WorldWideScience

Sample records for culture religion sex

  1. Who's Afraid of Sex at School? The Politics of Researching Culture, Religion and Sexuality at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Louisa; Rasmussen, Mary Lou; Quinlivan, Kathleen; Aspin, Clive; Sanjakdar, Fida; Brömdal, Annette

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the methodological politics of researching at the intersections of sexuality, culture and religion in secondary schools. It draws on experiences during a project concerned with how to address cultural and religious diversity in sexuality education in Australia and New Zealand. The paper focuses on two methodological sticking…

  2. Who's Afraid of Sex at School? The Politics of Researching Culture, Religion and Sexuality at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Louisa; Rasmussen, Mary Lou; Quinlivan, Kathleen; Aspin, Clive; Sanjakdar, Fida; Brömdal, Annette

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the methodological politics of researching at the intersections of sexuality, culture and religion in secondary schools. It draws on experiences during a project concerned with how to address cultural and religious diversity in sexuality education in Australia and New Zealand. The paper focuses on two methodological sticking…

  3. Religion and cultural integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Jørn; Ahlin, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The relations and possible causality between religion, ethnicity, and cultural integration is discussed using empirical data from survey on a group people with Vietnamese origin in Denmark......The relations and possible causality between religion, ethnicity, and cultural integration is discussed using empirical data from survey on a group people with Vietnamese origin in Denmark...

  4. Religion and Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabih, Joshua

    group breaks totally with the existing Arabic Bible translations that they were in the habit of using. In this translation, the previously strenuous relationship between culture and religion is flattened in a binary sets of oppositions between an unaltered Devine message preserved in ancient Bible...... of this paper to shed some light on Jehovah’s Witnesses theological perception of religion and culture within the context of modern Arab Christianity; a subject that has not received the scholarly attention it deserves. This paper shall also look into Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Arabic Bible Translation New World...... translation of the Holy Scriptures, and address how an originally-American Christian group re-constructs the relationship of religion –universality of one truth and its embodiment in one community of faith – and culture; and specifically, Arabic culture. Culture, in its manifold forms -Jehovah’s witnesses...

  5. Teaching Religion and Material Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carp, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Because religions discipline and interpret bodies; create and define sacred spaces; generate, adore and study images in all media; regulate the intake of food; structure temporal experience; and in general interpenetrate and are permeated by the cultural landscapes in which they exist, religious studies must engage material religion and religious…

  6. Teaching Religion and Material Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carp, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Because religions discipline and interpret bodies; create and define sacred spaces; generate, adore and study images in all media; regulate the intake of food; structure temporal experience; and in general interpenetrate and are permeated by the cultural landscapes in which they exist, religious studies must engage material religion and religious…

  7. "Good sex" and religion: a feminist overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Mary E; Jung, Patricia Beattie

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an overview of both the processes and the results of an international, interdisciplinary, and interreligious feminist study of "good sex" that resulted in a volume by the same name. We argue that religion (including its secular equivalent, i.e., global capitalism) remains a powerfully influential cultural force that shapes people's lives, in general, and sanctifies their beliefs, in particular, about what makes for good sex. This review seeks to expand conversations about sex in the bedroom and other private arenas (like the confessional) into more public venues and to demonstrate the connections between power, pleasure, and justice. The need to deconstruct religious traditions so as to critically analyze their structures and components is recognized. Several examples of how feminist scholars and activists are retrieving female-friendly religious insights from both their traditions and more transgressive communities of resistance are provided. This article also points to several ways that religious sexual scripts and norms might be reconstructed. Topics addressed include discussions of how to understand footbinding, the tendency of "forbidden" fruit to prove most erotic, whether sexual entanglements are spiritually dangerous distractions, and ways in which religion can make motherhood "compulsory." We examine both the ways in which equating sexual activity with reproductive activity have obscured the value of women's sexual delight and the risks to many women and children of an unqualified validation of sexual pleasure. Both the ambivalence of religious teachings about sexuality and the difficulties posed by monolithic portrayals of religious traditions are identified.

  8. Psychology of religion: perspectives from cultural psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    After a brief introduction, this paper tries to establish what type of psychology the psychology of religion is. Having introduced cultural psychology in general, some theories applicable in research on religion are presented, and some examples of cultural psychological research of religious

  9. The Role of Religion among Sex Workers in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroj Sorajjakool

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research seeks the understanding of the role of religion in the lives of sex workers in Thailand. It is based on interviews conducted among sex workers working in karaoke bars in Bangkok. Findings show that most sex workers experience different levels of life difficulty. The level of life difficulty also affects the experience of internal conflicts regarding sex and morality. Finally religion has been used as a form of ritual purification in dealing with internal sense of conflicts.

  10. The Role of Religion among Sex Workers in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Siroj Sorajjakool; Arelis Benitez

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative research seeks the understanding of the role of religion in the lives of sex workers in Thailand. It is based on interviews conducted among sex workers working in karaoke bars in Bangkok. Findings show that most sex workers experience different levels of life difficulty. The level of life difficulty also affects the experience of internal conflicts regarding sex and morality. Finally religion has been used as a form of ritual purification in dealing with internal sense of con...

  11. The cultural evolution of religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulbulia, Joseph; Geertz, Armin W.; Atkinson, Quentin D.

    2013-01-01

    I dette bidrag til en bog om kulturel evolution beskriver forfatterne religionens kulturel evolution. Kapitlet forsøger ved anvendelsen af en bred vifte af metoder og data at forklare kompleksiteten og variationen i religion inden for og på tværs of grupper gennem historien....

  12. The cultural evolution of prosocial religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norenzayan, Ara; Shariff, Azim F; Gervais, Will M; Willard, Aiyana K; McNamara, Rita A; Slingerland, Edward; Henrich, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We develop a cultural evolutionary theory of the origins of prosocial religions and apply it to resolve two puzzles in human psychology and cultural history: (1) the rise of large-scale cooperation among strangers and, simultaneously, (2) the spread of prosocial religions in the last 10-12 millennia. We argue that these two developments were importantly linked and mutually energizing. We explain how a package of culturally evolved religious beliefs and practices characterized by increasingly potent, moralizing, supernatural agents, credible displays of faith, and other psychologically active elements conducive to social solidarity promoted high fertility rates and large-scale cooperation with co-religionists, often contributing to success in intergroup competition and conflict. In turn, prosocial religious beliefs and practices spread and aggregated as these successful groups expanded, or were copied by less successful groups. This synthesis is grounded in the idea that although religious beliefs and practices originally arose as nonadaptive by-products of innate cognitive functions, particular cultural variants were then selected for their prosocial effects in a long-term, cultural evolutionary process. This framework (1) reconciles key aspects of the adaptationist and by-product approaches to the origins of religion, (2) explains a variety of empirical observations that have not received adequate attention, and (3) generates novel predictions. Converging lines of evidence drawn from diverse disciplines provide empirical support while at the same time encouraging new research directions and opening up new questions for exploration and debate.

  13. Age, sex, education, religion, and perception of tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang

    2002-04-01

    Tattooing has become more acceptable in the mainstream American culture in recent years. Based on a survey with face-to-face interviews of 335 nontattooed adults randomly selected from a city with a population of 444,000, this study explored the relationship of individuals' demographic variables, attitudes toward religion, and their perceptions of tattoos. The hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that age and attitude toward religion were associated with individuals' perception of tattoos.

  14. Culture and religion in nursing: providing culturally sensitive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Aysha

    Last month, Aysha Mendes discussed the impact on care of personal beliefs held by both nurses and patients. This month, she delves into the aspects of culture and religion, which form important pieces of this puzzle, as well as the importance of culturally appropriate care provision in nursing practice.

  15. [Sexuality of Tunisian women: Involvement of religion and culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Thabet, J; Charfeddine, F; Charfi, N; Baati, I; Zouari, L; Zouari, N; Maâlej, M

    2015-04-01

    Culture and religion carry several prohibitions and taboos, especially in the Arab-Muslim societies, and are therefore involved in the sexual behavior and its perception, particularly that of women. To assess the married population's knowledge and opinion about female sexuality, and to estimate the impacts of religious and cultural factors on women's life experience and sexual practice in the Tunisian society. Our study is in an inquiry. We targeted 55 men and 55 women agreeing to participate in the study. They responded to an anonymous self-administered questionnaire comprising 18 items related to the influence of religion and culture on female sexuality. Among these items, some were binary responses (yes or no) assessing knowledge about female sexuality in the Tunisian religious and cultural context; 8 others explored the opinions of participants about female sexuality. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software (15th version). Pearson's chi-square test and Fisher's exact association test were used for comparative study (Psexual pleasure, like men. Men recognized this right less often than women did (Psexual practices with his wife. This response was significantly more frequent in males (Psexuality, the percentage of those who thought that women might simulate orgasm was 70.9%. Women thought more frequently than men that such a behavior could be justified to avoid hurting the man's pride (Psexuality within the Tunisian population is hampered by the prohibitions related to religion and culture, at least in some of its aspects. The reasons for that may be the ignorance of religious texts or their misinterpretation and the biased cultural transmission not followed by questioning or seeking deeper knowledge. The introduction of sex education in school programs could play a crucial role in the fight against the obstacles surrounding sexuality, in order to promote the welfare of woman, and thereby, that of the couple and the family. Copyright © 2013 L

  16. Shaping attitudes about homosexuality: the role of religion and cultural context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Amy; Pitt, Cassady

    2009-06-01

    Across the globe, the debate over homosexuality continues, with great variation in public opinion about the acceptability of homosexuality, laws regulating same-sex unions and penalties for homosexual sex behaviors. Religion is often seen as an important predictor of attitudes about homosexuality. However, cross-national differences in cultural orientations suggest that the role religion has in explaining homosexual attitudes may depend on a nation's cultural context. In this study, we merge ideas from cultural sociology and religious contextual effects to explain cross-national variation in public opinion about homosexuality. Using data from the fourth wave of the World Values Survey and Hierarchical Modeling techniques, we find support for the micro and macro effects of religion and a survival vs. self-expressive cultural orientation. Moreover, we find that personal religious beliefs have a greater effect on attitudes about homosexuality in countries like the United States, which have a strong self-expressive cultural orientation.

  17. Culture (and religion in constitutional adjudication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Rautenbach

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The faculty of law of the Potchefstroom University for Christian Higher Education in corroboration with the Konrad-Adenauer-Stifttung embarked on a study on Politics, Socio-Economic Issues and Culture in Constitutional Adjudication. The aim of the project is twofold. The first aim is to analyse the influence of political, socio-economic and cultural considerations on the constitutional court’s interpretation and application of the Bill of Rights. The second aim is to develop practical guidelines (based on the findings during the analysing process for South African courts confronted with issues of a political, socio-economic and cultural nature. This article is concerned with initiating discussions of the decisions of the constitutional court with regard to cultural and religious rights.Before we can explore the role of political, socio-economic and cultural (and religious rights in the decisions of the constitutional court it is important to discuss a few preliminary issues. In this article the meaning of culture and religion within the South African context receives some attention. Secondly, some preliminary comments regarding constitutional protection of culturally and religiously based rights will be made.We are well aware that this is a daunting task, not only in view of the seemingly abysmal gap between the applicable constitutional rights and values enshrined in the 1996 Constitution that, in some instances over centuries, brought about customs and practices within “traditional” communities which, seemingly, infringe on certain constitutional values and rights.

  18. Cultural Consonance, Religion and Psychological Distress in an Urban Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Dressler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cultural consonance is the degree to which individuals approximate prototypes encoded in cultural models. Low cultural consonance is associated with higher psychological distress. Religion may moderate the association between cultural consonance and psychological distress. Brazil, with substantial variation in religion, is an important society for the examination of this hypothesis. Research was conducted in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, using a mixed-methods design. Measures of cultural consonance were derived using ethnographic methods and then applied in a survey of 271 individuals drawn from four distinct social strata. Low cultural consonance was associated with higher psychological distress in multiple regression analysis ( B = -.430, p < .001. Members of Pentecostal Protestant churches reported lower psychological distress independently of the effect of cultural consonance ( B = -.409, p < .05. There was no buffering effect of religion. Implications of these results for the study of religion and health are discussed.

  19. Homosexuality, Religion, and the Family: The Effects of Religion on Americans' Appraisals of the Parenting Abilities of Same-Sex Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Andrew L

    2017-03-23

    While a growing body of research focuses on Americans' attitudes toward same-sex couples as parents, very few include measures of religion and those that do fail to capture its multidimensional nature. Furthermore, many past studies rely on convenience samples of college students, or samples gathered outside the United States. Multivariate analyses of the 2012 General Social Survey-a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States-reveal that a slim majority of Americans still do not believe same-sex couples can parent as well as male-female couples and the religious beliefs, behaviors, and affiliations of Americans are significantly and at times differentially associated with appraisals of same-sex couples' parenting abilities. It appears that while religion is generally associated with more negative appraisals of the parenting abilities of same-sex couples, it is not uniformly so. Americans' immediate religious and cultural context can shape their appraisals of homosexuality in diverse ways.

  20. Digital Religion, Social Media and Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contributions on religion and computer-mediated communication cohere around the question: how will core religious understandings of identity, community and authority shape and be (re)shaped by the communicative possibilities of Web 2.0?...

  1. Digital Religion, Social Media and Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contributions on religion and computer-mediated communication cohere around the question: how will core religious understandings of identity, community and authority shape and be (re)shaped by the communicative possibilities of Web 2.0?......Contributions on religion and computer-mediated communication cohere around the question: how will core religious understandings of identity, community and authority shape and be (re)shaped by the communicative possibilities of Web 2.0?...

  2. Predicting civil religion at a cross-cultural level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrič Miran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of civil religion has caught major attention among scholars studying the junction of religion and politics (J.-J. Rousseau, E. Durkheim, R. Bellah. The notion focuses on the phenomenon of cultural contents sacralizing and ritualizing the ruling political institutions of a society, extending support to the integration of the political and social system at a cultural level. The notion of civil religion has recently been operationalized crossculturally, but light has not been shed upon its predictors. In this paper authoritarianism is tested as a predictor of civil religion cross-culturally. Four student samples of Bosnian, Serbian, Slovenian and US students were analyzed. Very strong, significant associations between authoritarianism, as operationalized by a modified Lane scale, and civil religion were found in all cases. Moreover, upon introducing femininity, anxiety and gender into the analysis, a strong, dominant and significant impact on the part of authoritarianism was still found when civil religion was observed crossculturally. When the same predictors were applied to explaining general religiosity, authoritarianism fell short of being a significant predictor in most of the environments observed. Such results suggest an especially close link between civil religion and authoritarianism.

  3. Religion, Culture, and Tax Evasion: Evidence from the Czech Republic

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    Wadim Strielkowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Our paper analyzes the impact of culture and religion on tax evasions in the Czech Republic, which represents one of the most atheistic countries in Europe, and a very interesting example of attitudes to the church and religion, as well as the influence of religion on the social and economic aspects of everyday life. Our results suggest that, in the Czech Republic, religion plays the role of tax compliance, but only through a positive effect of visiting the church. National pride supports tax morality while trust in government institutions and attitudes towards government are not associated with tax compliance. These results suggest that the Czech Republic is no different from other countries regarding the relationship between religion and tax compliance. Moreover, the role of government as the authority for improving tax compliance is different from what is observed in other countries.

  4. Allusions to Culture and Religion in Hispanic American Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavell, Judy A.

    2011-01-01

    Allusions to culture and religion frequently appear in Hispanic American children's literature. These allusions resonate with those who share the culture and help those students connect with the book. These same allusions inform those who are not of the culture and broaden their understanding. This paper will provide examples of such allusions…

  5. 29 CFR 34.4 - Specific discriminatory actions prohibited on the ground of race, color, religion, sex, national...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, political affiliation or belief, citizenship, or..., religion, sex, national origin, age, political affiliation or belief, citizenship, or participation in JTPA. (a) For the purposes of this section, prohibited ground means race, color, religion, sex, national...

  6. Religion as dialogical resource: a socio-cultural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucal, Aleksandar; Zittoun, Tania

    2013-06-01

    William James proposed a psychological study of religion examining people's religious experiences, and to see in what sense these were good for them. The recent developments of psychology of religion moved far from that initial proposition. In this paper, we propose a sociocultural perspective to religion that renews with that initial stance. After recalling Vygtotsky's core ideas, we suggest that religion, as cultural and symbolic system, participates to the orchestration of human activities and sense-making. Such orchestration works both from within the person, through internalized values and ideas, and from without, through the person's interactions with others, discourses, cultural objects etc. This leads us to consider religions as supporting various forms of dialogical dynamics-intra-psychological dialogues, interpersonal with present, absent or imaginary others, as well as inter-group dialogues-which we illustrate with empirical vignettes. The example of religious tensions in the Balkans in the 90's highlights how much the historical-cultural embeddedness of these dynamics can also lead to the end of dialogicality, and therefore, sense-making.

  7. Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Ole

    2004-01-01

    En sociologisk indgang til religion, som individuel religiøsitet, som organisation af et trossamfund og som samfundsinstitution. Religion betragtes både im- og eksplicit, og som både samlende og splittende for sociale fællesskaber.......En sociologisk indgang til religion, som individuel religiøsitet, som organisation af et trossamfund og som samfundsinstitution. Religion betragtes både im- og eksplicit, og som både samlende og splittende for sociale fællesskaber....

  8. Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Ole

    2004-01-01

    En sociologisk indgang til religion, som individuel religiøsitet, som organisation af et trossamfund og som samfundsinstitution. Religion betragtes både im- og eksplicit, og som både samlende og splittende for sociale fællesskaber.......En sociologisk indgang til religion, som individuel religiøsitet, som organisation af et trossamfund og som samfundsinstitution. Religion betragtes både im- og eksplicit, og som både samlende og splittende for sociale fællesskaber....

  9. Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lech, Marcel Lysgaard

    2017-01-01

    In the world of Greek Comedy, the traditionally austere gods of Tragedy are lowered to fit the streets of Athens. Religion is omnipresent in comedy on many levels, and we find gods on stage, prayers and oaths performed, sacrifices narrated, festivals performed. Religion in comedy is generally...

  10. Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2017-01-01

    Article on the different ways on which religion is relevant to discussions of discrimination and the normative issues this gives rise to.......Article on the different ways on which religion is relevant to discussions of discrimination and the normative issues this gives rise to....

  11. At the intersection of culture and religion: a cultural analysis of religion's implications for secondary control and social affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Joni Y; Kim, Heejung S

    2011-08-01

    Religion helps people maintain a sense of control, particularly secondary control-acceptance of and adjustment to difficult situations--and contributes to strengthening social relationships in a religious community. However, little is known about how culture may influence these effects. The current research examined the interaction of culture and religion on secondary control and social affiliation, comparing people from individualistic cultures (e.g., European Americans), who tend to be more motivated toward personal agency, and people from collectivistic cultures (e.g., East Asians), who tend to be more motivated to maintain social relationships. In Study 1, an analysis of online church mission statements showed that U.S. websites contained more themes of secondary control than did Korean websites, whereas Korean websites contained more themes of social affiliation than did U.S. websites. Study 2 showed that experimental priming of religion led to acts of secondary control for European Americans but not Asian Americans. Using daily diary methodology, Study 3 showed that religious coping predicted more secondary control for European Americans but not Koreans, and religious coping predicted more social affiliation for Koreans and European Americans. These findings suggest the importance of understanding sociocultural moderators for the effects of religion.

  12. Religion and the rainbow struggle: does religion factor into attitudes toward homosexuality and same-sex civil unions in Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogland, Curtis P; Verona, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    The provision of civil liberties to LGBT persons has become part of a global movement in societies across the world. In Brazil, a recent judicial ruling for the first time established the right for homosexual couples to enter into civil unions, despite the presence of widespread disapproval of homosexuality among the population and opposition from prominent religious groups. Picking up on this issue, the following study examines whether religion may factor into the attitudes Brazilians hold toward homosexuality and same-sex civil unions. Using data from the Brazilian Social Research Survey, we find that the most restrictive views toward homosexuality and the strongest opposition to same-sex civil unions are most prevalent among devoted followers of historical Protestant, Pentecostal, and Catholic faith traditions, whereas adherents of Afro-Brazilian and spiritist religions, as well as those with no religious commitment, are inclined to assume a more tolerant moral posture toward such issues. The findings point to religion as a potential influence in future public policy initiatives and social movements involving LGBT issues in Brazil.

  13. Religions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliade, Mircea

    1977-01-01

    A historical review of the scientific study of religion since the late nineteenth century. Concludes that religious researchers today must use approaches of many disciplines, including history, sociology, psychology, and phenomenology. For journal availability, see SO 506 201. (Author/DB)

  14. Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This is a thematic issue of the journal Religion 47 (3) entitled Exploring Aniconism. It contains elleven research articles on the use of aniconism in different religious traditions. Table of Content 1. Aniconism: definitions, examples and comparative perspectives (Milette Gaifman, concluding...

  15. Religion, Science, and Culture: An Integrated, Interconnected Paradigm of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amin Abdullah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Discussing the paradigm of dialogue and integration in the Islamic science of religion is important since the practice of religious education still applies the paradigm of conflict and independence. These paradigms have a great influence on the formation of socio-religious and cultural ways of thinking. The relationship between Islamic religiousc and natural, social, as well as cultural sciences, needs patterns of integrated, interconnected relations and dialogues. Islamic Studies requires a multidisciplinary approach, that is, interdisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. Scientific linearity, in which science is narrowly defined and mono-disciplinary, will lead to an understanding of religion and religious interpretations that has no contact with and relevance to the context in which it is studied. New types of religious thought that encourage independent discussion and dialogue on the subjective, objective and intersubjective aspects of science and religion will create the emergence of a new type of religiosity in the multicultural era. All of this requires more effort to undertake a serious reconstruction of scientific methodologies and the methodologies of scientific studies of religion.[Penerapan paradigma dialog dan integrasi dalam ilmu-ilmu keislaman masih penting untuk didiskusikan mengingat praktik pendidikan agama masih menerapkan paradigm konflik dan independen. Paradigma-paradigma ini memiliki pengaruh yang besar dalam pembentukan cara pandang keagamaan, baik sosial maupun kultural. Hubungan antara ilmu-ilmu keislaman di satu sisi dengan ilmu-ilmu alam, sosial, dan budaya di sisi lain, memerlukan pola hubungan dan dialog yang terintegrasi-interkoneksi. Studi Islam mensyaratkan pendekatan multi disiplin, baik interdisipliner maupun transdisipliner. Linearitas keilmuan yang membatasi bidang ilmu secara sempit dan mono-disiplin akan menggiring pemahaman agama dan tafsir keagamaan yang tidak terkait dan tidak relevan dengan konteks

  16. Dimensions Underlying Student Perceptions of Religion, Sex, and Alcohol: Male and Female Differences. Research Report No. 5-83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Aldrich M., Jr.; Sedlacek, William E.

    Identifying the variables which influence student attitudes, perceptions, and behavior patterns in regard to religion, sex, and alcohol has been a major source of investigation. To determine the dimensions underlying the relationship among religion, sex, alcohol use, and alcohol knowledge among university students, 376 University of Maryland…

  17. Lessons from the Ottoman Harem on Culture, Religion, and Wars

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Iyigun

    2013-01-01

    The Ottoman Empire had a profound impact in Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa at the apogee of its power, covering the era between 1453 and 1699. In this article, I exploit the empire's unique culture and institutions to examine the roles of ethnicity and religion in conflict and war. Using comprehensive data on Ottoman wars and conflicts covering the reigns of 31 Ottoman sultans between 1400 and 1909, I document that the ethnic background of the Valide Sultan (queen mother) was an im...

  18. Religion, culture, and discrimination against persons with disabilities in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Etieyibo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is not a lot in the literature on disability in Nigeria concerning the role that religion, culture and beliefs play in sustaining discriminatory practices against persons with disabilities.Objectives: Many of these practices are exclusionary in nature and unfair. They are either embedded in or sustained by religion, culture and beliefs about disability and persons with disabilities.Methods: Drawing on various resources and research on disability, this paper looks at these practices in respect of these sustaining factors. Some of the discriminatory practices that constitute the main focus of the paper are the trafficking and killing of people with mental illness, oculocutaneous albinism and angular kyphosis, raping of women with mental illness and the employment of children with disabilities for alms-begging.Results: The examination of these practices lends some significant weight and substance to the social model of disability, which construes disability in the context of oppression and the failure of social environments and structures to adjust to the needs and aspirations of people with disabilities.Conclusion: Given the unfairness and wrongness of these practices they ought to be deplored. Moreover, the Nigerian government needs to push through legislation that targets cultural and religious practices which are discriminatory against persons with disabilities as well as undertake effective and appropriate measures aimed at protecting and advancing the interests of persons with disabilities.

  19. Homosexuality, religion and the contested legal framework governing sex education in England

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderbeck, RM; Johnson, P

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how religion has influenced, and continues to influence, the legal framework that regulates the circulation of knowledge about homosexuality and same-sex relationships within state-funded schools in England. This legal framework has become the subject of considerable recent public and legislative contestation. We argue that religious considerations and interests have contributed to the production and maintenance of an uneven educational landscape in which young people fa...

  20. Religion as culture: religious individualism and collectivism among american catholics, jews, and protestants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam B; Hill, Peter C

    2007-08-01

    We propose the theory that religious cultures vary in individualistic and collectivistic aspects of religiousness and spirituality. Study 1 showed that religion for Jews is about community and biological descent but about personal beliefs for Protestants. Intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity were intercorrelated and endorsed differently by Jews, Catholics, and Protestants in a pattern that supports the theory that intrinsic religiosity relates to personal religion, whereas extrinsic religiosity stresses community and ritual (Studies 2 and 3). Important life experiences were likely to be social for Jews but focused on God for Protestants, with Catholics in between (Study 4). We conclude with three perspectives in understanding the complex relationships between religion and culture.

  1. 'It's my inner strength': spirituality, religion and HIV in the lives of young African American men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Michael L; Arnold, Emily; Rebchook, Gregory; Kegeles, Susan M

    2011-10-01

    Young black men who have sex with men account for 48% of 13-29-year-old HIV-positive men who have sex with men in the USA. It is important to develop an effective HIV prevention approach that is grounded in the context of young men's lives. Towards this goal, we conducted 31 interviews with 18-30-year-old men who have sex with men in the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Area. This paper examines the roles of religion and spirituality in men who have sex with men's lives, which is central in the lives of many African Americans. Six prominent themes emerged: (1) childhood participation in formal religious institutions, (2) the continued importance of spirituality among men who have sex with men, (3) homophobia and stigmatisation in traditional black churches, (4) tension between being a man who has sex with men and being a Christian, (5) religion and spirituality's impact on men's sense of personal empowerment and coping abilities and (6) treatment of others and building compassion. Findings suggest that integrating spiritual practice into HIV prevention may help programmes be more culturally grounded, thereby attracting more men and resonating with their experiences and values. In addition, faith-based HIV/AIDS ministries that support HIV-positive men who have sex with men may be particularly helpful. Finally, targeting pastors and other church leaders through anti-stigma curricula is crucial.

  2. Stripping, Sex, and Popular Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, Catherine M.

    2007-01-01

    At the heart of Stripping, Sex, and Popular Culture lies a very personal story, of author Catherine Roach's response to the decision of her life-long best friend to become an exotic dancer. Catherine and Marie grew up together in Canada and moved to the USA to enroll in PhD programs at prestigious universities. For various reasons, Marie left her program and instead chose to work as a stripper. The author, at first troubled and yet fascinated by her friend's decision, follows Marie's journey ...

  3. Religion and HIV Sexual Risk Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Stephen W; Zhang, Zheng; Li, Dongliang; Carpiano, Richard M; Schechter, Martin T; Ruan, Yuhua; Spittal, Patricia M

    2016-12-01

    Religion can profoundly impact the sociocultural contexts that shape sexual HIV vulnerability among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, the relationship between religion and HIV vulnerability remains poorly understood for MSM in China, where religious affiliations and practices are rapidly increasing. Using cross-sectional survey data collected in Beijing and Tianjin, China, from 2013 to 2014 (n = 400), this study tests 3 hypotheses regarding religion and HIV sexual risk: (1) HIV vulnerabilities and testing patterns among religiously affiliated MSM are lower than for areligious MSM, (2) religiosity is inversely associated with HIV vulnerabilities and testing, and (3) the magnitude of inverse association between religiosity and HIV vulnerabilities/testing will be stronger among Christian and Muslim MSM than Buddhist and areligious MSM. Compared with areligious participants, Buddhists had higher odds of reporting unprotected anal intercourse [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13 to 3.75] and more male sex partners (AOR: 1.95, 1.16-3.27), whereas Muslims had lower odds of reporting unprotected anal intercourse (AOR: 0.33, 95% CI: 0.15 to 0.73) and higher odds of reporting male circumcision (AOR: 3.04, 95% CI: 1.45 to 6.40). Reporting of forced sex was associated with more frequent participation in social religious activities (AOR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.52) and private religious activities (AOR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.61). Among Christians, participation in private religious activities was associated with lower odds of reporting anal intercourse (AOR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.88). The sustained growth of multiple religious traditions in China appears to have important implications for HIV vulnerability among religious minority MSM.

  4. Traumatised between culture and religion: Women’s stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Landman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The majority of churches in South Africa offer some form of healing, be it diaconal, ritual or faith healing. Western and township views on healing differ significantly in terms of the natural and supernatural causes of and cures for illnesses. This article tells the stories of township women who were trapped between the binaries presented by Western, cultural and township healings, and their choicelessness in terms of abortion, adoption, abuse, death and sex. Through narrative counseling, based on social construction theories, the women experienced healing by exploring the healing spaces between the binaries of cultural contexts and Western medicine, through the liberty afforded them by the perspective of a preferred way of being.

  5. On religion and hospitality cultures in economic relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anni

    Recently prominent scholars (as Beckford 2003, Casanova 2004, Habermas 2008) have offered an argument for integrating the sociology of religion into the corpus of sociology and to rethink religion sociologically. This has given rise to questioning the fact that after the European Enlightenment th...... the role of these intermediaries in disseminating the rules of the marketplace from other port cities with direct access to the Atlantic and Indian Ocean. And it takes a closer look into how these rules have structured particular ‘spaces of hospitality’ in the city of Copenhagen....

  6. American Religion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田甜

    2008-01-01

    It is said that American religion,as a great part of American culture,plays an important role in American culture. It is hoped that some ideas can be obtained from this research paper,which focuses on analyzing the great impact is produced to American culture by American religion. Finally, this essay gives two useful standpoints to English learners:Understunding American religion will help understand the American history, culture and American people,and help you to communic.ate with them better. Understanding American religion will help you understand English better.

  7. Religion and attitudes toward same-sex marriage among U.S. Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher G; Acevedo, Gabriel A; Ramos-Wada, Aida I

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. This study examines links between multiple aspects of religious involvement and attitudes toward same-sex marriage among U.S. Latinos. The primary focus is on variations by affiliation and participation, but the possible mediating roles of biblical beliefs, clergy cues, and the role of religion in shaping political views are also considered.Methods. We use binary logistic regression models to analyze data from a large nationwide sample of U.S. Latinos conducted by the Pew Hispanic Forum in late 2006.Results. Findings highlight the strong opposition to same-sex marriage among Latino evangelical (or conservative) Protestants and members of sectarian groups (e.g., LDS), even compared with devout Catholics. Although each of the hypothesized mediators is significantly linked with attitudes toward same-sex marriage, for the most part controlling for them does not alter the massive affiliation/attendance differences in attitudes toward same-sex marriage.Conclusions. This study illustrates the importance of religious cleavages in public opinion on social issues within the diverse U.S. Latino population. The significance of religious variations in Hispanic civic life is likely to increase with the growth of the Latino population and the rising numbers of Protestants and sectarians among Latinos.

  8. 13 CFR 113.3-1 - Consideration of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consideration of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national origin. 113.3-1 Section 113.3-1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS OF SBA...

  9. IMPLEMENTATION OF HINDU RELIGION EDUCATION AT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF CULTURAL STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Tanu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Religious education was firstly implemented based on the Act of Number 4 year1950, concerning education and teaching. In one of its articles, it is stated that Indonesia is areligion-based country. The govern ment has the right and is obliged to arrange religiouseducation starting from Kindergarten to University and the time allocated for this is 2 (twohours per week. However, an imbalance has occurred as far as Hindu Religion education isconcerned, that is, the students at particular educational institutions are not provided withHindu Religion education as intended by the Act.In Article 30 of the Act of Number 20 year 2003 concerning national educationsystem, on the other hand, it is stated that: any religious education can be carried out by thegovernment and or a community’s group belonging to a particular religion in accordancewith the applicable regulations. It is also stated that religious education is functioned toprepare the students to be able to comprehend and apply their religious teaching values and orto be experts in religions. In addition, it is also stated that religious education can be formallyand informally conducted in the forms of diniyah, pesantren, pesraman, phabaja, smnera,and the like.How Hindu Religion educa tion is implemented at Elementary School Number 17Dauh Puri and Dwijendra Elementary School Depasar cannot be separated from theinfrastructure, facilities, curri culum and teachers available, and the government’s policy.Therefore, this study is focused on 1 the existence of the components needed forimplementing Hindu Religion education, 2 the factors influencing the implementation ofHindu religion education, and 3 the meaningfulness and attempts done to implement HinduReligion education if related to the inventory of Balinese culture.This study is conducted to explain, describe, criticize, and analyze theimplementation of Hindu Religion education at Elementary School Number 17 Dauh Puri andDwijendra Elementary

  10. Extraterrestrial intelligence and human imagination SETI at the intersection of science, religion, and culture

    CERN Document Server

    Traphagan, John

    2015-01-01

    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) represents one of the most significant crossroads at which the assumptions and methods of scientific inquiry come into direct contact with—and in many cases conflict with—those of religion. Indeed, at the core of SETI is the same question that motivates many interested in religion: What is the place of humanity in the universe? Both scientists involved with SETI (and in other areas) and those interested in and dedicated to some religious traditions are engaged in contemplating these types of questions, even if their respective approaches and answers differ significantly. This book explores this intersection with a focus on three core points: 1) the relationship between science and religion as it is expressed within the framework of SETI research, 2) the underlying assumptions, many of which are tacitly based upon cultural values common in American society, that have shaped the ways in which SETI researchers have conceptualized the nature of their endeavo...

  11. The cultural life script of Qatar and across cultures: effects of gender and religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    Cultural life scripts (CLS) are culturally shared cognitive representations of the expected order and timing of important life events in a prototypical life. Through three studies data from Qatar were analysed and compared to previously collected data from Denmark, Turkey, and the US. In Study 1 we examined the CLS of Qatar in order to determine whether the clear segregation of men and women as well as the centrality of religion in this society would influence the CLS. A total of 55 Qatari undergraduates completed the standard CLS task, imaging a Qatari infant of their own as well as the opposite gender. In Study 2 important personal life story events were collected from 83 Qatari undergraduates in order to explore the overlap between remembered life events and CLS events. Study 3 was a reanalysis of CLS data from Denmark, Turkey, and the US. There was a considerable overlap of events across cultures, but we also found that the Qatari CLS showed more gender differences and contained more religious and positive events compared to the other three countries.

  12. Islamic Art as Tool to Convergence and Dialogue between Religions- A new Siege Perspective for Cultural and Peace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Amer Salman

    2013-06-01

    The research methodology focused on symmetry patterns in particular, which has been classified to architectural designs and geometrical religions symbols, then sort the common or similar patterns who have at least two background cultures through symbol religions analysis and constructed indicators based on the shape, interpretation, content and current existing place of the patterns.

  13. Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions P age

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    Africana philosophy and culture-oriented discourse in Africa like Outlaw, Cabral,. Fanon ... worldviews or philosophy that uses distinct African philosophical methods” (JANZ. 2009 ... philosophy such as critical rigor, argumentation and analysis.

  14. ‘It’s my inner strength’: Spirituality, religion and HIV in the lives of young African American men who have sex with men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Michael L.; Arnold, Emily; Rebchook, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) account for 48% of 13–29 year old HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in the USA. It is important to develop an effective HIV prevention approach that is grounded in the context of young men’s lives. Towards this goal, we conducted 31 interviews with 18–30 year old YBMSM in the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Area. This paper examines the roles of religion and spirituality in YBMSM’s lives, which is central in the lives of many African Americans. Six prominent themes emerged: (1) childhood participation in formal religious institutions; (2) the continued importance of spirituality among YBMSM; (3) homophobia and stigmatisation in traditional black churches; (4) tension between being an MSM and Christian; (5) religion and spirituality’s impact on men’s sense of personal empowerment and coping abilities; and (6) treatment of others and building compassion. Findings suggest that integrating spiritual practice into HIV prevention may help programmes be more culturally grounded, thereby attracting more men and resonating with their experiences and values. In addition, faith-based HIV/AIDS ministries that support HIV-positive YBMSM may be particularly helpful. Finally, targeting pastors and other church leaders through anti-stigma curricula is crucial. PMID:21824017

  15. Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions P age

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    the attainment of flag independence by different African nations. Hence ... through an expose of the two concepts in contention: Neo-colonialism and Post- .... of cultural representations involved in the contest for political and social authority ... the peculiar slant to Postcolonialism articulated by Bhabha and Spivak, but which.

  16. Religion and self: notions from a cultural psychological perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Belzen

    2010-01-01

    After a brief introduction of a cultural psychological perspective, this paper turns to the concept of self. The paper proposes to conceive of that reality to which the concepts of self refer as a narrative, employing especially autobiographies and other ego-documents in empirical exploration. After

  17. Latino culture and sex education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, C

    1987-01-01

    This article points out important facets of Latino culture to which family life educators must be sensitive. If a family life education program is to prove successful for any Latino community, it must be bilingual. Approximately 85% of all Latinos are Catholic. Latinos are not accustomed to extensive support from the world outside the family; the cultural pattern is to rely on support from the extended family. Latino parents are especially concerned that differing sexual mores, values, and customs will corrupt their children; they place high value on the ideal of cultural preservation. The macho concept of the exaggerated importance of being male is inculcated in a male child from a very early age. Girls are constantly reminded of their inferiority and weakness and usually praised for their docility, submissiveness, and attractiveness. Marianismo, the submissive and obedient female character, pervades the traditional role of wife bestowed upon the Latina. Male and female homosexuality is not looked on favorably in the Latino community. Latinos generally employ a certain degree of formality when dealing with outsiders, professionals, and community leaders. Fatalismo, or fatalism, is particularly to blame for Latinos' apparent deference to others and yielding to authorities. Once these basic cultural characteristics are understood, health care providers can pick up on the forces operating to modify this traditional outline, such as social class, education, socioeconomic status, country of orgin, religiosity, the changing role of women, and the impact of the media, as well as the potential benefical impact of family life education programs.

  18. Infertility in India: social, religion and cultural influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sheoran

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The study concluded that there is a huge burden on the part of female to have a baby after marriage. Also the childless women face social and financial adversities at time and this is not limited to low income or low education strata. Health care professionals need to understand cultural and social implications of infertility in order to provide counseling, and referring women with fertility concerns for consultation and further treatment. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(6.000: 1783-1788

  19. Advance care planning, culture and religion: an environmental scan of Australian-based online resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Salgado, Amanda; Mader, Patrick; Boyd, Leanne M

    2017-04-20

    Objectives Culture and religion are important in advance care planning (ACP), yet it is not well understood how this is represented in ACP online resources. The aim of the present study was to identify the availability of Australian-based ACP websites and online informational booklets containing cultural and religious information.Methods An environmental scanning framework was used with a Google search conducted from 30 June 2015 to 5 July 2015. Eligible Australian-based ACP websites and online informational booklets were reviewed by two analysts (APS & PM) for information pertaining to at least one culture or religion. Common characteristics were agreed upon and tabulated with narrative description.Results Seven Australian-based ACP websites were identified with varying degrees of cultural and religious information. Seven Australian-based ACP informational booklets were identified addressing culture or religion, namely of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (n=5), Sikh (n=1) and Italian (n=1) communities. Twenty-one other online resources with cultural and religious information were identified, developed within the context of health and palliative care.Conclusions There is no comprehensive Australian-based ACP website or informational booklet supporting ACP across several cultural and religious contexts. Considering Australia's multicultural and multifaith population, such a resource may be beneficial in increasing awareness and uptake of ACP.What is known about the topic? Health professionals and consumers frequently use the Internet to find information. Non-regulation has resulted in the proliferation of ACP online resources (i.e. ACP websites and online informational booklets). Although this has contributed to raising awareness of ACP, the availability of Australian-based ACP online resources with cultural and religious information is not well known.What does this paper add? This paper is the first to use an environmental scanning methodology to identify

  20. Religion, Ethnicity and Geography: A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Demand for Education in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blunch, Niels-Hugo

    2003-01-01

    for economic development this is (or should be) a point of concern to both the national government and international development organizations. On this background, this study analyzes the demand for education in Ghana to try to understand the main factors underlying this. The focus is on cross-cultural......Most cross-cultural research of demand behavior is focused at cross-country studies. For Sub-Saharan Africa, however, the fact that the borders were more or less arbitrarily drawn by the colonial powers suggests that demand behavior - including the demand for education - in this context are more...... affected by within country factors such as ethnicity, geographical location and religion. On this premise, we analyze the demand for education in Ghana from a cross-cultural perspective. A substantial share of Ghanaian youth and young adults has never attended school. As education is an important vehicle...

  1. Religion, Ethnicity and Geography: A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Demand for Education in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blunch, Niels-Hugo

    2003-01-01

    Most cross-cultural research of demand behavior is focused at cross-country studies. For Sub-Saharan Africa, however, the fact that the borders were more or less arbitrarily drawn by the colonial powers suggests that demand behavior - including the demand for education - in this context are more...... affected by within country factors such as ethnicity, geographical location and religion. On this premise, we analyze the demand for education in Ghana from a cross-cultural perspective. A substantial share of Ghanaian youth and young adults has never attended school. As education is an important vehicle...... for economic development this is (or should be) a point of concern to both the national government and international development organizations. On this background, this study analyzes the demand for education in Ghana to try to understand the main factors underlying this. The focus is on cross-cultural...

  2. Disentangling Religion and Culture: Americanizing Islam as the Price of Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN H. MORGAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay is an exploration into the social inevitabilities of culture shifts within the American Muslim community’s self-understanding of their faith. Rather than a theological explication of the reasons why and why not Islam may or can or will not assimilate in America, our approach will be strictly sociological thereby side-stepping the intricate dialectic of theological niceties in deference to the social realities of culture change. As a social psychologist, my duty is to acknowledge the inevitabilities of behavioral shifts brought about due to social and cultural pressures resulting from immigration into an alien cultural weltanschauung, i.e., worldview. Therefore in this essay, we will explicate the meaning and nature of de-ethnicization and re-enculturation as we endeavor to disentangle religion from culture, recognizing that much of what goes under the flag of religious orthodoxy is really culturally-mandated behavior and worldview. The assimilation process, however, will bear heavily upon the necessity for Muslim clergy in America to become professional by Western standards and we will in the process explore the complexities of religious secularism as a way of becoming an “American” Muslim. Finally, we will suggest liturgical and architectural “adjustments” to Western modes of public worship while indicating linguistic niceties which will prove helpful in the assimilation process which we have chosen here to call the “Islamicization of America”.

  3. RELIGION, CULTURE AND LOCAL WISDOM IN THE DEATH RITUAL OF PONTIANAK MALAY SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumarman Muhammad Djar’ie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Death is inevitable and will occur to every living creature, including humans no mater what religion or belief they have; however, no one knows for sure when it happens. Humans can only predict death based on indicators that can be seen before it occurs. Still until now, there are many people who attempt to oppose death, even though in the end they have to admit that Allah is the Almighty. Therefore, no wonder if the death is still considered a tragedy rather than the culmination of happiness when humans finally harvest of deeds they have done all their life. In this light, death rituals are often accompanied by the tears of the family of the deceased, even some cry hard to express their pain as someone they love is gone, coupled with the arrival of relatives and acquaintances who mourn, and condolences as well as the phrase “inna lillâh wa inna ilaihi raji’ȗn”. A day of joy has turned into a day of sorrow, although it always ends with kendurian (gathering for remembering the dead, whose excitement is like that of selamatan (communal feast and syukuran (celebration of thankfulness. This paper tries to present the infiltration of religion and culture in the death ritual in Pontianak Malay community as an object of discussion of local wisdom by using mafhȗm mukhâlafah approach, to provide a new understanding of the meaning of death.

  4. Psychology of Religion

    OpenAIRE

    Ulu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter of book that entitled Science, Religion and Society: An Encyclopedia of History, Culture, and Controversy has been given important informations about psychology of religion’s historical development as well as pioneer figures’ contributions. In this text some evaluations has been made by categorizing studies in field of psychology of religion. Finally some informations are provided about current status of the psychology of religion and position of the psychology of religion ...

  5. What is Religion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jeppe Sinding

    which can be analysed and compared across time and cultures, What is Religion? brings the most up-to-date scholarship to bear on humankind’s most enduring creation. The book opens with a brief history of the idea of religion, then divides the study of religion into four essential topics - types......Religious belief is one of the most pervasive and ubiquitous characteristics of human society. Religion has shadowed and illuminated human lives since primitive times, shaping the world views of cultures from isolated tribes to vast empires. Starting from the premise that religion is a concept...

  6. Cross-cultural dataset for the evolution of religion and morality project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purzycki, Benjamin Grant; Apicella, Coren; Atkinson, Quentin D; Cohen, Emma; McNamara, Rita Anne; Willard, Aiyana K; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Norenzayan, Ara; Henrich, Joseph

    2016-11-08

    A considerable body of research cross-culturally examines the evolution of religious traditions, beliefs and behaviors. The bulk of this research, however, draws from coded qualitative ethnographies rather than from standardized methods specifically designed to measure religious beliefs and behaviors. Psychological data sets that examine religious thought and behavior in controlled conditions tend to be disproportionately sampled from student populations. Some cross-national databases employ standardized methods at the individual level, but are primarily focused on fully market integrated, state-level societies. The Evolution of Religion and Morality Project sought to generate a data set that systematically probed individual level measures sampling across a wider range of human populations. The set includes data from behavioral economic experiments and detailed surveys of demographics, religious beliefs and practices, material security, and intergroup perceptions. This paper describes the methods and variables, briefly introduces the sites and sampling techniques, notes inconsistencies across sites, and provides some basic reporting for the data set.

  7. Leprosy and its socio-cultural perception in Indian religions and ancient texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, A K; Banerjee, B G; Singh, S

    2010-01-01

    Leprosy is one of the oldest ailments known to the mankind. Many of the ancient texts and scriptures reveal that leprosy was not categorised as a specified disease but was grouped along with other skin diseases. However, in certain texts categorical mention of this disease does exist. The prime objective of this article is to highlight the age old traditional line of perception about this disease. A literature review was done to up-date the socio-cultural perception of leprosy in Indian religions and ancient texts. References were obtained through examining relevant bibliographies and the views/suggestions of eminent scholars engaged in this field were also included. An analysis of the secondary sources of data, particularly the ancient texts reveals that in good old days, leprosy had been considered to be an infliction of wrong-doings and sins. This viewpoint has been significantly reflected in these texts.

  8. Gender, religion, and sociopolitical issues in cross-cultural online education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Zareen; Verstegen, Daniëlle; Naqvi, Rahat; Morahan, Page; Dornan, Tim

    2016-05-01

    Cross-cultural education is thought to develop critical consciousness of how unequal distributions of power and privilege affect people's health. Learners in different sociopolitical settings can join together in developing critical consciousness-awareness of power and privilege dynamics in society-by means of communication technology. The aim of this research was to define strengths and limitations of existing cross-cultural discussions in generating critical consciousness. The setting was the FAIMER international fellowship program for mid-career interdisciplinary health faculty, whose goal is to foster global advancement of health professions education. Fellows take part in participant-led, online, written, task-focused discussions on topics like professionalism, community health, and leadership. We reflexively identified text that brought sociopolitical topics into the online environment during the years 2011 and 2012 and used a discourse analysis toolset to make our content analysis relevant to critical consciousness. While references to participants' cultures and backgrounds were infrequent, narratives of political-, gender-, religion-, and other culture-related topics did emerge. When participants gave accounts of their experiences and exchanged cross-cultural stories, they were more likely to develop ad hoc networks to support one another in facing those issues than explore issues relating to the development of critical consciousness. We suggest that cross-cultural discussions need to be facilitated actively to transform learners' frames of reference, create critical consciousness, and develop cultural competence. Further research is needed into how to provide a safe environment for such learning and provide faculty development for the skills needed to facilitate these exchanges.

  9. 论原始宗教与原始文化艺术的关系%Reading Primitive Culture from Original Religion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李洋

    2011-01-01

    原始宗教是维系原始文化的精神纽带,是原始文化的思想内容,原始文化是原始宗教的表现形式。原始文化艺术渗透在原始宗教中。%Primitive religion was spirit ligament to keep up primitive culture and the thought contents of primitive culture.Primitive culture art was the form of expression of primitive religion.Primitive culture art was permeated in the primitive religion.

  10. Jaina Religion and Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manilal Gada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jaina religion has existed for thousands of years. Lord Mahavir was the last of the 24 Tirthankaras, 23 having preceded him. The principals of Jaina religion teach us: (1 Self-control, which includes: (a Control over physiological instinct of hunger and sex; (b control over desires; (c control over emotions; (2 meditation; (3 introspection; (4 concentration; and (5 healthy interpersonal relationship. The principles of Jaina Religion can contribute to Positive Mental Health.

  11. Jaina religion and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gada, Manilal

    2015-01-01

    Jaina religion has existed for thousands of years. Lord Mahavir was the last of the 24 Tirthankaras, 23 having preceded him. The principals of Jaina religion teach us: (1) Self-control, which includes: (a) Control over physiological instinct of hunger and sex; (b) control over desires; (c) control over emotions; (2) meditation; (3) introspection; (4) concentration; and (5) healthy interpersonal relationship. The principles of Jaina Religion can contribute to Positive Mental Health.

  12. Introduction to US4: History, culture, art and religion in the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Paul

    2010-05-01

    The Annual General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (and EGS before it) has always provided a platform for the reporting and debate of high quality geoscience in a very focussed manner. The breadth of its sections and sessions allows most geoscientists to present their work to like-minded colleagues or interdisciplinarily. However, many geoscientists have even wider interests: interests in history, art, politics and economics. Many have diverse abilities in music, painting, sculpture, and practice them as amateurs or to a high standard. Today we fill the gap, by providing a session with the broadest of scopes: History, culture, art and religion in the geosciences I hope that the session will appeal to all those geoscientists who wish to practice their science in the context of the wider culture. According to William Blake "To see a world in a grain of sand, And a heaven in a wild flower, Hold infinity in the palm of your hand, And eternity in an hour." Only, in our case it is more like an hour and a half, and I hope it does not seem like an eternity!

  13. Interactive Effects of Culture and Sex Hormones on Sex Role Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda ePletzer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sex role orientation, i.e. a person’s masculinity or femininity, influences cognitive and emotional performance, like biological sex. While it is now widely accepted that sex differences are modulated by the hormonal status of female participants (menstrual cycle, hormonal contraceptive use, the question, whether hormonal status and sex hormones also modulate participants sex role orientation has hardly been addressed previously. The present study assessed sex role orientation and hormonal status as well as sex hormone levels in three samples of participants from two different cultures (Northern American, Middle European. Menstrual cycle phase did not affect participant’s masculinity or femininity, but had a significant impact on reference group. While women in their follicular phase (low levels of female sex hormones determined their masculinity and femininity in reference to men, women in their luteal phase (high levels of female sex hormones determined their masculinity and femininity in reference to women. Hormonal contraceptive users rated themselves as significantly more feminine and less masculine than naturally cycling women. Furthermore, the impact of biological sex on the factorial structure of sex role orientation as well as the relationship of estrogen to masculinity/femininity was modulated by culture. We conclude that culture and sex hormones interactively affect sex role orientation and hormonal status of participants should be controlled for when assessing masculinity and/or femininity.

  14. Interactive effects of culture and sex hormones on the sex role self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Belinda; Petasis, Ourania; Ortner, Tuulia M; Cahill, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Sex role orientation, i.e., a person's masculinity or femininity, influences cognitive and emotional performance, like biological sex. While it is now widely accepted that sex differences are modulated by the hormonal status of female participants (menstrual cycle, hormonal contraceptive use), the question, whether hormonal status and sex hormones also modulate participants sex role orientation has hardly been addressed previously. The present study assessed sex role orientation and hormonal status as well as sex hormone levels in three samples of participants from two different cultures (Northern American, Middle European). Menstrual cycle phase did not affect participant's masculinity or femininity, but had a significant impact on reference group. While women in their follicular phase (low levels of female sex hormones) determined their masculinity and femininity in reference to men, women in their luteal phase (high levels of female sex hormones) determined their masculinity and femininity in reference to women. Hormonal contraceptive users rated themselves as significantly more feminine and less masculine than naturally cycling women. Furthermore, the impact of biological sex on the factorial structure of sex role orientation as well as the relationship of estrogen to masculinity/femininity was modulated by culture. We conclude that culture and sex hormones interactively affect sex role orientation and hormonal status of participants should be controlled for when assessing masculinity and/or femininity.

  15. Extraordinary sex ratios: cultural effects on ecological consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Molnár

    Full Text Available We model sex-structured population dynamics to analyze pairwise competition between groups differing both genetically and culturally. A sex-ratio allele is expressed in the heterogametic sex only, so that assumptions of Fisher's analysis do not apply. Sex-ratio evolution drives cultural evolution of a group-associated trait governing mortality in the homogametic sex. The two-sex dynamics under resource limitation induces a strong Allee effect that depends on both sex ratio and cultural trait values. We describe the resulting threshold, separating extinction from positive growth, as a function of female and male densities. When initial conditions avoid extinction due to the Allee effect, different sex ratios cannot coexist; in our model, greater female allocation always invades and excludes a lesser allocation. But the culturally transmitted trait interacts with the sex ratio to determine the ecological consequences of successful invasion. The invading female allocation may permit population persistence at self-regulated equilibrium. For this case, the resident culture may be excluded, or may coexist with the invader culture. That is, a single sex-ratio allele in females and a cultural dimorphism in male mortality can persist; a low-mortality resident trait is maintained by father-to-son cultural transmission. Otherwise, the successfully invading female allocation excludes the resident allele and culture and then drives the population to extinction via a shortage of males. Finally, we show that the results obtained under homogeneous mixing hold, with caveats, in a spatially explicit model with local mating and diffusive dispersal in both sexes.

  16. Religion and religiosity as cultural phenomena : from ontological reductionism to acknowledgment of plurality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, J.A.; Valsiner, J.; Marsico, G.; Chaudhary, N.; Sato, T.; Dazzani, V.

    2016-01-01

    After reminding some of the historical relationships between psychology and religion, this chapter explains what is usually understood by psychology of religion in a proper sense, differentiating it from neighboring fields such as ‘psychology and religion’ and ‘pastoral psychology.’ The chapter

  17. Religion and religiosity as cultural phenomena : from ontological reductionism to acknowledgment of plurality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, J.A.; Valsiner, J.; Marsico, G.; Chaudhary, N.; Sato, T.; Dazzani, V.

    2016-01-01

    After reminding some of the historical relationships between psychology and religion, this chapter explains what is usually understood by psychology of religion in a proper sense, differentiating it from neighboring fields such as ‘psychology and religion’ and ‘pastoral psychology.’ The chapter cont

  18. How Do Scientists Cross Cultural Borders Between Religion and Science: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barner, Chester A., III

    The cultures of science and religion have had different levels of conflict throughout the past several hundred years due in part to the development of the theory of evolution. Although many ideas abound in science education as to the alleviation of this struggle, few studies have examined how scientists who profess religious beliefs deal with this conflict. In general, the study sought to understand the cognitive dynamic of the cultural interaction between the scientific and religious culture within a few individuals. Specifically, the study allowed scientists to explain how they found a measure of compatibility between their faith and their scientific endeavors. Within the boundaries of both the general and specific purposes for the study, the following research question was used: How do college science professors describe the interaction between their faith and their scientific knowledge in reference to their transitioning between a naturalistic or scientific understanding and a super-naturalistic or religious understanding? Three theoretical lenses were used as backdrop to view the cultural interaction. World View (Kearney, 1984), Collateral Learning Theory (Jegede, 1995), and Faith Perspective in relation to the Stages of Faith Theory (Fowler, 1981) constituted the theoretical framework. Because of the qualitative nature of the research, the author used a modified naturalistic paradigm that stressed an emergent quality, grounded categorical design, and a modified case study written format that aided in the understanding of data generated through multiple qualitative methods. Three overlapping themes emerged within the data that offer new insights not only into the complex nature of the conflict but also into the ways scientists themselves find a reason to have faith as well as scientific knowledge. Boundaries based upon a philosophical and world view difference, conflict due to culturally integrative ideas, and cultural bridges without distortion made up the

  19. A New Theological Culture in Order to Get a Deeper Understanding of the Richness of Religion and Religiosity in the Midst of Global Cultural Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The author believes that the future of learning religion and religiously learning does not primary depend on new methods or medias transferring faith or religiosity to people's lives. It depends more on a change of theological awareness and of people's ways of theologizing in the midst of cultural flow in order to get a deeper understanding of the…

  20. An exploration of lived religion in same-sex couples from Judeo-Christian traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon Scales; Riggle, Ellen D B; Brodnicki, Carolyn; Olson, Amber

    2008-09-01

    Religious involvement has been found to be associated with higher levels of commitment and relationship satisfaction among heterosexually married individuals (Mahoney et al., 1999). Little is known, however, about the religiosity of gay, lesbian, bisexual (GLB) individuals, and virtually nothing is known about religious involvement in same-sex couples. The purpose of this qualitative interview study was to examine couples' experiences of incorporating religious involvement into their committed relationships. In a sample of 14 same-sex couples, we found that couples used their spiritual/religious values to understand and undergird their relationships. In this process, they negotiated intra-couple differences in religious practices, involved themselves in activities that have religious or spiritual meaning to them, created religious social support for their relationships, and experienced some non-supportive or rejecting interpersonal interactions with religious family members, congregants, and strangers. These findings are instructive to therapists who work with same-sex couples and the family members of GLB individuals. We conclude with specific suggestions for practitioners.

  1. Influences of religion and culture on continuing bonds in a sample of British Muslims of Pakistani origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hanan; Oyebode, Jan R

    2009-11-01

    This study considered the nature of continuing bonds with deceased relatives in a sample of Pakistani Muslims living in the United Kingdom. Ten participants were interviewed following a cultural psychology approach and transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Dreaming, talking with others about the deceased, following the deceased's example, keeping memories and mementos, and doing actions thought to help the deceased were forms of continued relationship found. These were intertwined with the process of grieving and were influenced by the family, culture, and religion. Religion was a strong influence on the prominence given by participants to finishing well and on the notion of doing actions thought to help the deceased. Cultural mores, such as the community, and collectivist ethos and the expectation that emotion would be expressed around the time of death, were found to be supportive for some but sources of tension for other participants. Expressing a continuing bond through following the deceased's example so as to make them proud or happy seemed to be reinforced by cultural roots in respect for elders. Participants gave instances of tensions in areas such as expression of emotion and communality versus individualism that arose as a result of their position between two cultural frameworks, some illustrating how assimilation into the host culture set up conflict with the expected norms of their family/ancestral culture. The study highlights how understanding different cultural and religious influences may enrich the concept of continuing bonds.

  2. Religion and Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Religion and politics provide an interesting juxtaposition. On the one hand, both may initially come across as rather self-evident categories, with religion dealing with human perceptions and what people hold as sacred, and politics addressing the control and governance of fellow human beings....... Nonetheless, such a simple opposition should only work as a starting point for an interrogation of both terms and how they have come to look and function as empirical and analytical categories. Focusing on the ways that religion is played out in relation to politics reveals different historical and cultural...... constellations and positions, which can be highlighted as variations of religion as politics, religion in politics, religion out of politics, and religion not politics....

  3. Religion and Action Control: Faith-Specific Modulation of the Simon Effect but Not Stop-Signal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Scorolli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that religion has a specific impact on attentional processes. Here we show that religion also affects action control. Experiment 1 compared Dutch Calvinists and Dutch atheists, matched for age, sex, intelligence, education, and cultural and socio-economic background, and Experiment 2 compared Italian Catholics with…

  4. Religion and action control: faith-specific modulation of the Simon effect but not stop-signal performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommel, B.; Colzato, L.S.; Scorolli, C.; Borghi, A.M.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that religion has a specific impact on attentional processes. Here we show that religion also affects action control. Experiment 1 compared Dutch Calvinists and Dutch atheists, matched for age, sex, intelligence, education, and cultural and socio-economic background, and Ex

  5. Danmark. Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten, Martin Schwarz

    1991-01-01

    Danmarks kirkehistorie fra begyndelsen til nyere tid. Kirkehistorie, historie, folkekirke, religion......Danmarks kirkehistorie fra begyndelsen til nyere tid. Kirkehistorie, historie, folkekirke, religion...

  6. Religion and Gay Marriage: The Use of Religion in the Debate Concerning Same-Sex Marriage in the U.S.

    OpenAIRE

    Røkke, Frida

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s the issue of same-sex marriage has been publicly debated in the United States. This debate has lasted for several decades and gone through court cases and ballot measures to find a solution to the question. As several states legalized same-sex marriage the situation became tense and the demand to find a solution grew. In the summer of 2015, the United States Supreme Court handled the question of federal legalization of same-sex marriage and ruled in favor of it. As the propone...

  7. Religion and HIV/AIDS stigma in Puerto Rico: a cultural challenge for training future physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas-Díaz, Nelson; Neilands, Torsten B; Cintrón-Bou, Francheska; Santos-Figueroa, Axel; Marzán-Rodríguez, Melissa; Marques, Domingo

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS stigma continues to be a challenge for HIV prevention and treatment. When health professionals manifest stigma it can limit access to quality treatment. With an ever-growing epidemic among Latinos, including Puerto Ricans living on the Caribbean Island, the social and structural factors that foster HIV/AIDS stigma need to be understood. In this study, we documented the association of religion with HIV/AIDS stigma in a sample of medical students in Puerto Rico. Findings suggest that importance placed on religion, and participation in religious activities, is associated with HIV/AIDS stigma for this population.

  8. Nye religioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothstein, Mikael; Hammer, Olav

    2011-01-01

    Religionshistorisk fremstilling af fænomenet "nye religioner", især euroamerikanske religioner fra de sidste 100 år.......Religionshistorisk fremstilling af fænomenet "nye religioner", især euroamerikanske religioner fra de sidste 100 år....

  9. Cognitive development, culture, and conversation: comments on Harris and Koenig's "truth in testimony: how children learn about science and religion".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callanan, Maureen A

    2006-01-01

    Harris and Koenig make a compelling case for the importance of adult "testimony" and its influence on children's developing conceptions of topics in science and religion. This commentary considers how their analysis relates to constructivist and sociocultural theories and discusses several ways in which Harris and Koenig's arguments help to debunk some prevalent assumptions about research on the social context of cognitive development. Finally, a number of additional issues are raised for debate and discussion, and some critiques and suggestions for future research are discussed. The issues discussed by Harris and Koenig are crucial if we are to take seriously the importance of culture in cognitive development.

  10. Performance of the Duke Religion Index and the spiritual well-being scale in online samples of men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, J Michael; Smolensk, Derek J; Brady, Sonya S; Rosser, B R Simon

    2013-06-01

    Religiosity is associated with behaviors that reduce the risk of HIV/STI infection among general-population and heterosexual-specific samples. Whether this association is similar to homosexual persons is unknown. Measures of religiosity have not been evaluated psychometrically among men who have sex with men (MSM), a population who, because of stigma, experience religiosity differently than heterosexual persons. We assessed the duke religion index and the spiritual well-being in two samples of MSM. Neither instrument produced adequate model fit. To study the association between religiosity and HIV/STI risk behaviors among MSM, scales are needed that measure the religious and spiritual experiences of MSM.

  11. Religion/spirituality in African-American culture: an essential aspect of psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James H

    2002-05-01

    There is an astonishing diversity of religious beliefs and practices in the history of African Americans that influences the presentation, diagnosis, and management of both physical and mental disorders. The majority of African Americans, however, are evangelical Christians with religious experiences originating in the regions of ancient Africa (Cush, Punt, and to a great extent, Egypt), as well as black adaptation of Hebraic, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic beliefs and rituals. Consequently, more than 60 of the nation's 125 medical schools offer classes in spirituality and health. Although there is a lack of empirical evidence that religion improves health outcomes, physicians should understand patients as a biopsychosocial-spiritual whole. Asking about religion/spirituality during a health assessment can help the physician determine whether religious/spiritual factors will influence the patient's medical decisions and compliance. Two psychiatric case histories of African Americans are presented in which religion/spirituality significantly influenced treatment decisions and results. Neither of these patients suffered major debilitating medical comorbidity.

  12. Introduction to the Culture, Health & Sexuality Virtual Special Issue on sex, sexuality and sex work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allman, Dan; Ditmore, Melissa Hope

    2016-05-18

    This article provides an editorial introduction to a virtual special issue on sex work and prostitution. It offers a brief history of sex work studies as published in the journal Culture, Health & Sexuality; reflects on the breadth and scope of papers the journal has published; considers the contribution of the journal's papers to the wellbeing and sexuality of people who sell sex; and envisions future areas of inquiry for sex work studies. As authors, we identify major themes within the journal's archive, including activism, agency, context, discourse, hazard, health, legalisation, love, place, power, race, relationships, stigma and vulnerabilities. In particular, we reflect on how HIV has created an environment in which issues of culture, health and sexuality have come to be disentangled from the moral agendas of earlier years. As a venue for the dissemination of a reinvigorated scholarship, Culture, Health & Sexuality provides a platform for a community of often like-minded, rigorous thinkers, to provide new and established perspectives, methods and voices and to present important developments in studies of sex, sexuality and sex work.

  13. RETHINKING RELIGION THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL APPROACH TO INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY OF UNDERSTANDING RELIGION IN THE NAGA SOCIETY

    OpenAIRE

    Lemwang Chuhwanglim; Yahya Wijaya; Mark Woodward

    2016-01-01

    Religion in society has been a complex study for both academic and non-academic disciplines. Defining religion had become an issue since the beginning of world religions. This issue will continue to remain in society, unless world religions avoid imposed definition of religion from the world religions’ perspective. This research aims to study about how religion had been defined by many scholars theologically, politically, culturally, contextually, and how such different approaches...

  14. Religion and Cultural Identity in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet and the Musical Works it Inspired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottez Alina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Protean Shakespeare thrives not only in the theatre, but also through what Bolter and Grusin call remediation. This article analyses the religious stances in the play and then shows how opera, symphony and musical have been adapting the veteran Elizabethan drama since the 18th century. Its main approach is comparative and relies on the history of mentalities. Adaptation is dictated by cultural context, the conventions of the lyrical theatre, social and political factors, and reception. The confusing religious configuration of Shakespeare’s England is reinterpreted kaleidoscopically. The article demonstrates, for instance, that Berlioz and Gounod reread it according to staunch Catholicism in 19th century France, while Bernstein’s West Side Story moves the action to New York in the mid- 50’s, the Capulets and Montagues are replaced with rival Polish and Puerto Rican gangs and religion with cultural identity.

  15. Explaining moral religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Nicolas; Boyer, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    Moralizing religions, unlike religions with morally indifferent gods or spirits, appeared only recently in some (but not all) large-scale human societies. A crucial feature of these new religions is their emphasis on proportionality (between deeds and supernatural rewards, between sins and penance, and in the formulation of the Golden Rule, according to which one should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself). Cognitive science models that account for many properties of religion can be extended to these religions. Recent models of evolved dispositions for fairness in cooperation suggest that proportionality-based morality is highly intuitive to human beings. The cultural success of moralizing movements, secular or religious, could be explained based on proportionality.

  16. Queer Breeding: Historicising Popular Culture, Homosexuality and Informal Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Through an analysis of gay protest music (1975) and an educational kit for students (1978), both sponsored by the Campaign for Homosexual Equality in the UK, this paper brings into focus a history of gay rights activists' efforts to marshal popular culture in the development of informal sex education for young people in the second half of the…

  17. Queer Breeding: Historicising Popular Culture, Homosexuality and Informal Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Through an analysis of gay protest music (1975) and an educational kit for students (1978), both sponsored by the Campaign for Homosexual Equality in the UK, this paper brings into focus a history of gay rights activists' efforts to marshal popular culture in the development of informal sex education for young people in the second half of the…

  18. Queer Breeding: Historicising Popular Culture, Homosexuality and Informal Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Through an analysis of gay protest music (1975) and an educational kit for students (1978), both sponsored by the Campaign for Homosexual Equality in the UK, this paper brings into focus a history of gay rights activists' efforts to marshal popular culture in the development of informal sex education for young people in the second half of the…

  19. Kinesisk Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Esben; Nielsen, Klaus Bo

    Bogen Kinesisk Religion omhandler kongfuzianisme, daoisme, buddhisme, maoisme, folkereligion og nye religioner i ind- og udland. Den indeholder klassiske myter og magiske ritualer, historiske milepæle og moderne udfordringer, politisk religion og levende folkereligiøsitet. Bogen henvender sig...

  20. War and National Renewal: Civil Religion and Blood Sacrifice in American Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Wars are often associated with a rhetoric of renewal or new beginnings. This essay explores this claim through the lens of civil religion and a recent book by Carolyn Marvin and David Ingle, Blood Sacrifice and the Nation, which combines Emile Durkheim with Réné Girard in proposing that modern national cohesion depends on blood sacrifice. I unpack some of the paradoxes raised by this theory of national renewal in the context of 9/11, with a special focus on the sacred status of the flag and the special attention given to uniformed serviceman in the American body politic

  1. 宗教中的音乐文化——关于音乐的传统性与神圣性的哲学思考%Music Culture of Religion --Philosophical thinking of music tradition and sanctity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周钟

    2012-01-01

    Music is a kind of culture. This article makes a study of the related research between music culture and religion from the three aspects : music cultural tradition and religious life, music cultural spirit and the philosophy of religion, sacred music culture and feeling of religion.%音乐是一种文化。从音乐文化传统与宗教生活、音乐文化精神与宗教哲学、音乐文化神圣性与宗教感三个方面,将音乐文化与宗教联系探究。

  2. GENDER JUSTICE AND CULTURAL DIMENSION OF RELIGION, A PROPOSAL TO APPLY THE PROPHETIC TRADITION (THE HADITH IN PROMOTING GENDER JUSTICE AMONG INDONESIAN MUSLIMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faqihuddin Abdul Kodir

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available By arguing that religion as interpretative culture of people in their context, suggested by Clifford Geertz, this paper proposes an interpretation-oriented approach to the texts of the hadith of the Prophet Muhammad rather than a critical-deconstructive approach. The interpretation-oriented approach focuses on positive reading towards the hadith that advocates issues of gender justice; whether through selecting classical methods of interpretation or applying contemporary methods suggested by progressive Muslims. As this approach does not challenge the authority of the hadith, which is accepted culturally by majority of Muslims as second source after the Quran, cultural works for gender justice are assumed to be relatively more flexible and can be further maximized. By doing so, I argue that this cultural dimension of religion –accepting its sources and working on the field of interpreting them-should be considered in promoting gender justice among Indonesian Muslims.

  3. Cultural inheritance as a mechanism for population sex-ratio bias in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedberg, S; Wade, M J

    2001-05-01

    Although natural populations of most species exhibit a 1:1 sex ratio, biased sex ratios are known to be associated with non-Mendelian inheritance, as in sex-linked meiotic drive and cytoplasmic inheritance (Charnov 1982; Hurst 1993). We show how cultural inheritance, another type of non-Mendelian inheritance, can favor skewed primary sex ratios and propose that it may explain the female-biased sex ratios commonly observed in reptiles with environmental sex determination (ESD). Like cytoplasmic elements, cultural traits can be inherited through one sex. This, in turn, favors skewing the primary sex allocation in favor of the transmitting sex. Female nest-site philopatry is a sex-specific, culturally inherited trait in many reptiles with ESD and highly female-biased sex ratios. We propose that the association of nest-site selection with ESD facilitates the maternal manipulation of offspring sex ratios toward females.

  4. Bob Dylan and religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Häger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, which is located within the field of research on religion and popular culture, is a discussion of the relations of one particular rock artist, Bob Dylan, to religion. Religion can be seen as a recurring topic in Dylan’s work—particularly during a period at the end of the 1970s and beginning of the 1980s, often referred to as his ‘Christian era’—and also in the discourses around him. This article explores how the topic of religion appears in discourses around Bob Dylan. In this article one particular aspect of the connection between religion and popular culture is looked at: the construction of certain artists or stars as religious figures, and more specifically Bob Dylan as a case. The author does not try to discover whether Dylan is religious or not; or which religion he possibly adheres to. Rather, the author looks at how rock artists and in this case Bob Dylan are ‘constructed’ as religious figures.

  5. Perspectives on induced abortion among Palestinian women: religion, culture and access in the occupied Palestinian territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahawy, Sarrah; Diamond, Megan B

    2017-07-19

    Induced abortion is an important public health issue in the occupied Palestinian territories (OPT), where it is illegal in most cases. This study was designed to elicit the views of Palestinian women on induced abortion given the unique religious, ethical and social challenges in the OPT. Sixty Palestinian women were interviewed on their perceptions of the religious implications, social consequences and accessibility of induced abortions in the OPT at Al-Makassed Islamic Charitable Hospital in East Jerusalem. Themes arising from the interviews included: the centrality of religion in affecting women's choices and views on abortion; the importance of community norms in regulating perspectives on elective abortion; and the impact of the unique medico-legal situation of the OPT on access to abortion under occupation. Limitations to safe abortion access included: legal restrictions; significant social consequences from the discovery of an abortion by one's community or family; and different levels of access to abortion depending on whether a woman lived in East Jerusalem, the West Bank, or Gaza. This knowledge should be incorporated to work towards a legal and medical framework in Palestine that would allow for safe abortions for women in need.

  6. Religion and family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Bojana; Hakim, Marwan; Seidman, Daniel S; Kubba, Ali; Kishen, Meera; Di Carlo, Costantino

    2016-12-01

    Religion is embedded in the culture of all societies. It influences matters of morality, ideology and decision making, which concern every human being at some point in their life. Although the different religions often lack a united view on matters such contraception and abortion, there is sometimes some dogmatic overlap when general religious principles are subject to the influence of local customs. Immigration and population flow add further complexities to societal views on reproductive issues. For example, present day Europe has recently faced a dramatic increase in refugee influx, which raises questions about the health care of immigrants and the effects of cultural and religious differences on reproductive health. Religious beliefs on family planning in, for example, Christianity, Judaism, Islam and Hinduism have grown from different backgrounds and perspectives. Understanding these differences may result in more culturally competent delivery of care by health care providers. This paper presents the teachings of the most widespread religions in Europe with regard to contraception and reproduction.

  7. Legal and Policy Issues Regarding Niche Charter Schools: Race, Religion, Culture, and the Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckes, Suzanne E.; Fox, Robert A.; Buchanan, Nina K.

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of ethnocentric or culturally oriented niche charter schools have opened around the country. These ethnic or culture-oriented models raise legal and policy concerns about church/state entanglement as well as concerns about diversity. Indeed, there has already been litigation focused on racial and ethnic aspects of charter schools…

  8. Perceptions of the Religion--Health Connection among African Americans in the Southeastern United States: Sex, Age, and Urban/Rural Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Cheryl L.; Schulz, Emily; Wynn, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive literature reviews suggest that religiousness is positively associated with health. Much less understood is the particular nature of the religion-health connection. Religion and the church play a central role in the lives of many African Americans. This study used a mixed-methods approach to examine perceptions of the religion-health…

  9. The mediatisation of religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2011-01-01

    and experiences become moulded according to the demands of popular media genres. As a cultural and social environment, the media have taken over many of the cultural and social functions of the institutionalised religions and provide spiritual guidance, moral orientation, ritual passages and a sense of community......Drawing on recent advances in mediatisation theory, the article presents a theoretical framework for understanding the increased interplay between religion and media. The media have become an important, if not primary, source of information about religious issues, and religious information...

  10. Fiktionsbaseret religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Jediismen er en ny religion, der bygger på George Lucas' Star Wars-film. Kernen i jediismen er medlemmernes identifikation med jedi-ridderne fra Star Wars, troen på, at Kraften eksisterer uden for det fiktive univers, samt rituel interaktion med Kraften. På baggrund af en analyse af syv jediistiske...... gruppers hjemmesider skitserer artiklen jediismens selvforståelse med fokus på selv-identifikation, læren om Kraften, praksis og etik samt forhandlingen af forholdet til Star Wars. Endvidere argumenteres for, hvorfor jediismen må fortolkes som en religion og ikke blot som et fanfænomen. Endelig foreslås...... kategorien 'fiktionsbaseret religion' introduceret i religionsvidenskaben som betegnelse for en række nye religioner baseret på 'fiktive religioner' indlejret i fiktionstekster....

  11. Sex, gender and work segregation in the cultural industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesmondhalgh, David; Baker, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    This chapter addresses work 'segregation' by sex in the cultural industries. We outline some of the main forms this takes, according to our observations: the high presence of women in marketing and public relations roles; the high numbers of women in production co-ordination and similar roles; the domination of men of more prestigious creative roles; and the domination by men of technical jobs. We then turn to explanation: what gender dynamics drive such patterns of work segregation according to sex? Drawing on interviews, we claim that the following stereotypes or prevailing discourses, concerning the distinctive attributes of women and men, may influence such segregation: that women are more caring, supportive and nurturing; that women are better communicators; that women are 'better organized'; and that men are more creative because they are less bound by rules.

  12. Religion, Belief and Medial Layering of Communication. Perspectives from Studies in Visual Culture and Artistic Productions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Schade

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the relationship between religious practices, belief and the media based on the medial layering of communication. The arguments are situated within the fields of studies in visual culture and cultural studies, reflecting on the role of art as a specific medium in the Western religious tradition. Vera Frenkel’s video This Is Your Messiah Speaking (1990 is reviewed as a critical inquiry into religious practices and the media structures of communication.

  13. Association of violence against women with religion and culture in Erbil Iraq: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Tawil Namir Ghanim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence against women by intimate partners is still a public health problem. The study aims at finding out the prevalence of violence among women residing in Erbil city (Muslim culture and in Ankawa sub-district (Christian culture, finding out the role of religion and culture on the prevalence, and finding out some other factors (like occupation of husband and wife, age at marriage, woman agreement for marriage, illegitimate relations of husband that might be associated with violence. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in Erbil during the second half of the year 2011. Two groups were considered; group one (G1 included women residing in Ankawa sub-district (representing Christian culture, and group two (G2 included women residing in Erbil city (representing Muslim culture. A convenience method of sampling was used to collect the sample (250 women of each group. Questionnaire was designed to collect information about history of exposure to physical, sexual, and psychological violence, in addition to the related factors. These forms were distributed (by women of the Assyrian Women Union in sealed envelopes to women attending the Mass in three churches located in Ankawa. Women of Erbil group were recruited from the maternity teaching hospital of Erbil. The same questionnaire was distributed to them by the same team. Binary logistic regression was used to show the independent effect of each factor on the prevalence of violence. Results Overall prevalence of violence (physical and/or sexual in G2 (20.8% was higher than that of G1 (18.8%. The prevalence of psychological violence was 40% in Erbil, which was significantly higher than the prevalence (24.8% of Ankawa. The rates of physical and sexual violence were also higher in Erbil (18.4%, and 10.8% respectively than rates of Ankawa (16.8% and 8% respectively. Factors found to be significantly associated with overall violence were: culture of Erbil, alcoholic husband

  14. The Art of Pushkin Interpreted by Russian Religious Philosophers in the Context of the Problematic Interrelation of Philosophy, Literature and Religion in Russian Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Gidirinskiy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Serious and profound reflection is needed when probing the problem of the manysided rapport between philosophy and the social-religious culture of Russia. In the first place, this entails an examination of the relationship between religion and literature. In this article, an attempt is made at defining the major methodological principles guiding such research. However, such an analysis demands concrete examples although the study of them may yield differing results. The author is sure of this basic principle having applied himself to the study of Pushkin, who would seem to be one of the best models for this type of research. Finally the author ends with his own question: What is the best method (reception, approach, the mechanics of study for discovering and elucidating the complicated interrelationship linking religion, philosophy, and literature in Russian culture?

  15. THE SPATIAL-CULTURAL CONFIGURATION OF SEX WORK IN GOA INDIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, Ajay; Hutter, Inge; Huigen, Paulus P. P.

    2011-01-01

    Geographers have largely ignored the socio-spatial aspect of sex work in the non-Western context. Theorisation on place, sex and gender will aid in spatially situating sex work in the domain of geography. We present an empirical study to describe the spatial-cultural configuration of sex work as

  16. Using Relational-Cultural Theory to Conceptualize Couple Interventions in the Treatment of Sex Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Joanne E.

    2007-01-01

    Sex addictions have become an increasing concern since the growth of the sex industry, sex in advertising, and the ease of Internet access to sex. This article uses the foundational principles of Relational-Cultural Theory (RCT) to conceptualize sexual addiction and its relational impact. Particular attention is paid to the principles of…

  17. The Place of Drugs in the Religion of the Counter Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Walter Houston

    The thesis of this paper is that the main catalyst of religious interest of the counter culture has been the use of psychedelic drugs along with marijuana. The author determined, through investigating subjective experiences of an unselected population of 100 users of LSD type drugs and 20 users of cannabis drugs, that psychedelic drugs are…

  18. 2010 Presidential Address: Learning Religion and Religiously Learning amid Global Cultural Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging social media that build on digital technologies are reshaping how we interact with each other. Religious education and identity formation within these new cultural flows demands recognition of the shifts in authority, authenticity, and agency that are taking place, as well as the challenges posed by "context collapse." Digital…

  19. Religion, Ethnicity, Culture, Way of Life: Jews, Muslims, and Multicultural Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Lewis Z.; Ali, Saba Rasheed; Ackerman, Sandra R.; Dewey, J. Jane H.

    2009-01-01

    Jews and Muslims represent 2 unique cultural groups that have been relatively under-examined by multicultural counseling scholars. In this article, the authors review the recent literature on Jews and Muslims, synthesize and discuss the commonalities across these 2 groups, provide some recommendations for counseling members of these populations,…

  20. Marcos Zapata's "Last Supper": a feast of European religion and Andean culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendt, Christina

    2010-01-01

    In Marcos Zapata's 1753 painting of the Last Supper in Cuzco, Peru, Christian symbolism is filtered through Andean cultural tradition. Zapata was a late member of the Cuzco School of Painting, a group comprised of few European immigrants and handfuls of mestizo and Indian artists. The painters in Cuzco learned mostly from prints of European paintings, and their style tends to blend local culture into the traditional painting of their conquistadors. Imagery was the most successful tool used by the Spaniards in their quest to Christianize the Andean population. By teaching locals to paint Christian subjects, they were able to infuse Christianity into Andean traditions. Zapata's rendering of the Last Supper utilizes this cultural blending while staying true to the Christian symbolism within the subject. Instead of the traditional lamb, Zapata's Last Supper features a platter of cuy, or guinea pig, an Andean delicacy stocked with protein as well as cultural significance. Cuy was traditionally a sacrificial animal at Inca agricultural festivals and in this way it offers poignant parallel to the lamb, as a traditional Christian sacrificial animal.

  1. Gender, Religion, and Sociopolitical Issues in Cross-Cultural Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Zareen; Verstegen, Daniëlle; Naqvi, Rahat; Morahan, Page; Dornan, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Cross-cultural education is thought to develop critical consciousness of how unequal distributions of power and privilege affect people's health. Learners in different sociopolitical settings can join together in developing critical consciousness--awareness of power and privilege dynamics in society--by means of communication technology. The aim…

  2. Culture-Blind? Parental Discourse on Religion, Ethnicity and Secularism in the French Educational Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveaud, Maroussia

    2008-01-01

    This article examines policy mediation and adaptation in a context where religious, ethnic and other cultural identities are not officially recognised in the public sphere but considered part of the private sphere. French educational policy is firmly rooted within a secular Republican framework which relies on a colour-blind approach to promote…

  3. Religion in Japan and a Look at Cultural Transmission, Grades 7-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    This unit focuses on the periods in Japanese history up to the reign of Prince Shotoku (A.D. 592-622) and his role in the transmission of Chinese culture to Japan. A special focus is made on the joint practice of Buddhism and Shinto in Japan. Each lesson's materials and format are described in detail with specific objectives noted and the…

  4. CULTURE, RELIGION AND POLITICS IN CONTEXT OF OTTOMAN-TURKISH MODERNISATION MOVEMENT / OSMANLI-TÜRK MODERNLESME SÜRECINDE KÜLTÜR, DIN VE SIYASET ILISKILERI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assoc. Prof. Dr. Mustafa GENCER

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to explain the late Ottoman experiences withmodernisation and social changes in the fields of society, politics, culture andreligion in Tanzimat and Mesrutiyet periods in order to understand themodernisation process of the Republik. In this context, it would be tried toanalyse of the steps and character of Turkish modernisation movements, itsapproaches of religion, secularisation of educational system and the differentwiev-points of the intelligentsia to renovation and reorganisation of the stateand society.

  5. On Post-Earthquake Reconstruction of Religion from a Cultural Perspective%文化视阈下的地震灾后宗教重建问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘延刚

    2014-01-01

    Religion is the key to history and crucial constituting part in culture. In the past few years,religious issues are concerned after occurrence of major earthquakes in Sichuan,Qinghai and Yunnan provinces. The recon-struction of religion must be guided at the level of constructing socialist advancing culture,that is,to examine reli-gion from all sides as an essential carrier of cultural inheritance and a major part of spiritual culture construction. Emphasis must be given to both material and spiritual sides,promotion of both tradition and innovation,demonstra-tion of both governmental organizational function and social integration force,and exerting positive effect of religion while avoiding its negative effect.%宗教是历史的钥匙,是文化的重要组成部分。近年来四川、青海、云南大地震都涉及宗教问题,灾后宗教重建须从社会主义先进文化建设的高度进行引领,要将宗教作为文化传承的重要载体和精神文明建设的重要内容来全面考量,既要注重物质的层面,又要注重精神的层面,既要弘扬传统又要讲究创新,既要体现政府的组织功能,也要体现社会的整合力量,既要发挥宗教的积极作用,又要避免负面影响。

  6. Time Management - New Religion of Our Age: 'Time' In Anglo-American Culture vs. 'Vrijeme' in Croatian Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Juretić

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This research on time management within the project ‘Management in Entrepreneurship’ is based both on cognitive linguistics and the cultural dimension of time in international business. In accordance with our conceptualization and relationship to time, culture can be divided into monochronic time (M-time and polychronic time (P-time cultures. While M-time culture, which is best represented by the United States, emphasizes schedules, a precise reckoning of time, and promptness, P-time culture, Croatia, falling into this category, emphasizes the involvement of people rather than a rigid adherence to the clock. The results, so far, show how our conceptualization of time - on a subconscious level - influences our lives and how theories of time management can be transferred into teaching Business English in Croatia where, ‘having done something on time’ is definitely of less importance than to the American society.

  7. Religion and morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Ryan; Whitehouse, Harvey

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between religion and morality has long been hotly debated. Does religion make us more moral? Is it necessary for morality? Do moral inclinations emerge independently of religious intuitions? These debates, which nowadays rumble on in scientific journals as well as in public life, have frequently been marred by a series of conceptual confusions and limitations. Many scientific investigations have failed to decompose "religion" and "morality" into theoretically grounded elements; have adopted parochial conceptions of key concepts-in particular, sanitized conceptions of "prosocial" behavior; and have neglected to consider the complex interplay between cognition and culture. We argue that to make progress, the categories "religion" and "morality" must be fractionated into a set of biologically and psychologically cogent traits, revealing the cognitive foundations that shape and constrain relevant cultural variants. We adopt this fractionating strategy, setting out an encompassing evolutionary framework within which to situate and evaluate relevant evidence. Our goals are twofold: to produce a detailed picture of the current state of the field, and to provide a road map for future research on the relationship between religion and morality.

  8. The impact of religion and cultural values on AIDS education programs in Malaysia and the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteria, T; Sullivan, G

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of cultural values and government policies on the content of AIDS educational literature prepared by public health agencies in Malaysia and the Philippines. The literature from these countries, which has been distributed to the public and is intended to inform them of the danger of AIDS, how the HIV is and is not transmitted, and how to avoid infection, is analyzed and evaluated for effectiveness and congruence with the dominant religious tenets and cultural practices in each country, and attitudes to sexual behavior. The paper also describes the response of these countries to the AIDS pandemic, and concludes with suggestions about how this form of AIDS education can be improved.

  9. Should ESL Classes Never Mention Religion?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾炜俊

    2014-01-01

    As religion is an integrated part of human history and culture, an L2 cannot be learnt without some mentioning of it in the language classes. Teaching about religion cannot only help L2 learners learn the L2 itself but other general knowledge such as history, music and arts. However, differences should be made between teaching religion and teaching about religion and some guidelines should be followed if teachers are to teach it in the language classes.

  10. Computing Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielbo, Kristoffer Laigaard; Braxton, Donald M.; Upal, Afzal

    2012-01-01

    The computational approach has become an invaluable tool in many fields that are directly relevant to research in religious phenomena. Yet the use of computational tools is almost absent in the study of religion. Given that religion is a cluster of interrelated phenomena and that research...... concerning these phenomena should strive for multilevel analysis, this article argues that the computational approach offers new methodological and theoretical opportunities to the study of religion. We argue that the computational approach offers 1.) an intermediary step between any theoretical construct...... and its targeted empirical space and 2.) a new kind of data which allows the researcher to observe abstract constructs, estimate likely outcomes, and optimize empirical designs. Because sophisticated mulitilevel research is a collaborative project we also seek to introduce to scholars of religion some...

  11. JOURNAL OF RELIGION 2014 CURVEEE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IK

    religion and other cultural worldviews to explain natural occurrences of past and ... that everything in the physical world has a spiritual counterpart. This view .... efforts and resources have been put in place and involved especially with the.

  12. Suicide and the afterlife: popular religion and the standardisation of 'culture' in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Mary

    2012-06-01

    For an overwhelming majority of commentators, including many anthropologists, 'Japanese culture' is still associated with a positive view of suicide. Western-language writings have contributed by feedback loop to perpetuate this stereotype. Besides the local 'samurai ethic', Japanese Buddhism is also said not to prohibit taking one's life. However, the most popular examples of heroic self-sacrifice, from the Edo period to WWII, are fraught with covert contradictions. From ancient times to the present religious practitioners of all sorts have maintained that suicide creates unhappy, resentful spirits who harm the living. This article discusses many examples of a diverse series of narratives, from spirit medium's séances to drama to contemporary films, in which the anguished spirits of suicides are allowed to express themselves directly. After the figures rose alarmingly in the late 1990s various religious organisations have attempted to fight the stigma suffered by bereaved family members and have introduced new interpretations and new rituals.

  13. La religione una risorsa formativa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Nanni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The text aims to show how religion can contribute to the achievement of the human person. Religion, connected to the social and cultural framework, joins the individual world in its complexity. Is godlinesses a possible teaching resource? Yes, when read according to a pedagogical perspective, which support human advancement, historical and cultural being. The dialogue, good practice for any learning, it poses as a means to fight the life fragmentation in the discovery of common traces to all humanity.

  14. Role flexing: how community, religion, and family shape the experiences of young black men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Alexandra B; Oster, Alexandra M; Viall, Abigail H; Heffelfinger, James D; Mena, Leandro A; Toledo, Carlos A

    2012-12-01

    While the disproportionate impact of HIV on young black men who have sex with men (MSM) is well documented, the reasons for this disparity remain less clear. Through in-depth interviews, we explored the role of familial, religious, and community influence on the experiences of young black MSM and identified strategies that these young men use to negotiate and manage their sexual minority status. Between February and April 2008, 16 interviews were conducted among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected young (19- to 24-year-old) black MSM in the Jackson, Mississippi, area. Results suggest that overall, homosexuality remains highly stigmatized by the men's families, religious community, and the African American community. To manage this stigma, many of the participants engaged in a process of "role flexing," in which individuals modified their behavior in order to adapt to a particular situation. The data also provided evidence of internalized homophobia among a number of the participants. The impact of stigma on risk behavior should be more fully explored, and future intervention efforts need to explicitly address and challenge stigma, both among young men themselves and the communities in which they reside. Attention should also be paid to the role masculinity may play as a driver of the HIV epidemic among young black MSM and how this knowledge can be used to inform prevention efforts.

  15. Religion als soziale Deutungspraxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Lingen-Ali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ENGLISH: During the last decades, the topos religion transformed into a powerful category of difference, which is also relevant for educationsystems and settings. Religion as a tool to differentiate between subjects is linked with power and dominance and, thus,with ideas about the constructed identities of “the other”. With this respects, religion functions as a code to define in- andexclusions and mark “the other”, e.g. “the Muslim” in predominantly Christian societies in Europe. Critical theories on racismenable to recognize, describe and define these practices and their effects. They can provide a useful tool to question and challengeintercultural and interreligious educational approaches which potentially reproduce and, thus, strengthen cultural/religiousdifferentiations. DEUTSCH: Die Differenz- und Heterogenitätskategorie Religion hat sich in den letzten Jahren im europäischen und auch deutschsprachigenDiskursraum zu einer medial, wissenschaftlich und politisch wirkmächtigen Kategorie entwickelt. Dabei zeigt sich Religion sowohlals soziale Unterscheidungspraxis (auch in pädagogischen Arrangements, als auch als Mittel zur Identifikation und Charakterisierungbestimmter Gruppen und Individuen als religiöse Subjekte. Religion stellt in diesem Zusammenhang einen Zugehörigkeitscodedar, mit dem Personen als natio-ethno-kulturell Andere markiert werden, wie die Markierung von MuslimInnen durchAngehörige der mehrheitlich christlichen Dominanzgesellschaft zeigt. Rassismuskritische Ansätze ermöglichen es zumeist eherimplizit an Rassekonstruktionen anschließende Unterscheidungen zu erkennen und zu beschreiben, den Bedingungen ihres Wirksamwerdensnachzugehen sowie ihre Konsequenzen zu bestimmen. Eine rassismuskritische und migrationspädagogisch informierteReligionspädagogik ermöglicht AkteurInnen, weniger auf gewaltvolle Unterscheidungspraxen angewiesen zu sein undalternative Veränderungs- und Handlungsmöglichkeiten zu

  16. Construction of Gender in Serbian Folk Religion

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Ristivojević

    2016-01-01

    Review of the book by Lidija Radulović. Pol/rod i religija. Konstrukcija roda u narodnoj religiji Srba. [Sex/Gender and Religion. The Construction of Gender in Serbian Folk Religion]. 2009. Beograd: Srpski genealoški centar i Odeljenje za etnologiju i antropologiju Filozofskog fakulteta

  17. Indigenous religions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2009-01-01

    Dette essay diskuterer en publikation af James L. Cox med titlen From Primitive to Indigenous (2007). Bogen analyserer forskellige forfatteres holdninger til studiet af indfødte kulturers religioner. Cox's analyser tages op i dette essay og de problematiseres i forhold til mit eget arbejde....

  18. Whence Religion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Bidraget undersøger hvordan, hvornår og hvorfor religion er opstået. Med udgangspunkt i nyere neurologi, arkæologi og kognitiv religionsvidenskab kapitlet begrunder sin hypotese om at vi er intelligente aber som er meget følelsesladet, nemt forskrækket, meget overtroisk og ekstremt sensitiv til...

  19. Predicting Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the influence of liberal ideas on the capacity for Religious Education (RE) to consider religions critically in a climate of increasing government intervention in education. It finds that criticality in some areas of RE is absent or limited but that in key areas criticality is evident if not always deeply embedded. It…

  20. Predicting Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the influence of liberal ideas on the capacity for Religious Education (RE) to consider religions critically in a climate of increasing government intervention in education. It finds that criticality in some areas of RE is absent or limited but that in key areas criticality is evident if not always deeply embedded. It…

  1. Religion in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, I develop a theoretical framework for the discussion of religion i Scandinavian crime fiction where I consider theories of transgression and religion. Secondly, I run through five relatively popular examples of Scandinavian crime fiction to show how this genre trend works. Lastly, I...... connect this with what has been dubbed mediatized religion and a more general, philosophical explanation of why we see this development: The project of modernity is, as a result of cultural changes, at the moment transgressing its own epistemological boundaries opening up into what has been called...

  2. Rethinking the Space for Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What happens to people’s sense of belonging when globalization meets with proclaimed regional identities resting heavily on conceptions of religion and ethnicity? Who are the actors stressing cultural heritage and authenticity as tools for self-understanding? In Rethinking the Space for Religion....... The case studies exemplify how public intellectuals and academics have taken active part in the construction of recent and traditional pasts. Instead of repeating the simplistic explanation as a “return of religion”, the authors of this volume focus on public platforms and agents, and their use of religion...

  3. End-of-Life Practices in the Intensive Care Unit: The Importance of Geography, Religion, Religious Affiliation, and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, Marc; Sprung, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    End-of-life decisions are made daily in intensive care units worldwide. There are numerous factors affecting these decisions, including geographical location as well as religion and attitudes of caregivers, patients, and families. There is a spectrum of end-of-life care options from full continued care, withholding treatment, withdrawing treatment, and active life-ending procedures.

  4. Religion in American Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-07

    the way Daniel Goleman speaks of the "vital lies,,41 that comfort us even as they establish the structures within which we build our lives. Our faith...4. 37. Ibid, p 6. 38. Soelle, CHOOSING LIFE, p 40. * 39. Ibid, p 41. 40. Ibid, p 43. 41. Daniel Goleman , VITAL LIES t SIMPLE TRUIHS, (New York: Simon

  5. The religion of thinness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lelwica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the almost religious-like devotion of especially women in pursuing the goal of a thinner body. The quest for a slender body is analysed as a ‘cultural religion’, which the author calls the ‘Religion of Thinness’. The analysis revolves around four observations. The first is that for many women in the US today, the quest for a slender body serves what has historically been a ‘religious’ function: providing a sense of purpose that orients and gives meaning to their lives, especially in times of suffering and uncertainty. Second, this quest has many features in common with traditional religions, including beliefs, myths, rituals, moral codes, and sacred images—all of which encourage women to find ‘salvation’ (i.e., happiness and well-being through the pursuit of a ‘better’ (i.e., thinner body.Third, this secular faith draws so many adherents in large part because it appeals to and addresses what might be referred to as spiritual needs—including the need for a sense of purpose, inspiration, security, virtue, love, and well-being—even though it shortchanges these needs, and, in the long run, fails to deliver the salvation it promises. Fourth, a number of traditional religious ideas, paradigms and motifs tacit­ly inform and support the Religion of Thinness. More specifically, its soteri­ology resurrects and recycles the misogynist, anti-body, other-worldly, and exclusivist aspects of patriarchal religion. Ultimately, the analysis is not only critical of the Religion of Thinness; it also raises suspicions about any clear-cut divisions between ‘religion’, ‘culture’, and ‘the body’. In fact, examining the functions, features, and ideologies embedded in this secular devotion gives us insight into the constitutive role of the body in the production and apprehension of religious and cultural meanings.

  6. The supportive roles of religion and spirituality in end-of-life and palliative care of patients with cancer in a culturally diverse context: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sierra, Héctor E; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Jesús

    2015-03-01

    This is a literature review of the supportive roles of religion and spirituality (R/S) in end-of-life (EoL) and palliative care of patients with cancer in a culturally diverse context. This review examines 26 noteworthy articles published between August 2013 and August 2014 from five well supported databases. Current evidence shows that R/S evokes in patients the sources to find the necessary inner strengths, which includes perspective thinking, rituals for transcending immediate physical condition and modalities of coping with their oncological illnesses. R/S are not a monolithically experience for they always manifest themselves in diverse cultural settings. As such, R/S provide the individual and their families with a practical context and social memory, which includes traditions and social family practices for maintaining meaning and well-being. Nonetheless, although various dimensions of R/S show a link between cancer risk factors and well being in cancer patients, more specific dimensions of R/S need to be studied taking into account the individuals' particular religious and cultural contexts, so that R/S variables within that context can provide a greater integrative structure for understanding and to move the field forward. Behavioral, cognitive and psychosocial scientists have taken a more in-depth look at the claims made in the past, suggesting that a relationship between R/S, cultural diversity and health exists. Case in point are the studies on EoL care, which have progressively considered the role of cultural, religion and spiritual diversity in the care of patients with oncological terminal illnesses. Beyond these facts, this review also shows that EoL supportive and palliative care providers could further enhance their practical interventions by being sensitive and supportive of cultural diversity. http://links.lww.com/COSPC/A10

  7. Growth of Mixed-Sex and Monosex Nile Tilapia in Different Culture Systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Suman Bhusan; , Debasis Mazumdar; , Urmi Chatterji; , Samir Banerjee

    2011-01-01

    Growth of 17α-methyltestosterone treated monosex Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus was compared with hormone untreated mixed-sex fish in four different culture systems. The experiment had 2 X 4 factorial design: the first factor was presence or absence of hormone treatment (monosex and mixed-sex fish), the second factor was related to culture system (cistern, flow-through, pen and pond). Fish were cultured under similar feeding regime and stock...

  8. Religion in Chinese Education: From Denial to Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanbu, Hirotaka

    2008-01-01

    In China, from the founding of the People's Republic of China to the beginning of the Cultural Revolution, it was thought that religion would disappear with the development of society and the freedom not to believe in religion was stressed. During the Cultural Revolution religion became the object of oppression. However, from the end of the…

  9. Religion in Chinese Education: From Denial to Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanbu, Hirotaka

    2008-01-01

    In China, from the founding of the People's Republic of China to the beginning of the Cultural Revolution, it was thought that religion would disappear with the development of society and the freedom not to believe in religion was stressed. During the Cultural Revolution religion became the object of oppression. However, from the end of the…

  10. Diffused Religion and Prayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Cipriani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It is quite likely that the origins of prayer are to be found in ancient mourning and bereavement rites. Primeval ritual prayer was codified and handed down socially to become a deep-rooted feature of people’s cultural behavior, so much so, that it may surface again several years later, in the face of death, danger, need, even in the case of relapse from faith and religious practice. Modes of prayer depend on religious experience, on relations between personal prayer and political action, between prayer and forgiveness, and between prayer and approaches to religions. Various forms of prayer exist, from the covert-hidden to the overt-manifest kind. How can they be investigated? How can one, for instance, explore mental prayer? These issues regard the canon of diffused religion and, therefore, of diffused prayer.

  11. The role of cultural values and religion on views of body size and eating practices among adolescents from Fiji, Tonga, and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Waqa, Gade; Dev, Anjileena; Cama, Tilema; Swinburn, Boyd A

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated cultural values related to body image and eating practices in Western and non-Western societies. In total, 628 Fijian, 463 Indo-Fijian, 598 Tongan, and 534 Australian adolescents completed measures of cultural values and religious influences in relation to the ideal body and eating practices. Fijian and Tongan adolescents were more likely to value a large body. Religious influences were most strongly associated with eating practices for Fijians, Indo-Fijians, and Tongans. The findings support the role of religion in transmitting cultural values regarding eating practices in Pacific Island communities. What is already known on this subject? Previous research has demonstrated that sociocultural factors shape body image and eating behaviours. Most of this research has been conducted in Western countries. What does this study add? The current study identifies the role of cultural values and religious influences on body image and eating behaviours in a number of different cultural groups. This is the first study to use the same methodology to explore these relationships across Western and Pacific Island communities. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Getting Religion Right in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to culture-war rhetoric from the Right, there is more student religious expression and more study about religion in public schools today than at any time in the last 100 years. And contrary to dire warnings from the Left, much of the religion that goes to school these days arrives through the First Amendment door. Of course, this isn't to…

  13. Childhood Exposure to Religions With High Prevalence of Members Who Discourage Homosexuality Is Associated With Adult HIV Risk Behaviors and HIV Infection in Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, LaRon E; Wilton, Leo; Zhang, Nanhua; Regan, Rotrease; Thach, Chia T; Dyer, Typhanye V; Kushwaha, Sameer; Sanders, Rev Edwin C; Ndoye, Omar; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2016-01-12

    Exposure to childhood religious affiliations where the majority of members discourage homosexuality may have negative psychological impacts for Black men who have sex with men. This study tested the hypothesis that exposures to these environments during childhood were associated with adulthood human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infection (STI) behavioral risk and HIV infection, because these exposures influenced HIV/STI risk by undermining race/sexual identity congruence and increasing internalized homophobia and interpersonal anxiety. Structural equation modeling as well as logistic and Poisson regressions were performed using baseline data from HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 (N = 1,553). Childhood religion affiliations that were more discouraging of homosexuality were associated with increased likelihood of HIV infection; however, the association was no longer significant after adjusting for age, income, and education. Having a childhood religion affiliation with high prevalence of beliefs discouraging homosexuality was associated with increased numbers of sexual partners (adjusted odds ratio = 4.31; 95% confidence interval [3.76, 4.94], p < .01). The hypothesized path model was largely supported and accounted for 37% of the variance in HIV infection; however, interpersonal anxiety was not associated with HIV/STI risk behaviors. Structural interventions are needed that focus on developing affirming theologies in religious institutions with Black men who have sex with men congregants.

  14. Reporting of sex as a variable in cardiovascular studies using cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal complement, including that provided by the sex chromosomes, influences expression of proteins and molecular signaling in every cell. However, less than 50% of the scientific studies published in 2009 using experimental animals reported sex as a biological variable. Because every cell has a sex, we conducted a literature review to determine the extent to which sex is reported as a variable in cardiovascular studies on cultured cells. Methods Articles from 10 cardiovascular journals with high impact factors (Circulation, J Am Coll Cardiol, Eur Heart J, Circ Res, Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol, Cardiovasc Res, J Mol Cell Cardiol, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, J Heart Lung Transplant and J Cardiovasc Pharmacol and published in 2010 were searched using terms 'cultured' and 'cells' in any order to determine if the sex of those cells was reported. Studies using established cell lines were excluded. Results Using two separate search strategies, we found that only 25 of 90 articles (28% and 20 of 101 articles (19.8% reported the sex of cells. Of those reporting the sex of cells, most (68.9%; n = 31 used only male cells and none used exclusively female cells. In studies reporting the sex of cells of cardiovascular origin, 40% used vascular smooth-muscle cells, and 30% used stem/progenitor cells. In studies using cells of human origin, 35% did not report the sex of those cells. None of the studies using neonatal cardiac myocytes reported the sex of those cells. Conclusions The complement of sex chromosomes in cells studied in culture has the potential to affect expression of proteins and 'mechanistic' signaling pathways. Therefore, consistent with scientific excellence, editorial policies should require reporting sex of cells used in in vitro experiments.

  15. The role of sex guilt in the relationship between culture and women's sexual desire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jane S T; Brotto, Lori A; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2011-04-01

    A large body of literature demonstrates that East Asian women report lower sexual desire than Caucasian women. Although most studies have explained these differences by referring to general culture-linked differences in sexual conservatism, none have examined the potential role of specific constructs such as sex guilt. The goals of the current study were to examine the supposition that sexual conservatism mediates the relationship between culture and sexual desire, and to explore the potential mediating role of sex guilt in the link between culture and sexual desire. Caucasian (n = 105) and East Asian (n = 137) female university students completed questionnaires online. Caucasian women reported significantly higher levels of sexual desire, significantly lower levels of sexual conservatism, and significantly less sex guilt. In the entire sample, sexual conservatism and sex guilt separately mediated the relationship between ethnicity and sexual desire such that women with more sex guilt and those who were more sexually conservative reported lower sexual desire. Among the East Asian women, sex guilt, but not sexual conservatism, mediated the relationship between mainstream acculturation (degree of westernization) and sexual desire such that women with more sex guilt reported lower sexual desire. These findings suggest that sex guilt may be one mechanism by which ethnic groups differ in sexual desire.

  16. Sex, religion, and the single woman c.1950-75: the importance of a 'short' sexual revolution to the English religious crisis of the sixties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Callum G

    2011-01-01

    The English 'sexual revolution' has recently become increasingly conceived as 'long', lasting many decades, and by some historians as a gradual phenomenon, but reaching a peak with the introduction of the oral contraceptive pill in the 1960s. At the same time, the 'religious crisis' of the same decade has been attributed by some recent scholarship to liberal Christian revolt within the churches, and largely unconnected with sex. This article offers different views. First, based on the illegitimacy rate, it argues that, after a period of decline, restraint, and only minor change in the period 1946-59, the 1960s witnessed a sudden growth in pre-marital heterosexual intercourse before the pill's availability to single women, implying a cultural rather than a technological cause. Second, based on contemporary social surveys, it argues that there is clear evidence of a strong inverse correlation between levels of religious activity and levels of pre-marital sexual intercourse. Third, it argues that in the 1950s the dominant conservative Christian culture restrained single women from pre-marital sexual intercourse, but that from the early 1960s changing attitudes led to rising levels of sexual activity, led by single women, which reduced religious attitudes and Christian churchgoing, thus constituting a significant instigator of the religious crisis.

  17. The mediatization of public sex cultures in the case of the hook-up app Grindr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian Møller

    . This paper focuses on the interplay between media and public sex cultures in the case of the Grindr app use in gay male intimacy cultures. Though gay men’s sex practices, vis-à-vis cruising, have historically been thoroughly mobile and mediated, the Internet has brought about new ways of accessing...... and becoming visible in such cultures (Hollister, 2002). Making oneself visible to the right public (and as importantly invisible to others), now occurs in relation to the affordance structure that apps like Grindr offer. The paper asks to what extend different gay, public sex cultures are shaped by Grindr...... and Social Sciences, 1149–A. Jansson, A. (2013). Mediatization and social space: Reconstructing mediatization for the transmedia age. Communication Theory, 23, 279–296. Jansson, A. (2015). The molding of mediatization: The stratified indispensability of media in close relationships. Communications, 40...

  18. The Context of Workplace Sex Discrimination: Sex Composition, Workplace Culture and Relative Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, Kevin; Ratliff, Thomas N.; Roscigno, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    Building on prior work surrounding negative work-related experiences, such as workplace bullying and sexual harassment, we examine the extent to which organizational context is meaningful for the subjective experience of sex discrimination. Data draw on the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, which provides a key indicator of…

  19. The Context of Workplace Sex Discrimination: Sex Composition, Workplace Culture and Relative Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, Kevin; Ratliff, Thomas N.; Roscigno, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    Building on prior work surrounding negative work-related experiences, such as workplace bullying and sexual harassment, we examine the extent to which organizational context is meaningful for the subjective experience of sex discrimination. Data draw on the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, which provides a key indicator of…

  20. WHAT IS RELIGION ? AN AFRICAN UNDERSTANDING

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-24

    Oct 24, 2009 ... Original Research. A rtic le #. 3 .... that different cultural-religious groups understand religion differently. ... the divine. This interpretation of reality is already an indication ...... Animism creates the idea of a second, virtual, plane.

  1. Las religiones y culturas de origen africano (Brasil, Cuba, Venezuela a prueba de políticas turísticas y rivalidades ¿ Un desarrollo sostenible ? Religions and cultures of African origin (Brazil, Cuba, Venezuela to test tourism policies and rivalries. A sustainable development? Religions et cultures d'origine africaine (Brésil, Cuba, Venezuela à l'épreuve des politiques touristiques et des rivalités. Un développement soutenable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Fitó

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Les religions1 d’origine africaine ont été transformées, au Brésil, à Cuba et plus récemment au Venezuela, en instruments pour augmenter la captation de devises, par le biais de programmes présentés par les autorités comme répondant aux normes du développement durable. Mais, tant le contrôle exercé sur ces manifestations culturelles, à des fins de commercialisation, que les rivalités engendrées entre pays, ou entre villes dans certains cas, mènent à une aliénation des acteurs de leur propre culture (après Guillermo Bonfill, contredisant la définition même de “développement durable”.The religions of African origin have been taken in Brazil, in Cuba and more recently in Venezuela as instruments to increase the inflow of currency, in tourism development programs presented by the authorities as sustainable. But the control exercised on them by the State organizations, with marketing purposes, as well as the rivalries between countries, as well as between cities of the same country in some cases, carry an alienation of the culture (according to Guillermo Bonfill's theory of cultural control, questioning the possibility of a balanced development, that is to say a sustainable development.Las religiones de origen africano han sido tomadas en Brasil, en Cuba y más recientemente en Venezuela como instrumento para incrementar la entrada de divisas, en programas de desarrollo del turismo presentados por las autoridades como sostenibles. Pero, tanto el control ejercido sobre ellas por los organismos oficiales, con fines de comercialización, como las rivalidades entre paises, así como en algún caso, entre ciudades de un mismo país, conllevan una enajenación de la cultura (según la teoría del control cultural de Guillermo Bonfill, cuestionando la posibilidad de un desarrollo equilibrado, es decir sostenible.

  2. Gender, Culture, and Sex-Typed Cognitive Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, David

    2012-01-01

    Although gender differences in cognitive abilities are frequently reported, the magnitude of these differences and whether they hold practical significance in the educational outcomes of boys and girls is highly debated. Furthermore, when gender gaps in reading, mathematics and science literacy are reported they are often attributed to innate, biological differences rather than social and cultural factors. Cross-cultural evidence may contribute to this debate, and this study reports national gender differences in reading, mathematics and science literacy from 65 nations participating in the 2009 round of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Consistently across all nations, girls outperform boys in reading literacy, d = −.44. Boys outperform girls in mathematics in the USA, d = .22 and across OECD nations, d = .13. For science literacy, while the USA showed the largest gender difference across all OECD nations, d = .14, gender differences across OECD nations were non-significant, and a small female advantage was found for non-OECD nations, d = −.09. Across all three domains, these differences were more pronounced at both tails of the distribution for low- and high-achievers. Considerable cross-cultural variability was also observed, and national gender differences were correlated with gender equity measures, economic prosperity, and Hofstede’s cultural dimension of power distance. Educational and societal implications of such gender gaps are addressed, as well as the mechanisms by which gender differences in cognitive abilities are culturally mediated. PMID:22808072

  3. Gender, culture, and sex-typed cognitive abilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Reilly

    Full Text Available Although gender differences in cognitive abilities are frequently reported, the magnitude of these differences and whether they hold practical significance in the educational outcomes of boys and girls is highly debated. Furthermore, when gender gaps in reading, mathematics and science literacy are reported they are often attributed to innate, biological differences rather than social and cultural factors. Cross-cultural evidence may contribute to this debate, and this study reports national gender differences in reading, mathematics and science literacy from 65 nations participating in the 2009 round of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA. Consistently across all nations, girls outperform boys in reading literacy, d = -.44. Boys outperform girls in mathematics in the USA, d = .22 and across OECD nations, d = .13. For science literacy, while the USA showed the largest gender difference across all OECD nations, d = .14, gender differences across OECD nations were non-significant, and a small female advantage was found for non-OECD nations, d = -.09. Across all three domains, these differences were more pronounced at both tails of the distribution for low- and high-achievers. Considerable cross-cultural variability was also observed, and national gender differences were correlated with gender equity measures, economic prosperity, and Hofstede's cultural dimension of power distance. Educational and societal implications of such gender gaps are addressed, as well as the mechanisms by which gender differences in cognitive abilities are culturally mediated.

  4. Gender, culture, and sex-typed cognitive abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, David

    2012-01-01

    Although gender differences in cognitive abilities are frequently reported, the magnitude of these differences and whether they hold practical significance in the educational outcomes of boys and girls is highly debated. Furthermore, when gender gaps in reading, mathematics and science literacy are reported they are often attributed to innate, biological differences rather than social and cultural factors. Cross-cultural evidence may contribute to this debate, and this study reports national gender differences in reading, mathematics and science literacy from 65 nations participating in the 2009 round of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Consistently across all nations, girls outperform boys in reading literacy, d = -.44. Boys outperform girls in mathematics in the USA, d = .22 and across OECD nations, d = .13. For science literacy, while the USA showed the largest gender difference across all OECD nations, d = .14, gender differences across OECD nations were non-significant, and a small female advantage was found for non-OECD nations, d = -.09. Across all three domains, these differences were more pronounced at both tails of the distribution for low- and high-achievers. Considerable cross-cultural variability was also observed, and national gender differences were correlated with gender equity measures, economic prosperity, and Hofstede's cultural dimension of power distance. Educational and societal implications of such gender gaps are addressed, as well as the mechanisms by which gender differences in cognitive abilities are culturally mediated.

  5. Cultural consensus modeling to measure transactional sex in Swaziland: Scale building and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding-Miller, Rebecca; Dunkle, Kristin L; Cooper, Hannah L F; Windle, Michael; Hadley, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Transactional sex is associated with increased risk of HIV and gender based violence in southern Africa and around the world. However the typical quantitative operationalization, "the exchange of gifts or money for sex," can be at odds with a wide array of relationship types and motivations described in qualitative explorations. To build on the strengths of both qualitative and quantitative research streams, we used cultural consensus models to identify distinct models of transactional sex in Swaziland. The process allowed us to build and validate emic scales of transactional sex, while identifying key informants for qualitative interviews within each model to contextualize women's experiences and risk perceptions. We used logistic and multinomial logistic regression models to measure associations with condom use and social status outcomes. Fieldwork was conducted between November 2013 and December 2014 in the Hhohho and Manzini regions. We identified three distinct models of transactional sex in Swaziland based on 124 Swazi women's emic valuation of what they hoped to receive in exchange for sex with their partners. In a clinic-based survey (n = 406), consensus model scales were more sensitive to condom use than the etic definition. Model consonance had distinct effects on social status for the three different models. Transactional sex is better measured as an emic spectrum of expectations within a relationship, rather than an etic binary relationship type. Cultural consensus models allowed us to blend qualitative and quantitative approaches to create an emicly valid quantitative scale grounded in qualitative context.

  6. Culturally Sensitive Best Practices for Sex Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Santiago, Verenice; Hund, Alycia M.

    2012-01-01

    Learning about sexuality is a lifelong process that begins in childhood and continues through the lifespan. Through family and peer interactions and media sources, youth learn about sexuality and relationships, and develop their own values. The learning process and trajectory, however, may differ among youth from diverse cultures. In fact,…

  7. Sex Dilemmas, Amazons and Cyborgs: Feminist Cultural Studies and Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Tolvhed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss sport and physical activities as a field of empirical investi-gation for feminist cultural studies with a potential to contribute to theorizing the body, gender and difference. Sport has, historically, served to legitimize and rein-force the gender dichotomy by making men “masculine” through developing phys-ical strength and endurance, while women generally have been excluded or di-rected towards activities fostering a “feminine suppleness”. The recent case of runner Caster Semenya, who was subjected to extensive gender tests, demon-strates how athletic superiority and “masculine” attributes in women still today stir public emotions and evoke cultural anxieties of gender blurring. But the rigid gen-der boundaries have also made sport a field of transgressions. From the “Soviet amazon” of the Cold War, transgressions in sport have publicly demonstrated, but also pushed, the boundaries of cultural understandings of gender. Gender verifica-tion tests have exposed a continuum of bodies that cannot easily be arranged into two stable, separate gender categories.In spite of the so called “corporeal turn”, sport is still rather neglected within cultural studies and feminist research. This appears to be linked to a degradation, and fear, of the body and of the risk that women – once again – be reduced to biology and physical capacity. But studies of sport might further develop under-standings of the processes through which embodied knowledge and subjectivity is produced, in a way that overcomes the split between corporeality and discursive regimes or representations. Furthermore, with the fitness upsurge since the 1980s, the athletic female body has emerged as a cultural ideal and a rare validation of “female masculinity” (Halberstam in popular culture. This is an area well-suited for “third wave” feminist cultural studies that are at ease with complexities and contradictions: the practices and

  8. Religion, morality, evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Paul

    2012-01-01

    How did religion evolve? What effect does religion have on our moral beliefs and moral actions? These questions are related, as some scholars propose that religion has evolved to enhance altruistic behavior toward members of one's group. I review here data from survey studies (both within and across countries), priming experiments, and correlational studies of the effects of religion on racial prejudice. I conclude that religion has powerfully good moral effects and powerfully bad moral effects, but these are due to aspects of religion that are shared by other human practices. There is surprisingly little evidence for a moral effect of specifically religious beliefs.

  9. Methodological remarks on studying prehistoric Greek religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Pakkanen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodological approach to the study of Greek religion of the period which lacks written documents, i.e. prehistory. The assumptions and interpretations of religion of that time have to be based on archaeological material. How do we define religion and cultic activity on the basis of primary archaeological material from this period, and which are the methodological tools for this difficult task? By asking questions on the nature and definition of religion and culture scholars of religion have provided us with some methodological apparatus to approach religion of the past in general, but there are models developed by archaeologists as well. Critical combination of these methodological tools leads to the best possible result. Archaeology studies the material culture of the past. History of religion studies the spiritual culture of the past. In the background the two have important theoretical and even philosophical speculations since they both deal with meanings (of things or practices and with interpretation.

  10. The religion under the rule of aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto da Silva Moreira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the modern process of aestheticization of culture and religion as consequent unfolding of the expansion of market rationality to the subjective life and the libidinal sphere of subjects. Its main objective is to inquire about the future of religion under the impact of sensation seeking culture and the inflation of aesthetics. Firstly, with the help of Türcke, Welsch, Foucault and Schultze´s investigate the aestheticization process of of social life, its causes and characteristics; Secondly, following Dufour, Türcke Leiss, Kline, Jhally e Welsch, it asks how the dynamics of aesthetical impacts the daily life and the bio-psychic economy of people; thirdly, it applies the results obtained to the analysis of what is happening with religion under the regime of aesthetics and sensational culture. Finally, it asks about the possible emancipatory potential of aestheticized own religious experience and tries to draw some further consequences for religion in the aesthetic field.

  11. Religion and bioethics: toward an expanded understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Howard; Macdonald, Arlene

    2013-04-01

    Before asking what U.S. bioethics might learn from a more comprehensive and more nuanced understanding of Islamic religion, history, and culture, a prior question is, how should bioethics think about religion? Two sets of commonly held assumptions impede further progress and insight. The first involves what "religion" means and how one should study it. The second is a prominent philosophical view of the role of religion in a diverse, democratic society. To move beyond these assumptions, it helps to view religion as lived experience as well as a body of doctrine and to see that religious differences and controversies should be welcomed in the public square of a diverse democratic society rather than merely tolerated.

  12. Religion and Suicide Risk: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ryan E; Oquendo, Maria A; Stanley, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Although religion is reported to be protective against suicide, the empirical evidence is inconsistent. Research is complicated by the fact that there are many dimensions to religion (affiliation, participation, doctrine) and suicide (ideation, attempt, completion). We systematically reviewed the literature on religion and suicide over the last 10 years (89 articles) with a goal of identifying what specific dimensions of religion are associated with specific aspects of suicide. We found that religious affiliation does not necessarily protect against suicidal ideation, but does protect against suicide attempts. Whether religious affiliation protects against suicide attempts may depend on the culture-specific implications of affiliating with a particular religion, since minority religious groups can feel socially isolated. After adjusting for social support measures, religious service attendance is not especially protective against suicidal ideation, but does protect against suicide attempts, and possibly protects against suicide. Future qualitative studies might further clarify these associations.

  13. RELIGION IN FREUD’S APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukrimin Mukrimin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aimed to examine the essence of religion by using Sigmund Freud’ psychoanalysis. It looks at the Freud’s theories: “the ontogenic” and “the phylogenenic”. The origins of religious and belief traditions, as Freud had mapped, are neurosis, precarious future, and religion’s masculine roots. Freud’s realist approach on religion brought a controversy on the study of religion, i.e., by associating his patients and order cultural phenomena (art, literature, and philosophy. His falsification over religion mad Freud as the most controversial man in his time. For Freud, the truth-value of religious doctrines does not lie within the scope of the present enquiry. It is enough for us, as Freud asserts that we have recognized them as being, in their psychological nature, illusions. Key Words: religion, Freud, philosophy, psycho-analysis.

  14. New Religions and Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen er en antologi af bidrag fra en konference under Research Network on New Religions (RENNER). Med bidrag fra specialister i nye religioner og globalisering fra hele verden introduceres empiriske resultater samt teoretiske og metodiske reflektioner over emnet....

  15. Religion as Belief versus Religion as Fact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutch, Steven I.

    2002-01-01

    Makes the case that religions perceive their doctrines not as opinions or subjective personal preferences, but as demonstrable facts, supported by historical documentation, experience, observation, and logical inference. Asserts that when scientists deal with issues like creationism, the widespread failure to understand how religions regard their…

  16. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions…

  17. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach…

  18. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach…

  19. Religion and cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2008-01-01

    This is an introductory article in a special issue of a bulletin for researchers and teachers in religion in the USA. The article sketches the main positions and recent trends in the cognitive science of religion, and it attempts to attract scholars of religion to this field. It also profiles...

  20. Danish Regulation of Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lisbet; Vinding, Niels-Valdemar

    Presentation and analysis of current and upcoming conflicts in relations between religion and family; labour market; religion in the public sphere and state support to religion. Part of a comparative European analysis in the context of www.religareproject.eu. based on 18 Danish elite interviews...

  1. Sex Education and Cultural Values: Experiences and Attitudes of Latina Immigrant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Maria Elena; Concha, Maritza

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims to further explore the role that culture plays in the provision and assimilation of sex education among Latina immigrants in the USA. To accomplish this, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with 30 women from Central and South America who have lived in the USA for at least five years. Participants were asked to reflect…

  2. Cultural Influence on Pupils' Understanding of Conception, Birth of Twins and Sex Determination in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keraro, Fred N.; Okere, Mark I. O.; Anditi, Zephania O.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which primary and secondary school pupils believe in cultural interpretations of the biological concepts of conception, birth of twins and sex determination and the influence of education level and gender. Cross-sectional survey research design was used. The target population was Standard Seven (7th grade in…

  3. Sex Education and Cultural Values: Experiences and Attitudes of Latina Immigrant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Maria Elena; Concha, Maritza

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims to further explore the role that culture plays in the provision and assimilation of sex education among Latina immigrants in the USA. To accomplish this, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with 30 women from Central and South America who have lived in the USA for at least five years. Participants were asked to reflect…

  4. Pedagogical Transformations of "Religion" into "Culture" in Danish State Mass Schooling from the 1900s to the 1930s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Particularly after the Danish political system changed to parliamentarism in 1901, a growing interest in, and expanded meaning of, culture as a pedagogical category developed in relation to state schooling, on the road to a comprehensive school system for "the whole population". This article elaborates on the role played by theological…

  5. The appropriation of a religion: The case of Zoroastrianism in contemporary Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Stausberg, Michael; Tessmann, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This paper distinguishes between the (ontological) creation, (historical) emergence and (legal) ‘making’ of religion. Many religions claim plausibility by invoking long chains of (invented) traditions, while some post-modern religions positively affirm their invented character. The case of Zoroastrianism in contemporary Russia is discussed as an example of a cross-cultural ‘appropriation’ of religion, rather than a transfer of an extant religion through, for example, migration. This means tha...

  6. Probing into the Meaning of Peace in African Traditional Religion and Culture%非洲传统宗教文化中的和平含义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    [意大利]高德弗利·伊格韦布伊克·欧纳斯

    2012-01-01

    This paper intends to examine the meaning of peace in African tradi-tional religion (ATR) and culture, The essential features of ATR under three head- ings, which may be regarded as the three principal dimensions of religion: belief, worship and morality. Considering Africa as a whole, the main objects of traditional religious belief are: God, the divinities, spirits and the ancestors. Religion for the Africans embraces life as a whole and worship touches every aspect of their lives and this is done through sacrifices, offerings, prayers, invocation, praises, music and dance. The practical aspect of belief in ATR is not only worship but also human con- duct. Belief in God and in the other spiritual beings implies a certain type of con- duct, conduct that respects the order established by God and watched over by the divinities and the ancestors. So the social morality is based on these. Two things can therefore be said of the traditional world - view of the Africans, namely, that it is permeated by the spirit and that it is anthropocentric. In traditional African societies, peace is not an abstract poetic concept, but rather a down -to -earth and practical concept. In ATR peace is conceived not in relation to conflict and war, but in rela- tion to order, harmony and equilibrium. It is a religious value in that the order, har- mony and equilibrium in the universe and society is believed to be divinely estab- lished and the obligation to maintain them is religious. It is also a moral value since good conduct is required of human beings if the order, harmony and equilibrium are to be maintained. Finally, by way of conclusion possibility of world peace from the perspective o f we shall take a forward look at the ATR.%非洲传统宗教的基本特征体现在信仰、崇拜、道德和世界观四方面。就非洲整体而言,传统宗教信仰的主要对象是上帝、神、精灵和祖先;崇拜涉及生活的各个方面,通过献祭、供品、祷告、乞

  7. The Woman in the Contemporary Arab World in Norma Khouri’s Forbidden Love: Perceived by Culture or Religion?

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Many women in the Arab world are facing cultural challenges against society, that are considered as gender inequalities. Whether the woman is a young girl, wife and mother, the man is considered superior than her in some cases. This dissertation studies the main issues of the contemporary Arab woman as well as the main reasons behind Arab and society's guidance. In this case, is the contemporary Arab woman conducted by a true follow of Islamic values or is it just a matter of ...

  8. Religion and unforgivable offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam B; Malka, Ariel; Rozin, Paul; Cherfas, Lina

    2006-02-01

    The value of forgiveness is emphasized in many religions, but little is known about how members of distinct religious cultures differ in their views of forgiveness. We hypothesized and found that Jews would agree more than Protestants that certain offenses are unforgivable and that religious commitment would be more negatively correlated with belief in unforgivable offenses among Protestants than among Jews (Studies 1 and 2). Dispositional forgiveness tendencies did not explain these effects (Studies 1 and 2). In Study 3, Jews were more inclined than Protestants to endorse theologically derived reasons for unforgivable offenses (i.e., some offenses are too severe to forgive, only victims have the right to forgive, and forgiveness requires repentance by the perpetrator). Differential endorsement of these reasons for nonforgiveness fully mediated Jew-Protestant differences in forgiveness of a plagiarism offense and a Holocaust offense.

  9. Clients' Willingness to Incorporate Religion or Spirituality in Counseling: A Brief Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2013-01-01

    A total of 84 individuals with addiction issues (e.g., drugs, sex, weight, food, and codependency) were asked about their willingness to incorporate religion or spirituality in their counseling. These respondents expressed willingness to deal with religion or spirituality in counseling if the counselor was knowledgeable about their religion or…

  10. Clients' Willingness to Incorporate Religion or Spirituality in Counseling: A Brief Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2013-01-01

    A total of 84 individuals with addiction issues (e.g., drugs, sex, weight, food, and codependency) were asked about their willingness to incorporate religion or spirituality in their counseling. These respondents expressed willingness to deal with religion or spirituality in counseling if the counselor was knowledgeable about their religion or…

  11. Cracking the Mystery of Sex Culture in West China%破解西部性文化之谜

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The material production and the production of mankind itself in human society are the 2major pillars of social development. The latter is completed through the intercourse between both sexes. We have published the special topic of Cracking the Mystery of Sex Culture in West China in this issue in an attempt to remind people to smash the shackles of the age-old feadal ideas and to gain a correct understanding of the rich connotation of sex culture and warn them not only to pay attention to sex hygiene, sex science, to strictly guard against the spread of venereal disease and AIDS and but also to follow the principle of acquiring delight from sex and to facilitate the stability and prosperity of the society and family in West China so that sex science will shine with rays beneficial to the physical and mental health of people.

  12. Algumas notas sobre religião e cultura de consumo (Some notes on religion and consumer culture - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n17p146

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léa Freitas Perez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O texto trata do lugar da religião na sociedade contemporânea a partir da reflexão sobre as relações entre o sagrado e a cultura do consumo, campo pleno de atualidade e que remete ao clássico tema das relações entre religião e modernidade. Parte da constatação da existência, na sociedade contemporânea, de uma ampla e variada plêiade de expressões/modulações religiosas e, na companhia de Featherstone, de Derrida e de Vattimo, entre outros, questiona a doxa corrente sobre religião, propondo outra via de entendimento do sagrado na contemporaneidade, segundo a qual o sagrado, em plena sintonia com o espírito da época, possibilita experiências lúdicas, hedonistas e hibridizantes, pois que se acomoda ao mercado de consumo, ao lado de outros complexos significativos. Conclui com a ideia de que a religião continua a atuar sobre a vida, a ser fonte de sentido e de experiência, mas não necessariamente sob a forma exclusiva da religião institucional e tradicional, indicando a necessidade de, num plano eminentemente conceitual - para que compreendamos de um modo mais acurado e aprofundado a cultura contemporânea e o lugar que nela cabe à religião -, repensar nossas definições usuais de cultura e de religião, considerando sua ancoragem epistêmica. Palavras-chave: Religião; Cultura de consumo; Sagrado; Contemporaneidade; Pós-modernidade; Episteme   Abstract The text deals with the role of religion in contemporary society from the reflection of the relationship between the sacred and the consumer culture, a current field that refers to the classic theme of the relationship between religion and modernity. It starts with the verification of the existence in contemporary society of a diverse and broad constellation of religious expressions/modulations, from which, and in the company of Featherstone, of Derrida and Vattimo, among others, it questions the current understanding about religion, suggesting another route to

  13. Culture, social networks and HIV vulnerability among men who have sex with men in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauk, Nelsensius Klau; Merry, Maria Silvia; Sigilipoe, Mitra Andhini; Putra, Sukma; Mwanri, Lillian

    2017-01-01

    The current study aimed to explore cultural and social network influence on HIV vulnerability among Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) population in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. A qualitative inquiry employing in-depth one-on-one interviews was carried out with 24 MSM participants in July 2015. Data were analysed using a framework analysis and guided by the Social Networks Theory (SNT) as a conceptual framework. Findings indicated that prohibitive cultural perspectives and norms against same-sex marriage made them to conceal their sexual orientation and thus secretively engaging in unprotected sex that increased their predisposition to HIV transmission. The prohibitive cultures were also instrumental in the formation of MSM sexual networks that provided supportive environment for HIV-risky sexual practices among network partners. These findings provide information that can be used to improve HIV/AIDS service practices and policies. However, further studies with large numbers of MSM would be needed to improve the understanding of other HIV vulnerability determinants, the unique needs of MSM, and what and how programs could be conducted to reduce HIV vulnerability among MSM population.

  14. Sex determination of Joseon people skeletons based on anatomical, cultural and molecular biological clues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Suk; Oh, Chang Seok; Lee, Sang Jun; Park, Jun Bum; Kim, Myeung Ju; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2011-12-20

    Sex determination is very integral to examinations conducted by anatomists on human skeletons discovered in the archaeological field. In Korea, as in other countries, cultural or anatomical information has been the tool of first resort in making such determinations. In cases in which anatomical examination has revealed only borderline characteristics, PCR-based analysis of X/Y-chromosome genes has been employed. Even so, there are as yet very few reports on how accurately the respective results correspond with each other. In this study on 34 examined medieval Korean skeletons, 11 (32.3%) showed perfectly matching results for the three methods of sex determination. In the cases in which the cultural and anatomical findings were discordant, the amelogenin assay corroborated either the former or the latter. Although we must admit the relatively limited role of aDNA analysis, when only very small amounts of amplifiable DNA remain, we believe that the amelogenin assay can be very meaningful to Korean anatomists when employed in adjunct to conventional anatomically or culturally based sex determination.

  15. An Analysis on the Developed and Changed Processes of Buyi People Primitive Religion Cultural Psychology%布依族原始宗教信仰文化心理的发展变迁过程分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭建兵; 韦磐石

    2012-01-01

    布依族信仰多神。随着历史发展过程的演进,布依族原始宗教信仰在聚落纵向变迁的同时,接纳了其他民族、其他地域文化和外来宗教的元素,经历了由感性认识到理性认识、由生存式精神需要到娱乐式精神需要、由单纯信仰本民族神灵到接纳其他民族神灵从而丰富神灵系统的过程。%Buyi people beliefed many gods.With social history deleloping, Buyi People primitive religion developed and changed not only in the settlements,but also assimilating the elements of other nations, other regional culture and foreign religions. Buyi People primitive religion experienced from perceptual knowledge to rational knowledge,from survival spirital needs to recreational spirital needs,from only beliefing its own national gods to accepting other national gods.

  16. Religion til Hverdag

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthe Refslund

    2006-01-01

    Live rollespil er ikke religion men rollespillet bruges ofte hvor man ellers ville bruge religionens univers fx til mytologisering og ritualisering Udgivelsesdato: september......Live rollespil er ikke religion men rollespillet bruges ofte hvor man ellers ville bruge religionens univers fx til mytologisering og ritualisering Udgivelsesdato: september...

  17. Art and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century's interest in "art for art's sake," many thinkers have argued that art would supplant traditional religion as the spiritual locus of the increasingly secular society of Western modernity. If art can capture the sort of spirituality, idealism, and expressive community of traditional religions but without being ensnared…

  18. Om religion og evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2011-01-01

    , hvad man kan kalde en 'proto-religion'. Den art, som sandsynligvis har besiddet disse træk, er Homo erectus; men der kan have været ansatser til denne proto-religion endnu tidligere. Artiklen afsluttes med en diskussion af de mest kendte teorier og hypoteser, der har forsøgt at forklare, hvorfor...

  19. Suicide and religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Christopher C H

    2014-01-01

    Much of the evidence that religion provides a protective factor against completed suicide comes from cross-sectional studies. This issue of the Journal includes a report of a new prospective study. An understanding of the relationship between spirituality, religion and suicide is important in assessing and caring for those at risk.

  20. Religion 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, René Dybdal

    17 artikler som hver især fremviser og diskuterer aktuelle temaer i forhold til religion i Danmark i dag......17 artikler som hver især fremviser og diskuterer aktuelle temaer i forhold til religion i Danmark i dag...

  1. Ancient Greek Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albinus, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Oversigtskapitel til indføring i græsk religion, opdatering af forskningen inden for området.......Oversigtskapitel til indføring i græsk religion, opdatering af forskningen inden for området....

  2. Art and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century's interest in "art for art's sake," many thinkers have argued that art would supplant traditional religion as the spiritual locus of the increasingly secular society of Western modernity. If art can capture the sort of spirituality, idealism, and expressive community of traditional religions but without being ensnared…

  3. Overview of religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Nicky

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of 9 religions: Christianity, Judaism, Jehovah's Witnesses, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Christian Science, Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism. Basic information on the origins, language, naming practices, diet, personal hygiene, and dress requirements is provided. For additional information, Web sites for each of these religions are also provided.

  4. The emergence of sex differences in personality traits in early adolescence: A cross-sectional, cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bolle, Marleen; De Fruyt, Filip; McCrae, Robert R; Löckenhoff, Corinna E; Costa, Paul T; Aguilar-Vafaie, Maria E; Ahn, Chang-kyu; Ahn, Hyun-nie; Alcalay, Lidia; Allik, Jüri; Avdeyeva, Tatyana V; Bratko, Denis; Brunner-Sciarra, Marina; Cain, Thomas R; Chan, Wayne; Chittcharat, Niyada; Crawford, Jarret T; Fehr, Ryan; Ficková, Emília; Gelfand, Michele J; Graf, Sylvie; Gülgöz, Sami; Hřebíčková, Martina; Jussim, Lee; Klinkosz, Waldemar; Knežević, Goran; Leibovich de Figueroa, Nora; Lima, Margarida P; Martin, Thomas A; Marušić, Iris; Mastor, Khairul Anwar; Nakazato, Katsuharu; Nansubuga, Florence; Porrata, Jose; Purić, Danka; Realo, Anu; Reátegui, Norma; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Schmidt, Vanina; Sekowski, Andrzej; Shakespeare-Finch, Jane; Shimonaka, Yoshiko; Simonetti, Franco; Siuta, Jerzy; Szmigielska, Barbara; Vanno, Vitanya; Wang, Lei; Yik, Michelle; Terracciano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Although large international studies have found consistent patterns of sex differences in personality traits among adults (i.e., women scoring higher on most facets), less is known about cross-cultural sex differences in adolescent personality and the role of culture and age in shaping them. The present study examines the NEO Personality Inventory-3 (McCrae, Costa, & Martin, 2005) informant ratings of adolescents from 23 cultures (N = 4,850), and investigates culture and age as sources of variability in sex differences of adolescents' personality. The effect for Neuroticism (with females scoring higher than males) begins to take on its adult form around age 14. Girls score higher on Openness to Experience and Conscientiousness at all ages between 12 and 17 years. A more complex pattern emerges for Extraversion and Agreeableness, although by age 17, sex differences for these traits are highly similar to those observed in adulthood. Cross-sectional data suggest that (a) with advancing age, sex differences found in adolescents increasingly converge toward adult patterns with respect to both direction and magnitude; (b) girls display sex-typed personality traits at an earlier age than boys; and (c) the emergence of sex differences was similar across cultures. Practical implications of the present findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Male facial attractiveness and masculinity may provide sex- and culture-independent cues to semen quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, C; Kekäläinen, J; Núñez, M; Sancho, M; Álvarez, J G; Núñez, J; Yaber, I; Gutiérrez, R

    2014-09-01

    Phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis (PLFH) predicts that male secondary sexual traits reveal honest information about male fertilization ability. However, PLFH has rarely been studied in humans. The aim of the present study was to test PLFH in humans and to investigate whether potential ability to select fertile partners is independent of sex or cultural background. We found that on the contrary to the hypothesis, facial masculinity was negatively associated with semen quality. As increased levels of testosterone have been demonstrated to impair sperm production, this finding may indicate a trade-off between investments in secondary sexual signalling (i.e. facial masculinity) and fertility or status-dependent differences in investments in semen quality. In both sexes and nationalities (Spanish and Colombian), ranked male facial attractiveness predicted male semen quality. However, Spanish males and females estimated facial images generally more attractive (gave higher ranks) than Colombian raters, and in both nationalities, males gave higher ranks than females. This suggests that male facial cues may provide culture- and sex-independent information about male fertility. However, our results also indicate that humans may be more sensitive to facial attractiveness cues within their own populations and also that males may generally overestimate the attractiveness of other men to females. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  6. Sekularisering og religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten Marianne

    Sammendrag: Sekularisering og religion: En studie i fortællingens nøglerolle i folkeskolens religionsundervisning Kirsten M. Andersen Ph.d. afhandling, indleveret ved institut for Uddannelse og Pædagogik, Aarhus Universitet, d. 23. oktober 2014 Indledning Afhandlingens sigte er at bidrage til en...... fortsat udvikling af religionsundervisningen i skolen ud fra en almen pædagogisk interesse. Skolen har sit eget formål og derfor må religion ombrydes, så den gøres pædagogisk. Religionshistorisk, religionssociologisk og antropologisk opfattes religion og kultur i et kontinuum. Det betyder, at religion...... fænomenologiske overvejelser over, hvorfor filosofien har behov for at formulere en religionshermeneutik med henblik på en almen pædagogisk begrundelse for skolens religionsundervisning. I Del: Kap. 2: Afhandlingen indledes med at indkredse og definere både religion og sekularisering som kulturelle og kollektive...

  7. POST-RELIGION: TRADITIONALISTS’ ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill M. Tovbin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study is to describe the phenomenon of post-religion as a specific spiritual sphere of the Post-modernity. Methodology. In the introduction analyzed a variety of methodological approaches, opening his inadequacy applied to the spiritual sphere of Post-modernity: «classic» religious studies, religious studies of traditional spiritual movements and the post-modern religious studies, partly produced Traditionalist school, could - according to the author's hypothesis - become a methodological basis for the most complete analysis of post-religion. Scientific novelty. In the main part of the article crystallized the authorized concept of post-religion, its relation with traditional and religious spiritual realms. Post-religion is positioned as the top of secularism enshrined in the departure from the straight and aggressive secularism of the Modernity, but without recourse to Tradition. Post-religion a simulation spirituality, skillfully imitating the outer areas of traditional spirituality and creates a planar religiosity, radically preventing attached to the vertical line of Traditions. In this regard, are the main artificially selected parameters of post-religion: deconstruction, splitting, virtualization, and collage. Deconstruction is a transformation of spirituality in semiotic set for egocentric selectivity of modern believer. Post-religion’s splitting is deprivation of spirituality center, destruction of sacral Center and the transformation of spirituality in the plane on which the intellectual and sensual wandering post-believer from one semiotic island to another. Virtualization is a displacement field of spiritual tension in a completely virtual area, isolated from the natural conditions of existence and created as his replacement, network discussion sites and galleries. Collage is an arbitrary combination of different semiotic pieces of Tradition with the aim of creating a believable picture of tradition; it is collage leads

  8. Shortcomings of the Human Brain and Remedial Action by Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, K. Helmut

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus as to whether, and if so, in which regard and to what extent science and religion is needed for human survival. Here a circumscribed domain is taken up: the sovereignty and sufficiency of the human brain in this context. Several of its shortcomings are pointed out. Religion and other aspects of culture are needed for remedial…

  9. Are Religion or "Faith" Necessary for a Moral Sexual Ethos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marty

    2011-01-01

    Credit the editor of the American Journal of Sexuality Education for inviting an article on whether religion or faith is necessary for a moral sexual ethos. Credit organized religion for creating a global cultural narrative in which this question would even be asked. Most articles answer a central question. This article challenges the central…

  10. Are Religion or "Faith" Necessary for a Moral Sexual Ethos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marty

    2011-01-01

    Credit the editor of the American Journal of Sexuality Education for inviting an article on whether religion or faith is necessary for a moral sexual ethos. Credit organized religion for creating a global cultural narrative in which this question would even be asked. Most articles answer a central question. This article challenges the central…

  11. Shortcomings of the Human Brain and Remedial Action by Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, K. Helmut

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus as to whether, and if so, in which regard and to what extent science and religion is needed for human survival. Here a circumscribed domain is taken up: the sovereignty and sufficiency of the human brain in this context. Several of its shortcomings are pointed out. Religion and other aspects of culture are needed for remedial…

  12. This article has been retracted and is available online only: Religion, culture and male involvement in the use of family planning: evidence from Enugu and Katsina States of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jane J A

    2011-09-01

    The following article from the International Nursing Review, 'Religion, culture and male involvement in the use of family planning: evidence from Enugu and Katsina States of Nigeria', by C. Ujuju, J. Anyanti, S.B. Adebayo, F. Muhammad, O. Oluigbo and A. Gofwan, published online on 6 September 2010 on Wiley Online Library (http://wileyonlinelibrary.com) has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, Jane J.A. Robinson and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The retraction has been agreed as not all copyright permissions had been cleared. Jane J.A Robinson Editor International Nursing Review.

  13. SIMPLE LIFE AND RELIGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YILDIRIM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals in terms of the economy in which we live is one of the most important phenomenon of the century. This phenomenon present itself as the only determinant of people's lives by entering almost makes itself felt. The mo st obvious objective needs of the economy by triggering motive is to induce people to consume . Consumer culture pervades all aspects of the situation are people . Therefore, these people have the blessing of culture , beauty and value all in the name of w hatever is consumed. This is way out of the siege of moral and religious values we have is to go back again . Referred by local cultural and religious values, based on today increasingly come to the fore and the Muslim way of life appears to be close to th e plain / lean preferred by many people life has been a way of life. Even the simple life , a way of life in the Western world , a conception of life , a philosophy, a movement as it has become widely accepted. Here in determining the Muslim way of life Pr ophet. Prophet (sa lived the kind of life a very important model, sample, and determining which direction is known. Religious values, which is the carrier of the prophets, sent to the society they have always been examples and models. Because every aspect of human life, his life style and the surrounding area has a feature. We also value his life that he has unknowingly and without learning and skills and to understand it is not possible to live our religion . We also our presentation, we mainly of Islam o utlook on life and predicted life - style, including the Prophet of Islam 's (sa simple life to scrutinize and lifestyle issues related to reveal , in short Islam's how life has embraced and the Prophet. Prophet's will try to find answers to questions reg arding how to live.

  14. Ethics, religion and humanity: Rethinking religion in 21 st century ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethics, religion and humanity: Rethinking religion in 21 st century Africa. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES ... First and foremost, religion is a human activity. ... results of inhuman and unethical practices in religion and that these problems can be minimized ...

  15. Religion in der Padagogik? = Religion in Pedagogics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipkow, Karl Ernst

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the scant attention that education has paid to religion historically. Suggests perceiving Christianity in its historical development as ecclesiastical, social, and personal. Observes that religious education is independent of both theology and pedagogics. Demonstrates that the discourse between pedagogics and theology must be based on…

  16. Gaming for Safer Sex : Young German and Turkish People Report No Specific Culture-Related Preferences Toward Educational Games Promoting Safer Sex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüll, Phil; Ruiter, Robert A C; Wiers, Reinout W; Kok, Gerjo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Comprehensive sex education programs specifically designed for adolescents and young adults that take into account gender norms and cultural background have shown promise as a means of countering the high sexually transmitted infection rate in young people. Recently, digital gaming interv

  17. Gaming for Safer Sex : Young German and Turkish People Report No Specific Culture-Related Preferences Toward Educational Games Promoting Safer Sex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüll, P.; Ruiter, R.A.C.; Wiers, R.W.; Kok, G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Comprehensive sex education programs specifically designed for adolescents and young adults that take into account gender norms and cultural background have shown promise as a means of countering the high sexually transmitted infection rate in young people. Recently, digital gaming

  18. Gaming for Safer Sex: Young German and Turkish People Report No Specific Culture-Related Preferences Toward Educational Games Promoting Safer Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüll, Phil; Ruiter, Robert A C; Wiers, Reinout W; Kok, Gerjo

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive sex education programs specifically designed for adolescents and young adults that take into account gender norms and cultural background have shown promise as a means of countering the high sexually transmitted infection rate in young people. Recently, digital gaming interventions delivered on computers or mobile devices have emerged as another way to promote safer sex behavior in a young population. Tailoring these computer-based interventions to their target population has been recognized to increase positive behavior outcomes. In this qualitative study, we investigated whether young female and male adults from two different cultural backgrounds (all living in Germany) would have different preferences and needs in relation to an educational game promoting safer sex. We conducted four semistructured focus group interviews comprising open-ended questions with male and female participants who had either a German or a Turkish background. In total, 20 individuals, aged between 18 and 22 years, from two socially diverse and ethnically mixed vocational schools in Germany participated. Independent of cultural background and gender, participants preferred a real-world design with a first-person visual perspective over a fantasy-like third-person perspective. Furthermore, they preferred highly customizable avatars. All participants mentioned the importance of including an alcohol-intoxicated avatar and most participants wanted there to be additional information available about various safer sex approaches and about the use of different barrier protection methods. Males and females reported similar preferences for the design of an educational game promoting safer sex, with the only difference being exactly how the topic of having sexual intercourse should be addressed in the game. Males preferred a direct approach, whereas females had a preference for treating this subject more sympathetically. Educational games offer anonymity and can provide young people

  19. Preservice Teachers and Religion: Serious Gaps in Religious Knowledge and the First Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Melissa J.; Binkley, Russell; Daly, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the influence of religion on people's worldview and daily lives, we wondered if elementary and secondary social studies preservice teachers knew enough about religions not only to be culturally responsive in a classroom but also whether they knew enough to teach about these religions within the appropriate curriculum. We used…

  20. Preservice Teachers and Religion: Serious Gaps in Religious Knowledge and the First Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Melissa J.; Binkley, Russell; Daly, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the influence of religion on people's worldview and daily lives, we wondered if elementary and secondary social studies preservice teachers knew enough about religions not only to be culturally responsive in a classroom but also whether they knew enough to teach about these religions within the appropriate curriculum. We used questions…

  1. Preservice Teachers and Religion: Serious Gaps in Religious Knowledge and the First Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Melissa J.; Binkley, Russell; Daly, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the influence of religion on people's worldview and daily lives, we wondered if elementary and secondary social studies preservice teachers knew enough about religions not only to be culturally responsive in a classroom but also whether they knew enough to teach about these religions within the appropriate curriculum. We used questions…

  2. Religion, theology and cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Fitzgerald

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cosmology is one of the predominant research areas of the contemporary world. Advances in modern cosmology have prompted renewed interest in the intersections between religion, theology and cosmology. This article, which is intended as a brief introduction to the series of studies on theological cosmology in this journal, identifies three general areas of theological interest stemming from the modern scientific study of cosmology: contemporary theology and ethics; cosmology and world religions; and ancient cosmologies. These intersections raise important questions about the relationship of religion and cosmology, which has recently been addressed by William Scott Green and is the focus of the final portion of the article.

  3. Predictors of unprotected sex among young sexually active African American, Hispanic, and White MSM: the importance of ethnicity and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jacob C; Fernández, M Isabel; Harper, Gary W; Hidalgo, Marco A; Jamil, Omar B; Torres, Rodrigo Sebastián

    2008-05-01

    Despite the recognized need for culturally tailored HIV prevention interventions for gay, bisexual, and questioning youth, few studies have examined if predictors of unprotected sex vary for youth from different ethnic groups. This study reports on a sample of 189 gay, bisexual, and questioning youth (age 15-22) from three racial/ethnic backgrounds (African American, Hispanic, and White) recruited in Chicago, IL and Miami-Dade and Broward Counties, Florida. For African American youth, being in a long-term relationship, having been kicked out of the home for having sex with men, and younger age at initiation of sexual behavior were associated with unprotected sex. For Hispanic youth, higher ethnic identification and older age at initiation of sexual behavior were associated with unprotected sex. For White youth, no predictors were associated with unprotected sex. Our findings point to the importance of understanding the varying predictors of unprotected sex and integrating them into tailored prevention interventions.

  4. Influence of "Solcoseryl" during culture on the sex-dependent repair of bovine demi-embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, K; Yoneda, K; Utsumi, K

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of culture conditions on the development of split embryos after bisection and on the sex ratio of resultant bovine demi-embryos. Embryos that had developed into blastocysts on days 6 1/2 to 7 or on days 7 1/2 to 8 from oocytes matured and fertilized in vitro were bisected in BMOC-3 medium supplemented with 33% calf serum. The medium also contained 0%, 0.1% or 1.0% Solcoseryl, a deproteinized hemodialysate product from calf blood. The demi-embryos were first cultured for 4 hours in the same medium in which they had been bisected and then co-cultured with cumulus cells in TCM199 supplemented with 1% calf serum for an additional 20 hr. The rate of production of good to excellent quality demi-embryos obtained from days 6 1/2 to 7 blastocysts was higher than from those on days 7 1/2 to 8. The rate was also significantly improved when blastocysts were bisected in medium containing 0.1% or 1.0% Solcoseryl, compared to the medium without Solcoseryl. Male embryos seemed to recover more rapidly than female embryos, as assessed by morphological quality at 4 hr, although the quality of female embryos had improved by 24 hr. The percentage of males after culture was higher in the medium without Solcoseryl than in its presence. Thus, addition of Solcoseryl at either 0.1% or 1.0% to BMOC-3 medium seemed to improve the production efficiency of good quality demi-embryos, but did not influence the sex ratio. It appears as if female demi-embryos required more time than male embryos to be repaired after bisection.

  5. Reign and Religion in Palestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Anne

    and the political messages they wished to communicate. As religion was a highly complex aspect of the Jewish interrelations with other cultures, the utilization of sacred iconography is not only a precise indicator of cultural-religious affiliation, but also of cultural-religious changes occurring in the Jewish......Ancient Jewish coinage is one of the few material sources offering detailed insight into the political developments taking place throughout a specific period of ancient Jewish history. Jewish coinage was minted and issued in Palestine, along-side a number of other local coinages, almost consistently...... between the fifth century BCE and the early second century CE by a number of different Jewish authorities. The nature of these authorities varied greatly throughout time, and they increasingly and quite differently used this medium, which was gaining importance as a public propaganda tool, to communicate...

  6. Objects of Worship in South Asian Religions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Objects of worship are an aspect of the material dimension of lived religion in South Asia. The omnipresence of these objects and their use is a theme which cuts across the religious traditions in the pluralistic religious culture of the region. Divine power becomes manifest in the objects and fo...

  7. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RELIGION REPORTING IN NIGERIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2017-07-01

    Jul 1, 2017 ... covering religion in Malaysia is the multi-ethnic and multi-religious nature of the country and ... or other authorities to impose Islamic culture or norms on the ..... been a spate of clashes, particularly in the North of the country ...

  8. Teaching the Dance of World Religions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautter, Cia

    2005-01-01

    In the past decade, critical scholars such as Ronald Grimes and Talal Asad stated that there is a need to recognize the cultural and spiritual dimensions of religion, especially in an age of pluralism. While they call for an increased knowledge and application of techniques from anthropology, ethnology, and performance studies, what actually…

  9. Teaching the Dance of World Religions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautter, Cia

    2005-01-01

    In the past decade, critical scholars such as Ronald Grimes and Talal Asad stated that there is a need to recognize the cultural and spiritual dimensions of religion, especially in an age of pluralism. While they call for an increased knowledge and application of techniques from anthropology, ethnology, and performance studies, what actually…

  10. Objects of Worship in South Asian Religions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Objects of worship are an aspect of the material dimension of lived religion in South Asia. The omnipresence of these objects and their use is a theme which cuts across the religious traditions in the pluralistic religious culture of the region. Divine power becomes manifest in the objects and fo...

  11. Material Religion - Hinduism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aktor, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    Comprehensive bibliography on material religion in Hinduism. Monographs, anthologies, anthology chapters, journal articles, web articles, documentation on cultic elements of the landscape (mountains, rivers, trees, stones), three- and two-dimensional cultic artefacts, textiles, ritual accessories...

  12. Sex-specific genetic diversity is shaped by cultural factors in Inner Asian human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Nina; Hegay, Tatyana; Mennecier, Philippe; Georges, Myriam; Laurent, Romain; Whitten, Mark; Endicott, Philipp; Aldashev, Almaz; Dorzhu, Choduraa; Nasyrova, Firuza; Chichlo, Boris; Ségurel, Laure; Heyer, Evelyne

    2017-04-01

    Sex-specific genetic structures have been previously documented worldwide in humans, even though causal factors have not always clearly been identified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ethnicity, geography and social organization on the sex-specific genetic structure in Inner Asia. Furthermore, we explored the process of ethnogenesis in multiple ethnic groups. We sampled DNA in Central and Northern Asia from 39 populations of Indo-Iranian and Turkic-Mongolic native speakers. We focused on genetic data of the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. First, we compared the frequencies of haplogroups to South European and East Asian populations. Then, we investigated the genetic differentiation for eight Y-STRs and the HVS1 region, and tested for the effect of geography and ethnicity on such patterns. Finally, we reconstructed the male demographic history, inferred split times and effective population sizes of different ethnic groups. Based on the haplogroup data, we observed that the Indo-Iranian- and Turkic-Mongolic-speaking populations have distinct genetic backgrounds. However, each population showed consistent mtDNA and Y chromosome haplogroups patterns. As expected in patrilocal populations, we found that the Y-STRs were more structured than the HVS1. While ethnicity strongly influenced the genetic diversity on the Y chromosome, geography better explained that of the mtDNA. Furthermore, when looking at various ethnic groups, we systematically found a genetic split time older than historical records, suggesting a cultural rather than biological process of ethnogenesis. This study highlights that, in Inner Asia, specific cultural behaviors, especially patrilineality and patrilocality, leave a detectable signature on the sex-specific genetic structure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. First Handbooks on History of Religion and Comparative Religion Abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barashkov Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the important aspects of institutionalization of the religious studies in 1870– 1910s was the publishing of the fi rst handbooks on history of religion and comparative religion. The aim of the paper is to analyze methods and approaches of religious studies, as they described in these handbooks. The main characteristic of religion for the historians of religion was its universality. The most important methods, according to them, were historical approach, comparative approach, using of the notion «development». It is important, that we deal foremost with the «history of religion» in these handbooks, not with the «history of religions». Primitive religions were usually excluded from these handbooks, because they «have not history». First handbooks on history of religion often were edited in the series of theological handbooks, that’s why Christianity was described in them quite often as «higher» religion. Researches on comparative religion were based upon the history of religion. One of the main principles of comparative religion was that it should not deal with religious values, but only with a comparison of facts. The author concludes that scholars of religion nowadays should not only collect the facts, but also realize projects on the general history (theory of religion.

  14. Access to health care and religion among young American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillum, R Frank; Jarrett, Nicole; Obisesan, Thomas O

    2009-12-01

    In order to elucidate cultural correlates of utilization of primary health services by young adult men, we investigated religion in which one was raised and service utilization. Using data from a national survey we tested the hypothesis that religion raised predicts access to and utilization of a regular medical care provider, examinations, HIV and other STD testing and counseling at ages 18-44 years in men born between 1958 and 1984. We also hypothesized that religion raised would be more predictive of utilization for Hispanic Americans and non-Hispanic Black Americans than for non-Hispanic White Americans. The study included a national sample of 4276 men aged 18-44 years. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were used to assess the hypotheses using data on religion raised and responses to 14 items assessing health care access and utilization. Compared to those raised in no religion, those raised mainline Protestant were more likely (p Religion raised was not associated with testicular exams, STD counseling or HIV testing. In multivariate analyses controlling for confounders, significant associations of religion raised with insurance coverage, a physician as usual source of care and physical examination remained which varied by race/ethnicity. In conclusion, although religion is a core aspect of culture that deserves further study as a possible determinant of health care utilization, we were not able to document any consistent pattern of significant association even in a population with high rates of religious participation.

  15. Human survival: evolution, religion and the irrational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton H. Saier, jr

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Is there a possible biological explanation for religion? That is, is there a genetic basis for believing in mystical, supernatural beings when there is no scientifi c evidence for their existence? Can we explain why some people prefer to accept myth over science? Why do so many people still accept creation and refuse to embrace evolution? Is there an evolutionary basis for religious beliefs? It is certainly true that religions have been part of human civilization throughout most of its recent history, at least for the last 5,000 years, and probably for much longer. Even great nonmystical philosophers such as Confucius, Buddha, and Lao Tzu have had their teachings evolve into mystical religions with spiritual ancestors, gods and reincarnation. On the other hand, religion is largely absent in modern Chinese culture, and of diminishing importance in Japanese and European cultures. In all cultures, the degrees of education gained by individuals correlate inversely with attachments to mystical deities. Atheists abound although they may be reluctant to come out of the closet and affi rm their rational convictions. In this article, we seek explanations for human irrationality.

  16. The Politics of Religion in instant epoche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Marzec

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In presented text I focused on category of religion in instant culture, in which, as we know everything is fast. This phenomenon dominated also in the sphere of religion by the idiom of obligation of realisation here and now. We all need that right now! How Zbyszko Melosik has written, this phrase express this tendency: “fast food, fast car and fast sex”. But how all that relate to the title politics of religion in instant epoche and what does it include in that optical review? Thus, we can enumerate several characteristic phenomena in wide field of spirituality, but it does not mean simply New Age. I present the politics of religion in the very wide context: from review of J. Mariański’s conception of religion in the postmodern society, to “invisible religion” by Thomas Luckmann, to the implantation of meditation practices in the stream of therapeutic practices in the West by Jon Kabat-Zinn, and in the end to the view of Ken Wilber of “boomeritis buddism”, as the corossion of spirit of buddism in the conemporary american awangarda.

  17. Cultures of Abuse: ‘Sex Grooming’, Organised Abuse and Race in Rochdale, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Salter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Revelations of organised abuse by men of Asian heritage in the United Kingdom have become a recurrent feature of international media coverage of sexual abuse in recent years. This paper reflects on the similarities between the highly publicised ‘sex grooming’ prosecutions in Rochdale in 2012 and the allegations of organised abuse in Rochdale that emerged in 1990, when twenty children were taken into care after describing sadistic abuse by their parents and others. While these two cases differ in important aspects, this paper highlights the prominence of colonial ideologies of civilisation and barbarism in the investigation and media coverage of the two cases and the sublimation of the issue of child welfare. There are important cultural and normative antecedents to sexual violence but these have been misrepresented in debates over organised abuse as racial issues and attributed to ethnic minority communities. In contrast, the colonialist trope promulgating the fictional figure of the rational European has resulted in the denial of the cultural and normative dimensions of organised abuse in ethnic majority communities by attributing sexual violence to aberrant and sexually deviant individuals whose behaviours transgress the boundaries of accepted cultural norms. This paper emphasises how the implicit or explicit focus on race has served to obscure the power dynamics underlying both cases and the continuity of vulnerability that places children at risk of sexual and organised abuse.

  18. The religion paradox: if religion makes people happy, why are so many dropping out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Ed; Tay, Louis; Myers, David G

    2011-12-01

    As we estimate here, 68% of human beings--4.6 billion people--would say that religion is important in their daily lives. Past studies have found that the religious, on average, have higher subjective well-being (SWB). Yet, people are rapidly leaving organized religion in economically developed nations where religious freedom is high. Why would people leave religion if it enhances their happiness? After controlling for circumstances in both the United States and world samples, we found that religiosity is associated with slightly higher SWB, and similarly so across four major world religions. The associations of religiosity and SWB were mediated by social support, feeling respected, and purpose or meaning in life. However, there was an interaction underlying the general trend such that the association of religion and well-being is conditional on societal circumstances. Nations and states with more difficult life conditions (e.g., widespread hunger and low life expectancy) were much more likely to be highly religious. In these nations, religiosity was associated with greater social support, respect, purpose or meaning, and all three types of SWB. In societies with more favorable circumstances, religiosity is less prevalent and religious and nonreligious individuals experience similar levels of SWB. There was also a person-culture fit effect such that religious people had higher SWB in religious nations but not in nonreligious nations. Thus, it appears that the benefits of religion for social relationships and SWB depend on the characteristics of the society.

  19. De religione: How Christianity Became a Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Červenková

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the findings of contemporary theological and religious studies research, the present interdisciplinary study attempts to trace the process of adopting the originally Roman category of “religion” for referring to Christianity. The text notes, in particular, the socio-political role of religio in classical culture and the transformations that the relationship of the society of classical antiquity and the Christian community went through in the first centuries AD, especially the first Christian attempts at communication with the late classical Latin culture and the administrative structures of the Roman Empire. The adaptation of the category is traced back to Tertullian, whose conception appears to have fundamentally influenced later generations of Christians; the second part of the study therefore devotes considerable attention to his works. It is here that justified use of the category of “religion” in connection with the Christian tradition is first encountered, as an expression encompassing the doctrinal and philosophical, as well as ethical and liturgical aspects of Christianity. Analysis of the text of Tertullian’s Apologeticum shows how the apologetic literature of the second century AD conveys the Christian message in an exemplary and highly elaborate form, which serves the dual purpose of providing an adequate definition of the Christian religious identity and preserving it, as well as making it available to recipients of diverse contemporary cultural environments. De religione: Jak se křesťanství stalo náboženstvím Předkládaná interdisciplinární studie se v návaznosti na poznatky současného teologického a religionistického bádání snaží vystopovat proces převzetí původně římské kategorie „náboženství“ pro označení křesťanství. V textu se připomíná zejm. sociopolitická role religio v antické kultuře a proměny, jimiž procházel vztah antické společnosti a k

  20. Effect of rearing water temperature on protandrous sex inversion in cultured Asian Seabass (Lates calcarifer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athauda, Saman; Anderson, Trevor; de Nys, Rocky

    2012-02-01

    Asian Seabass, Lates calcarifer (Bloch, 1790), is a protandrous species cultured for Aquaculture. The cultured Asian Seabass in Australia exhibits precocious sex inversion before 2years of age. This phenomenon highly affects on maintaining a proper broodstock in a hatchery. The effect of temperature on sex inversion inducement in Asian Seabass was thus investigated at five different temperature regimes experienced in Australia. Asian Seabass (14months) grown in fresh water under natural temperature in a commercial farm in Queensland were transported to the research facility at James Cook University, Australia and held in fresh water at 28°C until acclimatized to the experimental conditions. Fish were acclimated to the experimental conditions (30ppt salinity) over the first and final week (22°C, 25°C, 28°C, 31°C and 34°C) of one month acclimatizing period. Fish were fed daily with a commercial pellet (50% protein, 18MJkg(-1)) to satiety. Blood, brain and gonad collected before transfer to the experimental temperature regime in the final week of acclimatization and at the end of the experiment were analysed. Plasma sex steroids level and aromatase activity of brain and gonad were also measured. There was an increase in plasma estradiol levels with increasing temperature from 25°C while no significant difference was observed among all treatment temperatures except at 25°C. However, fish held at 22°C showed higher estradiol level than at 25°C and 28°C. Significantly higher (pplasma testosterone levels were detected in fish held at 31°C and 34°C while a reducing trend was observed towards lower temperature regimes. Fish held at 22°C had significantly lower plasma testosterone than all others as well those sampled at the beginning. The plasma 11-ketoTestosterone was at non-detectable levels in all experimental temperatures as shown at the beginning. The average aromatase activity in brain was highest at 28°C among all temperatures, but no significant

  1. Sex-specific lung diseases: effect of oestrogen on cultured cells and in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosung Shim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex prevalence in lung disease suggests that sex-specific hormones may contribute to the pathogenesis and/or progression of at least some lung diseases, such as lung adenocarcinoma, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM and benign metastasising leiomyoma (BML. Oestrogen is an important hormone in normal lung development and in the pathogenesis of female predominant pulmonary diseases. In vivo and in vitro studies have facilitated our understanding of disease pathogenesis and discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Oestrogen promoted disease progression in cell and animal models of lung adenocarcinoma, LAM and BML. Specifically, oestrogen enhanced tumour growth and metastasis in animal models of these diseases. Furthermore, 17β-estradiol (E2, the most abundant form of oestrogen in humans, increased the size and proliferation of cultured cells of lung adenocarcinoma and LAM. Coupled with the known mechanisms of oestrogen metabolism and signalling, these model systems may provide insights into the diverse effects of oestrogen and other hormones on lung diseases. Anti-oestrogen treatments that target key events of oestrogen synthesis or signalling, such as aromatase activity, oestrogen receptors and signalling pathways, may offer additional opportunities for clinical trials.

  2. Obadia L., La religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Servais

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Comment casser quelques idées reçues sur la religion et, ce faisant, initier le com­mun des lecteurs à diverses problématiques relevant de la sociologie des religions, c’est ce double objectif que s’assigne implicitement l’ouvrage.Le livre est, dans cette perspective, élaboré autour de 21 questions que l’auteur se propose de discuter sur la base d’éléments des sciences humaines et sociales. Sont ain­si abordés pêle-mêle : l’origine, l’unité et la diversité des religions, les fonctions, for­me...

  3. Religion: more money, more morals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Konika; Bloom, Paul

    2015-01-05

    Between 500 BCE and 300 BCE, religions worldwide underwent a dramatic shift, emphasizing morality and asceticism for the first time. A new study suggests that the emergence of this new type of religion can be explained by increases in prosperity.

  4. Markedet, etik og religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgård, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Markedsmekanismen bliver med god grund prist af økonomer og politikere, men moral og religion giver nogle spilleregler, som markedet ikke uden videre kan erstatte. Også markedsmekanismen har sine begrænsninger, og det bør vi erkende.......Markedsmekanismen bliver med god grund prist af økonomer og politikere, men moral og religion giver nogle spilleregler, som markedet ikke uden videre kan erstatte. Også markedsmekanismen har sine begrænsninger, og det bør vi erkende....

  5. Truth, body and religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarl-Thure Eriksson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the words of welcome to the symposium on Religion and the Body on 16 June 2010. In a religious context ‘truth’ is like a mantra, a certain imperative to believe in sacred things. The concept of truth and falseness arises, when we as humans compare reality, as we experience it through our senses, with the representation we have in our memory, a comparison of new information with stored information. If we look for the truth, we have to search in the human mind. There we will also find religion.

  6. Religion og film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvithamar, Annika; Eskjær, Mikkel Fugl

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen søger at stipulere en ramme for analyse af religion og film. Dels ved at række ud over den blotte konstatering af tilstedeværelse af religiøse elementer i film, dels ved at anslå en række temaer, der kan anvendes til analyse af sådanne film (individualisering, (de-)sekularisering, banal...... religion og populæreeligion) og dels ved at foreslå en model, der kan danne ramme for en kategorisering af sammenhængen mellem tekst og produktionsmæssig kontekst....

  7. The mediatisation of religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on recent advances in mediatisation theory, the article presents a theoretical framework for understanding the increased interplay between religion and media. The media have become an important, if not primary, source of information about religious issues, and religious information and ex...... encourage secular practices and beliefs and invite religious imaginations typically of a more subjectivised nature.......Drawing on recent advances in mediatisation theory, the article presents a theoretical framework for understanding the increased interplay between religion and media. The media have become an important, if not primary, source of information about religious issues, and religious information...

  8. RELIGION AND FOLK BELIEFS

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa SEVER

    2011-01-01

    Folk beliefs, transmitted from generation to generation since the transfer from pre-writing and not included in any divine religion, but his side continued vitality of beliefs. Folk beliefs that have traditional as well as the local folk beliefs, include beliefs and practices, and personal features, divide two main types as a magic and experiential people’s beliefs. In this study we’ll focus on the qualities, differences and functions in everyday life of divine religion and folk beliefs and f...

  9. Disaggregating Corporate Freedom of Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2015-01-01

    to religion as a separate and independent jurisdiction with its own system of law over which religious groups are sovereign. I discuss the relationship between, on the one hand, ordinary rights of freedom of association and freedom of religion and, on the other hand, this idea of corporate freedom of religion...

  10. Religious prosociality and morality across cultures: how social enforcement of religion shapes the effects of personal religiosity on prosocial and moral attitudes and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrova, Olga; Siegers, Pascal

    2014-03-01

    The question of whether religiosity is linked to prosocial behavior is currently hotly debated in psychology. This research contributes to this debate by showing that the nature of individuals' religious orientations and their relationships to prosociality depend on their country's social enforcement of religiosity. Our analyses of data from more than 70 countries indicate that in countries with no social pressure to follow a religion, religious individuals are more likely to endorse an intrinsic religious orientation (Study 1), engage in charity work (Study 2), disapprove of lying in their own interests (Study 3), and are less likely to engage in fraudulent behaviors (Study 4) compared with non-religious individuals. Ironically, in secular contexts, religious individuals are also more likely to condemn certain moral choices than non-religious individuals (Study 2). These effects of religiosity substantially weaken (and ultimately disappear) with increasing national levels of social enforcement of religiosity.

  11. Fantasy som religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Artiklen redegør for George Lucas' religionspædagogiske projekt med Star Wars og jediismens brug af Star Wars som religiøs tekst i en fantasybaseret religion. Afslutningsvist gives en række forslag til hvordan man kan anvende Star Wars og jediismen i folkeskolens religionsundervisning....

  12. Religion og kognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2008-01-01

    Artiklen indleder et temanummer som er resultat af et udviklingskursus om kognition for religionslærerne arrangeret af Afdeling for Religionsvidenskab i samarbejde med Religionslærerforeningen. Artiklen indtroducerer emnet religion og kognition således at lærerne får indsigt i emnets væsentligste...

  13. Equality. Losing their religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Louise

    2009-07-23

    Some occasions of health employees' religious beliefs influencing their actions in the workplace have raised controversy in recent years. Despite religion and belief guidance published in January many areas remain hazy. Dress code rules to help combat infection control are raising concerns among some healthcare staff.

  14. Storby og religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    2014-01-01

    Det kan diskuteres, hvor bogstavelig man skal tage forudsigelsen om sekularisering eller religionens forsvindende betydning, men i dag kan en nærmere undersøgelse af livet og infrastrukturen i storbyerne bekræfte, at religion som sådan ikke er forsvundet fra byernes offentlige rum. Kan København på...

  15. African Journals Online: Religion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 6 of 6 ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES ... View Journal | Current Issue | Register This Journal is Open Access ... Ilorin Journal of Religious Studies is a peer-reviewed academic ... of Religion in Southern Africa as a forum for scholarly contributions of ...

  16. Religion in SETI Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pay, R.

    The prospect of millions of civilizations in the Galaxy raises the probability of receiving communications in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). However, much depends on the average lifetime of planetary civilizations. For a lifetime of 500 years, an optimistic forecast would predict about 65 civilizations in the Galaxy at any one time, separated by 5,000 light years. No prospect of communication. For a lifetime of 10 million years, over a million civilizations would be spaced 180 light years apart. Communication among them is feasible. This indicates that extraterrestrial communications depend on civilizations achieving long term stability, probably by evolving a global religion that removes sources of religious strife. Stability also requires an ethic supporting universal rights, nonviolence, empathy and cooperation. As this ethic will be expressed in the planet-wide religion, it will lead to offers of support to other civilizations struggling to gain stability. As stable civilizations will be much advanced scientifically, understanding the religious concepts that appear in their communications will depend on how quantum mechanics, biological evolution, and the creation of the universe at a point in time are incorporated into their religion. Such a religion will view creation as intentional rather than accidental (the atheistic alternative) and will find the basis for its natural theology in the intention revealed by the physical laws of the universe.

  17. Storby og religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    2014-01-01

    Det kan diskuteres, hvor bogstavelig man skal tage forudsigelsen om sekularisering eller religionens forsvindende betydning, men i dag kan en nærmere undersøgelse af livet og infrastrukturen i storbyerne bekræfte, at religion som sådan ikke er forsvundet fra byernes offentlige rum. Kan København på...

  18. Students' Attitudes toward Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S. D.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of the study of religion in the system of secular education hinges on the "reproduction of religiousness" in the secular school and, more broadly, in Russian society space, via the process of mass education. It is the prospect of expanded reproduction of religious consciousness, of religious psychology and practices as a…

  19. Shaping Sexual Knowledge: A Cultural History of Sex Education in Twentieth Century Europe. Routledge Studies in the Social History of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerteig, Lutz, Ed.; Davidson, Roger, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The history of sex education enables us to gain valuable insights into the cultural constructions of what different societies have defined as 'normal' sexuality and sexual health. Yet, the history of sex education has only recently attracted the full attention of historians of modern sexuality. "Shaping Sexual Knowledge: A Cultural History of…

  20. Shaping Sexual Knowledge: A Cultural History of Sex Education in Twentieth Century Europe. Routledge Studies in the Social History of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerteig, Lutz, Ed.; Davidson, Roger, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The history of sex education enables us to gain valuable insights into the cultural constructions of what different societies have defined as 'normal' sexuality and sexual health. Yet, the history of sex education has only recently attracted the full attention of historians of modern sexuality. "Shaping Sexual Knowledge: A Cultural History of Sex…

  1. The Public Presence of Religion in Western Europe: its social significance among religious constituencies lying between the secular and churchgoing Christians?

    OpenAIRE

    Tony Glendinning

    2014-01-01

    The study examines attitudes about public religion in the Netherlands, Britain, France and Denmark using ISSP survey data for 1998 and 2008. The context is de-privatization of religion in secular Western Europe due to Christian cultural defence. The majority of Dutch and British participants hold moderate opinions about mixing religion and politics. The majority of French and Danish participants are against public religion. Comparing 2008 to 1998, anti-public-religion attitudes are more evide...

  2. Robert Bellah, religion og menneskelig evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Jørgen Lundager

    2013-01-01

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Introduction to and discussion of Robert Bellah's major book, Religion in Human Evolution (2011). which defines and describes tribal religion (religion in pre-state societies), archaic religion (religion in early states) and religious currents in the axial age, the period...... to engage in historical and comparative studies. DANSK RESUMÉ: Introduktion til og diskussion af Robert Bellahs hovedværk fra 2011, Religion in Human Evolution, der definerer og beskriver tribal religion, dvs. religion i før-statslige samfund, arkaisk religion, dvs. religion i tidlig-statslige kulturer samt...

  3. Robert Bellah, religion og menneskelig evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Jørgen Lundager

    2013-01-01

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Introduction to and discussion of Robert Bellah's major book, Religion in Human Evolution (2011). which defines and describes tribal religion (religion in pre-state societies), archaic religion (religion in early states) and religious currents in the axial age, the period...... to engage in historical and comparative studies. DANSK RESUMÉ: Introduktion til og diskussion af Robert Bellahs hovedværk fra 2011, Religion in Human Evolution, der definerer og beskriver tribal religion, dvs. religion i før-statslige samfund, arkaisk religion, dvs. religion i tidlig-statslige kulturer samt...

  4. Grief, consolation, and religions: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klass, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Consolation is grief's traditional amelioration, but contemporary bereavement theory lacks a conceptual framework to include it. The article begins to develop that framework. The article argues that grief is inter-subjective, even at the biological level. Consolation and grief happen in the same inter-subjective space. Material from the histories of several religions sets the article in a cross-cultural and historical environment. The article examines consolation in interpersonal relationships, and then moves to consolation in cultural/religious resources that range from the literal image of God as an idealized parent to the abstract architecture of Brahm's Requiem. The most common consolation in the histories of religions comes within continuing bonds that are accessed in a wide variety of beliefs, rituals, and devotional objects. The article closes by briefly drawing the connection between consolation and faith.

  5. Multiculturalism and inconsistency in the perception of sex education in Australian society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahbobi, Ghanim

    2012-01-01

    A group of individuals who share common beliefs form a culture in which they communicate their values and attributes about certain aspects of society. Sex education remains one of the early teachings that humans experience irrespective of the race or level of development of a given society. However, different cultures perceive sex education differently due to differences in attitudes and beliefs, leading to significant diversity in the management of sex education among different societies across the globe. Many studies have found that in a traditional society with a homogeneous culture, the foremost reason for the different approaches to sex education is related to traditional values, in addition to other factors such as religion and political belief. In order to improve sex education, and consequently, sexual health in a modern multicultural society such as Australia, it becomes imperative to identify the inconsistency in beliefs about sex education among individuals with different cultural backgrounds in the Australian population. In this report, the author highlights similarities and differences in the methods employed by certain cultures of the Australian population. The report considers the different cultural environments of specific societies, the prevalence of sex education in these societies and how culture influences the prevalence. The concluding thoughts reflect on the success of the education programs in Australia, based on the idea that resolving the problems of sex education needs support from a number of bodies within Australian society.

  6. Religion, Sexuality, and Internalized Homonegativity: Confronting Cognitive Dissonance in the Abrahamic Religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meladze, Pikria; Brown, Jac

    2015-10-01

    This research was aimed at investigating how religious beliefs and internalized shame predicted homonegativity. An online survey, which consisted of a self-report questionnaire assessing religious orientation, internalized shame, and internalized homonegativity, was completed by 133 Caucasian and Asian gay men. The respondents also were asked to write a short answer in which they had to explain how they integrated their religion and sexual practices. The quantitative analyses of data demonstrated no significant difference in internalized homonegativity among the two cultural groups. Internalized homonegativity was predicted by the main Abrahamic faiths (i.e. Christianity, Islam, and Judaism) and internalized shame. Qualitative analysis showed that gay men who adhere to a monotheistic religious faith follow a different path to reconciling their religion and homosexuality compared to gay men who adhere to Philosophical/New Age religions or to gay men who have no religious faith. The implications of these findings as well as directions for future research studies were discussed.

  7. Appropriating religion: understanding religion as an object of science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Wiebe

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author focuses on the study of religion as a scientific project, for it is the scientific interest in religion which has constituted the grounds for admitting the study of religion into the curriculum of the modern Western university. Despite that academic legitimation, however, the study of religion in the setting of the modern research university is not held in high esteem relative to the other sciences. It if the scientific study of religion is to be legitimately ensconced in the modern research university, the notion of religion will have to be wholly appropriated by science; only then will we be able to establish a conceptual foundation from which to make valid knowledge claims about religion on a level commensurate with the pronouncements of the natural and social sciences. Indeed, to go one step further, given the hold on the concept of religion by those committed to the humanistic study of religion, we might need to talk here not of the appropriation but of expropriation of religion by science—that is, of wresting ownership of the concept from the humanists by using it solely as a taxonomic device to differentiate and explain a peculiar range of human behaviour demonstrated in religious practices.

  8. Projecting WEIRD features on ancient religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Pascal; Baumard, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The proposed narrative relies on an anachronistic projection of current religions onto prehistorical and historical cultures that were not concerned with prosocial morality or with public statement of belief. Prosocial morality appeared in wealthier post-Axial environments. Public demonstrations of belief are possible and advantageous when religious diversity starts interacting with coalitional recruitment dynamics in large-scale societies, a typical feature of modern, so-called WEIRD societies.

  9. RTSE DRUGDGON MONASTERY ATYPICAL BON RELIGION MONASTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    My First Visit to Rtse Drugdgon Monastery I first heard about Bon religion through a friend ten years ago.Having heard from him how people refer to Bon religion as an"evil religion"and sometimes a"black religion",I became quite terrified.In fact,Bon religion was actually the original Tibetan religion. Piously I prayed:"If one day I visit Tibet,please do not let me encounter Bon religion!"

  10. Research on Folk Religion Culture and Archetype of the Long Mu Temple Located in Deqing%德庆龙母祖庙民间宗教祭祀文化及原型探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文一峰

    2011-01-01

    西江龙母祖庙是西江人民的圣殿,是西江人民一种原生态的祭祀文化现象。宗教是前工业社会的基础,祭祀是世界性的文化现象。龙是水神,也由此是统摄自然力量的象征。文章阐释了“祭祀”的含义、“龙”文化及其意义;并结合荣格集体无意识原型理论,分析了西江龙母既是与龙文化相关的水神,也是一种大母神心理原型。龙母祖庙是西江人民原生态文化生命的载体。%The Long Mu (the Goddess of Dragon Mother) Temple is the Holy Land of the people living in the Xijiang River Basin. It is a kind of aboriginal worshiping culture there. Religion is a foundation of the pre-industrial society, and worshiping the ancestors is a worldwide cultural phenomenon. The dragon is a water god. It is there- fore regarded as a symbol of the natural forces. This paper explains the meaning of "worshiping the ancestors" and "the dragon", and the cultural significance of both of them. Based on Jung~ collective unconscious archetype theo- ry, this paper analyses the Xijiang Long Mu culture, and holds that the Dragon Mother is a water-related nymph, and a psychological archetype of the Great Mother as well. The Long Mu Temple embodies the aboriginal cultural life of the people living in the Xijiang River Basin.

  11. Religion, migration og integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Jørn

    2010-01-01

    Sammenhængen mellem religion og integration har de sidste år været genstand for debat. Artiklen kommer ind på begreber og sammenhænge relateret til området (migration, diaspora, assimilation, etnicitet, kultur) og ser på religionens mulige rolle som negativ eller positiv ressource i integrationss......Sammenhængen mellem religion og integration har de sidste år været genstand for debat. Artiklen kommer ind på begreber og sammenhænge relateret til området (migration, diaspora, assimilation, etnicitet, kultur) og ser på religionens mulige rolle som negativ eller positiv ressource i...

  12. State, religion and toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Contribution to Religion and State - From separation to cooperation? Legal-philosophical reflections for a de-secularized world. (IVR Cracow Special Workshop). Eds. Bart. C. Labuschagne & Ari M. Solon. Abstract: Toleration is indeed a complex phenomenon. A discussion of the concept will have...... to underline not only the broadmindedness and liberty of individuals or of groups, but also the relevant distinctions and arguments in political philosophy, epistemology, philosophy of religion and philosophical anthropology and their connection with educational issues. Through a discussion of these relations......, the essay argues three theses: (1) Toleration is not reducible to an ethics of spiritual freedom. (2) Toleration is not neutral to fanatism. (3) Toleration involves esteem for the person....

  13. Spirituality, religion, and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Anita M

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the relationships between spirituality and health has become increasingly important in health research, including nursing research. Very little of the research thus far has focused on spirituality, religion, and pain even though spiritual views have been intertwined with beliefs about pain and suffering throughout history. Spiritual views can have a substantial impact on patients' understanding of pain and decisions about pain management. The author reviews the research literature on spirituality and pain from a historical perspective. The analysis is concerned with how spirituality and religion have been used to construct a meaning of pain that shapes appraisal, coping, and pain management. The clinical implications include respectful communication with patients about spirituality and pain, inclusion of spirituality in education and support programs, integration of spiritual preferences in pain management where feasible and appropriate, consultation with pastoral care teams, and reflection by nurses about spirituality in their own lives. A discussion of research implications is included.

  14. Religion and Social Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spear, Roger

    2010-01-01

    /organisations) and local religious leaders to catalyse entrepreneurial activity. Thus these three dimensions of religious institutions (ideological discourse, networks, and leadership) will be examined in relation to social entrepreneurship. For the sake of simplifying the empirical base of this study, the field of social...... entrepreneurship will be limited to social enterprise which are co-operatives, mutuals and trading voluntary organisations (or non-profits), since there is a good evidence base of religious involvement in entrepreneurship in this sector, from which a number of cases will be drawn using secondary sources. However......This chapter is concerned with the role of religion in social entrepreneurship. It takes an institutional perspective and examines the way religious institutions and actors have supported social entrepreneurship. Weber has argued for the role of (protestant) religion in motivating people to take...

  15. Religion and Social Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spear, Roger

    2010-01-01

    as well as philanthropists. This has operated through religious leadership discourse, for example papal encyclicals orienting priests to support economic solutions to poverty and social problems in their communities, and the direct action of individual priests, institutional development (networks...... the theoretical framework developed will be based on the broader field of literature linking religion and entrepreneurship, thus this theoretical framework should have applicability to broader definitions of the social entrepreneurship field. The chapter covers three religious institutional dimensions underlying...

  16. Common-Sense Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett, Daniel C.

    2006-01-01

    According to surveys, most of the people in the world say that religion is very important in their lives. Many would say that without it, their lives would be meaningless. It is tempting just to take them at their word, to declare that nothing more is to be said-- and to tiptoe away. Who would want to interfere with whatever it is that gives their…

  17. Religion and Spirituality's Influences on HIV Syndemics Among MSM: A Systematic Review and Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, Jonathan M; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of the quantitative HIV research that assessed the relationships between religion, spirituality, HIV syndemics, and individual HIV syndemics-related health conditions (e.g. depression, substance abuse, HIV risk) among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. No quantitative studies were found that assessed the relationships between HIV syndemics, religion, and spirituality. Nine studies, with 13 statistical analyses, were found that examined the relationships between individual HIV syndemics-related health conditions, religion, and spirituality. Among the 13 analyses, religion and spirituality were found to have mixed relationships with HIV syndemics-related health conditions (6 nonsignificant associations; 5 negative associations; 2 positive associations). Given the overall lack of inclusion of religion and spirituality in HIV syndemics research, a conceptual model that hypothesizes the potential interactions of religion and spirituality with HIV syndemics-related health conditions is presented. The implications of the model for MSM's health are outlined.

  18. Religion and Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, V.

    1969: The Eagle lands on the Moon. A moment that would not only mark the highest scientific achievement of all times, but would also have significant religious impli- cations. While the island of Bali lodges a protest at the United Nations against the US for desecrating a sacred place, Hopi Indians celebrate the fulfilment of an ancient prophecy that would reveal the "truth of the Sacred Ways". The plaque fastened to the Eagle - "We Came in Peace for All Mankind" would have contained the words "under God" as directed by the US president, if not for an assistant administrator at NASA that did not want to offend any religion. In the same time, Buzz Aldrin takes the Holy Communion on the Moon, and a Bible is left there by another Apollo mission - not long after the crew of Apollo 8 reads a passage from Genesis while circling the Moon. 1998: Navajo Indians lodge a protest with NASA for placing human ashes aboard the Lunar Prospector, as the Moon is a sacred place in their religion. Past, present and fu- ture exploration of the Moon has significant religious and spiritual implications that, while not widely known, are nonetheless important. Is lunar exploration a divine duty, or a sacrilege? This article will feature and thoroughly analyse the examples quoted above, as well as other facts, as for instance the plans of establishing lunar cemeteries - welcomed by some religions, and opposed by others.

  19. Differential Effects of Family Structure on Religion and Spirituality of Emerging Adult Males and Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handal, Paul J; Lace, John W

    2016-12-23

    This study examined measures of religion and spirituality in a sample of male and female emerging adult college students whose parents were either divorced or intact using the Personal Religious Inventory, the Duke University Religion Index, the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale, the Spiritual Transcendence Scale, and the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale. Data were collected online, and 66% of participants received extra credit for participating. A main effect of sex was found, as females reported significantly higher scores than men on all but one measure of religion and spirituality, and the dataset was separated by sex. No differences were found between males from divorced and intact families. However, females from intact families scored significantly higher on all religion and spirituality measures than females from divorced families. This study suggests that females may respond differently than males to their parents' divorce in the context of religion and spirituality, and discusses possible reasons.

  20. Retaining the meaning of the words religiousness and spirituality: a commentary on the WHOQOL SRPB group's "a cross-cultural study of spirituality, religion, and personal beliefs as components of quality of life" (62: 6, 2005, 1486-1497).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Almeida, Alexander; Koenig, Harold G

    2006-08-01

    Recent years have seen increasing recognition paid to the relation of religiousness/spirituality (R/S) to health care and research. This has led to the development of more inclusive and trans-culturally validated measurements of R/S. This paper comments on the WHOQOL SRPB Group's "A cross-cultural study of spirituality, religion, and personal beliefs as components of quality of life" (62: 6, 2005, 1486-1497), a recently published paper in Social Science & Medicine, and illustrates a possible problem in the measurement of R/S, especially as related to the study of mental health outcomes. Some scales have included questions about psychological well-being, satisfaction, connectedness with others, hopefulness, meaning and purpose in life, or altruistic values as part of their measure of R/S. These questions are really tapping indicators of mental health, and should not be included in the definition of R/S itself. Otherwise, tautology is the result, and it should not be surprising that such measures of R/S (defined by questions tapping mental health) are related to mental health outcomes.

  1. Sacred Architecture as a Narrative for Defining Religion, Culture and Social and Educational Change: A Proposal for a Series of Workshops for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, James J.

    Sacred architecture provides a compelling narrative for explaining the ways religious belief and practice contribute to the construction of self identity and of lived cultural values in all societies. This paper proposes a collaborative and ethnographic research workshop series focused on the intersections among culture, religious meaning and…

  2. O divino retorno: uma abordagem fenomenológica de fluxos identitários entre a religião e a cultura The holy return: a phenomenological approach of identity flows between religion and culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rogério Lopes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa algumas transformações ocorridas na tradicional Festa do Divino Espírito Santo, realizada na cidade de São Luiz do Paraitinga, estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Em janeiro de 2010, uma enchente atingiu a cidade, derrubando parte de seu patrimônio cultural. Essa perda baixou a autoestima da população e vários agenciamentos religiosos e de políticas culturais emergiram no processo de recuperação da cidade. Através de uma abordagem fenomenológica, busca-se descrever e analisar a dinâmica desses agenciamentos na realização da Festa do Divino desse ano, evidenciando os fluxos identitários que atravessam os campos da religião e da cultura, buscando se sobrepor na produção do evento.The article analyzes some transformations in the traditional Festival of the Holy Spirit held in São Luiz do Paraitinga, a small town in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. In January 2010, a violent flood destroyed part of its built cultural heritage. That loss lowered the population’s self-esteem and many religious and cultural-policy agencies emerged in the process of recovery. Through a phenomenological approach, the article describes and analyzes the dynamics of such agencies in that year’s Festival of the Holy Spirit, showing the identity flows that cut across the fields of religion and culture, and their overlapping in the production of the event.

  3. Online newspapers: the impact of culture, sex, and age on the perceived importance of specified quality factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley G. Hope

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a proliferation of online newspapers over recent years. Despite this, or perhaps because of it, factors affecting the quality of online newspapers remain only partially understood. Based on a two-factor model of hygiene and motivator factors, this paper examines quality for online newspapers giving attention to differences across culture, sex, and age. Hygiene factors are essential requirements whose absence causes dissatisfaction, while motivators are desirable elements that add value and increase user satisfaction. The paper presents findings from an empirical study of eighty-four Web users. Results show that hygiene factors for our respondents were: Timeliness, Content attractiveness, Content coverage, Usefulness, and Navigation, while motivators were: Writing style, Layout, Archives, Services, Interactivity, and Multimedia presentation. Four factors were borderline: Journalism ethics, Ease of use, Front page and headlines, and Locating information. However, the research reveals some differences in classification of factors across culture, sex, and age.

  4. A Case Study of Social and Media Influence on Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Miranda Dawn

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to understand different religions and cultures by comparing and contrasting the similarities, differences, and opinions found within two religious/cultural groups. This case study uses the Social Learning Theory of communication to illustrate how perceptions of others are formed in a community with a growing Muslim population. It…

  5. Physical activity according to sex in the argar culture. An approach based on the human remains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-Brobeil, Silvia A.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A collection of human remains, from the Argaric Culture sites, was studied to broaden knowledge about the physical activity carried out by those populations. Three types of activity markers were analyzed: osteoarthritis, musculoskeletal stress markers and traumatisms. The obtained results coincide with the environment and terrain in which the archaeological sites were found, demonstrating a remarkable difference between sexes. Although it is impossible to determine the profession of the studied individuals, it can be affirmed that the men would perform activities that required muscular strength, walking through rugged and steeped terrain in which they risked suffering further trauma. The women, however, carried out activities centred around the domestic environment.

    Se estudian restos humanos procedentes de yacimientos de la Cultura de El Argar con el objetivo de ampliar el conocimiento sobre la actividad física llevada a cabo por los individuos. Se analizan tres tipos de marcadores: la artrosis, los marcadores de estrés músculo-esquelético y los traumatismos. Los resultados obtenidos son coincidentes con el entorno y los terrenos en los que se ubicaron los asentamientos argáricos y señalan una clara diferencia entre sexos. Aunque es imposible determinar la “profesión” de los individuos, sí se puede afirmar que los varones realizarían actividades que requerían fuerza muscular, caminar por terrenos duros y escarpados y en las que había riesgo de sufrir traumatismos. Las mujeres, sin embargo, llevarían a cabo actividades centradas en el entorno doméstico.

  6. Nietzsche – Psychologist of Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios Ávila Crespo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the following article is to fight some common misconceptions with respect to Nietzsche’s views on religion, and to show that these views are considerbly complex. Starting from the close relation between the human experience of suffering and the need for religion, as pointed out by Eliade, Freud and Schopenhauer, this essay focuses on the continuity between psychology and genealogy in Nietzsche’s analyses of religion and morality, it then responds to the questions about the essence, kinds and limits of the fact of religion, and ends by pointing out the different ontological status of Nietzsche’s principal philosophical positions.

  7. Religion and Science: What Can Anthropology Offer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skalník Peter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This short tribute to Ján Podolák comments on the space between two extremes: pure science and blind belief. If religion is not susceptible to scientific proof because it is a belief in an invisible world inhabited by spirits who influence human existence on earth then science in its strictest sense is the opposite of religion because it is not based on any beliefs but solely on provable facts. However, the anthropology of science should be based on the pluralism of knowledge and the seeking of truth in different cultural settings around the world. Everything human, also science, is a social and cultural phenomenon. This means that rationality is not a preserve of the Western mind only and that without falling into the trap of postmodernist excessive relativism, we should admit that rationality is not only universal but also not hierarchized evolutionistically or qualitatively by giving preference to its Western brand. Science thus ceases to be the only realm of rational knowledge. Religion in its turn is a kind of non-scientific knowledge.

  8. Rethinking Difference and Sex Education: From Cultural Inclusivity to Normative Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggis, Jane; Mulholland, Monique

    2014-01-01

    This paper aimed to problematise what is meant by 'difference' and consider what such a reinterpretation might mean for methodological interventions in sex education research. Our concern is the tendency for sex education research to treat difference as a set of categories to be "added-on", such as religious difference,…

  9. Happiness in Economics as Understood Across Ism and Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ghafar Ismail

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of happiness has been discussed long time ago by economists. Recently, it became the most related and important thing to be studied because of its impact in societies. Discussion about happiness basically interprets within two separate views. First, happiness related with economic variable, for instance, how money can create happiness. Second happiness is discussed within the context of religion. However, the discussion did not combine both contexts, economic variable and religion, to interpret happiness. Therefore, it is important to highlight the concept of happiness in a different way such as in this article. Different cultures will have their own perspective on the determination of happiness. From just “individual perspective” of happiness, they then formed an ism through involvement of a big society from the same culture. Some isms such as hedonism and materialism are synonyms in characterizing the concept of happiness in this modern world. At the same time, the isms are actually working with the economic and non-economic indicators as elements to strengthen the ism itself. On the other hand, the concept of happiness from the perspective of religion will also be a part of discussion in this article. Therefore, this article will reveal that the meaning of happiness is different in terms of religion and ism. So, to carry out both ism and religion simultaneously in shaping a more intrinsic value of happiness is not an easy task. Furthermore, religion is always associated with spiritual value that makes it hard for some people to practice religion and their isms at the same time. Thus, this article will propose that the right interpretation of isms based on their faith in religion can contribute to the concept of genuine happiness.

  10. The Role of Religion in Shaping Sexual Frequency and Satisfaction: Evidence from Married and Unmarried Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    McFarland, Michael J.; Uecker, Jeremy E.; Regnerus, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the role of religion in influencing sexual frequency and satisfaction among older married adults and sexual activity among older unmarried adults. We propose and test several hypotheses about the relationship between religion and sex among these two groups of older Americans, using nationally representative data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP). Results suggest that among married older adults, religion is largely unrelated with sexual freque...

  11. Hegel and the Egyptian Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Jon Bartley

    2015-01-01

    H.s Behandlung der Religion des alten Ägypten gehört zu den faszinierendsten Analysen in seinen Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der Religion. Dieses Thema wird aber nicht nur in diesem Werk, sondern auch in den Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der Geschichte, in den Vorlesungen über die Philosop...

  12. Immigration and Religion in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lisbet

    2009-01-01

    An overview over legal framework for immigration into Denmark, special clauses on religion as a parameter for residence permit and asylum in churches......An overview over legal framework for immigration into Denmark, special clauses on religion as a parameter for residence permit and asylum in churches...

  13. Religion in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, I develop a theoretical framework for the discussion of religion i Scandinavian crime fiction where I consider theories of transgression and religion. Secondly, I run through five relatively popular examples of Scandinavian crime fiction to show how this genre trend works. Lastly, I...

  14. Spirituality, Religion, and Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantmeier, Edward J., Ed.; Lin, Jing, Ed.; Miller, John P., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Spirituality, Religion, and Peace Education" attempts to deeply explore the universal and particular dimensions of education for inner and communal peace. This co-edited book contains fifteen chapters on world spiritual traditions, religions, and their connections and relevance to peacebuilding and peacemaking. This book examines the…

  15. The Study of Religion Today

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, Arie; Meyer, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Religion is one of the most challenging subjects of study. Long expected to vanish with modernization and development, religion is there to stay, in various shapes and forms. The variety of what is captured under the term ‘religion’ is enormous and the perennial attempts to define the concept seem d

  16. From Mystics to Modern Times: A History of Craniotomy & Religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W Christopher; Chivukula, Srinivas; Grandhi, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Neurosurgical treatment of diseases dates back to prehistoric times and the trephination of skulls for various maladies. Throughout the evolution of trephination, surgery and religion have been intertwined to varying degrees, a relationship that has caused both stagnation and progress. From its mystical origins in prehistoric times to its scientific progress in ancient Egypt and its resurgence as a well-validated surgical technique in modern times, trephination has been a reflection of the cultural and religious times. Herein we present a brief history of trephination as it relates religion, culture, and the evolution of neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative Study of English and Chinese Taboos in Recent Times by Social Cultural Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宜华

    2014-01-01

    A taboo is something you should avoid doing or saying because a society thinks it is offensive, embarrassing or wrong.Different cultures do not all agree on what taboo is and what should be tabooed in a given context.Both Chinese and English have taboos on such things as sex,death, religion, superstition and so forth, but they follow different cultural norms.This thesis incorporates some anthropological and sociolinguistic ideas to analyze linguistic taboos in Chinese and English.

  18. Religion and violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Juan Bottasso

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ¿Las religiones son necesariamente violentas?Resulta evidente que en la actualidad, muchos de los conflictos, que ensangrientan el planeta, tienen un trasfondo religioso. El que aparece casi a diario en los noticieros es el que contrapone israelíes y palestinos (judíos contra musulmanes, pero con enorme frecuencia se habla también de actos terroristas llevados a cabo por fanáticos religiosos que no dudan en masacrar a civiles inocentes, en nombre de la divinidad. Debe ser bajo el efecto de estas informaciones que, cuando a fines de 2010 el Times de Londres preguntó a los lectores si consideraban la religión útil para la sociedad, éstos contestaron mayoritariamente de manera negativa. En la mira de los críticos se encuentran especialmente las religiones monoteístas, porque, al considerarse exclusivas poseedoras de la única verdad, están particularmente expuestas a la intransigencia, basadas en la premisa que el error no puede tener derechos.

  19. Media, Religion and Public Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe FALCĂ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Relations between religion and politics are complex and paradoxical. Both strive to achieve and maintain power. Both politics and religion involve control over social relations and emphasiye social integration (politics in its concern for order in society, and religion in its concern for observance of order and obligations within the congregation. But they differ in respect of specific goals, the values ​​that ascribe to power and differences in their conceptions of the nature and source of power. In the modern world, power, embodied in political institutions, is secular; in the past, its association with religion created a transcendental relationship, causing the possession of power to be of different quality, to come from another world. But, while politics is focused on interpersonal relationships, religion is more oriented towards relations between humans and gods or other spiritual forces.

  20. Reforming U.S. Education for the Academic Study of Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Religion and spirituality are gaining renewed appreciation as key elements of the cultural milieu. Yet there has been an inattention to the academic study of religion and spirituality in U.S. education due to several contributing causes. Central to remediating this deficiency is an understanding of these causes and how the reform of key factors in…

  1. The Role of Comparative Religion Curricula in Intra-Inter Civilizational Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Haslina; Khambali @ Hambali, Khadijah Mohd; Sintang, Suraya; Senin, Nurhanisah; Shaharud-din, Suhaida; Ahmad, Mahmud; Nor, Mohd Roslan Mohd; Kadir, Nor Adina Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Comparative Religion is seen as an important curricula because it could serve as a mechanism for enhancing cross-cultural religious communication. The authors seek to examine the role of Comparative Religion as an important science for enhancing dialogue skills. Such a communication skill, however, must be developed from both intra- and…

  2. The Role of Comparative Religion Curricula in Intra-Inter Civilizational Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Haslina; Khambali @ Hambali, Khadijah Mohd; Sintang, Suraya; Senin, Nurhanisah; Shaharud-din, Suhaida; Ahmad, Mahmud; Nor, Mohd Roslan Mohd; Kadir, Nor Adina Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Comparative Religion is seen as an important curricula because it could serve as a mechanism for enhancing cross-cultural religious communication. The authors seek to examine the role of Comparative Religion as an important science for enhancing dialogue skills. Such a communication skill, however, must be developed from both intra- and…

  3. PERSIAN CULTURE AND THE ZOROASTRIAN RELIGION%世界文明之族之七--波斯文明及宗教

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The culture of the Persians, in the narrower sense of intellectual and artistic achievements, was largely derived from that of previous civilizations. Much of it came from Mesopotamia, but a great deal of it from Egypt, and some from Lydia and northern Palestine. Their system of writing was originally the Babylonian cuneiform1, but in time they devised an alphabet of thirty-nine letters, based upon the alphabet of the Aramears who traded within their borders.

  4. Sex differences in general knowledge domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Richard; Ivanec, Dragutin; Zarevski, Predrag

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate some cognitive differences in highly comparable (according to age, education and motivation) samples of female and male university graduates in Croatia. Female (N=280; age X = 26.59; SD = 2.84) and male participants (N=96; age X = 26.99; SD = 2.99) were university graduates in economics, law humanities and social sciences applying for positions in public service. As part of the selection procedure, they were given a number of cognitive tests. The results were that men obtained higher average scores on the g-factor intelligence test, on the general knowledge tests of natural and social sciences, world religion and customs, and knowledge of current affairs. There were no significant sex differences on vocabulary, foreign language ability and general knowledge of culture. An analysis of covariance, with intelligence test as a covariate, showed that sex differences in general knowledge were present when intelligence was controlled.

  5. Science and religion: what is at stake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2010-03-01

    There are some who experience irreconcilable differences between their religious beliefs concerning a world created as is, on the one hand, and a scientific view of the world that has developed by means of natural evolution over billions of years, on the other hand. In this special issue, scholars from very different religions, backgrounds, and academic fields contribute to the debate with contributions to (a) a forum based on philosophical argumentation, (b) a collection of original studies and approaches from different parts of the globe concerning the relation between the two domains, and (c) a forum concerning the conversations and writings of a high school student concerning his way of reconciling science and religion. Together, these three parts of this special issue on the topic of science and religion constitute within themselves and across the collection a highly variegated, multicolored tapestry of beliefs, voices, cultures, and countries that explode any narrowly defined opposition between the two domains particularly concerning the theory of evolution and belief in creation (intelligent design). In this introduction, I articulate the questions (always) to come, the power/knowledge dimension underlying the current struggle observable between the two forms of human experience in the public domain, sketch the contents of the issue as a whole, and provide some outline for possible future directions in our work.

  6. Sex and cultural differences in spatial performance between Japanese and North Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Maiko; Spiers, Mary V

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that Asians perform better than North Americans on spatial tasks but show smaller sex differences. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between long-term experience with a pictorial written language and spatial performance. It was hypothesized that native Japanese Kanji (a complex pictorial written language) educated adults would show smaller sex differences on spatial tasks than Japanese Americans or North Americans without Kanji education. A total of 80 young healthy participants (20 native Japanese speakers, 20 Japanese Americans-non Japanese speaking, and 40 North Americans-non Japanese speaking) completed the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT), the Mental Rotations Test (MRT), and customized 2D and 3D spatial object location memory tests. As predicted, main effects revealed men performed better on the MRT and RCFT and women performed better on the spatial object location memory tests. Also, as predicted, native Japanese performed better on all tests than the other groups. In contrast to the other groups, native Japanese showed a decreased magnitude of sex differences on aspects of the RCFT (immediate and delayed recall) and no significant sex difference on the efficiency of the strategy used to copy and encode the RCFT figure. This study lends support to the idea that intensive experience over time with a pictorial written language (i.e., Japanese Kanji) may contribute to increased spatial performance on some spatial tasks as well as diminish sex differences in performance on tasks that most resemble Kanji.

  7. Global migration and the selective reimagining of religions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Beyer

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is a commonplace in discussions of immigrant religion to speak of how religion aids in the adjustment of migrants to a new culture and society; how it serves as a dimension of continuity in the process of integration. This article examines theoretical foundations for reconsidering this perspective in the context of globalization in general and global migration in particular. In a global society, it is far less useful to think of migrants as leaving one society to join another, especially insofar as this optic tends to assume a that the new “host” culture remains comparatively unaffected while the immigrants culture faces the dilemma of assimilation versus ethnic preservation; and b that the culture of origin simply loses a few members without much effect by the migrants back onto their cultures of origin. By contrast, the article argues that the consequences of migration are to help (redefine religions in all areas where they are represented; and thus to make distinctions between “core” and “diaspora” far less salient. Instead, different areas where religious traditions are represented are better seen as centres for creating different options for the authentic construction of the same religion; options that are very often in communication with each other.

  8. Television vampire fandom and religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minja Blom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Popular culture and fandom provide a setting where people can reflect on the questions of life. A television show defines for many of its fans what it means to be human. It also discusses the way things are, and the way they should, or could, be in our reality. In this article the author shows that tele­vision shows Buffy the Vampire Slayer, True Blood and the Vampire Diaries have made the same kind of impact on their fans. The fan writings of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, True Blood and the Vampire Diaries show that these popular texts, and the communities they have formed, have greatly affected the lives of fans. People have found on their TV screens stories they can get strength and hope from. The vampire shows deal with the supernatural – vampires, werewolves, and witches – and place them in our contemporary world as if they are a natural part of it. Television vampire stories revolve around topics of death, good and evil, and humanity. These stories have created massive fan communities and even life changing fan experiences. The reflections upon existential questions, and the way the shows have empowered fans, make this phenomenon important to study in the context of today’s religions reality.

  9. Religion, body satisfaction and dieting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Karen Hye-Cheon

    2006-05-01

    Western societal pressures of thinness have assigned worth to the ideal body, contributing to body dissatisfaction and increased dieting. A social factor that may serve as an alternative avenue of worth than the body is religion. Survey data from a community sample (n=546) was collected to examine religion's relationships with body satisfaction and dieting. Religion was significantly related to greater body satisfaction and less dieting, and specifically negative aspects of religion were related to lower body satisfaction and greater dieting. Those utilizing more negative religious coping had lower body satisfaction (women: r=-0.47; men: r=-0.58). Self-esteem was a mediator in these relationships. In women, those reporting higher negative congregational social support were more likely to diet than those reporting lower levels (CI: 2.0; 1.2, 3.5). Overall, religion was related to body satisfaction and dieting, with specifically negative aspects of religion having more consistent and stronger relationships than other components of religion.

  10. On religion and language evolutions seen through mathematical and agent based models

    CERN Document Server

    Ausloos, M

    2011-01-01

    (shortened version) Religions and languages are social variables, like age, sex, wealth or political opinions, to be studied like any other organizational parameter. In fact, religiosity is one of the most important sociological aspects of populations. Languages are also a characteristics of the human kind. New religions, new languages appear though others disappear. All religions and languages evolve when they adapt to the society developments. On the other hand, the number of adherents of a given religion, the number of persons speaking a language is not fixed. Several questions can be raised. E.g. from a macroscopic point of view : How many religions/languages exist at a given time? What is their distribution? What is their life time? How do they evolve?. From a microscopic view point: can one invent agent based models to describe macroscopic aspects? Does it exist simple evolution equations? It is intuitively accepted, but also found through from statistical analysis of the frequency distribution that an ...

  11. Understanding the anatomy of religion as basis for religion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-04

    Jul 4, 2011 ... Claassen is not alone in denouncing confessional religion education in public schools. Roux and ... Firstly, evidence will be presented to support the contention ..... creation behaves unrestrictedly chaotic in a lawless universe.

  12. Connections between Marxism and religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Régio Bento

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research we shall verify the influence of Nicaraguan experience on breaking the paradigm under which religion and religious actors would be more associated to status quo preservation rather than its rupture. According to our work hypothesis, in Nicaragua religion was not the opium of the people, used for its social anesthesia, but the promoter of social changes, and through international diffusion of this experience, mainly in the context of socialist countries, the alliance between laic and Christian socialists in Nicaragua promoted also a shift in the traditional hermeneutic paradigm which reduced religion to the permanent condition of opium of the people.

  13. Religion as a Natural Phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennett, Daniel (Tufts University)

    2006-02-15

    Religion is a costly human activity that has evolved over the millennia. Why does it exist and how does it foster such powerful allegiances? To undertake a serious scientific study of religious practices and attitudes we must set aside a traditional exemption from scrutiny which religions have enjoyed. Religious adherents may not welcome this attention, but we should press ahead with it, since if we don't come to understand religion as a natural phenomenon, our attempts to deal with the problems that loom in the twenty-first century will likely be counterproductive.

  14. Islam and the History of Religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippee, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Considers the difficulties presented when studying the Islamic religion through the current approach to history of religions and offers reasons for this phenomena. Examines the academic methodology in studying the history of religion, and traces its evolution. Examines major scholarly figures in the study of religion field. (RW)

  15. Religion, Pledging, and the Premarital Sexual Behavior of Married Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E.

    2008-01-01

    Social scientists know little about the effect of religion and abstinence pledging on premarital sex beyond adolescence. Evidence from a sample of married young adults in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 2,079) reveals that premarital sex is widespread even among religious Americans and abstinence pledgers. Nevertheless,…

  16. Why Single-Sex Schools? Discourses of Culture/Faith and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saeeda; Conchar, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper is developed from a study carried out to explore factors influencing the choices of a range of stake-holders in a multi-ethnic urban community--students, parents, teachers, community representatives--with regard to single-sex schooling. The paper discusses competing perspectives underpinning the focus of the study. Recent legislation in…

  17. Sociology of religion and the occult revival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Ejerfeldt

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available The "new" that makes the cults of the occult revival to "new religions" of the Western world, is their recently increased social significance. Historically most of modern occultism is anything but new. From the research and theorizing about the occult revival we have picked up some main themes. The first is the social diffusion of the new occultism. In this field, we find some studies of superstition, especially astrology. These illuminate the differences in social connotation between the consumers of superstition and the followers of institutional religion. Secondly the study of the occult revival has made valuable contributions to the conceptualizing of "cult" and the cultic phenomenon. Thirdly, we will look upon the connection between the occult revival and the counter-culture. The problem of the rise of cults as a symptom of socio-cultural change will be briefly discussed with reference to Bell's thesis of "the disjuntion of culture and social structure". Lastly, we proffer some reflections on the occult revival and the new spiritual trends in the churches, which so sharply contrast with the theology and churchmanship of the sixties.

  18. Understanding Culture and Its Influence on HIV/AIDS-Related Communication Among Minority Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ambar; Dillon, Patrick J; Romero-Daza, Nancy

    2016-11-01

    Scholarly research and government surveillance reports demonstrate that African American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) bear an inequitable burden of new HIV infections. Among the estimated 31,896 HIV infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact in 2011, approximately 62% occurred in African American (38.2%) and Latino (23.5) MSM. Simultaneously, recent scholarship on minority MSM and HIV/AIDS reports a dearth of qualitative communication research that address this health issue. This manuscript reports a research study that seeks to fill this gap in health communication theory and praxis. Through in-depth interviews with 17 MSM of color, this article draws upon the culture-centered approach to demonstrate how cultural and contextual nuances, (in)access to structural resources, and participants' agentive capacity to act upon available knowledge/resources influences the ways they manage (the threat of) HIV/AIDS.

  19. Social and cultural contexts of HIV risk behaviors among Thai female sex workers in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Tooru; Iwamoto, Mariko; Sakata, Maria; Perngparn, Usaneya; Areesantichai, Chitlada

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the number of indirect female sex workers (FSWs) who work at bars/clubs and massage parlors is substantially increasing in Thailand; however, there are huge gaps in knowledge about HIV risk behaviors among indirect FSWs. This study aimed to describe and understand HIV risk behaviors among Thai FSWs in Bangkok in relation to sociocultural factors and work environment (e.g., bars/clubs, massage parlors, brothels, and street). Based on venue-based purposive sampling methods, Thai FSWs were recruited for qualitative interviews (n=50) and survey interviews (n=205). Based on mixed methods, the study revealed that HIV risk and substance use behaviors among FSWs significantly differed depending on work venues, although there were no significant differences between work venues on some key risk behaviors (e.g., inconsistent condom use with primary partners and customers; willingness to engage in unsafe sex with customers). A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that FSWs who had used illicit drugs, were young, had low levels of self-esteem, or reported STIs had frequently engaged in unprotected vaginal sex with customers. Also, FSWs who worked at bars/clubs, were young, had higher income, or reported STIs had frequently engaged in sex with customers under the influence of alcohol. Qualitative interviews illustrated FSWs' alcohol and drug use due to their stressful life (e.g., long working hours and a large number of customers) and easy access to alcohol and drugs. FSWs had shown inaccurate knowledge about HIV prevention methods and engaged in risky behaviors, such as washing vagina with water or toothpaste after having had sex with customers. The HIV prevention strategies in Thailand need to be re-structured through implementing evidence-based HIV prevention intervention programs for FSWs, which must address sociocultural factors (e.g., self-esteem) and alcohol and drug use specific to work venues.

  20. Cross-cultural variation in women's preferences for cues to sex- and stress-hormones in the male face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F. R.; Coetzee, V.; Contreras-Garduño, J.; Debruine, L. M.; Kleisner, K.; Krams, I.; Marcinkowska, U.; Nord, A.; Perrett, D. I.; Rantala, M. J.; Schaum, N.; Suzuki, T. N.

    2013-01-01

    Women in the UK prefer the faces of men with low levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and the relationship is moderated by the sex hormone testosterone. In a Latvian sample, however, women's preferences were not affected by cortisol, and the interaction with testosterone differed from that of the UK. To further explore cross-cultural variation in preferences for facial cues to sex- and stress-hormones, we tested the preferences of women from 13 countries for facial composites constructed to differ in combinations of the hormones. We found significant relationships between a measure of societal development (the United Nations human development index 2011) and preferences for cues to testosterone in the face, and the interaction between preferences for cues to testosterone and cortisol. We also found a significant relationship between preferences for cues to testosterone and a societal-level measure of parasite stress. We conclude that societal-level ecological factors influence the relative value of traits revealed by combinations of sex- and stress-hormones. PMID:23536442

  1. Sex Workers and HIV/AIDS: Analyzing Participatory Culture-Centered Health Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ambar; Dutta, Mohan J.

    2009-01-01

    An emerging trend in health communication research advocates the need to foreground articulations of health by participants who are at the core of any health campaign. Scholarly work suggests that the culture-centered approach to health communication can provide a theoretical and practical framework to achieve this objective. The culture-centered…

  2. Sex Workers and HIV/AIDS: Analyzing Participatory Culture-Centered Health Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ambar; Dutta, Mohan J.

    2009-01-01

    An emerging trend in health communication research advocates the need to foreground articulations of health by participants who are at the core of any health campaign. Scholarly work suggests that the culture-centered approach to health communication can provide a theoretical and practical framework to achieve this objective. The culture-centered…

  3. Religion, spirituality, and mental health: current controversies and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dein, Simon; Cook, Christopher C H; Koenig, Harold

    2012-10-01

    Although studies examining religion, spirituality, and mental health generally indicate positive associations, there is a need for more sophisticated methodology, greater discrimination between different cultures and traditions, more focus on situated experiences of individuals belonging to particular traditions, and, in particular, greater integration of theological contributions to this area. We suggest priorities for future research based on these considerations.

  4. Religion as memory: How has the continuity of tradition produced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-05

    Jun 5, 2015 ... theory, in the postmodern world the continuity of religious memory has been broken and all ... at showing, firstly, in what sense religion can be conceived of as memory ... tradition has produced collective meanings for a number of cultures ... memory in both pre- and postmodern societies, as captured and ...

  5. Punjabi Childrearing in Britain: Development of Identity, Religion and Bilingualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, J. S.; Ghuman, Paul A. S.

    1997-01-01

    Interviewed two generations of Punjabi mothers living in Britain. Found that while second-generation Punjabis are changing some traditional mores (equal treatment of boys and girls, modified system of arranged marriage), they are also eager to transmit the core values (religion, mother tongue, familial spirit) of their culture and want their…

  6. Governmentality and Religion in the Construction of the Argentinean Citizen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caride, Ezequiel Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies regarding citizens' identity and nation-building issues have relegated the analysis of religion, understood as a cultural practice, and its role in the governing of the citizen. However, this article states that religious narrative is still a crucial technology of government to conduct the conduct of citizens. Through the…

  7. Governmentality and Religion in the Construction of the Argentinean Citizen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caride, Ezequiel Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies regarding citizens' identity and nation-building issues have relegated the analysis of religion, understood as a cultural practice, and its role in the governing of the citizen. However, this article states that religious narrative is still a crucial technology of government to conduct the conduct of citizens. Through the…

  8. Television: The New State Religion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbner, George

    1977-01-01

    Outlines the special characteristics of television that make it a formula-bound, ritualistic, repetitive, and nonselectively used system; concludes that television's social symbolic functions resemble preindustrial religions more than they do the media that preceded it. (GT)

  9. Religions, Cult and their Cultural Crowding-out Effect%宗教、邪教与文化的挤占效应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武云

    2014-01-01

    Judging by historical experience, witcheries with religious characteristics partially satisfied people's religious demands when combined with the mainstream culture as a result of the"belief deifciency"in ancient China. In contemporary China, as a better choice, religious belief has a crowding-out effect on cult because a large number of people have a religious complex.%从历史经验看,中国古代传统主流文化存在“信仰缺乏症”,带有宗教特征的巫文化与主流文化结合,部分地满足了人们的宗教信仰需求,表现出对传统主流文化的占位效应。在当下中国,由于大量具有宗教情结人口的存在,宗教信仰作为一项次好的选择,能够发挥对邪教的文化挤出效应。

  10. Estimates of lay views about reversal multiple intelligences for self and others: Sex and cross-cultural comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Félix; da Conceição Pinto, Maria; Mullet, Etienne; Furnham, Adrian

    2015-12-08

    This study focuses on lay conceptions of intelligence. It examined sex and cross-cultural similarities and differences in estimated intelligences and beliefs about intelligence in two countries, Angola and East Timor, within the reversal theory framework. A total of 209 Angolan (109 women and 100 men) and 183 Timorese (89 women and 94 men) students were participated in this study. Participants completed a questionnaire in order to estimate their parents', partners' and own overall intelligence and the 8 reversal multiple intelligences (telic, paratelic, conformist, negativistic, autic mastery, autic sympathy, alloic mastery and alloic sympathy intelligence). Respondents also rated 6 questions about intelligence. Men rated their overall, conformist and autic mastery higher than women. Angolans rated their overall, telic, paratelic, conformist, negativistic, autic mastery, autic sympathy, alloic mastery and alloic sympathy intelligence higher than Timorese. In both countries, fathers have been perceived as more intelligent than mothers, and telic intelligence emerged as a significant predictor of overall intelligence. Principal component analysis of the 8 reversal multiple intelligences yielded one factor. Angolan participants revealed more IQ test experience than Timorese participants. Most of respondents in both countries did not believe in sex differences in intelligence. These findings are discussed by means of cross-cultural literature.

  11. A cross-cultural comparison between Spain and the USA: temperament and character distribution by sex and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Halabí, Susana; Herrero, Rocío; Sáiz, Pilar A; García-Portilla, María Paz; Errasti, José M; Corcoran, Paul; Bascarán, María Teresa; Bousoño, Manuel; Lemos, Serafín; Bobes, Julio

    2011-04-30

    The Unified Biosocial Theory of Personality developed by Cloninger has been applied in different cultures. Distribution by age and sex of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) dimensions were assessed cross-culturally for samples in Spain and the USA. Three non-clinical samples were included: i) 404 participants from Asturias (Spain); ii) 240 participants from Burgos (Spain); and iii) 300 adults from St. Louis (USA). Each participant was assessed by means of the TCI. A significant negative correlation between NS and both HA (r=-0.329; P<0.01) and P (r=-0.217; P<0.01) was found in the study sample, as well as significant effects of age in NS, HA, RD, and C for women and in NS and HA for men, and also of sex in HA and RD. Personality dimensions for the two Spanish samples appear to be similar (differences in HA4 and RD) compared to those for the US sample (differences in NS, HA, RD and P). Findings support Cloninger's theory about differences between men and women, but not regarding the intercorrelations between temperament dimensions.

  12. RNAi-Mediated Gene Silencing in a Gonad Organ Culture to Study Sex Determination Mechanisms in Sea Turtle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra García-Gasca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The autosomal Sry-related gene, Sox9, encodes a transcription factor, which performs an important role in testis differentiation in mammals. In several reptiles, Sox9 is differentially expressed in gonads, showing a significant upregulation during the thermo-sensitive period (TSP at the male-promoting temperature, consistent with the idea that SOX9 plays a central role in the male pathway. However, in spite of numerous studies, it remains unclear how SOX9 functions during this event. In the present work, we developed an RNAi-based method for silencing Sox9 in an in vitro gonad culture system for the sea turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea. Gonads were dissected as soon as the embryos entered the TSP and were maintained in organ culture. Transfection of siRNA resulted in the decrease of both Sox9 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, we found coordinated expression patterns for Sox9 and the anti-Müllerian hormone gene, Amh, suggesting that SOX9 could directly or indirectly regulate Amh expression, as it occurs in mammals. These results demonstrate an in vitro method to knockdown endogenous genes in gonads from a sea turtle, which represents a novel approach to investigate the roles of important genes involved in sex determination or differentiation pathways in species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

  13. STATE LIABILITY FOR VIOLATION OF CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AGAINST INDIGENOUS PEOPLE IN FREEDOM OF RELIGION AND BELIEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaka Firma Aditya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The government is perceived as the main perpetrator on violations of freedom of religion and belief in Indonesia. As the state organizer, the government frequently issues discriminatory regulations and policies and tend to cause intolerance to minority religions and beliefs, particularly to indigenous peoples. While freedom of religion or belief is a constitutional rights that cannot be reduced and is guaranteed universally in constitution and laws, the law provides limitation that causes ambiguity in the fulfillment of the rights of religion and belief. In addition, the government mindset still adheres to the term of "official religion" and "non-official religion" in any policy-making, causing adherents of minority religions and beliefs to be considered as cultural heritage to be preserved. This creates injustice, discrimination, intimidation and intolerance in rights fulfillment in state and society life. This paper discusses the existence of the guarantee of freedom of religion and belief for indigenous people and state liability for violations of freedom of religion and belief. This research used normative juridical method with statute approach and conceptual approach.

  14. Review of Big Gods: How Religion Transformed Cooperation and Conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Joseph Coleman III

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 'Big Gods: How Religion Transformed Cooperation and Conflict', presents an empirically grounded rational reconstruction detailing the role that belief in “big gods” (i.e., omniscient, omnipresent, and omnipotent gods has played in the formation of society from a cultural-evolutionary perspective. Ara Norenzayan’s primary thesis is neatly summed up in the title of the book: religion has historically served—and perhaps still serves—as a building block and maintenance system in societies around the world.

  15. Jürgen Habermas and Religion in the Public Sphere

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the difficulties posed by Jürgen Habermas’s proposal regarding the role of religion in the public sphere, in order to clarify and analyze its philosophical assumptions. The article then goes on to set forth five objections on the basis of the debate over same-sex marriage, and to relate those objections to Habermas’s philosophical assumptions, in order to show the need for a more detailed review of the problem.

  16. Jürgen Habermas and Religion in the Public Sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Aguirre

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the difficulties posed by Jürgen Habermas’s proposal regarding the role of religion in the public sphere, in order to clarify and analyze its philosophical assumptions. The article then goes on to set forth five objections on the basis of the debate over same-sex marriage, and to relate those objections to Habermas’s philosophical assumptions, in order to show the need for a more detailed review of the problem.

  17. Religion and Completed Suicide: a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andrew; Wang, Jing-Yu; Jia, Cun-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern and a leading cause of death around the world. How religion influences the risk of completed suicide in different settings across the world requires clarification in order to best inform suicide prevention strategies. A meta-analysis using search results from Pubmed and Web of Science databases was conducted following PRISMA protocol and using the keywords "religion" or "religious" or "religiosity" or "spiritual" or "spirituality" plus "suicide" or "suicidality" or "suicide attempt". Random and fixed effects models were used to generate pooled ORs and I2 values. Sub-analyses were conducted among the following categories: young age (Religion plays a protective role against suicide in a majority of settings where suicide research is conducted. However, this effect varies based on the cultural and religious context. Therefore, public health professionals need to strongly consider the current social and religious atmosphere of a given population when designing suicide prevention strategies.

  18. The rules of implicit evaluation by race, religion, and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axt, Jordan R; Ebersole, Charles R; Nosek, Brian A

    2014-09-01

    The social world is stratified. Social hierarchies are known but often disavowed as anachronisms or unjust. Nonetheless, hierarchies may persist in social memory. In three studies (total N > 200,000), we found evidence of social hierarchies in implicit evaluation by race, religion, and age. Participants implicitly evaluated their own racial group most positively and the remaining racial groups in accordance with the following hierarchy: Whites > Asians > Blacks > Hispanics. Similarly, participants implicitly evaluated their own religion most positively and the remaining religions in accordance with the following hierarchy: Christianity > Judaism > Hinduism or Buddhism > Islam. In a final study, participants of all ages implicitly evaluated age groups following this rule: children > young adults > middle-age adults > older adults. These results suggest that the rules of social evaluation are pervasively embedded in culture and mind.

  19. Ritualistics: a New Discipline in the History of Religions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Podemann Sørensen

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of Religions is in need of subdisciplines. Those that it has are mostly derived from other academic disciplines such as psychology, sociology, or, to mention a more recent invention, aesthetics. Interdisciplinary studies are in many ways a characteristic, inherent feature of the humanities, and certainly not to be resented or mistrusted. It is, however, worth noticing that the History of Religions has only one discipline entirely of its own: a comparative, cross-cultural, religio-specific discipline sometimes called the phenomenology of religion. The study of ritual is more than just the study of a very broad. It is with a view to the further exploration of the way meaning and form are put to work in ritual, and the way ritual determines and conditions the form of representations, that ritualistics can be suggested as a new discipline.

  20. Renegotiating religious imaginations through transformations of "banal religion" in Supernatural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Nybro

    2010-01-01

    is subsumed to media logic, and thus transformed religious representations are an example of a continuous process of mediatization of religion. This essay applies a three-sided theoretical approach, considering mediatization, cognitive anthropology, and social theory. The concept of mediatization applied here...... implies long-term processes in which media play a role in cultural and social change. The theory of cognitive anthropology of religion allows us to understand how the series activates shared implicit knowledge of supernatural agents and events to evoke recognition and emotion; but by transforming......Supernatural is saturated with a wide range of religious representations. These elements often serve to instigate the storyline for one or more episodes, but do so in a way that is removed from their original setting in, for example, traditional religious contexts. In Supernatural, religion...

  1. Renegotiating religious imaginations through transformations of "banal religion" in Supernatural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Nybro

    is subsumed to media logic, and thus transformed religious representations are an example of a continuous process of mediatization of religion. This essay applies a three-sided theoretical approach, considering mediatization, cognitive anthropology, and social theory. The concept of mediatization applied here...... implies long-term processes in which media play a role in cultural and social change. The theory of cognitive anthropology of religion allows us to understand how the series activates shared implicit knowledge of supernatural agents and events to evoke recognition and emotion; but by transforming......Supernatural is saturated with a wide range of religious representations. These elements often serve to instigate the storyline for one or more episodes, but do so in a way that is removed from their original setting in, for example, traditional religious contexts. In Supernatural, religion...

  2. (ReMaking a Difference. Religion, Mediatisation and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Lövheim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents and discusses how mediatisation as a theory can be used to analyse two commercial videos, one promoting the organisation Catholics Come Home and the other Coca Cola. A core question in the current debate on mediatisation and religion concerns if and how mediatisation changes not only the social forms of communication about religion but also the meaning of religion in society. The issue in focus for the analysis is whether these videos mirror attributes and roles traditionally associated with men and women within religious institutions or offer an alternative to these. By using gender as a lens, we can see that mediatisation challenges religious institutions to adapt their narratives and symbols to commercial media culture, but that also within this new setting some traditional female gender norms seem to remain or even become reinforced.

  3. Dualism of Social Conditions: Religion, Morality and Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa Levickaitė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the topic of social dualism through religion, morality and science. The paper refers to one of the most original works uncovering the social roots of religion – The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life by Emile Durkheim (1858–1917 who is considered to be the founder of modern sociology. The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life develops the coherent theory of religion as well as ventilates different aspects of the religious life. The message of the paper is: is religion the generative essence of social aspect, does a state of constant dependence stimulate a sense of religious piety, is a moral social order able to stabilize dualism of human energy. The paper proposes an assertion that science as a social phenomenon reflects knowledge and the values of its perception which are impacted by imagination and classified codes of cultural forms. As a result a thesis is proposed – a cultural (influenced by environment and a personal (influenced by internal factors desire for differentiation and its provoked conflict is of a social character. The second part of the paper deals with relation between science and social phenomena with inherent dualism. A short discussion is presented on L’ Année Sociologique (a group of scientists initiated by Durkheim representing a new sociological paradigm, the beginning of scientific social culture giving sense to cooperation of sociological theory and practice. 

  4. Religion, Ethics and Development – Method and Metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Basil HANS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Much has been written about the socio-cultural functions of religion. It is equally important to discuss the role and impact of religion and ethics on development and promoting reform in civil society. In today’s South Asian context it is necessary to analyse religion both as a tradition and a representation of modernity. Otherwise it is difficult to clearly understand not only the relationship of domination-subordination, together with processes of exclusions and violence prevalent in the sub-continent but also the emerging perspectives, lineages and languages of sociology in general and religion in particular. An attempt is made in this paper to examine the relationship and to evaluate the processes in the evolving discourse of sociology. It also analyses the ‘moral’ as embedded in religion and as an autonomous category emerging with secularisation. The subtleties of rights and righteousness in the method and metamorphosis of development are also dealt with in this paper.

  5. AFRICAN RELIGION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES IN POST COLONIAL AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Ohihon Igboin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between religion and the environment has been one of contest. But in African belief it is a rested argument because the cosmos is conceived as a whole and subsumed under God, the creator. This traditional belief has come in contact with serious Western ideologies on the environment that calls for a re-evaluation of the role of the moral agency in African Religion, namely, the ancestors. It is argued that in spite of the Western influences that have vitrified the traditional belief in the place and potency of the ancestors, a transformative-ecozoic model, with its all-compassing moral, social, cultural and educational contents, provides African Religion with challenges it must rise up to in the context of the comity of global religions. Through analytical and contextual framework, the paper argues further that African Religion still has crucial roles to play in the maintenance of the environment in the 21st century, but that these roles are anchored on its ability to match academics with praxis.

  6. Relationships between Religion, Collectivism, Individualism and Satisfaction with Life

    OpenAIRE

    Benn, Carola

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Religious belief and socio-cultural perspectives of Collectivism and Individualism are influential aspects of our perception of the world. Research has considered differences across groups, cultures and nations. Objectives: This study looks at whether there is a relationship between religion and Collectivism on the individual level. It further looks at correlations of Collectivism with satisfaction with life. Methods: A sample of 109 participants consisting of students and their ...

  7. A philosophical approach to the 'religion - national mythology' synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomilova Nonka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the philosophical aspects of the 'religion - national mythology' synthesis. The main directions of the study are as follows: 1. Both on the individual and social plan, the orientation of the transcending universalizing power of religion could vary depending on the macro-social movements a community /or an individual/ is involved in. For the individual as for the community, religion could be a cultural position transcending ego and ethno-centrism, mono-cultural tendencies; in situations of internal differentiation and disintegration of these entities, the universalizing binding role of religion is partialized and determined by various social groups, who are often in opposition to each other due to their economic political, ethnic, psychological features; 2. This process is usually related to the invalidation of universally uniting religious-moral bonds and values and intensification of differences: power, property, doctrinal differences to a shift of the weight center from internal spiritual movements /particularly typical of mysticism, asceticism, priesthood/ on to practical social action - reformist heresies, the various practical theologies of revolution, liberation, the religious-motivated wars; 3. When reduced to an ethnic, political, or state emblem, religious affiliation to Judaism, Islam Orthodoxy, Catholicism, Protestantism has become and still remain a tool for the sacralization of military and political conflicts. In religion-motivated conflict situations, opposing parties de-sacralize their Sacred Books as their acts contradict the books' moral content; 4. The power of historical mythologies is in reverse proportion to the capacity of a nation to periodically renew its social life world - its psychological attitudes labour relations, political stereotypes; 5. In this type of situation religion is usually reduced to 'belonging', as G. Davie put it, at the expense of 'believing' and a corresponding moral behavior. The

  8. Religions and Human Salvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Khodashenas pelko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Private relationship between man and his Creator is essentially founded on the idea of salvation. In plain English, we will define salvation as what it takes to get into Heaven or Paradise. The Qur’an clearly teaches that salvation is achieved on the basis of good works. The Buddhist, Christian and Hindu doctrines of salvation have agreat deal in common. In each, the emphasis is upon liberation from sin; upon rescue from evil. This paper is deals with berief ideas of Islam, Christianity, Jainism, Hinduism, Buddhism and Sikhism on salvation. Keyword: Heaven; Faith; God; Liberation; Save; Truth. Private relationship between man and his Creator is essentially founded on the idea of salvation. The salvation is a religious concept, and every religion includes a doctrine of salvation, a oteriology, even to Buddhism, which does not acknowledge the existence of God [1-2]. In plain English, we will define salvation as what it takes to get into Heaven or Paradise [3-4]. The Qur’an clearly teaches that salvation is achieved on the basis of good works.Considering the following statements: Every soul shall be paid in full what it has earned. God loves those who cleanse themselves. Gardens of Eden, underneath which rivers flow, there indwelling forever; that is the recompense of the self-purified [5]. The Buddhist, Christian and Hindu doctrines of salvation have a great deal in common. In each, the emphasis is upon liberation from sin, upon rescue from evil. In each, the objective is a return to the previous state of innocence and bliss [6].

  9. 文化安全视域下高校宗教文化热的反思%Reflection of Religion Culture Being Hot in the Universities in the Sight of Cultural Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彤磊

    2012-01-01

    从文化安全视域下,高校宗教文化热对高校马克思主义意识形态的稳固、高校科学精神的培养以及大学生对民族文化的认同存有负面影响。本文认为,高校党政领导和各职能部门应准确理解和把握党和政府的宗教理论和政策,从文化战略高度,加大科学无神论的研究和宣讲力度,弘扬优秀传统文化,以维护高校文化安全。%From the cultural security horizon, the religious culture heat has negative effect to college of scientific spirit culture and college students to national cultural identity being negative .This paper thinks, the university party and the functional departments should be accurate understanding and grasping the government's religious theory and policy, from the cultural strategy height, increasing scientific research and preach atheism strength, to carry forward the fine traditional culture and to protect the culture safety.

  10. Religion, religiosity and premarital sexual attitudes of young people in the informal settlements of Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyimah, Stephen Obeng; Kodzi, Ivy; Emina, Jacques; Cofie, Nicholas; Ezeh, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Although attitudes to premarital sex may be influenced by several factors, the importance of religion to that discourse cannot be underestimated. By providing standards to judge and guide behaviour, religion provides a social control function such that religious persons are expected to act in ways that conform to certain norms. This study investigated the interconnectedness of several dimensions of religion and premarital sexual attitudes among young people in the informal settlements of Nairobi, Kenya. Using reference group as the theoretical base, it was found that those affiliated with Pentecostal/Evangelical faiths had more conservative attitudes towards premarital sex than those of other Christian faiths. Additionally, while a high level of religiosity was found to associate with more conservative views on premarital sex, the effect was more pronounced among Pentecostal groups. The findings are discussed in relation to programmes on adolescent sexuality.

  11. On How to Construct Prison with Religion---Religious Issue on Prison from Prison Culture Construction Perspective%我国监狱是否需要“宗教”--从监狱文化建设视角看监狱中的宗教问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪峰; 高畅

    2015-01-01

    中国政府历来重视宗教问题,保护罪犯的宗教信仰权利。理论界普遍认为,宗教是监狱文化建设的重要方面,对罪犯改造具有积极的辅助作用。宗教的本质不在于宗教仪式或者宗教组织,而在于宗教精神。宗教精神包括忏悔意识和宽容精神、关爱精神以及对现实和功利主义(唯利主义)的超越精神。中国传统人文思想当中包含着丰富的宗教精神,可以启迪人生智慧、指引人生道路。因此,我国监狱需要培育罪犯的宗教精神。%Chinese government always attaches importance to religion, and tries to protect the criminals’ rights of religious belief. The theoretical circle is generally believed that religion was an important aspect of the construction of the prison culture, and has a positive role in auxiliary for the modification of the criminal.The essence of religion is not in a religious ceremony or religious organizations, but in the religious spirit. Religious spirit includes confession consciousness and the spirit of tolerance, love, spirit and the transcendence of spirit. Chinese traditional humanistic thought contains rich religious spirit, can inspire wisdom of life, and give a guide for life."Religious prison"focuses on cultivating criminal spirit of religion.

  12. Religion and Globalization in Laos Religion und Globalisierung in Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boike Rehbein

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available According to Eurocentric sociology, modernization is supposed to make religion secular, a functional system, or a private matter. A closer analysis of the impact of contemporary globalization on religion in Laos shows that these tendencies can only be observed in certain social groups and in certain realms of religion. Some social groups preserve or reinvent religious traditions, others construct a new identity, and some do tend towards secularism or differentiation. The paper investigates these tendencies, referring to an empirical case study. It proposes to explain them within a conceptual framework adapted to societies of the global South which focuses on the concepts of social structure, division of work, socioculture, and institution. On the basis of these concepts, the paper proposes to distinguish between different religious realms, namely, belief, performance, and knowledge. In each of these three realms, different tendencies and social distributions can be observed. Der eurozentrischen Soziologie zufolge wird Religion im Zuge der Modernisierung entweder säkularisiert oder privatisiert oder in ein funktionales System verwandelt. Eine genauere Analyse des Einflusses, den die gegenwärtige Globalisierung auf die Religion in Laos ausübt, zeigt jedoch, dass diese Tendenzen auf bestimmte soziale Gruppen und Aspekte der Religion beschränkt sind. Einige soziale Gruppen bewahren oder rekonstruieren religiöse Traditionen, andere konstruieren eine neue Identität und wieder andere tendieren zu Säkularisierung oder funktionaler Differenzierung. Der Aufsatz analysiert diese Phänomene am Beispiel einer Fallstudie auf der Basis eines an den globalen Süden angepassten Begriffsapparats, der um die Begriffe Sozialstruktur, Tätigkeitsteilung, Soziokultur und Institution kreist. Der Aufsatz schlägt vor, zwischen den religiösen Sphären des Glaubens, der Performanz und des Wissens zu unterscheiden. In jeder Sphäre lassen sich unterschiedliche

  13. A Review of "Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens, and the Culture of Sex"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Joe

    2012-01-01

    An American sociologist who grew up in the Netherlands, Amy Schalet digs deep into cultural values about adolescent sexuality to explain the reasons for the vast disparities between American and Dutch sexual health indicators. This article reviews the book's key conclusions and discusses their implications for parents, educators, and policy…

  14. A Review of "Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens, and the Culture of Sex"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Joe

    2012-01-01

    An American sociologist who grew up in the Netherlands, Amy Schalet digs deep into cultural values about adolescent sexuality to explain the reasons for the vast disparities between American and Dutch sexual health indicators. This article reviews the book's key conclusions and discusses their implications for parents, educators, and policy…

  15. Religion,Order and Metaphor:Reading Religion and Ritual in Chinese Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chao

    2016-01-01

    Western social scientists have fo-cused on the religion and ritual of China for a long time. Since modern times, a number of western si-nologists have committed themselves to conducting detailed and in-depth research on aspects of Chi-nese society and history in order to explain the be-liefs and practices of Chinese people. It is within such an academic background that Religion and Ritual in Chinese Society, edited by Arthur Wolf, an American anthropologist, compiled a series of studies on the religions and rituals of Taiwan and Hong Kong done by fifteen western scholars from the 1950s to the 1970s. The advent of this book not only characterizes the western academic study of Chinese society and culture of that era, but also causes us to reflect on current research. This book is a work of great academic value, as well as serves as a model for the study of sinology in the field of western anthropology.

  16. A qualitative investigation of Muslim and Christian women's views of religion and feminism in their lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saba Rasheed; Mahmood, Amina; Moel, Joy; Hudson, Carolyn; Leathers, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative investigation explored a relatively understudied aspect of cultural diversity: feminism and religion in the lives of religiously diverse women. More specifically, structured interviews were used to investigate views of religion, women's issues, gender roles, culture, and feminism for a small group of Muslim and Christian women living in the United States. The data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research methods (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997). Findings indicated a complex relationship between feminism, gender roles, culture, and religion for these women with the majority of the Muslim women reporting that their religion supports feminist principles and identifying themselves as feminist. Christian women were less willing to endorse the feminist label. Implications for multicultural feminist practice are discussed. 2008 APA

  17. Gender Differences in the Association Between Religion/Spirituality and Simultaneous Polysubstance Use (SPU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheampong, Abenaa B; Lasopa, Sonam; Striley, Catherine W; Cottler, Linda B

    2016-10-01

    While religion/spirituality strongly protects against drug use (Cheney et al. in J Drug Issues 44(1):94-113, 2014), little is known about gender differences in the association of religion/spirituality on simultaneous polysubstance use (SPU) among those who use prescription opioids. Data come from a community-based study that recruited community members from the St Louis area (N = 632). Participants were asked whether they used prescription opioids when not prescribed for them or in ways other than prescribed in the past 12 months. Religion/spirituality was categorized as high, medium, or low based on personal views on the importance of religion and spirituality, attendance at religious services, and advice seeking from religious leaders. SPU was defined as non-medical use of opioids simultaneously with use of cocaine, alcohol, ecstasy, or marijuana. Multivariate logistic regression determined the association between religion/spirituality, demographic variables, and SPU. Men with high levels of religion/spirituality had 63 % decreased odds of SPU compared with men with low levels. Other variables associated with SPU in men were four or more arrests (AOR 2.21), multiple sex partners (AOR 2.11), and opioid use without a prescription (AOR 3.04). Women with high or medium levels of religion/spirituality had 58 and 62 % decreased odds of SPU compared with women with low levels. Variables that predicted SPU in women also included 4+ arrests (AOR 5.00) and never being married (AOR 2.13). Being African-American was associated with decreased odds of SPU in women (AOR 0.32). Overall, a high level of religion/spirituality was associated with lower odds of SPU. Gender differences in this association were evident, whereas women with even a medium level of religion/spirituality had significantly decreased odds of SPU. Future drug prevention and interventions should consider the relevance of religion/spirituality in SPU.

  18. Have Tibetan Culture And Religion Become Extinct?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    HaveTibetanCultureAndReligionBecomeExtinct?TheChineseForeignMinistryarangedfor10BeijingcorespondentsofforeignandHongKongmass...

  19. Normative Cognition in Culture and Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jeppe Sinding

    2013-01-01

    "Normative Cognition" is a theoretical model of human cognition as driven, modulated and governed by symbolically mediated inter-subjective norms and conventions......"Normative Cognition" is a theoretical model of human cognition as driven, modulated and governed by symbolically mediated inter-subjective norms and conventions...

  20. Origins of religion, cognition and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    Bogen drejer sig om religionens, kognitionens og kulturens oprindelse. Den består af 21 kapitler foruden introduktionen, skrevet primært af religionsforskere med enkelte bidrag fra andre discipliner. Alle bidrag gøre op med den tidligere evolutionspsykologis og kognitionsvidenskabs biproduktshypo...

  1. Cultural Context Shapes Essentialist Beliefs about Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalik, Lisa; Leslie, Sarah-Jane; Rhodes, Marjorie

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the processes by which essentialist beliefs about religious categories develop. Children (ages 5 and 10) and adults (n = 350) from 2 religious groups (Jewish and Christian), with a range of levels of religiosity, completed switched-at-birth tasks in which they were told that a baby had been born to parents of 1…

  2. Religion and the Literary Critic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Potter

    1989-05-01

    Full Text Available In a recent article Jonathan Culler, condemned out of hand any use of religious terminology to define literature, seeing this as part of the destructive processes so-called “religion” has brought to American life. The article is an attempt to refute Culler by indicating, through an analysis of William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying, that an attempt to reject all religion as being destructive or quaintly anachronistic (as Culler ultimately does seriously limits the capacity of the literary critic to explore works of literature. Evidence is brought forward to suggest that while Faulkner rejects the hypocritically pious type of religion as does Culler, he, unlike Culler, seems to be aware that religion is a much broader and deeper concept than this, exploring in an extremely positive way a type of experience universally accepted as religious, which has about it none of the qualities which Culler rejects.

  3. The effect of glucocorticoids on sex steroid synthesis in cultured Taenia crassiceps Wake Forest University (WFU) cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, L; Valdez, R A; Salvador, V; Rodríguez, A G; Willms, K; Romano, M C

    2012-12-01

    We have shown previously that cultured Taenia crassiceps Wake Forest University (WFU) and Taenia solium cysticerci, as well as the adult worms, synthesize sex steroid hormones from [3H]steroid precursors and that androgens and oestrogens influence the in vitro development of the parasites. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used to control the inflammation caused by T. solium cysticerci in the brain. These steroids stimulate oestrogen synthesis in several tissues. Since there is no information on the effect of GC on the endocrine function of cysticerci, we investigated the effect of natural and synthetic GCs on the synthesis of oestrogens in cultured T. crassiceps WFU cysticerci. The cysticerci were obtained from the peritoneal cavity of infected female BALB/c mice; the cysts were washed extensively and pre-cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) plus antibiotics for 5 days. The parasites were further cultured with different doses of corticosterone, dexamethasone or the vehicle for 5 days. [3H]Dehydroepiandrosterone (3H-DHEA) was added to the media and the cysticerci were further incubated for 6 or 24 h. Media were then removed and the steroids ether-extracted. Aliquots of the media were seeded on silica gel plates and developed in solvent systems. Parasites incubated in the presence of 3H-DHEA synthesized [3H]androstenediol, [3H]testosterone and [3H]17β-oestradiol ([3H]17β-E2). The addition of 100 nm or higher corticosterone doses to the media increased [3H]17β-E2 synthesis fourfold after 24 h. Dexamethasone also increased [3H]17β-E2 synthesis. The experiments presented here show for the first time that corticosterone and the synthetic GC dexamethasone modulate the synthesis of oestrogens by cysticerci.

  4. Grænser for religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchau, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Paper om hvor og under hvilke betingelser danskerne finder religion acceptabel og/eller passende......Paper om hvor og under hvilke betingelser danskerne finder religion acceptabel og/eller passende...

  5. Science and Religion: Controverse or Complementarity

    OpenAIRE

    Zeps, Dainis

    2009-01-01

    Science and Religion: controverse or complementarity Relations between science and religion since times of Galileo, Newton and Leibniz discussed . Omega point approach considered and interpreted: using Omega point and Tipler's Singularities model, time versus creative order discussed.

  6. Grænser for religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchau, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Paper om hvor og under hvilke betingelser danskerne finder religion acceptabel og/eller passende......Paper om hvor og under hvilke betingelser danskerne finder religion acceptabel og/eller passende...

  7. Five Major Religions in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    CHINA is a nation of many religions, the main five ones being Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Roman Catholicism and Christianity (Protestantism). There are also some special religions of some minority nationalities or regional beliefs. Buddhism was introduced into China from India around the First Century, and gradually developed into several sects including the Han-language-family Buddhism, the Tibetan-language-family Buddhism (or Lamaism) and Pali-language-family Buddhism. For all of these sects, recent data reveals there are more than 9,500 Buddhist temples and 170,000 monks

  8. On the Origin of Ethics: is Ethics Dependent on Religion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Briedis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the historical and intellectual linkage between two fundamental spheres of culturereligion and ethics. The theistic ethical perspective and its most radical “supranaturalistic” form are explored. On the other hand, the atheistic position is also revised and the notion of anti-theism is introduced. After that critical analysis is presented on a substantial question concerning the kind of relation between religion and ethics: subordination, assimilation, complementarity or opposition. This question, in turn, demands a careful observance of various religious and secular perspectives, concerning the sources of morality, and poses the problem of faith and knowledge in a new light. Ethical norms constitute crucial part of various religious doctrines and to a certain degree correlate with major shifts in the history of secular culture. However, are these historical and theoretical testimonies sufficient for maintaining that ethics depends on religion and if so, what kind of dependence is it? In the last part of the paper the author formulates a sketch of an answer to a major theoretical concern on the way of reconciling religion and ethics beyond subordination or assimilation. 

  9. Is Buddhism the low fertility religion of Asia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vegard Skirbekk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The influence of religion on demographic behaviors has been extensively studied mainly for Abrahamic religions. Although Buddhism is the world's fourth largest religion and is dominant in several Asian nations experiencing very low fertility, the impact of Buddhism on childbearing has received comparatively little research attention. Objective: This paper draws upon a variety of data sources in different countries in Asia in order to test our hypothesis that Buddhism is related to low fertility. Methods: Religious differentials in terms of period fertility in three nations (India, Cambodia and Nepal and cohort fertility in three case studies (Mongolia, Thailand and Japan are analyzed. The analyses are divided into two parts: descriptive and multivariate analyses. Results: Our results suggest that Buddhist affiliation tends to be negatively or not associated with childbearing outcomes, controlling for education, region of residence, age and marital status. Although the results vary between the highly diverse contextual and institutional settings investigated, we find evidence that Buddhist affiliation or devotion is not related to elevated fertility across these very different cultural settings. Conclusions: Across the highly diverse cultural and developmental contexts under which the different strains of Buddhism dominate, the effect of Buddhism is consistently negatively or insignificantly related to fertility. These findings stand in contrast to studies of Abrahamic religions that tend to identify a positive link between religiosity and fertility.

  10. Prosociality and religion: History and experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beit-Hallahmi, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Norenzayan et al. are praised for choosing to deal with significant questions in the understanding of religion. They are then criticized for refusing to define religion and for relying on problematic theoretical concepts. The authors discuss Abrahamic religions as the best-known prosocial religions, but the evidence shows that the case does not fit their conceptual framework. Finally, an extension of the authors' ideas about the meaning of priming effects is proposed.

  11. A model for the evolutionary diversification of religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebeli, Michael; Ispolatov, Iaroslav

    2010-12-21

    We address the problem of cultural diversification by studying selection on cultural ideas that colonize human hosts and using diversification of religions as a conceptual example. In analogy to studying the evolution of pathogens or symbionts colonizing animal hosts, we use models for host-pathogen dynamics known from theoretical epidemiology. In these models, religious content colonizes individual humans. Rates of transmission of ideas between humans, i.e., transmission of cultural content, and rates of loss of ideas (loss of belief) are determined by the phenotype of the cultural content, and by interactions between hosts carrying different ideas. In particular, based on the notion that cultural non-conformism can be negative frequency-dependent (for example, religion can lead to oppression of lower classes and emergence of non-conformism and dissent once a religious belief has reached dominance), we assume that the rate of loss of belief increases as the number of humans colonized by a particular religious phenotype increases. This generates frequency-dependent selection on cultural content, and we use evolutionary theory to show that this frequency dependence can lead to the emergence of coexisting clusters of different cultural types. The different clusters correspond to different cultural traditions, and hence our model describes the emergence of distinct descendant cultures from a single ancestral culture in the absence of any geographical isolation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Louse infestation of the Chiribaya Culture, Southern Peru: variation in prevalence by age and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Karl J

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the interpretive potential of archaeoparasitology, it is important to demonstrate that the epidemiology of ancient parasites is comparable to that of modern parasites. Once this is demonstrated, then we can be secure that the evidence of ancient parasitism truly reflects the pathoecology of parasitic disease. Presented here is an analysis of the paleoepidemiology of Pediculus humanus infestation from 146 mummies from the Chiribaya culture 1000-1250 AD of Southern Peru. The study demonstrates the modern parasitological axiom that 10% of the population harbors 70% of the parasites holds true for ancient louse infestation. This is the first demonstration of the paleoepidemiology of prehistoric lice infestation.

  13. Unity in diversity: results of a randomized clinical culturally tailored pilot HIV prevention intervention trial in Baltimore, Maryland, for African American men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Karin; Kuramoto, Satoko J; German, Danielle; Fields, Errol; Spikes, Pilgrim S; Patterson, Jocelyn; Latkin, Carl

    2013-06-01

    Unity in Diversity was a randomized controlled trial of a culturally tailored HIV prevention intervention for African American men who have sex with men. The intervention condition was six group-based sessions and one individual session. The control condition was a single-session HIV prevention review. Participants were aged 18 years or older, identified as African American/Black race, reported having at least two sex partners in the prior 90 days (at least one of whom must be a male partner), unprotected anal sex with male partner in the prior 90 days, and willing to test for HIV. Retention exceeded 95% at 3-month follow-up. Results of multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for baseline risk, HIV status, and health insurance indicate intervention efficacy in decreasing the number of male sex partners and marginal effects on condom use with male partners and HIV-negative/unknown partners. Specifically, intervention condition was associated with increased odds of zero male sex partners (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26-7.28), condom use with male partners (AOR = 2.64, 95% CI = 0.95-7.36), and HIV-negative/unknown status partners (AOR = 3.19, 95% CI = 0.98-10.38) at follow-up. These results contribute to the limited number of culturally appropriate models of HIV prevention intervention that are urgently needed for African American men who have sex with men to address their persistently high rates of HIV.

  14. Life Interpretation and Religion among Icelandic Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Gunnar J.

    2009-01-01

    Does religion play any specific part in Icelandic teenagers' life interpretation? This paper examines Icelandic teenagers' talk about religion and presents some of the findings in interviews with teenagers in a qualitative research project. The focus is especially on how three individuals express themselves about the influence of religion on their…

  15. The "Make Your Own Religion" Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Chad M.; Hege, Brent A. R.; Kleckley, Russell; Willsky-Ciollo, Lydia; Lopez, Davina C.

    2016-01-01

    The "Make Your Own Religion" class project was designed to address a perceived need to introduce more theoretical thinking about religion into a typical religion survey course, and to do so in such a way that students would experience the wonder of theoretical discovery, and through or because of that discovery hopefully both better…

  16. The "Make Your Own Religion" Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Chad M.; Hege, Brent A. R.; Kleckley, Russell; Willsky-Ciollo, Lydia; Lopez, Davina C.

    2016-01-01

    The "Make Your Own Religion" class project was designed to address a perceived need to introduce more theoretical thinking about religion into a typical religion survey course, and to do so in such a way that students would experience the wonder of theoretical discovery, and through or because of that discovery hopefully both better…

  17. Life Interpretation and Religion among Icelandic Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Gunnar J.

    2009-01-01

    Does religion play any specific part in Icelandic teenagers' life interpretation? This paper examines Icelandic teenagers' talk about religion and presents some of the findings in interviews with teenagers in a qualitative research project. The focus is especially on how three individuals express themselves about the influence of religion on their…

  18. Cross-Cultural Sex Differences in Post-Conflict Affiliation following Sports Matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benenson, Joyce F; Wrangham, Richard W

    2016-08-22

    The nature of ancestral human social structure and the circumstances in which men or women tend to be more cooperative are subjects of intense debate. The male warrior hypothesis proposes that success in intergroup contests has been vital in human evolution and that men therefore must engage in maximally effective intragroup cooperation [1-3]. Post-conflict affiliation between opponents is further proposed to facilitate future cooperation [4], which has been demonstrated in non-human primates [5] and humans [6]. The sex that invests more in post-conflict affiliation, therefore, should cooperate more. Supportive evidence comes from chimpanzees, a close genetic relative to humans that also engages in male intergroup aggression [7]. Here we apply this principle to humans by testing the hypothesis that among members of a large community, following a conflict, males are predisposed to be more ready than females to repair their relationship via friendly contact. We took high-level sports matches as a proxy for intragroup conflict, because they occur within a large organization and constitute semi-naturalistic, standardized, aggressive, and intense confrontations. Duration or frequency of peaceful physical contacts served as the measure of post-conflict affiliation because they are strongly associated with pro-social intentions [8, 9]. Across tennis, table tennis, badminton, and boxing, with participants from 44 countries, duration of post-conflict affiliation was longer for males than females. Our results indicate that unrelated human males are more predisposed than females to invest in a behavior, post-conflict affiliation, that is expected to facilitate future intragroup cooperation.

  19. Corporate religion og Paulus' breve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Tang

    2007-01-01

    , analyseres grundigt. Af undersøgelsen fremgår det, at Kundes opfattelse af religion svarer til Clifford Geertz’ klassiske kulturantropologiske religionsdefinition. Ydermere fremdrages en række paralleller til Paulus’ breve, der godtgør, at Kundes forståelse og brug af religiøse forestillinger kan ses som en...

  20. JOURNAL OF RELIGION 2014 CURVEEE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IK

    It is against this background that religion emerged when ... have evolved only within the context of the Christian world view, with its teaching about ... such as arts and crafts, aside music, it lays emphasis on memorization of chapters of their Koran .... organizational goals is greatly dependent on the quality of leadership that.

  1. Has Political Science Ignored Religion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettell, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A common complaint from political scientists involved in the study of religion is that religious issues have been largely overlooked by political science. Through a content analysis of leading political science and sociology journals from 2000 to 2010, this article considers the extent of this claim. The results show that political science…

  2. Disaggregating Corporate Freedom of Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2015-01-01

    The paper investigates arguments for the idea in recent American Supreme Court jurisprudence that freedom of religion should not simply be understood as an ordinary legal right within the framework of liberal constitutionalism but as an expression of deference by the state and its legal system...

  3. Wicca : beskrivning av en religion

    OpenAIRE

    Lagerstedt, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    My essay is a description about the religion Wicca; laws, ethics, history, rites, inauguration and how they relate to the gods and the different seasons.It’s also about the wiccan history and how wicca have created their own history by taking old mythic stories and making them their legacy.

  4. Has Political Science Ignored Religion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettell, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A common complaint from political scientists involved in the study of religion is that religious issues have been largely overlooked by political science. Through a content analysis of leading political science and sociology journals from 2000 to 2010, this article considers the extent of this claim. The results show that political science…

  5. World Religions for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Dorothy Arnett

    This teaching and resource guide contains ideas appropriate for teaching junior and senior high school students about the following religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Individual sections discuss general approaches to teaching the religious philosophies and rituals, and exemplary…

  6. ‘Bringing it all back home’: mentalities, models and the historical study of religions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Sjöblom

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available If historians of mentalities are studying cultural models of the past, the cognitive historians of religions are in their turn studying religious model. A more useful definition for religious mentalities would be those cultural models which involves representations based on counterintuitive claims. The history of religions would methodologically be something like a specialized branch of the history of mentalities, and it would be necessary for them to work in close relationship, as applying cognitive approaches to cultural materials always relies on the principle of holism, that is, that all cultural representations should be viewed as parts of the cognitive network system they are found in.

  7. Proliferating Panic: Regulating Representations of Sex and Gender during the Culture Wars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristyn Davies

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available During the culture wars in the United States surveillance of representations of the American citizen reached a particular frenzy. This article explores the moral panic that has accompanied attempts by the New Right to shape and define the American citizen as heterosexual, monogamous, white, and a believer in middle-class family values. Davies focuses on the work of performance artists Karen Finley and Holly Hughes whose work challenges hegemonic discourses of gender and sexuality. They were two of those artists branded by the media as the ‘NEA Four’, practitioners whose work was considered indecent and consequently de-funded by the National Endowment for the Arts. The article imagines performance art as a queer time and space; that is, not only does performance art contest normative structures of traditional theatrical performance, so too does it challenge understandings of normative subjects, and the relation of the arts to structures of power.

  8. Marital satisfaction, sexual problems, and the possible difficulties on sex therapy in traditional Islamic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasan, Aziz; Gürgen, Faruk

    2009-01-01

    We plan to investigate the level of marital satisfaction, the prevalence of sexual problems, and related issues in couples who were referred to an outpatient clinic of psychiatry for their sexual problems. All were living according to traditional Islamic culture. Twenty-five (80.64%) of the couples attended the clinic for not being able to have any sexual intercourse. Overall, 25.8% of the women, and 3.2% of the men had been married without their consent; those marriages were arranged and mediated by matchmakers. Vaginismus (58.06%) was the most common diagnosis among women and premature ejaculation (38.70%) among men. We found that marital satisfaction was affected by the mode of marriage.

  9. Proliferating Panic: Regulating Representations of Sex and Gender during the Culture Wars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristyn Davies

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available During the culture wars in the United States surveillance of representations of the American citizen reached a particular frenzy. This article explores the moral panic that has accompanied attempts by the New Right to shape and define the American citizen as heterosexual, monogamous, white, and a believer in middle-class family values. Davies focuses on the work of performance artists Karen Finley and Holly Hughes whose work challenges hegemonic discourses of gender and sexuality. They were two of those artists branded by the media as the ‘NEA Four’, practitioners whose work was considered indecent and consequently de-funded by the National Endowment for the Arts. The article imagines performance art as a queer time and space; that is, not only does performance art contest normative structures of traditional theatrical performance, so too does it challenge understandings of normative subjects, and the relation of the arts to structures of power.

  10. UFO Religions – Beginnings and Main Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijel Sinani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at UFO religions, and considers the major factors that have played a role in the emergence and development of these alternative religious movements - from reports of close encounters of the third and fourth kinds and science fiction production, to alternative ideological elaborations of contacts with extraterrestrial worlds. It looks at the basic theological premises, iconography, activities, and, more generally, cultural precepts of several UFO religious movements (the Aetherius Society, Heaven's Gate, Unarius, the Raelian movement. Attention is drawn to the religious connotations of UFO discourse, and its motifs of "otherness" and "supernaturalness". In addition, the relation between the roles and themes promoted within the contactee movement and the accounts of persons claiming to have been abducted by aliens is explored. Finally, the paper highlights the key existential questions and identifies the themes and motifs with which UFO religionists present themselves to the public.

  11. Spirituality, religion, and healing in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchalski, Christina M; Dorff, Rabbi Elliot; Hendi, Imam Yahya

    2004-11-01

    In end-of-life care, attending to spiritual needs ensures that a dying patient has the opportunity to find meaning in the midst of suffering and to have the opportunity for love, compassion, and partnership in their final journey. This article summarizes some of the beliefs and traditions from Judaism, Islam, and Christianity that affect people as they face their own dying and mortality. People who do not participate in any formal religion also have a drive to find meaning in the midst of suffering and dying. They may find this in personal ways. This article presents some practical tools to help clinicians address and respect spiritual and religious issues of patients. It is crucial that our culture and our systems of care for the dying include a spiritual approach so that dying can be meaningful and even filled with hope.

  12. Personality and religion among female university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Alan Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The short-form Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire was completed by 462 female university students between the ages of 18 and 30 in France, together with the Francis Scale of Attitude toward Christianity. The findings are consistent with those from a series of studies employing the same measure of religiosity among school pupils and adults in England and Wales, thus adding to the cross-cultural evidence concerning the stability of the association between personality and religion. According to these findings there is an inverse relationship between psychoticism and religiosity, while neither neuroticism nor extraversion is either positively or negatively related to religiosity. These findings are discussed in terms of Eysenck’s theory relating personality to social attitudes and in light of discrepant findings proposed by other studies conducted among adult samples.

  13. Religion and cancer: examining the possible connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Jacquelyn N

    2009-01-01

    Numerous sound scientific studies (cross-sectional and longitudinal) have found a positive correlation between religion and physical and mental health. In particular, there is evidence that demonstrates that religion helps cancer patients better adjust to and cope with their disease, at least psychologically. However, some research suggests that mediating factors associated with religion may explain the positive effects of religion on health. This article argues that even if this is the case, there is still intrinsic value to religion in that the mediators themselves are strongly connected to religion, and therefore religion is important to the patient in terms of coping, support, hope, and meaning. This has possible important implications for clinical practice.

  14. The role of religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Ian

    2009-11-01

    I cannot agree with Chris Jeynes's assertion (October pp15-16) that to equate religious belief with belief in the tooth fairy is to be unaware of our cultural history. It is true, ofcourse, that cathedrals are inspiring achievements of architecture, but that has no bearing whatsoever on the truth of the beliefs of their designers. There are similarly impressive Muslim holy buildings, motivated by similar beliefs, but, to take one example, Jesus was either the son of God or he was not, so the beliefs of at least one group must therefore be incorrect. Pretty buildings make for poor evidence of universal truths.

  15. Religion as a Factor in Israeli-Turkish Relations: A Constructivist Overlook

    OpenAIRE

    Oztürk, Tugçe Ersoy

    2015-01-01

    The influence of religion in the foreign policy has recently begun to be discussed among the scholars of international relations field. That the role of religion as an attribute of individuals and communities and in its institutional connections with the state cannot be ignored has started to be widely accepted. This study argues that besides the material reasons stemming from realpolitik, there are also behind the scene, certain 'cultural codes'ᅵ that have played an important rol...

  16. HEALING AND WOMEN HEALERS IN YORUBA RELIGION AND AFRICAN CHRISTIANITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyeronke Olademo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Healing in African indigenous cultures is a corporate matter involving the totality of the person, family and community. Healing presupposes sickness; its practice is therefore interlocked with a people’s conception of sickness and diseases. In Africa, sickness is an attestation to the fact that an individual is out of tune with nature and the supernatural, which is represented by the various deities. The physical signs are therefore a part of the story and not the whole story. Similarly, the Christian conception of disease and healing is intertwined with the individual’s relationship with the supernatural and the physical signs are but part of the story. Diagnosis and prescription for treatment and healing take into cognizance all these facts and this is where the healer comes in. The healer constitutes an integral part of the patient’s healing in Yoruba religion as well as in African Christianity. There are female and male healers in both religions but whereas these specialists are designated as healers/diviners/custodians of tradition in Yoruba religion, in African Christianity, they are known as prophetesses/prophets/deliverance ministers. This paper seeks to evaluate the position of the healer among the Yoruba of Nigeria. A second objective is to analyze contemporary postures on healing activities in Yoruba religion and Christianity and how women feature in these processes.

  17. A Sex Work Research Symposium: Examining Positionality in Documenting Sex Work and Sex Workers’ Rights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Megan Lowthers; Magdalena Sabat; Elya M Durisin; Kamala Kempadoo

    2017-01-01

    Historically, academic literature on sex work has documented the changing debates, policies, and cultural discourse surrounding the sex industry, and their impact on the rights of sex workers worldwide...

  18. Elevers komplekse identitetskrav som utfordring i religions- og livssynsundervisning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tove Nicolaisen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In Religious Education (RE, religious identity is usually considered to be important. When the common mandatory Norwegian RE subject was implemented in 1997, an aim was to support the identities of the children, based on their background in a religious or secular tradition. In this article, I question this simplification concerning identity and explore whether intersectionality can be a more nuanced and empowering approach. Findings from a project about Hindu children’s experiences with RE in Norway indicate that the intersection of religion, culture, language, ethnicity, nationality and family is the focal point of children’s identity claims. I give examples of the children’s self-understandings and challenges. They rooted their self-understandings in the values of the transnational family, diasporic experiences and ethnicity. Religion was important as part of the family’s cultural luggage, which included strong ties to their countries of origin. In spite of this, in RE they were often labeled in accordance with their specific religious tradition. The article discusses how RE approaches to identity can avoid restricting identity to externally imposed categories, and instead being sensitive to the lived experiences of the children and their own identity claims. How can RE teaching meet children’s diverse and fluid identity claims and deal with religion as part of a complex cultural context?

  19. Crime fiction and mediatized religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    In recent Scandinavian crime fiction an ongoing discussion on religion and religiosity is taking place. This undercurrent goes historically a long way back, but the past few decades seem to have left room for an altered view on religion in modern crime fiction. Crime fiction has usually been...... connected with modernity, modern society and ensuing secularity, but the question is, then, what happens to crime fiction if modern societies no longer uphold its trust in secular ideals. The thesis is that this leaves modern Scandinavian media open for a religious discussion which then also seeps...... into popular crime fiction. In novels by Arne Dahl, Henning Mortensen, Gunnar Staalesen, A.J. Kazinski, Gretelise Holm and several other Scandinavian writers of crime fiction it is possible to locate an interest in theology and topics of religious philosophy which reflects this current trend in modern...

  20. Religion in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    In recent Scandinavian crime fiction an ongoing discussion on religion and religiosity is taking place. This undercurrent goes historically a long way back, but the past few decades seem to have left room for an altered view on religion in modern crime fiction. Crime fiction has usually been...... connected with modernity, modern society and ensuing secularity, but the question is, then, what happens to crime fiction if modern societies no longer uphold its trust in secular ideals. The thesis is that this leaves modern Scandinavian media open for a religious discussion which then also seeps...... into popular crime fiction. In novels by Arne Dahl, Henning Mortensen, Gunnar Staalesen, A.J. Kazinski, Gretelise Holm and several other Scandinavian writers of crime fiction it is possible to locate an interest in theology and topics of religious philosophy which reflects this current trend in modern...

  1. Death, dying and informatics: misrepresenting religion on MedLine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fins Joseph J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The globalization of medical science carries for doctors worldwide a correlative duty to deepen their understanding of patients' cultural contexts and religious backgrounds, in order to satisfy each as a unique individual. To become better informed, practitioners may turn to MedLine, but it is unclear whether the information found there is an accurate representation of culture and religion. To test MedLine's representation of this field, we chose the topic of death and dying in the three major monotheistic religions. Methods We searched MedLine using PubMed in order to retrieve and thematically analyze full-length scholarly journal papers or case reports dealing with religious traditions and end-of-life care. Our search consisted of a string of words that included the most common denominations of the three religions, the standard heading terms used by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature (NRCBL, and the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH used by the National Library of Medicine. Eligible articles were limited to English-language papers with an abstract. Results We found that while a bibliographic search in MedLine on this topic produced instant results and some valuable literature, the aggregate reflected a selection bias. American writers were over-represented given the global prevalence of these religious traditions. Denominationally affiliated authors predominated in representing the Christian traditions. The Islamic tradition was under-represented. Conclusion MedLine's capability to identify the most current, reliable and accurate information about purely scientific topics should not be assumed to be the same case when considering the interface of religion, culture and end-of-life care.

  2. Death, dying and informatics: misrepresenting religion on MedLine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Del Pozo, Pablo; Fins, Joseph J

    2005-07-01

    The globalization of medical science carries for doctors worldwide a correlative duty to deepen their understanding of patients' cultural contexts and religious backgrounds, in order to satisfy each as a unique individual. To become better informed, practitioners may turn to MedLine, but it is unclear whether the information found there is an accurate representation of culture and religion. To test MedLine's representation of this field, we chose the topic of death and dying in the three major monotheistic religions. We searched MedLine using PubMed in order to retrieve and thematically analyze full-length scholarly journal papers or case reports dealing with religious traditions and end-of-life care. Our search consisted of a string of words that included the most common denominations of the three religions, the standard heading terms used by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature (NRCBL), and the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) used by the National Library of Medicine. Eligible articles were limited to English-language papers with an abstract. We found that while a bibliographic search in MedLine on this topic produced instant results and some valuable literature, the aggregate reflected a selection bias. American writers were over-represented given the global prevalence of these religious traditions. Denominationally affiliated authors predominated in representing the Christian traditions. The Islamic tradition was under-represented. MedLine's capability to identify the most current, reliable and accurate information about purely scientific topics should not be assumed to be the same case when considering the interface of religion, culture and end-of-life care.

  3. A Sex Work Research Symposium: Examining Positionality in Documenting Sex Work and Sex Workers’ Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Lowthers

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, academic literature on sex work has documented the changing debates, policies, and cultural discourse surrounding the sex industry, and their impact on the rights of sex workers worldwide. As sex work scholars look to the future of sex workers’ rights, however, we are also in a critical moment of self-reflection on how sex work scholarship engages with sex worker communities, produces knowledge surrounding sex work, and represents the lived experiences of sex workers’ rights, organizing, and activism. In this short Communication, proceedings from a recent sex work research symposium entitled, Sexual Economies, Politics, and Positionality in Sex Work Research are presented. Held at the Centre for Refugee Studies at York University, this symposium is a response to the need for sex work researchers, sex workers, and sex worker-led organizations to come together and critically examine the future of research on sex work and the politics of documenting sex workers’ rights.

  4. The sociologically acceptable definition of religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Mirko

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author has presented several important issues regarding the sociology of religion, but primarily the issue of the sociologically acceptable definition of religion both in theoretical and empirical research. Bearing in mind the sociology of religion in former Yugoslavia the author has first discussed the possibility of a general definition of the sociology of religion, but has stated the opposite view as well. Then he has dealt with the two basic approaches towards religion and two general definitions of sociology, namely substantial and functional ones. Finally the author has tried to define the religiousness in terms of sociological empirical research of human attachment to religion and church in post-socialism.

  5. Lived religion: implications for nursing ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl

    2009-07-01

    This article explores how ethics and religion interface in everyday life by drawing on a study examining the negotiation of religious and spiritual plurality in health care. Employing methods of critical ethnography, namely, interviews and participant observation, data were collected from patients, health care providers, administrators and spiritual care providers. The findings revealed the degree to which 'lived religion' was intertwined with 'lived ethics' for many participants; particularly for people from the Sikh faith. For these participants, religion was woven into everyday life, making distinctions between public and private, secular and sacred spaces improbable. Individual interactions, institutional resource allocation, and social discourses are all embedded in social relationships of power that prevent religion from being a solely personal or private matter. Strategies for the reintegration of religion into nursing ethics are: adjusting professional codes and theories of ethics to reflect the influence of religion; and the contribution of critical perspectives, such as postcolonial feminism, to the understanding of lived ethics.

  6. Three Religions Mixed and Confucianism Dominant——The General Cultural Identity of Creation of the Gods%混合三教 以儒为本——论《封神演义》的整体文化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亦辉

    2011-01-01

    The general cultural identity of Creation of the Gods is "three religions mixed and Confucianism dominant",that is to say,the contents of three religions and ideas in the Creation of the Gods are in the state of mixture,but the fundamental thought is orthodox Confucianism.Political ethics of Creation of the Gods has distinct Neo-Confucianism cultural features,mainly reflecting on the revolutionary ideas of Confucianism,loyalty and filial piety,and the thought of Confucian benevolent governance.The general cultural identity mainly comes from the overall narrative strategy in Creation of the Gods,which is the coexistence and integration of orthodox narrative and folk narrative.%《封神演义》的整体文化特征是"混合三教,以儒为本"。三教的思想与内容在《封神演义》中呈现为混合杂陈的状态,但其思想的根本却是正统儒家思想。其主要表现便是对儒家的革命思想、忠孝思想和仁政思想的认同,且这些思想具有鲜明的理学文化特征。"混合三教"是该书民间叙事特征的反映,"以儒为本"是该书正统叙事特征的反映。编者"奇正并存,执正驭奇"的叙事策略是这一整体文化特征形成的主要原因。

  7. Assortative sociality, limited dispersal, infectious disease and the genesis of the global pattern of religion diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy

    2008-01-01

    Why are religions far more numerous in the tropics compared with the temperate areas? We propose, as an answer, that more religions have emerged and are maintained in the tropics because, through localized coevolutionary races with hosts, infectious diseases select for three anticontagion behaviours: in-group assortative sociality; out-group avoidance; and limited dispersal. These behaviours, in turn, create intergroup boundaries that effectively fractionate, isolate and diversify an original culture leading to the genesis of two or more groups from one. Religion is one aspect of a group's culture that undergoes this process. If this argument is correct then, across the globe, religion diversity should correlate positively with infectious disease diversity, reflecting an evolutionary history of antagonistic coevolution between parasites and hosts and subsequent religion genesis. We present evidence that supports this model: for a global sample of traditional societies, societal range size is reduced in areas with more pathogens compared with areas with few pathogens, and in contemporary countries religion diversity is positively related to two measures of parasite stress. PMID:18664438

  8. Religion and disparities: considering the influences of Islam on the health of American Muslims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Curlin, Farr A

    2013-12-01

    Both theory and data suggest that religions shape the way individuals interpret and seek help for their illnesses. Yet, health disparities research has rarely examined the influence of a shared religion on the health of individuals from distinct minority communities. In this paper, we focus on Islam and American Muslims to outline the ways in which a shared religion may impact the health of a racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse minority community. We use Kleinman's "cultural construction of clinical reality" as a theoretical framework to interpret the extant literature on American Muslim health. We then propose a research agenda that would extend current disparities research to include measures of religiosity, particularly among populations that share a minority religious affiliation. The research we propose would provide a fuller understanding of the relationships between religion and health among Muslim Americans and other minority communities and would thereby undergird efforts to reduce unwarranted health disparities.

  9. Culture of honour theory and social anxiety: Cross-regional and sex differences in relationships among honour-concerns, social anxiety and reactive aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Ashley N; Buckner, Julia D; Weeks, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with the "flight or fight" model of anxiety, social anxiety may incite withdrawal or attack; yet, it is unclear why some socially anxious individuals are vulnerable to aggress. It may be that culture impacts tendencies to "fight" or "flee" from social threat. Honour cultures, including the American South, permit or even promote aggression in response to honour-threats. Thus, social anxiety in the South may be more associated with aggression than in non-honour cultures. In the current sample, region moderated the relation between social anxiety and aggression; social anxiety related positively to reactive (but not proactive) aggression among Southerners (n = 285), but not Midwesterners (n = 258). Participant sex further moderated the relationship, such that it was significant only for Southern women. Also, for Southerners, prototypically masculine honour-concerns mediated the relationship between social anxiety and reactive aggression. Cultural factors may play key roles in aggressive behaviour among some socially anxious individuals.

  10. Mediality and Materiality in the History of Religions. A Medieval Case Study about Religion and Gender in In-Between Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Beinhauer-Köhler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses possible terminologies for labelling historical materials. Drawing on the history of the city of Cairo around the 12th century – to the Fatimid era and to later Ayyubid times – it looks at the documents of three religions on religious infrastructure donated by women. This reveals women’s ability to shape the public sphere. At least to a certain extent, the segregation of the sexes and the concept of the harem are questionable. This topic requires the reconstruction and re-reading of fragmental materials. Methodological reflections are helpful for dealing with different sources, mostly combinations of texts and archaeology, embedded in the current debate about material culture and media as well as materialization and mediation. It might seem anachronistic, but to specify these categories it is useful to compare this example with a contemporary study by Mia Lövheim on female Internet bloggers. In both cases we find women as self-confident agents in public spaces.

  11. Comparison of risk behaviors and socio-cultural profile of men who have sex with men survey respondents recruited via venues and the internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Joseph TF

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly more men who have sex with men (MSM are using the internet to seek sex partners, and many HIV-related studies targeting MSM collect data from gay venues in order to inform the design of prevention programs. However, internet-based MSM may have different HIV risk behaviors and associated factors from those attending venues. This study examined differences in risk behaviors and socio-cultural profiles between MSM recruited from venues (e.g., gay bars/saunas and from the internet respectively. Methods An anonymous cross-sectional survey was conducted. A total of 566 Chinese MSM (340 recruited from gay-venues and 226 recruited from the internet who self-reported having had anal or oral sex with another man in the last 12 months completed a structured questionnaire. Results Internet-based MSM were more likely than venue-based MSM to have engaged in unprotected anal intercourse (53.3% vs. 33.8% or commercial sex (as clients: 12.8% vs. 5.3%; as sex workers: 6.2% vs. 1.5%, to have sought MSM partners from the internet (51.3% vs. 20.9%, and to have contracted sexually transmitted diseases (STD in the last 12 months (4.4% vs. 0.3%. On the other hand, internet-based MSM were less likely to have multiple sex partners (58.4% vs. 75.6% and to have used psychoactive substances (7.1% vs. 15.6% or drunk alcohol before sex (8.8% vs. 16.2%. Moreover, internet-based MSM reported poor acceptance of their own sexual orientation, felt more discriminated against, and received less social support than venue-recruited MSM. Conclusions Significant differences were observed between the two groups of MSM. Segmentation and targeted interventions are recommended when designing preventive interventions.

  12. Teaching Religion, Teaching Truth: Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives. Religion, Education and Values. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astley, Jeff, Ed.; Francis, Leslie J., Ed.; Robbins, Mandy, Ed.; Selcuk, Mualla, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Religious educators today are called upon to enable young people to develop as fully-rounded human beings in a multicultural and multi-faith world. It is no longer sufficient to teach about the history of religions: religion is not relegated to the past. It is no longer sufficient to teach about the observable outward phenomena of religions:…

  13. Teaching Religion, Teaching Truth: Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives. Religion, Education and Values. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astley, Jeff, Ed.; Francis, Leslie J., Ed.; Robbins, Mandy, Ed.; Selcuk, Mualla, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Religious educators today are called upon to enable young people to develop as fully-rounded human beings in a multicultural and multi-faith world. It is no longer sufficient to teach about the history of religions: religion is not relegated to the past. It is no longer sufficient to teach about the observable outward phenomena of religions:…

  14. Beyond Freud in psychoanalytic psychology of religion? On the discussion of religion as projection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    In 1907, Sigmund Freud initiated the psychoanalytic psychology of religion, until the present day the most important contributor to the psychology of religion literature in general, and the branch of psychological critique of religion best known outside of psychology circles (having drawn attention

  15. The Influence of Religion on the Creation of National Identity in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta CVETKOVSKA OCOKOLJIC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes new religious values on the territory of Serbia and the creation of cultural-national model. During the nineties in Serbia the return to religion had been most popular. National homogenization due to the dissolution of the old state and creation of individual states with specific national characteristics was awakening. This phenomenon was caused by the need to establish some new and revive old values in the domain of culture, tradition and religion. Serbian Orthodox Church intimacy retreats before the rush of false believers who shift the stage of public squares into church and monasteries. Radical nationalism created a specific form of symbols and behavior. The identity of the entire nation is reduced to the dimension which equals national and religious affiliations. In this way, a desire to keep cultural, national and religious specificity turns into the fear of the deadly disease of Western culture. The paper analyzes the data of the research conducted on: the public expression of citizens’ religious affiliation, the influence of religion on the creation of national identity, the instrumentalization of religion by politicians and the use and misuse of religious symbols. In addition thanks to the research we can determine the effect of creating resistance or acceptance new values that are a necessary condition for positive change and joining the European Union. In addition, the impact of politics on the creation of national identity through the Orthodox religion, which creates a new form of ideology, can be determined.

  16. Renegotiating religious imaginations through transformations of "banal religion" in Supernatural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Nybro

    Supernatural is saturated with a wide range of religious representations. These elements often serve to instigate the storyline for one or more episodes, but do so in a way that is removed from their original setting in, for example, traditional religious contexts. In Supernatural, religion...... implies long-term processes in which media play a role in cultural and social change. The theory of cognitive anthropology of religion allows us to understand how the series activates shared implicit knowledge of supernatural agents and events to evoke recognition and emotion; but by transforming...... these representations, the show challenges our imaginations. These transformations of banal religious representations in Supernatural come about in three ways: (1) as a mainstreaming of occulture, (2) through connecting banal religious elements to existential themes, and (3) through playful intertextuality. The series...

  17. Renegotiating religious imaginations through transformations of "banal religion" in Supernatural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Nybro

    2010-01-01

    Supernatural is saturated with a wide range of religious representations. These elements often serve to instigate the storyline for one or more episodes, but do so in a way that is removed from their original setting in, for example, traditional religious contexts. In Supernatural, religion...... implies long-term processes in which media play a role in cultural and social change. The theory of cognitive anthropology of religion allows us to understand how the series activates shared implicit knowledge of supernatural agents and events to evoke recognition and emotion; but by transforming...... these representations, the show challenges our imaginations. These transformations of banal religious representations in Supernatural come about in three ways: (1) as a mainstreaming of occulture, (2) through connecting banal religious elements to existential themes, and (3) through playful intertextuality. The series...

  18. Negotiating reproduction: religion, gender and sexuality in political conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Kanckos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author discusses the role of ethics and religion in the context of the current political debate on assisted reproduction in Finland. There is reason to ask why the issues of family structures, gender roles and sexuality cause conflict situations in politics and society. How should we understand the nature of political conflicts concerning family, gender and sexuality? For a proper understanding of these conflicts, we need a nuanced analysis of the role of ethics and religion in political debates in a secular European culture. In this article the author focuses on two examples drawn from Finnish discussions of assisted reproduction. The first example comes from recent parliamentary discussion of assisted reproduction, and the second example from how the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Finland has reflected on the same issue.

  19. Gender, Religion and National Origin: Latinos' Attitude toward Capital Punishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Baik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Previous studies on attitudes toward capital punishment are heavily focused on comparisons between blacks and whites with little attention to the Latino population. This is problematic given the rapid growth of Latino population who is now the largest and fastest-growing ethnic minority in the United States. Approach: Empirical studies devoted exclusively to studying Latinos’ attitude toward capital punishment are few and thus, I focus on exclusively examining the Latino population utilizing 2007 Hispanic Religion Survey, which is the most recent survey that includes questions on Latinos’ attitude toward capital punishment. Results: I found that Latinos’ attitude toward capital punishment is driven by various demographic, religious and cultural factors. The most influential factors were gender, religion and the country of origin. Conclusion: Very few studies have examined Latinos’ attitude toward criminal justice policies in general and this study should be extended to study other criminal justice policies as well.

  20. Sex Differences in Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairweather, Hugh

    1976-01-01

    Sex differences in cognitive skills, grouped into motor, spatial and linguistic areas, are assessed in relation to current theories of cerebral lateralization. Few convincing sex differences exist, either overall, or in interactions with functional localization. Qualifying criteria include age, birth order, culture, sex of experimenter and sex…

  1. Brain, body and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2010-01-01

    uniquely accommodates contemporary cultural and neurobiological sciences. Since the challenge that the study of religion faces, in my opinion, is at the interstices of these sciences, I have tried to develop a theory of religion which acknowledges the fact. My hope is that the theory can be of use......This essay sketches out a biocultural theory of religion which is based on an expanded view of cognition that is anchored in brain and body (embrained and embodied), deeply dependent on culture (enculturated) and extended and distributed beyond the borders of individual brains. Such an approach...

  2. Defining religion, defying tradition? Concord and conflict about the role of religion in a Costa Rican indigenous community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Ola Tafjord

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available When approaching the issue of power, some fundamental questions always arise: Who is in a position to define? When, where, for whom, and why? These are also underlying questions in the particular case that is discussed in this article: Discourses about the role of religion among Bribris in Talamanca, the indigenously dominated area in south-eastern Costa Rica. The author looks at how ‘religion’ is defined by different actors, and into how the same actors understand religion in relation to what they see as other aspects of society and culture – in particular what the Bribris refer to as siwá, a concept they often translate into Spanish as tradición. In doing so, the it is highlighted how different actors discuss and negotiate the role of ‘religion’ in a particular cultural and historical context. For analytical purposes, it is proposed that defining should be seen as a practice that delimits something and gives it a certain place or space in relation to something else. To define is then to exercise power. As a consequence, discourses about the definition and role of religion in Talamanca are seen as both practices of, and contests about power.

  3. [Religion and brain functioning (part 1): are our mental structures designed for religion?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornreich, C; Neu, D

    2010-01-01

    Religions are seen everywhere in the world. Two main theories are competing to explain this phenomenon. The first one is based on the assumption that our cognitive structures are predisposing us to nurture religious beliefs. Religion would then be a by-product of mental functions useful for survival. Examples of these mental functions are children credulity, anthropomorphism and teleology. The second one hypothesizes that religion is maintained trough direct adaptation benefits occurring in cooperation exchanges. In particular, religion could function as an insurance mechanism given by the religious group. It is likely that both theories are complementary and useful to explain why religion is a universal phenomenon in the human species.

  4. Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor alters levels of key sex steroids and steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Zelieann R; Leslie, Traci C; Hatfield, Kimberly P; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A

    2010-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by decreasing antral follicle numbers and increasing follicular death. MXC is metabolized in the body to mono-hydroxy MXC (mono-OH). Little is known about the effects of mono-OH on the ovary. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that mono-OH exposure decreases production of 17β-estradiol (E₂) by cultured mouse antral follicles. Antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mice (age 35-39 days) and exposed to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or mono-OH (0.1-10 μg/mL) for 96 h. Media and follicles were collected for analysis of sex steroid levels and mRNA expression, respectively. Mono-OH treatment (10 μg/mL) decreased E(2) (DMSO: 3009.72±744.99 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 μg/mL: 1679.66±461.99 ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 1752.72±532.41 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 45.89±33.83 ng/mL), testosterone (DMSO: 15.43±2.86 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1μg/mL: 17.17±4.71 ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 13.64±3.53 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 1.29±0.23 ng/mL), androstenedione (DMSO: 1.92±0.34 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 μg/mL: 1.49±0.43ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 0.64±0.31 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 0.12±0.06 ng/mL) and progesterone (DMSO: 24.11±4.21 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1μg/mL: 26.77±4.41 ng/mL; 1 μg/mL: 20.90±3.75 ng/mL; 10 μg/mL: 9.44±2.97 ng/mL) levels. Mono-OH did not alter expression of Star, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1 and Cyp1b1, but it did reduce levels of Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 mRNA. Collectively, these data suggest that mono-OH significantly decreases levels of key sex steroid hormones and the expression of enzymes required for steroidogenesis.

  5. Post-religional perspective and secular Buddhism: Stephen Batchelor and the post-metaphysical religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Durazzo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present one of the contemporary trends on Buddhism, specially from the last decades in West, for its encounter with the globalized and dynamic context of present societies. This Buddhist trend, the progressive secularization of its traditions and practices, not to mention its increasing acceptance of historical-textual refutation, finds in Stephen Batchelor - a former monk in two different Buddhist traditions, Tibetan and Korean Zen - a catalyzer and a well-known advocate of secular perspective to the contemporary Buddhism. Here we will present the potential dialogue between the Secular Buddhism - besides the secularizing perspectives over orthodox cultural traditions - and the post-religional subject, as proposed by Marià Corbí and the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians. For the purposes of this paper we will focus on the modernizing and secular hermeneutics on Dharma practice, as defended by Stephen Batchelor and others.

  6. Religion and gender inequality: The status of women in the societies of world religions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingorová Kamila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The status of women in society is very diverse worldwide. Among many important traits associated with the differentiation of gender inequality is religion, which itself must be regarded as a fluid concept with interpretations and practices ‘embedded’ and thus varying with respect to cultural and historical relations. Admitting the complexity of the issues, some religious norms and traditions can contribute to the formation of gender inequalities and to subordinate the role of women in society. Using an exploratory quantitative analysis, the influence of religiosity on gender inequality in social, economic and political spheres is examined. Three categories of states have emerged from the analysis: (a states where the majority of inhabitants are without religious affiliation, which display the lowest levels of gender inequality; (b Christian and Buddhist societies, with average levels of gender inequality; and (c states with the highest levels of gender inequality across the observed variables, whose inhabitants adhere to Islam and Hinduism.

  7. Criminalising defamation of religion and belief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorloos, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the role of criminal law in dealing with defamatory expressions about religion or belief. Defamation of religion and belief is a form of indirect defamation ‘via identification’ which, as the discussion about the Dutch group defamation law shows, stretches up the notion of

  8. Markus Davidsen on Fiction-Based Religions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Markus Altena

    2012-01-01

    Interview with Christ Cotter from the Religious Studies Project. The podcast can be foudn here: http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2012/04/02/podcast-markus-davidsen-on-fiction-based-religions/......Interview with Christ Cotter from the Religious Studies Project. The podcast can be foudn here: http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2012/04/02/podcast-markus-davidsen-on-fiction-based-religions/...

  9. "World Religions" in Introductory Sociology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    A section on "world religions" (WRs) is now routinely included in the religion chapters of introductory sociology textbooks. Looking carefully at these WR sections, however, two things seem puzzling. The first is that the criteria for defining a WR varies considerably from textbook to textbook; the second is that these WRs sections…

  10. Towards a critique of indigenous African religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Strijdom

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is argued that a postcolonial critique of the colonial study of religion should not preclude a critique of indigenous African religion itself. The latter may be developed from a human rights perspective and a critique of exclusionary views of indigeneity. The argument is illustrated by means of specific case studies.

  11. Votives, Places and Rituals in Etruscan Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etruscans were deemed “the most religious of men” by their Roman successors and it is hardly surprising that the topic of Etruscan religion has been explored for some time now. This volume offers a contribution to the continued study of Etruscan religion and daily life, by focusing on the less ex...... aspects, based on archaeological and epigraphic sources....

  12. European Religious Education and European Civil Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearon, Liam

    2012-01-01

    This paper challenges a foundational conjecture of the Religion in Education Dialogue or Conflict (REDCo) project, that increased interest in religion in public and political life as manifested particularly in education is evidence of counter-secularisation. The paper argues that rather than representing counter-secularisation, such developments…

  13. European Religious Education and European Civil Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearon, Liam

    2012-01-01

    This paper challenges a foundational conjecture of the Religion in Education Dialogue or Conflict (REDCo) project, that increased interest in religion in public and political life as manifested particularly in education is evidence of counter-secularisation. The paper argues that rather than representing counter-secularisation, such developments…

  14. "World Religions" in Introductory Sociology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    A section on "world religions" (WRs) is now routinely included in the religion chapters of introductory sociology textbooks. Looking carefully at these WR sections, however, two things seem puzzling. The first is that the criteria for defining a WR varies considerably from textbook to textbook; the second is that these WRs sections…

  15. Criminalising defamation of religion and belief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorloos, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the role of criminal law in dealing with defamatory expressions about religion or belief. Defamation of religion and belief is a form of indirect defamation ‘via identification’ which, as the discussion about the Dutch group defamation law shows, stretches up the notion of ‘g

  16. Religion as a Source of Evil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The starting point is that there is a structural, although not necessary link between religion and two important expressions of religious evil, religious intolerance and violence. The origin of this link lies in the radicalism that is inherent in all religions. Although this radicalism often has

  17. Comparison in religion: a methodological contribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, C.A.M.; Sterkens, C.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    How do we build theory on religion in cross-religious research? This article deals with four methodological issues in answering this question. What are the goals of cross-religious comparison? What is the object of cross-religious research? What kind of definition of religion is used in cross-religi

  18. The Origins of Religion: Cosmology and Cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mary Evelyn

    1998-01-01

    Brings religion and natural science into a new whole, as the basis of religious trust and faith. Characterizes religion as mediating between nature and the individual, and provides examples from the major religious traditions. Explains the challenge of knowing the universe by linking the inner self with the natural world. (Author/SD)

  19. Religion is natural, atheism is not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.; Markússon, Gudmundur Ingi

    2010-01-01

    accounts of atheism offered by cognitive scientists of religion as being based on unfounded assumptions about the psychology of atheists, and object to the notion that the natural aspects of religion by corollary make atheism unnatural. By considering human cognition in a semiotic framework and emphasizing...

  20. Skal religion ud af det offentlige rum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2009-01-01

    I debatter om religion og politik fremsættes ofte generelle krav om "mindre religion i det offentlige rum", der tit begrundes med en henvisning til idealer om sekularisme, neutralitet eller upartiskhed. Artiklen skelner først mellem tre forskellige betydninger af, hvad der overordnet kan forstås ...

  1. Religion and violence in a globalised world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Huber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Violent religious extremism is seen as one of the mega-problems of the 21st century. This article � based on a key lecture at the conference on �Violence in a democratic South Africa� at the University of Pretoria and the David de Villiers memorial lecture at the University of Stellenbosch, both held during August 2010 � critically discussed the interaction between religion and violence in our present-day, globalised world. Three different propositions on the relationship between religion and violence were scrutinised. In countering the proposition that religion, or more specifically monotheism, necessarily leads to violence, it was argued that violence is not an inherent, but rather an acquired or even an ascribed quality of religion. The second proposition that religion leads to non-violence was affirmed to the extent that religions do provide a strong impulse to overcome violence. However, they also tend to accept violence as an inevitable part of reality and even justify the use of violence on religious grounds. The third proposition was regarded as the most convincing, for it argues that the link between religion and violence is contingent. Some situations do seem to make the use of violence inevitable; however, religions should refrain from justifying the use of violence and maintain a preferential option for nonviolence.

  2. Limits to expression on religion in France

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade conflicts about expression on religion have increased globally. Generally, these conflicts are regarded as a conflict between freedom of speech and freedom of thought, conscience and religion. In France there are many active religious interest groups that aim to protect a cert

  3. Religion and the Rwandan genocide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard van’t Spijker

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the problems concerning the relation of religion and the genocide in Rwanda in 1990. One of the most urgent questions – formulated as an accusation by the present political regime in Rwanda – is whether religion and the influence of the churches and church leaders have, in fact, fuelled the genocide, or even was Christian missionary activity the ultimate cause of the genocide? In the broader circles of the present regime that articulate public opinion, it is argued that the presence of Christianity, more precisely the activities of the Roman Catholic Church, has not only contrib­uted to the possibility of the genocide, but has been at the root of the political constellation that led to the genocide, and that during the genocide, Church leaders were actively involved in it. In many documents, it is argued that the Rwandan genocide would never have taken place, if Christian mis­sions, particularly those of the Roman Catholic Church, had not been estab­lished in Rwanda. Related to this is the question of how the religious change after the genocide is to be interpreted, since in fact, after 1994, many new Christian communities have been founded, and a striking growth of Islam may be noticed.

  4. The Relationship between Religion and Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdani, A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modernity is the process of the thought, philosophical, scientific, industrialized, political, and social development, which occurred in the West after renascence. This phenomenon possesses special characteristics. The chief question is 'what the relationship between this western phenomenon and religion is'. Is Islam necessarily contradictory with modernity or consistent with it? Whether the challenges between religion and modernity are resolvable? In this paper, the various doctrines will be examined. Some religious studies scholars hold that they are consistent. They believe that in order to develop our country, we need to follow the enlightenment. In contrast, some maintain that religion and modernity are necessarily contradictory. Some other thinkers believe that they are inconsistent, but their inconsistency is resolvable. To resolve the inconsistency, these thinkers are divided into some groups. In this paper, the doctrine will be defended that not only modernity and religion are not necessarily antagonistic, but also today religion is alive, dynamic, and thriving in many modern metropolises.

  5. Redefining Womanhood (?: Gender, Power, and the “Religion of Thinness”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lelwica

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Ce travail examine la manière dont les femmes utilisent les régimes amincissants comme moyen de surmonter les normes culturelles dominantes concernant les genres, aux Etats-Unis, au cours des dernières décennies. Bien que les femmes qui se consacrent à la perte de poids ne constituent pas un « groupe religieux » dans l’acception traditionnelle du terme, les symboles, rituels et croyances qui accompagnent leur quête de la minceur finissent par fonctionner exactement comme une religion. A partir de discours de femmes aux prises avec leur nourriture et l’image de leur corps, ainsi qu’avec toute une série d’images, rituels et croyances de la culture populaire, je mène l’analyse de cette religion séculière, que je nomme « la Religion de la Minceur » ; je vise à éclairer la manière dont les femmes s’en servent pour tenter d’obtenir le type de pouvoir et de visibilité qui est longtemps demeuré l’apanage des hommes. Enfin, je soutiens que la Religion de la Minceur ressuscite les dynamiques d’une religion patriarcale, dans laquelle le « salut » (libération de la femme passe par son sacrifice et son obéissance aux normes sociales dominantes.This paper examines women’s use of dieting as a means for negotiating dominant cultural gender norms in the United States during the past few decades. Although women who are devoted to losing weight do not constitute a “religious” group in the traditional sense of the word, the symbols, rituals, and beliefs surrounding their pursuit of thinness have come to function much like a religion. Drawing on women’s narratives about their struggles with food and body image, as well as a variety of popular cultural images, rituals, and beliefs, I analyze this secular religion, which I call the “Religion of Thinness,” highlighting how it serves as a vehicle through which women seek the kind of power and visibility that has historically been the prerogative of men. In the

  6. Religion and the secularisation of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, John

    2009-07-01

    To assess the claim that conceptualisations of religion and spirituality should be grounded in theology, and acknowledge the global resurgence of religion. Although there is widespread agreement in the nursing literature that 'spirituality' is a broader concept than 'religion,' and should be understood generically, this approximate consensus has occasionally been challenged. A recent paper by Barbara Pesut and colleagues argues that the generic view not only empties spirituality of powerful religious symbols and narratives, but underestimates the continuing social influence of religion, and its resurgence on a global scale. Accordingly, these authors suggest three principles for conceptualising spirituality and religion in health care, one of which is that conceptualisations should be grounded in philosophical and theological thinking, and should not ignore the global resurgence of religion. Critical review. The Pesut principle privileges theology, disregarding other disciplines which theorize religion. Arguably, it privileges specifically Christian theology, the history of which suggests a politics of orthodoxy and an epistemology of authority and obedience. The global resurgence of religion is not, in fact, global, as the industrialised countries have experienced a marked shift towards secular-rational values; and the postindustrial phase of development is associated with self-expression values, which represent a challenge not merely to religious institutions (arguably an affirmation of 'spirituality') but to traditional elites and structures of all kinds. Finally, religion 'resurgent' is not an attractive model for health care, since many of its most obvious manifestations are incompatible with the ideology of health professionals. In the secular societies of Europe, if not North America, there should be no expectation that nurses provide spiritual care. It is a requirement of the great separation between civil order and religion that the health services, as a

  7. Comparative Study of English and Chinese Taboos in Recent Times by Social Cultural Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宜华

    2014-01-01

    A taboo is something you should avoid doing or saying because a society thinks it is offensive,embarrassing or wrong.Different cultures do not all agree on what taboo is and what should be tabooed in a given context.Both Chinese and English have taboos on such things as sex,death,religion,superstition and so forth,but they follow different cultural norms.This thesis incorporates some anthropological and sociolinguistic ideas to analyze linguistic taboos in Chinese and English.

  8. College Premarital Sex Versus Self-Esteem, Religion, and Politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, Elizabeth D.

    Premarital sexual attitudes of a convenience sample of 95 young unmarried college women were examined to ascertain the association between liberality of premarital sexual attitudes, religiosity, conservatism, self-reported premarital sexual behavior, and self-esteem. SPSS Pearson Correlation analysis showed different patterns for the group as a…

  9. Between Politics and Religion – In Search of the Golden Mean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Tarasiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The author undertakes the problem of the identity of Western civilization in the light of a correlation between politics and religion. First, he traces the theoretical debates about the mutual correspondence of politics and religion in ancient Greece. Following two extreme errors depicted by Sophocles in his “Antigone,” and by Plato in his “Apology of Socrates,” he infers that the “Golden Mean” is necessary in resolving the problem of politics and religion. Then, he examines the underlying errors put forward in the history. His investigations show the erroneousness of endowing either politics or religion with sovereign status in culture. There is always a conflict between politics and religion unless man regains his own sovereignty from them. Ultimately the author arrives at the conclusion that the “Golden Mean” correlating politics and religion distinctly strengthens the identity of the Western Civilization, and consists in respecting all real and universal parameters of human person life, such as cognition, freedom (and responsibility, love, agency in law, ontological sovereignty, and religious dignity.

  10. BETWEEN POLITICS AND RELIGION – IN SEARCH OF THE GOLDEN MEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Tarasiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The author undertakes the problem of the identity of Western civilization in the light of a correlation between politics and religion. First, he traces the theoretical debates about the mutual correspondence of politics and religion in ancient Greece. Following two extreme errors depicted by Sophocles in his “Antigone,” and by Plato in his “Apology of Socrates,” he infers that the “Golden Mean” is necessary in resolving the problem of politics and religion. Then, he examines the underlying errors put forward in the history. His investigations show the erroneousness of endowing either politics or religion with sovereign status in culture. There is always a conflict between politics and religion unless man regains his own sovereignty from them. Ultimately the author arrives at the conclusion that the “Golden Mean” correlating politics and religion distinctly strengthens the identity of the Western Civilization, and consists in respecting all real and universal parameters of human person life, such as cognition, freedom (and responsibility, love, agency in law, ontological sovereignty, and religious dignity.

  11. Renegotiating religious imaginations through transformations of "banal religion" in "Supernatural"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Nybro Petersen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Supernatural is saturated with a wide range of religious representations. These elements often serve to instigate the storyline for one or more episodes, but do so in a way that is removed from their original setting in, for example, traditional religious contexts. In Supernatural, religion is subsumed to media logic, and thus transformed religious representations are an example of a continuous process of mediatization of religion. This essay applies a three-sided theoretical approach, considering mediatization, cognitive anthropology, and social theory. The concept of mediatization applied here implies long-term processes in which media play a role in cultural and social change. The theory of cognitive anthropology of religion allows us to understand how the series activates shared implicit knowledge of supernatural agents and events to evoke recognition and emotion; but by transforming these representations, the show challenges our imaginations. These transformations of banal religious representations in Supernatural come about in three ways: (1 as a mainstreaming of occulture, (2 through connecting banal religious elements to existential themes, and (3 through playful intertextuality. The series applies these narrative devices, which heighten plausibility and familiarity, while simultaneously offering viewers a change in perspective, thus creating opportunities for viewers to renegotiate existing religious imaginations.

  12. Globalization and Religion in Historical Perspective: A Paradoxical Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke M. Herrington

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Religion has long been a driving force in the process of globalization. This idea is not controversial or novel thinking, nor is it meant to be. However, the dominant reasoning on the subject of globalization, expressed by authors like Thomas Friedman, places economics at the center of analysis, skewing focus from the ideational factors at work in this process. By expanding the definition of globalization to accommodate ideational factors and cultural exchange, religion’s agency in the process can be enabled. Interestingly, the story of religion and globalization is in some ways the history of globalization, but it is riddled with paradoxes, including the agent-opponent paradox, the subject of this article. Religion and globalization have a co-constitutive relationship, but religious actors are both agents of globalization and principals in its backlash. While some actors might benefit from a mutually reinforcing relationship with globalization, others are marginalized in some way or another, so it is necessary to expose the links and wedges that allow for such a paradox. To that end, the concepts of globalization and religious actors must be defined, and the history of the agent-opponent paradox, from the Buddhists of the Silk Road to the Jubilee campaign of 2000, must be elucidated.

  13. Hunter-Gatherers and the Origins of Religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Hervey C; Duda, Pavel; Marlowe, Frank W

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of the evolution of religion have revealed the cognitive underpinnings of belief in supernatural agents, the role of ritual in promoting cooperation, and the contribution of morally punishing high gods to the growth and stabilization of human society. The universality of religion across human society points to a deep evolutionary past. However, specific traits of nascent religiosity, and the sequence in which they emerged, have remained unknown. Here we reconstruct the evolution of religious beliefs and behaviors in early modern humans using a global sample of hunter-gatherers and seven traits describing hunter-gatherer religiosity: animism, belief in an afterlife, shamanism, ancestor worship, high gods, and worship of ancestors or high gods who are active in human affairs. We reconstruct ancestral character states using a time-calibrated supertree based on published phylogenetic trees and linguistic classification and then test for correlated evolution between the characters and for the direction of cultural change. Results indicate that the oldest trait of religion, present in the most recent common ancestor of present-day hunter-gatherers, was animism, in agreement with long-standing beliefs about the fundamental role of this trait. Belief in an afterlife emerged, followed by shamanism and ancestor worship. Ancestor spirits or high gods who are active in human affairs were absent in early humans, suggesting a deep history for the egalitarian nature of hunter-gatherer societies. There is a significant positive relationship between most characters investigated, but the trait "high gods" stands apart, suggesting that belief in a single creator deity can emerge in a society regardless of other aspects of its religion.

  14. Traditional Culture's Influences on Indian Modern Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Mingzhong

    2004-01-01

    @@ India's five-thousand year history has a distinctive mark of its own in terms of cultural tradition and noble moral system. It is a country that has faithfully believed in religions ever since the ancient times, thus religions, religious mass organizations and their devout believers have become the carriers of Indian traditional culture.

  15. THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF RELIGION OF THE NEW TYPE OF JACQUES WAARDENBURGH IN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE DUTCH TRADITION OF THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF RELIGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr Koltsov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The author examines in this article the religious phenomenology of Jacques Waardenburgh, a Dutchman known for his studies of the phenomenology of religion of the new type. After a brief examination of various tendencies in the study of religious phenomenology and their classification, the author turns his attention to the phenomenology of religion of the new type as exemplified by the classical proponents of the Dutch school (Pierre Daniel Chantepie de la Saussayee, William Kristensen and Gerardus van der Leeuw. By comparing concepts stated as answers to specific questions, Waardenburgh appears to employ critical acumen in his formulation of the material left by his predecessors in the field. But the elements of religious phenomenology which relate to an existential conception of data and which were accepted by the classical school are excluded by Waardenburgh. Waardenburgh, on the other hand, attempts to substitute a philosophical hermeneutic with one drawn from the applied sciences, in as much, and this is the author’s opinion, that the phenomenology of religion of the new type refuses to mediate between the disciplines which study empirical material and the philosophical conception of religion. In addition, Waardenburgh remarks that the constant task of the phenomenology of religion is to mediate among the disciplines which employ the empirical method and those cognitive spiritual needs which face the student of religious phenomena. Among these disciplines, sociology replaces history to take first place, followed by cultural anthropology. Thus, the cognitive factor become more pragmatic

  16. RELIGION AND PURIFICATION OF SOUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Khodashenas Pelko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Jainism emphasizes three major teachings about the purification of the soul (jiva, Ahimsa, Aparigrapha and anekantwad. Jainism, The focus of this religion has been purification of the soul by means of right conduct, right faith and right knowledge. The ultimate goal of Hinduism is Moksha or liberation (total freedom. In Hinduism, purification of the soul is a goal that one must work to attain. The Buddhism is the science of pursuing the aim of making the human mind perfect, and of purifying the human soul. The knowledge of purifying of the soul and softening of the hearts is as essential for human. They having the correct motivations means purifying our souls from hypocrisy, caprice, and heedlessness. The primary goal of Taoism may be described as the mystical intuition of the Tao, which is the way, the undivided unity, and the ultimate Reality. According to the Christianity access to truth cannot be conceived without purity of the soul

  17. Tagore and the academic study of religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahim H. KHAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941, at about the start of the nineteenth century, was advocating that the study about religion has to be included in university‑level education in the East. The university he envisioned and founded (Visva‑Bharati included in its curriculum such a study. Shortly after India’s regaining independence in 1947 and becoming a secular state, that institution was inaugurated as a central university with an advanced institute for philosophy and the study of religion. This essay answers whether his understanding of studying religion would accommodate the approach to the academic study of religion associated with the modern Western research university. It also inquires the extent that the curriculum for the study of religion at Visva‑Bharati evidences such an approach. The answers it advances draw primarily on his two essays, Eastern University and Hindu University, which offer his vision of univer‑ sity level education; on commissioned reports for higher level education in the new India as a secular state; on developments in the academic study of religion in the West, especially the United States; on the relatively recent revised curriculum for such a study at Visva‑Bharati University; and on ideas of social imaginary and the comparative study of religion articulated by Western scholars.

  18. Is Ancestor veneration the most universal of all world religions? A critique of modernist cosmological bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Reuter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Research by anthropologists engaged with the Comparative Austronesia Project (Australian National University has amassed an enormous data set for ethnological comparison between the religions of Austronesian-speaking societies, a language group to which nearly all Indonesian societies also belong. Comparative analysis reveals that ancestor veneration is a key-shared feature among “Austronesian” religious cosmologies; a feature that also resonates strongly with the ancestor-focused religions characteristic of East Asia. Characteristically, the religions of Austronesian-speaking societies focus on the core idea of a sacred time and place of ancestral origin and the continuous flow of life that is issuing forth from this source. Present-day individuals connect with the place and time of origin though ritual acts of retracing a historical path of migration to its source. What can this seemingly exotic notion of a flow of life reveal about the human condition writ large? Is it merely a curiosity of the ethnographic record of this region, a traditional religious insight forgotten even by many of the people whose traditional religion this is, but who have come under the influence of so-called world religions? Or is there something of great importance to be learnt from the Austronesian approach to life? Such questions have remained unasked until now, I argue, because a systematic cosmological bias within western thought has largely prevented us from taking Ancestor Religion and other forms of “traditional knowledge” seriously as an alternative truth claim. While I have discussed elsewhere the significance of Ancestor Religion in reference to my own research in highland Bali, I will attempt in this paper to remove this bias by its roots. I do so by contrasting two modes of thought: the “incremental dualism” of precedence characteristic of Austronesian cultures and their Ancestor Religions, and the “transcendental dualism” of mind and

  19. Cognitive ability correlates positively with son birth and predicts cross-cultural variation of the offspring sex ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dama, Madhukar Shivajirao

    2013-06-01

    Human populations show remarkable variation in the sex ratio at birth which is believed to be related to the parental condition. In the present study, the global variation of sex ratio at birth (SRB, proportion of male offspring born) was analyzed with respect to indirect measure of condition, the intelligence quotient (IQ). IQ correlates strongly with lifespan across nations, which makes it a good indicator of health of the large populations. Relation between three standard measures of average national IQ and SRB was studied using multiple linear regression models. Average national IQ was positively correlated with SRB (r = 0.54 to 0.57, p wealth, son preference, latitude, low birth weight, and neonatal mortality in the regression models. These results suggest that the striking variation of offspring sex ratio across nations could be caused in part by the difference in general condition of populations.

  20. Cognitive ability correlates positively with son birth and predicts cross-cultural variation of the offspring sex ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dama, Madhukar Shivajirao

    2013-06-01

    Human populations show remarkable variation in the sex ratio at birth which is believed to be related to the parental condition. In the present study, the global variation of sex ratio at birth (SRB, proportion of male offspring born) was analyzed with respect to indirect measure of condition, the intelligence quotient (IQ). IQ correlates strongly with lifespan across nations, which makes it a good indicator of health of the large populations. Relation between three standard measures of average national IQ and SRB was studied using multiple linear regression models. Average national IQ was positively correlated with SRB ( r = 0.54 to 0.57, p low birth weight, and neonatal mortality in the regression models. These results suggest that the striking variation of offspring sex ratio across nations could be caused in part by the difference in general condition of populations.

  1. Culture Difference and Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何冬兰

    2012-01-01

    Culture difference is necessary to be paid attention to during the process of translating.Culture difference is caused by different history,regions,customs,religions and the modes of thinking.Having the awareness of the culture difference will make translation more accurate and successful.

  2. Religion and Communication: A Selected, Annotated Basic Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Eugene D.; McConnell, Kathleen

    This annotated bibliography provides a broad perspective on the way religion and communication relate to one another. Forty-two references are listed in the areas of (1) "Religion and Communication Theory"; (2) "Religion and Language"; (3) "Televangelism and Televangelists"; (4) "Historical Roots of Religion and…

  3. A Comparative Study on Religion between Britainand China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐彩霞

    2012-01-01

    1. INTRODUCTION Religion in Britain In the UK, Christians constitute about 71% of the population, but Britain is a multi-faith society and all other religions, including; Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Islam and Sikhism are freely practiced. About 23% of Britons have no particular religion. Religion in China China is a

  4. Teaching about the World Religions in History Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Brant W.

    1990-01-01

    Suggests ways of teaching about religion in a historically honest way on the precollege level. Urges making students objectively aware of religion to reduce susceptibility to cults. Encourages in-depth study of religions unfamiliar to students. Suggests role playing to help students understand other religions and religious conflicts. (DK)

  5. Agency-communion and self-esteem relations are moderated by culture, religiosity, age, and sex: evidence for the "self-centrality breeds self-enhancement" principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Jochen E; Wagner, Jenny; Sedikides, Constantine; Neberich, Wiebke

    2013-06-01

    Who has high self-esteem? Is it ambitious, competitive, outgoing people-agentic personalities? Or is it caring, honest, understanding people-communal personalities? The literature on agency-communion and self-esteem is sparse, indirect, and inconsistent. Based on William James's theorizing, we propose the "self-centrality breeds self-enhancement" principle. Accordingly, agency will be linked to self-esteem, if agency is self-central. Conversely, communion will be linked to self-esteem, if communion is self-central. But what determines the self-centrality of agency and communion? The literature suggests that agency is self-central in agentic cultures, as well as among nonreligious individuals, men, and younger adults. Communion is self-central in communal cultures, as well as among religious individuals, women, and older adults. This study examined 187,957 people (47% female; mean age = 37.49 years, SD = 12.22) from 11 cultures. The large sample size afforded us the opportunity to test simultaneously the effect of all four moderators in a single two-level model (participants nested in cultures). Results supported the unique moderating effect of culture, religiosity, age, and sex on the relation between agency-communion and self-esteem. Agentic and communal people can both have high self-esteem, depending on self-centrality of agency and communion. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. JOURNAL OF RELIGION 2014 CURVEEE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IK

    unit” by biological-cultural affinity, marriage, economy, cultural, tradition, honour, and friendship .... contributes to the development of their personality, and makes the growth of civilization possible. ..... becomes the basis for role differentiation.

  7. ON THE SACREDNESS OF THE NATURE IN GLOBAL RELIGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Alilova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The central aim is to consider the highly complex problem of interdependence of ecology and religion; determine the possibility of finding ways to revive nature protection traditions rooted in different religious systems; demonstrate the possibility of formation of ecological consciousness, ecological ethics as a prerequisite for sustainable development of the modern society.Methods. We used the method of socio-cultural and socio-natural approach based on humanistic philosophical ideas which laid the basis for understanding the person as a subject of nature, history and culture.Findings. Were analyzed the environmental ideas of the religious teachings of various faiths, which should contribute to the development of environmental ethics and culture, the notion of a human as part of nature, and the impossibility of human survival without conservation of the nature. It is necessary to use different forms of cooperation between the state and religious organizations.Conclusion. The results can be recommended to be included in the school curriculums, starting with elementary grades, as well as in specialized secondary schools and higher educational institutions. The ways the priorities of the environmental aspects of the nature in various faiths are expressed are not the same, but the presence of the humanistic component in all religions contributes to greater environmental consciousness of the people of the earth, so this perspective deserves a multifaceted discussion and analysis. 

  8. On studying religion, media and the young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Maskulin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper charts a unique and important phase of media use and meaning-making processes among young people during the first decade of twenty-first century. The rapid changes in media content and consumption have brought about a transformation which impacts on forms of religion and spirituality for young people. In this article I review four studies on the field of religion and the media. Key concepts of the construction of individuality and the narrative of personal biographies are found in all of them. The role of Evangelical Christianity and the core narrative of the apocalypse, as well as the clear polarities of good and evil are analysed in two of the studies which give a description of the global and transnational dimension, while the other two put more emphasis on the local, cultural and historical dimensions. The significance of the transnational character of religious narratives, the media and popular culture is analysed in reference to a long period of ethnographical inquiry and detailed documentations of the cultural discourses associated with musical subcultures as well as the locality and new media conventions approach in the studies of existential and religious expressions in the mediated environment.

  9. It is more than sex and clothes: Culturally safe services for older lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crameri, Pauline; Barrett, Catherine; Latham, J R; Whyte, Carolyn

    2015-10-01

    This paper outlines the development of culturally safe services for older lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. It draws on a framework for cultural safety, developed in New Zealand which incorporates an understanding of how history, culture and power imbalances influence the relationship between service providers and Maori people. This has been adapted to the needs of older lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex Australians.

  10. Where Is the Sociology of Religion Heading? Some Comments to 'Three European Sociologies of Religion'

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Comments on Zdenek R. Nespor's article, 'Three European Sociologies of Religion: Beyond the Usual Agenda of the Discipline,' which reviews three new European overviews of the discipline that go beyond its traditional agenda. There is agreement with Nespor that there has been a merging of European & Anglo-American sociologies of religion; however, differences between European & American applications of the sociological study of religion are said to be an artificially created problem. Attention...

  11. Sex and Relationships Education, Sexual Health, and Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Sexual Cultures: Views from Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, Eleanor

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on three small-scale studies with young people in two cities in the United Kingdom, which sought to gather views on sex and relationships education (SRE) and sexual health, and included those who self-identified as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB). Participants were involved in detailed self-completion surveys and/or in-depth…

  12. Religion, civil society and conflict: What is it that religion does for and to society?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Beyers

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Human consciousness instinctively tries to make sense of reality. Different human interpretations of reality lead to a world consisting of multiple realities. Conflict occurs when differing realities (worldviews encounter one another. Worldviews are socially created and determine human behaviour and, as such, most often find expression in religion. The discussion of conflict and the role of religion in civil society take place within the discourse of the sociology of religion. Religion is socially determined. Peter Berger’s insight into the sociology of religion therefore plays an important role in establishing the relationship between religion and civil society as one that takes on different forms. Thus, a clear definition of both civil society and religion was needed to understand the nature of these relationships. The role of religion in civil society with regard to the presence of conflict in society was further investigated in this article. The conditions under which conflict in society occurs were discussed, as were the conditions for tolerance in society, for religion ultimately becomes the provider of moral discernment when conflict occurs in civil society.

  13. Engaging Diversity in Teaching Religion and Theology: An Intercultural, De-Colonial Epistemic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraos, Michel Elias

    2012-01-01

    This essay explores new ways of engaging diversity in the production of knowledge in the classroom using coloniality as an analytical lens. After briefly engaging some of the recent literature on coloniality, focusing on the epistemic dimension, the author uses the example of teaching a course on religion, culture, and theology, where he employs…

  14. Beyond Evolution: Addressing Broad Interactions between Science and Religion in Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Joseph W.; Binns, Ian C.; Meadows, Lee; Hermann, Ronald S.; Benus, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Science and religion are two indisputably profound and durable cultural forces with a complex history of interaction. As ASTE members are aware, these interactions often manifest themselves in classrooms and in the surrounding communities. In this essay, we encourage science teacher educators to broaden their perspectives of science-religion…

  15. Tell us our story : Understanding 'religion and violence' in multiple contexts of learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Liere, Lucien

    2014-01-01

    This article raises the question about how definitions of religion and violence can be understood as links to the context in which they are formulated. The focus is on the context of academic learning. Understanding a definition as a micro-narrative that reflects the cultural 'archive', the author u

  16. Attitudes Toward Victims of Rape: Effects of Gender, Race, Religion, and Social Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Barbara; Matsuo, Hisako; McIntyre, Kevin P.; Morrison, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Although previous literature focusing on perceptions of victims of rape has examined how gender, race, and culture influence the attitudes one holds toward victims, these studies have yielded mixed results. This study compared perceptions of victims of rape across a wide range of ages, educational backgrounds, religions, and income levels, while…

  17. Religion insulates ingroup evaluations: the development of intergroup attitudes in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunham, Y.; Srinivasan, M.; Dotsch, R.; Barner, D.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the development of implicit intergroup attitudes has placed heavy emphasis on race, leaving open how social categories that are prominent in other cultures might operate. We investigate two of India's primary means of social distinction, caste and religion, and explore the development of

  18. Religion insulates ingroup evaluations : the development of intergroup attitudes in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Srinivasan, Mahesh; Dotsch, Ron; Barner, David

    2014-01-01

    Research on the development of implicit intergroup attitudes has placed heavy emphasis on race, leaving open how social categories that are prominent in other cultures might operate. We investigate two of India's primary means of social distinction, caste and religion, and explore the development of

  19. Perspectives on Tolerance in Education Flowing from a Comparison of Religion Education in Mexico and Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, Ferdinand J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates religion education (RE) in Mexico and Thailand -- two countries from different parts of the world with vastly different populations and cultures. We wanted to learn whether they had tackled similar problems regarding the provision of RE in their schools, particularly with respect to the matter of tolerance in diverse…

  20. From the Axial Age to the New Age: Religion as a Dynamic of World History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Carlton H.

    In order to broaden student understanding of past and contemporary situations, the world history survey course needs to consider religion as a vehicle through which history moves. The course proposal includes prehistory and paleolithic times to contemporary Islamic culture. The course is thematic and comparative in orientation, but moves through…

  1. Re-envisioning the sites and sights of the late twentieth century study of religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind I. J. Hackett

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author shares some of the findings, observations, and stimulating insights from colleagues and students gathered during visits to various parts of the world.The academic study of religion must now encompass more than it has done until now the effects of modern media and communications technologies, global consumption patterns, cultural mobility, and changing geo-political configurations. Scholars of religion are are being outpaced by these developments, whether because of the limitations of vision, or the shortsightedness of theoretical lenses.' The argument is that sites such as art, the media, Internet, outer space, diasporas, global culture, nature, and the public space deserve critical attention - not just for reasons of content, but because these new or neglected sites offer a potential challenge to our categories and concepts. Focus has to be shifted increasingly from bounded local cultures to transnational cultural flows and the significance of place has to be reexamined. This paper has suggests a number of pathways that are deserving of more exploration by scholars of religion. What we choose to include or exclude from our gaze affects the nature of our discourse(s through and through. The whole business of "seeing" is integral to both the academic enterprise as well as the political economy of the academic study of religion. This paper highlights some of the exciting new areas that face us as students of religious ideas and phenomena, and point to their methodological implications.

  2. Grænser for religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchau, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Analyse af danskernes holdning til religion i det private og offentlige rum med fokus på en distinktion mellem religiøs autoritetsudøvelse og religiøs selvudfoldelse.......Analyse af danskernes holdning til religion i det private og offentlige rum med fokus på en distinktion mellem religiøs autoritetsudøvelse og religiøs selvudfoldelse....

  3. Rational/Natural Religion and Spinoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullatif Tüzer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tension and enmity between religion and philosophy, as observed through the history of thought, had burst with the Enlightment and contemporary philosophy. On the part of each side, the tension has been intensified and severe due to that they did not recognize each other and also counted each other as incommensurate and refused each other as injurious. The conflict between them has been enormously incited by materialists, positivists and atheists who reduced religion into natural causes or denied it on the grounds of scientific and philosophical reasons. Indeed, what is in question is a quarrel about which camp is to have authority on politics, society, economy, law, aesthetics and epistemology and give shape to individual and society. In this quarrel, some thinkers who are devout and religious but assert that science and reason alone has authority and final judgement on politics, society, etc. and also on religion. These thinkers have been accused of creating their own religions by theologians and clergy. According to these thinkers, authentic religion is not other than one based on wisdom and virtue. This article deals with rational/natural religion represented by the thinkers in question, especially in context of Spinoza's views.

  4. Kosovar Society through Secularism and Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Dritero Arifi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will analyze the importance and the effects of religion, in Kosovar society. A great part of the paper, will analyze the social and the political relations in Post-War Kosovo. Initially it will elaborate religion and secularism, especially in theoreticall aspect, what impact have these definitions in modern societies. In order to explain what the importance of the religion in Kosovo is, we will focus on analyzing ethnical, social and political relations within Kosovo society. A considerable component of the paper is also, the elaboration of secularism in Kosovo conditions. This implies that the formulation of the problem and the objective of this research, are the substance of the paper’s theme, which is, religion in Kosovo; its definition and the outlook of the Kosovar society on religion. Is Kosovo post-war society more or less religious? That means the elements of Religions and Secularism will be part of the analysis of developments in post-war Kosovo.

  5. After the arab spring: the problem of freedom of religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario G. Losano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2011 “Arab Spring” arouses, in Western societies, expectations that often do not take into account the real context of the Islamic countries. As a matter of fact, the Western Secular tradition frequently obstructs the understanding of the strong religious feeling that pervades the social reality of the Islamic world, even if in a non-uniform way: the modernists, traditionalists and fundamentalists’ school of thoughts have a different idea of the modern Islamic State. In order to clarify this diversity, the history of the relationships between State and Islam, the inter-relationship (in a degree that is unthinkable in Western culture between State, religion and law and the consequent different perception of single individual behaviours have to be examined. This encounter-conflict with the Western political perspective became real in the Islamic States through the imposition of the Western law during the colonial period and – in the opposite direction – is taking place, today, in Europe through the increasing immigration of Islamic believers. The provision of concordats (a potential solution with other monotheistic religions is not possible with the Islamic communities, because Islam does not take into consideration a hierarchically organized ecclesiastical structure and, therefore, the Western States cannot find a single and official interlocutor. This way, within each individual Western State, a frequently difficult coexistence between Western and Islamic States is growing, a coexistence that is leading to new forms of legal pluralism. On an international relations level, the economic difference between the Western States and those who took part in the “Arab Spring” make it difficult for these last countries to promptly build up a modern State. The potential models range from Iranian theocracy to Turkish Secularism, with innumerous intermediate solutions. Today, the tendency seems to go towards an Islamic State, as the

  6. Association of religion with delusions and hallucinations in the context of schizophrenia: implications for engagement and adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearing, Robin Edward; Alonzo, Dana; Smolak, Alex; McHugh, Katie; Harmon, Sherelle; Baldwin, Susanna

    2011-03-01

    The relationship of religion and schizophrenia is widely acknowledged, but often minimized by practitioners and under investigated by researchers. In striving to help fill this gap, this paper focuses on examining four aims: 1) how research has investigated the association between religiosity and schizophrenia; 2) how is religiosity associated with delusions and hallucinations; 3) what are the risk and protective factors associated with religiosity and schizophrenia; and 4) does religion influence treatment adherence with individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. A systematic literature search of PsycINFO and MEDLINE databases from January 1, 1980 through January 1, 2010 was conducted using the terms schizophrenia, schizoaffective, schizophreniform, psychotic disorder not otherwise specified (NOS) and religion, religiosity, spirituality, or faith. Seventy (n=70) original research studies were identified. Religion can act as both a risk and protective factor as it interacts with the schizophrenia symptoms of hallucination and delusions. Cultural influences tend to confound the association of religion and schizophrenia. Adherence to treatment has a mixed association with religiosity. The relationship between religion and schizophrenia may be of benefit to both clinicians and researchers through enhancing adherence to treatment, and enhancement of the protective aspects while minimizing associated risk. The relationship of religion and schizophrenia needs further research that is more nuanced and methodologically rigorous, specifically concerning its influence on engagement and adherence to treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Defining "coercion" and "consent" cross-culturally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, L; Moore, K; Toubia, N

    1996-01-01

    Excerpts are presented from a book entitled Sexual Coercion and Reproductive Health: A Focus on Research published by the Population Council in 1995. All societies have forms of sexual violence that are socially proscribed and others that are tolerated by social customs. Some argue that there is no such thing as marital rape because of the very meaning of marriage. Most societies condemn sex between adults and children and forced sexual intercourse with an unmarried virgin. However, in many societies forced sex within marriage is accepted. Most cultural definitions of abuse are devoid of the volition, perceptions, and feelings of the woman. Coercive sex can be conceived as a continuum from transgressive to tolerated coercive sex. Some types of coercive sex are in transition, for instance, in the United States acts for which the girl would have been blamed 20 years ago are increasingly being termed date rape. The psychologist Patricia Rozee suggests that female choice should the benchmark for the definition of rape. At a seminar on sexual coercion participants endorsed the idea of a universal standard for identifying coerced sex across cultures. The ultimate goal is to make possible voluntary, safe sexuality for all people. Although male dominance has persisted in sexual matters, no major religion or social code of ethics condones sexual violence. The appropriate definition of rape or coerced sex was also discussed in situations when the word itself was not used by the victim. When interviewed, exiled Iranian women living in the United States revealed that for most of them their wedding nights in Iran had been violent and traumatic; many had been held down by relatives for what they now (but not at the time) described as rape and torture.

  8. Religion and Spirituality’s Influences on HIV Syndemics Among MSM: A Systematic Review and Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of the quantitative HIV research that assessed the relationships between religion, spirituality, HIV syndemics, and individual HIV syndemics-related health conditions (e.g. depression, substance abuse, HIV risk) among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. No quantitative studies were found that assessed the relationships between HIV syndemics, religion, and spirituality. Nine studies, with 13 statistical analyses, were found that examined the relationships between individual HIV syndemics-related health conditions, religion, and spirituality. Among the 13 analyses, religion and spirituality were found to have mixed relationships with HIV syndemics-related health conditions (6 nonsignificant associations; 5 negative associations; 2 positive associations). Given the overall lack of inclusion of religion and spirituality in HIV syndemics research, a conceptual model that hypothesizes the potential interactions of religion and spirituality with HIV syndemics-related health conditions is presented. The implications of the model for MSM’s health are outlined. PMID:26319130

  9. Religious Education and Freedom of Religion and Belief. Religion Education and Values. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephen, Ed.; Freathy, Rob, Ed.; Francis, Leslie J., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    What opportunities and challenges are presented to religious education across the globe by the basic human right of freedom of religion and belief? To what extent does religious education facilitate or inhibit "freedom of religion" in schools? What contribution can religious education make to freedom in the modern world? This volume provides…

  10. Religious Education and Freedom of Religion and Belief. Religion Education and Values. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephen, Ed.; Freathy, Rob, Ed.; Francis, Leslie J., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    What opportunities and challenges are presented to religious education across the globe by the basic human right of freedom of religion and belief? To what extent does religious education facilitate or inhibit "freedom of religion" in schools? What contribution can religious education make to freedom in the modern world? This volume…

  11. Teaching Religion: Disrupting Students' Notions of Authoritative Texts and Placing Religion into an Interdisciplinary Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    This article argues the importance of including religion in the curriculum of undergraduate studies. Religion is, at its nexus, an ideology, a belief system that reverberates through literature and history. Such knowledge in itself is invaluable for students, introducing them to the difference between ideology and fact and to how ideology becomes…

  12. No Religion Is an Island: Teaching World Religions to Adolescents in a Jewish Educational Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    What is the place of teaching about other world religions in a Jewish educational curriculum for adolescents? This article explores a course in world religions that has been taught at the Genesis Program at Brandeis University since 2001. Based on a participant observational study during 2002 and 2012, the author traces how the teachers construct…

  13. No Religion Is an Island: Teaching World Religions to Adolescents in a Jewish Educational Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    What is the place of teaching about other world religions in a Jewish educational curriculum for adolescents? This article explores a course in world religions that has been taught at the Genesis Program at Brandeis University since 2001. Based on a participant observational study during 2002 and 2012, the author traces how the teachers construct…

  14. Expression of betaglycan, an inhibin coreceptor, in normal human ovaries and ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors and its regulation in cultured human granulosa-luteal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianqi; Kuulasmaa, Tiina; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Bützow, Ralf; Vänttinen, Teemu; Hydén-Granskog, Christel; Voutilainen, Raimo

    2003-10-01

    Activins and inhibins are often antagonistic in the regulation of ovarian function. TGFbeta type III receptor, betaglycan, has been identified as a coreceptor to enhance the binding of inhibins to activin type II receptor and thus to prevent the binding of activins to their receptor. In this study we characterized the expression and regulation pattern of betaglycan gene in normal ovaries and sex cord-stromal tumors and in cultured human granulosa-luteal cells from women undergoing in vitro fertilization. Expression of betaglycan mRNA was detected by RT-PCR or Northern blotting in normal ovarian granulosa, thecal, and stroma cells as well as in granulosa-luteal cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positive staining for betaglycan in antral and preovulatory follicular granulosa and thecal cells and in corpora lutea of normal ovaries. Furthermore, betaglycan expression was detected in the vast majority of granulosa cell tumors, thecomas, and fibromas, with weaker staining in granulosa cell tumors compared with fibrothecomas. In cultured granulosa-luteal cells, FSH and LH treatment increased dose-dependently the accumulation of betaglycan mRNA, as did the protein kinase A activator dibutyryl cAMP and the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. In contrast, the protein kinase C activator 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate had no significant effect on betaglycan mRNA levels. Treatment with prostaglandin E(2) and with its receptor EP2 subtype agonist butaprost increased betaglycan mRNA accumulation and progesterone secretion dose- and time-dependently. In summary, betaglycan gene is expressed in normal human ovarian steroidogenic cells and sex cord-stromal ovarian tumors. The accumulation of its mRNA in cultured granulosa-luteal cells is up-regulated by gonadotropins and prostaglandin E(2), probably via the protein kinase A pathway. The specific expression and regulation pattern of betaglycan gene may be related to the functional antagonism of inhibins to

  15. Religion insulates ingroup evaluations: the development of intergroup attitudes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Srinivasan, Mahesh; Dotsch, Ron; Barner, David

    2014-03-01

    Research on the development of implicit intergroup attitudes has placed heavy emphasis on race, leaving open how social categories that are prominent in other cultures might operate. We investigate two of India's primary means of social distinction, caste and religion, and explore the development of implicit and explicit attitudes towards these groups in minority-status Muslim children and majority-status Hindu children, the latter drawn from various positions in the Hindu caste system. Results from two tests of implicit attitudes find that caste attitudes parallel previous findings for race: higher-caste children as well as lower-caste children have robust high-caste preferences. However, results for religion were strikingly different: both lower-status Muslim children and higher-status Hindu children show strong implicit ingroup preferences. We suggest that religion may play a protective role in insulating children from the internalization of stigma. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Survey of the Origin and Evolution of Religion from the Points of View Edward Tylor and James Frazer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza khajegir

    2016-01-01

    similarity of the mind. According to Taylor, the whole world is also like a single country based on the fundamental principle of human intellectual and cultural development. So, any diversity in human species is not synonymous with diversity in kind, but it is the difference in the level of cultural evolution. This degree of cultural evolution can be found in all societies and, therefore, the cultural/cognitive evolution of human beings and the basic form of the human mind are all connected .  As a matter of fact, the religious and cultural evolution of primitive man to modern one is the evolution of human rationality. In his view, there are three methods to understand the howness of the evolution of human cognition: magical, religious, and scientific .  That is why Taylor differentiates between magic and religion. He takes magic not based on spiritual entities but on impersonal powers and forces. According to him, magic works in line with the principle of similarity and association, and because the things that are similar have a causal relationship with each other, so magic is pseudo-science, but it is rooted in false reasoning. Taylor’s view, especially that of religion and magic, has influenced Fraser to a large extent. On the word of Taylor, the belief in spirits that think and act like human beings abounds in in all religions. So, in his view, the essence of religion and religious myths is faith-animism. Therefore, Taylor has proposed animism as the source and origin of primitive religions, and he takes the following as the developmental stages of religion: animism, nature worship, polytheism, monotheism, and metaphysical thought .  The relationship between magic and religion is the key issue for Fraser. According to Fraser, the first and most important principle to understand magic and religion was that the life of primitive man centered around the struggle for life, such as killing animals by hunters. According to him, the founding reasoning principles for magic

  17. A Survey of the Origin and Evolution of Religion from the Points of View Edward Tylor and James Frazer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza khajegir

    2015-12-01

    similarity of the mind. According to Taylor, the whole world is also like a single country based on the fundamental principle of human intellectual and cultural development. So, any diversity in human species is not synonymous with diversity in kind, but it is the difference in the level of cultural evolution. This degree of cultural evolution can be found in all societies and, therefore, the cultural/cognitive evolution of human beings and the basic form of the human mind are all connected .  As a matter of fact, the religious and cultural evolution of primitive man to modern one is the evolution of human rationality. In his view, there are three methods to understand the howness of the evolution of human cognition: magical, religious, and scientific .  That is why Taylor differentiates between magic and religion. He takes magic not based on spiritual entities but on impersonal powers and forces. According to him, magic works in line with the principle of similarity and association, and because the things that are similar have a causal relationship with each other, so magic is pseudo-science, but it is rooted in false reasoning. Taylor’s view, especially that of religion and magic, has influenced Fraser to a large extent. On the word of Taylor, the belief in spirits that think and act like human beings abounds in in all religions. So, in his view, the essence of religion and religious myths is faith-animism. Therefore, Taylor has proposed animism as the source and origin of primitive religions, and he takes the following as the developmental stages of religion: animism, nature worship, polytheism, monotheism, and metaphysical thought .  The relationship between magic and religion is the key issue for Fraser. According to Fraser, the first and most important principle to understand magic and religion was that the life of primitive man centered around the struggle for life, such as killing animals by hunters. According to him, the founding reasoning principles for magic

  18. Models of cultural niche construction with selection and assortative mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanza, Nicole; Fogarty, Laurel; Feldman, Marcus W

    2012-01-01

    Niche construction is a process through which organisms modify their environment and, as a result, alter the selection pressures on themselves and other species. In cultural niche construction, one or more cultural traits can influence the evolution of other cultural or biological traits by affecting the social environment in which the latter traits may evolve. Cultural niche construction may include either gene-culture or culture-culture interactions. Here we develop a model of this process and suggest some applications of this model. We examine the interactions between cultural transmission, selection, and assorting, paying particular attention to the complexities that arise when selection and assorting are both present, in which case stable polymorphisms of all cultural phenotypes are possible. We compare our model to a recent model for the joint evolution of religion and fertility and discuss other potential applications of cultural niche construction theory, including the evolution and maintenance of large-scale human conflict and the relationship between sex ratio bias and marriage customs. The evolutionary framework we introduce begins to address complexities that arise in the quantitative analysis of multiple interacting cultural traits.

  19. Models of cultural niche construction with selection and assortative mating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Creanza

    Full Text Available Niche construction is a process through which organisms modify their environment and, as a result, alter the selection pressures on themselves and other species. In cultural niche construction, one or more cultural traits can influence the evolution of other cultural or biological traits by affecting the social environment in which the latter traits may evolve. Cultural niche construction may include either gene-culture or culture-culture interactions. Here we develop a model of this process and suggest some applications of this model. We examine the interactions between cultural transmission, selection, and assorting, paying particular attention to the complexities that arise when selection and assorting are both present, in which case stable polymorphisms of all cultural phenotypes are possible. We compare our model to a recent model for the joint evolution of religion and fertility and discuss other potential applications of cultural niche construction theory, including the evolution and maintenance of large-scale human conflict and the relationship between sex ratio bias and marriage customs. The evolutionary framework we introduce begins to address complexities that arise in the quantitative analysis of multiple interacting cultural traits.

  20. Theory of Transcendent unity of Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ali Torkamany

    2015-09-01

    Shinakht, Vol.2. No.2, 213-245 • Akbariyan, Reza, Jalali, Alireza,2008, A ciritical consideration on ancient view of the Unity of reliegions, The new religious thought journal, No:12 • Bahrami, Mohammad, 2002,A Critique on “Quran and pluralism”, Quranic research journal, No:32, 124-151 • Bahrami, Mohammad, 2003,A Critique on “Quran and pluralism”, Quranic research journal, No:33, 149-169 • Bahrani, seyed Hashem, 1995, Al-borhan, Trhran, Besat institute • Fakhr-e-Razi, mohammad ibn omar, 1999, Mafatih ol-gheyb, Beirut, Dar ehya al-toras al-arabi • Fazlollah, seyed mohammad Hosein,1998, men wahye Al-qoran, Beirut, Dar ol-melak • Feyz Kashani, Mohsen,1994, Al-safi, Tehran, Al-Sadr • Ghadrdan Gharamaleki, MohammadHasan, (n.d, Quran And Pluraism, Tehran, Youth thought center • Ghadrdan Gharamaleki, MohammadHasan,2003, A Critique on “Quran and pluralism”, Quranic researchs journal, No:33, 138-157 • Gharaati, Mohsen,1994, Tafsir-e-Noor, Tehran, Cultural Center of the lessons from the Quran • Glyn, Richards, 2001, Towards atheology of religions, translated by Gandomi NasrAbadi, Reza, Meftah, AhmadReza, Qom, Religious Studies and researchs Center, • Hick, john, 1993, Philosophy of Reliegion, Tehran, Al-hoda • Ibn babeweih, Mohammad ibn Ali, 1997,Al-amali, Tehran, Ketabchi • Ibn-r-e-manzur, mohammad ibn mokarram, 1993, Lesan ol-Arab, Beirut, Dar e sadr • Peterson ,Michael, Hasker ,William , Reichenbach, Bruce & Basinger ,David , 2010, Reason and religious belief, Tehran, Tarhe now • Javadi Amoli, Abd-o-allah, 2010, Religious studies, Qom. Esra • Javadi Amoli, Abd-o-allah, 2011, Tasnim, Qom. Esra • Karami, Tayebe, Kadivar, Mohsen, 2004, Relationship human diversity with a multiplicity of religions And the idea of transcendent unity of religions in the eyes of traditionalists Journal of Religious Thought , No:12 • Majlesi, Mohammadbagher, 1982 , Behar ol-Anwar(Seas of Lights , Beirut, Dar ehya al-toras al-arabi • Makarem, Shirazi