case report addresses the diagnosis and treatment of a case of idiopathic gingival enlargement in a 13-year-old female. The patient presented with generalized diffuse gingival enlargement involving the maxillary and mandibular arches extending on buccal and lingual/palatal surfaces and covering incisal / occlusal third of the tooth resulting in difficulty in speech and mastication since last three years. Patient also gave a history of surgical treatment being carried out four years back in upper anterior region suggesting of recurrence. Biopsy report confirmed the diagnosis of gingival hyperplasia. Gingivectomy was carried out in all four quadrants by using four different methods.

  9. Nonsurgical gingival displacement in restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Manuel S; Joseph, Robin Mathai; Parolia, Abhishek

    2011-06-01

    Gingival displacement is critical for obtaining accurate impressions for the fabrication of fixed restorations, especially when the finish line is at or just within the gingival sulcus. Displacement of the gingival tissue is also important when dealing with the restoration of cervical lesions due to their proximity to the periodontal tissue. The methods of gingival tissue displacement can be broadly classified as nonsurgical and surgical techniques, with nonsurgical being the more commonly practiced method. Dentists must alter their armamentarium and gingival displacement techniques to meet specific demands and obtain predictable results. Hence, the purpose of this article is to describe the different means by which nonsurgical gingival displacement can be achieved effectively under a variety of clinical situations.

  10. Nifedipine-Induced gingival overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Florio, Ornella; School of Dentistry of São Jose dos Campos - State University of São Paulo; Tfouni, Maysa; School of Dentistry of São Jose dos Campos - State University of São Paulo; Balducci, Ivan; School of Dentistry of São Jose dos Campos - State University of São Paulo; Marco, Andrea Carvalho de; School of Dentistry of São Jose dos Campos - State University of São Paulo; Neves Jardini, Maria Aparecida; School of Dentistry of São Jose dos Campos - State University of São Paulo; Dias Almeida, Janete; School of Dentistry of São Jose dos Campos - State University of São Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate gingival overgrowth induced by nifedipine and to correlate it with plaque accumulation. Material and Methods: Sixty patients were divided into a treated group (n=30) consisting of hypertensive patients treated with nifedipine and a control group (n=30) consisting of patients without arterial hypertension. The following exams were performed on the first visit: anamnesis, measurement of blood pressure, weight and height, extra- and i...

  11. [Gingival bleaching: teaching and ethnocentrism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Edson Daruich; Goldenberg, Paulete

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify buccal/gingival cosmetic dentistry patterns subjacent to formation and professional practice of the dental surgeon from the ethnocentrism point of view. This is an exploratory study with a qualitative approach based on the thematic analysis. Initially a documental analysis was carried out. Thereafter, dental surgeons were interviewed and semi-structured questions were applied. In the Periodontal teaching field, this study showed that the presence of racial melanosis is omitted or treated as an alteration in the normality patterns and it is considered anti-aesthetic. All the interviewers learnt how to practice gingival bleaching in the post-graduation courses, they were all encouraged to offer this cosmetic dentistry procedure with the opportunity of obtaining a beautiful and healthy smile, thus assuring the belief of the Caucasian racial aesthetic superiority. This study make us think that the offer of gingival bleaching is oriented by the Caucasian pattern of beauty evidencing the ethnocentric character of this procedure.

  12. Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; MacEachern, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Gingival recession represents a clinical condition in adults frequently encountered in the general dental practice. It is estimated that 23% of adults in the US have one or more tooth surfaces with ≥ 3 mm gingival recession. Clinicians often time face dilemmas of whether or not to treat such a condition surgically. Therefore, we were charged by the editorial board to answer this critical question: “Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?” An initial condensed literature search was...

  13. Unusual Gingival Enlargement: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Dixit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an atypical case report of a 20-year-old male patient who suffered from unusual unilateral, gingival enlargement together with rapidly progressive alveolar bone loss. The enlarged gingiva completely covered his left posterior teeth in both arches. The patient was diagnosed with gingival fibromatosis and aggressive periodontitis based on the clinical, histological, and radiographic findings. The gingival enlargement was treated by conventional gingivectomy under local anaesthesia. The postoperative result was uneventful.

  14. Kant and the development of the human and cultural sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkreel, Rudolf A

    2008-12-01

    Starting with Kant's doubts about psychology as a natural science capable of explaining human behavior, several alternative attempts to conceive of human life, culture and history are examined. Kant proposes an anthropology that will be a commonly useful human science rather than a universally valid natural science. This anthropology relates to philosophy as a mode of world-cognition. Special attention is given to how Kant's theory of right can help define our appropriate place in a communal world. The different ways in which Wilhelm Dilthey and Hermann Cohen respond to Kant's idea of legitimate appropriation are also considered. The various tasks that descriptive elucidation, explanation, reflective understanding, characterization and interpretation can perform for the human and cultural sciences are examined throughout the essay.

  15. Tapered toothbrush filaments in relation to gingival abrasion, removal of plaque and treatment of gingivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, P.A.; Piscaer, M.; Rosema, N.A.M.; Timmerman, M.F.; van der Velden, U.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To compare a tapered filament toothbrush (TFTB) to a control toothbrush (ADA) in their potential to cause gingival abrasion and improve the gingival condition following a period of experimental gingivitis. Methods: Thirty-two subjects refrained from brushing mandibular teeth for 21 days.

  16. Adherence of human basophils to cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which circulating human basophils adhere to vascular endothelium and migrate to sites of allergic reactions is unknown. Agents have been identified which stimulate the adherence of purified basophils to cultured human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HuVEC). Treatment of HuVEC with interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), bacterial endotoxin, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in time and dose-dependent increases of adhesiveness for basophils...

  17. Effect of advanced glycation end products on the human gingival fibroblast proliferation and typeⅠcollagen synthesis%糖基化终产物对牙龈成纤维细胞增殖和Ⅰ型胶原合成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐刘英; 付云; 周燕

    2008-01-01

    Objective To apply the synthesized advanced glycation end products(AGE)to the cultured human gingival fibroblast(HGF)in vitro and then to investigate the effects of AGE on the HGF proliferation and type Ⅰ collagen synthesis and the potential impact of AGE in the repair of periodontium and its molecular mechanism in diabetes-associated periodontitis. Methods The HGF was obtained from explants of human healthy gingival tissues by using tissue-explant technique.The AGE Was prepared and then added to the culture media, its effect on HGF proliferation at different time duration Was examined with MTT colorimetric assay.The type Ⅰ collagen concentrations in cell culture supematants and intracellular proteins were detected by EUSA,and the type Ⅰ collagen mRNA expression of HGF was analyzed by realtime RT-PCR. Results 200 mg/L AGE decreased the A value(P <0.05)and changed the HGF shape.Incubation of HGF with AGE for 72 hours,the quantities of type Ⅰ collagen were reduced(P<0.05),and the expression of type Ⅰ collagen mRNA Was down-regulated(P<0.05). Condusions The AGE inhibited the HGF proliferation,decreased the synthesis of type Ⅰ collagen and down-regulated the expression of type Ⅰ collagen mRNA,impairing the repair of periodontium.%目的 观察糖基化终产物对牙龈成纤维细胞增殖能力和Ⅰ型胶原合成的影响,探讨糖基化终产物对牙周组织修复功能的作用及在伴有糖尿病牙周炎中的致病机制.方法 采用组织块法培养牙龈成纤维细胞,培养基中加入体外合成的不同浓度的糖基化终产物,甲基噻唑基四唑(MTT)法检测在不同时间段下牙龈成纤维细胞增殖水平的变化,酶联免疫吸附测定法和实时定量反转录聚合酶链法(RT-PCR)分别测定牙龈成纤维细胞合成Ⅰ型胶原的量和表达Ⅰ型胶原mRNA的水平.结果 200 mg/L糖基化终产物作用于牙龈成纤维细胞48、74 h的A值分别为0.016±0.023、0.035±0.008,比其他组A值低(P<0

  18. "Humanized" stem cell culture techniques: the animal serum controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekkatte, Chandana; Gunasingh, Gency Ponrose; Cherian, K M; Sankaranarayanan, Kavitha

    2011-01-01

    Cellular therapy is reaching a pinnacle with an understanding of the potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to regenerate damaged tissue in the body. The limited numbers of these hMSCs in currently identified sources, like bone marrow, adipose tissue, and so forth, bring forth the need for their in vitro culture/expansion. However, the extensive usage of supplements containing xenogeneic components in the expansion-media might pose a risk to the post-transplantation safety of patients. This warrants the necessity to identify and develop chemically defined or "humanized" supplements which would make in vitro cultured/processed cells relatively safer for transplantation in regenerative medicine. In this paper, we outline the various caveats associated with conventionally used supplements of xenogenic origin and also portray the possible alternatives/additives which could one day herald the dawn of a new era in the translation of in vitro cultured cells to therapeutic interventions.

  19. Experimental study of bioartificial liver with cultured human liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AIM To establish an extracorporeal bioartificial liver support system (EBLSS) using cultured human liver cells and to study its support effect for fulminant hepatic failure (FHF).METHODS The liver support experiment of EBLSS consisting of aggregates cultured human liver cells, hollow fiber bioreactor, and circulation unit was carried out in dizhepatic dogs.RESULTS The viability of isolated hepatocytes and nonparenchymal liver cells reached 96%. These cells were successfully cultured as multicellular spheroids with synthetic technique. The typical morphological appearance was retained up to the end of the artificial liver experiment. Compared with the control dogs treated with EBLSS without liver cells, the survival time of artificial liver support dogs was significantly prolonged. The changes of blood pressure, heart rate and ECG were slow. Both serum ammonia and lactate levels were significantly lowered at the 3rd h and 5th h. In addition, a good viability of human liver cells was noted after 5 h experiment.CONCLUSION EBLSS playing a metabolic role of cultured human hepatocytes, is capable of compensating the function of the liver, and could provide effective artificial liver support and therapy for patients with FHF.

  20. Chloride and potassium conductances of cultured human sweat ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Pedersen, P S; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the ion conductances, in particular those for Cl- and K+, of human sweat duct cells grown in primary culture. Sweat duct cells from healthy individuals were grown to confluence on a dialysis membrane, which was then mounted in a mini-Ussing chamber...

  1. Building Social, Human, and Cultural Capital through Parental Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Lars G.; Lewis, Wayne D.; Browne-Ferrigno, Tricia; Donkor, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between schools and society in the United States and uses human, social, and cultural capital theories to reframe the discussion of the role of schools in nurturing parent engagement. We argue that the ramifications of parent engagement in schools transcend functionalist ideas of complying with state and…

  2. Hanging drop cultures of human testis and testis cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Young, J; Nielsen, J E

    2014-01-01

    limited by the lack of experimental models. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental tissue culture model to maintain normal and malignant germ cells within their niche and allow investigation of treatment effects. METHODS: Human testis and testis cancer specimens from orchidectomies were...

  3. 硝苯地平对人牙龈上皮细胞bcl-2基因表达的影响%Nifedipine regulated expression of bcl-2 in human gingival epithelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文海燕; 束蓉; 蒋少云; 姜云涛

    2010-01-01

    目的:体外观察硝苯地平(nifedipine,NIF)对人牙龈上皮细胞(human gingival epithelial cells,HGECs)bcl-2基因转录水平的调节,探讨NIF诱导的药物性牙龈增生(drug-induced gingival overgrowth,DGO)与凋亡抑制基因bcl-2的相关性.方法:采用牙周手术切除的健康牙龈组织.用酶消化法分离培养HGECs;免疫组织化学方法对培养细胞进行细胞鉴定;实时定量PCR技术检测不同浓度NIF(1 μg/ml、2 μg/ml和3 μg/ml)刺激下HGECs中bcl-2 mRNA水平,以0 μg/ml NIF为空白对照.采用SPSS 11.0软件包对所得数据进行单因素方差分析.结果:酶消化法获得的HGECs在体外培养中生长状态良好;免疫组织化学显示,HGECs抗角蛋白染色阳性,抗波形蛋白染色阴性;NIF处理24h后的HGECs bcl-2 mRNA水平随NIF浓度的增高而上升,3 μg/ml浓度组与空白对照组有显著差异(P<0.05);NIF处理48h后.2 μg/ml、3 μg/ml浓度组HGECs bcl-2 mRNA水平与空白对照组差异明显(P<0.05).结论:NIF调节体外培养的HGECs中bcl-2基因转录的水平.

  4. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Generalized Gingival Overgrowth Resembling Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis in Siblings: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Yaprak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is a group of hereditary disorders primarily characterized by developmental abnormalities in the quantity and/or quality of enamel. There are some reports suggesting an association between AI and generalized gingival enlargement. This paper describes the clinical findings and oral management of two siblings presenting both AI and hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF like generalized gingival enlargements. The treatment of gingival enlargements by periodontal flap surgery was successful in the management of the physiologic gingival form for both patients in the 3-year follow-up period. Prosthetic treatment was also satisfactory for the older patient both aesthetically and functionally.

  5. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Jhaveri, Hiral M. [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India); Mishra, Gyan C. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  6. Regulation of extracellular matrix genes by arecoline in primary gingival fibroblasts requires epithelial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangjam, G S; Agarwal, P; Balapure, A K; Rao, S Girish; Kondaiah, P

    2009-12-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis, a disease of collagen disorder, has been attributed to arecoline present in the saliva of betel quid chewers. However, the molecular basis of the action of arecoline in the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis is poorly understood. The basic aim of our study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the action of arecoline on the expression of genes in oral fibroblasts. Human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) and primary human gingival fibroblasts were treated with arecoline in combination with various pathway inhibitors, and the expression of transforming growth factor-beta isoform genes and of collagen isoforms was assessed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. We observed the induction of transforming growth factor-beta2 by arecoline in HaCaT cells and this induction was found to be caused by activation of the M-3 muscarinic acid receptor via the induction of calcium and the protein kinase C pathway. Most importantly, we showed that transforming growth factor-beta2 was significantly overexpressed in oral submucous fibrosis tissues (p = 0.008), with a median of 2.13 (n = 21) compared with 0.75 (n = 18) in normal buccal mucosal tissues. Furthermore, arecoline down-regulated the expression of collagens 1A1 and 3A1 in human primary gingival fibroblasts; however these collagens were induced by arecoline in the presence of spent medium of cultured human keratinocytes. Treatment with a transforming growth factor-beta blocker, transforming growth factor-beta1 latency-associated peptide, reversed this up-regulation of collagen, suggesting a role for profibrotic cytokines, such as transforming growth factor-beta, in the induction of collagens. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of arecolineinduced epithelial changes in the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis.

  7. Metabolism of (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene by cultured human bronchus and cultured human pulmonary alveolar macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1978-01-01

    The metabolism of (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene by cultured human bronchial epithelium and pulmonary alveolar macrophages was studied. Explants of bronchus were prepared and pulmonary alveolar macrophages were isolated from peripheral lung by trypsinization and by differential adhesion to plastic tissue...

  8. Probing around implants and teeth with healthy or inflamed peri-implant mucosa/gingival. A histologic comparison in cynomolgus monkeys. (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Søren; Holmstrup, Palle; Stoltze, K.

    2002-01-01

    Osseointegrated oral implants; teeth; phathology; peri-implant mucositis; gingivitis; peri-implantitis; periodontitis; diagnosis; probing depth; non-human primates; cynomolgus monkeys: Macaca fascicularis......Osseointegrated oral implants; teeth; phathology; peri-implant mucositis; gingivitis; peri-implantitis; periodontitis; diagnosis; probing depth; non-human primates; cynomolgus monkeys: Macaca fascicularis...

  9. Rat gingival model for testing drugs influencing inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaju P Jacob

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical drug testing is an important areain new drug development where animals are used.An ideal animal model for this is one which is simple,reliable and can be extrapolated to humans. Topicaldrugs for inflammation are conventionally tested onthe skin of animals after induction of inflammation.A gingival model would be simple as inflammation canbe induced naturally by the action of plaque. Rats area popular animal model for testing drugs as well as tostudy various diseases of the periodontium. Periodontaldisease including gingival inflammation develops inrats in relation to indigenous plaque or experimentallyinduced bacterial products. A number of features ofrats ranging from anatomy, histology and response tobacterial insult can be seen mirrored to a great extentin humans. There is a lot similarity in the developmentand resolution of inflammation as well as the gingivalwound healing of rats and humans. This paper tries toexplore the feasibility of using the rat gingival modelfor preclinical testing of drugs acting on or influencinginflammation and concludes by identifying potentialareas of research using this model. The addition of sucha simple and inexpensive model for preclinical testing ofdrugs will be welcomed by the drug developers.

  10. Establishing human lacrimal gland cultures with secretory function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha Tiwari

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Dry eye syndrome is a multifactorial chronic disabling disease mainly caused by the functional disruptions in the lacrimal gland. The treatment involves palliation like ocular surface lubrication and rehydration. Cell therapy involving replacement of the gland is a promising alternative for providing long-term relief to patients. This study aimed to establish functionally competent lacrimal gland cultures in-vitro and explore the presence of stem cells in the native gland and the established in-vitro cultures. METHODS: Fresh human lacrimal gland from patients undergoing exenteration was harvested for cultures after IRB approval. The freshly isolated cells were evaluated by flow cytometry for expression of stem cell markers ABCG2, high ALDH1 levels and c-kit. Cultures were established on Matrigel, collagen and HAM and the cultured cells evaluated for the presence of stem cell markers and differentiating markers of epithelial (E-cadherin, EpCAM, mesenchymal (Vimentin, CD90 and myofibroblastic (α-SMA, S-100 origin by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The conditioned media was tested for secretory proteins (scIgA, lactoferrin, lysozyme post carbachol (100 µM stimulation by ELISA. RESULTS: Native human lacrimal gland expressed ABCG2 (mean±SEM: 3.1±0.61%, high ALDH1 (3.8±1.26% and c-kit (6.7±2.0%. Lacrimal gland cultures formed a monolayer, in order of preference on Matrigel, collagen and HAM within 15-20 days, containing a heterogeneous population of stem-like and differentiated cells. The epithelial cells formed 'spherules' with duct like connections, suggestive of ductal origin. The levels of scIgA (47.43 to 61.56 ng/ml, lysozyme (24.36 to 144.74 ng/ml and lactoferrin (32.45 to 40.31 ng/ml in the conditioned media were significantly higher than the negative controls (p<0.05 for all comparisons. CONCLUSION: The study reports the novel finding of establishing functionally competent human lacrimal gland cultures in-vitro. It also

  11. [Periodontology and esthetics: the gingival recession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corba, N H

    1991-06-01

    Gingival recessions are regarded by many people as an esthetical problem. Successively the etiology, the significance and the indications for therapy are discussed. Different kinds of therapy such as oral hygiene instruction, the free gingival graft and various pedicle grafts are explained. Finally it is advocated that surgical kinds of therapy have to be applied with reservedness.

  12. Three Dimensional Culture of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Organoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A Batchelder

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinomas arise from the nephron but are heterogeneous in disease biology, clinical behavior, prognosis, and response to systemic therapy. Development of patient-specific in vitro models that efficiently and faithfully reproduce the in vivo phenotype may provide a means to develop personalized therapies for this diverse carcinoma. Studies to maintain and model tumor phenotypes in vitro were conducted with emerging three-dimensional culture techniques and natural scaffolding materials. Human renal cell carcinomas were individually characterized by histology, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative PCR to establish the characteristics of each tumor. Isolated cells were cultured on renal extracellular matrix and compared to a novel polysaccharide scaffold to assess cell-scaffold interactions, development of organoids, and maintenance of gene expression signatures over time in culture. Renal cell carcinomas cultured on renal extracellular matrix repopulated tubules or vessel lumens in renal pyramids and medullary rays, but cells were not observed in glomeruli or outer cortical regions of the scaffold. In the polysaccharide scaffold, renal cell carcinomas formed aggregates that were loosely attached to the scaffold or free-floating within the matrix. Molecular analysis of cell-scaffold constructs including immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR demonstrated that individual tumor phenotypes could be sustained for up to 21 days in culture on both scaffolds, and in comparison to outcomes in two-dimensional monolayer cultures. The use of three-dimensional scaffolds to engineer a personalized in vitro renal cell carcinoma model provides opportunities to advance understanding of this disease.

  13. Feline gingivitis-stomatitis-pharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, K; Rosychuk, R A

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions of the feline mouth are commonly encountered in small animal practice. Although the majority can be attributed to dental disease and a small percentage are due to autoimmune diseases, the eosinophilic granuloma complex, neoplasia, and other miscellaneous syndromes, many cases appear to be due to a gingivitis-stomatitis-pharyngitis complex, which is likely multifactorial in origin. Viruses, bacterial infection, diet, dental disease, oral conformation, genetic predisposition, hypersensitivities, immunoinsufficiencies, and other defects in oral defense mechanisms may all be contributory. The complexities of this syndrome have made it one of the most challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problems in feline medicine.

  14. Preliminary characterization of the oral microbiota of Chinese adults with and without gingivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial communities inhabiting human mouth are associated with oral health and disease. Previous studies have indicated the general prevalence of adult gingivitis in China to be high. The aim of this study was to characterize in depth the oral microbiota of Chinese adults with or without gingivitis, by defining the microbial phylogenetic diversity and community-structure using highly paralleled pyrosequencing. Methods Six non-smoking Chinese, three with and three without gingivitis (age range 21-39 years, 4 females and 2 males were enrolled in the present cross-sectional study. Gingival parameters of inflammation and bleeding on probing were characterized by a clinician using the Mazza Gingival Index (MGI. Plaque (sampled separately from four different oral sites and salivary samples were obtained from each subject. Sequences and relative abundance of the bacterial 16 S rDNA PCR-amplicons were determined via pyrosequencing that produced 400 bp-long reads. The sequence data were analyzed via a computational pipeline customized for human oral microbiome analyses. Furthermore, the relative abundances of selected microbial groups were validated using quantitative PCR. Results The oral microbiomes from gingivitis and healthy subjects could be distinguished based on the distinct community structures of plaque microbiomes, but not the salivary microbiomes. Contributions of community members to community structure divergence were statistically accessed at the phylum, genus and species-like levels. Eight predominant taxa were found associated with gingivitis: TM7, Leptotrichia, Selenomonas, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Prevotella, Lautropia, and Haemophilus. Furthermore, 98 species-level OTUs were identified to be gingivitis-associated, which provided microbial features of gingivitis at a species resolution. Finally, for the two selected genera Streptococcus and Fusobacterium, Real-Time PCR based quantification of relative bacterial

  15. Challenges of culturing human norovirus in three-dimensional organoid intestinal cell culture models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathia Papafragkou

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Recently, cell culture systems have been described using either human embryonic intestinal epithelial cells (Int-407 or human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2 growing on collagen-I porous micro carrier beads in a rotating bioreactor under conditions of physiological fluid shear. Here, we describe the efforts from two independent laboratories to implement this three dimensional (3D cell culture system for the replication of norovirus. Int-407 and Caco-2 were grown in a rotating bioreactor for up to 28 days. Prior to infection, cells were screened for the presence of microvilli by electron microscopy and stained for junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and β-catenin. Differentiated 3D cells were transferred to 24-well plates and infected with bacteria-free filtrates of various norovirus genotypes (GI.1, GI.3, GI.8, GII.2, GII.4, GII.7, and GII.8. At 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h post inoculation, viral RNA from both cells and supernatants were collected and analyzed for norovirus RNA by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Despite observations of high expression of junction proteins and microvilli development in stained thin sections, our data suggest no significant increase in viral titer based on norovirus RNA copy number during the first 48 h after inoculation for the different samples and virus culture conditions tested. Our combined efforts demonstrate that 3D cell culture models using Int-407 or Caco-2 cells do not support norovirus replication and highlight the complexity and difficulty of developing a reproducible in vitro cell culture system for human norovirus.

  16. Effects of Choukroun's platelet-rich fibrin on human gingival fibroblasts proliferation, migration and type Ⅰ collagen secretion%富血小板纤维蛋白对人牙龈成纤维细胞增殖、迁移和分泌Ⅰ型胶原的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范文娟; 杨明; 张晨; 薛蕊; 张炜; 秦红霞

    2013-01-01

    fibroblasts (HGF) biological behavior such as proliferation,migration and collagen-Ⅰ expression.Methods Human healthy gingival tissues were cultured according to the explant technique to obtain primary cultures.PRF was prepared by means of Choukroun' s.HGF were co-cultured with PRF membrane originating from the same donor as the explants,divided into three groups,PRF1 group,PRF2 group and blank control group.Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium(MTT) assay was used for cytotoxicity and cell proliferation study,and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for collagen-Ⅰ (COL-Ⅰ) secretion study at the 1st,3rd,5th day respectively.Eluates from PRF membrane was prepared,and divided into three groups,PRF1 group,PRF2 group and blank control group.Transwell chamber was utilized to determine the effect of PRF membrane eluate on cell migration.Results The A values of HGF in culture of the PRF1 (0.615 ±0.036,0.686 ± 0.006,0.693 ± 0.004) and PRF2 groups (0.653 ± 0.023,0.766 ± 0.034,0.775 ± 0.053)were significantly higher than those of the control cultures(0.514 ± 0.020,0.544 ± 0.006,0.545 ± 0.009)(P <0.01),but the difference between PRF1 and PRF2 group was not significant(P > 0.05).In each group at different time points,the HGF proliferation effect was significantly enhanced with time (P< 0.01).Cell migration test showed that the migration numbers of HGF in PRF1 and PRF2 groups (85.67 ± 2.94,85.83 ± 1.47)were significantly higher than those of the control group (54.17 ± 2.48) (P <0.01),but the difference between the two experimental groups was not significant (P > 0.05).COL-Ⅰsecretion test exhibited that the A values of COL-Ⅰ in PRF1 (0.184 ± 0.004,0.200 ± 0.004,0.204 ±0.009) and PRF2 group (0.213 ± 0.008,0.226 ± 0.005,0.229 ± 0.006) were significantly higher than the A values of the control group (0.174 ± 0.002,0.184 ± 0.002,0.186 ± 0.003) (P < 0.01),but the difference between the two experimental groups was not significant(P > 0.05).In each group

  17. The vaginal microflora in relation to gingivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibel Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gingivitis has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcome (APO. Bacterial vaginosis (BV has been associated with APO. We assessed if bacterial counts in BV is associated with gingivitis suggesting a systemic infectious susceptibilty. Methods Vaginal samples were collected from 180 women (mean age 29.4 years, SD ± 6.8, range: 18 to 46, and at least six months after delivery, and assessed by semi-quantitative DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization assay (74 bacterial species. BV was defined by Gram stain (Nugent criteria. Gingivitis was defined as bleeding on probing at ≥ 20% of tooth sites. Results A Nugent score of 0–3 (normal vaginal microflora was found in 83 women (46.1%, and a score of > 7 (BV in 49 women (27.2%. Gingivitis was diagnosed in 114 women (63.3%. Women with a diagnosis of BV were more likely to have gingivitis (p = 0.01. Independent of gingival conditions, vaginal bacterial counts were higher (p Prevotella bivia (p Prevotella disiens (p P. bivia, P. disiens, M. curtisii and M. mulieris (all at the p 1.0 × 104 cells and a diagnosis of gingivitis was 3.9 for P. bivia (95% CI 1.5–5.7, p P. disiens (95%CI: 1.8–7.5, p P. bivia (odds ratio: 5.3, 95%CI: 2.6 to 10.4, p P. disiens (odds ratio: 4.4, 95% CI: 2.2 to 8.8, p Conclusion Higher vaginal bacterial counts can be found in women with BV and gingivitis in comparison to women with BV but not gingivitis. P. bivia and P. disiens may be of specific significance in a relationship between vaginal and gingival infections.

  18. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ito

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and citrate synthase (CS, which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1 and aggrecan (ACAN, was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9, which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and

  19. Xeno-free culture of human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubiani, Oriana; Diomede, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of transplanting adult stem cells into damaged organs has opened a new prospective for the treatment of several human pathologies. Currently, in vitro expansion and culture of mesenchymal stem cells is founded on supplementing cell culture and differentiation medium with fetal calf serum (FCS) or fetal bovine serum (FBS) that contain numerous growth factors inducing cell attachment to plastic surfaces, proliferation, and differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured with medium containing FCS or FBS are unusable in the cell therapy; in fact the central issues regarding limitations in using animal sera for cell therapy is that its components are highly variable and often unknown and may trigger a xenogenic immune response, immunological reactions, and the potential transmission of prion diseases and zoonoses. Here we describe the culture system protocols for the expansion and production of human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs) using a new xeno-free medium formulation ensuring the maintenance of the stem cells features comprising the multiple passage expansion, mesengenic lineage differentiation, cellular phenotype, and genomic stability, essential elements for conforming to translation to cell therapy.

  20. Cultural and psychological dimensions of human organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P A; Daar, A S

    1998-01-01

    Human organ transplantation is practiced in local cultural worlds that shape beliefs about appropriate conduct for its development and application. The psychological response of individuals to the transplant experience mediate and condition its life-changing force in the context of family and community. In this paper, three cases are examined to illustrate the impact of cultural and psychological influences on human organ replacement therapies. First, we explore brain death and its implications for the definition of death and the procurement of organs. A case example from Japan provides the framework for addressing the cultural foundations that contribute to perceptions of personhood and the treatment of the body. Second, we examine marketing incentives for organ donation using a case from India where, until recently, explicit forms of financial incentives have played a role in the development of renal transplantation involving non-related living donors. Third, we focus on the psychological remifications of organ transplantation using a case that demonstrates the profound experience of being the recipient of the "gift of life". Resolution of scientific and ethical challenges in the field of organ transplantation must consider the complex and significant impact of cultural and psychological factors on organ replacement therapies.

  1. Genotoxicity of the herbicide butachlor in cultured human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, S; Panneerselvam, N; Shanmugam, G

    1995-08-01

    Butachlor, a pre-emergence herbicide was investigated for its ability to induce sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosome aberrations (CA) in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes were treated with three different concentrations (5, 10 and 20 micrograms/ml) of butachlor for 24, 48 and 72 h. Our results indicate a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations at 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment with butachlor. No SCE was promoted by butachlor.

  2. Universality of Man as a Cultural and Historical Human Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the grounds of theoretical synthesis, the paper reveals the phenomenon of human being in its creative dimension. The present research is aimed at exploring the prospective opportunities for academic processes. The basics of universal essence of man as a cultural historic being with unlimited potential of self- development are defined; the man being mirrored by the basic philosophic concepts: naturalistic, orthodox-oriented, bio-social or bio-socio-cultural. There are two opposing views on human nature: the anthropological essentialism holding that individuality is predetermined by essence; and the anthropological existentialism claiming the opposite – human existence precedes the essentiality, the latter being constituted by the acts of choice, self-development and self-responsibility for personal choice and projecting. In the first case, the subjective side of human existence is ignored, while in the second – the objective socially conditioned side is left behind. Both theories are antihistorical as it is the history that conditions the essence of man according to the ancestral determination, the latter being modified by way of human activity and communication in a particular historical period. The components of human universal essence are defined as follows: possession of organic body, social heritage, free will, self-activity, creativity, social and rational human nature, absence of antagonistic programs of social behavior. According to the author, for the adequate realization of human universality, it is necessary to move from the profit oriented speculative market economy to the creative one oriented on social effectiveness, quality of life and reproduction of wholesome individuals. The research output can be used for devising the methodology of philosophic and pedagogic anthropology, as well as pedagogic practices of teaching philosophy and pedagogic theory in higher school. 

  3. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide KSL-W on Human Gingival Tissue and C. albicans Growth, Transition and Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase (SAPS) 2, 4, 5 and 6 Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    filamentous growth [3]. This occurs through the DNA binding protein Nrg1p in conjunction with the global transcriptional repressorral Ltd. This is an open...at 1200 rpm and the super- natant was removed. The remaining pellet from each well was then washed with warm PBS, with 200 μl of 0.04 N HCl in...antimicrobial peptide mimetic against planktonic and biofilm cultures of oral pathogens. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2007, 51:4125–4132. 50. Patrzykat

  4. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  5. Biological Effects of Culture Substrates on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Yohei Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, as human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been commonly cultured in feeder-free conditions, a number of cell culture substrates have been applied or developed. However, the functional roles of these substrates in maintaining hPSC self-renewal remain unclear. Here in this review, we summarize the types of these substrates and their effect on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression has been shown to be crucial in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. These ECM molecules interact with integrin cell-surface receptors and transmit their cellular signaling. We discuss the possible effect of integrin-mediated signaling pathways on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Activation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK, which transmits ECM-integrin signaling to AKT (also known as protein kinase B, has been shown to be critical in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Also, since naïve pluripotency has been widely recognized as an alternative pluripotent state of hPSCs, we discuss the possible effects of culture substrates and integrin signaling on naïve hPSCs based on the studies of mouse embryonic stem cells. Understanding the role of culture substrates in hPSC self-renewal and differentiation enables us to control hPSC behavior precisely and to establish scalable or microfabricated culture technologies for regenerative medicine and drug development.

  6. Genotoxic Effects of Culture Media on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Bangalore, Megha; Adhikarla, Syama; Mukherjee, Odity; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2017-01-01

    Culture conditions play an important role in regulating the genomic integrity of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (HPSCs). We report that HPSCs cultured in Essential 8 (E8) and mTeSR, two widely used media for feeder-free culturing of HPSCs, had many fold higher levels of ROS and higher mitochondrial potential than cells cultured in Knockout Serum Replacement containing media (KSR). HPSCs also exhibited increased levels of 8-hydroxyguanosine, phospho-histone-H2a.X and p53, as well as increased sensitivity to γ-irradiation in these two media. HPSCs in E8 and mTeSR had increased incidence of changes in their DNA sequence, indicating genotoxic stress, in addition to changes in nucleolar morphology and number. Addition of antioxidants to E8 and mTeSR provided only partial rescue. Our results suggest that it is essential to determine cellular ROS levels in addition to currently used criteria i.e. pluripotency markers, differentiation into all three germ layers and normal karyotype through multiple passages, in designing culture media. PMID:28176872

  7. Biocompatibility of alloys used in orthodontics evaluated by cell culture tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locci, P; Marinucci, L; Lilli, C; Belcastro, S; Staffolani, N; Bellocchio, S; Damiani, F; Becchetti, E

    2000-09-15

    The cytotoxicity of the most common alloys used in orthodontic appliances was determined by cell culture testing. Human gingival fibroblasts were cultured on 304 and 316 stainless steel, on brazing alloy composed of palladium (Pd), copper (Cu), and silver (Ag), and on plastic substrate (control). Studies were carried out with SEM and radiolabeled precursor incorporation. Cells were cultured in MEM without serum but with the addition of (3)H-thymidine to evaluate cell proliferation and (3)H-glucosamine to evaluate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis and secretion in the culture medium. Moreover, gingival fibroblasts were cultured in the presence of some metal ions generally released by orthodontic appliances to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of single ions. Morphologic observations with SEM and radiolabeled incorporation studies showed that 304 and 316 stainless steel were more biocompatible than the brazing alloy. Among the metal ions tested, Ag and Pd, constituents of the brazing alloy, showed the highest cytotoxicity.

  8. In vitro assessment of the soft tissue/implant interface using porcine gingival explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Willberg, Jaana; Syrjänen, Stina; Vallittu, Pekka K; Närhi, Timo O

    2015-01-01

    The biologic seal of peri-implant soft tissue is crucial for long-term prognosis of oral implants. This in vitro study describes a novel tissue culture model using porcine gingival explants to evaluate the soft tissue/implant interface. Two different types of substrates were investigated: (a) plain polymer: BisGMA-TEGDMA (50-50 %) and (b) unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Porcine gingival explants were obtained from a local slaughterhouse. The experimental implants (n = 4) were inserted into the middle of freshly excised porcine gingival explants and cultured at the air/liquid interface up to 14 days. Porcine gingival explants with no implants served as baseline controls. The specimens were fixed and processed for the preparation of undecalcified samples. Histological analysis of the soft tissue/implant interface was carried out using a light-microscope. Microscopic evaluation suggests that the gingival explants established epithelial and connective tissue attachment to both implant types over the incubation period. FRC surfaces seemed to have a favorable tissue response with a sign of an outward epithelial migration. However, tissue degeneration was observed at the end of the experiment. In conclusion, this in vitro model maintains mucosal viability and ability to histologically evaluate soft tissue attachment to biomaterials rendering it a time efficient and cost effective model that may reduce the need for animal experiments.

  9. Reciprocity, culture and human cooperation: previous insights and a new cross-cultural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gächter, Simon; Herrmann, Benedikt

    2009-03-27

    Understanding the proximate and ultimate sources of human cooperation is a fundamental issue in all behavioural sciences. In this paper, we review the experimental evidence on how people solve cooperation problems. Existing studies show without doubt that direct and indirect reciprocity are important determinants of successful cooperation. We also discuss the insights from a large literature on the role of peer punishment in sustaining cooperation. The experiments demonstrate that many people are 'strong reciprocators' who are willing to cooperate and punish others even if there are no gains from future cooperation or any other reputational gains. We document this in new one-shot experiments, which we conducted in four cities in Russia and Switzerland. Our cross-cultural approach allows us furthermore to investigate how the cultural background influences strong reciprocity. Our results show that culture has a strong influence on positive and in especially strong negative reciprocity. In particular, we find large cross-cultural differences in 'antisocial punishment' of pro-social cooperators. Further cross-cultural research and experiments involving different socio-demographic groups document that the antisocial punishment is much more widespread than previously assumed. Understanding antisocial punishment is an important task for future research because antisocial punishment is a strong inhibitor of cooperation.

  10. The evolution of culture: from primate social learning to human culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Laureano; Toro, Miguel A

    2004-07-01

    Cultural transmission in our species works most of the time as a cumulative inheritance system allowing members of a group to incorporate behavioral features not only with a positive biological value but sometimes also with a neutral, or even negative, biological value. Most of models of dual inheritance theory and gene-culture coevolution suggest that an increase, either qualitative or quantitative, in the efficiency of imitation is the key factor to explain the transformation of primate social learning in a cumulative cultural system of inheritance as it happens during hominization. We contend that more efficient imitation is necessary but not enough for this transformation to occur and that the key factor enabling such a transformation is that some hominids developed the capacity to approve or disapprove their offspring's learned behavior. This capacity to approve or disapprove offspring's behavior makes learning both less costly and more accurate, and it transformed the hominid culture into a system of cumulative cultural inheritance similar to that of humans, although the system was still prelinguistic in nature.

  11. Melanin: A scavenger in gingival inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nilima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the major direct or indirect targets of ultraviolet exposure of skin is the melanocyte or the melanin -forming cell. Epidermal melanocytes act as a trap for free radicals. Based on the protective role of melanocytes in medical literature, the role of melanin pigmentation in gingiva needs to be elucidated. Periodontal pathogens and their products demonstrate the ability to induce the generation of reactive oxygen species. Hence purpose of this study was to unravel the protective role of melanin (if any against the gingival inflammation. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects; 20 in each group were selected. The selection of subjects regarding gingival pigmentation was based on Dummett′s scoring criteria 0, 3. A complete medical, dental history and an informed consent were obtained from the patients. After evaluation of clinical parameters the GCF was collected using microcapillary pipettes at the selected sites. IL-1β levels were quantitated using ELISA. Results: In non-pigmented healthy and gingivitis groups, there was a positive correlation between plaque index, gingival index and bleeding index versus IL-1β level: indicating an increase in the biochemical mediator of inflammation corresponding to an increase in the clinical parameters of inflammation. Also a positive correlation was found between the gingival index and bleeding index versus the IL-1β levels in the pigmented healthy group. The pigmented gingivitis groups showed a negative correlation between the plaque index, gingival index and bleeding index. Conclusions: The clinical markers of inflammation such as gingival index, bleeding index was of low numerical value in pigmented group than in the non-pigmented group, supposedly due to the protective action of melanin. The negative correlation of clinical markers of inflammation to the IL-1β levels in the pigmented gingivitis group could possibly be attributed to the protective role of melanins.

  12. Gingivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with some systemic diseases such as respiratory disease, diabetes, coronary artery disease, stroke and rheumatoid arthritis. Some research suggests that the bacteria responsible for periodontitis can enter your bloodstream through gum tissue, possibly ...

  13. Idiopathic gingival enlargement: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Shah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis is a relatively rare condition characterized by the proliferation of the gingival tissues resulting in masticatory, esthetics, phonetics and psychological disturbances. We present a case with generalized diffuse gingival enlargement involving the maxillary and mandibular arches extending on buccal and lingual/palatal surfaces and covering incisal/occlusal third of the tooth in the left maxillary region. Gingivectomy was carried out in all four quadrants. Periodic recalls showed maintenance of good oral hygiene and one year follow-up revealed no recurrence.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(1: 26-28

  14. Oral gingival metastasis: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Aswath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cavity is a rare target for metastasis with an incidence of 1% among all oral cancers. In 24% of such cases, oral metastasis is the first indication of an undiagnosed primary. Metastatic oral malignancies have been reported in the mandible, tongue, and gingiva. Although gingival metastasis has been reported from lung, prostate, rectal carcinoma in men and carcinoma of breast, adrenal glands, and genitalia in females, gingival metastasis from carcinoma of the penis has not been reported. Herein, a case of metastatic gingival carcinoma that developed after extraction of teeth from primary carcinoma of the penis is presented. An extensive literature search revealed no such similar case reports.

  15. Plasma cell gingivitis: treatment with chlorpheniramine maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan Thiruputkuzhi; Chandran, Chitraa R; Prabhakar, Priya; Lakshmiganthan, Mahalingam; Parthasaradhi, Thakkalapati

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a benign lesion of unknown etiology characterized by massive and diffuse infiltration of plasma cells into the gingival connective tissue. Clinically, it can be seen as a diffuse, erythematous, and edematous swelling involving the marginal gingiva and extending into the attached gingiva. Although usually painless, the lesion can be esthetically unappealing, especially when anterior gingiva is involved. Although the usual line of management is removal of the offending agent, this report describes the treatment of plasma cell gingivitis with the topical application of chlorpheniramine maleate (25 mg) for a period of 10 days.

  16. Has solar variability caused climate change that affected human culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feynman, Joan

    If solar variability affects human culture it most likely does so by changing the climate in which the culture operates. Variations in the solar radiative input to the Earth's atmosphere have often been suggested as a cause of such climate change on time scales from decades to tens of millennia. In the last 20 years there has been enormous progress in our knowledge of the many fields of research that impinge on this problem; the history of the solar output, the effect of solar variability on the Earth's mean climate and its regional patterns, the history of the Earth's climate and the history of mankind and human culture. This new knowledge encourages revisiting the question asked in the title of this talk. Several important historical events have been reliably related to climate change including the Little Ice Age in northern Europe and the collapse of the Classical Mayan civilization in the 9th century AD. In the first section of this paper we discus these historical events and review the evidence that they were caused by changes in the solar output. Perhaps the most important event in the history of mankind was the development of agricultural societies. This began to occur almost 12,000 years ago when the climate changed from the Pleistocene to the modern climate of the Holocene. In the second section of the paper we will discuss the suggestion ( Feynman and Ruzmaikin, 2007) that climate variability was the reason agriculture developed when it did and not before.

  17. Cultural alteration of human teeth in the Mariana Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara-Quebral, R; Douglas, M T

    1997-11-01

    Evidence of cultural dental modification in a precontact (pre-1521) skeletal sample from the Academy of Our Lady of Guam gymnasium site in Agana, Guam, is documented. Two of the four individuals recovered at the Academy Gym site exhibit modification of the maxillary teeth. One individual displays vertical incising of a single tooth, and the other exhibits horizontal abrading of the anterior teeth which may be a purposeful or an incidental alteration. Although deliberate alteration of the dentition, including tooth extraction, notching, filing, and drilling, has been documented in human groups worldwide, little has been written about these cultural practices in the Mariana Islands. Examination of the available literature on precontact human remains from the region reveals at least three patterns of dental incising and similar cases of dental abrasion. While the origins of these practices are not known, the presence and style of these cultural alterations may be sex-specific, cosmetic in nature, or an indication of status in a ranked society. Alternatively, they may signify membership in a particular group or lineage, or mark a rite of passage. Because the comparative samples are limited in number and small, and the provenience of many of the skeletons is obscure, temporal variation cannot be ruled out.

  18. Analysis of Delphinidin and Luteolin Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocyte Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Ezić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bioflavonoids delphinidin (2-(3,4,5-Trihydroxyphenylchromenylium-3,5,7-triol and luteolin (2-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl-5,7-dihydroxy-4-chromenone have been recognized as promising antioxidants and anticancer substances. Due to their extensive use, the goal of the research was to determine whether they have any genotoxic potential in vitro.Methods: Analysis of genotoxic potential was performed applying chromosome aberrations test in human lymphocyte culture, as this kind of research was not conducted abundantly for these two bioflavonoids. Delphinidin and luteolin were dissolved in DMSO and added to cultures in final concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 μM.Results: In human lymphocytes cultures Delphinidin induced PCDs in all treatments, potentially affecting the cell cycle and topoisomerase II activity. In concentration of 50 μM luteolin showed strong genotoxic effects and caused significant reduction of cell proliferation.Conclusion: Luteolin exhibited certain genotoxic and cytostatic potential. Delphinidin was not considered genotoxic, however its impact on mitosis, especially topoisomerase II activity, was revealed.

  19. Human ES cells: starting culture from frozen cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-11-09

    Here we demonstrate how our lab begins a HuES human embryonic stem cell line culture from a frozen stock. First, a one to two day old ten cm plate of approximately one (to two) million irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells is rinsed with HuES media to remove residual serum and cell debris, and then HuES media added and left to equilibrate in the cell culture incubator. A frozen vial of cells from long term liquid nitrogen storage or a -80 C freezer is sourced and quickly submerged in a 37 C water bath for quick thawing. Cells in freezing media are then removed from the vial and placed in a large volume of HuES media. The large volume of HuES media facilitates removal of excess serum and DMSO, which can cause HuES human embryonic stem cells to differentiate. Cells are gently spun out of suspension, and then re-suspended in a small volume of fresh HuES media that is then used to seed the MEF plate. It is considered important to seed the MEF plate by gently adding the HuES cells in a drop wise fashion to evenly disperse them throughout the plate. The newly established HuES culture plate is returned to the incubator for 48 hrs before media is replaced, then is fed every 24 hours thereafter.

  20. Characterization of tendon cell cultures of the human rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, S; Klatte, F; Strobel, C; Schmidmaier, G; Greiner, S; Scheibel, M; Wildemann, B

    2010-07-26

    Rotator cuff tears are common soft tissue injuries of the musculoskeletal system that heal by formation of repair tissue and may lead to high retear rates and joint dysfunction. In particular, tissue from chronic, large tendon tears is of such degenerative nature that it may be prone to retear after surgical repair. Besides several biomechanical approaches, biologically based strategies such as application of growth factors may be promising for increasing cell activity and production of extracellular tendon matrix at the tendon-to-bone unit. As a precondition for subsequent experimental growth factor application, the aim of the present study was to establish and characterize a human rotator cuff tendon cell culture. Long head biceps (LHB)- and supraspinatus muscle (SSP)- tendon samples from donor patients undergoing shoulder surgery were cultivated and examined at the RNA level for expression of collagen type-I, -II and -III, biglycan, decorin, tenascin-C, aggrecan, osteocalcin, tenomodulin and scleraxis (by Real-time PCR). Finally, results were compared to chondrocytes and osteoblasts as control cells. An expression pattern was found which may reflect a human rotator cuff tenocyte-like cell culture. Both SSP and LHB tenocyte-like cells differed from chondrocyte cell cultures in terms of reduced expression of collagen type-II (ptendon matrix and osteofibroblastic integration at the tendon-bone unit following tendon repair.

  1. Treatment of gingival recession in two surgical stages: Free gingival graft and connective tissue grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Paulo Sergio Gomes; Nunes, Marcelo Pereira; Pelegrine, Andre Antonio

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a clinical case of severe Miller Class II gingival recession treated by two stages of surgery that combined a free gingival graft and connective tissue grafting. First, a free gingival graft (FGG) was performed to obtain an adequate keratinized tissue level. Three months later, a connective tissue graft (CTG) was performed to obtain root coverage. The results indicated that the FGG allows for a gain in the keratinized tissue level and the CTG allows for root coverage with decreased recession level after 16 months. Therefore, for this type of specific gingival recession, the combination of FGG and CTG can be used.

  2. Human autologous serum as a substitute for fetal bovine serum in human Schwann cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Goodarzi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, cell -based and tissue engineered products have opened new horizons in treatment of incurable nervous system disorders. The number of studies on the role of Schwann cells (SC in treating nervous disorders is higher than other cell types. Different protocols have been suggested for isolation and expansion of SC which most of them have used multiple growth factors, mitogens and fetal bovine sera (FBS in culture medium. Because of potential hazards of animal-derived reagents, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of replacing FBS with human autologous serum (HAS on SC's yield and culture parameters. Samples from 10 peripheral nerve biopsies were retrieved and processed under aseptic condition. The isolated cells cultured in FBS (1st group or autologous serum (2nd group. After primary culture the cells were seeded at 10000 cell/cm2 in a 12 wells cell culture plate for each group. At 100% confluency, the cell culture parameters (count, viability, purity and culture duration of 2 groups were compared using paired t-test. The average donors' age was 35.80 (SD=13.35 and except for 1 sample the others cultured successfully. In first group, the averages of cell purity, viability and culture duration were 97% (SD=1.32, 97/33% (SD=1.22 and 11.77 (SD=2.58 days respectively. This parameters were 97.33% (SD=1.00, 97.55% (SD=1.33 and 10.33 days (SD=1.65 in second group. The difference of cell count, purity and viability were not significant between 2 groups (P>0.05. The cells of second group reached to 100% confluency in shorter period of time (P=0.03. The results of this study showed that autologous serum can be a good substitute for FBS in human SC culture. This can reduce the costs and improve the safety of cell product for clinical application.

  3. LIN28A expression reduces sickling of cultured human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcellos, Jaira F; Fasano, Ross M; Lee, Y Terry; Kaushal, Megha; Byrnes, Colleen; Meier, Emily R; Anderson, Molly; Rabel, Antoinette; Braylan, Raul; Stroncek, David F; Miller, Jeffery L

    2014-01-01

    Induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) has therapeutic importance for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and the beta-thalassemias. It was recently reported that increased expression of LIN28 proteins or decreased expression of its target let-7 miRNAs enhances HbF levels in cultured primary human erythroblasts from adult healthy donors. Here LIN28A effects were studied further using erythrocytes cultured from peripheral blood progenitor cells of pediatric subjects with SCD. Transgenic expression of LIN28A was accomplished by lentiviral transduction in CD34(+) sickle cells cultivated ex vivo in serum-free medium. LIN28A over-expression (LIN28A-OE) increased HbF, reduced beta (sickle)-globin, and strongly suppressed all members of the let-7 family of miRNAs. LIN28A-OE did not affect erythroblast differentiation or prevent enucleation, but it significantly reduced or ameliorated the sickling morphologies of the enucleated erythrocytes.

  4. Human rights, cultural pluralism, and international health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Patricia A

    2005-01-01

    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically on health research conducted in resource-poor settings. I will demonstrate the potential for addressing human rights considerations in international health research with special attention to the importance of collaborative partnerships, capacity building, and respect for cultural traditions. Strengthening professional knowledge about international research ethics increases awareness of ethical concerns associated with study design and informed consent among researchers working in resource-poor settings. But this is not enough. Technological and financial resources are also necessary to build capacity for local communities to ensure that research results are integrated into existing health systems. Problematic issues surrounding the application of ethical guidelines in resource-poor settings are embedded in social history, cultural context, and the global political economy. Resolving the moral complexities requires a commitment to engaged dialogue and action among investigators, funding agencies, policy makers, governmental institutions, and private industry.

  5. Low doses of X-rays induce prolonged and ATM-independent persistence of γH2AX foci in human gingival mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Pustovalova, Margarita; Grekhova, Anna; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyova, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry Y; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-09-29

    Diagnostic imaging delivering low doses of radiation often accompany human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-based therapies. However, effects of low dose radiation on MSCs are poorly characterized. Here we examine patterns of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) and phospho-S1981 ATM (pATM) foci formation in human gingiva-derived MSCs exposed to X-rays in time-course and dose-response experiments. Both γH2AX and pATM foci accumulated linearly with dose early after irradiation (5-60 min), with a maximum induction observed at 30-60 min (37 ± 3 and 32 ± 3 foci/cell/Gy for γH2AX and pATM, respectively). The number of γH2AX foci produced by intermediate doses (160 and 250 mGy) significantly decreased (40-60%) between 60 and 240 min post-irradiation, indicating rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, γH2AX foci produced by low doses (20-80 mGy) did not change after 60 min. The number of pATM foci between 60 and 240 min decreased down to control values in a dose-independent manner. Similar kinetics was observed for pATM foci co-localized with γH2AX foci. Collectively, our results suggest differential DNA double-strand break signaling and processing in response to low vs. intermediate doses of X-rays in human MSCs. Furthermore, mechanisms governing the prolonged persistence of γH2AX foci in these cells appear to be ATM-independent.

  6. Massive pregnancy gingival enlargement: A rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amitabh; Gupta, Krishna Kumar; Srivastava, Sunita; Garg, Jaishree

    2013-07-01

    Gingival enlargement related to pregnancy is sometimes seen in the oral cavity. Pregnancy is a physiological state that brings full of changes in a woman's life. The metabolism and immunology of the body are modified by progesterone and estrogen as well as other local factors, these sex hormones may modify the oral mucosa and may lead to various periodontal diseases. A case of female patient 23 yrs of age reported during 8(th) month of pregnancy with a localised gingival enlargement affecting the buccal aspect of left maxillary central incisor upto canine. The hormonal changes occurring during pregnancy may be associated with generalized or localised gingival enlargement and the presence of local factors may accentuate the gingival response. Rarely the enlargement becomes maasive and protrude out extraorally.

  7. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis with distinctive facies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sunkara Shree Ramalinga; Radharani, Chitturi; Sinha, Soumya; Kumar, Sv Kiran

    2012-11-01

    Hereditary gingival enlargement also known as gingivitis or familial elephantiasis is a rare type of gingival enlargement. It appears as an isolated autosomal dominant disorder or maybe associated with other conditions. Oral manifestations may vary from minimal involvement of only tuberosity area and the buccal gingiva around the lower molars to a generalized enlargement inhibiting eruption of the teeth. This paper discusses the case of a 13-year-old female patient with distinctive facial characteristics who presented to the department with a chief complaint of swollen gums since 1 year. She had severe diffuse gingival enlargement of the maxilla and mandible. Diagnosis was made based upon clinical examination and family history. Quadrant wise internal bevel gingivectomy procedure was done for the patient to restore her functional and esthetic needs.

  8. Salivary cytokine levels in early gingival inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Damgaard, Christian; Könönen, Eija

    2017-01-01

    chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, IL-1β, and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in gingival inflammation. Twenty-eight systemically and orally healthy nonsmokers abstained from oral hygiene protocols for 10 days. After that, self-performed cleaning was resumed for 14 days. Plaque and gingival indexes were measured......Salivary protein levels have been studied in periodontitis. However, there is lack of information on salivary cytokine levels in early gingival inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine salivary levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL)-8, monocyte......, and saliva samples were collected at days 1, 4, 7, 10, and 24. Salivary cytokines were detected with Luminex®-xMAP™. Salivary IL-1β, IL-1Ra, and VEGF levels decreased after 10 days' development of experimental gingivitis and reached baseline levels at the end of the 2-week resolution period. Salivary IL-8...

  9. An unusual clinical presentation of gingival melanoacanthoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. K. Kennedy Babu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival melanoacanthoma is a rare, benign pigmented lesion characterized clinically by sudden onset and rapid growth of a macular brown black lesion and histologically by acanthosis of superficial epithelium and proliferation of dendritic melanocytes. This article reports a previously undescribed case of pigmented unilateral diffuse gingival enlargement, which on histopathological examination proved to be melanoacanthoma. Intraoral examination revealed pigmented unilateral diffuse gingival enlargement in relation to second and third quadrants buccally, palatally/lingually. Based on these clinical findings, gingivectomy was performed and the excised tissue was sent for biopsy. Microscopic examination revealed acanthotic and parakeratotic surface epithelium with dendritic melanocytes distributed in basal and suprabasal layers of the epithelium. 1 year follow-up recall revealed no recurrence of lesion at the surgical sites. Our patient exhibits an unusual clinical presentation of melanoacanthoma of gingiva. Pigmented gingival overgrowth of recent origin and without any etiologic factors warrants histopathologic examination.

  10. Restoring gingival harmony around single tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reikie, D F

    1995-07-01

    One of the biggest challenges to restoring a single tooth implant in the esthetic zone of the mouth is the creation of harmonious gingival contour around the restoration. Soft- or hard-tissue deficiencies of the edentulous space are the most common obstacles to achieving gingival symmetry around the proposed restoration. Numerous gingival and osseous grafting and regeneration techniques are available but may complicate treatment by increasing the number of surgical procedures and sites necessary. This article describes a technique for treating mild-to-moderate ridge defects without the required additional surgical procedures or a surgical donor site. Soft-tissue overcontouring is provided around the healing abutment by modification of the surgical flap at second-stage implant surgery. Subsequent gingivoplasty allows establishment of anatomic gingival architecture that surrounds the single implant prosthesis.

  11. Plasma Cell Gingivitis: An Occasional Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M B; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis, an infrequently observed oral condition, has been clinically characterized by diffuse gingival enlargement, erythema and sometimes desquamation. These lesions are usually asymptomatic, but invariably the patient will complain of a burning sensation in the gingiva and bleeding from the mouth. The diagnosis requires hematological screening in addition to clinical and histopathological examinations. This case report outlines one such case of plasma cell gingivitis in a 15-year-old female caused by use of an herbal, homemade toothpowder. The case presented here highlights the adverse effects and irrational use of herbal agents in dentifrices. At the same time, it emphasizes the need for comprehensive history taking, careful clinical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for gingival conditions that are refractory to conventional therapy and to exclude certain malignancies and oral manifestations of systemic diseases.

  12. Phenytoin- and amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Wen Chang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is an adverse event associated with three types of drugs, i.e., anticonvulsants, immunosuppressants, and calcium-channel blockers. It was shown that the combined use of an immunosuppressant (cyclosporine and a calcium-channel blocker increases the prevalence and severity of gingival overgrowth. However, few reports discussed the effects of the combination of an anticonvulsant (phenytoin and a calcium-channel blocker (amlodipine. In this case report, we present an epilepsy patient who was using both phenytoin and amlodipine, which caused extensive gingival overgrowth. After periodontal treatment and a gingivectomy, the gingival overgrowth was significantly reduced. A postoperative drug-substitution regimen and intensive professional care ensured a stable result 1 year after surgery.

  13. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  14. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  15. Regulation of Interleukin—6 Production by Cultured Human Thyrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段宇; 刘超; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the modulation of interleukin-6(IL-6) generation from human thyroid cells.Methods Thryoid tissues were obtained at surgery from patients with Graves disease.IL-6 in the supernatant of cultured thyrocytes was detected with ultra-sensitive ELISA.mRNA was extracted respectively from primany human cultured thyroidal cells under stimulated and unstimulated conditions,and semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction(RTPCR) technique was used for IL-6 mRNA detection.Results:(1) In the basic conditions,thyroid cells can produce high concentration IL-6.Thyrotropin(TSH,103mU/L),tumor necrosis factorα(TNF-α,10-1U/ml),interleukin-1(IL-1,10 U/ml) and adrenaline(10-5 mol/L) significantly increased Il-6 levels in the supernatant of cultured thyroid cells,whereas dexamethasone(10 mmol/L) markedly suppressed IL-6 release from thryocytes.Nal of 10-4 mol/L exerted no effect on the production of Il-6.(2)Compared with the basal results,at a concentration of 10-103 mmol/L,dexamethasone could gradually suppress IL-6 gene expression on human thryocytes,while TNF-α could obviously stimulate the production of IL-6 mRNA in the range of 10-1-102 U/ml.On the level of 102 U/ml,IL-1 increased the expression of IL-6,but the same effect could not be shown when IL-1 was 10-1 U/ml.Sodium iodine(NaI) could not affect Il-6 gene from the level of 10-8 to 10-4 mol/L.Conclusion IL-6 produced by thyrocytes might be regulated by many factors that modulate thyroid functions in vitro as well as in vivo.

  16. Characterization of tendon cell cultures of the human rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pauly

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available tator cuff tears are common soft tissue injuries of the musculoskeletal system that heal by formation of repair tissue and may lead to high retear rates and joint dysfunction. In particular, tissue from chronic, large tendon tears is of such degenerative nature that it may be prone to retear after surgical repair. Besides several biomechanical approaches, biologically based strategies such as application of growth factors may be promising for increasing cell activity and production of extracellular tendon matrix at the tendon-to-bone unit. As a precondition for subsequent experimental growth factor application, the aim of the present study was to establish and characterize a human rotator cuff tendon cell culture.Long head biceps (LHB- and supraspinatus muscle (SSP- tendon samples from donor patients undergoing shoulder surgery were cultivated and examined at the RNA level for expression of collagen type-I, -II and -III, biglycan, decorin, tenascin-C, aggrecan, osteocalcin, tenomodulin and scleraxis (by Real-time PCR. Finally, results were compared to chondrocytes and osteoblasts as control cells.An expression pattern was found which may reflect a human rotator cuff tenocyte-like cell culture. Both SSP and LHB tenocyte-like cells differed from chondrocyte cell cultures in terms of reduced expression of collagen type-II (p≤0.05 and decorin while higher levels of collagen type-I were seen (p≤0.05. With respect to osteoblasts, tenocyte-like cells expressed lower levels of osteocalcin (p≤0.05 as well as tenascin C, biglycan and collagen type-III. Expression of scleraxis, tenomodulin and aggrecan was similar between all cell types.This study represents a characterization of tenocyte-like cells from the human rotator cuff as close as possible. It helps analyzing their biological properties and allows further studies to improve production of tendon matrix and osteofibroblastic integration at the tendon-bone unit following tendon repair.

  17. Influence of a constant magnetic field on human lymphocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardito, G; Lamberti, L; Bigatti, P; Prono, G

    1984-07-31

    The growing exposure to magnetic fields of a certain intensity could represent a serious hazard for our health. In the present note we analyze the effect of a 740 Gauss magnetic field on human lymphocyte cell cultures. From the analysis of our data it is possible to point out that this field produces an inhibition of the cell growth, while does not affect at all the sister chromatid exchange frequency of the chromosomes. Conversely we found a significant increase of chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells. The chromosome aberrations found were mostly gaps and breaks.

  18. Massive pregnancy gingival enlargement: A rare case

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Gingival enlargement related to pregnancy is sometimes seen in the oral cavity. Pregnancy is a physiological state that brings full of changes in a woman's life. The metabolism and immunology of the body are modified by progesterone and estrogen as well as other local factors, these sex hormones may modify the oral mucosa and may lead to various periodontal diseases. A case of female patient 23 yrs of age reported during 8th month of pregnancy with a localised gingival enlargement affecting t...

  19. NIFEDIPINE - INDUCED GINGIVAL ENLARGEMENT (IN SPANISH)

    OpenAIRE

    Manzur-Villalobos Isabella; Manzur-Jattin Fernando; Díaz-Caballero Antonio José

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: the gingival enlargement is the increase of the size of the gingiva caused by diverse factors, between which are the drugs, mainly the antihypertensive, immunosuppressive and anticonvulsant medications. Between the first ones, the nifedipine, an antagonist of the calcium, is one of the most frequently indicated. Clinical case: A 62-year-old-male patient with arterial hypertension treated with nifedipine for more of fifteenth years, who presented chronic gingival e...

  20. Primary Adult Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Cultures on Human Amniotic Membranes

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    Singhal Shweta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells grow well on surfaces that provide an extracellular matrix. Our aim was to establish primary adult human RPE cell cultures that retain their epithelial morphology in vitro using human amniotic membrane (hAM as substrate. Materials and Methods: Human cadaver eyeballs (16 were obtained from the eye bank after corneal trephination. RPE cells were harvested by a mechanical dissection of the inner choroid surface (10, group 1 or by b enzymatic digestion using 0.25% Trypsin/0.02% EDTA (6, group 2. The cells were explanted onto de-epithelialized hAM, nourished using DMEM/HAMS F-12 media and monitored for growth under the phase contrast microscope. Cell cultures were characterised by whole mount studies and paraffin sections. Growth data in the two groups were compared using the students′ ′t′ test. Results: Eleven samples (68.75% showed positive cultures with small, hexagonal cells arising from around the explant which formed a confluent and progressively pigmented monolayer. Whole mounts showed closely placed polygonal cells with heavily pigmented cytoplasm and indistinct nuclei. The histologic sections showed monolayers of cuboidal epithelium with variable pigmentation within the cytoplasm. Growth was seen by day 6-23 (average 11.5 days in the mechanical group, significantly earlier ( P Conclusions: Primary adult human RPE cell cultures retain epithelial morphology in vitro when cultured on human amniotic membranes . Mechanical dissection of the inner choroid surface appears to be an effective method of isolating RPE cells and yields earlier growth in cultures as compared to isolation by enzymatic digestion

  1. 服用硝苯地平后牙龈增生以及未增生患者牙龈成纤维细胞生物特性比较%Comparison of Biologic Properties of Gingival Fibroblasts for Patients with or without Gingival Overgrowth after Administrated with Nifedipine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪靖; 束蓉

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the mechanism of gingival overgrowth associated with nifedipine, we investigated the cell response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) under nifedipine stimulation. Methods: HGFs were derived by external culture from a Nifedipine responder (NIFr—HGFs) and a Nifedipine non—responder(NIFn—HGFs). Using transmission electron microscopy(TEM) ,ultrastructural difference between these cells were compared. In addition, cell cycle differences and the proliferation between the two types of gingival fibroblasts were observed by the method of flow cytometry and MTT( methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium) to investigate the effects of the nifedipine on the two types of cells. Results: Expanded rough endoplasmic reticulum were observed in the NIFr—HGFs by TEM . After nifedipine stimulation ,NIFr—HGFs showed increased proliferation compared to NIFn—HGFs. Conclusion; This indicated that the biological properties and the ability to respond to the calcium antagonists of two types of cells may be different . And there is cellular heterogeneity in the occurance of the calcium antagonists —induced gingival hyperplasia.%目的:观察服用硝苯地平后牙龈增生和未增生患者牙龈成纤维细胞(nifedipine responders gingival fibroblasts NIFr-HGF,nifedipine non-responders gingival fibroblasts NIFn-HGF)超微结构、细胞周期变化以及增殖能力的差异性,以探讨该药导致牙龈增生的可能作用机理.方法:采用透射电镜观察NIFr-HGF、NIFn-HGF的超微结构,利用流式细胞仪、MTT法检测和比较2种细胞经硝苯地平诱导后其细胞周期以及增殖能力的差异性.结果:与NIFn-HGF相比较,NIFr-HGF内粗面内质网扩张;受硝苯地平诱导后其增殖明显加强.结论:NIFr-HGF合成蛋白质的能力可能较NIFn-HGF强,且前者对于硝苯地平的反应也明显强于后者,这提示两类细胞的细胞生物学特性以及对钙离子拮抗剂的反应能力存在差异,药物性牙龈增生

  2. Morphology of primary human venous endothelial cell cultures before and after culture medium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger-Genge, A; Fuhrmann, R; Jung, F; Franke, R P

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of the interaction of human, venous endothelial cells (HUVEC) with body foreign materials on the cellular level cannot be performed in vivo, but is investigated in vitro under standard culture conditions. To maintain the vitality, proliferation and morphology of HUVEC seeded on body foreign substrates over days, the cell culture medium is usually exchanged every second day. It is well known, that alterations in the microenvironment of cells bear the risk of influencing cell morphology and function. In the current study the influence of cell culture medium exchange on HUVEC cytoskeletal microfilament structure and function was investigated. HUVEC in the third passage were seeded on extracellular matrix (ECM) - which was secreted from bovine corneal endothelial cells on glass- until functional confluence was reached. The experiment started 11 days after HUVEC seeding with an exchange of the cell culture medium followed by a staining of the actin microfilaments with phalloidin-rhodamin 1.5 and 5 minutes after medium exchange. The microfilaments were documented by use of an Olympus microscope (IMT-2) equipped with a UV lamp and online connected to a TV chain (Sony XC 50 ST/monochrome) implying an OPTIMAS - Image analysis system. Prostacyclin was analysed in the cell culture supernatant. 1.5 min after culture medium exchange in the functionally confluent cultures a slight disturbance of the actin microfilament structure with a broadening of the marginal filament band, a partial disconnection of cell-cell contacts and the appearance of intercellular fenestrations were observed. 5 minutes after medium exchange a redevelopment of the slightly disturbed microfilament structure with a condensation and narrowing of the marginal filament band was seen. 12 h later a further consolidation of the microfilament structure occurred. In addition, a perturbation of the cultured HUVEC occurred after cell culture medium exchange. The prostacyclin concentration in the

  3. Investigation of Entamoeba gingivalis and Trichomonas tenax in Periodontitis or Gingivitis Patients in Kayseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, Süleyman; Çetinkaya, Ülfet; Hamamcı, Berna; Alkan, Arzu; Şişman, Yıldıray; Esen, Çağrı; Kolay, Melike

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Entamoeba gingivalis and Trichomonas tenax in periodontitis and gingivitis patients. The study consisted of 107 periodontitis patients and 68 gingivitis patients. Bacterial plaque samples were collected with a curette from the deepest pocket in each quadrant and placed into separate tubes containing sterile 0.9% saline solution. Samples were examined at a magnification of ×400 by light microscopy. Cultivation for T. tenax was performed using the same samples, and the cultures were examined after 48 hours. E. gingivalis was present in the samples from 38 periodontitis patients, whereas T. tenax was present in samples from only 3 periodontitis patients. Both E. gingivalis and T. tenax were found together in the samples from 2 periodontitis patients. In total, 22 and 2 gingivitis patients were found to be infected with E. gingivalis and with T. tenax, respectively. Only 1 gingivitis patient was found to be infected with both E. gingivalis and T. tenax. In our study, oral protozoa were found in a high percentage in periodontitis and gingivitis patients. We believe that the prevalence of E. gingivalis and T. tenax should be determined via new studies and, in particular, the protection principles should be complied with.

  4. The romantic drive and human sciences in western culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Dias Duarte

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern Western culture is based upon the tension between a basic universalism and its permanent romantic counterpoint. Science is one of the main expressions of the universalistic attitude and the romantic genius dealt actively with it, criticizing and transforming it in many different ways. The emergence of modern 'human sciences' (originally conceived of as the Geisteswissenschaften, or 'moral sciences' is due to this tension, in the sense that they came to provide a sense of reality and knowledge very different from that prevailing in the pristine universalistic ideology. The themes of 'difference', 'totality', 'uniqueness', 'flow', 'drive', 'experience', and 'understanding' inspired or challenged the great founding fathers of the human sciences - eventually in contradictory directions. They remain nowadays as powerful as ever, either as the necessary rationalization for any anthropological research or as the channel for the so-called 'post-modern' speculations. To make them explicit and understandable is the task of this article.

  5. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs.

  6. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Harris

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (<25% attachment loss in feline plaque. Knowledge of these species is a first step in understanding the potential for improving oral health of cats via dietary interventions that alter the proportions of influential species. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from 92 cats with healthy gingiva, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs.

  7. Association of a genetic polymorphism (-44 C/G SNP in the human DEFB1 gene with expression and inducibility of multiple β-defensins in gingival keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dommisch Henrik

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human β-defensins (hBDs are antimicrobial peptides with a role in innate immune defense. Our laboratory previously showed that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the 5' untranslated region of the hBD1 gene (DEFB1, denoted -44 (rs1800972, is correlated with protection from oral Candida. Because this SNP alters the putative mRNA structure, we hypothesized that it alters hBD1 expression. Methods Transfection of reporter constructs and evaluation of antimicrobial activity and mRNA expression levels in keratinocytes from multiple donors were used to evaluate the effect of this SNP on constitutive and induced levels of expression. Results Transfection of CAT reporter constructs containing the 5' untranslated region showed that the -44 G allele yielded a 2-fold increase in CAT protein compared to other common haplotypes suggesting a cis effect on transcription or translation. The constitutive hBD1 mRNA level in human oral keratinocytes was significantly greater in cells from donors with the -44 GG genotype compared to those with the common CC genotype. Surprisingly, the hBD3 mRNA level as well as antimicrobial activity of keratinocyte extracts also correlated with the -44 G allele. Induced levels of hBD1, hBD2, and hBD3 mRNA were evaluated in keratinocytes challenged with Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 ligands, interleukin-1β, TNFα, and interferon-γ (IFNγ. In contrast to constitutive expression levels, IFNγ-induced keratinocyte hBD1 and hBD3 mRNA expression was significantly greater in cells with the common CC genotype, but there was no clear correlation of genotype with hBD2 expression. Conclusion The DEFB1 -44 G allele is associated with an increase in overall constitutive antimicrobial activity and expression of hBD1 and hBD3 in a manner that is consistent with protection from candidiasis, while the more common C allele is associated with IFNγ inducibility of these β-defensins and is likely to be more protective in

  8. Culture and purification of human fetal olfactory bulb ensheathing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To obtain high purity of human fetal olfactory bulb ensheathing cells (OB-hOECs) in vitro and to develop a simple and effective method for primary culture of OB-hOECs. Methods: OB-hOECs were cultured based on the differential rates of attachment of the various harvested cell types. Then the method was combined with arabinoside cytosine (Ara-C)inhibition, serum-free starvation or intermittent neurotrophin 3 (NT3) nutrition method to observe cell states in different cultural environments. The purity of OB-hOECs was assessed with immunocytochemical analysis. Results: OB-hOECs appeared bipolar and tripolar shape, with slender processes forming network. The purity of OECs reached 88% with the selective attachment method on day 6, and then fibroblast proliferated quickly and reduced the purity. When combined with the starvation method, the purity of OECs was 91% on day 6 and 86% on day 9, however, OECs were in a poor state. While combined with the NT3 method, the purity reached 95% on day 9 and 83% on day 12, respectively. The cells still remained in a good state. Conclusion: A combination of selective attachment and intermittent NT3 nutrition is an effective method to obtain OECs with higher purity and quality.

  9. Isolation and culture of adult human microglia within mixed glial cultures for functional experimentation and high-content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy M; Gibbons, Hannah M; Lill, Claire; Faull, Richard L M; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are thought to be involved in diseases of the adult human brain as well as normal aging processes. While neonatal and rodent microglia are often used in studies investigating microglial function, there are important differences between rodent microglia and their adult human counterparts. Human brain tissue provides a unique and valuable tool for microglial cell and molecular biology. Routine protocols can now enable use of this culture method in many laboratories. Detailed protocols and advice for culture of human brain microglia are provided here. We demonstrate the protocol for culturing human adult microglia within a mixed glial culture and use a phagocytosis assay as an example of the functional studies possible with these cells as well as a high-content analysis method of quantification.

  10. Gold resistance in cultured human cells possible role of metallothionein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennås, A

    1983-01-01

    Insufficient therapeutic effect of auranofin (AF), used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, is found in about 8% of the patients included in clinical trials until now. The mechanisms of resistance to gold-containing drugs are not known, but one reason might be acquired drug resistance. We have studied the relationship between the effects of gold and concentration of the cytoplasmic metal-binding protein metallothionein (MT), in order to evaluate MT as a possible contributing factor to resistance against AF. Different strains of cultured human epithelial cells derived from normal skin, treated with AF, were used as models. The experiments indicate two possible mechanisms for resistance against AF in cells: 1) binding of gold to pre-existent cadmium-induced MT or to de novo AF-induced MT, and 2) the cells' ability to keep the intracellular gold concentration at a low level. AF apparently causes a rapid and pronounced increase of MT-content in these cells. Preliminary results also indicated that AF causes increase of MT-content in human rheumatoid synovial cells, grown as primary cultures. These findings may have two clinical implications: 1) AF-induced MT may decrease therapeutic response, and 2) decrease the toxicity of AF.

  11. Culture models of human mammary epithelial cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2000-11-10

    Human pre-malignant breast diseases, particularly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)3 already display several of the aberrant phenotypes found in primary breast cancers, including chromosomal abnormalities, telomerase activity, inactivation of the p53 gene and overexpression of some oncogenes. Efforts to model early breast carcinogenesis in human cell cultures have largely involved studies in vitro transformation of normal finite lifespan human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to immortality and malignancy. We present a model of HMEC immortal transformation consistent with the know in vivo data. This model includes a recently described, presumably epigenetic process, termed conversion, which occurs in cells that have overcome stringent replicative senescence and are thus able to maintain proliferation with critically short telomeres. The conversion process involves reactivation of telomerase activity, and acquisition of good uniform growth in the absence and presence of TFGB. We propose th at overcoming the proliferative constraints set by senescence, and undergoing conversion, represent key rate-limiting steps in human breast carcinogenesis, and occur during early stage breast cancer progression.

  12. The cultural animal human nature, meaning, and social life

    CERN Document Server

    Baumeister, Roy F

    2005-01-01

    What makes us human? Why do people think, feel, and act as they do? What is the essence of human nature? What is the basic relationship between the individual and society? These questions have fascinated both great thinkers and ordinary humans for centuries. Now, at last, there is a solid basis for answering them, in the form of the accumulated efforts and studies by thousands of psychology researchers. We no longer have to rely on navel-gazing and speculation to understand why people are the way they are - we can instead turn to solid, objective findings. This book, by an eminent social psychologist at the peak of his career, not only summarizes what we know about people - it also offers a coherent, easy-to-understand, through radical, explanation. Turning conventional wisdom on its head, the author argues that culture shaped human evolution. Contrary to theories that depict the individual's relation to society as one of victimization, endless malleability, or just a square peg in a round hole, he proposes t...

  13. ANGKA KEJADIAN KARIES DAN GINGIVITIS PADA ANAK SEKOLAH DASAR USIA 8-12 TAHUN DI KABUPATEN MAROS TAHUN 2014

    OpenAIRE

    HANAPI, ADE NURZAQIAH

    2014-01-01

    2014 Teeth are part of the tools of mastication on the digestive system in the human body. The main problem child oral health are dental caries. Dental caries in children is a serious problem in oral health in Indonesia, with a prevalence of up to 90.05% .Other diseases that often accompany dental caries is a disease of periodontal tissues. Gingivitis is an inflammatory process in the periodontal tissue is confined to the gingiva and gingivitis reversibel.a...

  14. LACK OF ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HERPESVIRUS DETECTION IN SALIVA AND GINGIVITIS IN HIV‑INFECTED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata A. OTERO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to compare the detection of human herpesviruses (HHVs in the saliva of HIV-infected and healthy control children, and to evaluate associations between viral infection and gingivitis and immunodeficiency. Saliva samples were collected from 48 HIV-infected and 48 healthy control children. Clinical and laboratory data were collected during dental visits and from medical records. A trained dentist determined gingival indices and extension of gingivitis. Saliva samples were tested for herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, varicella zoster virus (VZV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, and cytomegalovirus (CMV by nested polymerase chain reaction assays. Thirty-five HIV-infected and 16 control children had gingivitis. Seventeen (35.4% HIV-infected children and 13 (27% control children were positive for HHVs. CMV was the most commonly detected HHV in both groups (HIV-infected, 25%; control, 12.5%, followed by HSV-1 (6.2% in both groups and HSV-2 (HIV-infected, 4.2%; control, 8.3%. The presence of HHVs in saliva was not associated with the presence of gingivitis in HIV-1-infected children (p = 0.104 or healthy control children (p = 0.251, or with immunosuppression in HIV-infected individuals (p = 0.447. Gingivitis was correlated with HIV infection (p = 0.0001. These results suggest that asymptomatic salivary detection of HHVs is common in HIV-infected and healthy children, and that it is not associated with gingivitis.

  15. LACK OF ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HERPESVIRUS DETECTION IN SALIVA AND GINGIVITIS IN HIV‑INFECTED CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Renata A; Nascimento, Flávia N N; Souza, Ivete P R; Silva, Raquel C; Lima, Rodrigo S; Robaina, Tatiana F; Câmara, Fernando P; Santos, Norma; Castro, Gloria F

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the detection of human herpesviruses (HHVs) in the saliva of HIV-infected and healthy control children, and to evaluate associations between viral infection and gingivitis and immunodeficiency. Saliva samples were collected from 48 HIV-infected and 48 healthy control children. Clinical and laboratory data were collected during dental visits and from medical records. A trained dentist determined gingival indices and extension of gingivitis. Saliva samples were tested for herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) by nested polymerase chain reaction assays. Thirty-five HIV-infected and 16 control children had gingivitis. Seventeen (35.4%) HIV-infected children and 13 (27%) control children were positive for HHVs. CMV was the most commonly detected HHV in both groups (HIV-infected, 25%; control, 12.5%), followed by HSV-1 (6.2% in both groups) and HSV-2 (HIV-infected, 4.2%; control, 8.3%). The presence of HHVs in saliva was not associated with the presence of gingivitis in HIV-1-infected children (p = 0.104) or healthy control children (p = 0.251), or with immunosuppression in HIV-infected individuals (p = 0.447). Gingivitis was correlated with HIV infection (p = 0.0001). These results suggest that asymptomatic salivary detection of HHVs is common in HIV-infected and healthy children, and that it is not associated with gingivitis.

  16. Effects of immunization with natural and recombinant lysine decarboxylase on canine gingivitis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jennifer L; DeMars, Paul L; Collins, Lindsay M; Stoner, Julie A; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Komori, Naoka; Singh, Anil; Feasley, Christa L; Haddock, James A; Levine, Martin

    2012-10-19

    Periodontal disease, gingival inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontal attachment loss (periodontitis), causes tooth loss and susceptibility to chronic inflammation. Professionally scaling and cleaning the teeth regularly controls the disease, but is expensive in companion animals. Eikenella corrodens is common in canine oral cavities where it is a source of lysine decarboxylase (LDC). In human dental biofilms (plaques), LDC converts lysine to cadaverine and impairs the gingival epithelial barrier to bacteria. LDC vaccination may therefore retard gingivitis development. Year-old beagle dogs provided blood samples, and had weight and clinical measurements (biofilm and gingivitis) recorded. After scaling and cleaning, two dogs were immunized subcutaneously with 0.2mg native LDC from E. corrodens and 2 sets of four dogs with 0.2mg recombinant LDC purified from Escherichia coli. A third set of 4 dogs was immunized intranasally. Rehydragel(®), Emulsigen(®), Polygen™ or Carbigen™ were used as adjuvant. Four additional pairs of dogs were sham-immunized with each adjuvant alone (controls). Immunizations were repeated twice, 3 weeks apart, and clinical measurements were obtained after another 2 weeks, when the teeth were scaled and cleaned again. Tooth brushing was then stopped and the diet was changed from hard to soft chow. Clinical measurements were repeated after 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Compared with sham-immunized dogs, gingivitis was reduced over all 8 weeks of soft diet after subcutaneous immunization with native LDC, or after intranasal immunization with recombinant LDC in Carbigen™, but for only 6 of the 8 weeks after subcutaneous immunization with recombinant LDC in Emulsigen(®) (repeated measures ANOVA). Subcutaneous vaccination induced a strong serum IgG antibody response that decreased during the soft diet period, whereas intranasal immunization induced a weak serum IgA antibody response that did not decrease. Immunization with recombinant LDC may

  17. Adhesion of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to human intestinal enterocytes and cultured human intestinal mucosa.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The adhesion of classic enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains of human origin to isolated human small intestinal enterocytes and cultured small intestinal mucosa was investigated. An adhesion assay with isolated human enterocytes prepared from duodenal biopsy samples was developed and tested with EPEC strains known to cause diarrhea in healthy adult volunteers. In the assay a mean of 53 and 55% of enterocytes had brush border-adherent E. coli E2348 (O127;H6) and E851 (O142:H6), res...

  18. The culture of human embryonic stem cells in microchannel perfusion bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korin, Natanel; Bransky, Avishay; Dinnar, Uri; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2007-12-01

    The culture of human Embryonic Stem (ES) cells in microchannel bioreactors can be highly beneficial for ES cell biology studies and ES tissue engineering applications. In the present study we examine the use of Human Foreskin Fibroblasts (HFF) cells as feeder cells for human ES culture in a microchannel perfusion bioreactor. PDMS microchannels (depth:130 micron) were fabricated using conventional soft-lithography techniques. The channels were sterilized, coated with a human fibronectin solution and seeded with cells. Following a period of static incubation, culture medium was perfused through the channels at various flow rates and cell growth was monitored throughout the culture process. Mass transport and fluid mechanics models were used to evaluate the culture conditions (shear stress, oxygen levels within the micro-bioreactor as a function of the medium flow rate. The conditions for successful long-term culture (>7 days) of HFF under flow were established. Experiments with human embryonic stem cells cultured in microchannels show that the conditions essential to co-culture human ES cell on HFF cells under perfusion differ from the conditions necessary for HFF cell culture. Human ES cells were found to be highly sensitive to flow and culture conditions and did not grow under flow rates which were suitable for HFF long-term culture. Successful culture of undifferentiated human ES cell colonies in a perfusion micro-bioreactor is a basic step towards utilizing microfluidic techniques to explore stem cell biology.

  19. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in Cultured Human Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta V.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The radiation-induced “bystander effect” (RIBE) was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC) are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed. Methodology/Principal Findings Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and embryonic stem cells (hESC) were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05). A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05). Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative

  20. Radiation-induced bystander effects in cultured human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta V Sokolov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The radiation-induced "bystander effect" (RIBE was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR. RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC and embryonic stem cells (hESC were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05. A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of h

  1. Pathogenesis of Human Enterovirulent Bacteria: Lessons from Cultured, Fully Differentiated Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts are protected from attack by potentially harmful enteric microorganisms, viruses, and parasites by the polarized fully differentiated epithelial cells that make up the epithelium, providing a physical and functional barrier. Enterovirulent bacteria interact with the epithelial polarized cells lining the intestinal barrier, and some invade the cells. A better understanding of the cross talk between enterovirulent bacteria and the polarized intestinal cells has resulted in the identification of essential enterovirulent bacterial structures and virulence gene products playing pivotal roles in pathogenesis. Cultured animal cell lines and cultured human nonintestinal, undifferentiated epithelial cells have been extensively used for understanding the mechanisms by which some human enterovirulent bacteria induce intestinal disorders. Human colon carcinoma cell lines which are able to express in culture the functional and structural characteristics of mature enterocytes and goblet cells have been established, mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal epithelial barrier. Moreover, Caco-2-derived M-like cells have been established, mimicking the bacterial capture property of M cells of Peyer's patches. This review intends to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of human enterovirulent bacteria observed in infected cultured human colon carcinoma enterocyte-like HT-29 subpopulations, enterocyte-like Caco-2 and clone cells, the colonic T84 cell line, HT-29 mucus-secreting cell subpopulations, and Caco-2-derived M-like cells, including cell association, cell entry, intracellular lifestyle, structural lesions at the brush border, functional lesions in enterocytes and goblet cells, functional and structural lesions at the junctional domain, and host cellular defense responses. PMID:24006470

  2. In vitro methods to culture primary human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouf, Afshin; Sun, Yu Jia

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that much like leukemia, breast tumors are maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor cells that have stem cell properties. These cancer stem cells are envisaged to be responsible for tumor formation and relapse. Therefore, knowledge about their nature will provide a platform to develop therapies to eliminate these breast cancer stem cells. This concept highlights the need to understand the mechanisms that regulate the normal functions of the breast stem cells and their immediate progeny as alterations to these same mechanisms can cause these primitive cells to act as cancer stem cells. The study of the primitive cell functions relies on the ability to isolate them from primary sources of breast tissue. This chapter describes processing of discarded tissue from reduction mammoplasty samples as sources of normal primary human breast epithelial cells and describes cell culture systems to grow single-cell suspensions prepared from these reduction samples in vitro.

  3. An unusual case of generalized severe gingival enlargement during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Crystal L; Kolhatkar, Shilpa; Winkler, James R; Ojha, Junu; Bhola, Monish

    2010-01-01

    Increased hormone levels that are present during puberty and pregnancy are associated with localized or generalized gingival enlargement. This article reviews the gingival alterations that can occur during pregnancy and describes a case of generalized severe gingival enlargement associated with pregnancy and its management. A 36-year-old woman had severe bilateral gingival enlargement of short duration. The patient denied taking any medications. The laboratory report revealed no systemic abnormalities; however, the report disclosed that she was pregnant. Surgical therapy for the gingival enlargement included gingivectomy and gingivoplasty of all quadrants, which reduced the size of the enlarged gingiva. Postoperative visits demonstrated uneventful healing, with no recurrence seen at the one-year follow-up appointment. It appears that the English literature includes only one other case report that discusses generalized gingival enlargement during pregnancy. Pregnancy-related gingival enlargement should be included as a differential diagnosis in women who have non-drug-induced generalized gingival enlargement.

  4. Diagnostic considerations concerning a case of an unusual gingivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Haring, I.S.; Witjes, M.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    A young woman presented a severe gingivitis that wouldn't respond to antibiotics prescribed by her general practitioner. Thorough clinical examination showed atypical gingival inflammation. In such unusual cases a careful anamnesis is essential in determining appropriate continued diagnostic

  5. LIN28A expression reduces sickling of cultured human erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaira F de Vasconcellos

    Full Text Available Induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF has therapeutic importance for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD and the beta-thalassemias. It was recently reported that increased expression of LIN28 proteins or decreased expression of its target let-7 miRNAs enhances HbF levels in cultured primary human erythroblasts from adult healthy donors. Here LIN28A effects were studied further using erythrocytes cultured from peripheral blood progenitor cells of pediatric subjects with SCD. Transgenic expression of LIN28A was accomplished by lentiviral transduction in CD34(+ sickle cells cultivated ex vivo in serum-free medium. LIN28A over-expression (LIN28A-OE increased HbF, reduced beta (sickle-globin, and strongly suppressed all members of the let-7 family of miRNAs. LIN28A-OE did not affect erythroblast differentiation or prevent enucleation, but it significantly reduced or ameliorated the sickling morphologies of the enucleated erythrocytes.

  6. Reconcilable differences? Human diversity, cultural relativity, and sense of community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Greg; Kloos, Bret; Green, Eric P; Franco, Margarita M

    2011-03-01

    Sense of community (SOC) is one of the most widely used and studied constructs in community psychology. As proposed by Sarason in (The Psychological sense of community: prospects for a community psychology, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 1974), SOC represents the strength of bonding among community members. It is a valuable component of community life, and it has been linked to positive mental health outcomes, citizen participation, and community connectedness. However, promotion of SOC can become problematic in community psychology praxis when it conflicts with other core values proposed to define the field, namely values of human diversity, cultural relativity, and heterogeneity of experience and perspective. Several commentators have noted that promotion of SOC can conflict with multicultural diversity because it tends to emphasize group member similarity and appears to be higher in homogeneous communities. In this paper, we introduce the idea of a community-diversity dialectic as part of praxis and research in community psychology. We argue that systematic consideration of cultural psychology perspectives can guide efforts to address a community-diversity dialectic and revise SOC formulations that ultimately will invigorate community research and action. We provide a working agenda for addressing this dialectic, proposing that systematic consideration of the creative tension between SOC and diversity can be beneficial to community psychology.

  7. Cultural Diversities and Human Rights: History, Minorities, Pluralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO J. RUIZ VIEYTEZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultural diversity plays today a prominent role in the updating and developing of human rights. Past developments in the protection of rights have essentially forgotten the democratic management of cultural and identity-based diversity. States have stifled the main developments of the rights and constrained them to partial views in favour of the majority or dominant groups in each country. The current context of regional progressive integration and social diversification within each state agrees on the need to address the adequacy of systems for the protection of rights from different strategies to the context of multiculturalism. Against the process of "nationalization of rights" it is necessary to adopt a strategy for pluralization. On the one hand, the concept of minority has to be given its corresponding importance in both international and domestic law. On the other hand, different kind of policies and legal instruments for the accommodation of diversity can be identified and used to foster this necessary process of pluralization.

  8. Comparison of human nasal epithelial cells grown as explant outgrowth cultures or dissociated tissue cultures in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jian; Meng, Na; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Luo

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cell growth characteristics, ciliated cell differentiation, and function of human nasal epithelial cells established as explant outgrowth cultures or dissociated tissue cultures. Human nasal mucosa of the uncinate process was obtained by endoscopy and epithelial cell cultures were established by explant outgrowth or dissociated tissue culture methods. Epithelial cell growth characteristics were observed by inverted phase contrast microscopy. Ciliated cell differentiation was detected by β-tubulin IVand ZO-1 immunocytochemistry. Basal and ATP-stimulated ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was measured using a highspeed digital microscopic imaging system. Both the explant and dissociated tissue cultures established as monolayers with tight junctions and differentiated cell composition, with both types of cultures comprising ciliated and non-ciliated epithelial cells. Fibroblasts were also frequently found in explant cultures but rarely seen in dissociated tissue cultures. In both culture systems, the highest ciliated cell density appeared at 7th-10th culture day and declined with time, with the lifespan of ciliated cells ranging from 14 to 21 days. Overall, 10% of the cells in explant cultures and 20% of the cells in the dissociated tissue cultures were ciliated. These two cultures demonstrated similar ciliary beat frequency values at baseline (7.78 ± 1.99 Hz and 7.91 ± 2.52 Hz, respectively) and reacted equivalently following stimulation with 100 μM ATP. The results of this study indicate that both the explant outgrowth and dissociated tissue culture techniques are suitable for growing well-differentiated nasal ciliated and non-ciliated cells, which have growth characteristics and ciliary activity similar to those of nasal epithelial cells in vivo.

  9. Study of HLA-DR synthesis in cultured human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, N E; Huff, J C; Norris, D A; Boyce, S T; Cary, M; Kissinger, M; Weston, W L

    1986-11-01

    Within the normal human epidermis only Langerhans and indeterminate cells express HLA-DR. Human keratinocytes (HK), however, may also express HLA-DR in certain disease states characterized by mononuclear cell infiltrates. Previous studies have shown that HK synthesize HLA-DR in response to stimulation by interferon gamma (INF-gamma). The purposes of this study were to define conditions under which cultured HK might express HLA-DR and to compare the HLA-DR synthesis of HK with that of monocytes. HLA-DR expression by HK as determined by indirect immunofluorescence of HK cultures was absent under standard low calcium conditions and remained absent with the addition of calcium, serum, mitogens, and supernatants from Pam-212 cells containing epidermal thymocyte-activating factor. HLA-DR expression in HK was induced by cocultivation with concanavalin A-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), but not unstimulated PBMC. This effect was time-dependent and directly related to the number of PBMC. HLA-DR expression was also induced in a time- and dose-dependent manner by addition of supernatant from stimulated PBMC (SS) or by addition of recombinant INF-gamma but not by addition of interleukin (IL)-1 or IL-2. Induction by either SS or INF-gamma was blocked by an antiserum to INF-gamma. As determined by a semiquantitative immunoprecipitation technique, HLA-DR synthesis by HK was directly related to INF-gamma concentration. The pattern of HLA-DR peptides produced by HK was similar to that of monocytes, but the relative quantity synthesized was far less than that of monocytes.

  10. A laser Doppler study of gingival blood flow variations following periosteal stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Pascal; Cherene, Sabine; Miller, Neal; Weissenbach, Michel; Penaud, Jacques

    2002-02-01

    Evaluation of the modifications occurring in human gingival blood flow following periosteal stimulation. Laser Doppler was used to measure the gingival blood flow (GBF). The reproducibility of the technique was validated by comparing measures made at intervals of 1 week. Sensitivity was verified by recording GBF before and after injection of an anesthetic containing a vasoconstrictor. Finally, 12 patients were subjected to GBF measurements before and 8 days after periosteal stimulation prior to gingival grafting. The laser Doppler accurately measured GBF. Measurements made at day 0 and day 7 were not statistically different (p=0.60). After injection of an anesthesic solution containing vasoconstrictor, the laser Doppler recorded a sharp decrease of the GBF (p=0.04). The patient that underwent periosteal stimulation showed statistically significant increases (p=0.02) in GBF before and 1 week post-stimulation. Periosteal stimulation induces significant increases in the GBF after 1 week.

  11. The effect of Nifedipine on the expression of type I collagen in gingival fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bei Li; Weibin Sun; Yong Ji

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of nifedipine(calciumchannel blocker) on the expression of collagen in gingival fibroblasts invitro, Methods:Primarily gingival fibroblasts were cultured and incubated with various concentrations of nifedipine(108 μg/L, 360μg/L and 1200 μg/L)for 5 days. Gingival fibroblasts were primarily cultured derived from nifedipine responders and non-responders in the presence of 360 μg/L nifedipine. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to evaluate the amount of type Ⅰ collagen. Cell proliferation was measured by cell counting with evaluating MTT value. Results:The expressions of collagen and cell proliferation were significantly different among the high concentration groups and the others on the fifth day, especially higher in 360 μg/L and 1200 μg/L groups and also different among nifedipine responders and non-responders. Conclusion:The expression of collagen and cell proliferation may be concerned with the biological mechanism for gingival overgrowth.

  12. Bacterial diversity in oral samples of children in niger with acute noma, acute necrotizing gingivitis, and healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Bolivar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites were amplified using "universal" PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis, gender, and site status (diseased or control site. Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98-99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries. CONCLUSIONS: Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent.

  13. Gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts differ in their inflammatory response to viable Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, N.; Laine, M.L.; de Vries, T.J.; Everts, V.; van Winkelhoff, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective: Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral pathogen strongly associated with destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues in human periodontitis. Gingival fibroblasts (GF) and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF) are functionally different cell types in the periodontium that can

  14. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on gingival expression of inducible nitric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... reported to enhance cellular proliferation and wound healing, suppress iNOS production, and provide protection against oxidative damage. .... cytokines from human gingival fibroblasts[29] as TNF‑α and interleukin‑1β, and that .... The role of reactive oxygen and antioxidant species in periodontal tissue ...

  15. Systems Toxicology Assessment of the Biological Impact of a Candidate Modified Risk Tobacco Product on Human Organotypic Oral Epithelial Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Filippo; Sewer, Alain; Mathis, Carole; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Schlage, Walter K; Leroy, Patrice; Majeed, Shoaib; Guedj, Emmanuel; Trivedi, Keyur; Martin, Florian; Elamin, Ashraf; Merg, Céline; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Frentzel, Stefan; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-08-15

    Cigarette smoke (CS) has been reported to increase predisposition to oral cancer and is also recognized as a risk factor for many conditions including periodontal diseases, gingivitis, and other benign mucosal disorders. Smoking cessation remains the most effective approach for minimizing the risk of smoking-related diseases. However, reduction of harmful constituents by heating rather than combusting tobacco, without modifying the amount of nicotine, is a promising new paradigm in harm reduction. In this study, we compared effects of exposure to aerosol derived from a candidate modified risk tobacco product, the tobacco heating system (THS) 2.2, with those of CS generated from the 3R4F reference cigarette. Human organotypic oral epithelial tissue cultures (EpiOral, MatTek Corporation) were exposed for 28 min to 3R4F CS or THS2.2 aerosol, both diluted with air to comparable nicotine concentrations (0.32 or 0.51 mg nicotine/L aerosol/CS for 3R4F and 0.31 or 0.46 mg/L for THS2.2). We also tested one higher concentration (1.09 mg/L) of THS2.2. A systems toxicology approach was employed combining cellular assays (i.e., cytotoxicity and cytochrome P450 activity assays), comprehensive molecular investigations of the buccal epithelial transcriptome (mRNA and miRNA) by means of computational network biology, measurements of secreted proinflammatory markers, and histopathological analysis. We observed that the impact of 3R4F CS was greater than THS2.2 aerosol in terms of cytotoxicity, morphological tissue alterations, and secretion of inflammatory mediators. Analysis of the transcriptomic changes in the exposed oral cultures revealed significant perturbations in various network models such as apoptosis, necroptosis, senescence, xenobiotic metabolism, oxidative stress, and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NFE2L2) signaling. The stress responses following THS2.2 aerosol exposure were markedly decreased, and the exposed cultures recovered more completely compared

  16. Effect of a chlorhexidine mouthrinse on plaque, gingival inflammation and staining in gingivitis patients: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Strydonck, D.A.C.; Slot, D.E.; van der Velden, U.; van der Weijden, F.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To systematically evaluate the efficacy of chlorhexidine (CHX) mouthrinses on plaque, gingival inflammation and staining in gingivitis patients. MATERIAL & METHODS: Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2011. Randomized controlled

  17. [Neutrophils and monocytes in gingival epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, H X; Zheng, L P

    1994-06-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes of gingival epithellium in health gingiva(H),marginal gingivitis(MG),juvenile periodontitis(JP),adult periodontitis(AP) and subgingival bacteria were quantitated and analyzed,The results showed that the numbers of PMN within either pocket epithelium or oral gingival epithelium in JP were significantly lower than in AP and G.The amounts of PMN in AP were much larger than other three groups.Positive correlation between the number of PMN in sulcular pocket epitelium and the motile bacteri of subgingival plaque was demonstrated by correlation analysis.Monocytes mainly presented in deep pocket and junctional epithelum which were stained by NAE method,however very few Langhans cells were seen in these areas.

  18. Gingival Harmony in Anterior Aesthetic Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalenda Hadyaoui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a case of gingival asymmetry with compromising aesthetics. A 25-year-old dental student presented to the department of prosthetic dentistry. She was concerned about the greyish transparency of the crown metal margin through the marginal gingiva. The crown was placed to restore her lateral incisor. A comprehensive examination revealed that this unaesthetic aspect was caused by a non-harmonious gingival architecture in the lateral incisor marked by an unaesthetic gingival Zenith. The treatment plan included a surgical crown lengthening followed by prosthetic therapy consisting in a Zirconia based crown replacing the old prosthesis. Thanks to a well-planned multi-disciplinary approach, the result was esthetically acceptable and the patient was satisfied.

  19. Gingival recession, oral hygiene and associated factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the presence of plaque, calculus, gingival bleeding and gingival recession at six sites ... Results: The prevalence of gingival recession (GR) > 1mm was 33.6%, calculus 99.3%, plaque 100%, and ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v86i3.54967.

  20. Diverse modalities of gingival replacement: A report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep N Vinnakota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival replacement is often a component of comprehensive prosthodontics. Gingival prostheses may be fixed or removable. It can be made from acrylics, composite resins, silicones or porcelain-based materials.This paper describes different clinical situations in which three types of gingival prostheses, removable acrylic veneer with melanin pigmentation, fixed ceramic veneer and flexible nylon based veneer, were used effectively.

  1. Human Performance Optimization: Culture Change and Paradigm Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuster, Patricia A; OʼConnor, Francis G

    2015-11-01

    The term "Human Performance Optimization" (HPO) emerged across the Department of Defense (DoD) around 2006 when the importance of human performance for military success on the battlefield was acknowledged. Likewise, the term Total Force Fitness (TFF) arose as a conceptual framework within DoD in response to the need for a more holistic approach to the unparalleled operational demands with multiple deployments and strains on the United States Armed Forces. Both HPO and TFF are frameworks for enhancing and sustaining the health, well-being, and performance among our warriors and their families; they are fundamental to accomplishing our nation's mission. A demands-resources model for HPO is presented within the context of TFF to assist in operationalizing actions to enhance performance. In addition, the role leaders can serve is discussed; leaders are uniquely postured in the military chain of command to directly influence a culture of fitness for a ready force, and promote the concept that service members are ultimately responsible for their fitness and performance.

  2. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  3. Sulforaphane induces DNA single strand breaks in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sestili, Piero, E-mail: piero.sestili@uniurb.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Paolillo, Marco [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Lenzi, Monia [Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Colombo, Evelin; Vallorani, Luciana; Casadei, Lucia; Martinelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Fimognari, Carmela [Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-07-07

    Sulforaphane (SFR), an isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, possesses growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing activities in cancer cell lines. Recently, SFR has been shown to promote the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human cancer cell lines. The present study was undertaken to see whether SFR-derived ROS might cause DNA damage in cultured human cells, namely T limphoblastoid Jurkat and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). 1-3 h treatments with 10-30 {mu}M SFR elicited intracellular ROS formation (as assayed with dihydrorhodamine, DHR, oxidation) as well as DNA breakage (as assessed with fast halo assay, FHA). These effects lacked cell-type specificity, since could be observed in both Jurkat and HUVEC. Differential-pH FHA analysis of damaged DNA showed that SFR causes frank DNA single strand breaks (SSBs); no DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were found within the considered treatment times (up to 3 h). SFR-derived ROS were formed at the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) level: indeed rotenone or myxothiazol (MRC Complex I and III inhibitors, respectively) abrogated ROS formation. Furthermore ROS were not formed in Jurkat cells pharmacologically depleted of respiring mitochondria (MRC-/Jurkat). Formation of ROS was causally linked to the induction of SSBs: indeed all the experimental conditions capable of preventing ROS formation also prevented the damage of nuclear DNA from SFR-intoxicated cells. As to the toxicological relevance of SSBs, we found that their prevention slightly but significantly attenuated SFR cytotoxicity, suggesting that high-dose SFR toxicity is the result of a complex series of events among which GSH depletion seems to play a pivotal role. In conclusion, the present study identifies a novel mechanism contributing to SFR toxicity which - since DNA damage is a prominent mechanism underlying the cytotoxic activity of established antineoplastic agents - might help to exploit the therapeutic value

  4. An unusual case of idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikender S Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic gingival fibromatosisis, a condition of undetermined cause can develop as an isolated disorder, but mostly it is associated with some syndrome. It usually begins at the time of eruption of permanent teeth but can develop with the eruption of deciduous dentition and rarely present at birth. This case report describes an unusual case of non-syndromic generalized idiopathic gingival fibromatosis in a 15-year-old male present since birth. Surgical treatment in the form of ledge and wedge procedure with internal bevel gingivectomy was performed. No recurrence of enlargement was seen after 2 years of follow-up.

  5. [Frenectomy associated with a triangular gingival graft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, A; Guy, J P; Cesano, B

    1991-11-01

    In periodontal therapy, frenectomy is indicated when the frenum exerts tension on the gingival margin and interferes with proper oral hygiene. The procedure is also employed when the frenum prevents closure of a diastema during orthodontic therapy. Frenectomy should be done after the canines have erupted and before retention is started to prevent separation of the teeth. For an improved surgical and cosmetic result, the authors propose a triangular-shaped gingival graft after the frenum has been excised. The advantage of the procedure is to create an area of attached gingiva and enhance healing.

  6. Masking the unmasked-gingival veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti Sanghavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Black triangles are third most disliked aesthetic problem after caries and crown margins. Periodontal disease is one of most common reason for black triangles. The dental aesthetics is a fine balance between white and pink component surrounding natural teeth and their replacements. Gingival veneer is of importance in periodontal conditions where multiple teeth are affected with alveolar bone loss and surgical correction is not a feasible option. Gingival veneer is noninvasive, economical, and less time consuming treatment option large areas of aesthetic and functional deficit.

  7. [Effects of culture supernatant of human amnion mesenchymal stem cells on biological characteristics of human fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi'er; Lyu, Lu; Xin, Haiming; Luo, Liang; Tong, Yalin; Mo, Yongliang; Yue, Yigang

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of culture supernatant of human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs-CS) on biological characteristics of human fibroblasts. (1) hAMSCs were isolated from deprecated human fresh amnion tissue of placenta and then sub-cultured. The morphology of hAMSCs on culture day 3 and hAMSCs of the third passage were observed with inverted phase contrast microscope. (2) Two batches of hAMSCs of the third passage were obtained, then the expression of vimentin of cells was observed with immunofluorescence method, and the expression of cell surface marker CD90, CD73, CD105, and CD45 was detected by flow cytometer. (3) hAMSCs-CS of the third passage at culture hour 72 were collected, and the content of insulin-like growth factor Ⅰ (IGF-Ⅰ), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. (4) Human fibroblasts were isolated from deprecated human fresh prepuce tissue of circumcision and then sub-cultured. Human fibroblasts of the third passage were used in the following experiments. Cells were divided into blank control group and 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70% hAMSCs-CS groups according to the random number table (the same grouping method below), with 48 wells in each group. Cells in blank control group were cultured with DMEM/F12 medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS), while cells in the latter 4 groups were cultured with DMEM/F12 medium containing corresponding volume fraction of hAMSCs-CS and 2% FBS. The proliferation activity of cells was detected by cell counting kit 8 and microplate reader at culture hour 12, 24, 48, and 72, respectively, and corresponding volume fraction of hAMSCs-CS which causing the best proliferation activity of human fibroblasts was used in the following experiments. (5) Human fibroblasts were divided into blank control group and 50% hAMSCs-CS group and treated as in (4), with 4 wells in each group, at post

  8. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R., E-mail: mundy.william@epa.gov

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  9. Evolution of social learning does not explain the origin of human cumulative culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enquist, Magnus; Ghirlanda, Stefano

    2007-05-07

    Because culture requires transmission of information between individuals, thinking about the origin of culture has mainly focused on the genetic evolution of abilities for social learning. Current theory considers how social learning affects the adaptiveness of a single cultural trait, yet human culture consists of the accumulation of very many traits. Here we introduce a new modeling strategy that tracks the adaptive value of many cultural traits, showing that genetic evolution favors only limited social learning owing to the accumulation of maladaptive as well as adaptive culture. We further show that culture can be adaptive, and refined social learning can evolve, if individuals can identify and discard maladaptive culture. This suggests that the evolution of such "adaptive filtering" mechanisms may have been crucial for the birth of human culture.

  10. Aggressive Periodontitis with Streptococcal Gingivitis a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute streptococcal gingivitis is an acute inflammation of the oral mucosa and also seen with the other oral diseases as aggressive periodontitis. Streptococcal infections of gingiva are seen rarely; also the origin of this gingival inflammation is occasionally different from that of routine plaque associated gingivitis. This case report describes a patient who presented with severe gingival inflammation and attachment loss that was diagnosed as an acute streptococcal infection associated with aggressive periodontitis. A case of aggressive periodontitis with streptococcal gingivitis was reported which was diagnosed treated with no postoperative complications.

  11. Gingival overgrowth: Part 1: aetiology and clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, J; Chesterman, J; Kellett, M; Durey, K

    2017-01-27

    Most commonly, gingival overgrowth is a plaque-induced inflammatory process, which can be modified by systemic disease or medications. However, rare genetic conditions can result in gingival overgrowth with non-plaque-induced aetiology. It is also important to appreciate the potential differential diagnoses of other presentations of enlarged gingival tissues; some may be secondary to localised trauma or non-plaque-induced inflammation and, albeit rarely, others may be manifestations of more sinister diseases or lesions. A definitive diagnosis will then enable an appropriate management strategy. This paper aims to discuss clinical features and diagnoses for conditions presenting with gingival overgrowth and other enlargements of gingival tissues.

  12. Doxycycline inhibits neutrophil (PMN)-type matrix metalloproteinases in human adult periodontitis gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, L M; Sorsa, T; Lee, H M; Ciancio, S; Sorbi, D; Ramamurthy, N S; Gruber, B; Salo, T; Konttinen, Y T

    1995-02-01

    We previously reported that low-dose doxycycline (DOXY) therapy reduces host-derived collagenase activity in gingival tissue of adult periodontitis (AP) patients. However, it was not clear whether this in vivo effect was direct or indirect. In the present study, inflamed human gingival tissue, obtained from AP patients during periodontal surgery, was extracted and the extracts partially purified by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. The extracts were then analyzed for collagenase activity using SDS-PAGE/fluorography/laser densitometry, and for gelatinase activity using type I gelatin zymography as well as a new quantitative assay using biotinylated type I gelatin as substrate. DOXY was added to the incubation mixture at a final concentration of 0-1000 microM. The concentration of DOXY required to inhibit 50% of the gingival tissue collagenase (IC50) was found to be 16-18 microM in the presence or absence of 1.2 mM APMA (an optimal organomercurial activator of latent procollagenases); this IC50 for DOXY was similar to that exhibited for collagenase or matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8 from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and from gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of AP patients. Of interest, Porphyromonas gingivalis collagenase was also inhibited by similar DOXY levels (IC50 = 15 microM), however the collagenase activity observed in the gingival tissue extracts was found to be of mammalian not bacterial origin based on the production of the specific alpha A (3/4) and alpha B (1/4) collagen degradation fragments. In contrast, the inhibition of collagenase purified from culture media of human gingival fibroblasts (MMP-1) required much greater DOXY levels (IC50 = 280 microM). The predominant molecular forms of gelatinolytic activity presented in the AP patients gingival tissue extracts were found to closely correspond to the 92 kD PMN-type gelatinase (MMP-9) although small quantities of 72 kD fibroblast-type gelatinase (MMP-2), and some other low molecular weight gelatinases

  13. Proviral HIV-1 DNA in gingival crevicular fluid of HIV-1-infected patients in various stages of HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maticic, M; Poljak, M; Kramar, B; Tomazic, J; Vidmar, L; Zakotnik, B; Skaleric, U

    2000-07-01

    The oral cavity is rarely reported to be a site of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission, despite detectable virus in saliva and relatively frequent prevalence of periodontal disease in HIV-infected persons yielding increased excretion of mononuclear-cell-enriched gingival fluid. To search for possible sources of HIV in saliva, and using the polymerase chain-reaction technique, we sought the presence and shedding patterns of proviral HIV-1 DNA in gingival crevicular fluid in a group of patients previously determined as HIV-1-seropositive. Periodontal status at the collection sites was monitored by several clinical parameters, including Plaque Index, Gingival Index, probing depth, and clinical attachment loss. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected by means of paper points. Proviral HIV-1 DNA was detected in the gingival fluid of 17 out of 35 HIV-1-infected patients. Its detection correlated significantly with higher plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load (p = 0.03) and not with peripheral blood CD4+ cell count, the presence of blood in gingival fluid, or oral lesions. There was a significant correlation between clinical attachment loss at the sites of fluid collection and plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load (p = 0.002), and borderline correlation between the latter and probing depth (p = 0.54) in the group of patients harboring proviral HIV-1 DNA in gingival crevicular fluid. The results of our study suggest that mononuclear cells present in gingival crevicular fluid and harboring proviral HIV-1 DNA could represent a potential source of HIV-1 in the presence or absence of local bleeding, especially in persons with advanced HIV infection and increased loss of clinical attachment.

  14. 227 Globalization, Culture and Human Development in the 21 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The world has been described as a global village due to enhanced global communication and interaction ... impact of globalization on Nigerian culture and the effect on .... This gives opportunity to a global access of Nigeria's culture. Modern ...

  15. 冠向复位瓣术治疗牙龈退缩的临床研究%Coronally positioned flap procedure in the treatment of human gingival recession

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于春梅; 陈巨峰; 方溢云; 李嘉朋; 卢钰芬

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To compare the clinical outcome following treatment of local gingival recessions by coronal ly positioned flap with a bioabsorbable membrane or by a coronally positioned flap procedure alone. METHODS: Twenty patients with buccal bilateral Miller Class Ⅰ or Class Ⅱ gingival recession defects were treated randomly by coro nally positioned flap with a bioabsorbable membrane or a coronally positioned flap alone (20 sites). The treatment sites were selected randomly. Twenty sites in the membrane group and 20 sites in the non - membrane group were examinat ed at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Clinical variables included the apical extent of the gingival re cession ( RD), the width of the gingival recession ( RW) at the cemento - enamel junction ( CEJ), the probing depth ( PD ) and the clinical attachment level ( CAL). RESULTS: Both treatments resulted in a significant gain of root cov erage(p 0.05). Statistical difference could be found in the results of PD, CAL but non in the results of RD and RW between two groups. CONCLUSION: Compared with coronally positioned flap combined with a bioabsorbable membrane , coronally positioned flap procedure alone can get more root coverage in vertical and horizontal direc tions. The coronally positioned flap operation offers a predictable and simple approach as a root coverage procedure for 2.5 mm~5mm recession defects .%目的:单纯冠向复位瓣技术(Coronally positioned flap,CPF)与冠向复位瓣技术联合引导组织再生技术(guided tissue regeneration,GTR)治疗牙龈退缩临床效果的比较.方法:选择牙弓两侧均有唇或颊侧牙龈退缩的病人20例(Miller分度Ⅰ或Ⅱ度,2.5 mm0.05);两组间的CAL、PD结果无统计学差异(P>0.05);RD、RW有统计学差异(P<0.05);结论:冠向复位瓣技术治疗2.5-5 mm的牙龈退缩可在垂直和水平方向获得更多的根面覆盖,与冠向复位瓣技术联合引导组织再生技术相比具有一定的临床优越性.

  16. Bifunctional Effect of Human IFN-γ on Cultured Human Fibroblasts from Tenon‘s Capsule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanGuo; JianGe; 等

    2002-01-01

    Purpose:To study the effect of human IFN-γ on in ivtro cultured human fibroblasts from Tenon's capsule.Materials and methods:The effect of different concentrations of human IFN-γand mitomycin-C (MMC),5-fluorouracil(5-Fu) on cultured human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts(HTCF) was measured using a MTT[3-(4,5-dimethylthiazo-2-yI)]-2,5-diphenylterazolium bromide;Thiazolyl blue) colorimetric assay.The results were analyzed using ANOVA of the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) 9.0 version.The difference was considered to be significant if P<0.05.Results:The effects of MMC and 5-Fu on the growth of HTCF were negative,while the effects of IFN-γon the growth of HTCF were both negative(102-104 units/ml in two experiments)and positive(106,105,10 units /ml in two experiments).The inhibition rate of MMC ranged from 5.73% to 46.9% ,which was similar to the inhibition rate of 5-Fu ranged from 12.49% to 38.92%(P=0.351).The inhibition rate of IFN-γ in two experiments was smaller than MMC and 5-Fu (P<0.05).Conclusion: IFN-γ has bifunctional effect (both enhancement and inhibition)on proliferation of cultured HTCF.The antiproliferative effect of IFN-γ was weaker than MMC and 5-Fu.Further study has to be carried out to document theinhibition of scar formation of filtration bleb by IFN-γ and the molecular mechanisms of its bifunctional effect on HTCF proliferation.Eye Science 2000;16:43-47.

  17. Bifunctional Effect of Human IFN-γon Cultured Human Fibroblasts from Tenon's Capsule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Guo; Jian Ge; Haiquan Liu; Yanyan Li; Jianliang Zheng; Xiangkun Huang; Yuqing Lan

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of human IFN-γ on in vitro cultured human fibroblasts from Tenon's capsuleMaterials and methods: The effect of different concentrations of human IFN-γ and mitomycin-C (MMC), 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) on cultured human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts (HTCF) was measured using a MIT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazo-2-yl)] -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide; Thiazolyl blue) colorimetric assay. The results were analyzed using ANOVA of the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) 9.0version. The difference was considered to be significant if P < 0. 05.Results: The effects of MMC and 5-Fu on the growth of HTCF were negative, while the effects of IFN-γ on the growth of HTCF were both negative (102 ~ l04 units/ml in two experiments) and positive (106, 105, 10 units/ml in two experiments) . The inhibition rate of MMC ranged from 5.73% to 46. 9%, which was similar to the inhibition rate of 5-Fu ranged from 12.49% to 38.92% ( P= 0. 351) . The inhibition rate of IFN-γ in two experiments was smaller than MMC and 5-Fu ( P < 0.05).Conclusion: IFN-γ has bifunctional effect (both enhancement and inhibition) on proliferation of cultured HTCF. The antiproliferative effect of IFN-γ was weaker than MMC and 5-Fu. Further study has to be carried out to document the inhibition of scar formation of filtration bleb by IFN-γ and the molecular mechanisms of its bifunctional effect on HTCF proliferation. Eye Science 2000; 16: 43~ 47.

  18. Sangramiento gingival y flora bacteriana en la gingivitis y la periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iriam Baldemira Rodríguez

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron 30 sitios o áreas periodontales que presentaban gingivitis y 30 con periodontitis, con el objetivo de determinar la relación existente entre el sangramiento gingival y la flora microbiana presente en la gingivitis y la periodontitis. Los pacientes seleccionados no presentaban antecedentes de enfermedad general y no habían recibido medicación antimicrobiana ni tratamiento periodontal en los útimos 6 meses; en el caso de las mujeres, no podían estar embarazadas. En los dientes seleccionados se procedió a tomar la muestra cumpliendo con los requisitos establecidos; luego se examinó inmediatamente en el microscopio de campo oscuro. Los resultados obtenidos indican que no hubo relación entre los morfotipos microbianos y los diferentes valores del índice de sangramiento gingival.Thirty periodontal sites presenting with gingivitis and 30 with periodontitis were studied with the aim of determining the relation between gingival bleeding and microflora present in gingivitis and periodontitis. Patients selected for the study did not present with a history of systemic diseases and received neither antimicrobial medication nor periodontal treatment during the last 6 months, in the case of women it was required that they were not pregnant. The sample was taken in the teeth chosen in compliance with the requirements established; then the sample was immediately examined in the dark field microscope. Results obtained suggest that there was no relationship between microbial morphological types and the different values of the gingival bleeding index.

  19. The Paradox of Freedom: John Dewey on Human Nature, Culture, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keall, Cherilyn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that John Dewey's view of human nature entails that culture is a necessary but not sufficient condition for freedom. A surprising corollary of this argument is that, if left to run its natural course, culture in fact tends not to enable but rather to preclude freedom. Hence, there are specific cultural practices--habits…

  20. Perspectives on Cultural Geography in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher; Johnston-Anumonwo, Ibipo

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of selected current concerns in cultural geography and the way it is taught. It includes coverage of cultural convergence and divergence, race and gender as culturally defined topics, and best teaching practices, including those related to analyzing controversial issues. Two important geographical models are laid…

  1. Preclinical safety studies on autologous cultured human skin fibroblast transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Zhang, Shuying; Liu, Dai; Chai, Mi; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhao, Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Recently, FDA approved the clinical use of autologous fibroblasts (LAVIV™) for the improvement of nasolabial fold wrinkles in adults. The use of autologous fibroblasts for the augmentation of dermal and subcutaneous defects represents a potentially exciting natural alternative to the use of other filler materials for its long-term corrective ability and absence of allergic adverse effects proved by clinical application. However, compared to the clinical evidence, preclinical studies are far from enough. In this study, human skin-derived fibroblasts were cultured and expanded for both in vitro and in vivo observations. In vitro, the subcultured fibroblasts were divided into two groups. One set of cells underwent cell cycle and karyotype analysis at passages 5 and 10. The second group of cells was cocultured in medium with different concentrations of human skin extract D for the measurement of collagen concentration and cell count. In vivo, the subcultured fibroblasts were injected into nude mice subcutaneously. Biopsies were taken for morphology observation and specific collagen staining at 1, 2, and 3 months after injection. The results in vitro showed no significant differences in cell cycle distribution between passages 5 and 10. Cell proliferation and secretion were inhibited as the concentration of extract D increased. In vivo, the fibroblasts were remarkably denser on the experimental side with no dysplastic cells. Mitotic cells were easily observed at the end of the first month but were rare at the end of the third month. Type III collagen was detected at the end of the first month, while collagen type I was positive at the end of the second month. The content of both collagens increased as time passed. The above results indicated that the use of the autologous fibroblasts was safe, providing a basic support for clinical use of fibroblasts.

  2. Primary culture of human skin melanocyte and comparison of culture in the presence and absence of phorbol ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Yarani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary culture takes place following the cell isolation from tissues. Isolation and culture of melanocytes based on their roll in the protection of body against hazardous sun rays, production of skin, cornea and hair color is really important. This study was done to set isolation, culture and proliferation of melanocytes from children foreskin and adult eyelashes, and also comparison of two types of melanocyte culture medium. Methods: Human foreskin and eyelash samples were used for melanocyte isolation and culture. After isolation of epidermis from dermis, epidermis cell suspensions were prepared by enzymatic digestion. The isolated cells were cultured in two melanocyte selective culture media. Immunocytochemistary and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays were used for confirmation of isolated and cultured melanocytes. Results: Our results indicated that isolated melanocyte cultured in the selective medium without phorbol esters is better than the melanocytes cultured in selective medium cont-aining phorbol esters not only morphologically but also physiologically and from the aspect of cell adhesion. In addition, the results showed that isolated melanocyte from adult eyelashes are more dendritic than melanocytes isolated from children foreskin. Conversely, our results indicated that the number of cell passages in melanocyte isolat-ed from foreskin is more than melanocytes isolated from adult eyelashes. Conclusion: Melanocytes cultured in selective medium containing convenient growth factors in absence of phorbol esters show more native physiological and adhesive properties. In addition, melanocyte isolated from younger tissues such as foreskin have better proliferative and sub-culturing properties so we suggest isolation and culture of younger tissues.

  3. The relation of gingival thickness to dynamics of gingival margin position pre- and post-surgically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharidhi Laxman Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the gingival margin position (GMP before and after open flap debridement in different gingival thickness (GT. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven healthy patients with moderate to advanced adult periodontitis were included in a randomized control clinical trial. A calibrated UNC-15 periodontal probe, an occlusal onlay stent was used for clinical measurements recorded at baseline, 3 month, 6 month, and 16 month. The changes in the GMP were studied at midbuccal (Mi-B, mesiobuccal (MB, and distobuccal sites. GT was measured presurgically, transgingivally at Mi-B and interdental sites, divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (thin and Group 2 (thick. Results: In GT of ≤1 mm group, the statistically significant apical shift of GMP led to gingival recession at all study sites in the early postsurgical period of 1 and 3 months. During 6 and 16 months, the apical shift of GMP coincided with the Chernihiv Airport at Mi-B site (6 months, MB site (16 months. The gingival recession was obvious at Mi-B sites (16 months. In the GT of >1 mm, the statistically significant apical shift of GMP did not cause gingival recession at any sites throughout postsurgical (1, 3, 6, and 16 months period. Conclusion: Thin gingiva showed apical shift of GMP leading to gingival recession as compared to thick gingiva postsurgically.

  4. Prevention of gingivitis: Oral hygiene and dentifrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sälzer, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    At the basis of Oral Health lies daily oral hygiene self-care with the result, if correctly performed, of plaque and gingivitis reduction. Epidemiological studies indicate that the level of oral hygiene in the general population has increased over the last decades. However, there still appears to be

  5. Prevention of gingivitis: Oral hygiene and dentifrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sälzer, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    At the basis of Oral Health lies daily oral hygiene self-care with the result, if correctly performed, of plaque and gingivitis reduction. Epidemiological studies indicate that the level of oral hygiene in the general population has increased over the last decades. However, there still appears to be

  6. Improvement of human dendritic cell culture for immunotoxicological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-07-01

    A toxic injury such as a decrease in the number of immature dendritic cells caused by a cytotoxic effect or a disturbance in their maturation process can be responsible for immunodepression. There is a need to improve in vitro assays on human dendritic cells used to detect and evaluate adverse effects of xenobiotics. Two aspects were explored in this work: cytotoxic effects of xenobiotics on immature dendritic cells, and the interference of xenobiotics with dendritic cell maturation. Dendritic cells of two different origins were tested. Dendritic cells obtained either from umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells or, for the first time, from umbilical cord blood monocytes. The cytotoxicity assay on immature dendritic cells has been improved. For the study of the potential adverse effects of xenobiotics on the maturation process of dendritic cells, several parameters were selected such as expression of markers (CD86, CD83, HLA-DR), secretion of interleukins 10 and 12, and proliferation of autologous lymphocytes. The relevance and the efficiency of the protocol applied were tested using two mycotoxins, T-2 toxin and deoxynivalence, DON, which are known to be immunosuppressive, and one phycotoxin, domoic acid, which is known not to have any immunotoxic effect. Assays using umbilical cord monocyte dendritic cell cultures with the protocol defined in this work, which involves a cytotoxicity study followed by evaluation of several markers of adverse effects on the dendritic cell maturation process, revealed their usefulness for investigating xenobiotic immunotoxicity toward immune primary reactions.

  7. Bone formation induced in mouse thigh by cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H C; Coulter, P R

    1967-04-01

    Cultured FL human amnion cells injected intramuscularly into cortisone-conditioned mice proliferate to form discrete nodules which become surrounded by fibroblasts. Within 12 days, fibroblastic zones differentiate into cartilage which calcifies to form bone. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that FL cells behave as an inductor of bone formation. In the electron microscope, FL cells were readily distinguished from surrounding fibroblasts. Transitional forms between the two cell types were not recognized. Stains for acid mucopolysaccharides emphasized the sharp boundary between metachromatic fibroblastic and cartilaginous zones and nonmetachromatic FL cells. (35)S was taken up preferentially by fibroblasts and chondrocytes and then deposited extracellularly in a manner suggesting active secretion of sulfated mucopolysaccharides. FL cells showed negligible (35)S utilization and secretion. FL cells, labeled in vitro with thymidine-(3)H, were injected and followed radioautographically, during bone formation. Nuclear label of injected FL cells did not appear in adjacent fibroblasts in quantities sufficient to indicate origin of the latter from FL cells. The minimal fibroblast nuclear labeling seen may represent reutilization of label from necrotic FL cells. It is suggested that FL cells injected into the mouse thigh induced cartilage and bone formation by host fibroblasts.

  8. Substance P stimulation of cultured human smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsuhashi, M.; Payan, D.G.

    1986-03-01

    Substance P (SP) has been shown to be mitogenic for cells active in the inflammatory response, such as lymphocytes and macrophages, and demonstrates vasodilatory and bronchoconstrictor properties, implicating SP receptor-mediated responses on smooth muscle cells. The effects of SP on cultured human vascular smooth muscle cell (HSMC) proliferative responses and protein synthesis were assessed by measuring the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA and (/sup 3/H)leucine into intracellular proteins, respectively. SP at concentrations of 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/M stimulated a 40-50% increase in the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine in HMSC. In addition, the uptake of (/sup 3/H)leucine into HSMC proteins was increased significantly by SP over the concentration range 10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -6/M. Moreover, an enhancement of protein synthesis in HSMC by 10/sup -9/M SP was demonstrated by an increased incorporation of (/sup 35/S)methionine into cellular proteins of MW 40-30,000 daltons as assessed by autoradiographic analysis of HSMC lysates analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Furthermore, the uptake of (/sup 3/H)inositol into HSMC membrane phospholipid was increased significantly by SP in a dose-dependent manner over the concentration range 10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -6/M. Peptides such as SP which stimulate smooth muscle contraction, also demonstrate mitogenic properties on HSMC, suggesting that these cellular response shares common pathways of activation.

  9. Acquired resistance to auranofin in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennås, A; Rugstad, H E

    1985-01-01

    A substrain (HEAF) of cultured human epithelial cells, grown as monolayers, was selected for resistance to auranofin (AF), a gold-containing anti-arthritic drug, by growing the parental HE cells with stepwise increased concentrations of AF in the medium. HEAF cells acquired resistance to 2 mumol AF/l, twice the concentration tolerated by the sensitive HE cells. Resistance to AF was also demonstrated in another substrain (HE100) originally selected for by its cadmium resistance, and characterized by a high cytosolic metallothionein (MT) content. Following continuous exposure to 2 mumol AF/l for 4 days, 58% of the HEAF cells, 67% of the HE100 cells, and 16% of the HE cells remained adherent to the flasks, compared with non-treated controls. Following 24 h AF exposure to living cells, HEAF cells had one-half and HE100 cells twice the cellular and cytosolic gold concentration per mg protein, as compared with HE cells. Gel filtration of cell cytosols revealed gold-binding proteins with a mol. wt. of about 10 000 apparently occurring on AF exposure in HEAF and HE cells. They bound 10-15% of cytosolic gold. MT in HE100 cells bound AF-gold to about the same extent. We suggest that the ability of cells to maintain the gold concentration at a low level (HEAF) and trapping of gold by MT (HE100) or low molecular weight proteins occurring on AF treatment (HEAF) may be mechanisms contributing to the observed cellular resistance to AF.

  10. Cultural Pluralism in International Human Rights Law: The Role of Reservations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses cultural pluralism in international human rights law by analysing reservations to human rights treaties. It has been argued that reservations "…are a legitimate, perhaps even desirable, means of accounting for cultural, religious, or political value diversity across nations".

  11. Cultural pluralism in international human rights law: the role of reservations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.; Vrdoljak, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter addresses cultural pluralism in international human rights law by analysing one specific aspect of international law, namely reservations to human rights treaties. It has been argued that reservations "…are a legitimate, perhaps even desirable, means of accounting for cultural,

  12. Separation of water-soluble metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene formed by cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1979-01-01

    A method has been developed to separate conjugated metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene into three major fractions: sulfate esters, glucuronides and glutathione conjugates. In cultured human colon, formation of sulfate esters and glutathione conjugates is the major conjugation pathway, while formation o......-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene were the major substrates for sulfotransferase in cultured human colon....

  13. Metabolic activation and DNA binding of benzo(a)pyrene in cultured human bronchus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    Human bronchus is one target site for the carcinogenic action of tobacco smoke, which contains chemical carcinogens, including benzo(a)pyrene. Human bronchi were obtained from surgery or “immediate” autopsy and then cultured in a chemically defined medium. The cultured bronchi were exposed...

  14. A novel feeder-free culture system for human pluripotent stem cell culture and induced pluripotent stem cell derivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Vuoristo

    Full Text Available Correct interactions with extracellular matrix are essential to human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC to maintain their pluripotent self-renewal capacity during in vitro culture. hPSCs secrete laminin 511/521, one of the most important functional basement membrane components, and they can be maintained on human laminin 511 and 521 in defined culture conditions. However, large-scale production of purified or recombinant laminin 511 and 521 is difficult and expensive. Here we have tested whether a commonly available human choriocarcinoma cell line, JAR, which produces high quantities of laminins, supports the growth of undifferentiated hPSCs. We were able to maintain several human pluripotent stem cell lines on decellularized matrix produced by JAR cells using a defined culture medium. The JAR matrix also supported targeted differentiation of the cells into neuronal and hepatic directions. Importantly, we were able to derive new human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC lines on JAR matrix and show that adhesion of the early hiPSC colonies to JAR matrix is more efficient than to matrigel. In summary, JAR matrix provides a cost-effective and easy-to-prepare alternative for human pluripotent stem cell culture and differentiation. In addition, this matrix is ideal for the efficient generation of new hiPSC lines.

  15. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter…

  16. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter…

  17. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter alia"…

  18. The effect of the culture vessel and insemination method on the in vitro fertilization and development of human oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, William R.; Johnson, Jane E.

    1997-01-01

    Our laboratory has corroborated previously published work demonstrating that tissue culture tubes and microdrops perform equally well for in vitro fertilization and culture of human oocytes and embryos.

  19. Cultured rat and purified human Pneumocystis carinii stimulate intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T; Aliouat, E M; Lundgren, B

    1998-01-01

    The production of free radicals in human neutrophils was studied in both Pneumocystis carinii derived from cultures of L2 rat lung epithelial-like cells and Pneumocystis carinii purified from human lung. Using the cytochrome C technique, which selectively measured extracellular superoxide....... It was established that 1) P. carinii stimulated intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils, 2) opsonized cultured rat-derived P. carinii stimulated human neutrophils to a strong intracellular response of superoxide production, and 3) opsonized P. carinii, purified from human lung also...

  20. Cyclooxygenases in human and mouse skin and cultured human keratinocytes: association of COX-2 expression with human keratinocyte differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Rakhlin, N.; Habib, A.; Maclouf, J.; Goldyne, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal expression of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H-generating cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) was evaluated both by immunohistochemistry performed on human and mouse skin biopsy sections and by Western blotting of protein extracts from cultured human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes. In normal human skin, COX-1 immunostaining is observed throughout the epidermis whereas COX-2 immunostaining increases in the more differentiated, suprabasilar keratinocytes. Basal cell carcinomas express little if any COX-1 or COX-2 immunostaining whereas both isozymes are strongly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas deriving from a more differentiated layer of the epidermis. In human keratinocyte cultures, raising the extracellular calcium concentration, a recognized stimulus for keratinocyte differentiation, leads to an increased expression of both COX-2 protein and mRNA; expression of COX-1 protein, however, shows no significant alteration in response to calcium. Because of a recent report that failed to show COX-2 in normal mouse epidermis, we also looked for COX-1 and COX-2 immunostaining in sections of normal and acetone-treated mouse skin. In agreement with a previous report, some COX-1, but no COX-2, immunostaining is seen in normal murine epidermis. However, following acetone treatment, there is a marked increase in COX-1 expression as well as the appearance of significant COX-2 immunostaining in the basal layer. These data suggest that in human epidermis as well as in human keratinocyte cultures, the expression of COX-2 occurs as a part of normal keratinocyte differentiation whereas in murine epidermis, its constitutive expression is absent, but inducible as previously published.

  1. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs. PMID:26605793

  2. The role of cultural practices in the emergence of modern human intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    2008-06-12

    Innate cognitive capacities are orchestrated by cultural practices to produce high-level cognitive processes. In human activities, examples of this phenomenon range from everyday inferences about space and time to the most sophisticated reasoning in scientific laboratories. A case is examined in which chimpanzees enter into cultural practices with humans (in experiments) in ways that appear to enable them to engage in symbol-mediated thought. Combining the cultural practices perspective with the theories of embodied cognition and enactment suggests that the chimpanzees' behaviour is actually mediated by non-symbolic representations. The possibility that non-human primates can engage in cultural practices that give them the appearance of symbol-mediated thought opens new avenues for thinking about the coevolution of human culture and human brains.

  3. Human primary mixed brain cultures: preparation, differentiation, characterization and application to neuroscience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Balmiki; Chopra, Nipun; Long, Justin M; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2014-09-16

    Culturing primary cortical neurons is an essential neuroscience technique. However, most cultures are derived from rodent brains and standard protocols for human brain cultures are sparse. Herein, we describe preparation, maintenance and major characteristics of a primary human mixed brain culture, including neurons, obtained from legally aborted fetal brain tissue. This approach employs standard materials and techniques used in the preparation of rodent neuron cultures, with critical modifications. This culture has distinct differences from rodent cultures. Specifically, a significant numbers of cells in the human culture are derived from progenitor cells, and the yield and survival of the cells grossly depend on the presence of bFGF. In the presence of bFGF, this culture can be maintained for an extended period. Abundant productions of amyloid-β, tau and proteins make this a powerful model for Alzheimer's research. The culture also produces glia and different sub-types of neurons. We provide a well-characterized methodology for human mixed brain cultures useful to test therapeutic agents under various conditions, and to carry forward mechanistic and translational studies for several brain disorders.

  4. Development of a multidisciplinary course in cultural competence for nursing and human service professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Cora C; DoBroka, Cheryl Conrad; Mohammad, Saleem

    2009-09-01

    A multidisciplinary teaching model was used to develop a pilot course for students in the human service professions of nursing, education, and social work to gain additional knowledge and skills in providing diverse clients with culturally appropriate services during field and clinical experiences. This article focuses on the process of developing a multidisciplinary course in cultural competence that is consistent with a university mission to prepare students for leadership and service in an increasingly diverse society. Using the theoretical framework of Campinha-Bacote's process of cultural competence and the six developmental stages of intercultural competence in Bennett's developmental model of intercultural sensitivity, the course content covered the five components of cultural awareness, cultural knowledge, cultural skills, cultural encounters, and cultural desire. Students' written reflections indicated growth in acquisition of cultural knowledge, skills, and desire. Faculty collaboration across disciplines included the benefits of an enriched knowledge base and shared scholarship.

  5. Intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses versus dental implants: a comparison between keratinocyte and gingival epithelial cell adhesion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendegrass, C J; Lancashire, H T; Fontaine, C; Chan, G; Hosseini, P; Blunn, G W

    2015-04-19

    Infection is the primary failure modality for transcutaneous implants because the skin breach provides a route for pathogens to enter the body. Intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses (ITAP) are being developed to overcome this problem by creating a seal at the skin-implant interface. Oral gingival epithelial cell attachment creates an infection-free seal around dental implants. However, this has yet to be achieved consistently outside of the oral environment. Epithelial cells attach to metal substrates by means of hemidesmosomes and focal adhesions. Their density per unit cell is an indicator of attachment strength. We postulate that gingival epithelial cells express more hemidesmosomes and focal adhesions at earlier time points, compared with epidermal keratinocytes, and this increased speed and strength of attachment may be the reason why an infection-free seal is often achieved around dental implants but less frequently around ITAP. The aim of this study was to compare epidermal keratinocyte with oral gingival cell attachment on titanium alloy in vitro, to determine whether these two cell types differ in their speed and strength of attachment. We aimed to test the hypothesis that gingival cells up-regulate focal adhesion and hemidesmosome formation at earlier time points compared with extra-oral keratinocytes. To test this hypothesis we cultured epidermal keratinocytes and oral gingival cells on titanium alloy substrates and assessed cell attachment by focal adhesions and hemidesmosome expression at 4, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Formation and expression of hemidesmosomes temporally lagged behind that of focal adhesions in both cell types. Gingival derived cells up-regulated focal adhesion and hemidesmosome expression at earlier time points compared with epidermal keratinocytes. Hemidesmosome expression in oral gingival cells was 3 times greater compared with epidermal keratinocytes at 4 hours. Our findings indicate that earlier attachment may be key to the

  6. Humane Orientation as a New Cultural Dimension of the GLOBE Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlösser, Oliver; Frese, Michael; Heintze, Anna-Maria

    2013-01-01

    We validate, extend, and empirically and theoretically criticize the cultural dimension of humane orientation of the project GLOBE (Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness Research Program). Theoretically, humane orientation is not just a one-dimensionally positive concept about...... study used student samples from 25 countries that were either high or low in humane orientation (N = 876) and studied their relation to the traditional GLOBE scale and other cultural-level measures (agreeableness, religiosity, authoritarianism, and welfare state score). Findings revealed a strong...

  7. A novel method for generating xeno-free human feeder cells for human embryonic stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guoliang; Liu, Shiying; Krawetz, Roman; Chan, Michael; Chernos, Judy; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2008-06-01

    Long-term cultures of human embryonic stem (hES) cells require a feeder layer for maintaining cells in an undifferentiated state and increasing karyotype stability. In routine hES cell culture, mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) feeders and animal component-containing media (FBS or serum replacement) are commonly used. However, the use of animal materials increases the risk of transmitting pathogens to hES cells and therefore is not optimal for use in cultures intended for human transplantation. There are other limitations with conventional feeder cells, such as MEFs, which have a short lifespan and can only be propagated five to six passages before senescing. Several groups have investigated maintaining existing hES cell lines and deriving new hES cell lines on human feeder layers. However, almost all of these human source feeder cells employed in previous studies were derived and cultured in animal component conditions. Even though one group previously reported the derivation and culture of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) in human serum-containing medium, this medium is not optimal because HFFs routinely undergo senescence after 10 passages when cultured in human serum. In this study we have developed a completely animal-free method to derive HFFs from primary tissues. We demonstrate that animal-free (AF) HFFs do not enter senescence within 55 passages when cultured in animal-free conditions. This methodology offers alternative and completely animal-free conditions for hES cell culture, thus maintaining hES cell morphology, pluripotency, karyotype stability, and expression of pluripotency markers. Moreover, no difference in hES cell maintenance was observed when they were cultured on AF-HFFs of different passage number or independent derivations.

  8. Human cultures as niche constructions within the solar system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Vliert, Evert

    2016-01-01

    This commentary seeks to refine Kashima’s (2016) timely and topical but too-general call for embedding culture within the planetary ecosystem. My starting point is that cultures are to an underestimated extent ongoing niche constructions within the merry-go-round of the Sun’s radiation, the Earth’s

  9. Exploring the Animal Turn: Human-animal relations in Science, Society and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Animals' omnipresence in human society makes them both close to and ye tremarkably distant from humans. Human and animal lives have always been entangled, but the way we see and practice the relationships between humans and animals - as close, intertwined, or clearly separate - varies from time to time and between cultures, societies, and even situations. By putting these complex relationships in focus, this anthology investigates the ways in which human society deals with its co-existence wi...

  10. An investigation of donor and culture parameters which influence epithelial outgrowths from cultured human cadaveric limbal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Oliver; Rooney, Paul; Figueiredo, Francisco; Lako, Majlinda; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2013-05-01

    Limbal stem cell deficiency is a blinding disease which affects the cornea at the front of the eye. The definitive cure involves replacing the corneal epithelial (limbal) stem cells, for example by transplanting cultured limbal epithelial cells. One method of performing cultures is to grow a sheet of epithelial cells from a limbal explant on human amniotic membrane. The growth of limbal tissue can be variable. The aim of this study is to investigate how different donor and culture factors influence the ex vivo growth of cadaveric limbal explants. Limbal explant cultures were established from 10 different cadaveric organ cultured corneo-scleral discs. The growth rate and the time taken for growth to be established were determined. Statistical analysis was performed to assess correlation between these factors and donor variables including donor age, sex, time from donor death to enucleation, time from enucleation to organ culture storage and duration in organ culture. Growth curves consistently showed a lag phase followed by a steeper linear growth phase. Donor age, time between death and enucleation, and time between enucleation and organ culture were not correlated to the lag time or the growth rate. Time in organ culture had a significant correlation with the duration of lag time (P = 0.003), but no relationship with the linear growth rate. This study shows that an important factor correlating with growth variation is the duration of corneo-scleral tissue in organ culture. Interestingly, donor age was not correlated with limbal explant growth. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Astrocyte cultures derived from human brain tissue express angiotensinogen mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milsted, A.; Barna, B.P.; Ransohoff, R.M.; Brosnihan, K.B.; Ferrario, C.M. (Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The authors have identified human cultured cell lines that are useful for studying angiotensinogen gene expression and its regulation in the central nervous system. A model cell system of human central nervous system origin expressing angiotensinogen has not previously been available. Expression of angiotensinogen mRNA appears to be a basal property of noninduced human astrocytes, since astrocytic cell lines derived from human glioblastomas or nonneoplastic human brain tissue invariably produced angiotensinogen mRNA. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that angiotensinogen mRNA production was not limited to a subpopulation of astrocytes because >99% of cells in these cultures contained angiotensinogen mRNA. These cell lines will be useful in studies of the molecular mechanisms controlling angiotensin synthesis and the role of biologically active angiotensin in the human brain by allowing the authors to examine regulation of expression of the renin-angiotensin system in human astrocyte cultures.

  12. Experimental and theoretical models of human cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Marius; Mesoudi, Alex

    2014-05-01

    The modern field of cultural evolution is now over 30 years old, and an extensive body of theory and data has been amassed. This article reviews models of cultural evolution, both experimental and theoretical, and surveys what they can tell us about cultural evolutionary processes. The models are grouped according to which of four broad questions they address: (1) How are cultural traits changed during transmission? (2) How and why do cultural traits accumulate over time? (3) What social learning biases do people use? and (4) What are the population-level consequences of different social learning biases? We conclude by highlighting gaps in the literature and promising future research directions, including the further integration of theoretical models and experimental data, the identification of the factors underlying cumulative cultural evolution, and the explanation of individual and cultural variation in social learning biases. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Primary cell culture of human adenocarcinomas--practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerescu, Lucian; Tucureanu, Cătălin; Caraş, Iuliana; Neagu, Stefan; Melinceanu, Laura; Sălăgeanu, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture is one of the major tools for oncology research, being an excellent system in which to study the biochemistry and molecular biology associated with individual cancer types and to understand cancer cell physiology. Progress in understanding the biology of any type of carcinoma has been impeded by the inability to culture adequately malignant cells from most epithelial tissues. The ultimate in vitro tumor model would completely reflect the in vivo tumor microenvironment in function and mechanism. Unfortunately, such a model does not currently exist. Homogeneous cell lines that can be continuously propagated on plastic surfaces have been extensively used as a surrogate for tumor environment; however they are very different from the in vivo tumor cells. Model systems involving primary culture represent the situation most closely related to the original tissue although they have a number of disadvantages over cell lines, such as the limited ability to repeat studies with a well characterized culture system that can be used in multiple laboratories. The primary culture may contain many types of stromal and infiltrating cell types potentially complicating the interpretation of data. Yet, their properties better reflect the cellular interactions present in intact tissue. The present article reviews the critical steps in obtaining, routine maintenance and cryopreservation of primary tumor cell cultures, based on information from literature and personal experience on the subject. The article also includes an updated protocol for primary tumor cell isolation and culture.

  14. Culture medium refinement by dialysis for the expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Suman Chandra; Nagamori, Eiji; Horie, Masanobu; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) secrete essential autocrine factors that are removed along with toxic metabolites when the growth medium is exchanged daily. In this study, after determining the minimum inhibitory level of lactic acid for hiPSCs, a medium refining system was constructed by which toxic metabolites were removed from used culture medium and autocrine factors as well as other growth factors were recycled. Specifically, about 87 % of the basic fibroblast growth factor and 80 % of transforming growth factor beta 1 were retained in the refined medium after dialysis. The refined medium efficiently potentiated the proliferation of hiPS cells in adherent culture. When the refining system was used to refresh medium in suspension culture, a final cell density of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(6) cells mL(-1) was obtained, with 99.5 ± 0.2 % OCT 3/4 and 78.3 ± 1.1 % TRA-1-60 expression, on day 4 of culture. These levels of expression were similar to those observed in the conventional suspension culture. With this method, culture medium refinement by dialysis was established to remove toxic metabolites, recycle autocrine factors as well as other growth factors, and reduce the use of macromolecules for the expansion of hiPSCs in suspension culture.

  15. Chronic inflammatory gingival overgrowths: laser gingivectomy & gingivoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, B Shiva; T, Ramadevi; S, Neetha M; Reddy, P Sunil Kumar; Saritha, G; Reddy, J Muralinath

    2013-02-01

    It is quite common to note chronic inflammatory Gingival overgrowths during and/or post orthodontic treatment. Sometimes the overgrowths may even potentially complicate and/or interrupt orthodontic treatment. With the introduction of soft tissue lasers these problems can now be addressed more easily. Amongst many LASERS now available in Dentistry DIODE LASERS seem to be most ideal for orthodontic soft tissue applications. As newer treatments herald into minimally invasive techniques, DIODE LASERS are becoming more promising both in patient satisfaction and dentist satisfaction. How to cite this article: Shankar BS, Ramadevi T, Neetha M S, Reddy P S K, Saritha G, Reddy J M. Chronic Inflammatory Gingival Overgrowths: Laser Gingivectomy & Gingivoplasty. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(1):83-87.

  16. Idiopathic gingival enlargement and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in the size of gingiva referred to as "gingival enlargement," usually overfills the interproximal spaces, ballooning out over the teeth and sometimes even protruding into the oral cavity. It may occur as localized enlargement in relation to a single tooth, a group of teeth, or may be generalized involving the entire dentition. It is multifactorial in origin having the influence of bacterial plaque, systemic factors or conditions, genetic predisposition (hereditary or familial, and various medications. Sometimes, it may appear as diffuse enlargement of gingiva without any specific etiologic factor. It is then considered as idiopathic enlargement. In this case report, an idiopathic gingival enlargement was successfully treated using gingivectomy by ledge and wedge procedure. The surgical technique performed yielded functionally as well as esthetically satisfying results. Gingivectomy provides a viable option to manage diffuse enlargement cases. This procedure provides the functional as well as esthetic demands and at the same time, it maintains the integrity of periodontium.

  17. Familial gingival fibromatosis: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a rare condition that can occur as an isolated disease or as part of a syndrome or chromosomal abnormality. In severe cases, the gingival enlargement may cover the crowns of teeth and cause severe functional and aesthetic concerns. Here, we present a case of an 8-year-old girl with severe enlargement of gums in maxilla and mandible. Both deciduous and permanent teeth were not erupted in the oral cavity at all. Mutation in the Son-of-Sevenless (SOS-1 gene has been associated with the disease. The diagnosis was made based on clinical examination and family history. Surgical removal of the hyperplastic tissue was performed under general anesthesia.

  18. [Gingival recessions and periodontal plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quincey, G de; Padmos, J A D; Renkema, A M

    2015-11-01

    Periodontal plastic surgery is defined as the set of surgical procedures that are performed to prevent or correct developmental disorders and anatomical, traumatic and pathological abnormalities of the gingiva, alveolar mucosa, and alveolar bone. Root coverage procedures fall under this term and have been applied for more than fifty years with varying degrees of success. There are several indications for the treatment of gingival recessions. When the treatment of choice - a conservative approach - offers no solace (any more), gingival recessions can be treated by applying periodontal plastic surgery. The goal of this surgery is complete recovery of the anatomical structures in the area of the recession. To this end several surgical techniques have been developed during the last decades. The choice of a particular technique depends on various factors, such as the number of defects, their size and the amount of keratinized gingiva around the defect.

  19. Human Papilloma Viral DNA Replicates as a Stable Episome in Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, Robert F.; Taichman, Lorne B.

    1982-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is poorly understood because systems for its growth in tissue culture have not been developed. We report here that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes could be infected with HPV from plantar warts and that the viral DNA persisted and replicated as a stable episome. There were 50-200 copies of viral DNA per cell and there was no evidence to indicate integration of viral DNA into the cellular genome. There was also no evidence to suggest that viral DNA underwent productive replication. We conclude that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes may be a model for the study of certain aspects of HPV biology.

  20. Technology as Human Social Tradition : Cultural Transmission among Hunter-Gatherers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Technology as Human Social Tradition outlines a novel approach to studying variability and cumulative change in human technology—a research theme that spans both archaeology and anthropology. Peter Jordan argues that human material culture is best understood as an expression of social tradition.

  1. Organizational culture and human resources management in multinational companies under the conditions of intercultural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetráková Milota

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the opinion and experiences of professionals on specifics of human resources management and organizational culture forming in multinational companies. The theoretical knowledge is in confrontation with the results of sociological questioning in the form of structured interviews with managers of multinational companies branches in Slovakia. The starting point of the research was hypothesis about respecting national culture specifics in culture of multinational company culture. We can proof this hypothesis by research; the majority of companies apply transnational and polycentric approach to create local branch culture.

  2. Gingival hyperplasia by upper airway obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Soriano, Ana; Docente Departamento Académico de Estomatología Biosocial.; Lévano Torres, Víctor; Docente Departamento Académico Médico Quirúrgico.; Pastor Yataco, Shamila; Alumnos del 3er año de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Vallejos Pulido, Arturo; Alumnos del 3er año de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Huamanyauri Gonzales, Lizbeth; Alumnos del 3er año de Odontología de la UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of mouth breathing are the introduction of cold air, dry and dusty in the mouth and pharynx, the lost functions of heating, humedificacion and filtering the air entering the nose increases the oral mucosa irritation and pharyngeal. A case of a female patient 15 years old who comes for consultation of Periodontology with increase in volume and gingival redness in the upper anterior sector of upper airway obstruction caused by deviated septum right turbinate hypertrophy and maxillar...

  3. Gingival enlargement in partial hemifacial hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Jagtap, Rasika Ravindra; Deshpande, Gaurav Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    Hemifacial hypertrophy is a rare developmental disorder, characterized by unilateral enlargement of facial tissues. The hemifacial hyperplasia is classified as true hemifacial hypertrophy and partial hemifacial hypertrophy. It is unilateral enlargement of viscerocranial condition in which not all structures are enlarged. We present a rare case of gingival enlargement in partial hemifacial hyperplasia highlighting the clinical and radiological findings with the corrective treatment offered for...

  4. Gingival overgrowth: Part 2: management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterman, J; Beaumont, J; Kellett, M; Durey, K

    2017-02-10

    The effective and predictable management of gingival overgrowth requires correct diagnosis and consideration of aetiological factors, as discussed in Part 1 (BDJ 2017; 222: 85-91). Initial management should involve cause-related therapy, which may resolve or reduce the lesion. If functional, aesthetic and maintenance complications persist following this phase; further treatment may be required in the form of surgery. This paper discusses management strategies, including management of aetiological factors and surgical techniques.

  5. Chronic Inflammatory Gingival Overgrowths: Laser Gingivectomy & Gingivoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar, B Shiva; T, Ramadevi; S, Neetha M; Reddy, P Sunil Kumar; Saritha, G; Reddy, J Muralinath

    2013-01-01

    It is quite common to note chronic inflammatory Gingival overgrowths during and/or post orthodontic treatment. Sometimes the overgrowths may even potentially complicate and/or interrupt orthodontic treatment. With the introduction of soft tissue lasers these problems can now be addressed more easily. Amongst many LASERS now available in Dentistry DIODE LASERS seem to be most ideal for orthodontic soft tissue applications. As newer treatments herald into minimally invasive techniques, DIODE LA...

  6. INTERACTION BETWEEN HUMAN BEING AND URBAN CULTURE SPACE: ONE OF THE MOTIVATIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION INTERNATIONALISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Liang Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the objective of this paper is to deeply and clearly explain the internationalisation of higher education from the aspect of the integration of human being with urban cultural space. Materials and Methods: the methods used in the research are mainly analytical and descriptive ones enabling to show how the integration of human being and urban cultural space promote and influence the internationalisation of higher education. Results: the motivation for the internationalisation of higher education is closely interrelated with that of urbanisation. Besides the economic and political incentives, modern urban culture, caused by globalisation, also plays a very important role in encouraging higher education internationalisation. Discussion and Conclusions: the appearance of higher education internationalisation is mediated by the alteration of the existing environment of urban culture space against the background of city internationalisation. Human beings’ need for self-assurance in urban culture space helps to stimulate the internationalisation of higher education, and human beings promote the development of modern culture space and their separation in urban culture space accelerates the development of higher education. From the perspective of higher education internationalisation, to sort out the cultural motivation for higher education and find its suitable form for the city’s internationalisation is crucial for adjusting the orientation and guaranteeing the efficacy of higher education internationalisation. From the aspect of human beings’ development, the separation between urban space and human beings caused by the city’s ongoing internationalisation is a pressing problem to be solved. From the aspect of the construction of urban culture space, as an important means of retaining human beings’ equilibrium, urban culture promotes the internationalisation of higher education.

  7. Workshop on cultural usability and human work interaction design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Ørngreen, Rikke; Roese, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    , Workplace observation, Think-Aloud Usability Test, etc. These techniques often give - seemingly - similar results when applied in diverse cultural settings, but experience shows that we need a deep understanding of the cultural, social and organizational context to interpret the results, and to transform...... and climate, etc.). See conference website http://www.nordichi2008.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=68&Itemid=92 and workgroup website at http://ilex.cbs.dk/hwid/, where the proceedings is available....

  8. Optimization of Culture of Leptospira from Humans with Leptospirosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Smythe, Lee D.; Symonds, Meegan L.; Dohnt, Michael F.; Slack, Andrew T.; Limpaiboon, Roongreung; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study of 989 patients with acute febrile illness was performed in northeast Thailand to define the yield of Leptospira from four different types of blood sample. Based on a comparison of the yields from whole blood, surface plasma, deposit from spun plasma, and clotted blood samples from 80 patients with culture-proven leptospirosis, we suggest a sampling strategy in which culture is performed using whole blood and deposit from spun plasma. PMID:17301285

  9. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Serum for Culturing the Supportive Feeder Cells of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruttachuk Rungsiwiwut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs can proliferate robustly on the feeder-free culture system, genetic instability of hPSCs has been reported in such environment. Alternatively, feeder cells enable hPSCs to maintain their pluripotency. The feeder cells are usually grown in a culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS prior to coculture with hPSCs. The use of FBS might limit the clinical application of hPSCs. Recently, human cord blood-derived serum (hUCS showed a positive effect on culture of mesenchymal stem cells. It is interesting to test whether hUCS can be used for culture of feeder cells of hPSCs. This study was aimed to replace FBS with hUCS for culturing the human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs prior to feeder cell preparation. The results showed that HFFs cultured in hUCS-containing medium (HFF-hUCS displayed fibroblastic features, high proliferation rates, short population doubling times, and normal karyotypes after prolonged culture. Inactivated HFF-hUCS expressed important genes, including Activin A, FGF2, and TGFβ1, which have been implicated in the maintenance of hPSC pluripotency. Moreover, hPSC lines maintained pluripotency, differentiation capacities, and karyotypic stability after being cocultured for extended period with inactivated HFF-hUCS. Therefore, the results demonstrated the benefit of hUCS for hPSCs culture system.

  10. Treatment of gingival pigmentation : A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Deepak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A smile expresses a feeling of joy, success, sensuality, affection and courtesy, and reveals self confidence and kindness. The harmony of the smile is determined not only by the shape, the position and the color of the teeth but also by the gingival tissues. Gingival health and appearance are essential components of an attractive smile. Gingival pigmentation results from melanin granules, which are produced by melanoblasts. The degree of pigmentation depends on melanoblastic activity. Although melanin pigmentation of the gingiva is completely benign and does not present a medical problem, complaints of ′black gums′ are common particularly in patients having a very high smile line (gummy smile. For depigmentation of gingiva different treatment modalities have been reported like- Bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap, cryotherapy, electrosurgery and laser. In the present case series bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap (epithelial excision cryotherapy and electrosurgery have been tried for depigmentation, which are simple, effective and yield good results, along with good patient satisfaction. The problems encountered with some of these techniques have also been discussed.

  11. Treatment of gingival pigmentation: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Prasad; Sunil, S; Mishra, R; Sheshadri

    2005-01-01

    A smile expresses a feeling of joy, success, sensuality, affection and courtesy, and reveals self confidence and kindness. The harmony of the smile is determined not only by the shape, the position and the color of the teeth but also by the gingival tissues. Gingival health and appearance are essential components of an attractive smile. Gingival pigmentation results from melanin granules, which are produced by melanoblasts. The degree of pigmentation depends on melanoblastic activity. Although melanin pigmentation of the gingiva is completely benign and does not present a medical problem, complaints of 'black gums' are common particularly in patients having a very high smile line (gummy smile). For depigmentation of gingiva different treatment modalities have been reported like- Bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap, cryotherapy, electrosurgery and laser. In the present case series bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap (epithelial excision) cryotherapy and electrosurgery have been tried for depigmentation, which are simple, effective and yield good results, along with good patient satisfaction. The problems encountered with some of these techniques have also been discussed.

  12. Non syndromic gingival fibromatosis in a mild mental retardation child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh K Duddu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival fibromatosis is a benign oral condition characterized by enlargement of gingival tissues. It usually develops as an isolated disorder but can be one of the features of a syndrome. This case report is of a 5-year-old male with severe gingival hyperplasia and mild mental retardation which was complicated by open bite, abnormal occlusion, open lip posture, and disabilities associated with mastication and speech. Full mouth gingivectomy in single sitting under general anesthesia was done with electrocautery.

  13. Characterization of dental anatomy and gingival biotype in Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stacey A; Kim, Alexis C; Prusa, Louis A; Kao, Richard T

    2013-01-01

    Gingival and dental characteristics are risk factors for periodontal problems. With short or fused roots, a decreased periodontium results in some attachment loss, compromising periodontal stability. Similarly, with an increased incidence of thin gingival biotype, inflammatory and traumatic insults may result in gingival recession. Anecdotally, Asian dentitions have been described as having short roots with "thin gingiva". This cross-sectional study will utilize clinical data and radiographic interpretation to ascertain whether this clinical impression is valid.

  14. Gingival displacement methods used by dental professionals: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    S V Giridhar Reddy; M.Bharathi; B. Vinod; K Rajeev Kumar Reddy; N Simhachalam Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to identify the methods used by dental professionals for gingival displacement before making impressions for fixed prostheses. Materials and Methods: A printed questionnaire was distributed to over 600 dentists at a National Dental Conference held in Hyderabad. The questionnaire was designed to know the preferred method of gingival displacement, medicament used, frequency of performing gingival displacement, etc. The results were analyzed and represented ...

  15. Expression of haemopexin receptors by cultured human cytotrophoblast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van Dijk (Hans); M.J. Kroos; J.S. Starreveld; H.G. van Eijk (Henk); S.P. Tang; D.X. Song

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe expression of cell-surface haemopexin (Hx) receptors on human cytotrophoblasts was assessed by using four different Hx species purified from plasma: human Hx isolated by wheatgerm-affinity chromatography, human Hx isolated by haem-agarose-affinity

  16. A cytotoxic analysis of a sardinian plant extract cream on human oral primary cell cultures: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinjari, B; Diomede, F; Murmura, G; Traini, T; Merciaro, I; Trubiani, O; Caputi, S

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing agents support the natural healing process, reduce trauma and likelihood of secondary infections and hasten wound closure. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of different concentration of a new Sardinian plant cream (RD7) on two human primary cultures: Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs) and Gingival Fibroblasts (hGFs) derived from oral tissues in terms of morphological changes, cell proliferation and wound healing properties. RD7, is an interactive dressing containing phytocomplex derived from Sardinian endemic or not, medicinal plant extracts, with an important anti-radical, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity finalized to rapidly promote tissue regeneration and the formation of granulation tissue. hPDLSCs and hGFs were seeded at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 mg/ml) of RD7. The cell proliferation and viability was evaluated using colorimetric assays (MTT assay) and trypan blue exclusion test. Meanwhile, the morphological cell changes were evaluated by means of optic (OM) and scanning electronic microscopes (SEM). The induction of the migratory properties was evaluated by means of wound healing assay. In vitro results, using hPDLSCs and hGFs, showed a decrease of cell growth starting at 24 h of incubation, at high concentrations (2.5 mg/ml and 5 mg/ml). This cell growth reduction was associated to evident morphological changes, whilst, at low concentrations (0.5 and 1 mg/ml) a typical unchanged morphology of both hPDLSCs and hGFs was shown. Wound healing assay showed a complete wound full closure occurring after 24 h of treatment in samples treated with low concentration of RD7. The results of the present work indicate that low concentrations of RD7 have no cytotoxicity effect, stimulate cell proliferation and contribute to induce the migratory properties in hPDLSCs and hGFs, therefore it could be considered a new product for use in clinical practice.

  17. Isolated gingival overgrowths: A review of case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Raizada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians are often intrigued by the varied manifestations of the gingival tissue. Gingival overgrowth is a common clinical finding and most of them represent a reactive hyperplasia as a direct result of plaque-related inflammatory gingival disease. These types of growth generally respond to good plaque control, removal of the causative irritants, and conservative tissue management. This case series highlights three different cases of localized gingival overgrowth and its management with emphasis on the importance of patient awareness and motivation.

  18. Predictive modeling of gingivitis severity and susceptibility via oral microbiota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Shi; Li, Rui; Zeng, Xiaowei; He, Tao; Zhao, Helen; Chang, Alice; Bo, Cunpei; Chen, Jie; Yang, Fang; Knight, Rob; Liu, Jiquan; Davis, Catherine; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    ...), and to experimental gingivitis (EG). In diseased plaque microbiota, 27 bacterial genera changed in relative abundance and functional genes including 33 flagellar biosynthesis-related groups were enriched...

  19. Culture of human mesenchymal stem cells using a candidate pharmaceutical grade xeno-free cell culture supplement derived from industrial human plasma pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, José M; Bauman, Ewa; Gajardo, Rodrigo; Jorquera, Juan I

    2015-03-13

    Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is an animal product used as a medium supplement. The animal origin of FBS is a concern if cultured stem cells are to be utilized for human cell therapy. Therefore, a substitute for FBS is desirable. In this study, an industrial, xeno-free, pharmaceutical-grade supplement for cell culture (SCC) under development at Grifols was tested for growth of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), cell characterization, and differentiation capacity. SCC is a freeze-dried product obtained through cold-ethanol fractionation of industrial human plasma pools from healthy donors. Bone marrow-derived hMSC cell lines were obtained from two commercial suppliers. Cell growth was evaluated by culturing hMSCs with commercial media or media supplemented with SCC or FBS. Cell viability and cell yield were assessed with an automated cell counter. Cell surface markers were studied by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Cells were cultured then differentiated into adipocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and neurons, as assessed by specific staining and microscopy observation. SCC supported the growth of commercial hMSCs. Starting from the same number of seeded cells in two consecutive passages of culture with medium supplemented with SCC, hMSC yield and cell population doubling time were equivalent to the values obtained with the commercial medium and was consistent among lots. The viability of hMSCs was higher than 90%, while maintaining the characteristic phenotype of undifferentiated hMSCs (positive for CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105, CD146, CD166 and Stro-1; negative for CD14 and CD19). Cultured hMSCs maintained the potential for differentiation into adipocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and neurons. The tested human plasma-derived SCC sustains the adequate growth of hMSCs, while preserving their differentiation capacity. SCC can be a potential candidate for cell culture supplement in advanced cell therapies.

  20. [Human Primordial Germ Cell Specification--Breakthrough In Culture and Hopes for Therapeutic Utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnúsdóttir, Erna

    2015-10-01

    Germ cells are the precursors to the gametes that carry genetic and epigenetic information between human generations and generate a new individual. Because germ cells are specified early during embryogenesis, at the time of embryo implantation, they are inaccessible for research. Our understanding of their biology has therefore developed slowly since their identification over one hundred years ago. As a result of research into the properties of human and mouse embryonic stem cells and primordial germ cells, scientists have now succeeded in efficiently generating human primordial germ cells in culture by embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell culture. In this review we will discuss the state of our knowledge of human primordial germ cells and how research into the pluripotent properties of human and mouse embryonic germ cells has led to this breakthrough. In addition we will discuss the possible utilization of a cell culture system of human primordial germ cells for research into and treatment of germ cell related abnormalities.

  1. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjaerg, L L; Hansen, J E; Dalbøge, H;

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...

  2. The evolution of culture: From primate social learning to human culture

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Laureano; Toro, Miguel A

    2004-01-01

    Cultural transmission in our species works most of the time as a cumulative inheritance system allowing members of a group to incorporate behavioral features not only with a positive biological value but sometimes also with a neutral, or even negative, biological value. Most of models of dual inheritance theory and gene-culture coevolution suggest that an increase, either qualitative or quantitative, in the efficiency of imitation is the key factor to explain the transformation of primate soc...

  3. The Biological Study of the Cultured Human Lens Epithelial Cells in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    The human lens epithelial cells (HLE) cultured in vitro was established in normal and cataractous lenses. The biological feature, histological characteristics and the ultrastructure of the cultured HLE cells were investigated. The results reveal that the proliferative capacity of the culutured HLE cells is reversely proportional to the donour age; the cultured HLE cells has the limited proliferative capacity in vitro. The relieve of the contact inhibition is the effective trigger of the HLE cell prolife...

  4. Psychosocial and Cultural Modeling in Human Computation Systems: A Gamification Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Riensche, Roderick M.; Haack, Jereme N.; Butner, R. Scott

    2013-11-20

    “Gamification”, the application of gameplay to real-world problems, enables the development of human computation systems that support decision-making through the integration of social and machine intelligence. One of gamification’s major benefits includes the creation of a problem solving environment where the influence of cognitive and cultural biases on human judgment can be curtailed through collaborative and competitive reasoning. By reducing biases on human judgment, gamification allows human computation systems to exploit human creativity relatively unhindered by human error. Operationally, gamification uses simulation to harvest human behavioral data that provide valuable insights for the solution of real-world problems.

  5. Globalization of Human Resource Management: A Cross-Cultural Perspective for the Public Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Suk

    1999-01-01

    Presents a framework for a global perspective in the education of human-resource-management professionals that includes negotiation skills, cross-cultural training based on social-learningl theory, and a mix of instrumental and experiential learning. (SK)

  6. The effect of systemic administration of ibuprofen in the experimental gingivitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekino, Satoshi; Ramberg, Per; Lindhe, Jan

    2005-02-01

    Studies in humans have indicated that systemically administered flurbiprofen and ibuprofen may reduce gingivitis. De novo plaque formation is enhanced at tooth surfaces adjacent to inflamed gingivae. The aim of the present clinical trial was to evaluate the effect of systemic administration of ibuprofen on gingivitis and plaque build-up. Eleven subjects were recruited for the study and were given oral hygiene instruction, scaling and professional mechanical tooth cleaning (PTC). At the end of a preparatory period (Day 0), the participants were told to abstain from all mechanical plaque control measures during a 2-week experimental period but to rinse with an assigned mouth rinse (positive control: 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate; negative control: saline) or administer ibuprofen (tablets of 200 mg twice daily). Mouth rinsing was performed twice a day (after breakfast and in the evening), for 60 s with 10 ml. Re-examination was performed after 14 days of experiment. After a 2-week "wash-out" period, the participants received a new PTC and a second 14-day experimental period was initiated. The experimental and "wash-out" periods were repeated until all volunteers had been involved in all three regimens. Dental plaque was scored using the Quigley & Hein Plaque Index system and gingivitis according to the Gingival Index (GI) system. Supragingival plaque was collected and prepared for dark-field microscopy. One hundred bacterial cells were counted and classified into six different groups: coccoid cells, straight rods, filaments, fusiforms, spirochetes and motile rods. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was collected from the same sites that were sampled for plaque. The volume of GCF collected in each strip was measured and analysed regarding content of lactoferrin and albumin. During the period when the panelists rinsed with saline they accumulated large amounts of plaque and developed marked signs of gingivitis. When they rinsed with chlorhexidine digluconate, small

  7. EXPLANTATION OF MESANGIAL CELL HILLOCKS - A METHOD FOR OBTAINING HUMAN MESANGIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULLER, EW; KIM, Y; MICHAEL, AF; VERNIER, RL; VANDERHEM, GK; VANDERWOUDE, FJ

    1992-01-01

    A simple method is presented for selective cell culture of human mesangial cells using explanatation of mesangial cell hillocks. Glomeruli which had been incubated with collagenase were explanted on plastic tissue culture flasks. Three to 6 weeks after explantation, a rapidly growing multilayer of e

  8. Transplantation of human neonatal foreskin stromal cells in ex vivo organotypic cultures of embryonic chick femurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    NSSCs in ex vivo organotypic cultures of embryonic chick femurs. Isolated embryonic chick femurs (E10 and E11) were cultured for 10 days together with micro-mass cell pellets of hNSSCs, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or a combination of the two cell types. Changes in femurs gross morphology...

  9. The Human-Computer Interaction of Cross-Cultural Gaming Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Joyram; Norcio, Anthony F.; Van Der Veer, Jacob J.; Andre, Charles F.; Miller, Zachary; Regelsberger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the cultural dimensions of the human-computer interaction that underlies gaming strategies. The article is a desktop study of existing literature and is organized into five sections. The first examines the cultural aspects of knowledge processing. The social constructs technology interaction is discussed. Following this, the…

  10. The Oblique Art of Shoes: Popular Culture, Aesthetic Pleasure, and the Humanities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Lindner

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses popular culture and the humanities. It uses shoes as an object of analysis to interrogate the place and function of aesthetic pleasure in critical thinking and cultural practice in the age of globalization and the neoliberal university. Tracking contemporary articulations of t

  11. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Enriched Human Spermatogonia after Short- and Long-Term Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Conrad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to provide a molecular signature for enriched adult human stem/progenitor spermatogonia during short-term (<2 weeks and long-term culture (up to more than 14 months in comparison to human testicular fibroblasts and human embryonic stem cells. Human spermatogonia were isolated by CD49f magnetic activated cell sorting and collagen−/laminin+ matrix binding from primary testis cultures obtained from ten adult men. For transcriptomic analysis, single spermatogonia-like cells were collected based on their morphology and dimensions using a micromanipulation system from the enriched germ cell cultures. Immunocytochemical, RT-PCR and microarray analyses revealed that the analyzed populations of cells were distinct at the molecular level. The germ- and pluripotency-associated genes and genes of differentiation/spermatogenesis pathway were highly expressed in enriched short-term cultured spermatogonia. After long-term culture, a proportion of cells retained and aggravated the “spermatogonial” gene expression profile with the expression of germ and pluripotency-associated genes, while in the majority of long-term cultured cells this molecular profile, typical for the differentiation pathway, was reduced and more genes related to the extracellular matrix production and attachment were expressed. The approach we provide here to study the molecular status of in vitro cultured spermatogonia may be important to optimize the culture conditions and to evaluate the germ cell plasticity in the future.

  12. EXPLANTATION OF MESANGIAL CELL HILLOCKS - A METHOD FOR OBTAINING HUMAN MESANGIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULLER, EW; KIM, Y; MICHAEL, AF; VERNIER, RL; VANDERHEM, GK; VANDERWOUDE, FJ

    1992-01-01

    A simple method is presented for selective cell culture of human mesangial cells using explanatation of mesangial cell hillocks. Glomeruli which had been incubated with collagenase were explanted on plastic tissue culture flasks. Three to 6 weeks after explantation, a rapidly growing multilayer of e

  13. Stochastic synchronization analysis of cultured human glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazsi, Gabor; Cornell-Bell, Ann; Simonotto, Enrico; Neiman, Alexander; Moss, Frank

    2000-03-01

    The production of calcium waves is a property of a healthy astrocyte culture when exposed to the neurotransmitter kainate [Jung et al, J. Neurophys, 79, 1098 (1998)]. Healthy and epileptic tissues differ to a great extent in their dynamics: while a healthy cell culture shows much pattern formation, and wave propagation, the epileptic tissue shows spatially irregular flickering activity or global oscillation. Developing statistical tools to describe healthy versus epileptic tissue dynamics could be very important in order to study the effects of specific drugs, or to identify oscillation centers in the epileptic brain. We perform a statistical analysis in terms of phase synchronization. We show that hyper active epileptic astrocyte cultures are characterized by synchronization between different regions of the network taken from the uncus part of the brain.

  14. Extracellular-like matrices and leukaemia inhibitory factor for in vitro culture of human primordial follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Assiel J; Lerer-Serfaty, Galit; Stav, Dana; Sabbah, Bethsabee; Shochat, Tzippy; Kessler-Icekson, Gania; Zahalka, Muayad A; Shachar-Goldenberg, Michal; Ben-Haroush, Avi; Fisch, Benjamin; Abir, Ronit

    2017-02-01

    The possibility of maturing human primordial follicles in vitro would assist fertility restoration without the danger of reseeding malignancies. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and certain culture matrices may promote human follicular growth. The present study compared human primordial follicular growth on novel culture matrices, namely human recombinant vitronectin (hrVit), small intestine submucosa (SIS), alginate scaffolds and human recombinant virgin collagen bioengineered in tobacco plant lines (CollPlant). The frozen-thawed ovarian samples that were used had been obtained from girls or young women undergoing fertility preservation. In the first part of the study, 20 samples were cultured for 6 days on hrVit or SIS with basic culture medium alone or supplemented with one of two concentrations of LIF (10ngmL-1 and 100ngmL-1), with and without LIF-neutralising antibody. In the second part of the study, 15 samples were cultured for 6 days on alginate scaffolds or CollPlant matrices with basic culture medium. Follicular development was assessed by follicular counts and classification, Ki67 immunohistochemistry and 17β-oestradiol and anti-Müllerian hormone measurements in spent media samples. Primordial follicular growth was not enhanced by LIF. Despite some significant differences among the four matrices, none appeared to have a clear advantage, apart from significantly more Ki67-stained follicles on alginate and CollPlant matrices. Further studies of other culture matrices and medium supplements are needed to obtain an optimal system.

  15. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithelial cells, while endothelin-3 was added to stimulate their growth. By adding endothelin-3, the achievement ratio (viable cell cultures/total cultures was enhanced to 60% of a total of 10 cultures (initiated from 8 distinct fetal small intestines, allowing the generation of viable epithelial cell cultures. Western blot, real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 had high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated markers such as sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV also showed high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells, with the expression of surface markers (cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 and secretion of cytokines (sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, may be cultured by the thermolysin and endothelin-3 method and maintained for at least 20 passages. This is relatively simple, requiring no sophisticated techniques or instruments, and may have a number of varied applications.

  16. Effect of passage number on electrophoretic mobility distributions of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic investigation was undertaken to characterize population shifts that occur in cultured human embryonic kidney cells as a function of passage number in vitro after original explantation. This approach to cell population shift analysis follows the suggestion of Mehreshi, Klein and Revesz that perturbed cell populations can be characterized by electrophoretic mobility distributions if they contain subpopulations with different electrophoretic mobilities. It was shown that this is the case with early passage cultured human embryo cells.

  17. Maintenance of Hepatic Functions in Primary Human Hepatocytes Cultured on Xeno-Free and Chemical Defined Human Recombinant Laminins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masaaki; Zemack, Helen; Johansson, Helene; Hagbard, Louise; Jorns, Carl; Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Refined methods for maintaining specific functions of isolated hepatocytes under xeno-free and chemical defined conditions is of great importance for the development of hepatocyte research and regenerative therapy. Laminins, a large family of heterotrimeric basement membrane adhesion proteins, are highly cell and tissue type specific components of the extracellular matrix and strongly influence the behavior and function of associated cells and/or tissues. However, detailed biological functions of many laminin isoforms are still to be evaluated. In this study, we determined the distribution of laminin isoforms in human liver tissue and isolated primary human hepatocytes by western blot analysis, and investigated the efficacy of different human recombinant laminin isoforms on hepatic functions during culture. Protein expressions of laminin-chain α2, α3, α4, β1, β3, γ1, and γ2 were detected in both isolated human hepatocytes and liver tissue. No α1 and α5 expression could be detected in liver tissue or hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from five different individual livers, and cultured on human recombinant laminin isoforms -111, -211, -221, -332, -411, -421, -511, and -521 (Biolamina AB), matrigel (extracted from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma), or collagen type IV (Collagen). Hepatocytes cultured on laminin showed characteristic hexagonal shape in a flat cell monolayer. Viability, double stranded DNA concentration, and Ki67 expression for hepatocytes cultured for six days on laminin were comparable to those cultured on EHS and Collagen. Hepatocytes cultured on laminin also displayed production of human albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, bile acids, and gene expression of liver-enriched factors, such as hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, glucose-6-phosphate, cytochrome P450 3A4, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. We conclude that all forms of human recombinant laminin tested maintain cell viability and liver-specific functions of primary human

  18. Different Cultures Show Same Respect for Human Dignity