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Sample records for culture medlineplus medical

  1. Medical Dictionary: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/mplusdictionary.html Medical Dictionary To use the sharing features on this ... Search term GO GO Visit the tutorial, Understanding Medical Words You may also be interested in these ...

  2. Medical Encyclopedia: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/encyclopedia.html Medical Encyclopedia To use the sharing features on this ... please enable JavaScript. The A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia includes over 4,000 articles about diseases, ...

  3. Health and Medical News: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not just injuries: study Related MedlinePlus Topics: Asbestos , Child Safety , Motor Vehicle Safety Coming Soon: Glaucoma Self-Care, ... the drinking culture, study finds Related MedlinePlus Topics: Internet Safety , Parenting , Underage Drinking Chlorine + Pee = Breathing Trouble for ...

  4. Introducing medlineplus.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Introducing medlineplus.gov Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... Discover a world of FREE medical resources: medlineplus.gov Your gateway to the world's most comprehensive and ...

  5. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine | NIH ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents MLA President Ruth Holst presented FNLM ... Service Award at the MLA’s recent national conference. ...

  6. Mobile MedlinePlus | NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Mobile MedlinePlus Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Trusted medical information on your mobile phone http://m.medlineplus.gov Wondering what the ...

  7. Mobile MedlinePlus | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Mobile MedlinePlus Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Trusted medical information on your mobile phone http://m.medlineplus.gov Wondering what the ...

  8. Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues / Spring 2012 Table of Contents Newspapers, radio, television, and the Internet are full of health news stories. Some sound too good to be true. Others sound truly alarming. Here are some tips on how to ... of medical research on television or read about it in the paper. Perhaps ...

  9. Libraries in Maryland: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/maryland.html Libraries in Maryland To use the sharing features on ... Anne Arundel Medical Center Joyce C. Miller, Medical Library 2001 Medical Parkway Annapolis, MD 21401 443-481- ...

  10. Libraries in Washington: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/washington.html Libraries in Washington To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. Bellevue Overlake Hospital Medical Center Medical Library 1035 116th Avenue NE Bellevue, WA 98004 425- ...

  11. Libraries in Nebraska: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/nebraska.html Libraries in Nebraska To use the sharing features on ... Omaha CHI BERGAN MERCY MEDICAL CENTER HARTIGAN MEDICAL LIBRARY - PAVILION 7500 MERCY ROAD OMAHA, NE 68124-9832 ...

  12. Cultural competence in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Janne; Jervelund, Signe Smith; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2017-01-01

    the survey, and 199 responded. The response rate is 14%. Data were analysed through descriptive calculations, and answers to open-ended questions were coded using content analysis. Results: Results showed that 82.4% of the informants agreed or strongly agreed that the medical education programme should...... in receiving training on cultural competence. Conclusions: Generally, there is interest in and acknowledgement of the importance of cultural competence in Danish medical education among teachers at the University of Copenhagen. This creates an opportunity to implement cultural competence in the medical...

  13. Improper Medication Use Rising Among Older Adults | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alcohol-Medicine Interactions Improper Medication Use Rising Among Older Adults Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Problems Taking Medications Many older adults take medications that treat health ...

  14. Cultural initiation of medical doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsinkó-Szabó, Zoltán; Lázár, Imre

    2013-12-01

    Eighteen years experience of teaching medical anthropology at a Hungarian medical school offers insight into the dynamics of interference between the rationalist epistemological tradition of biomedicine as one of the central paradigms of modernism and the cultural relativism of medical anthropology, as cultural anthropology is considered to be one of the generators of postmodern thinking. Tracing back the informal "prehistory" of our Institute, we can reveal its psychosomatic, humanistic commitment and critical basis as having represented a kind of counterculture compared with the technocrats of state-socialist Hungary's health ideology. The historical change and socio-cultural transition in Hungary after 1989 was accompanied by changes in the medical system as well as in philosophy and in the structure of the teaching of social sciences. The developing pluralism in the medical system together with the pluralism of social ideologies allowed the substitution of the dogmatic Marxist-Leninist framework with the more pragmatic and empiricist behavioral sciences including medical sociology and medical anthropology. The conflict between the initiation function of the hard preclinical training of the first two years, and the reflective, relativistic and critical narrative on "biomedicine as culture bound entity" constructed by medical anthropology during the second year of medical training is discussed. We also submit our fieldwork data gained as a result of a two year investigation period focusing on diverse initiation types of "would be" physicians. The main proportion of our data derives from individual semi structured deep interviews together with focus group interviews carried out with medical students of upper years. Finally, the role of medical anthropology in the "rite of passage" of becoming a medical doctor is summarized, paying attention to their field work reports and the risks and gains in this process.

  15. MedlinePlus: About MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools Español You Are Here: Home → About MedlinePlus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/aboutmedlineplus.html ... updated daily and can be bookmarked at the URL: https://medlineplus.gov/ . There is no advertising on ...

  16. Libraries in Georgia: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in Georgia URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/georgia.html Libraries in Georgia ... PRINCE AVENUE ATHENS, GA 30606 706-475-3416 http://www.armc.org/mdx.shtml Atlanta Atlanta Medical ...

  17. Libraries in Arizona: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in Arizona URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/arizona.html Libraries in Arizona ... Candy Lane Cottonwood, AZ 86326 928-639-6444 http://nahealth.com Flagstaff Flagstaff Medical Center John B. ...

  18. Libraries in California: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in California URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/california.html Libraries in California ... Alameda, CA 94501 510-522-3700 ext. 3331 http://www.alamedahospital.org Anaheim Anaheim Regional Medical Center ...

  19. Libraries in Alaska: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alaska.html Libraries in Alaska To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Anchorage University of Alaska Anchorage Alaska Medical Library 3211 Providence Drive Anchorage, AK 99508-8176 907- ...

  20. Libraries in Louisiana: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/louisiana.html Libraries in Louisiana To use the sharing features on ... Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center/AHEC LRC Library Service (142D) P.O Box 69004 2495 Shreveport ...

  1. Libraries in Oklahoma: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/oklahoma.html Libraries in Oklahoma To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Ada MERCY HOSPITAL ADA MEDICAL LIBRARY ILL 430 NORTH MONTE VISTA ADA, OK 74820 ...

  2. Libraries in New York: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/newyork.html Libraries in New York To use the sharing features ... please enable JavaScript. Albany Albany Medical College Schaffer Library of Health Sciences 47 New Scotland Avenue Mail ...

  3. Libraries in New Jersey: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/newjersey.html Libraries in New Jersey To use the sharing features ... Mills Deborah Heart and Lung Center Tobin Medical Library 200 Trenton Road Browns Mills, NJ 08015 609- ...

  4. Libraries in Utah: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/utah.html Libraries in Utah To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Provo Utah Valley Hospital Medical Library ILL 1134 North 500 West Provo, UT 84604- ...

  5. Libraries in Wyoming: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/wyoming.html Libraries in Wyoming To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Gillette Campbell County Health Medical Library 501 S. Burma Ave. PO Box 3011 Gillette, WY ...

  6. Libraries in Mississippi: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/mississippi.html Libraries in Mississippi To use the sharing features on ... Jackson G. V. (Sonny) Montgomery VA Medical Center Library Service (142D) 1500 E. Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS ...

  7. Libraries in Vermont: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/vermont.html Libraries in Vermont To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. Burlington University of Vermont Dana Medical Library 81 Colchester Avenue Burlington, VT 05405-0068 802- ...

  8. Libraries in West Virginia: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/westvirginia.html Libraries in West Virginia To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. Bridgeport United Hospital Center Health Sciences Library 327 Medical Park Dr Bridgeport, WV 26330 681- ...

  9. Libraries in Michigan: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/michigan.html Libraries in Michigan To use the sharing features on ... Battle Creek Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center Library Section (142D) Attn: Larry Beacham 5500 Armstrong Road ...

  10. Libraries in Wisconsin: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/wisconsin.html Libraries in Wisconsin To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. Appleton APPLETON MEDICAL CENTER DECOCK MEMORIAL LIBRARY 1818 NORTH MEADE STREET APPLETON, WI 54911 920- ...

  11. Libraries in Kansas: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/kansas.html Libraries in Kansas To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Fort Riley IRWIN ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY 650 Huebner Road FORT RILEY, KS 66442-5037 ...

  12. Libraries in Tennessee: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/tennessee.html Libraries in Tennessee To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Chattanooga Erlanger Health System Medical Library ILL Attn: Kathy McManus 975 East 3RD Street ...

  13. Libraries in Pennsylvania: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/pennsylvania.html Libraries in Pennsylvania To use the sharing features on ... Altoona James E. Van Zandt VA Medical Center Library Service 12E-L 2907 Pleasant Valley Boulevard Altoona, ...

  14. Libraries in Massachusetts: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/massachusetts.html Libraries in Massachusetts To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Boston Boston Children's Hospital Medical Library BCH3044 300 Longwood Ave. Boston, MA 02115 617- ...

  15. Libraries in Montana: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/montana.html Libraries in Montana To use the sharing features on ... page, please enable JavaScript. Billings Billings Clinic Medical Library 2825 8th Avenue North Billings, MT 59107-5100 ...

  16. Diabetes: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Prevention and Risk Factors Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type ... Resources for Living Well (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetic Diet: MedlinePlus Health Topic (National Library of Medicine) ...

  17. "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Bionic Man Meet the Bionic Man Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents The ... medical imaging, visit www.nibib.nih.gov "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research The National Institute of Biomedical ...

  18. Assessing and changing medical practice culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Your medical practice has an existing culture that manifests itself daily in literally hundreds of ways. Some aspects of your culture likely support your practice's growth; others may be impeding your progress. This article describes the characteristics of medical practice culture and provides numerous examples of how culture influences behavior. It describes how culture is expressed in a medical practice through objects and artifacts, language, emotions, interactions, practice management systems, and daily work habits. It offers three techniques for assessing an existing medical practice culture and a checklist for conducting culture observations. This article also provides guidelines for identifying a desired medical practice culture and explores why changing culture is so difficult. It describes five reasons employees are likely to resist culture change and provides 12 fundamental changes that will enable a practice to improve its culture. Finally, this article explores how medical practice cultures are formed and perpetuated and provides more than a dozen questions to ask employees in a culture survey.

  19. MedlinePlus: For Developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/fordevelopers.html MedlinePlus: For Developers To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. MedlinePlus offers services for developers. All are available at no cost and without ...

  20. MedlinePlus: Copyright Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here: Home → Copyright Information URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/copyright.html Copyright Information To use ... the Magazine and NIH MedlinePlus Salud The FAQs ( https://medlineplus.gov/faq/faq.html ) The same content ...

  1. MedlinePlus: Articles about MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MedlinePlus → Articles about MedlinePlus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/bibliography.html Articles about MedlinePlus To ... Dec 29]; 3(5):256-60. Available from: http://ecp.acponline.org/sepoct00/nlm.htm . Marill JL, ...

  2. MedlinePlus: Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools Español You Are Here: Home → MedlinePlus Accessibility URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/accessibility.html ... or (301) 594-5983 and provide the address (URL) of the page on which you need assistance, ...

  3. Enhancing cultural competence in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Janne; Norredam, Marie; Dogra, Nisha

    2017-01-01

    A health system serving diverse populations requires health professionals who are competent in caring for patients and population groups who differ in e.g. age, gender, socio-economic status, migrant status, and ethnicity. Cultural competence (CC) among health professionals is viewed as one...... the project Culturally Competent in Medical Education involving 13 partners from 11 countries.4 The project aimed to support the implementation of CC in medical curricula. First, a Delphi Study involving 34 experts was conducted to develop a framework of core cultural competencies for medical school teachers...... The proposed guidelines were presented in September 2015 in Amsterdam at a workshop entitled: “How to integrate cultural competence in medical education”. A range of participants attended the workshop, including the project partners, deans and faculty members of Dutch medical schools, physicians, and students...

  4. MedlinePlus: Disclaimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provides links to other Internet sites for the convenience of World Wide Web users. NLM is not ... a public service. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  5. MedlinePlus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health's Web site for patients and their families and friends. Produced by the National Library of Medicine, the world’s...

  6. Childhood obesity : medical, cultural and psychological factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radhakishun, N.N.E.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to examine medical, cultural and psychological factors of childhood obesity in a multi-ethnic cohort. Medical factors Several associations between weight measured and hormones were determined in obese children between 6 and 18 years. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was a

  7. Childhood obesity: medical, cultural and psychological factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radhakishun, N.N.E.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to examine medical, cultural and psychological factors of childhood obesity in a multi-ethnic cohort. Medical factors Several associations between weight measured and hormones were determined in obese children between 6 and 18 years. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was

  8. Medical science, culture, and truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Grant

    2006-12-19

    There is a fairly closed circle between culture, language, meaning, and truth such that the world of a given culture is a world understood in terms of the meanings produced in that culture. Medicine is, in fact, a subculture of a powerful type and has its own language and understanding of the range of illnesses that affect human beings. So how does medicine get at the truth of people and their ills in such a way as to escape its own limited constructions? There is a way out of the closed circle implicit in the idea of a praxis and the engagement with reality that is central to it and the further possibility introduced by Jacques Lacan that signification is never comprehensive in relation to the subject's encounter with the real. I will explore both of these so as to develop a conception of truth that is apt for the knowledge that arises in the clinic.

  9. Usage Statistics: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/usestatistics.html MedlinePlus Statistics To use the sharing features on this page, ... By Quarter View image full size Quarterly User Statistics Quarter Page Views Unique Visitors Oct-Dec-98 ...

  10. MedlinePlus FAQ: Framing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/faq/framing.html I'd like to link to MedlinePlus, ... as HealthDay. Our license agreements do not permit framing of their content from our site. For more ...

  11. Email Updates: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/listserv.html Email Updates To use the sharing features on this ... view your email history or unsubscribe. Prevent MedlinePlus emails from being marked as "spam" or "junk" To ...

  12. Medical Archives and Digital Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernoff, Suzannah

    2012-09-01

    When BioShock was released in 2007, reviewers praised the moral complexities of the narrative and the game's dystopian vision of what Ayn Rand dubbed the "virtue of selfishness". What critics overlooked was the extent to which the disturbingly realistic artwork and musical score relied on found images and sound, including a recording of distressed breathing from a physician's website, and digitised First World War medical photographs of soldiers with facial injuries. This article examines the implications of these acts of appropriation from a range of critical perspectives including Susan Sontag's commentary on the representation of suffering; recent literature on the ethics of computer games; and an online discussion forum in which players of BioShock discuss the moral "grey areas" of the game.

  13. Medical marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000899.htm Medical marijuana To use the sharing features on this ... have legalized marijuana for medical use. How Does Medical Marijuana Work? Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized ...

  14. Are medical ethics universal or culture specific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furqaan; Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    In our society and culture where family is of utmost importance,sometimes I wonder how much of a doctor’s duty is to the patient and how much is to the whole family.As a medical student,I remember being told by my professors that we should treat the patient as a whole and not focus on just one problem or organ system.Similarly when practicing medicine in Pakistan,one cannot treat the patient alone and ignore the family.How much should relatives’ wishes be taken into account when dealing with a patient? Don’t patients have a right to their medical information? When,how,and by whom can that right be waived? What role does culture play when debating medical ethics?

  15. Milestones in Medical Research, The Human Genome and ClinicalTrials.gov | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Milestones in Medical Research, The Human Genome and ClinicalTrials.gov Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Donald West King, M.D. FNLM ... genetic foundation of all human beings; the second, a comprehensive information service to ...

  16. MedlinePlus Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you can find all types of information about back pain. A great place to start is the Summary. MedlinePlus also offers information on Drugs & Supplements. The Drugs & Supplements page has two sections: Drugs, and Herbs and Supplements. You can find drugs alphabetically by ...

  17. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MedlinePlus Connect → Web Service URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/service.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web ... the base URL for the Web service is: https://apps.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/services/mpconnect_service. ...

  18. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MedlinePlus Connect → Web Application URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/application.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web ... the base URL for the Web application is: https://apps.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/services/mpconnect.cfm ...

  19. MedlinePlus: Linking to MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or healthcare providers from electronic health record (EHR) systems to relevant MedlinePlus information, use MedlinePlus Connect . You are welcome to link to and display the data provided by these services. Please observe the general guidelines for NLM ...

  20. MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patient Portals and Electronic Health Records to Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient portals, patient health record (PHR) systems, and electronic health record (EHR) systems can use MedlinePlus Connect to provide ... patient portal, patient health record (PHR) system, or electronic health record (EHR) system sends a problem, medication, or lab ...

  1. To Your Health: NLM Update transcript - NIH MedlinePlus magazine Winter 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of quote). Incidentally, NIH MedlinePlus magazine explains complementary health recognizes evidence-based as well as traditional approaches to medical treatment, including yoga, acupuncture, and massage therapy. Integrative strategies combine and ...

  2. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  3. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  4. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  5. Information for Librarians and Trainers: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your classes and health fairs. Resources for Teaching MedlinePlus MedlinePlus Tour MedlinePlus Tour in English and Spanish - A narrated tour of the main features of MedlinePlus. The video runs about 2.5 minutes. MedlinePlus Brochures MedlinePlus ...

  6. Physician and Patient Perceptions of Cultural Competency and Medical Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohana, S.; Mash, R.

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between the different perceptions of medical teams and their patients of the cultural competence of physicians, and the influence of this relationship on the conflict between them. Physicians' cultural competence (Noble A. Linguistic and cultural mediation of social services. Cultural competence of health care.…

  7. Physician and Patient Perceptions of Cultural Competency and Medical Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohana, S.; Mash, R.

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between the different perceptions of medical teams and their patients of the cultural competence of physicians, and the influence of this relationship on the conflict between them. Physicians' cultural competence (Noble A. Linguistic and cultural mediation of social services. Cultural competence of health care.…

  8. Search Tips: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Search Tips URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/searchtips.html ... site by adding 'site:' and the domain or URL to your search words. For example, if you ...

  9. Web Service: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an alternate method of accessing MedlinePlus data. Base URL https ://wsearch.nlm.nih.gov/ws/query Please ... the Web service. All special characters must be URL encoded. Spaces may be replaced by '+' signs, which ...

  10. MedlinePlus: Quality Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... identifies some materials for patients to access from Electronic Health Records. These materials are usually short overviews ... accurate, science-based information that complements or enhances the government information found on MedlinePlus. The source of the ...

  11. Health Topics: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/healthtopics.html Health Topics To use the sharing features on this page, ... regularly reviewed, and links are updated daily. Find topics A-Z Expand Section A B C D ...

  12. MedlinePlus Connect: Technical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Are Here: Home → MedlinePlus Connect → Technical Information URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/technical. ... on the How it Works page . Queries are URL-based. Connect uses the GET method not POST. ...

  13. Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus magazine!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus magazine! Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... Produced by the National Institutes of Health, the magazine and its companion Web site medlineplus.gov are ...

  14. Video Player Keyboard Shortcuts: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/hotkeys.html Video Player Keyboard Shortcuts To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. MedlinePlus offers a set of accessible keyboard shortcuts for our latest Health videos on the ...

  15. MedlinePlus Connect: Email List

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/connect/emaillist.html MedlinePlus Connect: Email List To use the sharing features on this ... developments and exchange ideas with your colleagues. This email list will be useful for health IT developers ...

  16. MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/survey/index.html MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015 To use the sharing features on ... government sites in the "Information/News" category. Other survey question responses: What best describes your role in ...

  17. Cultural minority students' experiences with intercultural competency in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyerzapf, Hannah; Abma, Tineke

    2017-05-01

    Medical schools increasingly value and focus on teaching students intercultural competency within present-day multicultural society. Little is known about the experiences of cultural minority students in intercultural competence activities. This article discusses the intercultural competence activities of medical education in a Dutch university from the perspective of cultural minority students. We will formulate recommendations for how to stimulate intercultural competency in, as well as inclusiveness of, medical education. A qualitative evaluation was performed within a medical school in the Netherlands. Data were collected through interviews (n = 23), a focus group (six participants) and participant observations (20 hours). Thematic analysis was performed. Cultural minority students experienced a lack of respect and understanding by cultural majority students and teachers. Education activities intended to transfer intercultural knowledge, address personal prejudice and stimulate intercultural sensitivity were perceived as stigmatising and as creating an unsafe climate for cultural minority students. Cultural minority and majority students on campus seemed segregated and the intercultural awareness of minority students was not integrated in intercultural competence activities. As cultural minority students were confronted with microaggressions, the medical school did not succeed in creating a safe education environment for all students. Contrary to their aims and intentions, intercultural competence activities had limited effect and seemed to support the polarisation of cultural minority and majority students and teachers. This can be seen as pointing towards a hidden curriculum privileging majority over minority students. For structural integration of intercultural competency in medical education, the focus must penetrate beyond curricular activities towards the critical addressing of the culture and structure of medical school. Collective commitment to

  18. Assessing medical student cultural competence: what really matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Windsor W; Mayo, Rachel M; Truong, Khoa D; Pribonic, Anne P; Schalkoff, Christine A

    2016-07-30

    The study aimed to explore medical students' attitudes and beliefs toward Latino patients, specifically: to assess students' levels of knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos; to determine students' exposure to and previous experience with Latinos; and to evaluate whether factors such as study abroad, living abroad, previous clinical experience with Latinos, and language proficiency predict Latino knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos. This study utilized a cross-sectional survey design. Participants were third and fourth year medical students at three medical schools in the Southeastern United States. Three composite measures: Latino knowledge, Cultural competence, and Comfort with Latino patients, were predicted in a multivariate regression model including individual sociodemographic characteristics and past clinical or social experience with Latinos. A total of 170 medical students completed the survey (43% response rate). Spanish language proficiency was a statistically significant predictor (t(131)=2.72, pcultural competence. Previous clinical experience with Latinos was not significantly associated with the three composite dependent variables, and comfort with Latino patients was not significantly predicted by any of the six Latino-related explanatory variables. Factors prior to medical school matriculation and during medical education may contribute to increased cultural competence and comfort with multicultural patients. Cultural patient-partner programs may be an effective way to increase cultural competence within the confines of medical school curricula.

  19. Health Topic XML File Description: MedlinePlus

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  1. Cultural context in medical ethics: lessons from Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powell Tia

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper examines two topics in Japanese medical ethics: non-disclosure of medical information by Japanese physicians, and the history of human rights abuses by Japanese physicians during World War II. These contrasting issues show how culture shapes our view of ethically appropriate behavior in medicine. An understanding of cultural context reveals that certain practices, such as withholding diagnostic information from patients, may represent ethical behavior in that context. In contrast, nonconsensual human experimentation designed to harm the patient is inherently unethical irrespective of cultural context. Attempts to define moral consensus in bioethics, and to distinguish between acceptable and unacceptable variation across different cultural contexts, remain central challenges in articulating international, culturally sensitive norms in medical ethics.

  2. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on culture as a dynamic process situated in a social context, and has been valued in diverse fields for yielding rich understandings of complex issues and key factors involved. This paper explains how activity theory can be used in (cross-)cultural medical education research. We discuss activity theory's theoretical background and principles, and we show how these can be applied to the cultural research practice by discussing the steps involved in a cross-cultural study that we conducted, from formulating research questions to drawing conclusions. We describe how the activity system, the unit of analysis in activity theory, can serve as an organizing principle to grasp cultural complexity. We end with reflections on the theoretical and practical use of activity theory for cultural research and note that it is not a shortcut to capture cultural complexity: it is a challenge for researchers to determine the boundaries of their study and to analyze and interpret the dynamics of the activity system.

  3. MedlinePlus FAQ: Can you tell me how to cite MedlinePlus pages?

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  4. Cultural differences in medical communication: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Barbara C; Meeuwesen, Ludwien

    2006-12-01

    Culture and ethnicity have often been cited as barriers in establishing an effective and satisfying doctor-patient relationship. The aim of this paper is to gain more insight in intercultural medical communication difficulties by reviewing observational studies on intercultural doctor-patient communication. In addition, a research model for studying this topic in future research is proposed. A literature review using online databases (Pubmed, Psychlit) was performed. Findings reveal major differences in doctor-patient communication as a consequence of patients' ethnic backgrounds. Doctors behave less affectively when interacting with ethnic minority patients compared to White patients. Ethnic minority patients themselves are also less verbally expressive; they seem to be less assertive and affective during the medical encounter than White patients. Most reviewed studies did not relate communication behaviour to possible antecedent culture-related variables, nor did they assess the effect of cultural variations in doctor-patient communication on outcomes, leaving us in the dark about reasons for and consequences of differences in intercultural medical communication. Five key predictors of culture-related communication problems are identified in the literature: (1) cultural differences in explanatory models of health and illness; (2) differences in cultural values; (3) cultural differences in patients' preferences for doctor-patient relationships; (4) racism/perceptual biases; (5) linguistic barriers. It is concluded that by incorporating these variables into a research model future research on this topic can be enhanced, both from a theoretical and a methodological perspective. Using a cultural sensitive approach in medical communication is recommended.

  5. The role of medical culture in the journey to resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Howard

    2015-06-01

    There is growing concern about the difficulty primary care practices are experiencing both recruiting and retaining practitioners. Frustrations stemming from integrating electronic medical records, satisfying external documentation requirements for oversight and billing, and the divide created between inpatient and ambulatory care teams all contribute to practitioner and staff burnout. Addressing the current culture of medical education and primary care is clearly an essential issue for health care leaders and medical educators.Using two experiences, a workshop on resilience with a large primary care practice group and a medical student studying for the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1, the author describes the cultural imperative, beginning in medical school, to sacrifice self-care for productivity and individual achievement. This approach has consequences for practitioners' levels of burnout and selecting primary care as a career. The author concludes by providing recommendations for both individual and organizational approaches to addressing these concerns.

  6. Organizational Culture, Values, and Routines in Iranian Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Zavareh, Davoud Khorasani; Masiello, Italo

    2009-01-01

    In Iran, restructuring of medical education and the health care delivery system in 1985 resulted in a rapid shift from elite to mass education, ultimately leading to an increase in the number of medical schools, faculties, and programs and as well as some complications. This study aimed to investigate views on academic culture, values, and…

  7. Chinese Confucian culture and the medical ethical tradition.

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Z

    1995-01-01

    The Confucian culture, rich in its contents and great in its significance, exerted on the thinking, culture and political life of ancient China immense influences, unparalleled by any other school of thought or culture. Confucian theories on morality and ethics, with 'goodness' as the core and 'rites' as the norm, served as the 'key notes' of the traditional medical ethics of China. The viewpoints of Confucianism on benevolence and material interests, on good and evil, on kindheartedness, and...

  8. NLM MedlinePlus Magazine Team | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... OCPL), NLM Kathleen Cravedi MEDLINEPLUS AND MEDLINEPLUS EN ESPAÑOL TEAMS, NLM Fedora Braverman WRITER-EDITOR, NLM Kathryn ... www.facebook.com/mplus.gov Facebook MedlinePlus en Espanol www.facebook.com/mvedlineplusenespanol Follow us on Twitter @ ...

  9. Assessment of patient safety culture: what tools for medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaneliere, M; Jacquet, F; Occelli, P; Touzet, S; Siranyan, V; Colin, C

    2016-09-29

    The assessment of patient safety culture refers mainly to surveys exploring the perceptions of health professionals in hospitals. These surveys have less relevance when considering the assessment of the patient safety culture of medical students, especially at university or medical school. They are indeed not fully integrated in care units and constitute a heterogeneous population. This work aimed to find appropriate assessment tools of the patient safety culture of medical students. Systematic review of the literature. Surveys related to a care unit were excluded. A typology of the patient safety culture of medical students was built from the included surveys. Eighteen surveys were included. In our typology of patient safety culture of medical students (15 dimensions), the number of dimensions explored by survey (n) ranged from 1 to 12, with 6 "specialized" tools (n ≤ 4) and 12 "global" tools (N ≥ 5). These surveys have explored: knowledge about patient safety, acknowledgment of the inevitability of human error, the lack of skills as the main source of errors, the errors reporting systems, disclosure of medical errors to others health professionals or patients, teamwork and patient involvement to improve safety in care. We recommend using Wetzel's survey for making an overall assessment of the patient safety culture of medical students at university. In a specific purpose-e.g. to assess an educational program on medical error disclosure-the authors recommend to determine which dimensions of patient safety will be taught, to select the best assessment tool. Learning on patient safety should however be considered beyond the university. International translations of tools are required to create databases allowing comparative studies.

  10. Cultural competence in medical education: A questionnaire study of Danish medical teachers' perceptions of and preparedness to teach cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Janne; Jervelund, Signe Smith; Norredam, Marie; Kristiansen, Maria; Krasnik, Allan

    2017-03-01

    The cultural competence training of healthcare professionals is a key element in ensuring the quality of both the access and delivery of healthcare to increasingly ethnically diverse populations. The aim of this study is to investigate Danish medical teachers' opinions about cultural competence, their willingness to receive training and preparedness to teach cultural competence topics. The survey was sent to medical teachers, clinical teachers and external lecturers who teach in the medical programme at the University of Copenhagen. A total of 1400 medical teachers received the survey, and 199 responded. The response rate is 14%. Data were analysed through descriptive calculations, and answers to open-ended questions were coded using content analysis. Results showed that 82.4% of the informants agreed or strongly agreed that the medical education programme should include training on cultural issues, and 60.3% agreed or strongly agreed that students should be assessed on their cultural competence skills. Regarding preparedness to teach a diverse classroom, 88.4% felt somewhat or very prepared to engage and motivate all students. About 70% were interested in receiving training on cultural competence. Generally, there is interest in and acknowledgement of the importance of cultural competence in Danish medical education among teachers at the University of Copenhagen. This creates an opportunity to implement cultural competence in the medical curriculum, training of teachers and strengthening the diversity sensitivity of the organisation. However, support for this programme by management and the allocation of an appropriate level of resources is a prerequisite to the success of the programme.

  11. Why change habits? Early modern medical innovation between medicalisation and medical culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loetz, Francisca

    2010-01-01

    Based on a discussion of the concept of medicalisation and medical culture in Anglo-American, French-, and German-speaking historiography the paper argues that medical innovation in Europe from the sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century should be approached in a different way. Instead of asking from the perspective of a too narrow concept of medicalisation why medical innovations were rejected by the population, (medical) historians should analyse medical culture and ask why people should have changed their health and illness behaviour. This conceptual argument is deduced from four empirical examples: the introduction of smallpox vaccination, "medical police," the problem of medical professionalization, and the questions arising around the relations between the healthy/sick and their practitioners.

  12. Application of medical physical culture at extensive deep burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjacheslav Meleshkov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: describe the role of medical physical culture at extensive deep combustions for prophylaxis of development of congestive pneumonia, contractures and a muscular atrophy, and also for restoration of adaptation of an organism to household and labor loads after an dermoplastika. Material & Methods: analysis and generalization of scientific and methodical literature. Results: the main agent of physical aftertreatment – medical physical culture is considered; its application at treatment of patients with extensive deep combustions is proved; techniques of medical physical culture during the periods of a septicotoxemia and reconvalescence are described in detail. Conclusions: it is established that functional treatment will promote restoration of function of a locomotorium, the cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

  13. Chinese Confucian culture and the medical ethical tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z

    1995-08-01

    The Confucian culture, rich in its contents and great in its significance, exerted on the thinking, culture and political life of ancient China immense influences, unparalleled by any other school of thought or culture. Confucian theories on morality and ethics, with 'goodness' as the core and 'rites' as the norm, served as the 'key notes' of the traditional medical ethics of China. The viewpoints of Confucianism on benevolence and material interests, on good and evil, on kindheartedness, and on character cultivation were all inherited by the medical workers and thus became prominent in Chinese traditional medical ethics. Hence, it is clear that the medical profession and Confucianism have long shared common goals in terms of ethics. Influenced by the excellent Confucian thinking and culture, a rather highly-developed system of Chinese traditional medical ethics emerged with a well-defined basic content, and the system has been followed and amended by medical professionals of all generations throughout Chinese history. This system, just to mention briefly, contains concepts such as the need: to attach great importance to the value of life; to do one's best to rescue the dying and to heal the wounded; to show concern to those who suffer from diseases; to practise medicine with honesty; to study medical skills painstakingly; to oppose a careless style of work; to comfort oneself in a dignified manner; to respect local customs and to be polite; to treat patients, noble or humble, equally, and to respect the academic achievements of others, etc. Of course, at the same time, Confucian culture has its own historical and class limitations, which exerted negative influences on traditional medical ethics. Now, if we are to keep up with the development of modern medicine, a serious topic must be addressed. That is how to retain the essence of our traditional medical ethics so as to maintain historic continuity and yet, at the same time, add on the new contents of medical

  14. Mismatch of Cultural Dimensions in an Urban Medical Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Malone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify cultural dimensions and their potential mismatches between attending physicians and their residents and medical students. Methods. We surveyed faculty and students, both undergraduates and postgraduate resident physicians, at the SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, using Hofstede’s VSM-08 questionnaire, and calculated cultural dimensions, including the Power-Distance Index (PDI, Individualism (IDV, Masculinity (MAS, Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI, and Long-term Outlook (LTO. Correlations between faculty and student demographic data and cultural dimensions were calculated (SPSS. Results. There were 237 student and resident respondents and 96 faculty respondents. Comparing all faculty and student respondents, significant differences were found in four of five cultural dimensions, with faculty scoring higher in MAS, and lower in PDI, IDV, UAI, and LTO. Conclusions. These differences may be important in the design and implementation of a medical educational curriculum, and, particularly, in the measurement and evaluation of educational outcomes.

  15. Integrating social factors into cross-cultural medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alexander R; Betancourt, Joseph R; Carrillo, J Emilio

    2002-03-01

    The field of cross-cultural medical education has blossomed in an environment of increasing diversity and increasing awareness of the effect of race and ethnicity on health outcomes. However, there is still no standardized approach to teaching doctors in training how best to care for diverse patient populations. As standards are developed, it is crucial to realize that medical educators cannot teach about culture in a vacuum. Caring for patients of diverse cultural backgrounds is inextricably linked to caring for patients of diverse social backgrounds. In this article, the authors discuss the importance of social issues in caring for patients of all cultures, and propose a practical, patient-based approach to social analysis covering four major domains--(1) social stress and support networks, (2) change in environment, (3) life control, and (4) literacy. By emphasizing and expanding the role of the social history in cross-cultural medical education, faculty can better train medical students, residents, and other health care providers to care for socioculturally diverse patient populations.

  16. A Prescription for Cultural Competence in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kripalani, Sunil; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Katz, Marra G; Genao, Inginia

    2006-01-01

    Cultural competence programs have proliferated in U.S. medical schools in response to increasing national diversity, as well as mandates from accrediting bodies. Although such training programs share common goals of improving physician-patient communication and reducing health disparities, they often differ in their content, emphasis, setting, and duration. Moreover, training in cross-cultural medicine may be absent from students' clinical rotations, when it might be most relevant and memorab...

  17. Variation in emergency medical services workplace safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Huang, David T; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Simeone, Scott; Weaver, Matthew; Wang, Henry E

    2010-01-01

    Workplace attitude, beliefs, and culture may impact the safety of patient care. This study characterized perceptions of safety culture in a nationwide sample of emergency medical services (EMS) agencies. We conducted a cross-sectional survey involving 61 advanced life support EMS agencies in North America. We administered a modified version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), a survey instrument measuring dimensions of workplace safety culture (Safety Climate, Teamwork Climate, Perceptions of Management, Job Satisfaction, Working Conditions, and Stress Recognition). We included full-time and part-time paramedics and emergency medical technicians. We determined the variation in safety culture scores across EMS agencies. Using hierarchical linear models, we determined associations between safety culture scores and individual and EMS agency characteristics. We received 1,715 completed surveys from 61 EMS agencies (mean agency response rate 47%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 10%, 83%). There was wide variation in safety culture scores across EMS agencies [mean (minimum, maximum)]: Safety Climate 74.5 (min 49.9, max 89.7), Teamwork Climate 71.2 (min 45.1, max 90.1), Perceptions of Management 67.2 (min 31.1, max 92.2), Job Satisfaction 75.4 (min 47.5, max 93.8), Working Conditions 66.9 (min 36.6, max 91.4), and Stress Recognition 55.1 (min 31.3, max 70.6). Air medical EMS agencies tended to score higher across all safety culture domains. Lower safety culture scores were associated with increased annual patient contacts. Safety Climate domain scores were not associated with other individual or EMS agency characteristics. In this sample, workplace safety culture varies between EMS agencies.

  18. MedlinePlus Milestones: 1998-present

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    ... easier access to health information and a new search engine is introduced. MedlinePlus en español is released with ... MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine's consumer health Web site, debuts with 22 health topics. In its ...

  19. Interactive Health Games: MedlinePlus

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    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Videos & Tools → Interactive Health Games: MedlinePlus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... Physiology or Medicine (Nobel Foundation) Sleep for Kids: Games and ... (Department of Homeland Security) Drug Abuse Test Your Knowledge: Exercise Your Brain and Test Your Knowledge of Drugs and How ...

  20. MedlinePlus Connect: How it Works

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    ... page for more examples of Web Application response pages. Web Service The MedlinePlus Connect REST-based Web service ... to the user. Visit the Web Service Demonstration page for more examples of Web Service response pages. More Information How MedlinePlus Connect ...

  1. Organizational culture, continuous quality improvement, and medication administration error reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, B J; Blegen, M A; Uden-Holman, T; Vaughn, T; Chrischilles, E; Wakefield, D S

    2001-01-01

    This study explores the relationships among measures of nurses' perceptions of organizational culture, continuous quality improvement (CQI) implementation, and medication administration error (MAE) reporting. Hospital-based nurses were surveyed using measures of organizational culture and CQI implementation. These data were combined with previously collected data on perceptions of MAE reporting. A group-oriented culture had a significant positive correlation with CQI implementation, whereas hierarchical and rational culture types were negatively correlated with CQI implementation. Higher barriers to reporting MAE were associated with lower perceived reporting rates. A group-oriented culture and a greater extent of CQI implementation were positively (but not significantly) associated with the estimated overall percentage of MAEs reported. We conclude that health care organizations have implemented CQI programs, yet barriers remain relative to MAE reporting. There is a need to assess the reliability, validity, and completeness of key quality assessment and risk management data.

  2. Enhancing cultural awareness education for undergraduate medical students: Initial findings from a unique cultural immersion activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Sargeant

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Cultural awareness education is mandatory for medical programs, with particular emphasis on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. However, there is limited evidence to measure the impact of such education has on medical students. Aims This paper presents the development and delivery of a cultural immersion activity for first year undergraduate medical students. Additionally we explore how this type of activity may improve attitudes, comprehension and perceived competence relating to working with and understanding people of different cultures. Methods A pre- and post-survey design was utilised in connection with a cultural immersion activity. First year medical students (N=284, responses 196, 69 per cent from three cohorts (2012–2014 inclusive voluntarily completed a cultural awareness questionnaire, which contained items that related to perceptions, personal characteristics and educational competence. The main outcome measures were changes in perceived cultural knowledge, awareness, beliefs and attitudes. Data were analysed using principal component analysis and obtained means comparison. Results Principal component analysis revealed five dimensions for pre-post comparison: Knowledge Acquisition, Perceptions of Role Modelling, Internal Beliefs and Reflections, Personality Variables and Institutional Influences. Non-parametric means comparison showed increased ratings for knowledge acquisition and institutional influences (p<0.001, whilst a decline was noted for the personality variables (p<0.05. Conclusion Cultural immersion has great potential to elicit positive shifts in attitudinal and knowledge related aspects of cultural awareness at early stages in medical curricula. Negative directions also suggest that students question their beliefs and behaviours relating to cultural knowledge.

  3. Organizational safety culture and medical error reporting by Israeli nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Ilya; Barnoy, Sivia

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the association between patient safety culture (PSC) and the incidence and reporting rate of medical errors by Israeli nurses. Self-administered structured questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 247 registered nurses enrolled in training programs at Tel Aviv University (response rate = 91%). The questionnaire's three sections examined the incidence of medication mistakes in clinical practice, the reporting rate for these errors, and the participants' views and perceptions of the safety culture in their workplace at three levels (organizational, departmental, and individual performance). Pearson correlation coefficients, t tests, and multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Most nurses encountered medical errors from a daily to a weekly basis. Six percent of the sample never reported their own errors, while half reported their own errors "rarely or sometimes." The level of PSC was positively and significantly correlated with the error reporting rate. PSC, place of birth, error incidence, and not having an academic nursing degree were significant predictors of error reporting, together explaining 28% of variance. This study confirms the influence of an organizational safety climate on readiness to report errors. Senior healthcare executives and managers can make a major impact on safety culture development by creating and promoting a vision and strategy for quality and safety and fostering their employees' motivation to implement improvement programs at the departmental and individual level. A positive, carefully designed organizational safety culture can encourage error reporting by staff and so improve patient safety. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. Culture and healthcare in medical education: migrants' health and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, Michael; Akinci, Secil; Soydan, Nedim

    2010-01-01

    One of the main challenges for teaching programs on immigration, ethnic diversity and health is to transform the commonplace notion of "culture" into a helpful tool for medical training and practice. This paper presents the teaching approach of an interdisciplinary course on "migrants' health" established at the University of Giessen since 2004, which has recently been complemented by a thematically related collaboration with two universities in Latin America (Ecuador, Peru). The overall goal is to translate the abstract philosophy of "think global and teach local" into medical practice, and to provide students with the insights, attitudes and skills needed for a fruitful use of concepts like "culture", "ethnicity" and "migration background". A key feature of the course is the strong commitment to ethnography as an important means for looking under the surface of superficial attributions to culture, and for grasping the interplay of medicine and health with cultural, social, religious, economic and legal aspects in its particular local and/or individual shape. Three elements of the course are presented to illustrate this approach: First, a unit on Islam and Medicine, as important parts of the local immigrant community are Muslims. The second one deals with psychosomatic aspects, because in case of immigrants, complex symptoms and disease representations like somatisation are easily misinterpreted as "cultural". The third element consists of a unit with specialized social workers form outside the university, who provide direct insights into the living conditions and health problems of local immigrant communities.

  5. [Application of cell co-culture techniques in medical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun; Sun, Gui-Bo; Qin, Meng; Yao, Fan; Sun, Xiao-Bo

    2012-11-01

    As the cell co-culture techniques can better imitate an in vivo environment, it is helpful in observing the interactions among cells and between cells and the culture environment, exploring the effect mechanisms of drugs and their possible targets and filling the gaps between the mono-layer cell culture and the whole animal experiments. In recently years, they has attracted much more attention from the medical sector, and thus becoming one of research hotspots in drug research and development and bio-pharmaceutical fields. The cell co-culture techniques, including direct and indirect methods, are mainly used for studying pathological basis, new-type treatment methods and drug activity screening. Existing cell co-culture techniques are used for more pharmacological studies on single drug and less studies on interaction of combined drugs, such as collaborative compatibility and attenuation and synergistic effect among traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). In line with the action characteristics of multi-component and multi-target, the cell co-culture techniques provide certain reference value for future studies on the effect and mechanism of combined TCMs on organisms as well as new methods for studies on TCMs and their compounds. This essay summarizes cell co-culture methods and their application and look into the future of their application in studies on TCMs and compounds.

  6. Labrets in Africa and Amazonia: medical implications and cultural determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garve, Roland; Garve, Miriam; Türp, Jens C; Meyer, Christian G

    2017-02-01

    The custom of wearing labrets has a long tradition. Labrets appeared independently several thousand years ago in various culture groups in Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas. Today, apart from diverse body modifications as increasingly practiced in western civilisations, lip plates and plugs are found among a small number of tribal groups only in Africa and Amazonia. We summarise the history of labrets in different societies, describe medical consequences of wearing lip plates and plugs for jaws and teeth and address relevant cultural issues.

  7. Military medical graduates' perceptions of organizational culture in Turkish military medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Mustafa; Bakir, Bilal; Teke, Abdulkadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Bas, Turker; Atac, Adnan

    2008-08-01

    Organizational culture is the term used to describe the shared beliefs, perceptions, and expectations of individuals in organizations. In the healthcare environment, organizational culture has been associated with several elements of organizational experience that contribute to quality, such as nursing care, job satisfaction, and patient safety. A range of tools have been designed to measure organizational culture and applied in industrial, educational, and health care settings. This study has been conducted to investigate the perceptions of military medical graduates on organizational culture at Gülhane Military Medical School. A measurement of organizational culture, which was developed by the researchers from Akdeniz University, was applied to all military medical graduates in 2004. This was a Likert type scale that included 31 items. Designers of the measurement grouped all these items into five main dimensions in their previous study. The items were scored on a five-point scale anchored by 1: strongly agree and 5: strongly disagree. Study participants included all military physicians who were in clerkship training period at Gulhane Military Medical Academy in 2004. A total of 106 graduates were accepted to response the questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 25.2 +/- 1.1. At the time of study only 8 (7.5%) graduates were married. The study results have showed that the measurement tool with 31 items had a sufficient reliability with a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.91. Factor analysis has resulted a final measurement tool of 24 items with five factors. Total score and the scores of five subdimensions have been estimated and compared between groups based on living city and marital status. The study has shown the dimension of symbol received positive perceptions while the dimension of organizational structure and efficiency received the most negative perceptions. GMMS has a unique organizational culture with its weak and strong aspects. Conducting this kind

  8. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  9. Informal learning in postgraduate medical education: from cognitivism to 'culturism'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Tim

    2005-08-01

    Work-based learning occupies a central role in the training and ongoing development of the medical workforce. With this arises the need to understand the processes involved, particularly those relating to informal learning. Approaches to informal learning in postgraduate medical education have tended to consider the mind as an independent processor of information. In this paper, such cognitive approaches are critiqued and an alternative socio-cultural view on informal learning described. Recent and imminent changes in postgraduate medical education are identified, namely the reduction in patient experience, the fragmentation of teaching, and the development of competency frameworks and structured curricula. It is argued that although the latter may be useful in the construction of formal learning programmes, they will do little to enhance the progression of the individual from newcomer to old-timer or the cultural assimilation of the learner into a profession. Strategies for enhancing informal learning in the workplace are recommended in which increased attention is paid to the development of the medical apprentice within a community of social practice. These include the establishment of strong goals, the use of improvised learning practices, attention to levels of individual engagement and workplace affordances, immersion in professional discourse and behaviours, support in relation to the development of a professional identity and the provision of opportunities to transform social practice.

  10. Parathyroid Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Parathyroid Disorders URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Parathyroid Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  11. MedlinePlus Health Topic Web Service

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    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A search-based Web service that provides access to disease, condition and wellness information via MedlinePlus health topic data in XML format. The service accepts...

  12. Oil Spills - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Oil Spills URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Oil Spills - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  13. Libraries in Connecticut: MedlinePlus

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  17. Anxiety - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  20. Libraries in Missouri: MedlinePlus

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  1. Libraries in Rhode Island: MedlinePlus

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  2. Libraries in North Dakota: MedlinePlus

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  4. Libraries in Hawaii: MedlinePlus

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  5. Libraries in Alabama: MedlinePlus

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  6. Libraries in Texas: MedlinePlus

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  7. Libraries in Other Locations: MedlinePlus

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  8. Libraries in Ohio: MedlinePlus

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  9. Libraries in Quebec: MedlinePlus

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  10. Libraries in New Hampshire: MedlinePlus

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  11. Libraries in Virginia: MedlinePlus

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  12. Libraries in Arkansas: MedlinePlus

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  13. Libraries in South Dakota: MedlinePlus

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  14. Libraries in British Columbia: MedlinePlus

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  15. Libraries in North Carolina: MedlinePlus

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  16. Libraries in Delaware: MedlinePlus

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  18. Libraries in Nevada: MedlinePlus

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  19. Libraries in Idaho: MedlinePlus

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  20. Libraries in Minnesota: MedlinePlus

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  1. Libraries in New Mexico: MedlinePlus

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  2. Libraries in Saskatchewan: MedlinePlus

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  3. Child Nutrition - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Child Nutrition URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Child Nutrition - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  4. Joint Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  5. Cesarean Section - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  6. Pulmonary Rehabilitation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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    ... Related Issues Breathing and Relaxation (National Jewish Health) DANCE Your Way to Healthier Lungs (American Association for Respiratory Care) Exercises (National Jewish Health) Oxygen Therapy: MedlinePlus Health Topic (National Library of Medicine) Also ...

  7. Newborn Screening: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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    ... National Library of Medicine) Article: Use of a Smartphone App to Assess Neonatal Jaundice. Article: Fragile X ... See our disclaimer about external links and our quality guidelines . About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support ...

  8. MedlinePlus XML Data Sources

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    ... of the links that appear on MedlinePlus health topic pages. With the Web service, software developers can build ... all site records (links) assigned to a health topic page, including their names, URLs, organizations, category assignments, and ...

  9. Healthy Aging - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  10. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  11. Cosmetic Dentistry - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  12. Sports Safety - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  14. Child Abuse - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  17. Testicular Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  18. Burns - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

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  19. Back Cover: NIH MedlinePlus Salud

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    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues NIH MedlinePlus Salud Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. ¡A su salud! Los Institutos Nacionales de la Salud (NIH, por ...

  20. [Patient safety culture - knowledge and knowledge needs of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toennessen, B; Swart, E; Marx, Y

    2013-12-01

    Ten years after the publication of "To Err is Human" in November1999, the development of patient safety efforts has been summa-rised in the statement "Ten years later, a million lives lost, billions of dollars wasted." This leads to the question why, despite evidence-based mea-sures for greater patient safety, they are not implemented or only implemented on a small scale. One approach to promote patient safety is the implementation of a safety culture. Such a safety culture is based on knowledge of employees about safe behaviour and their willingness to implement it. In this context it is interesting to explore the knowledge and the needs of medical students concerning patient safety. At the University of -Magdeburg 354 medical students in their clinical semesters were asked about their knowledge of specific recommendations on patient safety and about their attitude to patient safety and risk man-agement as well as their subjective need for knowledge on this subject. Only 16.7 % of the PJ (practical year) students and 11.7 % of students in all other clinical semester indicated to know the recommenda-tions for patient safety. This correlated with the answers to questions about single recommenda-tions. The importance of risk management during medical education was considered to be important by 53.3 % of the students of all clinical semesters and in particular 80.6 % of the surveyed PJ students. The answers to most questions showed a high demand for general information on patient safety. This is seen throughout all questions, especially with increasing clinical experience, and the need for information on single recommendations, such as critical incident reporting systems (CIRS), or Team Time Out. The establishment of a safety culture is described as a useful way to fewer patient injuries. This includes knowledge on recommendations for patient safety, which may contribute to the implementation of a safety culture to reduce medical errors. Our survey shows the

  1. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

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    ... Issues Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. Among those attending the NIH MedlinePlus magazine launch on Capitol Hill were (l-r) NIH ...

  2. MedlinePlus Marks its 15th Anniversary

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    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/anniversary.html MedlinePlus Marks its 15 th Anniversary To use the sharing features ... people across the country and around the world. It now includes: Over 950 pages providing links to ...

  3. Cultural Competency Training Requirements in Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Adrian Jacques H.; Lin, Susan Y.; Chun, Maria B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competency is an important skill that prepares physicians to care for patients from diverse backgrounds. Objective We reviewed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) program requirements and relevant documents from the ACGME website to evaluate competency requirements across specialties. Methods The program requirements for each specialty and its subspecialties were reviewed from December 2011 through February 2012. The review focused on the 3 competency domains relevant to culturally competent care: professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, and patient care. Specialty and subspecialty requirements were assigned a score between 0 and 3 (from least specific to most specific). Given the lack of a standardized cultural competence rating system, the scoring was based on explicit mention of specific keywords. Results A majority of program requirements fell into the low- or no-specificity score (1 or 0). This included 21 core specialties (leading to primary board certification) program requirements (78%) and 101 subspecialty program requirements (79%). For all specialties, cultural competency elements did not gravitate toward any particular competency domain. Four of 5 primary care program requirements (pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, family medicine, and psychiatry) acquired the high-specificity score of 3, in comparison to only 1 of 22 specialty care program requirements (physical medicine and rehabilitation). Conclusions The degree of specificity, as judged by use of keywords in 3 competency domains, in ACGME requirements regarding cultural competency is highly variable across specialties and subspecialties. Greater specificity in requirements is expected to benefit the acquisition of cultural competency in residents, but this has not been empirically tested. PMID:24404264

  4. Biodesign process and culture to enable pediatric medical technology innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, James; Wynne, Elizabeth; Krummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Innovation is the process through which new scientific discoveries are developed and promoted from bench to bedside. In an effort to encourage young entrepreneurs in this area, Stanford Biodesign developed a medical device innovation training program focused on need-based innovation. The program focuses on teaching systematic evaluation of healthcare needs, invention, and concept development. This process can be applied to any field of medicine, including Pediatric Surgery. Similar training programs have gained traction throughout the United States and beyond. Equally important to process in the success of these programs is an institutional culture that supports transformative thinking. Key components of this culture include risk tolerance, patience, encouragement of creativity, management of conflict, and networking effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Culture of General Palliative Nursing Care in Medical Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbæk, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    and the nurses' reflections on GPNC: (1) GPNC provided in a treatment setting, (2) transition to loving care and the licence to perform palliative care (PC) and (3) potential for team improvement. Conclusions: GPNC as a culture in medical departments seemed to be embedded in a setting not suited for dying...... patients. Palliative care was still practised according to the transition model of care, sharply dividing curative from palliative care, and was inappropriately conducted in a fragmented and individual-based way. The term ‘loving care’ was used as a ‘gate-opener’ to provide palliative care for the dying......Background: In many countries, approximately half of the population dies in hospital, making general palliative nursing care (GPNC) a core nursing task. GPNC in the hospital setting is described as challenging, however little is known about its actual practice. Aim: To explore the GPNC culture...

  6. The cultural and philosophical foundations of normative medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T P

    1994-11-01

    Thirty years ago, the idea that culture and philosophy could provide a foundation for normative medical ethics was more easily entertained than it is today when the very notion of a norm, whether culturally, philosophically or ethically derived, is in itself a problem. In large measure this comes from our contemporary embrace of cultural and philosophical pluralism and an increasing tendency to exchange the difficult belief in abstract and universally applicable norms for the more accessible notion that ethical values are cultural and relative derivatives. Despite this, in the face of the unprecedented ethical dilemmas presented by modern medicine, we have attempted to apply traditional ethical norms and analysis to modern medicine to establish a consensus for its right practice. Unfortunately, the attempt has not been successful, so that wherever we turn we find that ethical problems in medicine remain intractable and unresolved. That, in turn, has prompted a certain scepticism about the efficacy of ethics in medicine. In order to understand why we have reached this impasse, it is essential to realize that we have seriously underestimated the way science and technology have informed and, as a consequence, transformed the practice of medicine. Contributing to this, our tendency to think of technology simply as a way of doing things has blinded us to the fact that it is more fundamentally a way of thinking, knowing and valuing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Ideal Positions: 3D Sonography, Medical Visuality, Popular Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiber, Tim

    2016-03-01

    As digital technologies are integrated into medical environments, they continue to transform the experience of contemporary health care. Importantly, medicine is increasingly visual. In the history of sonography, visibility has played an important role in accessing fetal bodies for diagnostic and entertainment purposes. With the advent of three-dimensional (3D) rendering, sonography presents the fetus visually as already a child. The aesthetics of this process and the resulting imagery, made possible in digital networks, discloses important changes in the relationship between technology and biology, reproductive health and political debates, and biotechnology and culture.

  8. Changing the culture of medical training: An important step toward the implementation of competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Peter C; Caverzagie, Kelly J; Nousiainen, Markku T; Snell, Linda

    2017-06-01

    The current medical education system is steeped in tradition and has been shaped by many long-held beliefs and convictions about the essential components of training. The objective of this article is to propose initiatives to overcome biases against competency-based medical education (CBME) in the culture of medical education. At a retreat of the International Competency Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators group, an intensive brainstorming session was held to determine potential barriers to adoption of CBME in the culture of medical education. This was supplemented with a review of the literature on the topic. There continues to exist significant key barriers to the widespread adoption of CBME. Change in educational culture must be embraced by all components of the medical education hierarchy. Research is essential to provide convincing evidence of the benefit of CBME. The widespread adoption of CBME will require a change in the professional, institutional, and organizational culture surrounding the training of medical professionals.

  9. Western medical ethics taught to junior medical students can cross cultural and linguistic boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolis Stephen A

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about teaching medical ethics across cultural and linguistic boundaries. This study examined two successive cohorts of first year medical students in a six year undergraduate MBBS program. Methods The objective was to investigate whether Arabic speaking students studying medicine in an Arabic country would be able to correctly identify some of the principles of Western medical ethical reasoning. This cohort study was conducted on first year students in a six-year undergraduate program studying medicine in English, their second language at a medical school in the Arabian Gulf. The ethics teaching was based on the four-principle approach (autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice and delivered by a non-Muslim native English speaker with no knowledge of the Arabic language. Although the course was respectful of Arabic culture and tradition, the content excluded an analysis of Islamic medical ethics and focused on Western ethical reasoning. Following two 45-minute interactive seminars, students in groups of 3 or 4 visited a primary health care centre for one morning, sitting in with an attending physician seeing his or her patients in Arabic. Each student submitted a personal report for summative assessment detailing the ethical issues they had observed. Results All 62 students enrolled in these courses participated. Each student acting independently was able to correctly identify a median number of 4 different medical ethical issues (range 2–9 and correctly identify and label accurately a median of 2 different medical ethical issues (range 2–7 There were no significant correlations between their English language skills or general academic ability and the number or accuracy of ethical issues identified. Conclusions This study has demonstrated that these students could identify medical ethical issues based on Western constructs, despite learning in English, their second language, being in the third

  10. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... turn Javascript on. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the magazine NIH MedlinePlus the magazine is published quarterly, in print and on the ... up for a free subscription to NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Librarians may order this magazine in bulk . Please ...

  11. Culture-bound syndrome and a culturally sensitive approach: from a viewpoint of medical anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoji, A; Miyakawa, T

    2000-08-01

    Some aspects of the culture-bound syndrome are presented for discussion. From the psychiatric and medical anthropological viewpoints, kamidaari is described as an initiatory illness for seeing a shaman, and focus on clinical realities developing between different therapeutic subcultures in the same culture and the complementary practices of two epistemological ones, namely, the shamanistic and modern psychiatric system in the shamanistic climate. It is suggested that the culture-bound syndrome that reflects cultural influences on disease patterns and renders them difficult to place in a universal classificatory system should be seen as a vernacular bricolage or as tactics used by people within the web of their own local culture of origin. Therapists who treat patients in a cross-epistemological milieu should be aware of the subcultural-epistemological issues that may affect the clinical process. It should be recognized that, depending on the nature of a particular psychiatric crisis, the clinical encounter is straddling the boundaries of multiple clinical realities. At every stage in the clinical field, there is an intersection, consonance, or interruption of rejoinders in the open dialog by all those engaged in the clinical time. Aspects of climatic, culturally sensitive psychotherapy will be described, and the concept of the culture-bound syndrome will be reconsidered. Our approach could be seen as 'situation- and fudo-bound'.

  12. Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions

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    ... https://medlineplus.gov/medwords/medicalwordsdownload.html Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions To use the sharing features ... no Internet connection is available. Download: Understanding Medical Words [16MB zip file] Download instructions : Click on the ...

  13. 'Medical Tattoos' Help Hide Surgical Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161132.html 'Medical Tattoos' Help Hide Surgical Scars Pigments can restore more ... scars from cancer surgeries may benefit from "medical tattoos" that can help restore some of the skin's ...

  14. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members' organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet networks, in order to promote university netiquette and

  15. Cultural diversity: blind spot in medical curriculum documents, a document analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternotte, E.; Fokkema, J.P.; Loon, K.A. van; Dulmen, S. van; Scheele, F.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cultural diversity among patients presents specific challenges to physicians. Therefore, cultural diversity training is needed in medical education. In cases where strategic curriculum documents form the basis of medical training it is expected that the topic of cultural diversity is inc

  16. Cultural diversity: blind spot in medical curriculum documents, a document analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternotte, E.; Fokkema, J.P.I.; Loon, K.A.van; Dulmen, S. van; Scheele, F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cultural diversity among patients presents specific challenges to physicians. Therefore, cultural diversity training is needed in medical education. In cases where strategic curriculum documents form the basis of medical training it is expected that the topic of cultural diversity is inc

  17. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  18. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  19. An Examination of Cultural Competence Training in US Medical Education Guided by the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Hearod, Jordan B; Tran, Kim; Norris, Keith C; Buchwald, Dedra

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, medical students must demonstrate a standard level of "cultural competence," upon graduation. Cultural competence is most often defined as a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, organization, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. The Association of American Medical Colleges developed the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (TACCT) to assist schools in developing and evaluating cultural competence curricula to meet these requirements. This review uses the TACCT as a guideline to describe and assess pedagogical approaches to cultural competence training in US medical education and identify content gaps and opportunities for curriculum improvement. A total of 18 programs are assessed. Findings support previous research that cultural competence training can improve the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of medical trainees. However, wide variation in the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of cultural competence training programs exists, leading to differences in training quality and outcomes. More research is needed to establish optimal approaches to implementing and evaluating cultural competence training that incorporate cultural humility, the social determinants of health, and broader structural competency within the medical system.

  20. An Examination of Cultural Competence Training in US Medical Education Guided by the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Hearod, Jordan B.; Tran, Kim; Norris, Keith C.; Buchwald, Dedra

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, medical students must demonstrate a standard level of “cultural competence,” upon graduation. Cultural competence is most often defined as a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, organization, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. The Association of American Medical Colleges developed the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (TACCT) to assist schools in developing and evaluating cultural competence curricula to meet these requirements. This review uses the TACCT as a guideline to describe and assess pedagogical approaches to cultural competence training in US medical education and identify content gaps and opportunities for curriculum improvement. A total of 18 programs are assessed. Findings support previous research that cultural competence training can improve the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of medical trainees. However, wide variation in the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of cultural competence training programs exists, leading to differences in training quality and outcomes. More research is needed to establish optimal approaches to implementing and evaluating cultural competence training that incorporate cultural humility, the social determinants of health, and broader structural competency within the medical system. PMID:27818848

  1. Reciprocal Evolution of Opiate Science from Medical and Cultural Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Pilonis, Nastazja; Ptacek, Radek; Kream, Richard M

    2017-06-13

    Over the course of human history, it has been common to use plants for medicinal purposes, such as for providing relief from particular maladies and self-medication. Opium represents one longstanding remedy that has been used to address a range of medical conditions, alleviating discomfort often in ways that have proven pleasurable. Opium is a combination of compounds obtained from the mature fruit of opium poppy, papaver somniferum. Morphine and its biosynthetic precursors thebaine and codeine constitute the main bioactive opiate alkaloids contained in opium. Opium usage in ancient cultures is well documented, as is its major extract morphine. The presence of endogenous opiate alkaloids and opioid peptides in animals owe their discovery to their consistent actions at particular concentrations via stereo select receptors. In vitro expression of morphine within a microbiological industrial setting underscores the role it plays as a multi-purpose pharmacological agent, as well as reinforcing why it can also lead to long-term social dependence. Furthermore, it clearly establishes a reciprocal effect of human intelligence on modifying evolutionary processes in papaver somniferum and related plant species.

  2. MedlinePlus FAQ: Will MedlinePlus work on my mobile device?

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    ... mobile.html Question: Will MedlinePlus work on my mobile device? To use the sharing features on this page, ... Some video content might not play on your mobile device. See our FAQ on playing videos on phones ...

  3. MedlinePlus FAQ: How Often MedlinePlus is Updated

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    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: MedlinePlus health topics pages: Reviewed continuously. We add new links every day. ... two dates in the footer of every health topic page: "Date last updated" indicates when information was added ...

  4. MedlinePlus FAQ: MedlinePlus and MEDLINE/PubMed

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    ... What is the difference between MedlinePlus and MEDLINE/PubMed? To use the sharing features on this page, ... latest health professional articles on your topic. MEDLINE/PubMed: Is a database of professional biomedical literature Is ...

  5. Physical Culture as an integral part of general culture of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Sivas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of education of the individuality through the culture with the help of development of value potential in physical culture is discussed in the article. Improving the efficiency of education of medical students is becoming the leading aim of high school, which is connected with the development of culture of thinking, imagination, feelings and human creativity. Development of human motor capabilities is inseparable from the development of his personal qualities in physical education. One of the most important tasks of the educational process at high school is providing the motivation of a healthy lifestyle, motivation for physical culture and sports. Promotion of a healthy lifestyle should go through the activation of incentive mechanisms and a number of other phenomena of the individual's inner world. Efficiency of this approach is that it provides activity of a person in questions connected with preservation of individual and public health. The article tells us about the need to develop programs that can promote future professionals to form healthy and productive lifestyle, sustained motivation to permanent physical self-improvement. The problem can be successfully solved in the process of learning such course as «Physical education».

  6. Cultural Complementarity : Reshaping Professional and Organizational Logics in Developing Frontline Medical Leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordegraaf, Mirko; Schneider, Magriet; Boselie, Paul; van Rensen, E.L.J.

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of clinical management, new skills of medical doctors stand out, including leadership skills. Medical doctors organize medical work and improve patient care. The training of frontline leadership skills, however, is weakly developed in residency programmes. Medical professional cultures

  7. How are we 'doing' cultural diversity? A look across English Canadian undergraduate medical school programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Diana L; Reitmanova, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Cultural diversity education is a required curriculum component at all accredited North American medical schools. Each medical school determines its own content and pedagogical approaches. This preliminary study maps the approaches to cultural diversity education in English Canadian medical schools. A review of 14 English Canadian medical school websites was undertaken to identify the theoretical approaches to cultural diversity education. A PubMed search was also completed to identify the recent literature on cultural diversity medical education in Canada. Data were analysed using 10 criteria that distinguish pedagogical approaches, curricular structure, course content and theoretical understandings of cultural diversity. Based on the information posted on English Canadian medical school websites, all schools offer cultural diversity education although how each 'does' cultural diversity differs widely. Two medical schools have adopted the cultural competency model; five have adopted a critical cultural approach to diversity; and the remaining seven have incorporated some aspects of both approaches. More comprehensive research is needed to map the theoretical approaches to cultural diversity at Canadian medical schools and to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of these approaches on improving physician-patient relationships, reducing health disparities, improving health outcomes and producing positive learning outcomes in physicians.

  8. Mobility Aids: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ClinicalTrials.gov: Self-Help Devices (National Institutes of Health) Journal Articles References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National ... Eldercare at Home: Mobility Problems (AGS Foundation for Health in Aging) Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Mobility Aids ...

  9. MRSA - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → MRSA URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/mrsa.html Other topics A-Z A B C ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All MRSA - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  10. Anthrax - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

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  11. Brain Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Brain Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Brain Diseases - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  12. Pneumocystis Infections: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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    ... with bilateral ankle pain (microangiopathy) and complicated... Article: Comparison of a commercial real-time PCR assay, RealCycler® ... the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  13. Libraries in Manitoba: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/manitoba.html Libraries in Manitoba To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Winnipeg Grace Hospital Library 300 Booth Drive Winnipeg, MB R3J 3M7 CANADA ...

  14. Libraries in Ontario: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/ontario.html Libraries in Ontario To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Barrie Royal Victoria Regional Health Centre Health Library 201 Georgian Drive Barrie, ON L4M 6M2 CANADA ...

  15. Arsenic - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arsenic URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arsenic.html Other topics A-Z A B C ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Arsenic - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  16. Streptococcal Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Translations Korean (한국어) Strep Throat 패혈성 인두염 - 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Infecciones por estreptococo Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  17. The psychiatric cultural formulation: translating medical anthropology into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews proposed revisions to the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation for clinical practice. The author begins by exploring the theoretical development of and assumptions involved in the Cultural Formulation. A case presentation is then used to demonstrate shortcomings in the current implementation of the Cultural Formulation based on older definitions of culture. Finally, the author recommends practical questions based on the growing anthropological literature concerning the interpersonal elements of culture and the social course of illness. A simple clear format that clinically translates social science concepts has the potential to increase use of the Cultural Formulation by all psychiatrists, not just those specializing in cultural psychiatry.

  18. Cultural Competence in Medical Education: Aligning the Formal, Informal and Hidden Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, David; Ewen, Shaun C.; Jones, Rhys

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cultural competence has become reified by inclusion as an accreditation standard in the US and Canada, in New Zealand it is demanded through an Act of Parliament, and it pervades discussion in Australian medical education discourse. However, there is evidence that medical graduates feel poorly prepared to deliver cross-cultural care…

  19. Cultural Competence in Medical Education: Aligning the Formal, Informal and Hidden Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, David; Ewen, Shaun C.; Jones, Rhys

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cultural competence has become reified by inclusion as an accreditation standard in the US and Canada, in New Zealand it is demanded through an Act of Parliament, and it pervades discussion in Australian medical education discourse. However, there is evidence that medical graduates feel poorly prepared to deliver cross-cultural care…

  20. Medical School Can Be an Emotional Pressure-Cooker

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162396.html Medical School Can Be an Emotional Pressure-Cooker Yet ... 2016 TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many medical students from around the world struggle with depression, ...

  1. Medical Marijuana Not a Lure for Kids: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161668.html Medical Marijuana Not a Lure for Kids: Study Found no ... kids who live in states with legal medical marijuana more likely to smoke pot? The answer appears ...

  2. MedlinePlus en español marks its 10th anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/spanishanniversary.html MedlinePlus en español Marks its 10 th Anniversary To use the ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. MedlinePlus en español ( http://medlineplus.gov/espanol ) launched in September 2002. ...

  3. High theory/mass markets: Newsweek magazine and the circuits of medical culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradley

    2007-01-01

    Medicine is driven by much more than science and reason (ethics); it is also driven by the circuits of culture within which it operates. This article examines how postmodern theory deconstructs standard ideals of science and reason and allows medical humanities scholars to better contextualize the world of medicine. As such, postmodern theory provides an invaluable tool for understanding the circuits of popular culture and medicine's place within these circuits. Using a recent issue of Newsweek magazine devoted to health and technology to illustrate the main points, this essay argues that contemporary popular influences on medicine are deeply problematic, and that through an appreciation of the dynamics of culture, medical humanities scholars can join the struggle over medical culture. This perspective allows medical humanities to make important contributions toward alternative circuits of medical representation, consumption, and identification.

  4. Visualizing reproduction: a cultural history of early-modern and modern medical illustrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Written as a response to a conference exhibition of medical illustrations of reproduction, this article considers the gains of an interdisciplinary study of medical illustration to both historians and medics. The article insists that we should not only be attuned to the cultural work that such representations perform but also that such illustrations are the product of material medical practices and the often humane impulses that drive them.

  5. Cultural diversity: blind spot in medical curriculum documents, a document analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternotte, Emma; Fokkema, Joanne P I; van Loon, Karsten A; van Dulmen, Sandra; Scheele, Fedde

    2014-08-22

    Cultural diversity among patients presents specific challenges to physicians. Therefore, cultural diversity training is needed in medical education. In cases where strategic curriculum documents form the basis of medical training it is expected that the topic of cultural diversity is included in these documents, especially if these have been recently updated. The aim of this study was to assess the current formal status of cultural diversity training in the Netherlands, which is a multi-ethnic country with recently updated medical curriculum documents. In February and March 2013, a document analysis was performed of strategic curriculum documents for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in the Netherlands. All text phrases that referred to cultural diversity were extracted from these documents. Subsequently, these phrases were sorted into objectives, training methods or evaluation tools to assess how they contributed to adequate curriculum design. Of a total of 52 documents, 33 documents contained phrases with information about cultural diversity training. Cultural diversity aspects were more prominently described in the curriculum documents for undergraduate education than in those for postgraduate education. The most specific information about cultural diversity was found in the blueprint for undergraduate medical education. In the postgraduate curriculum documents, attention to cultural diversity differed among specialties and was mainly superficial. Cultural diversity is an underrepresented topic in the Dutch documents that form the basis for actual medical training, although the documents have been updated recently. Attention to the topic is thus unwarranted. This situation does not fit the demand of a multi-ethnic society for doctors with cultural diversity competences. Multi-ethnic countries should be critical on the content of the bases for their medical educational curricula.

  6. Partnership for Diversity: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Nurturing Cultural Competence at an Emerging Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Stephanie M; Abuelroos, Dena; Dabaja, Emman; Jurva, Stephanie; Martin, Kimberly; McCarron, Joshua; Reed-Hendon, Caryn; Yeow, Raymond Y; Harriott, Melphine M

    2015-01-01

    Fostering cultural competence in higher education institutions is essential, particularly in training future health care workers to care for diverse populations. The opportunity to explore techniques to address diversity and cultural competence at a new medical school was undertaken by a multidisciplinary team of librarians, faculty, staff, and medical students. From 2011 to 2015, the team sponsored a voluntary programming series to promote cultural competence and raise awareness of health care disparities for the medical school. Thirteen events were hosted with 562 participants across all. This approach to diversity proved effective and could be adapted in any higher education setting.

  7. What's New on MedlinePlus: Announcements and Special Features

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    ... on Twitter " updates via email. Thank you for connecting with us! Other Features Latest Health News To Your Health: NLM Update NIH MedlinePlus Magazine About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  8. MedlinePlus: The ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/survey/foreseesurvey.html The ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey To use the sharing features on this ... and MedlinePlus en español. NLM uses the ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey to measure online user satisfaction. The survey ...

  9. NIH Institutes and MLN MedlinePlus Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [4.3 mb] ... nih.gov (301) 496-7301 National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) www.nimh.nih.gov 1-866- ...

  10. Different use of medical terminology and culture-specific models of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    speaking patients and English-speaking doctors at a South ... in both Xhosa and English. Contrastive linguistic ... difficulty was experienced in translating medical terminology.5 ..... languages, and learn more about patients' culture and models.

  11. The Supplementary Action of Hospital Culture on Medical Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hua; WANG Bing; LI Tie; SHAO Chuanzhang; DU Hongxu

    2003-01-01

    Practice has proved that Hospital Culture and Environment influences economic effects di-rectly. So adapting the newly directed patient market and creating a good hospital culture and environmentwill take an active effect on strengthening the competitive advantage. Besides, appropriate forms of artisticmovement work in different aspects of patients. They recuperate patients physiologically, mentally, sociallyand psychologically, and dispel their misgivings and help them regain health.

  12. The Supplementary Action of Hospital Culture on Medical Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUHua; WANGBing; LITie; SHAOChuanzhang; DUHongxu

    2003-01-01

    Practice has proved that Hospital Culture and Environment influences economic effects di-rectly. So adapting the newly directed patient market and creating a good hospital culture and environment will take an active effect on strengthening the competitive advantage. Besides, appropriate forms of artistic movement work in different aspects of patients. They recuperate patients physiologically, mentally, socially and psychologically, and dispel their misgivings and help them regain health.

  13. Targeting Oral and Cultural Proficiency for Medical Personnel: An Examination of Current Medical Spanish Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Karol

    2012-01-01

    Demand for medical Spanish courses has grown with the rising needs of Spanish-speaking patients in the United States, but while there is no shortage of beginning medical Spanish textbooks, very few target the intermediate level. This article examines eighteen medical Spanish texts published in the last twenty years with respect to seven factors:…

  14. Friends of the National Library of Medicine, Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus, the magazine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Friends of the National Library of Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2017 ... of Contents Dear Readers, WELCOME to NIH MedlinePlus , the magazine. The purpose of NIH MedlinePlus , the magazine, ...

  15. Taiwanese Medical Students' Narratives of Intercultural Professionalism Dilemmas: Exploring Tensions between Western Medicine and Taiwanese Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Jung; Gosselin, Katherine; Chandratilake, Madawa; Monrouxe, Lynn V.; Rees, Charlotte E.

    2017-01-01

    In an era of globalization, cultural competence is necessary for the provision of quality healthcare. Although this topic has been well explored in non-Western cultures within Western contexts, the authors explore how Taiwanese medical students trained in Western medicine address intercultural professionalism dilemmas related to tensions between…

  16. Influence of Clerkship on Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry across Cultures: United States and Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgut, F. Tuna; Polan, H. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assure adequate treatment for patients with mental illness worldwide, medical schools must impart positive attitudes toward psychiatry. The authors examined the effect of culture on changes in attitudes toward psychiatry among medical students receiving the same psychiatry clerkship curriculum in two different countries. Methods: A…

  17. THE FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF CORPORATE CULTURE OF THE MEDICAL ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Zadvornaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of formation and development of corporate culture as the main factor of the successful functioning of medical organization in terms of optimization of activity of the health system. Discusses the importance and main directions of development of corporate culture for personal and organizational development. The authors identified features of the corporate culture of healthcare organizations, the approaches, showing the sequence and contents of the main practical activities on the formation, maintenance and development of corporate culture. Emphasized the need for further research and introduction of corporate culture and cultural values in health care organizations. Purpose/ objectives: to Study and evaluate the corporate culture of healthcare organizations to improve institutional management and increase of efficiency activity of medical organizations. Materials and methods: For data collection methods were used: direct observation, interviews, questionnaires. In conducting this study used data from official sources, a literature review, a systematic approach, comparative analysis, historical, sociological, statistical research methods. The results of the study indicate the need for concept development, tools implementation and development of corporate culture in the practice of the medical organizations.Conclusions/Significance: Corporate culture – the system of collectively shared values, symbols, beliefs, standards of behaviour employees of the organization that contributes to the originality and uniqueness of the activities of medical organizations that promote the identification of employees with the organization; Corporate culture is formed with the influence of factors external and internal environment of the organization, solving problems, external adaptation  and internal integration in the environment; Generated and promoted by the corporate culture is an important management tool, creates

  18. Motivational interviewing to explore culturally and linguistically diverse people's comorbidity medication self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison; Manias, Elizabeth; Cross, Wendy; Crawford, Kim

    2015-05-01

    To examine the perceptions of a group of culturally and linguistically diverse participants with the comorbidities of diabetes, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease to determine factors that influence their medication self-efficacy through the use of motivational interviewing. These comorbidities are a global public health problem and their self-management is more difficult for culturally and linguistically diverse populations living in English-speaking communities. Few interventions have been tested in culturally and linguistically diverse people to improve their medication self-efficacy. A series of motivational interviewing telephone calls were conducted in the intervention arm of a randomised controlled trial using interpreter services. Patients with these comorbidities aged ≥18 years of age whose preference it was to speak Greek, Italian or Vietnamese were recruited from nephrology outpatient clinics of two Australian metropolitan hospitals in 2009. The average age of the 26 participants was 73·5 years. The fortnightly calls averaged 9·5 minutes. Thematic analysis revealed three core themes which were attitudes towards medication, having to take medication and impediments to chronic illness medication self-efficacy. A lack of knowledge about medications impeded confidence necessary for optimal disease self-management. Participants had limited access to resources to help them understand their medications. This work has highlighted communication gaps and barriers affecting medication self-efficacy in this group. Culturally sensitive interventions are required to ensure people of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds have the appropriate skills to self-manage their complex medical conditions. Helping people to take their medications as prescribed is a key role for nurses to serve and protect the well-being of our increasingly multicultural communities. The use of interpreters in motivational interviewing requires careful planning and

  19. Cultural diversity process improves organizational community in urban teaching medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R; Spence, M M

    1996-01-01

    An urban teaching facility with nearly 3,000 employees had communication problems associated with race, gender and other cultural differences. It also competed for health care dollars and faced possible reduction in federal funding. The medical center instituted mandatory training in cultural diversity and customer service-and integrated the training process with the hospital's overall quality improvement plan and marketing strategy. The integrated approach affected the bottom line-Hurley's patient base has increased, and the medical center operates in the black. Training in cultural diversity and customer service is an effective tool to improve employee communication and improve financial outlook.

  20. The transformations of disease in expert and lay medical cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Bode

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Every culture has rules for translating signs into symptoms, for linking symptomatologies to etiologies and interventions, and for using the evidence provided by interventions to confirm translations and legitimize outcomes. The path a person follows from translation to socially significant outcome constitutes his sickness (Allan Young 1982. p. 270.

  1. Medical professionalism from a socio-cultural perspective: evaluating medical residents communicative attitudes during the medical encounter in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganasegeran, K; Al-Dubai, S A R

    2014-01-01

    The practice of medicine requires good communication skills to foster excellent rapport in doctor patient relationship. Reports on communication skills learning attitude among medical professionals are key essentials toward improving patient safety and quality of care. We aimed to determine factors affecting communication skills learning attitudes among medical residents in Malaysia. Cross-sectional survey, in a Malaysian public health hospital. A total of 191 medical residents across medical and surgical based rotations were included. We assessed the validated communication skills attitude scale among medical residents from different rotations. Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS®) (version 16.0, IBM, Armonk, NY) was used. Cronbach's alpha was used to test the internal consistency of the scale. Descriptive analysis was conducted for all variables. Bivariate analysis was employed across the socio-demographic variables. Majority of the residents believed that communication skills training should be made compulsory in Malaysia (78.5%). Medical residents agreed that acquiring good communication skills is essential to be a good doctor. However, the majority cited time pressures for not being able to learn communication skills. Significant differences in communication skills learning attitude scores were found between Malays and Chinese. The majority of medical residents had a positive attitude toward communication skills learning. Socio-demographic factors influenced communication skills learning attitude among medical residents. Incorporating communicative skills modules during hospital Continuous Medical Education for medical residents is essential to cultivate communicative skills attitudes for effective doctor-patient relationship during the routine medical encounters.

  2. Survey of Attitudes towards Curriculum Reforms among Medical Teachersin Different Socio-economic and Cultural Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mads Ronald

    2007-01-01

    schools in 3 countries in post-communist transition (Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina). The survey included a 5-point Likert-type scale on attitudes towards reforms in general and towards reforms of medical curriculum (10 items each). Teaching staff from medical schools in Bosnia and Herzegovina......Curriculum reforms in medical schools require cultural and conceptual changes from the faculty. We assessed attitudes towards curriculum reforms in different academic, economic, and social environments among 776 teachers from 2 Western European medical schools (Belgium and Denmark) and 7 medical...... had more positive attitude towards reforms of medical curriculum (mean score 36.8 out of maximum 50 [95% CI 36.1 to 37.3]) than those from medical schools in Croatia or Slovenia (30.7 [29.8 to 31.6]) or Western Europe (27.7 [27.1 to 28.3]) (Pattitudes...

  3. Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/medicalwords.html Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine ... enable JavaScript. This tutorial teaches you about medical words. You'll learn about how to put together ...

  4. Examining a Paradigm for Cultural Development at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bakhtazmay Bonab

    2016-12-01

    Results: Assessing the effective factors on cultural development indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between current and optimal status (p<0.001 (95% CI: 1.435.00. Results indicated that there is a significant difference in cultural development between current status and optimal state among the staff of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Conclusion: The results of the research show that cultural education in its optimal state is of higher rank than other indicators. Thus it seems necessary to pay more attention to cultural development and sustainable development.

  5. Survey of Attitudes towards Curriculum Reforms among Medical Teachersin Different Socio-economic and Cultural Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mads Ronald

    2007-01-01

    towards medical curriculum reform in post-communist transition countries, but not in Western European schools, was younger age, as well as female gender in Bosnia and Herzegovina,. Factors influencing faculty attitudes may not be easy to identify and may be specific for different settings......Curriculum reforms in medical schools require cultural and conceptual changes from the faculty. We assessed attitudes towards curriculum reforms in different academic, economic, and social environments among 776 teachers from 2 Western European medical schools (Belgium and Denmark) and 7 medical...

  6. A culture of safety: a business strategy for medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, James W; Finkelstein, Maggie M; Marles, Adam F

    2012-01-01

    Physician practices can enhance their economics by taking patient safety to a new level within their practices. Patient safety has a lot to do with systems and processes that occur not only at the hospital but also within a physician's practice. Historically, patient safety measures have been hospital-focused and -driven, largely due to available resources; however, physician practices can impact patient safety, efficiently and effectively, with a methodical plan involving assessment, prioritization, and compliance. With the ever-increasing focus of reimbursement on quality and patient safety, physician practices that implement a true culture of safety now could see future economic benefits using this business strategy.

  7. Medical professionalism from a socio-cultural perspective: Evaluating medical residents communicative attitudes during the medical encounter in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ganasegeran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The practice of medicine requires good communication skills to foster excellent rapport in doctor patient relationship. Reports on communication skills learning attitude among medical professionals are key essentials toward improving patient safety and quality of care. Aims: We aimed to determine factors affecting communication skills learning attitudes among medical residents in Malaysia. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional survey, in a Malaysian public health hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 191 medical residents across medical and surgical based rotations were included. We assessed the validated communication skills attitude scale among medical residents from different rotations. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS® (version 16.0, IBM, Armonk, NY was used. Cronbach′s alpha was used to test the internal consistency of the scale. Descriptive analysis was conducted for all variables. Bivariate analysis was employed across the socio-demographic variables. Results: Majority of the residents believed that communication skills training should be made compulsory in Malaysia (78.5%. Medical residents agreed that acquiring good communication skills is essential to be a good doctor. However, the majority cited time pressures for not being able to learn communication skills. Significant differences in communication skills learning attitude scores were found between Malays and Chinese. Conclusion: The majority of medical residents had a positive attitude toward communication skills learning. Socio-demographic factors influenced communication skills learning attitude among medical residents. Incorporating communicative skills modules during hospital Continuous Medical Education for medical residents is essential to cultivate communicative skills attitudes for effective doctor-patient relationship during the routine medical encounters.

  8. Where Medical Pot Is Legal, Fatal Car Crashes Often Decline

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    ... 162675.html Where Medical Pot Is Legal, Fatal Car Crashes Often Decline It's possible that these state ... and Human Services. More Health News on: Marijuana Motor Vehicle Safety Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  9. Medical Marijuana's Pain Relief May Work Better for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160603.html Medical Marijuana's Pain Relief May Work Better for Men Study ... a new study indicates. Researchers asked 42 recreational marijuana smokers to place one hand in extremely cold ...

  10. The Changing Drug Culture: Medical and Recreational Marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, Timothy E; Chenoweth, James A; Colby, Daniel K; Sutter, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    The major psychoactive compounds in marijuana (cannabis) are cannabinoids, the most significant of which is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. There are also two synthetic pharmaceutical cannabinoids, nabilone and dronabinol, available by prescription in the United States. The use of marijuana has increased in the United States with passage of medical marijuana laws in many states and legalization of recreational marijuana use in several states. In addition, the potency of marijuana has increased in recent years. Marijuana has been used for a variety of medical purposes, including management of nausea and vomiting, appetite and immunologic stimulation in patients with HIV infection and AIDS, glaucoma, neurologic disorders, and pain relief. Studies on the benefits of marijuana as a treatment for various conditions have been inconsistent, except for those on pain management. Marijuana has adverse effects, and has been associated with driving impairment, psychosis, dependence and withdrawal syndromes, hyperemesis, acute cardiac events, some cancers, and impaired lung function. As with studies on the benefits of marijuana, studies of adverse effects have yielded inconsistent results. Except for impaired driving and the occurrence of dependence and withdrawal syndromes, the adverse effects of marijuana use have not been fully studied.

  11. 25 tips for working through language and cultural barriers in your medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2009-01-01

    The language and cultural barriers facing medical patients with limited English language proficiency pose tremendous challenges and risks. Moreover, medical practices today are more likely than ever to employ individuals whose first language is not English or who do not possess native-like knowledge of American culture. Knowing how to work through the language and cultural barriers you are likely to encounter in your medical practice has become increasingly more important. This article is written by a practice management consultant who has graduate-level linguistics training and second-language teaching credentials and experience. It offers 25 practical tips to help you communicate more effectively with individuals who are outside of your native culture and language. These include easy-to-implement tips about English language pronunciation, grammar, and word choice. This article also suggests what you can do personally to bridge the cultural divide with your patients and co-workers. Finally, this article includes a case study of one Virginia practice in which cultural differences interfered with the practice's smooth operation. It explains how the practice eventually worked through and overcame this cultural obstacle.

  12. Health Information in Amharic (amarunya): MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → Amharic (amarunya) URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/amharic.html Health Information in Amharic (amarunya) To use ...

  13. HIV/AIDS Medicines: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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    ... Infectious Diseases) Children Approved Antiretroviral Drugs Used for Pediatric Treatment of HIV Infection (Food and Drug Administration) Patient Handouts FDA-Approved HIV Medicines (AIDSinfo) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get HIV/AIDS ...

  14. Libraries in District of Columbia: MedlinePlus

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    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/districtofcolumbia.html Libraries in District of Columbia To use the sharing ... 476-3195 http://www.childrensnational.org Find another library If you need help finding a consumer health ...

  15. Piercing and Tattoos - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Piercing and Tattoos URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... XYZ List of All Topics All Piercing and Tattoos - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  16. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... XYZ List of All Topics All Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  17. A Family Day program enhances knowledge about medical school culture and necessary supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cushing Herbert E

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Family Day program was implemented at Indiana University School of Medicine to educate the families and friends of in-coming medical students about the rigors of medical school and the factors that contribute to stress. Methods Surveys that assessed knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about medical school were administered to participants before and after the program. Results After the program, participants showed a significant improvement in their understanding of medical school culture and the importance of support systems for medical students. Post-test scores improved by an average of 29% (P Conclusions The inclusion of family members and other loved ones in pre-matriculation educational programs may serve to mitigate the stress associated with medical school by enhancing the students' social support systems.

  18. Towards cultural materialism in the medical humanities: the case of blood rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Catherine

    2017-05-11

    This paper argues for an approach within the medical humanities that draws on the theoretical legacy of cultural materialism as a framework for reading cultural practices and their relationship to the social and economic order. It revisits the origins and development of cultural materialism in cultural studies and literary studies between the 1970s and 1990s and considers how, with adaptation, this methodology might facilitate ideological criticism focused on material formations of health, disease and the human body. I outline three key characteristics of a medicocultural materialist approach along these lines: (a) interdisciplinary work on a broad range of medical and cultural sources, including those drawn from 'popular' forms of culture; (b) the combination of historicist analysis with scrutiny of present-day contexts; (c) analyses that engage with political economy perspectives and/or the work of medical sociology in this area. The subsequent sections of the paper employ a medicocultural materialist approach to examine conjectural understandings of, and empirical investigations into, the capacity of transfused human blood to rejuvenate the ageing body. I trace textual faultlines that expose the structures of power which inform the movement of blood between bodies in 'medical gothic' fictions from the 19th-century fin de siècle, including Mary Elizabeth Braddon's 'Good Lady Ducayne' (1896) and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). I conclude with a critique of biomedical innovations in blood rejuvenation in the era of medical neoliberalism, before considering the potential applications of medicocultural materialism to other topics within the field of the medical humanities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Student perspectives on diversity and the cultural climate at a U.S. medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Robert; McClendon, Jennifer; Henderson, Anita; Evans, Yolanda; Colquitt, Rosa; Saha, Somnath

    2007-02-01

    To obtain the perspectives of medical students at one school on racial/ethnic campus diversity and cultural competence and to gain their perceptions of the institutional climate around diversity at their university and of reasons for minority underrepresentation at their medical school. A student-driven survey of all medical students (N = 398) at a single medical school in the spring of 2003, supplemented by four focus groups from all racial and ethnic groups on the campus. A large majority of the responding students (n = 216; 54%) endorsed the value of campus diversity and the importance of cultural competence to the process of becoming a clinician. Most students felt their university had achieved a positive cultural climate, characterized by openness to diverse perspectives and attention to equity. Most students also felt that the university's programs and policies reflected a commitment to diversity, but fewer students--those from underrepresented minorities (URMs) in particular--felt that the university truly valued having a diverse student body and faculty. Most students felt that the lack of diversity on campus was a barrier to recruiting and retaining minority candidates. Some minority students also blamed the medical school's limited social, academic, and financial support, as well as inadequate efforts to recruit minority students. Medical students generally place a high value on campus diversity and cultural competence. URM students in particular felt that their university could do more to implement its commitment to diversity, including making greater efforts to recruit and retain URM students. These views constitute a barometer for medical schools to gauge and track their efforts to enhance campus diversity, incorporate cultural competence education, and create an inclusive and welcoming climate for students of all backgrounds.

  20. Influence of national culture on the adoption of integrated medical curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Majoor, Gerard D

    2011-03-01

    Integrated curricula have been implemented in medical schools all over the world. However, among countries different relative numbers of schools with integrated curricula are found. This study aims to explore the possible correlation between the percentage of medical schools with integrated curricula in a country and that country's cultural characteristics. Curricula were defined as not integrated if in the first 2 years of the program at least two out of the three monodisciplinary courses Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry were identified. Culture was defined using Hofstede's dimensions Power distance, Uncertainty avoidance, Masculinity/Femininity, and Individualism/Collectivism. Consequently, this study had to be restricted to the 63 countries included in Hofstede's studies which harbored 1,195 medical schools. From each country we randomly sampled a maximum of 15 schools yielding 484 schools to be investigated. In total 91% (446) of the curricula were found. Correlation of percent integrated curricula and each dimension of culture was determined by calculating Spearman's Rho. A high score on the Power distance index and a high score on the Uncertainty avoidance index correlated with a low percent integrated curricula; a high score on the Individualism index correlated with a high percent integrated curricula. The percentage integrated curricula in a country did not correlate with its score on the Masculinity index. National culture is associated with the propensity of medical schools to adopt integrated medical curricula. Consequently, medical schools considering introduction of integrated and problem-based medical curricula should take into account dimensions of national culture which may hinder the innovation process.

  1. [The transparent body: medical imaging and popular culture in the twentieth century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Francisco

    2006-10-01

    In today's societies, successful new medical imaging technologies have focused unprecedented attention on the inside of the human body. These techniques have jumped the walls of the biomedical field per se, penetrating the fields of culture and law. The article traces a genealogy of twentieth-century medical techniques used to visualize the human body and brain, from X-rays to the more sophisticated CTs, MRIs, and PET scans. It explores the changes that these ever more numerous visualization techniques have occasioned in our corporality and examines how these technologies have been received in the courtroom and in popular culture, especially in literature, movies, and magazines.

  2. Cholesterol Levels: What You Need to Know | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol Cholesterol Levels: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents Measuring Cholesterol Levels Learn more at MedlinePlus: https://medlineplus.gov/ ...

  3. Food allergy sufferer lives a cautious but normal life | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [4.3 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  4. The impact of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence In Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Parcham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organizational Culture is one of the most important factors that can change the climate of silence. The main aim of this research was to investigate the influence of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Method: This research was a descriptive-correlation one. The target population was chosen from 1900 staff of the University of Medical sciences and Health Care headquarter in Shiraz. Thus 311 employees were selected using the Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The instrument used in this research was Denison (2006 organizational culture questionnaire and Dimitris Buratas and Maria Vacula (2007 organizational culture. Cornbrash’s alpha method was used to calculate the reliability. The Item analysis and expert consensus were applied to calculate the validity of instruments. All gathered data analyzed with PLS software. Results: The results showed that the four dimensions of organizational culture include organizational involvement, organizational adaptability, organizational concistency and organizational mission was moderate and the mean scores obtained for each factor were 2.85, 2.82, 2.94 and 2.93 respectively. Structural equation model showed Organizational culture has a significant positive impact on organizational silence (β=0.68; P<.001. Conclusion: Based on the results and impact of organizational culture on organizational silence that is positive and significant; The organization further efforts to strengthen various aspects of organizational culture, especially the employees’ involvement in decision making; Employees can better express their opinions and thus reduced their organizational silence. In other words strengthening corporate culture is combined with the reduction of organizational silence. Medical organizations can establish appropriate reward system for creative ideas and suggestions to encourage people express their ideas As a result, reduced

  5. Better medical office safety culture is not associated with better scores on quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, Benjamin; Singer, Mendel E; Curry-Smith, Anne C; Nottingham, Kelly; Hickner, John

    2012-03-01

    A strong safety culture is an essential element of safe medical practice. Few studies, however, have studied the link between safety culture and clinical quality outcomes. In this study, we examined the association between safety culture and quality measures in primary care offices. A total of 24 primary care offices in Cleveland, Ohio. The Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety was administered to clinicians and support staff to rate 12 dimensions of safety culture and a single overall patient safety rating. An average of the 12 safety culture dimension scores was calculated to produce an aggregated patient safety score. Using linear correlation, we calculated the association between the 2 summary safety measures (overall patient safety rating and aggregated patient safety score) and 2 composite quality measures, a chronic disease score, and a prevention score. The survey response rate was 79% (387/492). There was considerable variation in both safety culture scores and quality scores from office to office. There was no association between the chronic disease score and either summary measure of safety culture. There were small but statistically significant negative associations between the prevention score and the overall patient safety rating (β = -0.087, P = 0.002) as well as the aggregated patient safety score (β = -0.004, P = 0.007). Although safety theory predicts a positive association between safety culture and quality, we found no meaningful associations between safety culture and currently accepted measures of primary care clinical quality. Larger studies across several health care organizations are needed to determine whether these findings are reproducible. If so, it may be necessary to reconsider the dimensions of safety culture in primary care as well as the relationship between safety culture and primary care clinical quality.

  6. Improving safety culture on adult medical units through multidisciplinary teamwork and communication interventions: the TOPS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, M A; Sehgal, N L; Alldredge, B K; Gearhart, S; Auerbach, A A; Wachter, R M

    2010-08-01

    The goal of this project was to improve unit-based safety culture through implementation of a multidisciplinary (pharmacy, nursing, medicine) teamwork and communication intervention. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was used to determine the impact of the training with a before-after design. Surveys were returned from 454 healthcare staff before the training and 368 staff 1 year later. Five of eleven safety culture subscales showed significant improvement. Nurses perceived a stronger safety culture than physicians or pharmacists. While it is difficult to isolate the effects of the team training intervention from other events occurring during the year between training and postevaluation, overall the intervention seems to have improved the safety culture on these medical units.

  7. Teaching cultural diversity: current status in U.K., U.S., and Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Nisha; Reitmanova, Sylvia; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the current state of cultural diversity education for undergraduate medical students in three English-speaking countries: the United Kingdom (U.K.), United States (U.S.) and Canada. We review key documents that have shaped cultural diversity education in each country and compare and contrast current issues. It is beyond the scope of this paper to discuss the varied terminology that is immediately evident. Suffice it to say that there are many terms (e.g. cultural awareness, competence, sensitivity, sensibility, diversity and critical cultural diversity) used in different contexts with different meanings. The major issues that all three countries face include a lack of conceptual clarity, and fragmented and variable programs to teach cultural diversity. Faculty and staff support and development, and ambivalence from both staff and students continue to be a challenge. We suggest that greater international collaboration may help provide some solutions.

  8. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - NIH MedlinePlus magazine Summer 2017

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    ... how food allergies develop and progress. NIH MedlinePlus magazine explains food allergies often develop during childhood. NIH MedlinePlus magazine ... the page). The web version of NIH MedlinePlus magazine includes links that ... in some articles. Before I go, this reminder... MedlinePlus.gov is ...

  9. American Sign Language and Deaf Culture Competency of Osteopathic Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinsky, Jessica; Colonna, Caitlin; Sexton, Patricia; Richard, Mariah

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a workshop on Deaf culture and basic medical American Sign Language for increasing osteopathic student physicians' confidence and knowledge when interacting with ASL-using patients. Students completed a pretest in which they provided basic demographic information, rated their confidence levels, took a video…

  10. Applying Medical Anthropology: Developing Diabetes Education and Prevention Programs in American Indian Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brooke

    1999-01-01

    Medical anthropology provides a broader contextual framework for understanding complex causal factors associated with diabetes among American Indians and how to minimize these factors in education/treatment programs. Discusses historical, epidemiological, and genetic considerations in American Indian diabetes; cultural factors related to foods,…

  11. Can dimensions of national culture predict cross-national differences in medical communication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwesen, L.; Brink, A. van den; Hofstede, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated at a country level how cross-national differences in medical communication can be understood from the first four of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, i.e. power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity, together with nati

  12. Cross-cultural education in U.S. medical schools: development of an assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Dolhun, Eduardo; Muñoz, Claudia; Grumbach, Kevin

    2003-06-01

    Medical education is responding to an increasingly diverse population and to regulatory and quality-of-care requirements by developing cross-cultural curricula in health care. This undertaking has proved problematic because there is no consensus on what elements of cross-cultural medicine should be taught. Further, less is known about what is being taught. This study hypothesized that a tool could be developed to assess common themes, concepts, learning objectives, and methods in cross-cultural education. In 2001, 31 U.S. medical schools were invited to provide the researchers all written and/or Web-based materials related to implementing cross-cultural competency in their curricula. A tool was developed to measure teaching methods, skill sets, and eight content areas in cross-cultural education. A total of 19 medical schools supplied their curricular materials. There was considerable variation in approaches to teaching and in the content of cross-cultural education across the schools. Most emphasized teaching general themes, such as the doctor-patient relationship, socioeconomic status, and racism. Most also focused on specific cultural information about the ethnic communities they served. Few schools extensively addressed health care access and language issues. This assessment tool is an important step toward developing a standard nomenclature for measuring the success of cross-cultural education curricula. On the national level, the tool can be used to compare program components and encourage the exchange of effective teaching tools by promoting a common language, which will be essential for developing and implementing curricula, for comparing programs, and evaluating their effects on quality of care.

  13. A low-fidelity serious game for medical-based cultural competence education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zain; Kapralos, Bill

    2017-07-01

    Research has shown that the quality of care is compromised when healthcare providers respond inappropriately to patient language and cultural factors. However, research indicates that medical education is not keeping pace with the changing composition of the patient population in culturally diverse societies such as Canada and the United States, and many healthcare providers do not possess the attitudes or skills required to be effective within a culturally diverse healthcare setting. Here, we present Fydlyty, a web-based, low-fidelity serious game for medical-based cultural competence education. Fydlyty includes both a scenario and dialogue editor providing the ability to develop conversations, interpret responses, and respond to questions/answers from the game player. These responses are based on predefined cultural characteristics of the virtual patient and on different moods that the virtual patient may express depending on the situation. The results of a usability experiment conducted with medical professionals and trainees revealed that the game is easy to use, intuitive, and engaging.

  14. Information technology leadership in academic medical centers: a tale of four cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, C P

    1999-07-01

    Persons and groups within academic medical centers bring consistent and predictable viewpoints to planning and decision making. The varied professional and academic cultures of these individuals appear to account primarily for the diversity of their viewpoints. Understanding these professional cultures can help leaders achieve some predictability in the complex environments for which they are responsible. Leaders in information technology in particular, in order to be successful, must become part-time anthropologists, immersing themselves in the varied workplaces of their constituents to understand the work they do and the cultures that have grown up around this work. Only in this way will they be able to manage the challenges that arise continuously as the technology and the needs it can address change over time. In this article, the author briefly describes the concept of culture, portrays four specific professional cultures that typically coexist in academic medical centers, and argues that understanding these cultures is absolutely critical to effective management and use of information resources.

  15. Perspective: the negativity bias, medical education, and the culture of academic medicine: why culture change is hard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haizlip, Julie; May, Natalie; Schorling, John; Williams, Anne; Plews-Ogan, Margaret

    2012-09-01

    Despite ongoing efforts to improve working conditions, address well-being of faculty and students, and promote professionalism, many still feel the culture of academic medicine is problematic. Depression and burnout persist among physicians and trainees. The authors propose that culture change is so challenging in part because of an evolutionary construct known as the negativity bias that is reinforced serially in medical education. The negativity bias drives people to attend to and be more greatly affected by the negative aspects of experience. Some common teaching methods such as simulations, pimping, and instruction in clinical reasoning inadvertently reinforce the negativity bias and thereby enhance physicians' focus on the negative. Here, the authors examine the concept of negativity bias in the context of academic medicine, arguing that culture is affected by serially emphasizing the inherent bias to recognize and remember the negative. They explore the potential role of practices rooted in positive psychology as powerful tools to counteract the negativity bias and aid in achieving desired culture change.

  16. A meta-ethnography of organisational culture in primary care medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Suzanne; Guthrie, Bruce; Entwistle, Vikki; Williams, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been growing international interest in shaping local organisational cultures in primary healthcare. However, the contextual relevance of extant culture assessment instruments to the primary care context has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to derive a new contextually appropriate understanding of the key dimensions of primary care medical practice organisational culture and their inter-relationship through a synthesis of published qualitative research. A systematic search of six electronic databases followed by a synthesis using techniques of meta-ethnography involving translation and re-interpretation. A total of 16 papers were included in the meta-ethnography from the UK, the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand that fell into two related groups: those focused on practice organisational characteristics and narratives of practice individuality; and those focused on sub-practice variation across professional, managerial and administrative lines. It was found that primary care organisational culture was characterised by four key dimensions, i.e. responsiveness, team hierarchy, care philosophy and communication. These dimensions are multi-level and inter-professional in nature, spanning both practice and sub-practice levels. The research contributes to organisational culture theory development. The four new cultural dimensions provide a synthesized conceptual framework for researchers to evaluate and understand primary care cultural and sub-cultural levels. The synthesised cultural dimensions present a framework for practitioners to understand and change organisational culture in primary care teams. The research uses an innovative research methodology to synthesise the existing qualitative research and is one of the first to develop systematically a qualitative conceptual framing of primary care organisational culture.

  17. Translation to Brazilian Portuguese and cultural adaptation of a questionnaire addressing high-alert medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Ariane Cristina Barboza; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Bernardes, Andrea; Pereira, Leonardo Régis Leira

    2016-10-24

    To describe the translation into Portuguese and cultural adaptation of a Questionnaire addressing High-Alert Medications to the Brazilian context. Methodological study comprising the translation from Chinese to Brazilian Portuguese, synthesis of translations, back translation, panel of experts, and pretest to obtain the final version of the questionnaire. Portuguese version presented semantic, idiomatic, cultural and conceptual equivalence, though 50% of the items required adjustment. Thirty nurses from a teaching hospital participated in the pretest and considered the items to be understandable. Satisfactory semantic, idiomatic, cultural and conceptual equivalence was obtained between the versions. The Portuguese version was also considered to be relevant to the Brazilian culture and easily understood. Nevertheless, its psychometric properties need to be assessed before making it available.

  18. Insurgent multiculturalism: rethinking how and why we teach culture in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Delese

    2003-06-01

    The author proposes a theoretical orientation for cultural competency that reorganizes common curricular responses to the study of culture in medical education. What has come to be known in medical education as cultural competency is theoretically truncated and may actually work against what educators hope to achieve. Using Giroux's concept of insurgent multiculturalism, she suggests that the critical study of culture might be a bridge to certain aspects of professional development. Insurgent multiculturalism moves inquiry away from a focus on nondominant groups to a study of how unequal distributions of power allow some groups but not others to acquire and keep resources, including the rituals, policies, attitudes, and protocols of medical institutions. This approach includes not only the doctor-patient relationship but also the social causes of inequalities and dominance. Linked to professional development efforts, insurgent multiculturalism can provide students with more opportunities to look at their biases, challenge their assumptions, know people beyond labels, confront the effects of power and privilege, and develop a far greater capacity for compassion and respect.

  19. Taiwanese medical students' narratives of intercultural professionalism dilemmas: exploring tensions between Western medicine and Taiwanese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Jung; Gosselin, Katherine; Chandratilake, Madawa; Monrouxe, Lynn V; Rees, Charlotte E

    2017-05-01

    In an era of globalization, cultural competence is necessary for the provision of quality healthcare. Although this topic has been well explored in non-Western cultures within Western contexts, the authors explore how Taiwanese medical students trained in Western medicine address intercultural professionalism dilemmas related to tensions between Western medicine and Taiwanese culture. A narrative interview method was employed with 64 Taiwanese medical students to collect narratives of professionalism dilemmas. Noting the prominence of culture in students' narratives, we explored this theme further using secondary analysis, identifying tensions between Western medicine and Taiwanese culture and categorizing students' intercultural professionalism dilemmas according to Friedman and Berthoin Antal's 'intercultural competence' framework: involving combinations of advocacy (i.e., championing one's own culture) and inquiry (i.e., exploring one's own and others' cultures). One or more intercultural dilemmas were identified in nearly half of students' professionalism dilemma narratives. Qualitative themes included: family relations, local policy, end-of-life care, traditional medicine, gender relations and Taiwanese language. Of the 62 narratives with sufficient detail for further analysis, the majority demonstrated the 'suboptimal' low advocacy/low inquiry approach (i.e., withdrawal or inaction), while very few demonstrated the 'ideal' high advocacy/high inquiry approach (i.e., generating mutual understanding, so 'intercultural competence'). Though nearly half of students' professionalism narratives concerned intercultural dilemmas, most narratives represented disengagement from intercultural dilemmas, highlighting a possible need for more attention on intercultural competence training in Taiwan. The advocacy/inquiry framework may help educators to address similar disconnects between Western medicine and non-Western cultures in other contexts.

  20. Accreditation and culture of quality in medical schools in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shehri, Ali M; Al-Alwan, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Saudi Arabia (SA), the largest country in the Gulf Region, has witnessed unprecedented expansion in undergraduate medical education (UME) with more than 200% increase in medical schools over the last five years. Such rapid expansion creates major challenges in relation to quality of outcomes to the extent that some authors argue that SA needs reform similar to Abraham Flexner. This may explain the strong movement towards accreditation of UME in SA but it is important to reflect on purpose of accreditation and learn from the experience of developed countries. In USA, more than 100 years ago Flexner used a predetermined gold standard to judge all medical schools and resulted in closing more than 50% of the medical schools at that time. For accreditation to fulfill its promises in ensuring quality of UME, it has to reassure stakeholders of its contribution to their culture of quality rather than an external judge of their quality. Recently, the World Federation for Medical Education recognizes that the presence of accreditation systems "does not provide a guarantee that the system is working and resulting in trustworthy decisions on the quality of programs in medical education". However, there must be a way of introducing quality management that maintain recent needed quantity development of UME in SA while ensuring the quality of products of medical schools. This paper describes accreditation development in SA and suggests a strategy for creating a culture of quality in medical schools in preparation for meaningful accreditation systems that ensure proper participation of all stakeholders in quality management on basis of evidence.

  1. Learning culture and feedback: an international study of medical athletes and musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Christopher; Driessen, Erik; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Lingard, Lorelei

    2014-07-01

    Feedback should facilitate learning, but within medical education it often fails to deliver on its promise. To better understand why feedback is challenging, we explored the unique perspectives of doctors who had also trained extensively in sport or music, aiming to: (i) distinguish the elements of the response to feedback that are determined by the individual learner from those determined by the learning culture, and (ii) understand how these elements interact in order to make recommendations for improving feedback in medical education. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 27 doctors or medical students who had high-level training and competitive or performance experience in sport (n = 15) or music (n = 12). Data were analysed iteratively using constant comparison. Key themes were identified and their relationships critically examined to derive a conceptual understanding of feedback and its impact. We identified three essential sources of influence on the meaning that feedback assumed: the individual learner; the characteristics of the feedback, and the learning culture. Individual learner traits, such as motivation and orientation toward feedback, appeared stable across learning contexts. Similarly, certain feedback characteristics, including specificity, credibility and actionability, were valued in sport, music and medicine alike. Learning culture influenced feedback in three ways: (i) by defining expectations for teachers and teacher-learner relationships; (ii) by establishing norms for and expectations of feedback, and (iii) by directing teachers' and learners' attention toward certain dimensions of performance. Learning culture therefore neither creates motivated learners nor defines 'good feedback'; rather, it creates the conditions and opportunities that allow good feedback to occur and learners to respond. An adequate understanding of feedback requires an integrated approach incorporating both

  2. Selling medical travel to US patient-consumers: the cultural appeal of website marketing messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobo, Elisa J; Herlihy, Elizabeth; Bicker, Mary

    2011-04-01

    More US-based patients than ever are travelling abroad for medical or dental services. Beyond financial incentives, what cultural factors have supported this trend? Because of their interest in selling medical travel, medical travel agencies (MTAs) have vested interests in this question. To find out how they are answering it, an ethnographic content analysis of MTA websites was undertaken. Beyond themes promoting a 'worry-free experience' of 'legitimate services', themes linking healthcare consumerism to culturally specific identity ideals and self-creation/representation processes predominated. Themes relating to the demonstration of social position, savvy expression of good consumer judgment, and achievement of libertarian ideals figured highly. However, various inconsistencies (including an appeal to tourism in some but not other situations) suggested that medical travel involves, for the US-based consumer, a complex act of juggling context-specific self-identity desires and expectations in relation to healthcare. The potential impact of prevailing discourses on 'self-construction-in-practice' was explored. Findings enhance understanding of the care seeking process as experienced within the context of globalized, mass-mediated healthcare consumerism. They also point to the need for finer-grained distinctions than the global gloss 'medical travel' offers.

  3. Clinically applied medical ethnography: relevance to cultural competence in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, Joan

    2011-06-01

    Medical anthropology provides an excellent resource for nursing research that is relevant to clinical nursing. By expanding the understanding of ethnographic research beyond ethnicity, nurses can conduct research that explores patient's constructions and explanatory models of health and healing and how they make meaning out of chronic conditions and negotiate daily life. These findings can have applicability to culturally competent care at both the organizational or systems level, as well as in the patient/provider encounter. Individual patient care can be improved by applying ethnographic research findings to build provider expertise and then using a cultural negotiation process for individualized patient care.

  4. [The Lancisiana library as a resource for the transmission of medical culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Maria; Fiorilla, Marco

    2002-01-01

    The Lancisiana Library was founded in the years 1711-1714 by Giovanni Maria Lancisi. Housed in the S. Spirito Hospital in Rome, its very structure and organization mirrors the scientific and medical culture of its founder. Lancisi meant to offer to the young apprentice, either physician or surgeon, the means foa a rational medical education, based on "plenty of patients" and a good choice of books. The comparison between the Library and some of Lancisi's works show his ideas about the relationship between the sciences - chemistry, natural history, mathematics and mechanics - and medicine, as well as the close relationship between medicine and surgery.

  5. [The cultural and medical significance of Xin an mingzuzhi(History of Famous Family in Xin'an)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, A H; Wan, S M

    2016-01-28

    History of Famous Family in Xin'an includes abundant information and important value of the medical cultural history, including the medical family, medical ethics and the number of the famous doctors and its distribution, the medical books and its outline the medical ethics, the diseases. As for the 115 famous doctors recorded in this book, Shexian county owns the most while Jixi county owns the least, and of the average number of famous doctors among the 10, 000 local people, Yixian county owns the most while Xiuning county owns the least. History of Famous Family in Xin'an includes 26 medical books, ranging from medical literature study, gynecological treatment, external medical treatment, diagnosis and treatment of pediatric diseases, ancient medical case records, medical education, acu-moxibustion and summary of other medical experiences. The book also demonstrates the noble morality of doctors, development of doctor' family, and records of paralytic stroke, epistaxis, tuberculous consumptive diseases, furunculosis, dystocia and some infectious diseases.

  6. Features of application of medical physical culture for the children of patients by bronchial asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleshina A.I.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of work consists in generalization of scientific recommendations of scientists in relation to application of medical physical culture for children with bronchial asthma. The problem of bronchial asthma is analysed, as an enough widespread disease in the world, the basic tendencies of his prevalence, range of measures instrumental in diagnostics and treatment, are certain. It is presented statistical information about prevalence of bronchial asthma on Ukraine among children. Principal reasons of origin of disease and role of physical exercises in the process of rehabilitation of patients with bronchial asthma are certain. The features of the use and influencing of respiratory gymnastics on the method of Buteyko, Strel'nikovoy, drainage exercises, sound gymnastics, exercises of aerobic character are analysed. The necessity of application of medical physical culture at this disease is grounded.

  7. Hospital organizational structures, culture, change and effectiveness: The case of Hamad Medical Corporation in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. This thesis presents health care organizations as heterogenic and highly complex in nature with particular normative structures underpinning their formal rational structures. It seeks to explore the evolution of organization structure as applied to a medical corporation in Qatar and to examine the nature of organizational culture and multi professional cohesiveness. In doing so it assesses a ...

  8. Development and evaluation of an instrument to assess medical students' cultural attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, L S; Alexander, G L; Wolf, F M; Fantone, J C; Davis, W K

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the development and psychometric evaluation of an instrument designed to assess medical students' comfort with a range of sociocultural issues and intercultural experiences. Each survey item obliged students to reflect on their own sociocultural identities and academic status in relation to others', and to judge how comfortable they would be interacting across perceived boundaries based on sociocultural identity and academic status. More than 90% of University of Michigan first-year medical students (n=153) completed the survey just before classes began. Principal components analysis of the survey's 26 items identified 7 interpretable factors or subscales; the Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients for the 7 subscales and the total scale ranged from .73 to .92. T-tests were used to investigate differences in average ratings among student subgroups (based on gender and ethnicity). To assess the magnitude of the effect of the differences between groups, effect size was computed for each of the means comparisons. Psychometric analyses indicated that this survey was both reliable and valid for assessing students' cultural attitudes. Further, analyses by gender and ethnic subgroup identified meaningful ratings differences in men's and women's reported comfort levels. Our findings suggest that this instrument is useful for assessing students' openness to developing cultural awareness and competence. Educators at other medical schools may find this instrument useful as a needs assessment tool for planning educational programs designed to increase students' cultural competence.

  9. Racial Dynamics and Cultural Competence Training in Medical and Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Margarita; Dise, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    Using the Self-Assessment of Perceived Level of Cultural Competence (SAPLCC) questionnaire, frequencies, means, and ANOVAS were determined to create medical and pharmacy student profiles of cultural competence. Profiles were used to identify needs for training and underscore critical issues that should be given priority in the curriculum. Significant differences were found in several domains of cultural competence (knowledge, skills, attitudes, and abilities); they may be explained by differences in the implementation of a pilot curriculum, the racial composition of students in both programs, and other characteristics. However, in the awareness domain, the main differences found may be explained only by respondents' attitudes and their personal experiences. Results confirm the importance of examining the racial dynamics factor and the need to address this sensitive topic early in the academic programs so students are prepared more fully to have sincere and meaningful encounters with their patients during the clinical years and as health care providers.

  10. Il Fasciculo di Medicina of 1493: medical culture through the eyes of the artist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, Salvatore; Discepola, Federico; Del Maestro, Rolando F

    2006-01-01

    THE FASCICULUS MEDICINA, printed in 1491, is considered the first illustrated medical book. The Latin essays and illustrations in this volume provide insight into the medical knowledge of Western Europe and, in the Italian edition published in 1493, glimpses into the medical culture of the late 15th century. We outline the scientific and social environments into which the Fasciculus Medicinae of 1491 was introduced and the transition that occurred with the publication of the 1493 Italian edition. The artist of the 1493 Fasciculo witnessed a paradigm shift occurring. In four woodcuts, the artist captured four themes: the relevance of knowledge-based medicine, the emergence of laboratory medicine, the Hippocratic lessons of patient observation, and the emerging revolution in anatomy.

  11. An anthropological approach to teach and evaluate cultural competence in medical students – the application of mini-ethnography in medical history taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Gang Hsieh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To use mini-ethnographies narrating patient illness to improve the cultural competence of the medical students. Methods: Between September 2013 and June 2015, all sixth-year medical students doing their internship at a medical center in eastern Taiwan were trained to write mini-ethnographies for one of the patients in their care. The mini-ethnographies were analyzed by authors with focus on the various aspects of cultural sensitivity and a holistic care approach. Results: Ninety-one students handed in mini-ethnographies, of whom 56 were male (61.5% and 35 were female (38.5%. From the mini-ethnographies, three core aspects were derived: 1 the explanatory models and perceptions of illness, 2 culture and health care, and 3 society, resources, and health care. Based on the qualities of each aspect, nine secondary nodes were classified: expectations and attitude about illness/treatment, perceptions about their own prognosis in particular, knowledge and feelings regarding illness, cause of illness, choice of treatment method (including traditional medical treatments, prejudice and discrimination, influences of traditional culture and language, social support and resources, and inequality in health care. Conclusions: Mini-ethnography is an effective teaching method that can help students to develop cultural competence. It also serves as an effective instrument to assess the cultural competence of medical students.

  12. Marketing to increase participation in a Web-based continuing medical education cultural competence curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Carlos A; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J; Allison, Jeroan J; Houston, Thomas K

    2011-01-01

    CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of 2 marketing strategies in the context of an online CME cultural competence curriculum (www.c-comp.org). In an interrupted time-series quasi-experimental design, 2 marketing strategies were tested: (1) wide dissemination to relevant organizations over a period of approximately 4 months, and (2) Internet paid search using Google Ads (5 consecutive 8-week periods--control 1, cultural/CME advertisement, control 2, hypertension/ content advertisement, control 3). Outcome measures were CME credit requests, Web traffic (visits per day, page views, pages viewed per visit), and cost. Overall, the site was visited 19,156 times and 78,160 pages were viewed. During the wide dissemination phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit decreased between the first (5.3%) and second (3.3%) halves of this phase (p = .04). During the Internet paid search phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit was highest during the cultural/CME advertisement period (control 1, 1.4%; cultural/CME ad, 4.3%; control 2, 1.5%; hypertension/content ad, 0.6%; control 3, 0.8%; p Education, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  13. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Tomazoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units.METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121.RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument.CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

  14. Balancing Two Cultures: American Indian/Alaska Native Medical Students' Perceptions of Academic Medicine Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, John Paul; Poll-Hunter, Norma; Stern, Nicole; Garcia, Andrea N; Brewster, Cheryl

    2016-08-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) remain underrepresented in the academic medicine workforce and little is known about cultivating AI/AN medical students' interest in academic medicine careers. Five structured focus groups were conducted including 20 medical students and 18 physicians. The discussion guide explored factors influencing AI/AN trainees' academic medicine career interest and recommended approaches to increase their pursuit of academia. Consensual qualitative research was employed to analyze transcripts. Our research revealed six facilitating factors, nine dissuading factors, and five recommendations towards cultivating AI/AN pursuit of academia. Facilitators included the opportunity to teach, serving as a role model/mentor, enhancing the AI/AN medical education pipeline, opportunities to influence institution, collegiality, and financial stability. Dissuading factors included limited information on academic career paths, politics, lack of credit for teaching and community service, isolation, self-doubt, lower salary, lack of positions in rural areas, lack of focus on clinical care for AI/AN communities, and research obligations. Recommendations included heighten career awareness, recognize the challenges in balancing AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborate with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, identify concordant role models/mentors, and identify loan forgiveness programs. Similar to other diverse medical students', raising awareness of academic career opportunities especially regarding teaching and community scholarship, access to concordant role models/mentors, and supportive institutional climates can also foster AI/AN medical students' pursuit of academia. Unique strategies for AI/AN trainees include learning how to balance AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborating with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, and increasing faculty opportunities in rural areas.

  15. Report for spreading culture of medical radiation safety in Korea: Mainly the activities of the Korean alliance for radiation safety and culture in medicine (KARSM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yong Su; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Ji Hyun; Choi, In Seok [Dept. of Radiologic Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Dong Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Eun [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Soo [Dept. of Radiation Safety, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    There are many concerns about radiation exposure in Korea after Fukushima Nuclear Plant Accident on 2011 in Japan. As some isotope materials are detected in Korea, people get worried about the radioactive material. In addition, the mass media create an air of anxiety that jump on the people’s fear instead of scientific approach. Therefore, for curbing this flow, health, medical institute from the world provide a variety of information about medical radiation safety and hold the campaign which can give people the image that medical radiation is safe. At this, the Korean Food and Drug Administration(KFDA) suggested that make the alliance of medical radiation safety and culture on August, 2011. Seven societies and institutions related medical radiation started to research and advertise the culture of medical radiation safety in Korea. In this report, mainly introduce the activities of the Korean Alliance for Radiation Safety and Culture in Medicine(KARSM) for spreading culture of medical radiation safety from 2011 to 2012.

  16. Detecting and Treating Gout | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uric acid crystals and increase the risk of gout. Even without treatment, such flare-ups (or bouts) usually subside within ... can be controlled through diet, exercise and proper treatment. To Find Out More Medlineplus. gov : Type in “gout” in the search box www.niams.nih.gov ...

  17. Diabetes Type 2 - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diabetes Type 2 URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diabetes Type 2 - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  18. MedlinePlus FAQ: Information on Doctors or Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: Many health topic pages in MedlinePlus contain a section which lists directories of doctors and services relevant to the topic. The Directories page lists many sources of information about physicians, other ...

  19. Obesity in Children - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Obesity in Children URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Obesity in Children - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  20. FNLM Medical Awards | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Medicine Award winner Dr. Mehmet Oz and wife Lisa at the Awards Gala. Photo: Michael Spencer Drs. Michael Roizen and Mehmet Oz helped improve patient education and health literacy in their bestselling YOU: ...

  1. Modifying the culture of medical education: the first three years of the RWJ Generalist Physician Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwill, J M; Perkoff, G T; Blake, R L; Paden, C; Beachler, M

    1997-09-01

    The Generalist Physician Initiative (GPI) was created by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to help medical schools increase the number of predoctoral and residency graduates entering generalist careers. The underlying assumption of the GPI is that more medical graduates will become generalists if schools select candidates whose personal characteristics are compatible with generalist careers and if schools provide for them an educational environment that values generalist careers in the same manner it has valued specialist careers. In essence, the GPI is helping schools modify the culture in which medical education occurs so that they may increase their production of generalists. Fourteen grants for six years of support were made to 16 U.S. medical schools in 1994. These schools are developing institution-wide efforts that span the continuum from the recruitment and selection of students through their medical school and residency education to their entry into practice, and include support of the practice. Most schools have developed external partners (e.g., state legislatures, managed care organizations, area health education centers) to assist in achieving their goals. The project is now (1997) at its halfway mark. This article describes the conceptual bases for the program (e.g., changes in admission criteria to favor applicants oriented to generalism), identifies common approaches to intervention chosen by the participating schools (e.g., establishing longitudinal, generalist-oriented clinical experiences throughout the four years of medical school), and explores issues being faced by the schools as they implement change (e.g., difficulties in decentralizing clinical education to include community physicians as teachers and role models).

  2. Managing the culturally diverse medical practice team: twenty-five strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A common misconception is that the phrase workplace diversity means meeting certain quotas in employee race or gender categories. In fact, diversity is much more than that. This article explores the unique benefits and challenges of managing a culturally diverse medical practice team and offers practice managers 25 practical strategies. It describes the two types of diversity training that are beneficial to practice managers and the kinds of policies, practices, and procedures that foster and promote diversity. This article also explores ethnocentrism, racism, ageism, sexism, stereotyping, and other potentially divisive issues among a diverse medical practice team. It provides an assessment instrument practice managers can use to evaluate their own diversity management skills. Finally, this article defines specifically what is meant by the term diversity and explores the top 10 diversity issues in workplaces today.

  3. Can medical students from two cultures learn effectively from a shared web-based learning environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Phillip; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Begg, Michael; Lam, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to establish whether medical students from 2 different cultures can learn effectively from a shared web-based learning environment. Students from the College of Medicine, Edinburgh, UK and the Medical School, Gifu, Japan shared 2 weeks of teaching and learning in clinical genetics, using problem-based learning in a web-based application (WBA). Questions about language, time zone, agreement about the curriculum (learning outcomes, tutor activity and assessment) and specific pedagogical issues about the educational effectiveness of students' learning were considered. The evidence indicates that a shared WBA is practical where the learning outcomes and problem scenarios are common and students are fluent in the same language. Problem-based learning transfers itself best to online discussion boards when the numbers in the group are 16 or more. Students do not use the WBA as a primary source of resource material, and they augment the discussion boards with face-to-face meetings with peers and tutors.

  4. Competency-based medical education and scholarship: Creating an active academic culture during residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Azzam, Amin

    2015-10-01

    The competency-based medical education movement has been adopted in several medical education systems across the world. This has the potential to result in a more active involvement of residents in the educational process, inasmuch as scholarship is regarded as a major area of competency. Substantial scholarly activities are well within the reach of motivated residents, especially when faculty members provide sufficient mentoring. These academically empowered residents have the advantage of early experience in the areas of scholarly discovery, integration, application, and teaching. Herein, the authors review the importance of instituting the germinal stages of scholarly productivity in the creation of an active scholarly culture during residency. Clear and consistent institutional and departmental strategies to promote scholarly development during residency are highly encouraged.

  5. American sign language and deaf culture competency of osteopathic medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Jessica; Colonna, Caitlin; Sexton, Patricia; Richard, Mariah

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a workshop on Deaf culture and basic medical American Sign Language for increasing osteopathic student physicians' confidence and knowledge when interacting with ASL-using patients. Students completed a pretest in which they provided basic demographic information, rated their confidence levels, took a video quiz on basic medical signs, and experienced a practical standardized encounter with a Deaf patient. They then attended a 4-hour workshop and, 2 weeks later, completed a posttest. Thirty-three students completed the pretest; 29 attended the workshop; 26 completed the posttest. Video quiz scores increased significantly from pretest to posttest, as did scores for the standardized patient encounter after completion of the workshop. Students also reported increased levels of confidence in interactions with the Deaf community. The results suggest that a single workshop was effective in increasing both confidence and short-term knowledge in interactions with Deaf patients.

  6. Medical anthropology and Ebola in Congo: cultural models and humanistic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, B S; Epelboin, A; Hewlett, B L; Formenty, P

    2005-09-01

    Seldom have medical anthropologists been involved in efforts to control high mortality diseases such as Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) This paper describes the results of two distinct but complementary interventions during the first phases of an outbreak in the Republic of Congo in 2003. The first approach emphasized understanding local peoples cultural models and political-economic explanations for the disease while the second approach focused on providing more humanitarian care of patients by identifying and incorporating local beliefs and practices into patient care and response efforts.

  7. The "Strengthening Nursing Culture Project" - an exploratory evaluation study of nursing students' placements within Aboriginal Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bethne; Cavanagh, Miriam; Douglas, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Cultural awareness and cultural competence have been the focus of the transcultural nursing literature that has explored the roles and responsibilities of nurses in their care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. Cultural immersion programs, upholding cultural safety and cultural humility, offer valuable guidance to the education of nursing students regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and cultures. This study seeks to explore nursing students' experiences of a cultural immersion program within Aboriginal Medical Services (AMSs) in New South Wales, Australia. Eight nursing students participated in a mixed methods design exploratory study of their clinical placement within AMSs. A survey gathered data regarding levels of preparation and confidence, learning barriers, placement stressors and personal reflections. Nursing students reported positive and transformative experiences of intercultural learning. Cultural immersion programs provide a valuable framework for the design and evaluation of clinical placement programs for nursing students within intercultural learning spaces.

  8. Patient Safety Culture Status From The Perspective Medical Staff Of Yasuj Hospitals In 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: One of the most important problems in the health sector, particularly in clinical centers, is the quality of healthcare. Patient safety is one of the most important elements in creating health care quality due to the fact that it is a critical component to the quality of health care and many errors are present in patient care and treatment practices..                                                               Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the status of the patient safety culture and its relationship with events reported in Yasuj hospitals. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 361 medical staff of Yasuj hospitals. The data were collected through a hospital survey on patient safety culture. The collected data were analyzed by using SPSS statistics soft ware version 21, using Descriptive methods, Pearson Coefficient, ANOVA, and T-Test. Results: The results of the present study revealed that the teamwork among hospital units (71/89percent, with expectations and management measures (66/38% in the case of safety obtained the most score and non-punitive response to errors (48/79% and manager support (55/88 percent obtained the least score. 73/7% of employees of three hospitals in the past 12 months did not report any event. In addition, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between the total score of safety culture and reporting the events. In this study, 15.5 % of respondents assess their safety culture in work as good, 44.3 % as acceptable and 30.5 percent reported poor. The overall safety culture among the three studied hospitals was 61.81 %. Results confirmed that the culture safety of patient in studied hospitals was average. Conclusions: The hospitals may rely on their strong points in terms of patient safety culture and try to remove their weak points to form a safe environment and appropriate

  9. Parents' refusal of medical treatment based on religious and/or cultural beliefs: the law, ethical principles, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnard-Palmer, Luanne; Kools, Susan

    2004-10-01

    When parents apply religious or cultural beliefs concerning spiritual healing, faith healing, or preference for prayer over traditional health care for children, concerns develop. Medical care is considered one of the most basic of all human needs, and yet parents may elect to apply religious or cultural beliefs in place of traditional Western medical care for their children. Because memberships in religious groups that have beliefs concerning prayer and health care for children are increasing, the topic is of great importance for pediatric health professionals. This article describes parental refusal of medical care, and it discusses the legal, ethical, and clinical implications.

  10. Medical education for a changing world: moving beyond cultural competence into transnational competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Peter H; Swick, Herbert M

    2006-06-01

    Given rapidly changing global demographic dynamics and the unimpressive evidence regarding health outcomes attributable to cultural competence (CC) education, it is time to consider a fresh and unencumbered approach to preparing physicians to reduce health disparities and care for ethnoculturally and socially diverse patients, including migrants. Transnational competence (TC) education offers a comprehensive set of core skills derived from international relations, cross-cultural psychology, and intercultural communication that are also applicable for medical education. The authors discuss five limitations (conceptual, vision, action, alliance, and pedagogical) of current CC approaches and explain how an educational model based on TC would address each problem area.The authors then identify and discuss the skill domains, core principles, and reinforcing pedagogy of TC education. The five skill domains of TC are analytic, emotional, creative, communicative, and functional; core principles include a comprehensive and consistent framework, patient-centered learning, and competency assessment. A central component of TC pedagogy is having students prepare a "miniethnography" for each patient that addresses not only issues related to physical and mental health, but also experiences related to dislocation and adaptation to unfamiliar settings. The TC approach promotes advances in preparing medical students to reduce health disparities among patients with multiple and diverse backgrounds, health conditions, and health care beliefs and practices. Perhaps most important, TC consistently directs attention to the policy and social factors, as well as the individual considerations, that can alleviate suffering and enhance health and well-being in a globalizing world.

  11. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in a Selected Number of Pharmacies Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Using the Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (SOPS)

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Jamili; Hossein Ebrahimipour; Elaheh Hooshmand; Habibollah Esmaeli; Ali Vafaee Najar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient safety culture plays a pivotal role in the improvement of patient safety level in health centers. This study aimed to assess patient safety culture in the pharmacies affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran using a standard questionnaire developed by the American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Materials and Methods This analytic, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted on 108 pharmacists and pharmacy technicians in Mashha...

  12. "It's just a clash of cultures": emotional talk within medical students' narratives of professionalism dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrouxe, Lynn V; Rees, Charlotte E

    2012-12-01

    Recent investigations into the UK National Health Service revealed doctors' failures to act with compassion and professionalism towards patients. The British media asked questions about what happens to students during their learning that influences such behaviour as doctors. We listened to 200 medical students' narratives of professionalism dilemmas during workplace learning (n = 833) to understand the range of dilemmas experienced and emotional reactions to them. 32 group and 22 individual interviews were held across three medical schools (England, Wales, Australia). Data were analysed thematically (Framework Analysis), for negative emotional content (Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count) and a narrative analysis of one exemplar narrative was also conducted. While a wider range of professionalism dilemmas than previously identified were found, most were classified to five main sub-themes. Within these sub-themes, clinical students' narratives contained more negative emotion words than pre-clinical students' narratives (p = 0.046, r = -0.36). Narratives of 'patient safety and dignity breaches by students' contained fewer anger words (p = 0.003, r = -0.51), 'patient safety and dignity breaches by healthcare professionals' contained more anger words (p = 0.042, r = -0.37), 'identity' narratives contained fewer anxiety words (p = 0.034, r = 0.38), and 'abuse' narratives contained more sadness words (p = 0.013, r = -0.47). The narrative analysis revealed a complex interplay between identities, attribution of blame, narrated emotions and emotional residue. Analysing emotional talk within narratives suggests that medical students sometimes struggle with contradictory formal and informal learning experiences around professionalism arising from a cultural clash. We provide educational recommendations to facilitate students' coping with their emotional reactions to professionalism dilemmas and to facilitate cultural change.

  13. Improving Medical Decision Making and Health Promotion through Culture-Sensitive Health Communication: An Agenda for Science and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsch, Cornelia; Böhm, Robert; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Butler, Robb; Chapman, Gretchen B; Haase, Niels; Herrmann, Benedikt; Igarashi, Tasuku; Kitayama, Shinobu; Korn, Lars; Nurm, Ülla-Karin; Rohrmann, Bernd; Rothman, Alexander J; Shavitt, Sharon; Updegraff, John A; Uskul, Ayse K

    2016-10-01

    This review introduces the concept of culture-sensitive health communication. The basic premise is that congruency between the recipient's cultural characteristics and the respective message will increase the communication's effectiveness. Culture-sensitive health communication is therefore defined as the deliberate and evidence-informed adaptation of health communication to the recipients' cultural background in order to increase knowledge and improve preparation for medical decision making and to enhance the persuasiveness of messages in health promotion. To achieve effective health communication in varying cultural contexts, an empirically and theoretically based understanding of culture will be indispensable. We therefore define culture, discuss which evolutionary and structural factors contribute to the development of cultural diversity, and examine how differences are conceptualized as scientific constructs in current models of cultural differences. In addition, we will explicate the implications of cultural differences for psychological theorizing, because common constructs of health behavior theories and decision making, such as attitudes or risk perception, are subject to cultural variation. In terms of communication, we will review both communication strategies and channels that are used to disseminate health messages, and we will discuss the implications of cultural differences for their effectiveness. Finally, we propose an agenda both for science and for practice to advance and apply the evidence base for culture-sensitive health communication. This calls for more interdisciplinary research between science and practice but also between scientific disciplines and between basic and applied research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. [Adaptation of the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPSC) tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre-Busto, C; Torijano-Casalengua, M L; Olivera-Cañadas, G; Astier-Peña, M P; Maderuelo-Fernández, J A; Rubio-Aguado, E A

    2015-01-01

    To adapt the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPSC) Excel(®) tool for its use by Primary Care Teams of the Spanish National Public Health System. The process of translation and adaptation of MOSPSC from the Agency for Healthcare and Research in Quality (AHRQ) was performed in five steps: Original version translation, Conceptual equivalence evaluation, Acceptability and viability assessment, Content validity and Questionnaire test and response analysis, and psychometric properties assessment. After confirming MOSPSC as a valid, reliable, consistent and useful tool for assessing patient safety culture in our setting, an Excel(®) worksheet was translated and adapted in the same way. It was decided to develop a tool to analyze the "Spanish survey" and to keep it linked to the "Original version" tool. The "Spanish survey" comparison data are those obtained in a 2011 nationwide Spanish survey, while the "Original version" comparison data are those provided by the AHRQ in 2012. The translated and adapted tool and the analysis of the results from a 2011 nationwide Spanish survey are available on the website of the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality. It allows the questions which are decisive in the different dimensions to be determined, and it provides a comparison of the results with graphical representation. Translation and adaptation of this tool enables a patient safety culture in Primary Care in Spain to be more effectively applied. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical Ethnobotany in Europe: From Field Ethnography to a More Culturally Sensitive Evidence-Based CAM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quave, Cassandra L.; Pardo-de-Santayana, Manuel; Pieroni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    European folk medicine has a long and vibrant history, enriched with the various documented uses of local and imported plants and plant products that are often unique to specific cultures or environments. In this paper, we consider the medicoethnobotanical field studies conducted in Europe over the past two decades. We contend that these studies represent an important foundation for understanding local small-scale uses of CAM natural products and allow us to assess the potential for expansion of these into the global market. Moreover, we discuss how field studies of this nature can provide useful information to the allopathic medical community as they seek to reconcile existing and emerging CAM therapies with conventional biomedicine. This is of great importance not only for phytopharmacovigilance and managing risk of herb-drug interactions in mainstream patients that use CAM, but also for educating the medical community about ethnomedical systems and practices so that they can better serve growing migrant populations. Across Europe, the general status of this traditional medical knowledge is at risk due to acculturation trends and the urgency to document and conserve this knowledge is evident in the majority of the studies reviewed. PMID:22899952

  16. Medical Ethnobotany in Europe: From Field Ethnography to a More Culturally Sensitive Evidence-Based CAM?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra L. Quave

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available European folk medicine has a long and vibrant history, enriched with the various documented uses of local and imported plants and plant products that are often unique to specific cultures or environments. In this paper, we consider the medicoethnobotanical field studies conducted in Europe over the past two decades. We contend that these studies represent an important foundation for understanding local small-scale uses of CAM natural products and allow us to assess the potential for expansion of these into the global market. Moreover, we discuss how field studies of this nature can provide useful information to the allopathic medical community as they seek to reconcile existing and emerging CAM therapies with conventional biomedicine. This is of great importance not only for phytopharmacovigilance and managing risk of herb-drug interactions in mainstream patients that use CAM, but also for educating the medical community about ethnomedical systems and practices so that they can better serve growing migrant populations. Across Europe, the general status of this traditional medical knowledge is at risk due to acculturation trends and the urgency to document and conserve this knowledge is evident in the majority of the studies reviewed.

  17. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GI Bleeding in Children (North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) - PDF Patient Handouts Bleeding esophageal varices (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Bloody or tarry stools (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ...

  18. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? (American Academy of Pediatrics) Also in Spanish Patient Handouts Aortic valve surgery - open (Medical Encyclopedia) ... Spanish Open heart surgery (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish ... heart surgery Pediatric heart surgery - discharge Sternal exploration or closure Related ...

  19. Libraries in Iowa: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levitt-medical-library Iowa City University of Iowa Hardin Library for the Health Sciences 600 Newton Road ... 319-335-9874 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/ Sioux City Mercy Medical Center Sioux City Health ...

  20. African-Americans' perceptions of health care provider cultural competence that promote HIV medical self-care and antiretroviral medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Gina B

    2013-01-01

    Most studies of cultural competence in healthcare examine healthcare providers' definitions of cultural competence practices. This study is unique in that it examines the relationship between African-American patients' perceptions of the cultural competence of their HIV healthcare providers and the adherence of these patients to medical self-care and antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cross-sectional, exploratory, descriptive study was conducted at the Ruth Rothstein CORE Center in Chicago, Illinois. The sample consisted of 202 HIV-positive African-Americans who completed surveys during clinic visits. Multiple measures were used, including the Patient Assessments of Cultural Competency survey instrument developed by the Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Medical self-care was measured using the advice and instructions scale and the self-care symptom management for people living with HIV/AIDS categorical scale. ART adherence was measured using the Adherence Behaviors Self-Report and Adherence Self-Report scales. The data revealed many significant correlations between variables. The more patients believed that providers should integrate culture in HIV treatment; the better their reported health (F1,138=0.151, P=0.05) and the more they followed their provider's advice and instructions (medical self-care; F1,138=0.029, P=0.05). Participants who trusted their providers engaged in more medical self-care (F1,138=0.280, P=0.01). More shared treatment decisions were reported among participants who had higher levels of education (F1,127=0.337, P=0.05). Findings of this study indicate the need for increased attention to the role of cultural competence in HIV/AIDS care. Understanding patient perceptions of provider cultural competence has the potential to improve HIV treatment adherence and health outcomes.

  1. Patient Safety Culture Based on Medical Staff Attitudes in Khorasan Razavi Hospitals, Northeastern Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Davoodi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since establishing a safety culture in an organization is considered as the first step in patient safety improvement, there is always a need for updated field evaluation to better plan future decisions.We performed a cross-sectional, analytic-descriptive study in 25 hospitals related to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS during a 3-month period from April to June 2012. A questionnaire, designed by previous patient safety culture studies with confirmed validity and reliability, was used and distributed among a sample of 922 staff, chosen randomly from the mentioned hospitals. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16."Organizational learning - continuous improvement" and "teamwork within unit" had the highest percentage of positive results as 79.85 ± 12.03% and 71.92 ± 17.08%, respectively; whereas "non-punitive response" to errors (21.57 ± 6.42 and "staffing" (26.36 ± 16.84 came out as the least important factors. There were no meaningful statistical relation between general features of the understudy hospitals including the number of beds, educational level or proficiency status with the general safety culture score.Most of the safety culture aspects were reported as low to moderate in terms of importance. If something needs to be modified interventionally in this respect, "the approach to confront errors" would be a wise choice. This could be achieved by establishing an atmosphere of open communication and continuous learning through elimination of the fear for reporting errors and installing a more acceptable approach in hospitals.

  2. Patient Safety Culture Based on Medical Staff Attitudes in Khorasan Razavi Hospitals, Northeastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, Rozita; Mohammadzadeh Shabestari, Mahmoud; Takbiri, Afsaneh; Soltanifar, Azadeh; Sabouri, Golnaz; Rahmani, Shaghayegh; Moghiman, Toktam

    2013-11-01

    Since establishing a safety culture in an organization is considered as the first step in patient safety improvement, there is always a need for updated field evaluation to better plan future decisions. We performed a cross-sectional, analytic-descriptive study in 25 hospitals related to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS) during a 3-month period from April to June 2012. A questionnaire, designed by previous patient safety culture studies with confirmed validity and reliability, was used and distributed among a sample of 922 staff, chosen randomly from the mentioned hospitals. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16. "Organizational learning - continuous improvement" and "teamwork within unit" had the highest percentage of positive results as 79.85 ± 12.03% and 71.92 ± 17.08%, respectively; whereas "non-punitive response" to errors (21.57 ± 6.42) and "staffing" (26.36 ± 16.84) came out as the least important factors. There were no meaningful statistical relation between general features of the understudy hospitals including the number of beds, educational level or proficiency status with the general safety culture score. Most of the safety culture aspects were reported as low to moderate in terms of importance. If something needs to be modified interventionally in this respect, "the approach to confront errors" would be a wise choice. This could be achieved by establishing an atmosphere of open communication and continuous learning through elimination of the fear for reporting errors and installing a more acceptable approach in hospitals.

  3. Dealing with foreign cultural paradigms: A systematic review on intercultural challenges of international medical graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Kerstin; Farhan, Nabeel; Motschall, Edith; Vach, Werner; Boeker, Martin

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of International Medical Graduates (IMG), who are defined to be physicians working in a country other than their country of origin and training, immigrate to Western countries. In order to ensure safe and high-quality patient care, they have to take medical and language tests. This systematic review aims to (1) collect all empiric research on intercultural communication of IMGs in medical settings, (2) identify and categorize all text passages mentioning intercultural issues in the included studies, and (3) describe the most commonly reported intercultural areas of communication of IMGs. This review was based on the PRISMA-Guidelines for systematic reviews. We conducted a broad and systematic electronic literature search for empiric research in the following databases: MEDLINE, BIOSIS Citation Index, BIOSIS Previews, KCI-Korean Journal Database and SciELO Citation Index. The search results were synthesized and analyzed with the aid of coding systems. These coding systems were based on textual analysis and derived from the themes and topics of the results and discussion sections from the included studies. A quality assessment was performed, comparing the studies with their corresponding checklist (COREQ or STROBE). Textual results of the studies were extracted and categorized. Among 10,630 search results, 47 studies were identified for analysis. 31 studies were qualitative, 12 quantitative and 4 studies used mixed methods. The quality assessment revealed a low level of quality of the studies in general. The following intercultural problems were identified: IMGs were not familiar with shared decision-making and lower hierarchies in the health care system in general. They had difficulties with patient-centered care, the subtleties of the foreign language and with the organizational structures of the new health care system. In addition, they described the medical education in their home countries as science-oriented, without focusing on

  4. Anatomy learning styles and strategies among Jordanian and Malaysian medical students: the impact of culture on learning anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Allouh, Mohammed Z; Mustafa, Intisar G; Hoja, Ibrahim M

    2013-07-01

    The study aims to investigate anatomy learning styles and strategies of Jordanian and Malaysian medical students at the Jordan University of Science and Technology. The study is a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. Students' responses for the questionnaire were numerically coded, and the results were analyzed to reveal statistically significant differences between Jordanian and Malaysian students. The results showed that Jordanian medical students were less interested in using cadavers in learning anatomy than Malaysian medical students. However, similar to their Malaysian counterparts, they prefer to employ other tools to learn anatomy like plastinated models and Internet-based resources. In addition to the aforementioned tools, Malaysian students were more interested in using cross-sectional images and making their own revision cards. Both Jordanian and Malaysian medical students were more interested in learning anatomy through clinical cases, and by system rather than by region. Moreover, it was revealed that Jordanian medical students learn anatomy more efficiently when they formulate a general view of a particular topic. Both Jordanian and Malaysian medical students also relied on reciting definitions and memorizing facts to learn anatomy. The study also reported significant differences between Jordanian and Malaysian students' perspectives on learning anatomy. The findings of the study suggest that Jordanian and Malaysian medical students posses different cultures of learning. Jordanian anatomy instructors need to consider these different learning cultures when they prepare their instructional methods and teaching materials to fulfill the educational needs of their culturally diverse students.

  5. Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... areas of its research: MedlinePlus . medlineplus.gov . Type "Parkinson's disease" in the Search box. NIHSeniorHealth —Parkinson's Disease http:// ...

  6. Trusted Health Information for the Public | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... debuted on October 22, 1998, with 22 “health topic” pages—collections of links to reliable information on subjects ... twitter.com/medlineplus4you ). MedlinePlus contains: Nearly 900 health topics pages that link to health information from NIH and ...

  7. Life with an artificial pancreas | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus ... Helme can't remember a time in her life when she didn't take care of her own type 1 diabetes. Diagnosed at the age of five, she quickly began checking her ...

  8. Making sense of HIV in southeastern Nigeria: fictional narratives, cultural meanings, and methodologies in medical anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winskell, Kate; Brown, Peter J; Patterson, Amy E; Burkot, Camilla; Mbakwem, Benjamin C

    2013-06-01

    Fictional narratives have rarely been used in medical anthropological research. This article illustrates the value of such narratives by examining how young people in southeastern Nigeria navigate the cultural resources available to them to make sense of HIV in their creative writing. Using thematic data analysis and narrative-based methodologies, it analyzes a sample (N = 120) from 1,849 narratives submitted by Nigerian youth to the 2005 Scenarios from Africa scriptwriting contest on the theme of HIV. The narratives are characterized by five salient themes: tragedy arising from the incompatibility of sex outside marriage and kinship obligations; female vulnerability and blame; peer pressure and moral ambivalence; conservative Christian sexual morality; and the social and family consequences of HIV. We consider the strengths and limitations of this narrative approach from a theoretical perspective and by juxtaposing our findings with those generated by Daniel Jordan Smith using standard ethnographic research methods with a similar Igbo youth population.

  9. Problems of communicative competence in multi-cultural medical encounters in South African health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, T

    2006-11-01

    Research in health communication shows communicative competence to be an important aspect of successful health-care. Definitions of competence involve more than the participants, however; the position and status of these participants in terms of the medical hierarchy and accepted paradigm, the language of choice, educational levels and a host of other variables affect relationships and perceptions of competence. This article grapples with a number of issues that impact on communicative competence in the health-care professions, given the multi-lingual and -cultural society within South Africa as well as emerging shifts that foreground this debate. In particular, the thorny question around language use, the hegemonies of the past regarding a dominant lingua franca and subsequent issues involving translation and interpretation are discussed.

  10. Creating a no-blame culture through medical education: a UK perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmqvist KO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Karl O Elmqvist,1 Maxime TJ Rigaudy,1,2 Jasper P Vink1 1Imperial College Business School, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Hull York Medical School, York, UK We read with great interest, and agree with the points made, in the Commentary by Leotsakos et al1 regarding the need to integrate patient safety into the core curricula for higher education in health care. The World Health Organisation (WHO patient safety curriculum guide: multi-professional edition (Geneva: Switzerland 2011 appears to be an effective aid to achieve this aim, promoting the culture of patient safety internationally. In the UK, where patient safety is a defining part of quality of care,2 attempts have been made to introduce the concept of a “no-blame culture”. The no-blame culture was introduced as a method to improve the quality of care by learning from mistakes, putting safeguards in place to ensure they do not occur again.  View the original paper by Leotsakos and colleagues.

  11. Questioning the medical fringe: the "cultural doxy" of Catholic hydropathy in Belgium, 1890-1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Evert

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between orthodox (mainstream) medicine and heterodox (fringe) medicine during the nineteenth century continues to puzzle historians of medicine. Though many have qualified the sharp antagonism between the two as a (biased) historical construct, it remains difficult to lay bare the common problems that structured mainstream and fringe. In this contribution on the reception of hydrotherapy in the Belgian fin de siècle, I attempt to rethink the oppositional character of nineteenth-century fringe medicine at an empirical level. In many ways, I argue, Belgian hydropaths were prototypical proponents of medical heterodoxy, as they defended neohumoralist medical conceptions and shared an integrated Catholic "cosmology". Their moderate critique of bacteriological science, however, also echoed the unease felt by many established physicians. In their pretheoretical beliefs about the healer's intuition, they voiced traditional conceptions that stemmed not from the fringe but from everyday bedside medicine. The popularity of hydrotherapy, I argue, reflected one of many attempts to save a common "cultural doxy" shared by established physicians and heterodox healers alike, in the wake of bacteriology's analysis and standardization.

  12. Differing perceptions of safety culture across job roles in the ambulatory setting: analysis of the AHRQ Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickner, John; Smith, Scott A; Yount, Naomi; Sorra, Joann

    2016-08-01

    Experts in patient safety stress the importance of a shared culture of safety. Lack of consensus may be detrimental to patient safety. This study examines differences in patient safety culture perceptions among providers, management and staff in a large national survey of safety culture in ambulatory practices in the USA. The US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (SOPS) assesses perceptions about patient safety issues and event reporting in medical offices (ie, ambulatory practices). Using the 2014 data, we analysed responses from medical offices with at least five respondents. We calculated differences in perceptions of patient safety culture across six job positions (physicians, management, nurse practitioners (NPs)/physician assistants (PAs), nurses, clinical support staff and administrative/clerical staff) for 10 survey composites, the average of the 10 composites and an overall patient safety rating using multivariate hierarchical linear regressions. We analysed data from 828 medical offices with responses from 15 523 providers and staff, with an average 20 completed surveys per medical office (range: 5-367) and an average medical office response rate of 65% (range: 3%-100%). Management had significantly more positive patient safety culture perceptions on nine of 10 composite scores compared with all other job positions, including physicians. The composite that showed the largest difference was Communication Openness; Management (85% positive) was 22% points more positive than other clinical and support staff and administrative/clerical staff. Physicians were significantly more positive than PAs/NPs, nursing staff, other clinical and support staff and administrative/clerical staff on four composites: Communication About Error, Communication Openness, Staff Training and Teamwork, ranging from 3% to 20% points more positive. These findings suggest that managers need to pay attention to the training needs

  13. Inheritance and Innovation of Medical Ethics Culture%医德文化的传承与创新

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖生武

    2013-01-01

    传承与创新医德文化要正确处理好社会效益与经济效益的关系、医德教育与奖惩监督的关系、精湛技术与高尚医德的关系.创新“医德文化”,必须树立淡泊名利的职业精神,必须树立以人为本的执业理念,必须培养热爱病人的职业情感,必须培育诚实慎独的职业品行,必须掌握娴熟精湛的医疗技术,必须弘扬特色医德文化.%Inheriting and innovating medical ethics culture should correctly handle the relationship between social benefits and economic benefits, between the medical ethics education and supervision of rewards and punishment, between superb technology and the noble medical ethics. The innovation of the "medical ethics culture" requires establishing the career spirit and be indifferent to fame and wealth, setting up the human - oriented practice concept, cultivating the love to the patients, fostering honest self - supervision professional conduct, mastering superb medical technology and carrying forward the characteristics of medical ethics culture.

  14. Libraries in Maine: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 602-2386 http://www.une.edu/library/ Lewiston Bates College Ladd Library 48 Campus Avenue Lewiston, ME 04240-6087 207-786-6471 http://abacus.bates.edu/Library/ Central Maine Medical Center Gerrish-True ...

  15. "That never would have occurred to me": a qualitative study of medical students' views of a cultural competence curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Gabriella

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence is mixed regarding the efficacy of cultural competence curricula in developing learners' knowledge, attitudes and skills. More research is needed to better understand both the strengths and shortcomings of existing curricula from the perspective of learners in order to improve training. Methods We conducted three focus groups with medical students in their first year of clinical training to assess their perceptions of the cultural competence curriculum at a public university school of medicine. Results Students evaluated the informal curriculum as a more important source of learning about cultural competence than the formal curriculum. In terms of bias in both self and others, the cultural competence curriculum increased awareness, but was less effective in teaching specific interventional skills. Students also noted that the cultural competence curriculum did not always sufficiently help them find a balance between group-specific knowledge and respect for individual differences. Despite some concerns as to whether political correctness characterized the cultural competence curriculum, it was also seen as a way to rehumanize the medical education experience. Conclusion Future research needs to pay attention to issues such as perceived relevance, stereotyping, and political correctness in developing cross-cultural training programs.

  16. Restructuring the organizational culture of medical institutions: a study on a community hospital in the I-Lan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2008-09-01

    Launched in 1995, the National Health Insurance Program has imposed tremendous pressure on hospitals across Taiwan. As a result, most hospitals, especially those of small and medium scale, have gone to great lengths to restructure their organizations in order to continue operating under the new medical setting. Using a community hospital in I-Lan area as its focus, this study attempts to identify the process of organizational culture restructuring in medical institutions. This process includes the two phases of (1) analyzing difficulties faced, with particular emphasis on three problems associated with the existing organizational culture and (2) restructuring the organizational culture and evaluating the restructuring process, with emphasis on four strategies geared to modify the organizational culture and a pre-and-post quasi-experimental study to evaluate outcomes. This study uses a triangulated data collection approach comprising four qualitative data collection techniques that include semi-structured interviews, focus groups, reflective participant observation, and critical review of relevant organizational materials. The evaluation reveals a significant level of difference between employee perspectives on organizational culture before and after restructuring. In short, employees expressed that, after the restructuring, they feel more respected and recognized than before. Research results, based on an organization's cultural restructuring process, show the process by which a hospital successfully restructured its organizational culture. Empirical data derived from the restructuring process may serve as reference for other hospitals contemplating restructuring.

  17. Republished paper: Improving safety culture on adult medical units through multidisciplinary teamwork and communication interventions: the TOPS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, M A; Sehgal, N L; Alldredge, B K; Gearhart, S; Auerbach, A A; Wachter, R M

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project was to improve unit-based safety culture through implementation of a multidisciplinary (pharmacy, nursing, medicine) teamwork and communication intervention. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was used to determine the impact of the training with a before-after design. Surveys were returned from 454 healthcare staff before the training and 368 staff 1 year later. Five of eleven safety culture subscales showed significant improvement. Nurses perceived a stronger safety culture than physicians or pharmacists. While it is difficult to isolate the effects of the team training intervention from other events occurring during the year between training and postevaluation, overall the intervention seems to have improved the safety culture on these medical units.

  18. Organizational Culture, Performance and Career Choices of Ph.D.s: A Case Study of Dutch Medical Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weijden, Inge; de Gilder, Dick; Groenewegen, Peter; Geerling, Maaike

    2008-01-01

    Increasing demands for accountability and applicability raise the question of how organizational factors affect researchers' performance and career choices. In a study of Dutch medical Ph.D. student's experiences, organizational culture and climate and attitudes towards research quality are related to performance and career choices. Ph.D.s who…

  19. Cultural adaptation of a brief motivational intervention for heavy drinking among Hispanics in a medical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Craig A; Cabriales, José Alonso; Woolard, Robert H; Tyroch, Alan H; Caetano, Raul; Castro, Yessenia

    2015-07-30

    Hispanics, particularly men of Mexican origin, are more likely to engage in heavy drinking and experience alcohol-related problems, but less likely to obtain treatment for alcohol problems than non-Hispanic men. Our previous research indicates that heavy-drinking Hispanics who received a brief motivational intervention (BMI) were significantly more likely than Hispanics receiving standard care to reduce subsequent alcohol use. Among Hispanics who drink heavily the BMI effectively reduced alcohol use but did not impact alcohol-related problems or treatment utilization. We hypothesized that an adapted BMI that integrates cultural values and addresses acculturative stress among Hispanics would be more effective. We describe here the protocol for the design and implementation of a randomized (approximately 300 patients per condition) controlled trial evaluating the comparative effectiveness of a culturally adapted (CA) BMI in contrast to a non-adapted BMI (NA-BMI) in a community hospital setting among men of Mexican origin. Study participants will include men who were hospitalized due to an alcohol related injury or screened positive for heavy drinking. By accounting for risk and protective factors of heavy drinking among Hispanics, we hypothesize that CA-BMI will significantly decrease alcohol use and alcohol problems, and increase help-seeking and treatment utilization. This is likely the first study to directly address alcohol related health disparities among non-treatment seeking men of Mexican origin by comparing the benefits of a CA-BMI to a NA-BMI. This study stands to not only inform interventions used in medical settings to reduce alcohol-related health disparities, but may also help reduce the public health burden of heavy alcohol use in the United States. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02429401; Registration date: April 28, 2015.

  20. 'Sometimes the work just needs to be done': socio-cultural influences on direct observation in medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Christopher; LaDonna, Kori A; Lingard, Lorelei; Voyer, Stephane; Hatala, Rose

    2016-10-01

    Direct observation promises to strengthen both coaching and assessment, and calls for its increased use in medical training abound. Despite its apparent potential, the uptake of direct observation in medical training remains surprisingly limited outside the formal assessment setting. The limited uptake of observation raises questions about cultural barriers to its use. In this study, we explore the influence of professional culture on the use of direct observation within medical training. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we interviewed 22 residents or fellows (10 male, 12 female) about their experiences of being observed during training. Participants represented a range of specialties and training levels. Data collection and analysis were conducted iteratively. Themes were identified using constant comparative analysis. Observation was used selectively; specialties tended to observe the clinical acts that they valued most. Despite these differences, we found two cultural values that consistently challenged the ready implementation of direct observation across specialties: (i) autonomy in learning and (ii) efficiency in health care provision. Furthermore, we found that direct observation was a primarily learner-driven activity, which left learners caught in the middle, wanting observation but also wanting to appear independent and efficient. The cultural values of autonomy in learning and practice and efficiency in health care provision challenge the integration of direct observation into clinical training. Medical learners are often expected to ask for observation, but such requests are socially and culturally fraught, and likely to constrain the wider uptake of direct observation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  1. Relationship between IQ, cultural intelligence and self-monitoring in the students of Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Esmaeili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Intelligence quotient (IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring are among important and influential parameters in learning-teaching process of students. Thus, the current study examined the relationship between these parameters in the students of Birjand University of Medical Science. Materials and Methods: The present study was a descriptive-analytic, cross-sectional type. The study population included all the students at Birjand University of Medical Sciences, selected through stratified randomized sampling method. In order to study IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring parameters R & B Cattell scale (Scale III, Erli’s Cultural Intelligence Inventory, and Snyder’s Self-monitoring Test were applied, respectively. The obtained data was fed into SPSS (V:21 software using Pearson correlation test, ANOVA, and t-test at the significant level of P≤0.05. Results: From a total of 171 subjects participating in the study, 53.2% were female. The average age of the participants was 21.3±2.7 years. The average IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring scores were 106±10.44, 85.73±17.31, and 12.35±3.20, respectively. There was a significant correlation between cultural intelligence and self-monitoring (P<0.000; r=0/37. However, there were no significant associations between cultural intelligence and IQ scores as well as between self-monitoring and IQ scores. Conclusion: Regarding the unfavorable cultural intelligence’ skills and abilities ;and their acquirable nature, it is suggested that University consider a significant position for educational and cultural programs in order to enhance cultural intelligence.

  2. Relationship between IQ, cultural intelligence and self-monitoring in the students of Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Esmaeili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Intelligence quotient (IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring are among important and influential parameters in learning-teaching process of students. Thus, the current study examined the relationship between these parameters in the students of Birjand University of Medical Science. Materials and Methods: The present study was a descriptive-analytic, cross-sectional type. The study population included all the students at Birjand University of Medical Sciences, selected through stratified randomized sampling method. In order to study IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring parameters R & B Cattell scale (Scale III, Erli’s Cultural Intelligence Inventory, and Snyder’s Self-monitoring Test were applied, respectively. The obtained data was fed into SPSS (V:21 software using Pearson correlation test, ANOVA, and t-test at the significant level of P≤0.05. Results: From a total of 171 subjects participating in the study, 53.2% were female. The average age of the participants was 21.3±2.7 years. The average IQ, cultural intelligence, and self-monitoring scores were 106±10.44, 85.73±17.31, and 12.35±3.20, respectively. There was a significant correlation between cultural intelligence and self-monitoring (P<0.000; r=0/37. However, there were no significant associations between cultural intelligence and IQ scores as well as between self-monitoring and IQ scores. Conclusion: Regarding the unfavorable cultural intelligence’ skills and abilities ;and their acquirable nature, it is suggested that University consider a significant position for educational and cultural programs in order to enhance cultural intelligence.

  3. Changing the culture of a medical school by orienting students and faculty toward community medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, F Daniel; Miller-Cribbs, Julie E; Clancy, Gerard P; Van De Wiele, C Justin; Teague, T Kent; Crow, Sheila; Kollaja, Elizabeth A; Fox, Mark D

    2014-12-01

    Oklahoma's health status has been ranked among the worst in the country. In 1972, the University of Oklahoma established the Tulsa branch of its College of Medicine (COM) to expand the physician workforce for northeastern Oklahoma and to provide care for the uninsured patients of the area. In 2008, the Tulsa branch launched a distinct educational track, the University of Oklahoma COM's School of Community Medicine (SCM), to prepare providers equipped and committed to addressing prevalent health disparities.The authors describe the Tulsa branch's Summer Institute (SI), a signature program of the SCM, and how it is part of SCM's process of institutional transformation to align its education, service, and research missions toward improving the health status of the entire region. The SI is a weeklong, prematriculation immersion experience in community medicine. It brings entering medical and physician assistant students together with students and faculty from other disciplines to develop a shared culture of community medicine. The SI uses an unconventional curriculum, based on Scharmer's Theory U, which emphasizes appreciative inquiry, critical thinking, and collaborative problem solving. Also, the curriculum includes Professional Meaning conversations, small-group sessions to facilitate the integration of students' observations into their professional identities and commitments. Development of prototypes of a better health care system enables participants to learn by doing and to bring community medicine to life.The authors describe these and other curricular elements of the SI, present early evaluation data, and discuss the curriculum's incremental evolution. A longitudinal outcomes evaluation is under way.

  4. The transition to medication adoption in publicly funded substance use disorder treatment programs: organizational structure, culture, and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    Medications for the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) are not widely available in publicly funded SUD treatment programs. Few studies have drawn on longitudinal data to examine the organizational characteristics associated with programs transitioning from not delivering any pharmacotherapy to adopting at least one SUD medication. Using two waves of panel longitudinal data collected over a 5-year period, we measured the transition to medication adoption in a cohort of 190 publicly funded treatment organizations that offered no SUD medications at baseline. Independent variables included organizational characteristics, medical resources, funding, treatment culture, and detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies. Of 190 programs not offering SUD pharmacotherapy at baseline, 22.6% transitioned to offering at least one SUD medication at follow-up approximately 5 years later. Multivariate logistic regression results indicated that the employment of at least one physician at baseline, having a greater proportion of Medicaid clients, and pharmaceutical detailing were positively associated with medication adoption. Adoption of pharmacotherapy was more likely in programs that had greater medical resources, Medicaid funding, and contact with pharmaceutical companies. Given the potential expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, patients served by publicly funded programs may gain greater access to such treatments, but research is needed to document health reform's impact on this sector of the treatment system.

  5. Tonsillitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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    ... child does not have strep. What are the treatments for tonsillitis? Treatment for tonsillitis depends on the cause. If the cause is ... Tonsillitis (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Tonsillitis (For ... Also in Spanish Treatments and Therapies Having Your Tonsils Taken Out (For ...

  6. Healthline | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... made a new discovery in their attempt to find a fast-acting drug to treat depression. Standard antidepressants can ... identify which patients will respond to the experimental, fast-acting ... goal is to find medications that will safely lift depression within hours ...

  7. Culture and Cultural Competency:How Medical Anthropology Contributes to Medical Humanities Education%文化与文化能力:浅析医学人类学对医学人文教育的贡献

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱剑峰; 何煦

    2014-01-01

    The deteriorating doctor-patient relationship in China casts doubt on medical school's humanistic education. This article reviews a crucial concept of "cultural competency" proliferating in U.S. medical schools, which originally aims to improve physician-patient communication and reduce health disparity. No matter how fashionable and valuable it is, cultural competency is criticized by medical anthropologists who promote "explanatory models" to replace cultural competency, which derives from cultural anthropology's unique methodology as ethnography. Based on their teaching practices of medical anthropology in China as well as in the United States, the authors aim to introduce the course of medical anthropology to Chinese medical schools in hopes of further promoting the modern biological-cultural understanding of illness in medical training.%中国日益恶化的医患关系让人们对医学院现行的人文教育提出了质疑。加强人文教育,培养医学生人文素养的呼声渐起。本文针对目前医学人文教育界所提出的诸多建议,并基于笔者的医学人类学教育实践,围绕北美医学院教育中的“文化能力”和文化人类学中“文化”两个重要的概念展开,简要论述了医学人类学对医学人文教育的贡献。笔者认为医学人类学以其显著的实践性、本土性和反思性,有效地贡献于医学人文教育中对具有移情式关爱能力的临床医生培养的长远目标,可以更好地推动“生物-文化”这一现代医疗模式指导下的临床实践。

  8. Turning cross-cultural medical education on its head: Learning about ourselves and developing respectful curiosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Bansal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cross-cultural education is often understood to mean acquiring cultural knowledge about different cultural groups in order to serve people from diverse groups equitably. However, this article argues that to work effectively in cross-cultural situations, we need to learn about our own culture and develop an approach of respectful curiosity. The first goal of cross-cultural education is to understand how culture influences our thoughts, perceptions, biases, and values at an unconscious level. The second goal is to understand the nature of individual cultural identity as a multidimensional and dynamic construct through exploration of our own cultural identity. This exploration helps us understand the limitations of learning about ‘others’ through learning categorical information and helps us limit the effect of our implicit biases on our interactions. The approach of respectful curiosity is recommended to question our assumptions, understand each unique individual patient, connect with each patient, and build the therapeutic relationship.

  9. Adapting to a US Medical Curriculum in Malaysia: A Qualitative Study on Cultural Dissonance in International Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilkofski, Nicole; Shields, Ryan Y

    2016-08-16

    Minimal research has examined the recent exportation of medical curricula to international settings. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, USA partnered with Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and implemented the same curriculum currently used at Johns Hopkins University to teach medical students at Perdana University. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of first-year medical students at Perdana University, focusing on issues of cultural dissonance during adaptation to a US curriculum. In-depth semi-structured interviews with the inaugural class of first-year students (n=24) were conducted, audio-recorded, and transcribed. Two reviewers independently coded and analyzed the qualitative data for major themes. The most prominent themes identified were the transition from a "passive" to an "active" learning environment and the friendliness and openness of the professors. Students noted that "[Perdana University] is a whole new, different culture and now we are adapting to the culture." Being vocal during classes and taking exams based on conceptual understanding and knowledge application/integration proved to be more challenging for students than having classes taught entirely in English or the amount of material covered. This study reinforced many cultural education theories as it revealed the major issues of Malaysian graduate students adapting to a US-style medical curriculum. Despite coming from a collectivistic, Confucian-based cultural learning background, the Malaysian students at Perdana University adopted and adapted to, and subsequently supported, the US learning expectations.

  10. Understanding the interrelationship of instructional technology use and organizational culture: a case study of a veterinary medical college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, Susan L; Harris, Edward L

    2005-01-01

    Many predicted that in the latter part of the twentieth century modern technology would revolutionize higher education and "create a second Renaissance" (Sculley J. The relationship between business and higher education: A perspective on the 21st century. Commun ACM32:1056-1061, 1989 p1061). However, as the reality of the twenty-first century has set in, it is apparent that these revolutionary prophecies have fallen short. Using the lens of Douglas's Typology of Grid and Group, this case study examines (1) the organizational context of a veterinary medical college at a large Midwestern university; (2) individual faculty members' preferences toward instructional technology use; and (3) the interrelationship of culture and the decision process to implement instructional technology use in curricula. The study has several implications for instructional technology use in veterinary medical educational settings that help explain how cultural context can guide leadership decisions as well as influence faculty motivation and preference. The findings suggest that a key mitigating factor to instructional technology implementation is conflict or concord between the cultural biases of faculty members and actual cultural identity of the college (Stansberry S, Harris EL. Understanding why faculty use (or don't use) IT: Implementation of instructional technology from an organizational culture perspective. In Simonson M, Crawford M, eds. 25th Annual Proceedings: Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the 2002 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, vol. 1. North Miami Beach, FL: Nova Southeastern University:viii, 507).

  11. [Cross-cultural adaptation to the European Portuguese of the questionnaire "Patient Knowledge about their Medications" (CPM-ES-ES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmerón Rubio, Joaquín; Iglésias-Ferreira, Paula; García Delgado, Pilar; Mateus-Santos, Henrique; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando

    2013-12-01

    The scope of this work is to conduct the cross-cultural adaptation from Spanish to European Portuguese of a questionnaire to measure the degree of "Patient Knowledge about their Medications" (CPM-ES-ES). A method based on six steps was applied: 1. Translation into Portuguese, 2. Elaboration of the first consensus version in Portuguese; 3.Back-translation into Spanish; 4. Elaboration of the second consensus version (cultural equivalency); 5. Conducting the pre-test; 6. Evaluation of the overall results. A cross-culturally adapted questionnaire in European Portuguese that measures the degree of "Patient Knowledge about their Medications" is proposed. The pre-test confirmation obtained 100% agreement with the corrected version of the second consensus version after pre-testing. The methodology selected made it possible to cross-culturally adapt the Spanish version of the CPM-ES-ES questionnaire to the Portuguese version. Further studies should demonstrate the equivalence of the psychometric properties of the cross-cultural translation into Portuguese with the original version.

  12. Virtual Environments and Interactive Tools to communicate Medical Culture in small museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Scucces

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available EnVirtual Environment technologies are becoming increasingly important, carving out place in several sectors like training, learning, entertainment or industry, thanks to their adaptability for different contexts.In the Cultural Heritage field, they have been mostly used to reconstruct and represent lost archaeological patrimony, or to create virtual tours of ancient cities and sites. However, these technologies have now also entered museums and cultural institutions, contributing in changing the concept itself of Museum as institution and its relation with the public, supporting an approach more centered on engagement and participatory experiences.This is particularly true in the case of topics commonly intended as “specialistic”, difficult to approach and understand for general public, such as those related to scientific, anatomical and medical collections. The use of VEs and, in general, also of simpler but carefully designed ICT tools (such as institutional websites can become an important tool to raise awareness and knowledge about these matters.In the present work we describe our experience, focused on a small Anatomy Museum of the University of Pisa, in which we have conducted a study on visitors, and consequently developed asset of interactive tools, aiming at increasing engagement and improving the educational experience, attempting at reducing the gap between the general public and the communication of scientific and medical topics.ItLe nuove tecnologie di Ambienti Virtuali stanno acquisendo una importanza sempre crescente, conquistandosi un posto in ambiti quali training, istruzione, eduntainment e settori industriali, grazie alla loro adattabilità ai vari contesti. Nel campo dei Beni Culturali sono state spesso impiegate nella ricostruzione e rappresentazione del patrimonio archeologico perduto o nella creazione di tour virtuali di antichi siti e città. Attualmente, queste tecnologie hanno fatto il loro ingresso nei musei e

  13. Could Externalized St. Jude Medical Riata® Lead Be a Culture Medium of a Polymicrobial Endocarditis? A Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zefferino Palamà

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a man affected by polymicrobial endocarditis developed on a St. Jude Medical Riata lead with a malfunction because of the outsourcing of conductors. The patient was treated with antibiotic targeted therapy and showed different bacteria at the blood cultures and then underwent transvenous leads extraction. Vegetations were highlighted on the caval, atrial, and ventricular tracts of the Riata lead, but the cultures were all negative. The externalization of Riata lead may cause the malfunction but it could also promote bacterial colonies and vegetations. In conclusion, looking for early signs of infection is mandatory during Riata leads follow-up checks.

  14. Does your pig go 'knor'? Medical students' skills in using animal sounds as a cross-cultural paediatric engagement tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Jon; Roy, Melyssa

    2016-12-01

    The development of verbal communication skills is an important aspect of medical education as accurate assessment in part relies on effectively obtaining information from patients. When assessing children of different cultural or ethnic backgrounds, young medics may find effective verbal communication difficult because they lack understanding about what children are really like. Animal noises are a likely tool with which to successfully engage with young children. However, these differ by culture and it is unclear whether young New Zealand medical students will be adept at effectively engaging and communicating with foreign children via this mode of communication. We therefore assessed whether medical students in our country were able to accurately reproduce animal noises from different cultures. Six current medical students from New Zealand (with English as their first language) were assessed on their ability to reproduce animal noises from three different foreign languages: Dutch, Arabic and Danish. The animals selected were duck, cow, dog, frog, pig and sheep. Students were played recordings of the foreign-language animal noises, and were then rated on a scale of 1-5 (1 = poor, 5 = outstanding) on their ability to reproduce the noise. Arabic animal noises were reproduced more convincingly than those in the other languages (mean score: 3.8), of which animal noises in Danish were worst (mean score: 3.1). Perhaps unsurprisingly, sheep noises were reproduced best (mean score: 4.7), whereas pig noises were the least convincing (mean score: 2.2). Findings indicate that New Zealand medical students are likely to be better than average at reproducing animal noises in the languages examined, and are perhaps socially and genetically predisposed to replicating sheep noises successfully. They are therefore likely to make good paediatric registrars and fabulous au pairs. The study highlights the more serious issues of multicultural understanding and tolerance of other

  15. Changing medical students’ perception of the evaluation culture: Is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorie M. Colbert-Getz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Student feedback is a critical component of the teacher-learner cycle. However, there is not a gold standard course or clerkship evaluation form and limited research on the impact of changing the evaluation process. Results from a focus group and pre-implementation feedback survey coupled with best practices in survey design were used to improve all course/clerkship evaluation for academic year 2013-2014. In spring 2014 we asked all subjected students in University of Utah School of Medicine, United States of America to complete the same feedback survey (post-implementation survey. We assessed the evaluation climate with 3 measures on the feedback survey: overall satisfaction with the evaluation process; time students gave effort to the process; and time students used shortcuts. Scores from these measures were compared between 2013 and 2014 with Mann-Whitney U-tests. Response rates were 79% (254 for 2013 and 52% (179 for 2014. Students’ overall satisfaction score were significantly higher (more positive post-implementation compared to pre-implementation (P<0.001. There was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations (P=0.981 and no change for the amount of time they used shortcuts to complete evaluations (P=0.956. We were able to change overall satisfaction with the medical school evaluation culture, but there was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations and times they used shortcuts to complete evaluations. To ensure accurate evaluation results we will need to focus our efforts on time needed to complete course evaluations across all four years.

  16. Changing medical students’ perception of the evaluation culture: Is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorie M. Colbert-Getz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Student feedback is a critical component of the teacher-learner cycle. However, there is not a gold standard course or clerkship evaluation form and limited research on the impact of changing the evaluation process. Results from a focus group and pre-implementation feedback survey coupled with best practices in survey design were used to improve all course/clerkship evaluation for academic year 2013-2014. In spring 2014 we asked all subjected students in University of Utah School of Medicine, United States of America to complete the same feedback survey (post-implementation survey. We assessed the evaluation climate with 3 measures on the feedback survey: overall satisfaction with the evaluation process; time students gave effort to the process; and time students used shortcuts. Scores from these measures were compared between 2013 and 2014 with Mann-Whitney U-tests. Response rates were 79% (254 for 2013 and 52% (179 for 2014. Students’ overall satisfaction score were significantly higher (more positive post-implementation compared to pre-implementation (P<0.001. There was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations (P=0.981 and no change for the amount of time they used shortcuts to complete evaluations (P=0.956. We were able to change overall satisfaction with the medical school evaluation culture, but there was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations and times they used shortcuts to complete evaluations. To ensure accurate evaluation results we will need to focus our efforts on time needed to complete course evaluations across all four years.

  17. Changing medical students' perception of the evaluation culture: Is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert-Getz, Jorie M; Baumann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Student feedback is a critical component of the teacher-learner cycle. However, there is not a gold standard course or clerkship evaluation form and limited research on the impact of changing the evaluation process. Results from a focus group and pre-implementation feedback survey coupled with best practices in survey design were used to improve all course/clerkship evaluation for academic year 2013-2014. In spring 2014 we asked all subjected students in University of Utah School of Medicine, United States of America to complete the same feedback survey (post-implementation survey). We assessed the evaluation climate with 3 measures on the feedback survey: overall satisfaction with the evaluation process; time students gave effort to the process; and time students used shortcuts. Scores from these measures were compared between 2013 and 2014 with Mann-Whitney U-tests. Response rates were 79% (254) for 2013 and 52% (179) for 2014. Students' overall satisfaction score were significantly higher (more positive) post-implementation compared to pre-implementation (Pstudents gave effort to completing evaluations (P=0.981) and no change for the amount of time they used shortcuts to complete evaluations (P=0.956). We were able to change overall satisfaction with the medical school evaluation culture, but there was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations and times they used shortcuts to complete evaluations. To ensure accurate evaluation results we will need to focus our efforts on time needed to complete course evaluations across all four years.

  18. Cancer Moonshot Aims to Double Pace of Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... stage. NIH MedlinePlus magazine sat down with Dinah Singer, PhD, one of the three co-chairs of ... Biology, to learn about its progress. Dr. Dinah Singer, co-chair of the National Cancer Moonshot Initiative ...

  19. The Match of Her Life | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... answer questions for this issue of NIH MedlinePlus magazine about her breast cancer. You discovered you had ... way of healing. As this issue of the magazine went to press, Navratilova was receiving radiation therapy ...

  20. Saying "Yes!" to Careers in Health Care | NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

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    ... From You! We want your feedback on the magazine, ideas for future issues, as well as questions ... com ) or send mail to Editor, NIH MedlinePlus Magazine, P.O. Box 18427, Greensboro, NC 27419-8427. ...

  1. Building Paths to Health Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... Selected articles from past issues of NIH MedlinePlus magazine will be a part of the course content. ... enjoy and learn from this issue of the magazine. And please consider joining FNLM to support all ...

  2. Finding Good Health Information on the Internet | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... MedlinePlus Advantage Finding Good Health Information on the Internet Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Millions ... get health information from magazines, TV, or the Internet. Some is reliable and up to date, some ...

  3. Psoriasis: On the Road to Discovery | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... Home Current issue contents Features: Psoriasis Follow us Psoriasis: On the Road to Discovery Research advances are ... his insights with NIH MedlinePlus magazine. How is psoriasis different from other skin conditions? Psoriasis is quite ...

  4. Medical educational culture: introducing patients to applicants as part of the medical school interview: feasibility and initial impact show and tell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shireen Madani Sims

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The College of Medicine at our institution underwent a major curricular revision in order to develop a patient-centered context for learning. The admission process was revised to reflect this change, adopting a holistic review process, with the hope of attracting students who were particularly well suited to a patient-centered curriculum and learning culture. Methods: Patients from a single practitioner, who were accustomed to working with medical students, were asked if they would like to select the next generation of physicians. The patient's experience included a brief didactic presentation related to the patient's diagnosis and treatment. This was followed by an informal session with the applicants and the physician, where they shared their story in a small group setting. They were encouraged to share their experiences with the healthcare system, both positive and negative. The goal was to allow applicants to glean the importance of the human aspects of disease in our institutional culture of learning. Results: The response and experience were overwhelmingly positive for the patients who donated their time to participate and for our applicants. Follow-up surveys indicated that our applicants found the experience to be unique and positive. Many of the students who chose to attend our university cited the interview experience and learning culture as factors that influenced their choice of medical schools. In addition, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education cited the favorability of the admission process in their recent site visit. Discussion: Now in its fifth year, we can say that the inclusion of patients as part of the interview day is feasible as part of our admission process. We continue to make changes and monitor our progress, and we have added several other faculty members and specialties in order to ensure the program is sustainable.

  5. Integrating Theory, Content, and Method to Foster Critical Consciousness in Medical Students: A Comprehensive Model for Cultural Competence Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Diane K; Goss, Adeline L; Hoekzema, Andrew S; Kelly, Lauren A; Logan, Alexander A; Mehta, Sanjiv D; Sandesara, Utpal N; Munyikwa, Michelle R; DeLisser, Horace M

    2017-03-01

    Many efforts to design introductory "cultural competence" courses for medical students rely on an information delivery (competence) paradigm, which can exoticize patients while obscuring social context, medical culture, and power structures. Other approaches foster a general open-minded orientation, which can remain nebulous without clear grounding principles. Medical educators are increasingly recognizing the limitations of both approaches and calling for strategies that reenvision cultural competence training. Successfully realizing such alternative strategies requires the development of comprehensive models that specify and integrate theoretical frameworks, content, and teaching principles.In this article, the authors present one such model: Introduction to Medicine and Society (IMS), a required cultural competence course launched in 2013 for first-year medical students at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Building on critical pedagogy, IMS is centered on a novel specification of "critical consciousness" in clinical practice as an orientation to understanding and pragmatic action in three relational domains: internal, interpersonal, and structural. Instead of transmitting discrete "facts" about patient "types," IMS content provokes students to engage with complex questions bridging the three domains. Learning takes place in a small-group space specifically designed to spur transformation toward critical consciousness. After discussing the three key components of the course design and describing a representative session, the authors discuss the IMS model's implications, reception by students and faculty, and potential for expansion. Their early experience suggests the IMS model successfully engages students and prepares future physicians to critically examine experiences, manage interpersonal dynamics, and structurally contextualize patient encounters.

  6. Perceptions of an 'international hospital' in Thailand by medical travel patients: cross-cultural tensions in a transnational space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Andrea; Chee, Heng Leng

    2015-01-01

    The growing trade in patients seeking health care in other countries, or medical travel, is changing the forms and experiences of health care seeking and producing changes to hospitals in terms of their design, organization and spaces. What is termed in marketing parlance in Thailand as an 'international hospital' oriented to attracting foreign patients, is a hotel-hospital hybrid that is locally produced through the inflexion of local practices to make a therapeutic space for international patients. The paper reports on work undertaken within a Thai hospital in 2012 which included observations and interviews with thirty foreign in-patients and nine informal interviews with hospital staff. Although theorized as a culturally neutral transnational 'space of connectivity', we show how cross-cultural tensions affect the experience of the hospital with implications for the organization of the hospital and notions of 'cultural competence' in care. There is no single universal experience of this space, instead, there are multiple experiences of the 'international hospital', depending on who patients are, where they are from, their expectations and relationships. Such hospitals straddle the expectations of both local patients and international clientele and present highly complex cross-cultural interactions between staff and patients but also between patients and other patients. Spatial organisation within such settings may either highlight cultural difference or help create culturally safe spaces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modern going near setting of medical physical culture taking into account etiology, type, form, degree and clinical displays of scoliotic illness for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Peshkova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Authors in the article are consider the basic going near setting of medical physical culture at scoliostic illness of І–ІІ degree for children taking into account a type, form, etiology, degree and clinical displays. Purpose: to describe the modern going near setting of medical physical culture taking into account etiology, type, form, degree and clinical displays of scoliostic illness for children. Material and Methods: analysis of the modern special literature on issue of physical rehabilitation of children at scoliostic illness; analysis of medical cards. Results: description of scoliosis is given on an etiologic sign, form, type, degrees and clinical displays. The features of methods of medical physical culture are presented taking into account the afore-named signs of scoliotic illness. Conclusions: setting of facilities and forms of medical physical culture at scoliotic illness depends on etiology, form and type of scoliosis, degree and clinical displays of disease

  8. [Organisational responsibility versus individual responsibility: safety culture? About the relationship between patient safety and medical malpractice law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    The contribution is concerned with the correlations between risk information, patient safety, responsibility and liability, in particular in terms of liability law. These correlations have an impact on safety culture in healthcare, which can be evaluated positively if--in addition to good quality of medical care--as many sources of error as possible can be identified, analysed, and minimised or eliminated by corresponding measures (safety or risk management). Liability influences the conduct of individuals and enterprises; safety is (probably) also a function of liability; this should also apply to safety culture. The standard of safety culture does not only depend on individual liability for damages, but first of all on strict enterprise liability (system responsibility) and its preventive effects. Patient safety through quality and risk management is therefore also an organisational programme of considerable relevance in terms of liability law.

  9. The relationship of centralization, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasirpour, Amir Ashkan; Gohari, Mahmoud Reza; Moradi, Saied

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30). Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals Tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval). Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture components have no significant

  10. The Relationship of Centralization, Organizational Culture and Performance Indexes in Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ashkan Nasirpour

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30. Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval. Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture components have no

  11. The Relationship of Centralization, Organizational Culture and Performance Indexes in Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ashkan Nasirpour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nOne of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30. Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval. Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture

  12. The GROG: A Journal of Navy Medical History and Culture. Issue 38, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Tunis by American merchants , and cancelled the right of the Tunisian government to comman- deer, for its commercial needs, Ameri- can merchant vessels...order and discipline into the entire medical system of supply, medical treatment, sanitation, soldier hygiene and diet, training of drivers and litter

  13. Role of microbiological culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of actinomyces in medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panya, Sappasith; Fliefel, Riham; Probst, Florian; Tröltzsch, Matthias; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Schubert, Sören; Otto, Sven

    2017-03-01

    We hypothesized that local infection plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). Recent developments in molecular methods have revolutionized new approaches for the rapid detection of microorganisms including those difficult to culture. The aim of our study is to identify the bacterial profiles in MRONJ by microbiological culture and polymerase chain reactions (PCR). A retrospective analysis was performed on MRONJ patients from 2008 to 2014. The bacterial profile from MRONJ bone samples was determined using microbiological culture and PCR. Ninety five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria with mean age of 69.85 ± 8.71 years. A female predilection was detected. The mandible was more commonly affected than maxilla. Tooth extraction was the frequent triggering factor. Breast cancer was the primary cause for administration and intravenous bisphosphonates were the most commonly administrated antiresorptive drugs. The majority of patients were classified as stage 2. Posterior teeth were most commonly affected. Based on bone culture results, the most common microorganism were both actinomyces and mixed flora. PCR confirmed the presence of actinomyces in 55 patients. Our data suggest that PCR might be an innovative method for detection of microorganisms difficult to culture using traditional microbiological techniques. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The establishing of Chinese medical concepts in Norwegian acupuncture schools: the cultural translation of jingluo ('circulation tracts').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagli, Gry

    2010-12-01

    Acupuncture and other forms of so-called alternative treatments, originating outside the West, have increasingly become an integrated part of the repertoire of medical practices widely used in health care remote from their places of origin. The main aim of this paper is to elucidate the cultural translation of Chinese medical concepts in a Western, acupuncture setting located far from China. Drawing on material from ethnographic fieldwork in acupuncture schools in Norway, this study discusses how concepts used in Chinese acupuncture are taught and interpreted for biomedically oriented students. The paper concentrates on the concept of jingluo ('circulation tracts', 'meridians') which the schools considered to be vital in order to conduct acupuncture. Similar to several other Chinese medical concepts, jingluo presents claims about the body that significantly differ from biomedical assumptions. The paper adds novel resources and insights to the research concerning medical conceptions, in that it applies the perspective of 'finitism' as developed in the field of sociology of knowledge by Barnes, Bloor and Henry (1996) in its analysis. It presents an analysis of five empirical examples demonstrating how a variety of interpretations of jingluo--many of them from different fields and some of them contradictory--were involved in establishing jingluo. Finally, by examining examples of Chinese concepts of the body, the paper seeks to contribute to the wider field of the anthropology of the body as well as to add to our understanding of the ways in which medical pluralism and globalisation of acupuncture unfolds.

  15. Using Foreign Virtual Patients With Medical Students in Germany: Are Cultural Differences Evident and Do They Impede Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähnert, Tina; Berman, Norman B; Fischer, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Background Learning with virtual patients (VPs) is considered useful in medical education for fostering clinical reasoning. As the authoring of VPs is highly demanding, an international exchange of cases might be desirable. However, cultural differences in foreign VPs might hamper learning success. Objective We investigated the need for support for using VPs from the United States at a German university, with respect to language and cultural differences. Our goal was to better understand potential implementation barriers of a intercultural VP exchange. Methods Two VPs were presented to 30 German medical students featuring a cultural background different from German standards with respect to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, ethical aspects, role models, and language (as identified by a cultural adaptation framework). Participants were assigned to two groups: 14 students were advised to complete the cases without further instructions (basic group), and 16 students received written explanatory supplemental information specifically with regard to cultural differences (supplement group). Using a 6-point scale (6=strongly agree), we analyzed the results of an integrated assessment of learning success as well as an evaluation of cases by the students on usefulness for learning and potential issues regarding the language and cultural background. Results The German students found it motivating to work with cases written in English (6-point scale, 4.5 points). The clinical relevance of the VPs was clearly recognized (6 points), and the foreign language was considered a minor problem in this context (3 points). The results of the integrated learning assessment were similar in both groups (basic 53% [SD 4] vs supplement 52% [SD 4] correct answers, P=.32). However, students using the supplemental material more readily realized culturally different diagnostic and therapeutic strategies (basic 4 vs supplement 5 points, P=.39) and were less affirmative when asked about the

  16. Using Foreign Virtual Patients With Medical Students in Germany: Are Cultural Differences Evident and Do They Impede Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walldorf, Jens; Jähnert, Tina; Berman, Norman B; Fischer, Martin R

    2016-09-27

    Learning with virtual patients (VPs) is considered useful in medical education for fostering clinical reasoning. As the authoring of VPs is highly demanding, an international exchange of cases might be desirable. However, cultural differences in foreign VPs might hamper learning success. We investigated the need for support for using VPs from the United States at a German university, with respect to language and cultural differences. Our goal was to better understand potential implementation barriers of a intercultural VP exchange. Two VPs were presented to 30 German medical students featuring a cultural background different from German standards with respect to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, ethical aspects, role models, and language (as identified by a cultural adaptation framework). Participants were assigned to two groups: 14 students were advised to complete the cases without further instructions (basic group), and 16 students received written explanatory supplemental information specifically with regard to cultural differences (supplement group). Using a 6-point scale (6=strongly agree), we analyzed the results of an integrated assessment of learning success as well as an evaluation of cases by the students on usefulness for learning and potential issues regarding the language and cultural background. The German students found it motivating to work with cases written in English (6-point scale, 4.5 points). The clinical relevance of the VPs was clearly recognized (6 points), and the foreign language was considered a minor problem in this context (3 points). The results of the integrated learning assessment were similar in both groups (basic 53% [SD 4] vs supplement 52% [SD 4] correct answers, P=.32). However, students using the supplemental material more readily realized culturally different diagnostic and therapeutic strategies (basic 4 vs supplement 5 points, P=.39) and were less affirmative when asked about the transferability of cases to a German

  17. Graduate medical education's new focus on resident engagement in quality and safety: will it transform the culture of teaching hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jennifer S; Nash, David B

    2014-10-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently announced its Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) program, which is designed to catalyze and promote the engagement of physician trainees in health care quality and patient safety activities that are essential to the delivery of high-quality patient care in U.S. teaching hospitals. In this Commentary, the authors argue that a strong organizational culture in quality improvement and patient safety is a necessary foundation for resident engagement in these areas. They describe residents' influence via their social networks on the behaviors and attitudes of peers and other health care providers and highlight this as a powerful driver for culture change in teaching hospitals. They also consider some of the potential unintended consequences of the CLER program and offer strategies to avoid them. The authors suggest that the CLER program provides an opportunity for health care and graduate medical education leaders to closely examine organizational quality and safety culture and the degree to which their residents are integrated in these efforts. They highlight the importance of developing collaborative interprofessional strategies to reach common goals to improve patient care. By sharpening the focus on patient safety, supervision, professionalism, patient care transitions, and the overall quality of health care delivery in the clinical learning environment during residents' formative training years, the hope is that the CLER program will inspire a new generation of physicians who possess and value these skills.

  18. Cultural adaptation of a survey to assess medical providers' knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS in Albania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane D Morrison

    Full Text Available Though the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southeastern Europe is one of low reported prevalence, numerous studies have described the pervasiveness of medical providers' lack of knowledge of HIV/AIDS in the Balkans. This study sought to culturally adapt an instrument to assess medical providers' knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS in Albania. Cultural adaptation was completed through development of a survey from previously validated instruments, translation of the survey into Albanian, blinded back translation, expert committee review of the draft instrument, focus group pre-testing with community- and University Hospital Center of Tirana-based physicians and nurses, and test-retest reliability testing. Blinded back translation of the instrument supported the initial translation with slight changes to the idiomatic and conceptual equivalences. Focus group pre-testing generally supported the instrument, yet some experiential and idiomatic changes were implemented. Based on unweighted kappa and/or prevalence adjusted bias adjusted kappa (PABAK, 20 of the 43 questions were deemed statistically significant at kappa and/or PABAK ≥0.5, while 12 others did not cross zero on the 95% confidence interval for kappa, indicating their probable significance. Subsequently, an instrument to assess medical providers' knowledge of and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS for an Albanian population was developed which can be expanded within Albania and potentially to other countries within the Balkans, which have an Albanian-speaking population.

  19. Cultural Adaptation of a Survey to Assess Medical Providers’ Knowledge of and Attitudes towards HIV/AIDS in Albania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shane D.; Rashidi, Vania; Banushi, Vilson H.; Barbhaiya, Namrata J.; Gashi, Valbona H.; Sarnquist, Clea; Maldonado, Yvonne; Harxhi, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    Though the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southeastern Europe is one of low reported prevalence, numerous studies have described the pervasiveness of medical providers’ lack of knowledge of HIV/AIDS in the Balkans. This study sought to culturally adapt an instrument to assess medical providers’ knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS in Albania. Cultural adaptation was completed through development of a survey from previously validated instruments, translation of the survey into Albanian, blinded back translation, expert committee review of the draft instrument, focus group pre-testing with community- and University Hospital Center of Tirana-based physicians and nurses, and test-retest reliability testing. Blinded back translation of the instrument supported the initial translation with slight changes to the idiomatic and conceptual equivalences. Focus group pre-testing generally supported the instrument, yet some experiential and idiomatic changes were implemented. Based on unweighted kappa and/or prevalence adjusted bias adjusted kappa (PABAK), 20 of the 43 questions were deemed statistically significant at kappa and/or PABAK ≥0.5, while 12 others did not cross zero on the 95% confidence interval for kappa, indicating their probable significance. Subsequently, an instrument to assess medical providers’ knowledge of and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS for an Albanian population was developed which can be expanded within Albania and potentially to other countries within the Balkans, which have an Albanian-speaking population. PMID:23544101

  20. Reduction of Clinical Culture Contamination in an Inpatient Medical Unit by Revisiting Microbiology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Bona; Irmler, Monica; Faselis, Charles; Liappis, Angelike P

    2016-10-01

    Clinical culture contaminations delay the correct diagnosis, result in repeat testing, and may extend the length of a hospital stay. A simple educational session reminding providers of the ubiquitous presence of bacteria on the skin and in our environment, led to a significant decrease in contaminated cultures (16.9% versus 10.9%, p = 0.03). J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(10):446-448. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Fostering a culture of interprofessional education for radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavender, Charlotte, E-mail: charlavender@gmail.com; Miller, Seth; Church, Jessica; Chen, Ronald C.; Muresan, Petronella A.; Adams, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    A less-studied aspect of radiation therapy and medical dosimetry education is experiential learning through attendance at interprofessional conferences. University of North Carolina radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students regularly attended morning conferences and daily pretreatment peer review, including approximately 145 hours of direct interaction with medical attending physicians and residents, medical physicists, and other faculty. We herein assessed the effect of their participation in these interprofessional conferences on knowledge and communication. The students who graduated from our radiation therapy and medical dosimetry programs who were exposed to the interprofessional education initiative were compared with those who graduated in the previous years. The groups were compared with regard to their knowledge (as assessed by grades on end-of-training examinations) and team communication (assessed via survey). The results for the 2 groups were compared via exact tests. There was a trend for the examination scores for the 2012 cohort to be higher than for the 2007 to 2011 groups. Survey results suggested that students who attended the interprofessional education sessions were more comfortable speaking with attending physicians, residents, physicists, and faculty compared with earlier students who did not attend these educational sessions. Interprofessional education, particularly vertical integration, appears to provide an enhanced educational experience both in regard to knowledge (per the examination scores) and in building a sense of communication (via the survey results). Integration of interprofessional education into radiation therapy and medical dosimetry educational programs may represent an opportunity to enrich the learning experience in multiple ways and merits further study.

  2. Cultural competence: a framework for promoting voluntary medical male circumcision among VaRemba communities in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumba, Kemist; Lubombo, Musara

    2017-07-01

    Almost a decade after the formal introduction of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) as an important technology for HIV prevention, its implementation is still fraught with acceptability challenges. This is especially true among ethnic groups where male circumcision is conducted as a rite of passage into adulthood. In this article we question why VMMC is being met with resistance despite widespread awareness of its promise to reduce HIV incidence in a culturally circumcising community in Zimbabwe. In-depth and key informant interviews were conducted with selected VaRemba initiation graduates and surgeons respectively in Mposi area in Mberengwa to explore why VMMC has not been readily accepted in their community. Findings suggest that male circumcision among VaRemba is not only the removal of prepuce but comprises a secretive and rich curriculum rooted in their culture and identity. Such a conceptualisation renders some social and programmatic impediments for VMMC uptake. To scale up VMMC uptake among VaRemba, we argue for a reorganisation and adaptation of VMMC services in a culturally competent way that accounts for local conceptions of circumcision and respect for the cultural beliefs and practices of VaRemba communities.

  3. Shaping beside student of the special medical group of the culture sound lifestyle by means of computer technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vovk L.V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Considered results of the pedagogical experiment with use computer information-diagnostic system "Passport of health" on shaping the culture sound lifestyle beside student of the special medical group. Two groups student have took part in experiment in amount 151 persons. It is proved that pedagogical experiment has positively influenced upon fortification of health, life activity, high level of the knowledges and practical skills during education in high school. It is installed that one of the main of the conditions to efficiency of the physical education, are a knowledges, which allow effective to solve the delivered problems of the physical education to personalities.

  4. Authentic early experience in Medical Education: a socio-cultural analysis identifying important variables in learning interactions within workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Sarah; Brosnan, Caragh; Richardson, Jane; Hays, Richard

    2013-12-01

    This paper addresses the question 'what are the variables influencing social interactions and learning during Authentic Early Experience (AEE)?' AEE is a complex educational intervention for new medical students. Following critique of the existing literature, multiple qualitative methods were used to create a study framework conceptually orientated to a socio-cultural perspective. Study participants were recruited from three groups at one UK medical school: students, workplace supervisors, and medical school faculty. A series of intersecting spectra identified in the data describe dyadic variables that make explicit the parameters within which social interactions are conducted in this setting. Four of the spectra describe social processes related to being in workplaces and developing the ability to manage interactions during authentic early experiences. These are: (1) legitimacy expressed through invited participation or exclusion; (2) finding a role-a spectrum from student identity to doctor mindset; (3) personal perspectives and discomfort in transition from lay to medical; and, (4) taking responsibility for 'risk'-moving from aversion to management through graded progression of responsibility. Four further spectra describe educational consequences of social interactions. These spectra identify how the reality of learning is shaped through social interactions and are (1) generic-specific objectives, (2) parallel-integrated-learning, (3) context specific-transferable learning and (4) performing or simulating-reality. Attention to these variables is important if educators are to maximise constructive learning from AEE. Application of each of the spectra could assist workplace supervisors to maximise the positive learning potential of specific workplaces.

  5. African-American and Latina Women Seeking Public Health Services: Cultural Beliefs regarding Pregnancy, including Medication-taking Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Dalia Sanchez, MD, MCP, MHA, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe cultural beliefs and medication-taking-behavior about pregnancy in African-American and Latina women. Design: qualitative study using phenomenological methodology; face-to-face, semi structured interviews and focus group. Thematic analysis was done to obtain themes consistent with the research objective. Setting: Maricopa County, Arizona, Department of Public-health Programs, November 2008 through April 2009.Participants: women seeking public-health services in the greater Phoenix, Arizona.Results: fifteen adult women representing two ethnic groups (seven African-Americans and eight Latinas participated. Themes derived from the interview data included: “The Dilemma: To Become or Not to Become Pregnant;” “The Ideal Stress-free World: Support System;” “Changing Worlds: Wanting Dependency;” and “The Health care System: Disconnection from Pregnancy to Postpartum.”Conclusions: based on the cultural themes: 1. pregnancies were not planned; 2. healthy life-style changes were not likely to occur during pregnancy; 3. basic facts about the biology of sexual intercourse and pregnancy were not understood, and there was no usage of any preconceptional or prenatal medications; and 4. professional health care was not desired or considered necessary (except during delivery. These cultural beliefs can contribute to negative birth outcomes, and need to be considered by pharmacists and other health-care providers. The information gained from this study can guide the implementation of educational programs developed by pharmacists that are more sensitive to the cultural beliefs and points of view of these particular women. Such programs would thus be more likely to be favorably received and utilized.

  6. The clash of medical civilizations: experiencing "primary care" in a neoliberal culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Brian

    2012-12-01

    An anthropologist describes how he found himself at the vortex of a "clash of medical civilizations:" neoliberalism and the international primary health care movement. His involvement in a $6 million social change initiative in medical education became a basis to unlock the hidden tensions, contradictions and movements within the "primary care" phenomenon. The essay is structured on five ethnographic stories, situated on a continuum from "natural" species-level primary care to "unnatural" neoliberal primary care. Food is an element of all tales. Taking the long view of history/prehistory permits us to better recognize ideological distortions in order to more capably transform medicine.

  7. Marketing to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Continuing Medical Education Cultural Competence Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of…

  8. "It's Just a Clash of Cultures": Emotional Talk within Medical Students' Narratives of Professionalism Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrouxe, Lynn V.; Rees, Charlotte E.

    2012-01-01

    Recent investigations into the UK National Health Service revealed doctors' failures to act with compassion and professionalism towards patients. The British media asked questions about what happens to students during their learning that influences such behaviour as doctors. We listened to 200 medical students' narratives of professionalism…

  9. Learning culture and feedback: an international study of medical athletes and musicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watling, C.; Driessen, E.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Lingard, L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Feedback should facilitate learning, but within medical education it often fails to deliver on its promise. To better understand why feedback is challenging, we explored the unique perspectives of doctors who had also trained extensively in sport or music, aiming to: (i) distinguish the

  10. Irish Medical Student Culture and the Performance of Masculinity, C.1880-1930

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Laura

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there have been valuable studies of medical education that have highlighted the importance of shared educational activities and the changing image of the student. Less attention has been paid to how masculine ideals were passed on to students and how educational and extra-curricular spheres became sites for the maintenance of…

  11. Learning culture and feedback: an international study of medical athletes and musicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watling, C.; Driessen, E.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Lingard, L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Feedback should facilitate learning, but within medical education it often fails to deliver on its promise. To better understand why feedback is challenging, we explored the unique perspectives of doctors who had also trained extensively in sport or music, aiming to: (i) distinguish the

  12. "It's Just a Clash of Cultures": Emotional Talk within Medical Students' Narratives of Professionalism Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrouxe, Lynn V.; Rees, Charlotte E.

    2012-01-01

    Recent investigations into the UK National Health Service revealed doctors' failures to act with compassion and professionalism towards patients. The British media asked questions about what happens to students during their learning that influences such behaviour as doctors. We listened to 200 medical students' narratives of professionalism…

  13. Modifying the Culture of Medical Education: The First Three Years of the RWJ Generalist Physician Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwill, Jack M.; Perkoff, Gerald T.; Blake, Robert L., Jr.; Paden, Carrie; Beachler, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes the first three years of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's six-year, $32-million grant program designed to help medical schools increase their production of generalist physicians. Outlines the program's conceptual bases, identifies common approaches to intervention in the 14 participating schools, and explores administrative and…

  14. Irish Medical Student Culture and the Performance of Masculinity, C.1880-1930

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Laura

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there have been valuable studies of medical education that have highlighted the importance of shared educational activities and the changing image of the student. Less attention has been paid to how masculine ideals were passed on to students and how educational and extra-curricular spheres became sites for the maintenance of…

  15. Changing the culture of academic medicine: the C-Change learning action network and its impact at participating medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupat, Edward; Pololi, Linda; Schnell, Eugene R; Kern, David E

    2013-09-01

    The culture of academic medicine has been described as hierarchical, competitive, and not highly supportive of female or minority faculty. In response to this, the authors designed the Learning Action Network (LAN), which was part of the National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine (C-Change). The LAN is a five-school consortium aimed at changing the organizational culture of its constituent institutions. The authors selected LAN schools to be geographically diverse and representative of U.S. medical schools. Institutional leaders and faculty representatives from constituent schools met twice yearly for four years (2006-2010), forming a cross-institutional learning community. Through their quarterly listing of institutional activities, schools reported a wide array of actions. Most common were increased faculty development and/or mentoring, new approaches to communication, and adoption of new policies and procedures. Other categories included data collection/management, engagement of key stakeholders, education regarding gender/diversity, and new/expanded leadership positions. Through exit interviews, most participants reported feeling optimistic about maintaining the momentum of change. However, some, especially in schools with leadership changes, expressed uncertainty. Participants reported that they felt that the LAN enabled, empowered, facilitated, and/or caused the reported actions.For others who might want to work toward changing the culture of academic medicine, the authors offer several lessons learned from their experiences with C-Change. Most notably, people, structures, policies, and reward systems must be put into place to support cultural values, and broad-based support should be created in order for changes to persist when inevitable transitions in leadership occur.

  16. Defiance, compliance, or alliance? How we developed a medical professionalism curriculum that deliberately connects to cultural context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shih-Li; Ho, Ming-Jung; Hirsh, David; Kern, David E

    2012-01-01

    In the age of globalization, non-Western medical educators seem too eager to conform to Western educational approaches and may, thereby, undermine the pursuit of local curricular needs. To develop a medical professionalism curriculum that explicitly considered local cultural needs and social expectations. We used a systematic six-step approach to develop the curriculum. We engaged local stakeholders (physicians, allied health professionals, and members of the public) in a nominal group process to identify professionalism competencies. Students and faculty participated in a survey and/or focus groups to determine learner/faculty needs. Teachers drafted goals and objectives related to locally valued competencies. We designed and implemented educational strategies to develop students' competencies that meet local societal expectations, such as involving family members in decision making. We plan to use multi-source feedback and a portfolio to assess students, which reinforces a definition of integrity that encompasses not only congruence between individual values and behaviors, but also achieving harmony among all stakeholders. We plan to reinforce the formal curriculum with faculty development and attention to the hidden curriculum. Based upon our experience and reflection, we offer some practical methods for integrating local cultural values and societal needs in professionalism education.

  17. On the medical college dormitory cultural construction several ponders%医学院校宿舍文化建设的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹威

    2012-01-01

    医学院校宿舍文化建设是开展医学生思想政治教育工作和提高医学生综合素质的重要园地,必须紧密结合医学专业的特点,明确目标,合理定位,通过严格制度文化,规范行为文化,引导精神文化,加强医学院校宿舍文化内涵建设;同时,要创新宿舍文化建设理念,拓展宿舍文化建设园地,提升宿舍文化建设层次与水平,从而不断推进医学生的人文素质教育.%Medical college dormitory culture construction is to carry out the medical students' Ideological and political education and enhance the comprehensive qualities of medical students in the important position,therefore should be closely combined with medical professional characteristics,make clear a target,reasonable positioning,through the strict norms of behavior culture,system culture,spirit culture and guide,strengthen medical college dormitory culture connotation construction; at the same time to innovation of dormitory culture the construction idea,expand the construction of dormitory culture position,enhance the construction of dormitory culture level,and constantly promote the medical students' humanistic quality education.

  18. Medical students' preferences for problem-based learning in relation to culture and personality: a multicultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holen, Are; Manandhar, Kedar; Pant, Devendra S; Karmacharya, Biraj M; Olson, Linda M; Koju, Rajendra; Mansur, Dil I

    2015-07-19

    The aim of this study was to explore positive and negative preferences towards problem-based learning in relation to personality traits and socio-cultural context. The study was an anonymous and voluntary cross-sectional survey of medical students (N=449) in hybrid problem-based curricula in Nepal, Norway and North Dakota. Data was collected on gender, age, year of study, cohabitation and medical school. The PBL Preference Inventory identified students' positive and negative preferences in relation to problem-based learning; the personality traits were detected by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. The determinants of the two kinds of preferences were analyzed by hierarchical multiple linear regressions. Positive preferences were mostly determined by personality; associations were found with the traits Extra-version, Openness to experience, Conscientiousness and Neuroticism; the first three are related to sociability, curiosity and orderliness, the last, to mental health. The learn-ing environments of such curricula may be supportive for some and unnerving for others who score high on Neuroticism. Negative preferences were rather determined by culture, but also, they correlated with Neuroticism and Conscientiousness. Negative preferences were lower among females and students living in symmetrical relationships. Some high on Conscientiousness disliked group work, and the negative correlation with Agreeableness indicated that less sociable students were not predisposed to this kind of learning activity. Preferences related to problem-based learning were significantly and independently determined both by personality traits and culture. More insights into the nature of students' preferences may guide aspects of curriculum modifications and the daily facilitation of groups.

  19. Make her a virgin again: when medical disputes about minors are cultural clashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Loretta M

    2014-02-01

    Recalcitrant disputes among health care providers and patients or their families may signal deep cultural differences about what interventions are needed or about clinicians's professional duties. These issues arose in relation to a mother's request for hymenoplasty or revirgination for her minor daughter to enable an overseas, forced marriage and protect her from an honor killing. The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology committee recommends against members performing a hymenoplasty or other female genital cosmetic surgeries due to a lack of data concerning their safety and efficacy. A key issue in such cases is how to determine what is in the minor's best interest and the scope of health care moral or professional's duties. The Best Interests Standard can serve as a powerful moral tool for resolving cross-cultural disputes and identifying needed policy.

  20. Using cultural immersion as the platform for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health in an undergraduate medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Janie D; Wolfe, Christina; Springer, Shannon; Martin, Mary; Togno, John; Bramstedt, Katrina A; Sargeant, Sally; Murphy, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    In 2011 Bond University was looking for innovative ways to meet the professional standards and guidelines in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health in its Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) curriculum. In 2012 Bond piloted a compulsory cultural immersion program for all first year students, which is now a usual part of the MBBS program. Three phases were included - establishing an Indigenous health group, determining the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander educational content based on the professional standards and developing nine educational sessions and resources - as well as significant administrative processes. The cultural immersion was piloted in 2012 with 92 first year medical students. Following refinements it was repeated in 2013 with 95 students and in 2014 with 94 students. A comprehensive evaluation process was undertaken that included a paper-based evaluation form using a five-point Likert scale, as well as a confidential talking circle evaluation. The response rate was 95.4% (n=271, pooled cohort). Data were entered separately into SPSS and annual reports were written to the Faculty. Descriptive statistics are reported alongside themed qualitative data. The three combined student evaluation results were extremely positive. Students (n=271) strongly agreed that the workshop was well organised (M=4.3), that the facilitators contributed very positively to their experience (M=4.3), and that they were very satisfied overall with the activity (M=4.2). They agreed that the eight overall objectives had been well met (M=3.9-4.3). The nine sessions were highly evaluated with mean ratings of between 3.9 and 4.8. The 'best thing' about the immersion identified by more than half of the students was overwhelmingly (n=140) the Storytelling session, followed by bonding with the cohort, the Torres Strait Islander session and learning more about culture. The item identified as needing most improvement was the food (n=87), followed by the

  1. Evaluation of the culture of safety: survey of clinicians and managers in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronovost, P J; Weast, B; Holzmueller, C G; Rosenstein, B J; Kidwell, R P; Haller, K B; Feroli, E R; Sexton, J B; Rubin, H R

    2003-12-01

    Despite the emphasis on patient safety in health care, few organizations have evaluated the extent to which safety is a strategic priority or their culture supports patient safety. In response to the Institute of Medicine's report and to an organizational commitment to patient safety, we conducted a systematic assessment of safety at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) and, from this, developed a strategic plan to improve safety. The specific aims of this study were to evaluate the extent to which the culture supports patient safety at JHH and the extent to which safety is a strategic priority. During July and August 2001 we implemented two surveys in disparate populations to assess patient safety. The Safety Climate Scale (SCS) was administered to a sample of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other ICU staff. SCS assesses perceptions of a strong and proactive organizational commitment to patient safety. The second survey instrument, called Strategies for Leadership (SLS), evaluated the extent to which safety was a strategic priority for the organization. This survey was administered to clinical and administrative leaders. We received 395 completed SCS surveys from 82% of the departments and 86% of the nursing units. Staff perceived that supervisors had a greater commitment to safety than senior leaders. Nurses had higher scores than physicians for perceptions of safety. Twenty three completed SLS surveys were received from 77% of the JHH Patient Safety Committee members and 50% of the JHH Management Committee members. Management Committee responses were more positive than Patient Safety Committee, indicating that management perceived safety efforts to be further developed. Strategic planning received the lowest scores from both committees. We believe this is one of the first large scale efforts to measure institutional culture of safety and then design improvements in health care. The survey results suggest that strategic planning of patient safety needs

  2. The effect of professional culture on intrinsic motivation among physicians in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Today, most healthcare organizations aim to manage professionals' motivation through monetary incentives, such as pay for performance. However, addressing motivation extrinsically can involve negative effects, such as disturbed teamwork, gaming the system, and crowd-out of intrinsic motivation. To offset these side effects, it is crucial to support professionals' intrinsic motivation actively, which is largely determined by enjoyment- and obligation-based social norms that derive from professionals' culture. For this study, a professional culture questionnaire was designed and validated, the results of which uncovered three factors: relationship to work, relationship to colleagues, and relationship to organization. These factors served as independent variables for regression analyses. Second, Amabile's validated work preference inventory was used to measure intrinsic motivation as a dependent variable. The regression analysis was controlled for sex, age, and experience. The study revealed that relationship to work had the strongest (and a positive) impact on intrinsic motivation in general and on Amabile's intrinsic subscales, enjoyment and challenge. Relationship to organization had a negative impact on intrinsic motivation and both subscales, and relationship to colleagues showed a low positive significance for the intrinsic scale only. Healthcare organizations have mostly focused on targeting professionals' extrinsic motivation. However, managing dimensions of professional culture can help support professionals' intrinsic motivation without incurring the side effects of monetary incentives.

  3. Interpreting hypernymic propositions in an online medical encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiszman, Marcelo; Rindflesch, Thomas C; Kilicoglu, Halil

    2003-01-01

    Interpretation of semantic propositions from bio-medical texts documents would provide valuable support to natural language processing (NLP) applications. We are developing a methodology to interpret a kind of semantic proposition, the hypernymic proposition, in MEDLINE abstracts. In this paper, we expanded the system to identify these structures in a different discourse domain: the Medical Encyclopedia from the National Library of Medi-cine's MEDLINEplus Website.

  4. Satisfaction with a 2-day communication skills course culturally tailored for medical specialists in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L; Alyafei, Khalid; Afana, Abdelhamid; Al-Romaihi, Sheyma; Yassin, Mohammed; Elnashar, Maha; Al-Arab, Banan; Al-Khal, Abdullatif

    2017-01-01

    Health-care communication skills training may be particularly needed in the Arabian Gulf countries because of the variety of cultures within the physician and patient populations. This study describes the implementation and results of a communication skills training program for physicians in Qatar that assessed previous training, and effect of previous training on participants' course evaluations. We conducted a 2-day communication skills training course covering seven culturally adapted modules. Educational strategies included large and small group work with the standardized patient, demonstration videos, and lectures. At the end, participants completed a course evaluation survey. Data analysis performed with SPSS; frequencies and percentages were calculated, and Chi-square test applied to evaluate statistical significance. A total of 410 physicians in Qatar have participated in the course over a period of 2 years. Evaluation ratings of the course were high. Participants rated the module on Breaking Bad News as the most useful, and the small group role-play as the most helpful course component. One-third of participants had previously participated in experiential communication skills training. There was no association between previous experience and evaluation of the course. Physicians in Qatar positively evaluated a 2-day communication skills course, though the majority of participants did not have any previous exposure to experiential communication skills training.

  5. Enhancing understanding and recall of quantitative information about medical risks: a cross-cultural comparison between Germany and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Retamero, Rocio; Galesic, Mirta; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2011-05-01

    In two experiments, we analyzed cross-cultural differences in understanding and recalling information about medical risks in two countries--Germany and Spain--whose students differ substantially in their quantitative literacy according to the 2003 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA; OECD, 2003, 2010). We further investigated whether risk understanding can be enhanced by using visual aids (Experiment 1), and whether different ways of describing risks affect recall (Experiment 2). Results showed that Spanish students are more vulnerable to misunderstanding and forgetting the risk information than their German counterparts. Spanish students, however, benefit more than German students from representing the risk information using ecologically rational formats--which exploit the way information is represented in the human mind. We concluded that our results can have important implications for clinical practice.

  6. Medical Groups Raise Blood Pressure Rx Threshold for Healthy Adults Over 60

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163063.html Medical Groups Raise Blood Pressure Rx Threshold for Healthy Adults Over 60 Guidelines ... benefit from more aggressive treatment is small, the groups say. Doctors ... control of blood pressure in healthy older adults may produce more harm ...

  7. The Bioinformatics of Integrative Medical Insights: Proposals for an International PsychoSocial and Cultural Bioinformatics Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Rossi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the formation of an International PsychoSocial and Cultural Bioinformatics Project (IPCBP to explore the research foundations of Integrative Medical Insights (IMI on all levels from the molecular-genomic to the psychological, cultural, social, and spiritual. Just as The Human Genome Project identified the molecular foundations of modern medicine with the new technology of sequencing DNA during the past decade, the IPCBP would extend and integrate this neuroscience knowledge base with the technology of gene expression via DNA/proteomic microarray research and brain imaging in development, stress, healing, rehabilitation, and the psychotherapeutic facilitation of existentional wellness. We anticipate that the IPCBP will require a unique international collaboration of, academic institutions, researchers, and clinical practioners for the creation of a new neuroscience of mind-body communication, brain plasticity, memory, learning, and creative processing during optimal experiential states of art, beauty, and truth. We illustrate this emerging integration of bioinformatics with medicine with a videotape of the classical 4-stage creative process in a neuroscience approach to psychotherapy.

  8. [Basic study to establish medication safety culture with patient-commitment style in community pharmacy: An examination from meeting reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Mitsuko; Okuda, Noriko; Kosaka, Naohiro; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Matsuura, Masayoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Yamada, Rika

    2007-12-01

    Our group conducted a Medication Safety Culture Building Drive, enlisting the cooperation of pharmacy patients to clarify obstacles and verify the effect of the measures implemented. Pharmacists at 38 community pharmacies instituted a 3-month trial period of rigorous prescription confirmation by checking filled prescriptions against the accompanying drug information (DI) in the presence of patients at pharmacy counters, whenever prescription drugs were dispensed. During the first month, 29 pharmacies reported carrying out the program with the rate of patient coverage was over 50%; while 8 others reported that rate of patient coverage was less than 50%. Factors standing in the way of checking filled prescriptions with the patients could be characterized as "physical conditions," "prescription content," or "patient attributes." The measures devised to counter these obstacles all fell within the categories of "education of patients and pharmacists," "advance arrangements made in preparation for checking," "methods of checking and nature of items checked," "checking procedure," and "DI literature." After three month, 34 pharmacies reported that the effort had been effective. During the three months, the average implementation rate (patient coverage rate) was improved from 92.5% in April to 96.5% in June (ppatients' and pharmacists' awareness regarding dispensing error prevention, 2) Increase in patients' interest in, and understanding of, their own prescription medications, 3) Increase in patients' understanding about the efforts and in number of patients cooperating with the effort.

  9. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance.

  10. Validation of a provider self-report inventory for measuring patient-centered cultural sensitivity in health care using a sample of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsu-Paun, Anca; Tucker, Carolyn M; Herman, Keith C; Hernandez, Caridad A

    2010-04-01

    The paper describes the construction and initial evaluation of the new Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Inventory (T-CSHCI) Provider Form, which was developed to address the shortcomings of existing similar measures. Two hundred seventeen (217) 3rd and 4th year medical students completed the T-CSHCI-Provider Form. Factor analysis was used to identify non-overlapping items. The final solution produced five factors: patient-centeredness, interpersonal skills, disrespect/disempowerment, competence, and cultural knowledge/responsiveness. The five T-CSHCI-Provider Form factors/subscales proved to be reliable and were associated with related constructs as hypothesized. This study provides initial evidence that the T-CSHCI-Provider Form measures independent dimensions of patient-centered culturally sensitive health care as perceived by medical students. Recommendations for ways in which the T-CSHCI Provider Form can be used to guide culturally sensitive health care training are provided.

  11. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  12. Polio and Post-Polio Syndrome - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Polio and Post-Polio Syndrome URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Polio and Post-Polio Syndrome - Multiple Languages To use ...

  13. Health Information in Hindi (हिन्दी): MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → Hindi (हिन्दी) URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/hindi.html Health Information in Hindi (हिन्दी) To ...

  14. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

  15. Technology Opens Doors to Scientific Discovery, Portrait Unveiled of Former NLM Director Lindberg | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my research into the social impact of the Internet back in the year 2000," she stated, "[the ... expand the publication and distribution of NIH MedlinePlus magazine, thousands and thousands more people will gain valuable, ...

  16. Factors influencing voluntary premarital medical examination in Zhejiang province, China: a culturally-tailored health behavioral model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Premarital medical examination (PME) compliance rate has dropped drastically since it became voluntary in China in 2003. This study aimed to establish a prediction model to be a theoretic framework for analyzing factors affecting PME compliance in Zhejiang province, China. Methods A culturally-tailored health behavioral model combining the Health Behavioral Model (HBM) and the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) was established to analyze the data from a cross-sectional questionnaire survey (n = 2,572) using the intercept method at the county marriage registration office in 12 counties from Zhejiang in 2010. Participants were grouped by high (n = 1,795) and low (n = 777) social desirability responding tendency (SDRT) by Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS). A structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to evaluate behavioral determinants for their influences on PME compliance in both high and low SDRT groups. Results 69.8% of the participants had high SDRT and tended to overly report benefits and underreport barriers, which may affect prediction accuracy on PME participation. In the low SDRT group, the prediction model showed the most influencing factor on PME compliance was behavioral intention, with standardized structural coefficients (SSCs) being 0.75 (P social environmental factors. The verified prediction model was tested to be an effective theoretic framework for the prediction of factors affecting voluntary PME compliance. It also should be noted that internationally available behavioral theories and models need to be culturally tailored to adapt to particular populations. This study has provided new insights for establishing a theoretical model to understand health behaviors in China. PMID:24972866

  17. [Living in abundance in the ancient and modern worlds from a medical and cultural-historical point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, D P

    2014-06-01

    Comparative investigations centre on attitudes of demand and consumption in ethnic groups living in affluence, beginning with the first pre-Christian century in the Roman Empire on the one hand and in Western countries in the post-industrial age of hight-tech in times of far advanced globalization on the other. In this context medical, psycho-social and socio-economical aspects will be treated considering ideal and cultural breaks. Renowned Roman and Greek historians, physicians and philosophers are vouching as witnesses of the times for developments in the antique world with their literary works, in excerpts and verbatim. Obviously general moral decay is a side effect of any affluence. Even in the antiquitiy the "ideology of renewal" proclaimed by the Emperor Augustus died away mostly in emptiness just as do the appeals for improving one's state of health for surviving directed to all citizens in our time. With the rise of Rome as a world power general relative affluence was widespread to such an extent that diseases caused by affluence have occured as mass phenomena. The old Roman virtues of temperance and frugality turned into greed and addiction to pleasure. In this way the Roman people under the banner of affluence degenerated into a society of leisure time, consumption, fun and throwaway mentality. The decline of the Empire was predetermined. The promise of affluence which modern Europe is addicted to is demanding its price following the principle of causality. "How the pictures resemble each other!"

  18. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in a Selected Number of Pharmacies Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Using the Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (SOPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jamili

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of this study, commitment of healthcare authorities to patient safety culture is the most important factor in the promotion of organizational patient safety. Considering that the lowest score of patient safety culture belonged to the dimension of “overall perceptions of patient safety”,it is recommended that related training interventions be implemented for healthcare staff in order to establish and promote the patient safety culture in pharmacies.

  19. Understanding Prostate Enlargement | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tender, or has abnormalities that require more testing. Medical Tests. A health care provider may refer men to a urologist—a doctor ... more urine for longer periods Medications A health care provider or ... such as the Medical Therapy of Prostatic Symptoms (MTOPS) study, have shown ...

  20. ["Abnormal reaction" or cultural misunderstandings? A contribution to the improvement of medical care to children of migrant labourers in the FRG (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, E; Riedesser, P; Schindera, F

    1982-01-01

    The overproportional rate of medical treatment of foreign children in the private practice of paediatricians and in the paediatric hospitals imposes very often special difficulties on our medical care system. These difficulties do not only result from the language barrier but also from the vast difference between the illness concepts of our medical system which bases in natural science, and the traditional concepts of the prescientific medical layman system of the foreign patients. Because of the doctors ignorance in these different cultural forms of understanding, feeling and expression of illness, as well as in the specific attitudes to the body, shown by members--specially women and girls--of the South European an Asia Minor societies, it leads often to deep misunderstandings in the doctor-patient-relation and therefore to false diagnosis and wrong treatment. This should be demonstrated in one case.

  1. 以优秀医学文化培育高素质医学人才%To cultivate advanced medical personnel with excellent culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王飞; 韩晓宏; 冯孟潜; 邵小轩; 王玉柱

    2012-01-01

    《国家中长期教育改革和发展规划纲要(2010-2020年)》为高素质医学人才培养指明了方向,也提出了新的要求.以先进文化理念引领医学人才培养,以优秀医学文化精神培育医学人才,以创新文化载体激活医学人才培养,是促进高素质医学人才脱颖而出的有效抓手.%National long-term education reform and development plan (2010-2020) for advanced medical personnel training specified the direction of new requirements.There is no uniform understanding about how to cultivate high-level medical personnel and the relevant work is still being explored.Cultivation of medical talents with the leading of the advanced culture concept,with excellent spirit of medical culture,and with the activation of innovation vector,which is effective starting point to promote a large number of senior medical personnel come to the fore.

  2. What Is the Organizational Culture Regarding Use of Family Nurse Practitioners as Perceived by Selected Objective Medical Group Executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    efficiently maintained the household during my mental absences throughout the past year. They have surprised me with gourmet dinners of pasta , jell-o... Dental Corps (DC), Medical Service Corps (MSC), or Biomedical Service Corps (BSC) who is responsible for successful mission accomplishments through...team there may be any mix of medical corps specialties (i.e.. Medical Corps, Nurse Corps, Dental Corps, Biomedical Service Corps, and 20 Medical

  3. A culturally adapted telecommunication system to improve physical activity, diet quality, and medication adherence among hypertensive African-Americans: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migneault, Jeffrey P; Dedier, Julien J; Wright, Julie A; Heeren, Timothy; Campbell, Marci Kramish; Morisky, Donald E; Rudd, Peter; Friedman, Robert H

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is more prevalent and clinically severe among African-Americans than whites. Several health behaviors influence blood pressure (BP) control, but effective, accessible, culturally sensitive interventions that target multiple behaviors are lacking. We evaluated a culturally adapted, automated telephone system to help hypertensive, urban African-American adults improve their adherence to their antihypertensive medication regimen and to evidence-based guidelines for dietary behavior and physical activity. We randomized 337 hypertensive primary care patients to an 8-month automated, multi-behavior intervention or to an education-only control. Medication adherence, diet, physical activity, and BP were assessed at baseline and every 4 months for 1 year. Data were analyzed using longitudinal modeling. The intervention was associated with improvements in a measure of overall diet quality (+3.5 points, p telecommunications systems can promote self-management of diet and energy balance in urban African-Americans.

  4. Cultural Intelligence and Social Adaptability: A Comparison between Iranian and Non-Iranian Dormitory Students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Batoul; Keyvanara, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    At the modern age, to acquire knowledge and experience, the individuals with their own specific culture have to enter contexts with cultural diversity, adapt to different cultures and have social interactions to be able to have effective inter-cultural relationships.To have such intercultural associations and satisfy individual needs in the society, cultural intelligence and social adaptability are deemed as inevitable requirements, in particular for those who enter a quite different culture. Hence, the present study tries to compare the cultural intelligence and its aspects and social adaptability in Iranian and non-Iranian dormitory students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2012. The study was of descriptiveanalytical nature. The research population consisted of Iranian and non-Iranian students resided in the dormitories of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences which are 2500, totally. For Iranian students, two-stage sampling method was adopted. At the first stage, classified sampling and at the second stage, systematic random sampling was conducted. In this way, 441 students were selected. To form non-Iranian students' sample, consensus sampling method was applied and a sample of 37 students were obtained. The research data was collected by using Earley & Ang's Cultural Intelligence Questionnaire with the Cronbach's coefficient α of 76% and California Social Adaptability Standard Questionnaire with the Cronbach's coefficient α of over 70%. Then, the data were put into SPSS software to be analyzed. Finally, the results were presented by descriptive and inferential statistics methods. The study findings revealed that there was no statistically significant difference between cultural intelligence and cognitive aspect of cultural intelligence in Iranian and non-Iranian students (P≥0/05). However, Iranian and non-Iranian students statistically differed in terms of the following aspects of cultural intelligence: meta-cognitive aspect (61.8% for

  5. Analysis on Drug Resistance and Experienced Medication in Blood Culture%血培养药敏结果与经验用药的调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽丹; 黄晓燕

    2011-01-01

    目的 提高临床医生在血培养结果出来前经验性用药的准确率.方法 对2009年11月-2010年10月我院血培养阳性菌株的耐药性进行分析,对相关病例进行回顾性分析.结果 178份血培养阳性的菌株耐药率较高;血培养结果出来前经验用药率达94.94%,与药敏试验结果的符合率为43.82%.使用率最高的抗菌药为喹诺酮类药物,使用率为41.86%.结论 临床医生应根据医院耐药谱合理选择用药,提高经验用药的准确率.%Objective To improve the veracity of experienced medication in clinical treatment of septicaemia before the outcome of blood culture. Methods 178 patients with positive blood culture from November 2009 to October 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Results Drug resistance rate was high. 94. 94% of medication were used before the outcome of blood culture , only 43. 82% were coincident with the outcome. Quinolone was the most frequently used medication, with a use ratio of 41. 86% . Conclusion Doctors should select medication reasonably in accordance with the drug resistance to improve the accuracy of experienced medication.

  6. [The Revista médica de Hamburgo. A medical journal as an instrument of German foreign cultural propaganda during the Weimar Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    After the First World War, foreign cultural policy became one of the few fields in which Germany could act relatively free from the restrictions of the Treaty of Versailles. In this context, in 1920 the Hamburg doctors Brauer, Nocht and Mühlens created a monthly medical journal in Spanish (and a bit of Portuguese) for use as an instrument of cultural propaganda, i.e. to increase German influence in Spain and, more importantly, in the countries of Latin America: the Revista médica de Hamburgo (since 1928 Revista médica germano-ibero-americana). The focus of the article is on the protagonists of the Revista project, i.e. the Hamburg doctors, the Cultural Department of the Foreign Office in Berlin, the German pharmaceutical industry, and the publishing houses involved: their conceptions and actions; their correspondence, negotiations, agreements and controversies.

  7. Results of a psychosomatic training program in China, Vietnam and Laos: successful cross-cultural transfer of a postgraduate training program for medical doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritzsche Kurt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the “ASIA-LINK” program, the European Community has supported the development and implementation of a curriculum of postgraduate psychosomatic training for medical doctors in China, Vietnam and Laos. Currently, these three countries are undergoing great social, economic and cultural changes. The associated psychosocial stress has led to increases in psychological and psychosomatic problems, as well as disorders for which no adequate medical or psychological care is available, even in cities. Health care in these three countries is characterized by the coexistence of Western medicine and traditional medicine. Psychological and psychosomatic disorders and problems are insufficiently recognized and treated, and there is a need for biopsychosocially orientated medical care. Little is known about the transferability of Western-oriented psychosomatic training programs in the Southeast Asian cultural context. Methods The curriculum was developed and implemented in three steps: 1 an experimental phase to build a future teacher group; 2 a joint training program for future teachers and German teachers; and 3 training by Asian trainers that was supervised by German teachers. The didactic elements included live patient interviews, lectures, communication skills training and Balint groups. The training was evaluated using questionnaires for the participants and interviews of the German teachers and the future teachers. Results Regional training centers were formed in China (Shanghai, Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City and Hue and Laos (Vientiane. A total of 200 physicians completed the training, and 30 physicians acquired the status of future teacher. The acceptance of the training was high, and feelings of competence increased during the courses. The interactive training methods were greatly appreciated, with the skills training and self-experience ranked as the most important topics. Adaptations to the cultural background of the

  8. Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus, the magazine

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    ... the humanities and the physical, life and social sciences. The collections stand at more than 8 million items—books, journals, technical reports, manuscripts, microfilms, photographs and images. Housed within the Library is one of the world's finest medical history ...

  9. Treating ADHD | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding ADHD Treating ADHD Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Currently available treatments aim at reducing the symptoms of ADHD and improving functioning. Treatments include medication, various types ...

  10. Child Mental Health: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry) Reactive Attachment Disorder (American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry) Also ... Nemours Foundation) Also in Spanish Patient Handouts Reactive attachment disorder of infancy or early childhood (Medical Encyclopedia) Also ...

  11. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOFSTEDE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND EMPLOYEES JOB BURNOUT IN HOSPITALS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES 2014-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzianpour, Fereshteh; Abbasi, Mahya; Foruoshani, Abbas Rahimi; Pooyan, Ebrahim Jafari

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Organizational culture plays a supportive role in modification of structure and implementation of new management systems. So, the management of organizational culture with cultural elements recognition plays an important role in improving the efficacy and effectiveness of the organization. On the other hand, the health sector requires healthy and motivated practitioners and staff to achieve these goals. Job burnout as a response to environmental stressors causes some changes in attitude and behavior towards work and work environment, and factors such as organizational culture effect on it. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between organizational culture and employee’s burnout. Material and Methods: This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study. The study population included all clinical staff (physicians and nurses) and nonclinical (administrative and financial) in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-2015. Among them, 387 participants were selected using simple stratified random sampling. In order to collect the required data, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (1981) and Hofstede’s organizational cultural questionnaire (1988) were used. Also Cronbach’s alpha obtained 0.836 and 0.913 for them, respectively. In order to analyze the data, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, multiple regression, independent t-test and binomial test were performed using SPSS 20. Results: Results showed that organizational culture in studied population were masculine, collectivism with high uncertainty avoidance and relatively equitable power distance. Mean score for emotional exhaustion was (31.4) and most of participants 315 (40.6%) had average emotional exhaustion. Mean score for depersonalization was (21.16) and most of participants 315 (82.1%) had high depersonalization. Mean score for personal accomplishment was (30.02) and most of participants 280 (73.2%) had high personal accomplishment. Multiple correlation coefficient showed

  12. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOFSTEDE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND EMPLOYEES JOB BURNOUT IN HOSPITALS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzianpour, Fereshteh; Abbasi, Mahya; Foruoshani, Abbas Rahimi; Pooyan, Ebrahim Jafari

    2016-02-01

    Organizational culture plays a supportive role in modification of structure and implementation of new management systems. So, the management of organizational culture with cultural elements recognition plays an important role in improving the efficacy and effectiveness of the organization. On the other hand, the health sector requires healthy and motivated practitioners and staff to achieve these goals. Job burnout as a response to environmental stressors causes some changes in attitude and behavior towards work and work environment, and factors such as organizational culture effect on it. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between organizational culture and employee's burnout. This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study. The study population included all clinical staff (physicians and nurses) and nonclinical (administrative and financial) in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-2015. Among them, 387 participants were selected using simple stratified random sampling. In order to collect the required data, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (1981) and Hofstede's organizational cultural questionnaire (1988) were used. Also Cronbach's alpha obtained 0.836 and 0.913 for them, respectively. In order to analyze the data, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, multiple regression, independent t-test and binomial test were performed using SPSS 20. Results showed that organizational culture in studied population were masculine, collectivism with high uncertainty avoidance and relatively equitable power distance. Mean score for emotional exhaustion was (31.4) and most of participants 315 (40.6%) had average emotional exhaustion. Mean score for depersonalization was (21.16) and most of participants 315 (82.1%) had high depersonalization. Mean score for personal accomplishment was (30.02) and most of participants 280 (73.2%) had high personal accomplishment. Multiple correlation coefficient showed that there is a significant relationship between

  13. Five Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... that scientists have made with NIGMS support are: Discovering a gene-silencing process called RNA interference, or ... disease outbreaks and the impact of interventions through computer simulations to provide valuable information to public health ...

  14. A Leader in Clinical Trials, Medical Data, & Electronic Health Information | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... PHR) The Lister Hill Center researches next-generation electronic health records to facilitate individualized patient care and better clinical treatment. This project aims to help individuals who are caring for ...

  15. Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... My favorite subjects in school were always science, sociology, and math. My interest in science was so well known that in high school, I was voted most likely to become a scientist. “What I like best about my work is that almost every day is different and ...

  16. Medication safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W

    2008-03-01

    Patient safety is a state of mind, not a technology. The technologies used in the medical setting represent tools that must be properly designed, used well, and assessed on an on-going basis. Moreover, in all settings, building a culture of safety is pivotal for improving safety, and many nontechnologic approaches, such as medication reconciliation and teaching patients about their medications, are also essential. This article addresses the topic of medication safety and examines specific strategies being used to decrease the incidence of medication errors across various clinical settings.

  17. A study on organizational culture, structure and information technology as three KM enablers: A case study in five Iranian medical and healthcare research centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Iran-nejad-parizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates organizational structure, culture, and information technology as knowledge management (KM infrastructural capabilities, and compares their significance and status quo in five medical research centers in Tehran, Iran. Objectives of this research were pursued by employing two statistical methods, regression analysis and Friedman test. Included in the study were 135 people (researchers and support staff from five medical and healthcare research centers of Tehran. A survey questionnaire including 23 questions was utilized to examine organizational structure, culture and information technology indicators. And another 12 questions examined KM effectiveness. The Friedman test indicated that in terms of their status quo, the three studied KM enablers are at different conditions, with organizational culture having the best (mean rank=1.79 and IT the worst (mean rank=2.14 status. Moreover, it was revealed by regression analysis that organizational structure is believed to have the most significant impact (Beta= 0.397 on the effectiveness of knowledge management initiatives, while information technology gained the least perceived impact (Beta= 0.176.

  18. Theoretical overview and socio-cultural implications of urban dwellers patronage of trado-medical homes and services in Nigerian urban centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojua, T.A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Global connectivity and developmental strides and the quest for human improvement as well as cultural behaviors of people is creating a concern for intellectual articulation. While Sociologists and Anthropologists alike look for a multi-cultural linkage for national and global development, as service provisions and acquisitions are being achieved at different areas. One of these is the increasing trado-medical centers in urban areas to meet or compliment orthodox medical services for good health. The problem of fake drugs, inactive or inefficient healing or curative strength of the orthodox services, high cost, and poor distribution, etc. has made the trado-medical services enjoy high patronage. This shows the viability of the different centers in a developing nation like Nigeria and which are especially being utilized by the urban dwellers for various reasons. This recently is becoming comparable with what exist in the rural areas. The paper discovered that irrespective of the social reconscientisation education/enlightenment and campaign at various levels against the patronage of these centers, they seem to progressively succeed in their own right. Some major ailments are being handled successfully although without any scientific means. Therefore, the paper recommends amongst others the improved and regulated policy measure of these practitioners. They should be professionally registered and proper training or induction made with clear ethical codes and principles adopted for effective performance etc. not as alternative medicine, but complementary medicine to orthodox practices.

  19. Medical Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine philosophical stances underpinning medical identity and assess the conceptual relationship between physician, medical practice and culture. Argument: Medical identity is about the ideals and moral positions that physicians take when justifying themselves. Medical identity...... hedonistic versus sentimentalist approaches to medical identity. The sociocultural philosophical analysis of medical identity can shed light on what it means conceptually for a physician to harbor beliefs associated with him/her being taken to be an autonomous professional. It is important because it touches...... on the meaning of being a compassionate, good and skilled physician, making its relevance to person-centered medicine self-evident. Conclusion: Medical identity should be analyzed with reference to literature, philosophy and medical practice in order for the physician to exercise a reflective position...

  20. System of Socialist Core Values Leads the Tendency of Medical Morality Cultural Construction%以社会主义核心价值体系引领医德文化建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳清

    2012-01-01

    以社会主义核心价值体系引领医德文化建设,是在推进社会主义文化大发展大繁荣背景下医学领域培养文化自觉意识、促进和谐持续发展的必然要求和具体体现.医德文化包括先进文化、德性文化、修身文化与生命文化四个方面的内涵.培养高度的文化自觉意识,增强文化认同与文化自信;立足思想政治教育主渠道,增强社会主义先进文化吸引力;以生命文化渗透为主题,建设特色校园文化,是当代医德文化建设的主要途径.%System of socialist core values leads the tendency of medical morality cultural development is an essential requirement, not only for cultivate cultural awareness, but also for promoting harmonious sustainable development under the background of promoting cultural development and prosperity in medicine domain. Medical morality cultural includes the advanced culture, moral culture, self cultivation culture and life culture. Cultivate high cultural awareness, enhance cultural identity and cultural confidence, to become the main channel of ideological and political education, strengthen the attraction of advanced socialist culture, build campus culture with cultural infiltration theme are the important ways and main methods for medical morality cultural construction.

  1. On the Bioethical Implications in the Traditional Chinese Medical Culture%略论中医药文化中的生命伦理意蕴

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭卫华; 樊民胜

    2012-01-01

    中医药文化发扬了中国传统文化中敬畏自然、遵循规律的原则,又从“医”之独特视角将人文情怀与科学精神相结合,嬗变出具有中医药特征的文化模式.在这种文化模式下,既有对自然生命之发展的透视,又有对生命价值和人性完美的引导.在中医药文化背景下开展生命伦理教育,需要在课程设置上加大医学人文教育课程的比重;挖掘中医药文化中的生命伦理教育资源,使中医药生命文化渗透于教学之中;将中医药文化纳入中医入学教育,培养学生中医药文化的认同感.%The culture of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) not only developed the principles of fearing the nature, following the law of nature in Chinese traditional culture, but also combined the humanistic feelings with scientific spirits from the viewpoint of " Medicine" , forming a cultural pattern with the characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine. This culture pattern, not only had the understanding of the development of natural life, but also had perfect guide for the value of life and perfect of human nature. Under the background of traditional Chinese medicine culture, the bioethical education needs to increase the proportion of medical humanistic education courses in the curriculum; to discover the bioethical education resources in the traditional Chinese medicine culture, make the life culture permeate in the teaching; to bring traditional Chinese medicine culture into entrance education of Chinese medicine, and cultivate students'sense of approval for traditional Chinese medicine culture.

  2. The Revista Médica project: medical journals as instruments of German foreign cultural policy towards Latin America, 1920-1938.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    After the First World War, foreign cultural policy became one of the few fields in which Germany could act with relative freedom from the restrictions imposed by the Treaty of Versailles. In this context the Hamburg doctors Ludolph Brauer, Bernhard Nocht and Peter Mühlens created the Revista Médica de Hamburgo (as of 1928 Revista Médica Germano-Ibero-Americana), a monthly medical journal in Spanish (and occasionally in Portuguese), to increase German influence especially in Latin American countries. The focus of this article is on the protagonists of this project, the Hamburg doctors, the Foreign Office in Berlin, the German pharmaceutical industry, and the publishing houses involved.

  3. Adapatação cultural e avaliação das propriedades de medida da "Self_Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale - SEAMS"

    OpenAIRE

    Rafaela Batista dos Santos Pedrosa

    2014-01-01

    Resumo: Este estudo tem como objetivo disponibilizar uma versão da Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Adherence Scale ¿ SEAMS para a cultura brasileira e avaliar suas propriedades de medida quando aplicada em pacientes com doença arterial coronária (DAC) em seguimento ambulatorial.. O processo de adaptação cultural foi realizado de acordo com as etapas propostas na literatura - tradução, síntese, retrotradução, avaliação por comitê de especialistas e pré-teste, seguidos pela avaliação d...

  4. Lack of language skills and knowledge of local culture in international medical graduates: Implications for the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamarneh, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    International Medical Graduates (IMGs) form a coherent part of the National Health Service (NHS). Nearly 25% of the doctors working in the NHS are IMGs who obtained their primary medical degree from outside the EU. Moving to a different country that holds a different set of values and belief systems can be very challenging for IMGs, which in turn could have a significant effect on the service provided to NHS patients. This article will address the issue of effective communication skills within the IMG population and will explore the underlying issues behind this problem.

  5. ' Emotional Learning and Identity Development in Medicine : A Cross-Cultural Qualitative Study Comparing Taiwanese and Dutch Medical Undergraduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, Esther; Yeh, Huei-Ming; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; de Vries-Erich, Joy M; Tsai, Daniel Fu-Chang; Dornan, Tim

    Purpose Current knowledge about the interplay between emotions and professional identity formation is limited and largely based on research in Western settings. This study aimed to broaden understandings of professional identity formation cross-culturally. Method In fall 2014, the authors

  6. 中药名与中医药文化%Traditional Chinese Medicine Name and Chinese Medical Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何明举

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine name is the carrier of culture of Chinese medicine,the crystallization of marriage of Chinese medicine and cultural art,which contains rich thoughts of humanities and philosophy. Since ancient times,it has spread more,and is a unique cultural landscape in the history of Chinese,it is precious wealth conceived of the development of Chinese medicine business by people,which has shown the cultural characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine incisively and vividly.%中药名是中医药文化的载体,是中医药与文化艺术联姻的结晶,蕴含着丰富的人文科学和哲学思想。自古多有流传,可谓华夏史上一道奇特的文化景观,是人民在千百年的中医药事业奋斗发展中孕育出来的宝贵财富,把中医学的文化特色彰显得淋漓尽致。

  7. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  8. A Study of the Growth and Flourish of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences; A Cultural History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Gilavand

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the striking features of ancient Persian civilization is the importance of medical sciences. One testimony to this is the foundation of Gondishapur University 1745 years ago in the south-western Persia (Iran. Gondishapur was one of the major cities of Persian Empire which was ordered by the Sassanid king, Shapur I (241-272 A. D to be built in 271 A. D. The city was built by employing Roman and Greek war prisoners after defeating a Roman army led by Emperor Valerian. Gondishapur was the greatest intellectual center and medical school of its time. It was one of the largest hospitals of the ancient world which hosted eminent scientists and physicians from around the world to do their research and practice medicine. In 651 A. D during the final years of Sassanid Empire the city was conquered by a Muslim Arab invasion. This led to the gradual emigration of the physicians to Baghdad and consequently to the demise and final closing of the center. After 12 centuries of being closed-down, Gondishapur (Jundishapur University was reopened in 1955 in Ahvaz, the central city of Khuzestan province. Currently, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (AJUMS has: 650 faculty members, 7000 students studying at bachelors, masters and PhD levels, fellowship and higher degrees in 163 different fields and 15000 staff. The university is one of the most prestigious universities in Iran and is type one university based on the rating of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education.

  9. 傣族传统医药研究的回顾和反思%Review and Reflection on the Dai Traditional Medical Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段忠玉; 郑进

    2016-01-01

    近年来,傣族传统医药文化的基础理论与临床研究、傣族医药传统文化研究,为了解傣医药的现状和趋势奠定了良好的基础。但研究中仍然存在不少问题,应进一步拓宽傣医药研究的地域,完善傣医药的医学人类学研究领域等。本文对傣医药文化研究成果进行了归纳和梳理,以期为此领域的研究者提供有价值的理论依据和学术资料。%Recently, traditional Dai medicine culture such as the basic theory and clinical research, traditional culture of Dai medicine has laid a good foundation for understanding the present situation and trend of Dai medicine.But the study still has many problems.The Dai medicine research area should be further broadened, the medical anthropology research should be improved in the Dai medicine.In this paper, the Dai medicine culture research results are generalized in order to provide valuable theoretical basis and academic information for researchers in the field.

  10. Investigation the Basic and Cultural Causes of Comorbidity of Major Depression and Obsession in Patient Referring to Clinics and Medical Centers in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GH Nikpour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The diagnosis of the disease from another disease for the patient and the therapist is very important and it happens in the diagnostic process.  When the disease has more than one disorder axis, we face with multiple diagnose or comorbidity. So, the research investigated underlying factors of comorbidity of OCD and major depression and cultural factors resulting the incidence of comorbidity of OCD and major depression.  Methods: 300 patients were selected by targeted sampling from the patients referred to clinics and medical centers of psychology and psychiatry in Tehran, and responded to the questionnaire made by researcher for diagnosis of cultural factors of comorbidity of OCD and major depression, and Klinjer’s TCI test that measures natural elements and secretary personality. The data were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: The results showed that the lack of flexibility, perfection-seeking of parents and giving extreme importance to cleanliness have impact on the incidence of comorbidity of these disorders without interaction of these variables with other variables,. Also, in part of cultural factors (extreme importance to hygiene and cleanliness and (intransigence and violence of the parents, and in the part of character and nature (persistence and perfection-seeking of parents were predicted by regression model. Conclusion: This study suggests that in the incidence of comorbidity of OCD and major depression, two cultural factors including the extreme importance of hygiene and cleanliness and perfection-seeking of parents interacting with an underlying of persistence leads to the comorbidity of this disorder.

  11. From traditional to patient-centered learning: curriculum change as an intervention for changing institutional culture and promoting professionalism in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Charles E; McBride, Rosanne B; Vari, Richard C; Olson, Linda; Wilson, H David

    2007-11-01

    The authors reframe a curriculum change from a traditional lecture-based to an integrated patient-centered approach as an intervention for changing the culture and hidden curriculum of an institution in ways that promote professionalism. Within this context, the authors articulate some of the inherent process and relational factors brought about by these curricular changes that are essential elements of this intervention process. In 1998 the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences (UNDSMHS) introduced a new preclinical patient-centered learning (PCL) curriculum for first- and second-year medical students. Case-based, small-group learning forms the critical foundation of the PCL process, and an integrated basic and clinical science didactic component supports this process. At the student level, the case-based PCL process generates innovative opportunities for professionalism education from the explicitly articulated formal content that arises naturally from the cases, but more importantly from the implicit values inherent to the PCL small-group process itself--humanism, accountability, pursuit of excellence, and altruism. Further, the organizational changes necessary for the transformation to the PCL curriculum required process changes at student, faculty, and administrative levels that have resulted in a cultural shift toward relationship centeredness within the institution. The authors describe the evolution and structure of the PCL curriculum at UNDSMHS and how this curricular transformation has served as an intervention that promotes professionalism and institutional culture change through (1) processes at the student level that present new opportunities for professionalism education, and (2) processes at student, faculty, administrative, and institutional levels that have created an institutional culture that supports, models, and promotes relationship-centered professional values.

  12. Non-cultural methods of human microflora evaluation for the benefit of crew medical control in confined habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Lana, Moukhamedieva; Georgy, Osipov; Aleksey, Batov; Zoya, Soloviova; Robert, Mardanov; Yana, Panina; Anna, Gegenava

    2011-05-01

    Current control of human microflora is a great problem not only for the space medicine but also for practical health care. Due to many reasons its realization by classical bacteriological method is difficult in practical application or cannot be done. To evaluate non-cultural methods of microbial control of crews in a confined habitat we evaluated two different methods. The first method is based on digital treatment of microbial visual images, appearing after gram staining of microbial material from natural sample. This way the rate between gram-positive and gram-negative microbe could be gained as well as differentiation of rods and cocci could be attained, which is necessary for primary evaluation of human microbial cenosis in remote confined habitats. The other non-culture method of human microflora evaluation is gas chromatomass spectrometry (gcms) analysis of swabs gathered from different body sites. Gc-ms testing of swabs allows one to validate quantitative and special microflora based on specific lipid markers analysis.

  13. Cross-cultural challenges for assessing medical professionalism among clerkship physicians in a Middle Eastern country (Bahrain: feasibility and psychometric properties of multisource feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Ansari A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Al Ansari,1–3 Khalid Al Khalifa,1 Mohamed Al Azzawi,1 Rashed Al Amer,1 Dana Al Sharqi,4 Anwar Al-Mansoor,5 Fadi M Munshi6 1Department of General Surgery, Bahrain Defense Force Hospital, 2Surgical Department, Arabian Gulf University, 3Medical Education Department, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland - Bahrain, 4Department of Internal Medicine, 5Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, Bahrain Defense Force Hospital, Riffa, Kingdom of Bahrain; 6College of Medicine, King Fahad Medical City, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: We aimed to design, implement, and evaluate the feasibility and reliability of a multisource feedback (MSF system to assess interns in their clerkship year in the Middle Eastern culture, the Kingdom of Bahrain.Method: The study was undertaken in the Bahrain Defense Force Hospital, a military teaching hospital in the Kingdom of Bahrain. A total of 21 interns (who represent the total population of the interns for the given year were assessed in this study. All of the interns were rotating through our hospital during their year-long clerkship rotation. The study sample consisted of nine males and 12 females. Each participating intern was evaluated by three groups of raters, eight medical intern colleagues, eight senior medical colleagues, and eight coworkers from different departments.Results: A total of 21 interns (nine males and 12 females were assessed in this study. The total mean response rates were 62.3%. A factor analysis was conducted that found that the data on the questionnaire grouped into three factors that counted for 76.4% of the total variance. These three factors were labeled as professionalism, collaboration, and communication. Reliability analysis indicated that the full instrument scale had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α 0.98. The generalizability coefficients for the surveys were estimated to be 0.78.Conclusion: Based on our

  14. Weight-loss medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000346.htm Weight-loss medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Several weight-loss medicines are available. Ask your health care provider ...

  15. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  16. Prospect for the Culture of Medicated Diet and Food Therapy in China%我国药膳食疗养生文化发展与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈家从

    2014-01-01

    The culture of medicated diet and food therapy has a long history and keeps enriching and developing. It runs through the i-dea of preventive treatment of disease, which corresponds to the principles of people-oriented and prevention-oriented. The doctrines of dy-namic equilibrium and balanced diet are consistent with the principle of balanced diet in the modern nutritional science, playing an extreme-ly important role in the application of medicated diet.%药膳食疗的养生文化源远流长,且在不断地得以丰富与发展。药膳食疗“未病先防”的思想与现代医学坚持“以人为本、预防为主”的原则高度契合,其“动态平衡”与“食饮有节”等原则,与现代营养学的膳食平衡原则相一致,对药膳食疗的应用有着极其重要的指导意义。

  17. 医学科研院所的文化创新与实践探索%Culture innovation and practical proposal in medical scientific research institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车艳春; 何春艳; 戴青

    2010-01-01

    随着我国市场经济体制改革和卫生事业体制改革的不断深化,医学科研院所更加重视对管理模式的创新.作为思想和理论层次上的文化建设,正在越来越多的医学科研院所中发挥着重要作用.本文论述了医学科研院所文化产生的背景、内涵及创新的内容,并结合中国医学科学院、北京协和医学院医学生物学研究所的实践活动,分析了新形势下医学科研院所文化创新的思路及做法.%With the continuous development of the reform of the state marketing economic system and the health care service system, the medical scientific research institutions have paid much more attention to the innovation of operating managerial patterns in practice. As an important and advanced managerial patter in thought and theoretical aspects, the construction of enterprise culture has played a major role in many institutions. In this paper, the general background, culture deposits and innovation in institutions were discussed;the ideas and actions in practice of culture innovation in new situation were proposed via practical activities taken place at the Institute.

  18. PA7 Developing a culture of medication safety in the palliative care home setting - supporting choices in place of care and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Caroline; Scott, Anne

    2015-04-01

    It is common informal practice in Australia for carers to be trained to administer PRN subcutaneous medications, especially in the last few days of life. A safe, legal and ethical framework for practice was needed to support end of life decision-making. To develop a culture of safety in the palliative care home setting by applying a Health Promoting Palliative Care philosophy, Kellehear (1999), to enable choice in place of care and death. Team brainstorming and literature review - developed: Carer education programme to evaluate a carer's preparedness to administer subcutaneous medications. Guideline Evaluation and Communication strategy Support Focus Ease of access to equipment Piloted 2009 RESULTS: Pilot 93% participants achieved wish to die at home - consistent at approximately 90% medication errors reduced. Carer confidence increased to confident and most confident. Hospital admissions reduced - remains approximately 8-10% of all days on service spent in hospital. Staff safety and satisfaction increased with reduction in after-hours home visits - averages remain at one or two per year. After-hours phone calls did not increase in response to practice changes. Health promotion, enablement and promotion of autonomy and support rather than control and disablement are powerful determinants of carer's ability to cope when caring for the dying, and enduring bereavement. This project is now standard practice and has transformed community practice of palliative care empowering consumers and health professionals with such potential. However, in response to criticism of this practice the carer's perspective will be captured in a carer survey. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Parents' refusal of medical treatment for cultural or religious beliefs: an ethnographic study of health care professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnard-Palmer, Luanne; Kools, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric nurses working in acute care settings serving religious and culturally diverse families may encounter parents whose beliefs influence treatment decisions. Previous literature describes how these complex situations lead to emotional distress and strained relationships between health care provider and family members. An ethnographic study was conducted to investigate the impact of parental treatment refusal on the bedside interactions between pediatric nurses and parents. Twenty in-depth interviews with nurses were conducted, and extensive field notes were taken during data collection. Emotional feelings associated with possible loss of guardianship and subsequent mandated treatment, the impact of the situation on the nurses' health and stress levels, and functional status were all explored. Three themes were identified following interpretive narrative analysis of transcriptions and field notes: weathering the storm of moral conflict, closeness and involvement versus distance and retreat, and battles between the supportive and oppositional groups. The findings of the study lead to a deeper understanding of the complexities of the ethical dilemma surrounding treatment refusal in pediatrics.

  20. 细胞共培养技术在医药研究中的应用%Application of cell co-culture techniques in medical studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗云; 孙桂波; 秦蒙; 姚帆; 孙晓波

    2012-01-01

    细胞共培养由于能更好地模拟体内环境,便于更好的观察细胞与细胞、细胞与培养环境之间的相互作用以及探讨药物的作用机制和可能的作用靶点,填补了单层细胞培养与整体动物实验研究的鸿沟,近年来倍受医药领域的关注,成为药物研发、生物制药领域的研究热点.细胞共培养方法包括直接共培养和间接共培养,主要用于疾病病理基础、新型治疗手段以及药物活性筛选的研究.现有的细胞共培养技术主要用于单一药物的药效学研究,用于联合药物相互作用的研究甚少.中药复方之间协同配伍,减毒增效.细胞共培养技术符合中药多成分、多靶点的作用特点,这对于未来探讨中药联合用药对机体的作用及机制的研究具有一定参考价值,为中药及复方研究提供了一种新的手段.该文就细胞共培养技术的方法与运用进行了概述,并对该技术运用于中药及复方的研究进行了展望.%As the cell co-culture techniques can better imitate an in vivo environment, it is helpful in observing the interactions among cells and between cells and the culture environment, exploring the effect mechanisms of drugs and their possible targets and filling the gaps between the mono-layer cell culture and the whole animal experiments. In recently years, they has attracted much more attention from the medical sector, and thus becoming one of research hotspots in drug research and development and bio-pharmaceutical fields. The cell co-culture techniques, including direct and indirect methods, are mainly used for studying pathological basis, new-type treatment methods and drug activity screening. Existing cell co-culture techniques are used for more pharmacological studies on single drug and less studies on interaction of combined drugs, such as collaborative compatibility and attenuation and synergistic effect among traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). In line with the action

  1. Development and evaluation of pictograms on medication labels for patients with limited literacy skills in a culturally diverse multiethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheir, Nadir; Awaisu, Ahmed; Radoui, Amina; El Badawi, Aya; Jean, Linda; Dowse, Ros

    2014-01-01

    Much of the migrant workforce in Qatar is of low literacy level and does not understand Arabic or English, presenting a significant challenge to health care professionals. Medicine labels are typically in Arabic and English and are therefore poorly understood by these migrant workers. To develop pictograms illustrating selected medicine label instructions and to evaluate comprehension of the pictograms or conventional text supported with verbal instructions in foreign workers with low literacy skills. A range of common labeling instructions were identified and pictograms depicting these were developed using visual concepts and ideas from the literature. The process involved a consultative approach with input from the researchers, a local graphic artist, and members of the target population. The final set was evaluated for comprehension in participants who were randomized to one of three study groups: text plus verbal instructions, pictogram-only label, and pictogram with verbal instructions. One-way ANOVA and Chi-square tests were used to assess differences between group variables. Statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Of 23 label instructions screened, 11 were selected for the study. A total of 123 participants took part in this study. Pictogram plus verbal instructions group achieved better results in interpreting the majority of the label instructions (P ≤ 0.05). The best interpreted pictograms with verbal instructions included: "Take two tablets three times a day," "Take one tablet in the morning and one tablet at night," and "Instill one drop in the eye." The worst interpreted pictograms with verbal instructions were: "Do not take with dairy products" and "Do not use by mouth." Some pictograms were difficult to interpret even when accompanied with verbal instructions, suggesting the need to thoroughly pilot them among users prior to implementation. Medication labels consisting of simple pictorials supported by verbal instructions were better

  2. FDA OKs New Injectable Type 2 Diabetes Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Medicines Diabetes Type 2 Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Medicines Diabetes Type 2 About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  3. Prevention Fish Disease and Medication in Carp Cage Culture%网箱养鲤鱼病防治及给药方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊占山

    2015-01-01

    鱼病防治对网箱养鲤的养殖成败至关重要。本文结合作者近年来的网箱养殖科研成果和出口商品鱼的生产实际,明确了网箱养鲤的鱼病防治原则为防重于治、防治结合,中西结合、内服为主、外用为辅,阐述了网箱养鲤的选药、给药及防治方法,提供了网箱养鲤鱼病防治的中、西药组方和使用方法,认为采用“挂袋法”防治网箱养殖鱼病值得商榷,供网箱养殖者参考。%It is very important that preventing fish disease for the Carp cage culture which will decide whether it is success or failure .In this paper ,combinning with the author's result of aquaculture research and the ex‐perience of actual production of export commodities fish ,we have got the principles of disease prevention those are prevention which is better than cure ,integrating prevention and treatment ,integrating Chinese medicine and western medicine ,taking drug orally which is priority to external splashing in the carp cage cul‐ture .Elaborating drug choice and medication ,inspecting fish disease and prevention methods of the Carp cage culturing .Provides the formula and methods of Chinese and western medicine for using in carp cage to prevent disease .It is considered that the"hanging bag method"to control carp disease would be questionable ,which is reference for the personnel concerned .

  4. First experience using cultured epidermal autografts in Taiwan for burn victims of the Formosa Fun Coast Water Park explosion, as part of Japanese medical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Hajime; Harunari, Nobuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroto

    2016-05-01

    On June 27, 2015, a flammable starch-based powder exploded at Formosa Fun Coast in Taipei, Taiwan, injuring 499 people, and more than 200 people were in critical condition with severe burns. Although a cultured epidermal autograft (CEA) was not approved or used in clinical practice, the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration requested a Japanese CEA manufacturer to donate CEA for the burn victims as part of international medical assistance. The authors cooperated in this project and participated in the patient selection, wound bed management for CEA, and technical assistance for CEA use. Here, we provide an overview of the project. Nine patients were enrolled, and two patients were excluded from the skin biopsy; seven skin biopsies were collected approximately 1 month after the disaster. The average TBSA% burned was 81.0%, and the mean age was 20.1 years. CEA was grafted in five patients; wound closure had been obtained in one patient, and one patient was severely ill at the time of grafting. The CEA was combined with a wide split auto mesh graft or patch graft. The mean re-epithelization rate at 4 weeks after the grafting was 84.2% by patient, and all of the patients survived. Although this project had many obstacles to overcome, CEA grafting was successful and contributed to wound closure and survival.

  5. Characteristics of project management at institutions sponsoring National Library of Medicine MedlinePlus Go Local*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Cynthia A.; Backus, Joyce E. B.; Klein, Lori J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Through interviews with the National Library of Medicine's MedlinePlus Go Local collaborators, an evaluation team sought to identify process characteristics that are critical for long-term sustainability of Go Local projects and to describe the impact that Go Local projects have on sponsoring institutions. Methods: Go Local project coordinators (n = 44) at 31 sponsor institutions participated in semi-structured interviews about their experiences developing and maintaining Go Local sites. Interviews were summarized, checked for accuracy by the participating librarians, and analyzed using a general inductive methodology. Results: Institutional factors that support Go Local projects were identified through the interviews, as well as strategies for staffing and partnerships with external organizations. Positive outcomes for sponsoring institutions also were identified. Conclusions: The findings may influence the National Library of Medicine team's decisions about improvements to its Go Local system and the support it provides to sponsoring institutions. The findings may benefit current sponsoring institutions as well as those considering or planning a Go Local project. PMID:20098657

  6. Characteristics of project management at institutions sponsoring National Library of Medicine MedlinePlus Go Local.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Cynthia A; Backus, Joyce E B; Klein, Lori J

    2010-01-01

    Through interviews with the National Library of Medicine's MedlinePlus Go Local collaborators, an evaluation team sought to identify process characteristics that are critical for long-term sustainability of Go Local projects and to describe the impact that Go Local projects have on sponsoring institutions. Go Local project coordinators (n = 44) at 31 sponsor institutions participated in semi-structured interviews about their experiences developing and maintaining Go Local sites. Interviews were summarized, checked for accuracy by the participating librarians, and analyzed using a general inductive methodology. Institutional factors that support Go Local projects were identified through the interviews, as well as strategies for staffing and partnerships with external organizations. Positive outcomes for sponsoring institutions also were identified. The findings may influence the National Library of Medicine team's decisions about improvements to its Go Local system and the support it provides to sponsoring institutions. The findings may benefit current sponsoring institutions as well as those considering or planning a Go Local project.

  7. Culture and Healthcare in Medical Education: Migrants' Health and Beyond [Medizin und ethnisch-kulturelle Vielfalt in der medizinischen Ausbildung: "Migrantenmedizin" und mehr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soydan, Nedim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] One of the main challenges for teaching programs on immigration, ethnic diversity and health is to transform the commonplace notion of “culture” into a helpful tool for medical training and practice. This paper presents the teaching approach of an interdisciplinary course on “migrants’ health” established at the University of Giessen since 2004, which has recently been complemented by a thematically related collaboration with two universities in Latin America (Ecuador, Peru. The overall goal is to translate the abstract philosophy of into medical practice, and to provide students with the insights, attitudes and skills needed for a fruitful use of concepts like “culture”, “ethnicity” and “migration background”. A key feature of the course is the strong commitment to ethnography as an important means for looking under the surface of superficial attributions to culture, and for grasping the interplay of medicine and health with cultural, social, religious, economic and legal aspects in its particular local and/or individual shape. Three elements of the course are presented to illustrate this approach: First, a unit on Islam and Medicine, as important parts of the local immigrant community are Muslims. The second one deals with psychosomatic aspects, because in case of immigrants, complex symptoms and disease representations like somatisation are easily misinterpreted as “cultural”. The third element consists of a unit with specialized social workers form outside the university, who provide direct insights into the living conditions and health problems of local immigrant communities. [german] Eine der zentralen Herausforderungen für Lehrprojekte zum Thema Medizin und ethnisch-kulturelle Vielfalt besteht in der Vermittlung eines angemessenen Konzepts von „Kultur“. Vor allem gilt es, den exklusiven Fokus auf als „fremd“ wahrgenommene Bevölkerungsgruppen und die Gefahr oberflächlicher kulturelle

  8. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects) By Barbara Cone, Patricia Dorn, Dawn Konrad- ... Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage the ear, resulting in hearing loss, ...

  9. Education on medical anthropology and intercultural health in Mexico: from the 20th century cultural indigenism to the 21st century interculturality

    OpenAIRE

    Campos-Navarro, Roberto; Departamento de Historia y filosofía de la Medicina, facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Médico, especialista en medicina familiar. Maestría y doctorado en Antropología Social.

    2010-01-01

    The study of the health/disease/healthcare process from the socio-medical aspect is the field of the medical anthropology. In Mexico, this medical specialty had its origins at the end of the 19th century. Since then, many educational reforms occurred associated to the political processes and the recognition and better understanding of Mexican pluricultural society; allowing expansion, diversification and consolidation of medical anthropology as an specialty. This review presents the histo...

  10. On medical ethics education of students from the perspective of cultural consciousness%文化自觉视阈下医学生医德医风教育探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭恩胜; 文林

    2015-01-01

    The medical ethics education in the perspective of cultural consciousness,is to observe the education situation from the perspective of cultural consciousness,find in the"culture-self",absorb the experience of other cultures,contact with reality,and thus construct a new cultural context of medical ethics.At present,the medical ethics education of students face with the dilemma which lacks of subjectivity,education content lacks of pertinence,education method presents stylized way,education environment appears diversification,etc.In the perspective of cultural consciousness,the departments of university should take these measures such as play the subjectivity of students,ensure the education content advanced,strengthen the teaching mechanism scientific,leading the campus culture outstanding to improve the teaching effect of medical ethics education.%“文化自觉”视阈中的医德医风教育,是以“文化自觉”的视阈观照医德医风教育境遇,找到医德医风教育中的“文化自我”,吸收其他文化的经验和长处,联系现实,从而建构新的医德医风的文化语境。目前,医德医风教育的受众主体性缺失、教育内容缺乏针对性、教育方式呈现程式化、教育环境出现多元化等问题是医德医风教育面临的困境。在文化自觉的视角下,应发挥学生的主体性,确保教育内容的先进性,强化教学机制的科学性,突出校园文化的引领性,破解教育困境,从而提高医德医风教育教学效果。

  11. 高职院校医学专业英语教学跨文化现状及教学策略%Cross-cultural Status and Teaching Strategies of Professional English Teaching of Medical Specialty in Higher Vocational Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘肖溢; 石天顺

    2014-01-01

    Language and culture are closely related .Different cultures nurture different language styles and language habits . Meanwhile , the language plays an important role in the heritage and promotion of culture .Language and culture have a close com-plementary relationship .In the process of language learning , learners should understand the cultural background and history of target language.Based on the cross-cultural status investigation of English learning of medical students , this paper attampts to explore the reform of English teaching methods .%语言和文化是密切相关的。不同的文化孕育出不同的语言风格和语言习惯。同时,语言对文化的传承与发扬也有一定的促进作用,语言和文化有着相辅相成的紧密关系。在语言的学习过程中需要了解目的语产生的文化背景和历史渊源。本文在对医学专业学生英语学习跨文化现状调查的基础上,对英语教学方法改革进行探究。

  12. On Medical Students "Cultural Feedback" in Network Era%网络时代医学生“文化反哺”调查及对策探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晋; 吕振波

    2012-01-01

    传统文化传递是长者向晚辈自上而下传授文化知识、行为规范和价值观念的教育过程。网络时代,医学生利用现代传播媒介接受大量知识信息,从某方面来说,他们正在超越家长和教师拥有更多的话语权。通过调查问卷形式,从"文化反哺"的表现和特点入手,对医学生"文化反哺"进行了初步的探索研究。%Traditional cultural transmission refers that the cultural knowledge,behavior norms and values education transmit from the elder to the younger.In the network times,medical students use modern media to accept a large number of knowledge information,on the other hand,they are beyond the parents and teachers and have more right to speak.Through the questionnaire and from the "cultural feedback" performance and characteristic,this paper made a preliminary exploration on medical students' "cultural feedback".

  13. [Education on medical anthropology and intercultural health in Mexico: from the 20th century cultural indigenism to the 21st century interculturality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Navarro, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    The study of the health/disease/healthcare process from the socio-medical aspect is the field of the medical anthropology. In Mexico, this medical specialty had its origins at the end of the 19th century. Since then, many educational reforms occurred associated to the political processes and the recognition and better understanding of Mexican pluricultural society; allowing expansion, diversification and consolidation of medical anthropology as an specialty. This review presents the historical evolution of the academic courses on this field, the educators that influenced its consolidation, and the current situation of the available academic programs on medical anthropology. The diversity of specialties from those health sciences that are associated to medical anthropology is emphasized.

  14. International students' experience of a western medical school: a mixed methods study exploring the early years in the context of cultural and social adjustment compared to students from the host country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, A; Brugha, R; Conroy, R M; Clarke, E; Byrne, E

    2015-07-02

    Few studies have addressed the challenges associated with international students as they adapt to studying medicine in a new host country. Higher level institutions have increasing numbers of international students commencing programmes. This paper explores the experiences of a cohort of students in the early years of medical school in Ireland, where a considerable cohort are from an international background. A mixed exploratory sequential study design was carried out with medical students in the preclinical component of a five year undergraduate programme. Data for the qualitative phase was collected through 29 semi-structured interviews using the peer interview method. Thematic analysis from this phase was incorporated to develop an online questionnaire combined with components of the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire and Student Integration Questionnaire. First year students were anonymously surveyed online. The Mokken Scaling procedure was used to investigate the students' experiences, both positive and negative. Three main themes are identified; social adjustment, social alienation and cultural alienation. The response rate for the survey was 49% (467 Respondents). The Mokken Scaling method identified the following scales (i) Positive experience of student life; (ii) Social alienation, which comprised of negative items about feeling lonely, not fitting in, being homesick and (iii) Cultural alienation, which included the items of being uncomfortable around cultural norms of dress and contact between the sexes. With the threshold set to H = 0.4. Subscales of the positive experiences of student life scale are explored further. Overall student adjustment to a western third level college was good. Students from regions where cultural distance is greatest reported more difficulties in adjusting. Students from these regions also demonstrate very good adaptation. Some students from the host country and more similar cultural backgrounds were also

  15. High medical impact of implementing the new polymeric bead-based BacT/ALERT® FAPlus and FNPlus blood culture bottles in standard care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarsy-Guerle, R; Mougari, F; Jacquier, H; Oliary, J; Benmansour, H; Riahi, J; Berçot, B; Raskine, L; Cambau, E

    2015-05-01

    Blood culture (BC) efficiency is critical for the diagnosis of bloodstream infection (BSI). We evaluated the impact on standard care of implementing the new BacT/ALERT® FAPlus and FNPlus BC bottles containing antibiotic-binding polymeric beads. We measured positivity rates and time to detection (TTD) during the first 10 months of implementation (PF) and during the previous 10-month period (PS) during which we were using standard aerobic (SA) or standard anaerobic (SN) BC bottles. For each period, the same number of consecutive patients (n = 3,918) was included. Per patient, a median of 1 BC set (1 aerobic and 1 anaerobic bottles) has been sampled. A higher positivity rate was measured during PF than PS when counting per BC bottle (7.0 % vs 5.8 % with 1,456 and 1,237 positive bottles respectively, P < 0.0001) and per BC set (9.6 % vs 7.8 % with 995 and 832 positive BC sets respectively, P < 0.0001). In PF, an increased number of cases due to staphylococci (P < 0.0001) and to Gram-negative bacilli (P < 0.005) was observed, whereas the contamination rate was similar during the two periods (2.4 % of BC sets in PF and 2.3 % in PS). Although antibiotic consumption and medical activity were similar during the two periods, BSI case detection increased from 2.2 to 2.6 per 1,000 hospital-days, especially in intensive care units (ICU; 35.1 to 55.7). Mean TTD for pathogenic microorganisms was significantly shorter in PF than in PS (15.5 h vs 18.0 h, P < 0.01). In conclusion, the use of the new FAPlus/FNPlus BC bottles improved the diagnosis of bacteremia in our hospital, especially in ICU patients.

  16. A Twofold Strategy for Translating a Medical Terminology into French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deléger, Louise; Merabti, Tayeb; Lecrocq, Thierry; Joubert, Michel; Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Darmoni, Stéfan

    2010-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study is to assist the translation of a medical terminology (MedlinePlus) into French. Methods We combined two types of approaches to acquire French translations of English MedlinePlus terms. The first is knowledge-based and relies on the conceptual information of the UMLS metathesaurus. The second method is a corpus-based NLP technique using a bilingual parallel corpus. Results The knowledge-based method brought translations for 611 terms, among which 67.6% were considered valid. The corpus-based approach provided translations for 143 terms of which 71.3% were considered valid. We thus acquired a total of 435 translated terms (51.3%). Conclusion Combining two approaches allowed us to semi-automatically translate more than half of the terminology, while focusing on only one would have provided a more partial translation. From an applicative viewpoint, this French version is now integrated in the catalogue of online health resources CISMeF. PMID:21346959

  17. Conceptions of How a Learning or Teaching Curriculum, Workplace Culture and Agency of Individuals Shape Medical Student Learning and Supervisory Practices in the Clinical Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Pia; Edgren, Gudrun; Borna, Petter; Lindgren, Stefan; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte; Stalmeijer, Renée E.

    2015-01-01

    The role of workplace supervisors in the clinical education of medical students is currently under debate. However, few studies have addressed how supervisors conceptualize workplace learning and how conceptions relate to current sociocultural workplace learning theory. We explored physician conceptions of: (a) medical student learning in the…

  18. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 Film | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Library of Medicine (NLM) is a World War II U.S. Navy training film directed by and starring Gene Kelly, who was then a rising Hollywood star. Combat Fatigue Irritability is a historically significant, yet ...

  19. Culture and Illness (Cultura y Enfermedad)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pedro Daniel

    1975-01-01

    Every culture has unique attitudes and values toward health and sickness. This article explores Mexican medical culture on native, folk and scientific levels, and its effect on national health and medical practice. (In Spanish). (CK)

  20. Culture and Illness (Cultura y Enfermedad)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pedro Daniel

    1975-01-01

    Every culture has unique attitudes and values toward health and sickness. This article explores Mexican medical culture on native, folk and scientific levels, and its effect on national health and medical practice. (In Spanish). (CK)

  1. The ethics of cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2004-04-01

    Cultural competence curricula have proliferated throughout medical education. Awareness of the moral underpinnings of this movement can clarify the purpose of such curricula for educators and trainees and serve as a way to evaluate the relationship between the ethics of cultural competence and normative Western medical ethics. Though rarely stated explicitly, the essential principles of cultural competence are (1) acknowledgement of the importance of culture in people's lives, (2) respect for cultural differences, and (3) minimization of any negative consequences of cultural differences. Culturally competent clinicians promote these principles by learning about culture, embracing pluralism, and proactive accommodation. Generally, culturally competent care will advance patient autonomy and justice. In this sense, cultural competence and Western medical ethics are mutually supportive movements. However, Western bioethics and the personal ethical commitments of many medical trainees will place limits on the extent to which they will endorse pluralism and accommodation. Specifically, if the values of cultural competence are thought to embrace ethical relativity, inexorable conflicts will be created. The author presents his view of the ethics of cultural competence and places the concepts of cultural competence in the context of Western moral theory. Clarity about the ethics of cultural competence can help educators promote and evaluate trainees' integration of their own moral intuitions, Western medical ethics, and the ethics of cultural competence.

  2. Cultural Activation of Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Carole E; Reid-Rose, Lenora; Joseph, Adriana M; Hernandez, Jennifer C; Haugland, Gary

    2016-02-01

    This column discusses "cultural activation," defined as a consumer's recognition of the importance of providing cultural information to providers about cultural affiliations, challenges, views about, and attitudes toward behavioral health and general medical health care, as well as the consumer's confidence in his or her ability to provide this information. An aid to activation, "Cultural Activation Prompts," and a scale that measures a consumer's level of activation, the Cultural Activation Measurement Scale, are described. Suggestions are made about ways to introduce cultural activation as a component of usual care.

  3. 来华医学留学生文化适应与健康适应状况分析%Study on cross-cultural adaptation and health status in medical international students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马莉; 付铁峰; 齐迹; 高晓虹; 张文利; 李响; 曹爽; 高长玉

    2011-01-01

    采用整群抽样调查的方法,利用自行设计调查问卷,针对在华医学留学生开展对跨文化适应与健康状况的评估与分析.148名来华医学留学生来自24个国家;宗教信仰依次为伊斯兰教、天主教、印度教、佛教和锡克教.医学留学生文化适应遭遇的障碍和烦恼主要是语言带来的,其次是食宿的不适应.经济和人际交往上的压力也是影响着留学生身心健康的主要原因.%A descriptive study to investigate the situation of cross-cultural adaptation and health status among medical international students was carried out using cluster sampling method and self-designed questionnaire in Dalian Medical University.148 international students come from 24 countries.There are 5 religions belief among these students.Islam,Catholic,Hindu,Buddhism and Sikhism.The main obstacles of cross-cultural adaptation are language,accommodation and diet.Economic status and stress of interpersonal relationship are also the main causes affecting the physical and mental health of medical international students.

  4. Medical design anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventura, Jonathan; Gunn, Wendy

    Barnard and Spencer define medical anthropology in the Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology as "Medical anthropology is, as the phrase implies, unavoidably concerned with the paradigm of modern Western medicine, whether implicitly or explicitly" (2002: 541). Recently there is a new...... focus in medical sociology and anthropology, which is patient's practices and influence on wider global health environment (see for example vol. 36(2) of Sociology of Health & Illness). While various social science theoreticians have written about agentic abilities of objects, there is a gap...... in literature concerning various levels of socio-cultural influence of the medical environment through medical products. In our research we have outlined the importance of medical design anthropology (MDA) to the practice and theory of design (Ventura and Gunn, 2016). In this paper, we study the ways in which...

  5. The symbolic context of Chinese medicine: a comparative approach to the study of traditional medical and psychiatric forms of care in Chinese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, A M

    1975-04-01

    This article explores a distinctly different aspect of Chinese medicine, and of health care in Chinese culture, from that receiving most attention and serious study at present in this country. It examines the symbolic structure and significance of illness and care in the Chinese context by (a) applying concepts developed in anthropology and the cross-cultural study of medicine and psychiatry; (b) examining recent studies of folk and popular forms of health care in contemporary Chinese communities; and (c) raising questions about the congnitive structure, cultural background, and bio-social significance of traditional Chinese healing beliefs and practices. An attempt is made to place this analysis in a comparative framework, so that Chinese cases can be related to health care systems in other cultural settings.

  6. Overcoming terminology barrier using Web resources for cross-language medical information retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Hsiang; Lin, Ray Shih-Jui; Chan, Yi-Che; Chen, Kuan-Hsi

    2006-01-01

    A number of authoritative medical websites, such as PubMed and MedlinePlus, provide consumers with the most up-to-date health information. However, non-English speakers often encounter not only language barriers (from other languages to English) but also terminology barriers (from laypersons inverted exclamation mark| terms to professional medical terms) when retrieving information from these websites. Our previous work address language barriers by developing a multilingual medical thesaurus, Chinese-English MeSH, while this study presents an approach to overcome terminology barriers based on Web resources. Two techniques were utilized in our approach: monolingual concept mapping using approximate string matching and crosslingual concept mapping using Web resources. The evaluation shows that our approach can significantly improve the performance on MeSH concept mapping and cross-language medical information retrieval.

  7. My Family Health Portrait, A tool from the Surgeon General | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. My Family Health Portrait, A tool from the Surgeon General ... use Why is it important to know my family medical history? Your family medical history is a ...

  8. Culture, Personality, Health, and Family Dynamics: Cultural Competence in the Selection of Culturally Sensitive Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Len

    2010-01-01

    Cultural sensitivity and cultural competence in the selection of culturally sensitive treatments is a requisite for effective counseling practice in working with diverse clients and their families, particularly when clients present with health issues or medical problems. Described here is a strategy for selecting culturally sensitive treatments…

  9. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  10. Cognition onPatient Safety Culture of Hospital Medical S taff:Survey and Analysis%某院医务人员患者安全文化认知情况调查与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建

    2014-01-01

    Objectiv e To find out the status of patient safety culture by medical staff and construction and to provide the basis for patient safety management and research .Methods In order to understand the clinical staff of patients'safety culture and attitudes related to patients'safety culture institutions, the application status of patient safety culture assessment questionnaire was used to evaluate 257 hospital medical staffs which were selected in Jan-uary 2012 randomly.Results The results of different professional medical workers in teamwork , safety measures, hospital management and shift differences between programs , suggesting that it has an important significance .The results show that difference exists in the respect of teamwork , safety measures, hospital management and shift among medical workers of different fields .The pharmacists(4.5 ±0.6)and nursing staff of the Department get the highest total score(4.5 ±0.6), while the medical technicians get the lowest score (4.4 ±0.5).Various positions of the medical staff Recognized patient safety culture of medical staff of various professional ranks :associate and senior (4.8 ±0.4)>intermediate(4.6 ±0.6 ) >elementary(4.4 ±0.5).Areas for improvement of safety culture in-cluded “staffing”,“work”,“If medical safety(adverse) events, more emphasis on helping hospitals and educa-tion” is common that the medical staff of the first few areas for improvement , the reaction rate <50%.According to the questionnaire,“staffing”,“work”,“If medical safety(adverse) events, more emphasis on helping hospitals and education”, are commonly regarded as prior areas that need to be improved , with a reaction rate less than 50%.Conclusion The hospital has a positive patient safety culture , but it still needs to improve the existing ad-verse event reporting system and to strengthen the safety management and training of the high -risk sections.%目的:了解医务人员对患者安全文化认知及建设

  11. A qualitative study of enablers and barriers influencing the incorporation of social accountability values into organisational culture: a perspective from two medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh-Hunt, Nicholas; Stroud, Laura; Murdoch Eaton, Deborah; Rudolf, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Definitions of social accountability describe the obligation of medical schools to direct education, research and service activities towards addressing the priority health concerns of the population they serve. While such statements give some direction as to how the goal might be reached, it does not identify what factors might facilitate or hinder its achievement. This study set out to identify and explore enablers and barriers influencing the incorporation of social accountability values into medical schools. Semi structured interviews of fourteen senior staff in Bar Ilan and Leeds medical schools were undertaken following a literature review. Participants were recruited by purposive sampling in order to identify factors perceived to play a part in the workings of each institution. Academic prestige was seen as a key barrier that was dependent on research priorities and student selection. The role of champions was considered to be vital to tackle staff perceptions and facilitate progress. Including practical community experience for students was felt to be a relevant way in which the curriculum could be designed through engagement with local partners. Successful adoption of social accountability values requires addressing concerns around potential negative impacts on academic prestige and standards. Identifying and supporting credible social accountability champions to disseminate the values throughout research and education departments in medical and other faculties is also necessary, including mapping onto existing work streams and research agendas. Demonstrating the contribution the institution can make to local health improvement and regional development by a consideration of its economic footprint may also be valuable.

  12. Research-Oriented Series: A Portal into the Culture of Biomedical Research for Junior Medical Students at Alfaisal University in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Mohammad Abrar; Dweik, Loai M.; Abudan, Zainab; Gazal, Abdalla M.; Abu-Dawas, Reema B.; Chamseddin, Ranim A.; Albali, Nawaf H.; Ali, Alaa A.; Khan, Tehreem A.; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A.

    2015-01-01

    Student contributions to research have been shown to effectively reflect on their communication and critical thinking skills. Short-term research courses offer opportunities for medical students to advance their research experience in subsequent high-demanding long-term research opportunities. The purpose of the present study was to describe the…

  13. How the Distinctive Cultures of Osteopathic and Allopathic Medical Schools Affect the Careers, Perceptions, and Institutional Efforts of Their Anatomy Faculties: A Qualitative Case Study of Two Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, James J.; Byram, Jessica N.; Traser, Courtney J.; Arbor, Tafline C.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy faculties are integral to basic science instruction in medical schools, particularly given the preponderance of anatomic instruction in the preclinical curriculum. Recent years have witnessed major curricular restructuring and other emerging national trends that pose significant challenges to anatomists. An examination of anatomy faculty…

  14. 病案管理文化建设探讨%A Discussion on the Culture Construction of Medical Records Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李柳珍; 陈振兆; 陈举宗

    2012-01-01

    先进的病案管理文化,可以激发病案管理人员的斗志,提升病案管理工作水平,提高为社会服务的质量,不断推动医疗事业全面发展.病案管理文化建设是指在病案管理系统中提倡和发展先进病案管理文化,并不断增强这种文化的吸引力、凝聚力和感染力,为推动病案管理建设科学发展、有效提高病案工作人员综合素质和意志作风提供强大精神动力和文化支撑.需要强化组织领导,完善规章制度,优化病案管理人员结构,加强人员培训,搞好宣传教育,借鉴成功经验,并将病案管理文化融入到现有文化之中,积极建设先进的病案管理文化.%A n advanced m edfcal records m anagem ent culture , can stim u]ate the m orals of the m edical records m anagem ent, enhance the level of m edfcal records m anagem ent, in prove the quality of social services , and constantly prom ote the developm ent of m edical undertakings . The construction of m edical records m anagem ent culture refers to the promotion and developm en t of advanced m edfcal records m anagem ent culture in the m edfcal records m anagem ent system , and continue to enhance the attractiveness , cohesion and appeal of this culture , to provide powerful spiritual m otivatfcn and cut" tural support for prom oting the scientific developm ent of the construction of m edical records m anagem ent , im proving the com prehensive quality and work style of the m edical records m anagem ent staff. It need to strengthen organkatfcn and leadership , im prove the rules and regulations , op tin Ee the structure of the m edical records m anagem ent staff, strengthen personnel training , do a good j>b in publicity and education , draw on successful ex perr~ ence , and integrate m edfcal records m anagem ent culture into the existing culture , to build an advanced m edfcal records m anagem ent culture .

  15. 我国医务人员患者安全文化测评结果系统评价%Patient safety culture assessment outcomes of medical workers in China:a systematic review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖清平; 张燕; 魏莎; 江颖; 赵庆华; 肖明朝

    2016-01-01

    目的:系统描述并分析我国医务人员的患者安全文化测评结果,为制定针对性的干预策略提供科学依据。方法计算机检索 Web of Science、PubMed、Ovid、EBSCO、Google Scholar、CBM、VIP、CNKI和 WanFang Data截至2014年12月发表的中、英文文献,纳入关于我国医务人员的患者安全文化测评研究。由2名研究者独立进行文献筛选、资料提取并交叉核对,如有分歧通过讨论或参考第三方意见达成一致,采用定性研究方法系统总结纳入文献的信息和结果。结果共检索到1721条记录,经筛选后最终纳入65篇文献,绝大部分研究为横断面研究。52篇文献的测评工具是参考国外量表经翻译修订后的中文版,其余13篇使用的是自编问卷。影响我国医务人员患者安全文化的主要因素有工龄、科室、学历、接受患者安全培训等。结论目前我国医务人员患者安全文化领域已开展了较多研究,但测评对象主要为护理人员,其他专业医务人员的研究开展得不够广泛。医院应加强人员配备,加强患者安全相关培训并建立公平公正、学习的患者安全文化,以保障患者安全。%Objective To systematically describe and analyze the patient safety culture assessment outcomes of medical workers in China,so as to provide scientific evidence for developing corresponding intervention measures.Methods Such databases as Web of Science,PubMed,Ovid,EBSCO,Google Scholar,CBM,VIP,CNKi and WanFang Data were used to collect studies published before December 2014,on patient safety culture assessment of medical workers in mainland China.Two reviewers independently screened,extracted and cross-checked the data,and the disagreements were resolved by discussion or by consulting a third reviewer.The qualitative synthesis method was used to analyze the study results.Results Of the total 1 721 records,65 studies were included,and most of them were cross

  16. [Were the Turks in the 18th century variolated against smallpox? the analysis of a typical example of misconception in medical cross-cultural transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Alicia

    2009-07-01

    There has been a continuing misconception for almost three centuries since the transmission of variolation from Turkey (actually the Ottoman Empire) to England that this was a practice of the Turkish Muslims. There are many sources of cogent evidence that variolation in the 18th century in the Ottoman Empire was opposed by Muslims due to their religious beliefs. This article uses cultural anthropology in its analysis of the reasons for the misconception.

  17. Conceptions of how a learning or teaching curriculum, workplace culture and agency of individuals shape medical student learning and supervisory practices in the clinical workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Pia; Edgren, Gudrun; Borna, Petter; Lindgren, Stefan; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte; Stalmeijer, Renée E

    2015-05-01

    The role of workplace supervisors in the clinical education of medical students is currently under debate. However, few studies have addressed how supervisors conceptualize workplace learning and how conceptions relate to current sociocultural workplace learning theory. We explored physician conceptions of: (a) medical student learning in the clinical workplace and (b) how they contribute to student learning. The methodology included a combination of a qualitative, inductive (conventional) and deductive (directed) content analysis approach. The study triangulated two types of interview data from 4 focus group interviews and 34 individual interviews. A total of 55 physicians participated. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: learning as membership, learning as partnership and learning as ownership. The themes described how physician conceptions of learning and supervision were guided by the notions of learning-as-participation and learning-as-acquisition. The clinical workplace was either conceptualized as a context in which student learning is based on a learning curriculum, continuity of participation and partnerships with supervisors, or as a temporary source of knowledge within a teaching curriculum. The process of learning was shaped through the reciprocity between different factors in the workplace context and the agency of students and supervising physicians. A systems-thinking approach merged with the "co-participation" conceptual framework advocated by Billet proved to be useful for analyzing variations in conceptions. The findings suggest that mapping workplace supervisor conceptions of learning can be a valuable starting point for medical schools and educational developers working with changes in clinical educational and faculty development practices.

  18. Medications and the Culture of Safety : Conference Title: At the Precipice of Quality Health Care: The Role of the Toxicologist in Enhancing Patient and Medication Safety Venue ACMT Pre-Meeting Symposium, 2014 North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology, New Orleans, LA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, Robin R

    2015-06-01

    Medication mishaps are a common cause of morbidity and mortality both within and outside of hospitals. While the use of a variety of technologies and techniques have promised to improve these statistics, instead of eliminating errors, new ones have appeared as quickly as old ones have been improved. To truly improve safety across the entire enterprise, we must ensure that we create a culture that is willing to accept that errors occur in normal course of operation to the best of people. Focus must not be on punishment and shame, but rather building a fault tolerant system that maintains safety of both staff and patients.

  19. Direct short-term effects of EBP teaching: change in knowledge, not in attitude; a cross-cultural comparison among students from European and Asian medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah S. Widyahening

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We report about the direct short-term effects of a Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-based Medicine (CE-EBM module on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior of students in the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU, Universitas Indonesia (UI, and University of Malaya (UM. Methods: We used an adapted version of a 26-item validated questionnaire, including four subscales: knowledge, attitude, behavior, and future use of evidence-based practice (EBP. The four components were compared among the students in the three medical schools before the module using one-way ANOVA. At the end of the module, we measured only knowledge and attitudes. We computed Cronbach's α to assess the reliability of the responses in our population. To assess the change in knowledge and attitudes, we used the paired t-test in the comparison of scores before and after the module. Results: In total, 526 students (224 UI, 202 UM, and 100 UMCU completed the questionnaires. In the three medical schools, Cronbach's α for the pre-module total score and the four subscale scores always exceeded 0.62. UMCU students achieved the highest pre-module scores in all subscales compared to UI and UM with the comparison of average (SD score as the following: knowledge 5.04 (0.4 vs. 4.73 (0.69 and 4.24 (0.74, p<0.001; attitude 4.52 (0.64 vs. 3.85 (0.68 and 3.55 (0.63, p<0.001; behavior 2.62 (0.55 vs. 2.35 (0.71 and 2.39 (0.92, p=0.016; and future use of EBP 4.32 (0.59 vs. 4.08 (0.62 and 3.7 (0.71, p<0.01. The CE-EBM module increased the knowledge of the UMCU (from average 5.04±0.4 to 5.35±0.51; p<0.001 and UM students (from average 4.24±0.74 to 4.53±0.72; p<0.001 but not UI. The post-module scores for attitude did not change in the three medical schools. Conclusion: EBP teaching had direct short-term effects on knowledge, not on attitude. Differences in pre-module scores are most likely related to differences in the system and infrastructure of both medical schools and their

  20. Survey on the current status of patient safety culture among medical personnel of a certain hospital%某海军医院医务人员患者安全文化现状调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏成凤; 周山

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a questionnaire survey on the current status of patient safety culture among the medical personnel of a certain hospital by using a self-made questionnaire form , so as to provide evidence for further improvement of patient safety culture and medical quality of the hospital .Methods A total of 1 583 questionnaires were issued to various departments of the hospital .The subjects of the survey were doctors, nurses, pharmacists and technicians .Epidata 3.1, SPSS 13.0 and Excel 2010 software were used for the feeding, analysis and statistics of the data .Positive response rate was applied to analyze the level of patient safety culture in the medical personnel .Results The level of patient safety culture in the medical personnel of the hospital was on the whole quite good with a total score of 4.08 ±0.42 and consent rate of 79.37%.Age, profession, staff category, length of work, education, professional titles were important factors affecting the level of patient safety culture .Conclusions In accordance with the results of the survey , correct and effective policies could be developed and sustaining progress be improved concerning patient safety .%目的:利用自制的患者安全文化调查问卷对某海军医院医务人员进行问卷调研,了解并分析该院医务人员的患者安全文化现状,为医院持续改进患者安全与医疗质量提供依据。方法采用问卷调研法,以科室为单位,发放问卷1583份。调查对象为科室医生、护士、药师和技师。采用Epidata 3.1、Spss 13.0和Excel 2010软件进行问卷数据录入、分析和统计。采用积极应答率分析医务人员的患者安全文化水平。结果该院医务人员患者安全文化整体水平较好(总得分4.08±0.42,同意率79.37%),部分条目需要加强;年龄、职别、编制类别、工作年限、学历、职称等是影响医务人员患者安全文化的重要因素。结论根据调查现状

  1. Healthy Eating and Harambee: curriculum development for a culturally-centered bio-medically oriented nutrition education program to reach African American women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Srimathi; Sparks, Arlene V; Webster, J DeWitt; Krishnakumar, Ambika; Lumeng, Julie

    2010-07-01

    The purpose was to develop, implement and evaluate a peer-led nutrition curriculum Healthy Eating and Harambee that addresses established objectives of maternal and infant health and to shift the stage for African American women of childbearing age in Genesee County toward healthier dietary patterns using a socio-cultural and biomedical orientation. The PEN-3 model, which frames culture in the context of health promotion interventions, was integrated with the Transtheoretical Model to guide this 13-week pre-test/post-test curriculum. Materials developed included soul food plate visuals, a micronutrient availability worksheet, a fruit stand, and gardening kits. Learning activities included affirmations, stories, case-scenarios, point-of-purchase product recognition, church health teams, and community health fairs. We investigated health-promoting dietary behaviors (consumption of more fruits and vegetables (F&V), serving more F&V to their families, and moderating dietary sodium and fat intakes), and biomedical behaviors (self-monitoring blood pressure and exercising) across five stages of change. Session attendance and program satisfaction were assessed. N = 102 women participated (mean age = 27.5 years). A majority (77%) reported adopting at least one healthy eating behavior (moderating sodium, serving more F&V to their families), 23% adopted at least two such behaviors (reading food labels for sodium; using culinary herbs/spices; serving more F&V to their families), and 45% adopted both dietary (moderating sodium; eating more fruits) and biomedical behaviors. Participants and facilitators favorably evaluated the curriculum and suggested improvements. A multi-conceptual approach coupled with cultural and biomedical tailoring has potential to promote young African American women's movement to more advanced stages of change and improve self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable intake, dietary sodium moderation, and self-monitoring blood pressure and physical activity.

  2. Contents and features of forming students' culture of health of special medical group in the process of theoretical preparation on physical education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribok N.N.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of forming valued attitude is considered toward own health for students with the presence of diseases. New vision of maintenance of theoretical preparation is found on physical education of students at which rejections are marked in a state of health. An experimental on-line tutorial is offered, on the basis of analysis of the existent program, on physical education for the students of task medical force. It is set that the offered on-line tutorial is directed not only on liquidation of diseases but also on forming, strengthening and maintenance of own health in spiritual, psychical and physical aspects.

  3. Research-oriented series: a portal into the culture of biomedical research for junior medical students at Alfaisal University in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Mohammad Abrar; Dweik, Loai M; Abudan, Zainab; Gazal, Abdalla M; Abu-Dawas, Reema B; Chamseddin, Ranim A; Albali, Nawaf H; Ali, Alaa A; Khan, Tehreem A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A

    2015-03-01

    Student contributions to research have been shown to effectively reflect on their communication and critical thinking skills. Short-term research courses offer opportunities for medical students to advance their research experience in subsequent high-demanding long-term research opportunities. The purpose of the present study was to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a research-oriented series (ROS) on undergraduate students at Alfaisal University in Saudi Arabia. The ROS was designed to comprise eight sessions. Each session addressed core principles and the practice of research concepts and was based on theoretical morning sessions supplemented by afternoon practical sessions delivered by experienced senior medical students and faculty members. Students were assessed comprehensively by the end of the ROS. The series was conducted twice, and 35 students were involved each time. A total of 70 enrolled students (35 men and 35 women) with grade point averages of >3.5 and students responded to the online survey and rated the ROS highly in improving their research knowledge, skills, and confidence. Male students reported significant gains compared with their female peers (Pstudent gains after attending the ROS. Qualitative responses were in support of three recurring themes favoring the unique learning environment in the ROS. In conclusion, the ROS offers a short-term systematic approach to fundamental steps and concepts of biomedical research. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  4. Medical education: Changes and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D.; Ba, Denian

    2013-01-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international trends, Chinese medical education has seen unique transformations that reflect its particular culture and history. PMID:23631405

  5. What You Don't Know Could Help You | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Know Could Help You. Past Issues / Spring 2012 Table of Contents CLINICAL TRIALS — AN OPTION WORTH CONSIDERING If you're diagnosed with a medical issue, tomorrow's treatment may already be in reach - as part ...

  6. FNLM 2013 Events & Programs Announced | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... 2013 Table of Contents At a Mentoring in Medicine (MIM) event, a possible future medical professional gets the chance to model a lab coat with a MIM mentor. Photo: Mentoring in Medicine. During 2013, the Friends will continue and expand ...

  7. Roller-coaster Ride to, Relief From TMJ | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... is to treat. She went from taking the pain killer Motrin, at the beginning of her problems, through four years of mouth splints (day and night), heat therapy, and craniofacial massage, physical therapy, prescription medications, stress relief, and ...

  8. Chronic Diseases: Asthma and You | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... develop with your doctor Taking medicines correctly Avoiding asthma triggers (except physical activity; you can take medication to ... school, or work environments, which alter exposure to asthma triggers. Medicines may need to be increased if asthma ...

  9. Gout: History, Research, and Recent NIH–Supported Advances | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Detecting and Treating Gout Gout: History, Research, and Recent NIH–Supported Advances Past ... History of Medicine Division, National Library of Medicine Gout—Before Modern Medicine Before medical research discovered the ...

  10. Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... on. Feature: Osteoporosis Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Osteoporosis ... exercise plan A healthy lifestyle Medications, if needed Prevention Nutrition A diet rich in calcium and vitamin ...

  11. The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Medical Mysteries The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program Past Issues / Spring 2011 ... D. Green, M.D., Ph.D., director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The National ...

  12. A comparative study of patient safety culture assessment tools in medical institutions%国内外医疗机构患者安全文化测评工具的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚琴; 石永乐; 王凌颖; 胡秀英

    2016-01-01

    对国外常用、国内自制医疗机构的患者安全文化测评工具及测评结果进行综述,分析比较国内外测评工具的性能特点,以期为医疗机构患者安全文化测评工具的选择和应用提供参考。%The aim of the article is to review on the commonly used patient safety culture assessment tools in foreign medical institutions and domestic homemade tools, and on the evaluation results, and to compare the performance characteristics of the tools, so as to provide the reference for seleting the tools.

  13. The effect of socio-cultural characteristics on the effectiveness of teamwork: a study in the Gülhane Military Medical Faculty Training Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelen, Özay; Teke, Abdulkadir; Cihangiroglu, Necmettin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, our aim was to determine the effect of the socio-cultural characteristics of health workers on the effectiveness of teamwork. In this study, a questionnaire method was used for data collection. To this end, a scale was first developed to assess the effectiveness of teamwork. The study was conducted in 34 departments/divisions within the GMMF Training Hospital with 423 health workers. "Specialist opinion" was used to determine the content validity of the "Teamwork Effectiveness Scale" developed for this study, while "factor analysis" was used to test the scale's construct validity. Cronbach Alpha values were calculated to test the reliability of the scale. To determine the effect of socio-cultural characteristics on the effectiveness of teamwork, the "Kruskal-Wallis" test, the "Mann-Whitney U" test and "Logistic Regression Analysis" were used within the context of the study. Based on the study results, it was observed that "assignment, "age" and "status" did not have an effect on the effectiveness of teamwork (p > 0.05). On the other hand, a significant and negative relationship was observed between "the obligation to perform compulsory service" and the attitudes that considered teamwork to be effective (p = 0.029). Similarly, a difference was identified between the workers' attitudes towards the effectiveness of teamwork depending on the size of the place of assignment (p = 0,042). It was thus observed that the "effectiveness of teamwork" was affected by the presence or absence of the "obligation to perform compulsory service" and by the "size of the place of assignment.

  14. More Americans Can Afford Medications Under Obamacare

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    ... have difficulty, a new study finds. At the recession's height in 2009, over 25 million Americans said ... Insurance Medicines About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us ...

  15. Abortion - medical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  16. Oral Medication

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    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  17. Genetic counseling for sex chromosome anomalies (SCAs) in Israel and Germany: assessing medical risks according to the importance of fertility in two cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiloni-Dolev, Yael

    2006-12-01

    In this article, I report findings from a comparative study of Israeli and German genetic counselors. Specifically, it concerns counselors' attitudes and risk assessments relating to prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome anomalies (SCAs) such as Klinefelter and Turner syndromes. Data collected through in-depth interviews with counselors in both countries (N = 32) are presented, and the types of claims experts deploy in their personal and professional estimation of the risks involved in SCAs are analyzed. The article concludes by suggesting that the counselors rhetoric concerning SCAs, whose major manifestation is the future infertility of the unborn child as well as their estimations of the related risks, should be situated in a broader cultural context, that of local Israeli and German understandings of the importance of fertility, and not in their professional nondirective ethos. Hence, to understand the practice of genetic counselors in two late-modern societies, one must understand the unique relationship between the individual bodies of pregnant women and the body politics of their nations, a relationship mediated by the counselors, who are the bearers of knowledge and expertise in this field.

  18. Medication safety in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirke, C

    2009-01-01

    Medication error and adverse drug reactions occur frequently, leading to a high burden of patient harm in the hospital setting. Many Irish hospitals have established medication safety initiatives, designed to encourage reporting and learning to improve medication use processes and therefore patient safety. Eight Irish hospitals or hospital networks provided data from voluntary medication safety incident and near miss reporting programmes for pooled analysis of events occurring between 1st January 2006 and 30th June 2007. 6179 reports were received in total (mean 772 per hospital; range 96-1855). 95% of reports did not involve patient harm. Forty seven percent of reports related to the prescribing stage of the medication use process, 40% to the administration stage and 9% to the pharmacy dispensing stage. This data is published to increase awareness of this key patient safety issue, to share learning from these incidents and near misses and to encourage a more open patient safety culture.

  19. Deep Vein Thrombosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest NIH Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may feel only when standing or walking Increased warmth in the area of the leg that’s swollen or in pain Red or discolored skin on the leg Diagnosis Your doctor will diagnose deep vein thrombosis (DVT) based on your medical history, a physical exam, and the results from tests. He or ...

  20. Turning Discovery Into Health – Asthma | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may require emergency care, and can be fatal. Asthma is diagnosed based on your medical history, a physical exam, and test results. Diagnosis is difficult in children under five. You must actively manage your asthma, get ongoing care, and watch for signs it ...