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Sample records for culture inhibits myogenesis

  1. Salidroside Inhibits Myogenesis by Modulating p-Smad3-Induced Myf5 Transcription

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    Peng Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Salidroside is an active compound extracted from Rhodiola rosea which is used to alleviate fatigue and enhance endurance in high altitude regions. Some studies have demonstrated that salidroside can affect precursor cell differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells, erythrocytes, and osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salidroside on myoblast differentiation and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of this effect.Methods: C2C12 myoblast cells were treated with different concentrations of salidroside in differentiation media. Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence assay were employed to evaluate the effects of salidroside on C2C12 differentiation. RNA interference was used to reveal the important role of Myf5 in myogenesis inhibited by salidroside. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and dual-luciferase reporter assay were utilized to explore the underlying mechanisms of salidroside-induced upregulation of Myf5.Results: We found that salidroside inhibits myogenesis by downregulating MyoD and myogenin, preserves undifferentiated reserve cell pools by upregulating Myf5. Knocking down Myf5 expression significantly rescued the myogenesis inhibited by salidroside. The effect of salidroside on myogenesis was associated with increased phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3. Both SIS3 (Specific inhibitor of p-Smad3 and dominant negative Smad3 plasmid (DN-Smad3 attenuated the inhibitory effect of salidroside on C2C12 differentiation. Moreover, the induction of Myf5 transcription by salidroside was dependent on a Smad-binding site in the promoter region of Myf5 gene.Conclusion and Implications: Our findings identify a novel role and mechanism for salidroside in regulating myogenesis through p-Smad3-induced Myf5 transcription, which may have implications for its further application in combating degenerative muscular diseases caused by depletion of muscle stem cells, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy or

  2. Dual roles of palladin protein in in vitro myogenesis: inhibition of early induction but promotion of myotube maturation.

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    Ngoc-Uyen-Nhi Nguyen

    Full Text Available Palladin is a microfilament-associated phosphoprotein whose function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Therefore, we investigate whether myogenesis is influenced by the depletion of palladin expression known to interfere with the actin cytoskeleton dynamic required for skeletal muscle differentiation. The inhibition of palladin in C2C12 myoblasts leads to precocious myogenic differentiation with a concomitant reduction in cell apoptosis. This premature myogenesis is caused, in part, by an accelerated induction of p21, myogenin, and myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin acts as a negative regulator in early differentiation phases. Paradoxically, palladin-knockdown myoblasts are unable to differentiate terminally, despite their ability to perform some initial steps of differentiation. Cells with attenuated palladin expression form thinner myotubes with fewer myonuclei compared to those of the control. It is noteworthy that a negative regulator of myogenesis, myostatin, is activated in palladin-deficient myotubes, suggesting the palladin-mediated impairment of late-stage myogenesis. Additionally, overexpression of 140-kDa palladin inhibits myoblast differentiation while 200-kDa and 90-kDa palladin-overexpressed cells display an enhanced differentiation rate. Together, our data suggest that palladin might have both positive and negative roles in maintaining the proper skeletal myogenic differentiation in vitro.

  3. TNFα inhibits skeletal myogenesis through a PW1-dependent pathway by recruitment of caspase pathways

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    Coletti, Dario; Yang, Ellen; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David

    2002-01-01

    Cachexia is associated with poor prognosis in patients with chronic disease. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) plays a pivotal role in mediating cachexia and has been demonstrated to inhibit skeletal muscle differentiation in vitro. It has been proposed that TNFα-mediated activation of NFκB leads to down regulation of MyoD, however the mechanisms underlying TNFα effects on skeletal muscle remain poorly understood. We report here a novel pathway by which TNFα inhibits muscle differentiation through activation of caspases in the absence of apoptosis. TNFα-mediated caspase activation and block of differentiation are dependent upon the expression of PW1, but occur independently of NFκB activation. PW1 has been implicated previously in p53-mediated cell death and can induce bax translocation to the mitochondria. We show that bax-deficient myoblasts do not activate caspases and differentiate in the presence of TNFα, highlighting a role for bax-dependent caspase activation in mediating TNFα effects. Taken together, our data reveal that TNFα inhibits myogenesis by recruiting components of apoptotic pathways through PW1. PMID:11847111

  4. Myostatin inhibits myogenesis and promotes adipogenesis in C3H 10T(1/2) mesenchymal multipotent cells.

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    Artaza, Jorge N; Bhasin, Shalender; Magee, Thomas R; Reisz-Porszasz, Suzanne; Shen, Ruoquin; Groome, Nigel P; Meerasahib, Mohamed Fareez; Fareez, Meerasaluh M; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F

    2005-08-01

    Inactivating mutations of the mammalian myostatin gene are associated with increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass; conversely, myostatin transgenic mice that overexpress myostatin in the skeletal muscle have decreased muscle mass and increased fat mass. We investigated the effects of recombinant myostatin protein and antimyostatin antibody on myogenic and adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal multipotent cells. Accordingly, 10T(1/2) cells were incubated with 5'-azacytidine for 3 d to induce differentiation and then treated with a recombinant protein for myostatin (Mst) carboxy terminal 113 amino acids or a polyclonal anti-Mst antibody for 3, 7, and 14 d. Cells were also cotransfected with a Mst cDNA plasmid expressing the full-length 375-amino acid protein (pcDNA-Mst375) and the silencer RNAs for either Mst (pSil-Mst) or a random sequence (pSil-RS) for 3 or 7 d, and Mst expression was determined. Adipogenesis was evaluated by quantitative image analysis of fat cells before and after oil-red-O staining, immunocytochemistry of adiponectin, and Western blot for CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-alpha. Myogenesis was estimated by quantitative image analysis-immunocytochemistry for MyoD (Myo differentiation protein), myogenin, and myosin heavy chain type II, or by Western blot for myogenin. 5'-Azacytidine-mediated differentiation induced endogenous full-length Mst expression. Recombinant Mst carboxy terminal 113 amino acids inhibited both early and late markers of myogenesis and stimulated both early and late markers of adipogenesis, whereas the antibody against Mst exerted the reverse effects. Myogenin levels at 7 d after transfection of pcDNA-Mst375 were reduced as expected and elevated by pSil-Mst, which blocked efficiently Mst375 expression. In conclusion, myostatin promotes the differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal cells into the adipogenic lineage and inhibits myogenesis.

  5. Muscle wasting and impaired myogenesis in tumor bearing mice are prevented by ERK inhibition.

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    Fabio Penna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The onset of cachexia is a frequent feature in cancer patients. Prominent characteristic of this syndrome is the loss of body and muscle weight, this latter being mainly supported by increased protein breakdown rates. While the signaling pathways dependent on IGF-1 or myostatin were causally involved in muscle atrophy, the role of the Mitogen-Activated-Protein-Kinases is still largely debated. The present study investigated this point on mice bearing the C26 colon adenocarcinoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C26-bearing mice display a marked loss of body weight and muscle mass, this latter associated with increased phosphorylated (p-ERK. Administration of the ERK inhibitor PD98059 to tumor bearers attenuates muscle depletion and weakness, while restoring normal atrogin-1 expression. In C26 hosts, muscle wasting is also associated with increased Pax7 expression and reduced myogenin levels. Such pattern, suggestive of impaired myogenesis, is reversed by PD98059. Increased p-ERK and reduced myosin heavy chain content can be observed in TNFα-treated C2C12 myotubes, while decreased myogenin and MyoD levels occur in differentiating myoblasts exposed to the cytokine. All these changes are prevented by PD98059. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that ERK is involved in the pathogenesis of muscle wasting in cancer cachexia and could thus be proposed as a therapeutic target.

  6. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis

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    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L.; Corbett, Jacob T. [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pierre, Philippe [Centre d’Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy U2M, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France); INSERM U631, Institut National de la Santé et Recherche Médicale, Marseille (France); CNRS UMR6102, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille (France); Chadee, Deborah N. [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pizza, Francis X., E-mail: Francis.Pizza@utoledo.edu [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast–myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube–myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • We examined mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 facilitates events of in vitro myogenesis. • Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured myoblasts did not influence their ability to proliferate or differentiate. • Skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augmented myoblast fusion, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size. • ICAM-1 augmented myogenic processes through

  7. Gene expression during normal and FSHD myogenesis

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    Sowden Janet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is a dominant disease linked to contraction of an array of tandem 3.3-kb repeats (D4Z4 at 4q35. Within each repeat unit is a gene, DUX4, that can encode a protein containing two homeodomains. A DUX4 transcript derived from the last repeat unit in a contracted array is associated with pathogenesis but it is unclear how. Methods Using exon-based microarrays, the expression profiles of myogenic precursor cells were determined. Both undifferentiated myoblasts and myoblasts differentiated to myotubes derived from FSHD patients and controls were studied after immunocytochemical verification of the quality of the cultures. To further our understanding of FSHD and normal myogenesis, the expression profiles obtained were compared to those of 19 non-muscle cell types analyzed by identical methods. Results Many of the ~17,000 examined genes were differentially expressed (> 2-fold, p DUX4 RNA isoform was detected by RT-PCR in FSHD myoblast and myotube preparations only at extremely low levels. Unique insights into myogenesis-specific gene expression were also obtained. For example, all four Argonaute genes involved in RNA-silencing were significantly upregulated during normal (but not FSHD myogenesis relative to non-muscle cell types. Conclusions DUX4's pathogenic effect in FSHD may occur transiently at or before the stage of myoblast formation to establish a cascade of gene dysregulation. This contrasts with the current emphasis on toxic effects of experimentally upregulated DUX4 expression at the myoblast or myotube stages. Our model could explain why DUX4's inappropriate expression was barely detectable in myoblasts and myotubes but nonetheless linked to FSHD.

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

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    Hagiwara, Hiroki [Department of Neurology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Department of Medical Science, Teikyo University of Science, 2-2-1 Senjusakuragi, Adachi-ku, Tokyo 120-0045 (Japan); Saito, Fumiaki, E-mail: f-saito@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Masaki, Toshihiro [Department of Neurology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Department of Medical Science, Teikyo University of Science, 2-2-1 Senjusakuragi, Adachi-ku, Tokyo 120-0045 (Japan); Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro [Department of Neurology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  9. Core issues in craniofacial myogenesis

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    Kelly, Robert G., E-mail: kelly@ibdml.univ-mrs.fr [Developmental Biology Institute of Marseilles-Luminy, UMR6216 CNRS Universite de la Mediterranee, Campus de Luminy Case 907, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 France (France)

    2010-11-01

    Branchiomeric craniofacial muscles control feeding, breathing and facial expression. These muscles differ on multiple counts from all other skeletal muscles and originate in a progenitor cell population in pharyngeal mesoderm characterized by a common genetic program with an adjacent population of cardiac progenitor cells, the second heart field, that gives rise to much of the heart. The transcription factors and signaling molecules that trigger the myogenic program at sites of branchiomeric muscle formation are correspondingly distinct from those in somite-derived muscle progenitor cells. Here new insights into the regulatory hierarchies controlling branchiomeric myogenesis are discussed. Differences in embryological origin are reflected in the lineage, transcriptional program and proliferative and differentiation properties of branchiomeric muscle satellite cells. These recent findings have important implications for our understanding of the diverse myogenic strategies operative both in the embryo and adult and are of direct biomedical relevance to deciphering the mechanisms underlying the cause and progression of muscle restricted myopathies.

  10. Controlled Heat Stress Promotes Myofibrillogenesis during Myogenesis.

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    Qiongyu Guo

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia therapy has recently emerged as a clinical modality used to finely tune heat stress inside the human body for various biomedical applications. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the optimal timing or temperature of heat stress that is needed to achieve favorable results following hyperthermia therapy for muscle regeneration purposes. The regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury is a highly complex and coordinated process that involves a multitude of cellular mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of hyperthermal therapy on the overall behavior of myoblasts during myogenic differentiation. Various cellular processes, including myogenesis, myofibrillogenesis, hypertrophy/atrophy, and mitochondrial biogenesis, were studied using systematic cellular, morphological, and pathway-focused high-throughput gene expression profiling analyses. We found that C2C12 myoblasts exhibited distinctive time and temperature-dependence in biosynthesis and regulatory events during myogenic differentiation. Specifically, we for the first time observed that moderate hyperthermia at 39°C favored the growth of sarcomere in myofibrils at the late stage of myogenesis, showing universal up-regulation of characteristic myofibril proteins. Characteristic myofibrillogenesis genes, including heavy polypeptide 1 myosin, heavy polypeptide 2 myosin, alpha 1 actin, nebulin and titin, were all significantly upregulated (p<0.01 after C2C12 cells differentiated at 39°C over 5 days compared with the control cells cultured at 37°C. Furthermore, moderate hyperthermia enhanced myogenic differentiation, with nucleus densities per myotube showing 2.2-fold, 1.9-fold and 1.6-fold increases when C2C12 cells underwent myogenic differentiation at 39°C over 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours, respectively, as compared to the myotubes that were not exposed to heat stress. Yet, atrophy genes were sensitive even to moderate hyperthermia

  11. Roles of Notch1 Signaling in Regulating Satellite Cell Fates Choices and Postnatal Skeletal Myogenesis.

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    Shan, Tizhong; Xu, Ziye; Wu, Weiche; Liu, Jiaqi; Wang, Yizhen

    2017-11-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, also called satellite cells, are indispensable for the growth, maintenance, and regeneration of the postnatal skeletal muscle. Satellite cells, predominantly quiescent in mature resting muscles, are activated after skeletal muscle injury or degeneration. Notch1 signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays crucial roles in satellite cells homeostasis and postnatal skeletal myogenesis and regeneration. Activation of Notch1 signaling promotes the muscle satellite cells quiescence and proliferation, but inhibits differentiation of muscle satellite cells. Notably, the new roles of Notch1 signaling during late-stage of skeletal myogenesis including in post-differentiation myocytes and post-fusion myotubes have been recently reported. Here, we mainly review and discuss the regulatory roles of Notch1 in regulating satellite cell fates choices and skeletal myogenesis. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2964-2967, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) regulates myogenesis and β1 integrin expression in vitro

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    Lluri, Gentian; Langlois, Garret D.; Soloway, Paul D.; Jaworski, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    Myogenesis in vitro involves myoblast cell cycle arrest, migration, and fusion to form multinucleated myotubes. Extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity during these processes is maintained by the opposing actions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) proteases and their inhibitors, the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Here, we report that TIMP-2, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP are differentially expressed during mouse myoblast differentiation in vitro. A specific role for TIMP-2 in myogenesis is demonstrated by altered TIMP-2 -/- myotube formation. When differentiated in horse serum-containing medium, TIMP-2 -/- myotubes are larger than wild-type myotubes. In contrast, when serum-free medium is used, TIMP-2 -/- myotubes are smaller than wild-type myotubes. Regardless of culture condition, myotube size is directly correlated with MMP activity and inversely correlated with β1 integrin expression. Treatment with recombinant TIMP-2 rescues reduced TIMP-2 -/- myotube size and induces increased MMP-9 activation and decreased β1 integrin expression. Treatment with either MMP-2 or MMP-9 similarly rescues reduced myotube size, but has no effect on β1 integrin expression. These data suggest a specific regulatory relationship between TIMP-2 and β1 integrin during myogenesis. Elucidating the role of TIMP-2 in myogenesis in vitro may lead to new therapeutic options for the use of TIMP-2 in myopathies and muscular dystrophies in vivo

  13. A new cell-based assay to evaluate myogenesis in mouse myoblast C2C12 cells

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    Kodaka, Manami [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Yang, Zeyu [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Ultrasound, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Nakagawa, Kentaro; Maruyama, Junichi [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Xu, Xiaoyin [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Breast Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China); Sarkar, Aradhan; Ichimura, Ayana [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Nasu, Yusuke [Department of Breast Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China); Ozawa, Takeaki [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Iwasa, Hiroaki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari [Chemical Biology Screening Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Shigeru [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Kagechika, Hiroyuki [Chemical Biology Screening Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); and others

    2015-08-15

    The development of the efficient screening system of detecting compounds that promote myogenesis and prevent muscle atrophy is important. Mouse C2C12 cells are widely used to evaluate myogenesis but the procedures of the assay are not simple and the quantification is not easy. We established C2C12 cells expressing the N-terminal green fluorescence protein (GFP) and the C-terminal GFP (GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells). GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells do not exhibit GFP signals until they are fused. The signal intensity correlates with the expression of myogenic markers and myofusion. Myogenesis-promoting reagents, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and β-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), enhance the signals, whereas the poly-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-FMK, suppresses it. GFP signals are observed when myotubes formed by GFP1–10 cells are fused with single nuclear GFP11 cells, and enhanced by IGF1, GPA, and IBS008738, a recently-reported myogenesis-promoting reagent. Fusion between myotubes formed by GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells is associated with the appearance of GFP signals. IGF1 and GPA augment these signals, whereas NSC23766, Rac inhibitor, decreases them. The conditioned medium of cancer cells suppresses GFP signals during myogenesis and reduces the width of GFP-positive myotubes after differentiation. Thus the novel split GFP-based assay will provide the useful method for the study of myogenesis, myofusion, and atrophy. - Highlights: • C2C12 cells expressing split GFP proteins show GFP signals when mix-cultured. • The GFP signals correlate with myogenesis and myofusion. • The GFP signals attenuate under the condition that muscle atrophy is induced.

  14. Pitx2 in Embryonic and Adult Myogenesis

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    Amelia E. Aranega

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue that represents between 30 and 38% of the human body mass and has important functions in the organism, such as maintaining posture, locomotor impulse, or pulmonary ventilation. The genesis of skeletal muscle during embryonic development is a process controlled by an elaborate regulatory network combining the interplay of extrinsic and intrinsic regulatory mechanisms that transform myogenic precursor cells into functional muscle fibers through a finely tuned differentiation program. However, the capacity of generating muscle still remains once these fibers have matured. Adult myogenesis resembles many of the embryonic morphogenetic episodes and depends on the activation of satellite cells that have the potential to differentiate into new muscle fibers. Pitx2 is a member of the bicoid family of homeodomain transcription factors that play an important role in morphogenesis. In the last decade, Pitx2 has emerged as a key element involved in the fine-tuning mechanism that regulates skeletal-muscle development as well as the differentiation and cell fate of satellite cells in adult muscle. Here we present an integrative view of all aspects of embryonic and adult myogenesis in which Pitx2 is involved, from embryonic development to satellite-cell proliferation, fate specification, and differentiation. Those new Pitx2 functions on satellite-cell biology might open new perspectives to develop therapeutic strategies for muscular disorders.

  15. Pitx2 in Embryonic and Adult Myogenesis.

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    Hernandez-Torres, Francisco; Rodríguez-Outeiriño, Lara; Franco, Diego; Aranega, Amelia E

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue that represents between 30 and 38% of the human body mass and has important functions in the organism, such as maintaining posture, locomotor impulse, or pulmonary ventilation. The genesis of skeletal muscle during embryonic development is a process controlled by an elaborate regulatory network combining the interplay of extrinsic and intrinsic regulatory mechanisms that transform myogenic precursor cells into functional muscle fibers through a finely tuned differentiation program. However, the capacity of generating muscle still remains once these fibers have matured. Adult myogenesis resembles many of the embryonic morphogenetic episodes and depends on the activation of satellite cells that have the potential to differentiate into new muscle fibers. Pitx2 is a member of the bicoid family of homeodomain transcription factors that play an important role in morphogenesis. In the last decade, Pitx2 has emerged as a key element involved in the fine-tuning mechanism that regulates skeletal-muscle development as well as the differentiation and cell fate of satellite cells in adult muscle. Here we present an integrative view of all aspects of embryonic and adult myogenesis in which Pitx2 is involved, from embryonic development to satellite-cell proliferation, fate specification, and differentiation. Those new Pitx2 functions on satellite-cell biology might open new perspectives to develop therapeutic strategies for muscular disorders.

  16. Differentiation of sarcoplasmic reticulum during cardiac myogenesis

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    Pegg, W.; Michalak, M.

    1987-01-01

    The composition and function of fetal and mature sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes were investigated. Phospholamban, a major phosphoprotein in the mature sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, was present in early stages of cardiac myogenesis. This fetal form of phospholamban was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase but not in the presence of Ca 2+ and calmodulin. 35 Ca 2+ uptake and Ca 2+ -dependent ATPase activity were low in fetal sarcoplasmic reticulum compared with the adult controls, although the apparent affinities for Ca 2+ were similar. Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated at all developmental stages had very low levels of plasma membrane and mitochondrial contamination. Sarcoplasmic reticulum 45 Ca 2+ uptake and Ca 2+ -dependent. ATPase activities were not affected by micromolar concentrations of vanadate, and the accumulated 45 Ca 2+ could not be released by the addition of NaCl. The amount of both the 110- and 55-kDa protein bands, identified with pecific antibodies as Ca 2+ -ATPase and calsequestrin, respectively, was low in early stages of cardiac myogenesis. Age-related differences in the Ca 2+ transport properties of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum and in the amount of the Ca 2+ -ATPase and calsequestrin may explain alterations in the regulation of intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations in the fetal heart. This may contribute to the developmental changes in myocardial function

  17. A necrotic stimulus is required to maximize matrix-mediated myogenesis in mice

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    Drew Kuraitis

    2013-05-01

    Biomaterials that are similar to skeletal muscle extracellular matrix have been shown to augment regeneration in ischemic muscle. In this study, treatment with a collagen-based matrix stimulated molecular myogenesis in an mdx murine model of necrosis. Matrix-treated animals ran ≥40% further, demonstrating functional regeneration, and expressed increased levels of myogenic transcripts. By contrast, matrix treatment was unable to induce transcriptional or functional changes in an MLC/SOD1G93A atrophic mouse model. In vitro, satellite cells were cultured under standard conditions, on matrix, in the presence of myocyte debris (to simulate a necrotic-like environment or with both matrix and necrotic stimuli. Exposure to both matrix and necrotic stimuli induced the greatest increases in mef2c, myf5, myoD and myogenin transcripts. Furthermore, conditioned medium collected from satellite cells cultured with both stimuli contained elevated levels of factors that modulate satellite cell activation and proliferation, such as FGF-2, HGF and SDF-1. Application of the conditioned medium to C2C12 myoblasts accelerated maturation, as demonstrated by increased mef2c, myf5 and myogenin transcripts and fusion indexes. In summary, the collagen matrix required a necrotic stimulus to enhance the maturation of satellite cells and their secretion of a myogenic cocktail. Considering that matrix treatment supports myogenesis only in in vivo models that exhibit necrosis, this study demonstrates that a necrotic environment is required to maximize matrix-mediated myogenesis.

  18. Manipulation of environmental oxygen modifies reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation during myogenesis.

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    McCormick, Rachel; Pearson, Timothy; Vasilaki, Aphrodite

    2016-08-01

    Regulated changes in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) activities are important in maintaining the normal sequence and development of myogenesis. Both excessive formation and reduction in RONS have been shown to affect muscle differentiation in a negative way. Cultured cells are typically grown in 20% O2 but this is not an appropriate physiological concentration for a number of cell types, including skeletal muscle. The aim was to examine the generation of RONS in cultured skeletal muscle cells under a physiological oxygen concentration condition (6% O2) and determine the effect on muscle myogenesis. Primary mouse satellite cells were grown in 20% or 6% O2 environments and RONS activity was measured at different stages of myogenesis by real-time fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent probes with different specificities i.e. dihydroethidium (DHE), 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA) and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7' -dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-DCFH-DA). Data demonstrate that satellite cell proliferation increased when cells were grown in 6% O2 compared with 20% O2. Myoblasts grown in 20% O2 showed an increase in DCF fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myoblasts grown at 6% O2. Myotubes grown in 20% O2 also showed an increase in DCF and DAF-FM fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myotubes grown in 6% O2. The catalase and MnSOD contents were also increased in myoblasts and myotubes that were maintained in 20% O2 compared with myoblasts and myotubes grown in 6% O2. These data indicate that intracellular RONS activities in myoblasts and myotubes at rest are influenced by changes in environmental oxygen concentration and that the increased ROS may influence myogenesis in a negative manner. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Positioning the expanded akirin gene family of Atlantic salmon within the transcriptional networks of myogenesis

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    Macqueen, Daniel J., E-mail: djm59@st-andrews.ac.uk [Laboratory of Physiological and Evolutionary Genomics, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB (United Kingdom); Bower, Neil I., E-mail: nib@st-andrews.ac.uk [Laboratory of Physiological and Evolutionary Genomics, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB (United Kingdom); Johnston, Ian A., E-mail: iaj@st-andrews.ac.uk [Laboratory of Physiological and Evolutionary Genomics, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} The expanded akirin gene family of Atlantic salmon was characterised. {yields} akirin paralogues are regulated between mono- and multi-nucleated muscle cells. {yields} akirin paralogues positioned within known genetic networks controlling myogenesis. {yields} Co-expression of akirin paralogues is evident across cell types/during myogenesis. {yields} Selection has likely maintained common regulatory elements among akirin paralogues. -- Abstract: Vertebrate akirin genes usually form a family with one-to-three members that regulate gene expression during the innate immune response, carcinogenesis and myogenesis. We recently established that an expanded family of eight akirin genes is conserved across salmonid fish. Here, we measured mRNA levels of the akirin family of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) during the differentiation of primary myoblasts cultured from fast-skeletal muscle. Using hierarchical clustering and correlation, the data was positioned into a network of expression profiles including twenty further genes that regulate myogenesis. akirin1(2b) was not significantly regulated during the maturation of the cell culture. akirin2(1a) and 2(1b), along with IGF-II and several igfbps, were most highly expressed in mononuclear cells, then significantly and constitutively downregulated as differentiation proceeded and myotubes formed/matured. Conversely, akirin1(1a), 1(1b), 1(2a), 2(2a) and 2(2b) were expressed at lowest levels when mononuclear cells dominated the culture and highest levels when confluent layers of myotubes were evident. However, akirin1(2a) and 2(2a) were first upregulated earlier than akirin1(1a), 1(1b) and 2(2b), when rates of myoblast proliferation were highest. Interestingly, akirin1(1b), 1(2a), 2(2a) and 2(2b) formed part of a module of co-expressed genes involved in muscle differentiation, including myod1a, myog, mef2a, 14-3-3{beta} and 14-3-3{gamma}. All akirin paralogues were expressed ubiquitously across ten

  20. Positioning the expanded akirin gene family of Atlantic salmon within the transcriptional networks of myogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macqueen, Daniel J.; Bower, Neil I.; Johnston, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The expanded akirin gene family of Atlantic salmon was characterised. → akirin paralogues are regulated between mono- and multi-nucleated muscle cells. → akirin paralogues positioned within known genetic networks controlling myogenesis. → Co-expression of akirin paralogues is evident across cell types/during myogenesis. → Selection has likely maintained common regulatory elements among akirin paralogues. -- Abstract: Vertebrate akirin genes usually form a family with one-to-three members that regulate gene expression during the innate immune response, carcinogenesis and myogenesis. We recently established that an expanded family of eight akirin genes is conserved across salmonid fish. Here, we measured mRNA levels of the akirin family of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) during the differentiation of primary myoblasts cultured from fast-skeletal muscle. Using hierarchical clustering and correlation, the data was positioned into a network of expression profiles including twenty further genes that regulate myogenesis. akirin1(2b) was not significantly regulated during the maturation of the cell culture. akirin2(1a) and 2(1b), along with IGF-II and several igfbps, were most highly expressed in mononuclear cells, then significantly and constitutively downregulated as differentiation proceeded and myotubes formed/matured. Conversely, akirin1(1a), 1(1b), 1(2a), 2(2a) and 2(2b) were expressed at lowest levels when mononuclear cells dominated the culture and highest levels when confluent layers of myotubes were evident. However, akirin1(2a) and 2(2a) were first upregulated earlier than akirin1(1a), 1(1b) and 2(2b), when rates of myoblast proliferation were highest. Interestingly, akirin1(1b), 1(2a), 2(2a) and 2(2b) formed part of a module of co-expressed genes involved in muscle differentiation, including myod1a, myog, mef2a, 14-3-3β and 14-3-3γ. All akirin paralogues were expressed ubiquitously across ten tissues, although mRNA levels

  1. Scaffold protein enigma homolog 1 overcomes the repression of myogenesis activation by inhibitor of DNA binding 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Miyuki; Ito, Jumpei; Koyama, Riko; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D.

    2016-01-01

    Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein for signaling proteins and transcription factors. Previously, we reported that ENH1 overexpression promotes the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ENH1 in the C2C12 cells differentiation remains elusive. ENH1 was shown to inhibit the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells by sequestering Inhibitor of DNA binding protein 2 (Id2) in the cytosol. Id2 is a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors activity and prevents myogenesis. Here, we found that ENH1 overcome the Id2 repression of C2C12 cells myogenic differentiation and that ENH1 overexpression promotes mice satellite cells activation, the first step toward myogenic differentiation. In addition, we show that ENH1 interacted with Id2 in C2C12 cells and mice satellite cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the activation of myogenesis through the repression of Id2 activity. -- Highlights: •Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein. •ENH1 binds to inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2) in myoblasts. •ENH1 overexpression overcomes the Id2's repression of myogenesis. •The Id2-ENH1 complex play an important role in the activation of myogenesis.

  2. Scaffold protein enigma homolog 1 overcomes the repression of myogenesis activation by inhibitor of DNA binding 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Miyuki [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); Ito, Jumpei [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, 102-0083 (Japan); Koyama, Riko [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka, 567-0047 (Japan); Niimi, Tomoaki [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); Kuroda, Shun' ichi [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka, 567-0047 (Japan); Maturana, Andrés D., E-mail: maturana@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan)

    2016-05-27

    Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein for signaling proteins and transcription factors. Previously, we reported that ENH1 overexpression promotes the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ENH1 in the C2C12 cells differentiation remains elusive. ENH1 was shown to inhibit the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells by sequestering Inhibitor of DNA binding protein 2 (Id2) in the cytosol. Id2 is a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors activity and prevents myogenesis. Here, we found that ENH1 overcome the Id2 repression of C2C12 cells myogenic differentiation and that ENH1 overexpression promotes mice satellite cells activation, the first step toward myogenic differentiation. In addition, we show that ENH1 interacted with Id2 in C2C12 cells and mice satellite cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the activation of myogenesis through the repression of Id2 activity. -- Highlights: •Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein. •ENH1 binds to inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2) in myoblasts. •ENH1 overexpression overcomes the Id2's repression of myogenesis. •The Id2-ENH1 complex play an important role in the activation of myogenesis.

  3. Inhibition of pneumococcal autolysis in lysis-centrifugation blood culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, O P

    1986-01-01

    The recovery of Streptococcus pneumoniae from the Isolator lysis-centrifugation blood culture has been low in many studies. The poor survival of pneumococci was not due to toxicity of the Isolator medium but to autolysis before plating. This autolysis was completely inhibited by adding 10 mM phosphorylcholine to the Isolator medium.

  4. Peptide Extracts from Cultures of Certain Lactobacilli Inhibit Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, Luc; Vincent, Pascal; Makras, Eleftherios; Leroy, Frédéric; Pot, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori inhibition by probiotic lactobacilli has been observed in vitro and in vivo. Carefully selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains could therefore play an important role in the treatment of H. pylori infection and eradication. However, the underlying mechanism for this inhibition is not clear. The aim of this study was to examine if peptide extracts, containing bacteriocins or other antibacterial peptides, from six Lactobacillus cultures (Lactobacillus acidophilus La1, Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471, Lactobacillus casei YIT 9029, Lactobacillus gasseri K7, Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) contribute to the inhibition of H. pylori. Peptide extracts from cultures of Lact. amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were most active, reducing the viability of H. pylori ATCC 43504 with more than 2 log units within 4 h of incubation (P < 0.001). The four other extracts were less or not active. When six clinical isolates of H. pylori were tested for their susceptibility towards five inhibitory peptide extracts, similar observations were made. Again, the peptide extracts from Lact. amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were the most inhibitory, while the three other extracts resulted in a much lower inhibition of H. pylori. Protease-treated extracts were inactive towards H. pylori, confirming the proteinaceous nature of the inhibitory substance.

  5. Effect of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid on Myogenesis and Mitochondrial Biosynthesis during Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Tun-Yun; Baum, Jamie I; Huang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are important nutrients for human health, especially omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which have been found to play positive roles in the prevention of various diseases. However, previous studies have reported that excessive omega-3 fatty acids supplement during pregnancy caused side effects such as slower neural transmission times and postnatal growth restriction. In this study, we investigated the effect of EPA and DHA on mitochondrial function and gene expression in C2C12 myoblasts during skeletal muscle differentiation. C2C12 myoblasts were cultured to confluency and then treated with differentiation medium that contained fatty acids (50-µM EPA and DHA). After 72 h of myogenic differentiation, mRNA was collected, and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. Microscopy was used to examine cell morphology following treatment with fatty acids. The effect of EPA and DHA on cellular oxygen consumption was measured using a Seahorse XF24 Analyzer. Cells treated with fatty acids had fewer myotubes formed ( P ≤ 0.05) compared with control cells. The expression of the genes related to myogenesis was significantly lower ( P ≤ 0.05) in cells treated with fatty acids, compared with control cells. Genes associated with adipogenesis had higher ( P ≤ 0.05) expression after treatment with fatty acids. Also, the mitochondrial biogenesis decreased with lower ( P ≤ 0.05) gene expression and lower ( P ≤ 0.05) mtDNA/nDNA ratio in cells treated with fatty acids compared with control cells. However, the expression of genes related to peroxisome biosynthesis was higher ( P ≤ 0.05) in cells treated with fatty acids. Moreover, fatty-acid treatment reduced ( P ≤ 0.05) oxygen consumption rate under oligomycin-inhibited (reflecting proton leak) and uncoupled conditions. Our data imply that fatty acids might reduce myogenesis and increase adipogenesis in myotube formation. Fatty acids

  6. Effect of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid on Myogenesis and Mitochondrial Biosynthesis during Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tun-Yun Hsueh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids are important nutrients for human health, especially omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, which have been found to play positive roles in the prevention of various diseases. However, previous studies have reported that excessive omega-3 fatty acids supplement during pregnancy caused side effects such as slower neural transmission times and postnatal growth restriction. In this study, we investigated the effect of EPA and DHA on mitochondrial function and gene expression in C2C12 myoblasts during skeletal muscle differentiation. C2C12 myoblasts were cultured to confluency and then treated with differentiation medium that contained fatty acids (50-µM EPA and DHA. After 72 h of myogenic differentiation, mRNA was collected, and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. Microscopy was used to examine cell morphology following treatment with fatty acids. The effect of EPA and DHA on cellular oxygen consumption was measured using a Seahorse XF24 Analyzer. Cells treated with fatty acids had fewer myotubes formed (P ≤ 0.05 compared with control cells. The expression of the genes related to myogenesis was significantly lower (P ≤ 0.05 in cells treated with fatty acids, compared with control cells. Genes associated with adipogenesis had higher (P ≤ 0.05 expression after treatment with fatty acids. Also, the mitochondrial biogenesis decreased with lower (P ≤ 0.05 gene expression and lower (P ≤ 0.05 mtDNA/nDNA ratio in cells treated with fatty acids compared with control cells. However, the expression of genes related to peroxisome biosynthesis was higher (P ≤ 0.05 in cells treated with fatty acids. Moreover, fatty-acid treatment reduced (P ≤ 0.05 oxygen consumption rate under oligomycin-inhibited (reflecting proton leak and uncoupled conditions. Our data imply that fatty acids might reduce myogenesis and increase adipogenesis in myotube formation. Fatty acids

  7. IL-15 promotes human myogenesis and mitigates the detrimental effects of TNFα on myotube development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Mary F; Wallace, Graham R; Bennett, Andrew J; Tsintzas, Kostas; Jones, Simon W

    2017-10-11

    Studies in murine cell lines and in mouse models suggest that IL-15 promotes myogenesis and may protect against the inflammation-mediated skeletal muscle atrophy which occurs in sarcopenia and cachexia. The effects of IL-15 on human skeletal muscle growth and development remain largely uncharacterised. Myogenic cultures were isolated from the skeletal muscle of young and elderly subjects. Myoblasts were differentiated for 8 d, with or without the addition of recombinant cytokines (rIL-15, rTNFα) and an IL-15 receptor neutralising antibody. Although myotubes were 19% thinner in cultures derived from elderly subjects, rIL-15 increased the thickness of myotubes (MTT) from both age groups to a similar extent. Neutralisation of the high-affinity IL-15 receptor binding subunit, IL-15rα in elderly myotubes confirmed that autocrine concentrations of IL-15 also support myogenesis. Co-incubation of differentiating myoblasts with rIL-15 and rTNFα, limited the reduction in MTT and nuclear fusion index (NFI) associated with rTNFα stimulation alone. IL-15rα neutralisation and rTNFα decreased MTT and NFI further. This, coupled with our observation that myotubes secrete IL-15 in response to TNFα stimulation supports the notion that IL-15 serves to mitigate inflammatory skeletal muscle loss. IL-15 may be an effective therapeutic target for the attenuation of inflammation-mediated skeletal muscle atrophy.

  8. Coupling between Myogenesis and Angiogenesis during Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Is Stimulated by Restorative Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Latroche

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: In skeletal muscle, new functions for vessels have recently emerged beyond oxygen and nutrient supply, through the interactions that vascular cells establish with muscle stem cells. Here, we demonstrate in human and mouse that endothelial cells (ECs and myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs interacted together to couple myogenesis and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo during skeletal muscle regeneration. Kinetics of gene expression of ECs and MPCs sorted at different time points of regeneration identified three effectors secreted by both ECs and MPCs. Apelin, Oncostatin M, and Periostin were shown to control myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling in vitro and to be required for myogenesis and vessel formation during muscle regeneration in vivo. Furthermore, restorative macrophages, which have been previously shown to support myogenesis in vivo, were shown in a 3D triculture model to stimulate myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling, notably through Oncostatin M production. Our data demonstrate that restorative macrophages orchestrate muscle regeneration by controlling myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling. : In this study, Chazaud et al. demonstrate that endothelial cells (ECs and myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs interacted to couple myogenesis and angiogenesis during skeletal muscle regeneration. EC- and MPC-derived Apelin, Oncostatin M, and Periostin controlled myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling and were required for myogenesis and vessel formation. They show that, via the production of Oncostatin M, restorative macrophages promoted myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling. Keywords: muscle stem cells, myogenesis, angiogenesis, skeletal muscle regeneration, macrophages

  9. ATOH8, a regulator of skeletal myogenesis in the hypaxial myotome of the trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan-Renuka, Ajeesh; Morosan-Puopolo, Gabriela; Yusuf, Faisal; Abduelmula, Aisha; Chen, Jingchen; Zoidl, Georg; Philippi, Susanne; Dai, Fangping; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2014-03-01

    The embryonic muscles of the axial skeleton and limbs take their origin from the dermomyotomes of the somites. During embryonic myogenesis, muscle precursors delaminate from the dermomyotome giving rise to the hypaxial and epaxial myotome. Mutant studies for myogenic regulatory factors have shown that the development of the hypaxial myotome differs from the formation of the epaxial myotome and that the development of the hypaxial myotome depends on the latter within the trunk region. The transcriptional networks that regulate the transition of proliferative dermomyotomal cells into the predominantly post-mitotic hypaxial myotome, as well as the eventual patterning of the myotome, are not fully understood. Similar transitions occurring during the development of the neural system have been shown to be controlled by the Atonal family of helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Here, we demonstrate that ATOH8, a member of the Atonal family, is expressed in a subset of embryonic muscle cells in the dermomyotome and myotome. Using the RNAi approach, we show that loss of ATOH8 in the lateral somites at the trunk level results in a blockage of differentiation and thus causes cells to be maintained in a predetermined state. Furthermore, we show that ATOH8 is also expressed in cultured C2C12 mouse myoblasts and becomes dramatically downregulated during their differentiation. We propose that ATOH8 plays a role during the transition of myoblasts from the proliferative phase to the differentiation phase and in the regulation of myogenesis in the hypaxial myotome of the trunk.

  10. The plasminogen activation system modulates differently adipogenesis and myogenesis of embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Hadadeh

    Full Text Available Regulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM plays an important functional role either in physiological or pathological conditions. The plasminogen activation (PA system, comprising the uPA and tPA proteases and their inhibitor PAI-1, is one of the main suppliers of extracellular proteolytic activity contributing to tissue remodeling. Although its function in development is well documented, its precise role in mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation in vitro is unknown. We found that the PA system components are expressed at very low levels in undifferentiated ESCs and that upon differentiation uPA activity is detected mainly transiently, whereas tPA activity and PAI-1 protein are maximum in well differentiated cells. Adipocyte formation by ESCs is inhibited by amiloride treatment, a specific uPA inhibitor. Likewise, ESCs expressing ectopic PAI-1 under the control of an inducible expression system display reduced adipogenic capacities after induction of the gene. Furthermore, the adipogenic differentiation capacities of PAI-1(-/- induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are augmented as compared to wt iPSCs. Our results demonstrate that the control of ESC adipogenesis by the PA system correspond to different successive steps from undifferentiated to well differentiated ESCs. Similarly, skeletal myogenesis is decreased by uPA inhibition or PAI-1 overexpression during the terminal step of differentiation. However, interfering with uPA during days 0 to 3 of the differentiation process augments ESC myotube formation. Neither neurogenesis, cardiomyogenesis, endothelial cell nor smooth muscle formation are affected by amiloride or PAI-1 induction. Our results show that the PA system is capable to specifically modulate adipogenesis and skeletal myogenesis of ESCs by successive different molecular mechanisms.

  11. The plasminogen activation system modulates differently adipogenesis and myogenesis of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadeh, Ola; Barruet, Emilie; Peiretti, Franck; Verdier, Monique; Bernot, Denis; Hadjal, Yasmine; Yazidi, Claire El; Robaglia-Schlupp, Andrée; De Paula, Andre Maues; Nègre, Didier; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Binétruy, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important functional role either in physiological or pathological conditions. The plasminogen activation (PA) system, comprising the uPA and tPA proteases and their inhibitor PAI-1, is one of the main suppliers of extracellular proteolytic activity contributing to tissue remodeling. Although its function in development is well documented, its precise role in mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation in vitro is unknown. We found that the PA system components are expressed at very low levels in undifferentiated ESCs and that upon differentiation uPA activity is detected mainly transiently, whereas tPA activity and PAI-1 protein are maximum in well differentiated cells. Adipocyte formation by ESCs is inhibited by amiloride treatment, a specific uPA inhibitor. Likewise, ESCs expressing ectopic PAI-1 under the control of an inducible expression system display reduced adipogenic capacities after induction of the gene. Furthermore, the adipogenic differentiation capacities of PAI-1(-/-) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are augmented as compared to wt iPSCs. Our results demonstrate that the control of ESC adipogenesis by the PA system correspond to different successive steps from undifferentiated to well differentiated ESCs. Similarly, skeletal myogenesis is decreased by uPA inhibition or PAI-1 overexpression during the terminal step of differentiation. However, interfering with uPA during days 0 to 3 of the differentiation process augments ESC myotube formation. Neither neurogenesis, cardiomyogenesis, endothelial cell nor smooth muscle formation are affected by amiloride or PAI-1 induction. Our results show that the PA system is capable to specifically modulate adipogenesis and skeletal myogenesis of ESCs by successive different molecular mechanisms.

  12. Merosin and laminin in myogenesis; specific requirement for merosin in myotube stability and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vachon, P H; Loechel, F; Xu, H

    1996-01-01

    to the culture medium induced their fusion. Clonal variants which fuse, but form unstable myotubes, express laminin but not merosin. Exogenous merosin converted these myotubes to a stable phenotype, while laminin had no effect. Myotube instability was corrected most efficiently by transfection of the merosin......Laminin (laminin-1; alpha 1-beta 1-gamma 1) is known to promote myoblast proliferation, fusion, and myotube formation. Merosin (laminin-2 and -4; alpha 2-beta 1/beta 2-gamma 1) is the predominant laminin variant in skeletal muscle basement membranes; genetic defects affecting its structure...... and laminin in myogenesis. In the parental cells, which fuse efficiently to multinucleated myotubes, merosin expression is upregulated as a function of differentiation while laminin expression is downregulated. Cells from fusion-deficient clones do not express either protein, but laminin or merosin added...

  13. Temporal changes in glycogenolytic enzyme mRNAs during myogenesis of primary porcine satellite cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henckel, Poul; Theil, Peter Kappel; Sørensen, Inge Lise

    2007-01-01

    , phosphorylase kinase, phosphorylase and glycogen debranching enzyme, and no alterations of the transporter molecule GLUT4, clearly indicate that glycogenolytic enzymes of potential importance to meat quality development are regulated at the gene level during myogenesis, and are heavily involved in muscle cell...... and muscle fibre development. The genes, however, are not influenced by insulin, and the lack of response to insulin of expression of gene-encoding enzymes involved in the formation and degradation of glycogen may question the applicability of porcine cell culture systems, like the one applied, as a model......The objective was to study the regulation of glycogenolytic enzyme mRNAs in porcine satellite cells during proliferation and differentiation. Beyond 80% confluence, cells were grown in absence or presence of 1 lM insulin. The observed increases in abundance of mRNA for glycogenin, glycogen synthase...

  14. Fine-tuning the onset of myogenesis by homeobox proteins that interact with the Myf5 limb enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Daubas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal myogenesis in vertebrates is initiated at different sites of skeletal muscle formation during development, by activation of specific control elements of the myogenic regulatory genes. In the mouse embryo, Myf5 is the first myogenic determination gene to be expressed and its spatiotemporal regulation requires multiple enhancer sequences, extending over 120 kb upstream of the Mrf4-Myf5 locus. An enhancer, located at −57/−58 kb from Myf5, is responsible for its activation in myogenic cells derived from the hypaxial domain of the somite, that will form limb muscles. Pax3 and Six1/4 transcription factors are essential activators of this enhancer, acting on a 145-bp core element. Myogenic progenitor cells that will form the future muscle masses of the limbs express the factors necessary for Myf5 activation when they delaminate from the hypaxial dermomyotome and migrate into the forelimb bud, however they do not activate Myf5 and the myogenic programme until they have populated the prospective muscle masses. We show that Msx1 and Meox2 homeodomain-containing transcription factors bind in vitro and in vivo to specific sites in the 145-bp element, and are implicated in fine-tuning activation of Myf5 in the forelimb. Msx1, when bound between Pax and Six sites, prevents the binding of these key activators, thus inhibiting transcription of Myf5 and consequent premature myogenic differentiation. Meox2 is required for Myf5 activation at the onset of myogenesis via direct binding to other homeodomain sites in this sequence. Thus, these homeodomain factors, acting in addition to Pax3 and Six1/4, fine-tune the entry of progenitor cells into myogenesis at early stages of forelimb development.

  15. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R.

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  16. Role of Inflammation in Muscle Homeostasis and Myogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domiziana Costamagna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle mass is subject to rapid changes according to growth stimuli inducing both hypertrophy, through increased protein synthesis, and hyperplasia, activating the myogenic program. Muscle wasting, characteristic of several pathological states associated with local or systemic inflammation, has been for long considered to rely on the alteration of myofiber intracellular pathways regulated by both hormones and cytokines, eventually leading to impaired anabolism and increased protein breakdown. However, there are increasing evidences that even alterations of the myogenic/regenerative program play a role in the onset of muscle wasting, even though the precise mechanisms involved are far from being fully elucidated. The comprehension of the links potentially occurring between impaired myogenesis and increased catabolism would allow the definition of effective strategies aimed at counteracting muscle wasting. The first part of this review gives an overview of skeletal muscle intracellular pathways determining fiber size, while the second part considers the cells and the regulatory pathways involved in the myogenic program. In both parts are discussed the evidences supporting the role of inflammation in impairing muscle homeostasis and myogenesis, potentially determining muscle atrophy.

  17. Scaffold protein enigma homolog 1 overcomes the repression of myogenesis activation by inhibitor of DNA binding 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Miyuki; Ito, Jumpei; Koyama, Riko; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2016-05-27

    Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein for signaling proteins and transcription factors. Previously, we reported that ENH1 overexpression promotes the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ENH1 in the C2C12 cells differentiation remains elusive. ENH1 was shown to inhibit the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells by sequestering Inhibitor of DNA binding protein 2 (Id2) in the cytosol. Id2 is a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors activity and prevents myogenesis. Here, we found that ENH1 overcome the Id2 repression of C2C12 cells myogenic differentiation and that ENH1 overexpression promotes mice satellite cells activation, the first step toward myogenic differentiation. In addition, we show that ENH1 interacted with Id2 in C2C12 cells and mice satellite cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the activation of myogenesis through the repression of Id2 activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) impairs myogenesis in C2C12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auh, Q-SChick; Park, Kyung-Ran; Lee, Myeong-Ok; Hwang, Mi-Jin; Kang, Soo-Kyung; Hong, Jung-Pyo; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2017-09-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) is expressed in sensory neurons and plays important roles in peripheral pain mechanisms. The aim of this study was to examine the effects and molecular mechanisms of NMDA on C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Cytotoxicity and differentiation were examined by the MTT assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. NMDA had no cytotoxicity (10-500 μM) and inhibited myoblastic differentiation of C2C12 cells, as assessed by F-actin immunofluorescence and levels of mRNAs encoding myogenic markers such as myogenin and myosin heavy-chain 2. It inhibited phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by inactivating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38. It induced reactive oxygen species production. Furthermore, NMDA-suppressed expression of F-actin was reversed by adding the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Collectively, these results indicate that NMDA impairs myogenesis or myogenic differentiation in C2C12 cells through the mTOR/MAPK signaling pathways and may lead to skeletal muscle degeneration. Muscle Nerve 56: 510-518, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Inhibition by chitosan of productive infection of T-series bacteriophages in the Escherichia coli culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkina, Z M; Pospeshny, G; Chirkov, S N

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of the use of chitosan aminopolysaccharide (poly-D-glucosamine) and its two salts--acetate and hydrochloride--to prevent phase infection of the Escherichia coli culture, strain B1, was studied. It was shown that chitosan inhibited productive infection caused by the bacteriophages T2 and T7, the efficiency of inhibition of both bacteriophages depending directly on the final concentration of chitosan in a medium. Neither chitosan nor its salts significantly prevented the growth of the bacterial culture.

  20. Ribosome-inhibiting proteins from in vitro cultures of Phytolacca dodecandra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S.; Hansen, Harald S.; Nyman, U.

    1991-01-01

    Phytolacca dodecandra (L'Herit) grown in cell cultures was investigated for content of ribosome-inhibiting proteins, which was evaluated hy measuring inhibition of protein synthesis in a cell-free rat liver extract. Calli initiated from leaf, cotyledon, radicle, and hypocotyl and suspension cells...

  1. Doxycycline inhibits collagen synthesis by bovine chondrocytes cultured in alginate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, B.; Verzijl, N.; Roos, J.A.D.M.de; Koopman, J.L.; Tekoppele, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Doxycycline is known for its ability to inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of enzymes that play a role in cartilage breakdown in arthritides. Its prophylactic effect in reducing joint degradation in osteoarthritis is mainly attributed to this property. In this study, we show that

  2. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannon, Patrick R., E-mail: phannon2@illinois.edu; Brannick, Katherine E., E-mail: kbran@illinois.edu; Wang, Wei, E-mail: Wei.Wang2@covance.com; Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@yahoo.com; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2015-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  3. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  4. A global downregulation of microRNAs occurs in human quiescent satellite cells during myogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Merel; Werker, Paul M N; van Luyn, Marja J A; Krenning, Guido; Harmsen, Martin C

    2012-01-01

    During myogenesis, human satellite cells differentiate and form multinucleated myotubes, while a fraction of the human satellite cells enter quiescence. These quiescent satellite cells are able to activate, proliferate and contribute to muscle regeneration. Post-transcriptional regulation of

  5. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1-100μg/ml) for 24-96 hr to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24-96 hr of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydorxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. PMID:25701202

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 in a guinea pig model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation: II. Effects on skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhees, Koen J P; Pansters, Nicholas A M; Baarsma, Hoeke A; Remels, Alexander H V; Haegens, Astrid; de Theije, Chiel C; Schols, Annemie M W J; Gosens, Reinoud; Langen, Ramon C J

    2013-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is accompanied by pulmonary inflammation and associated with extra-pulmonary manifestations, including skeletal muscle atrophy. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the regulation of muscle protein- and myonuclear turnover; two crucial processes that determine muscle mass. In the present study we investigated the effect of the selective GSK-3 inhibitor SB216763 on muscle mass in a guinea pig model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation-associated muscle atrophy. Guinea pigs were pretreated with either intranasally instilled SB216763 or corresponding vehicle prior to each LPS/saline challenge twice weekly. Pulmonary inflammation was confirmed and indices of muscle mass were determined after 12 weeks. Additionally, cultured skeletal muscle cells were incubated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) or glucocorticoids (GCs) to model the systemic effects of pulmonary inflammation on myogenesis, in the presence or absence of GSK-3 inhibitors. Repeated LPS instillation induced muscle atrophy based on muscle weight and muscle fiber cross sectional area. Intriguingly, GSK-3 inhibition using SB216763 prevented the LPS-induced muscle mass decreases and myofiber atrophy. Indices of protein turnover signaling were unaltered in guinea pig muscle. Interestingly, inhibition of myogenesis of cultured muscle cells by TNF-α or synthetic GCs was prevented by GSK-3 inhibitors. In a guinea pig model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, GSK-3 inhibition prevents skeletal muscle atrophy without affecting pulmonary inflammation. Resistance to inflammation- or GC-induced impairment of myogenic differentiation, imposed by GSK-3 inhibition, suggests that sustained myogenesis may contribute to muscle mass maintenance despite persistent pulmonary inflammation. Collectively, these results warrant further exploration of GSK-3 as a potential novel drug target to prevent or reverse muscle wasting in COPD.

  7. Clinically Relevant Concentrations of Ketamine Inhibit Osteoclast Formation In Vitro in Mouse Bone Marrow Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Erxia; McAllister, Patrick; Venna, Venugopal Reddy; Xiao, Liping

    2017-04-01

    Ketamine has been used safely in clinics for decades for analgesia and anesthesia. It is increasingly popular in clinical practice due to its new uses and importance for emergency procedures. It is known that ketamine is sequestered in the bone marrow and the major receptors for ketamine, noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), are expressed in osteoclasts (OCs) and osteoblasts. However, the impact of ketamine on OCs or osteoblasts is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of ketamine on osteoclastogenesis and regulation of NMDARs expression in vitro. Bone marrows (BMs) or bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) with or without ketamine for up to 6 days. OC formation peaked at day 5. On day 5 of culture, ketamine inhibited OC formation from both BM and BMM cultures at clinically relevant concentrations (3-200 µM). Ketamine inhibited RANKL-induced expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1) in BMM cultures. Inhibition of ketamine on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis is associated with down-regulation of NMDARs. In addition, ketamine significantly inhibited the M-CSF induced migration of BMMs, inhibited cell fusion and significantly increased mature OC apoptosis. We conclude that clinically relevant concentrations of ketamine inhibit OC formation in both BM and BMM cultures in vitro through inhibiting migration and fusion process and enhancing mature OC apoptosis. It is likely that ketamine regulates osteoclastogenesis, at least in part, via its effects on NMDAR expression. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 914-923, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lanner, Johanna T

    2016-12-01

    Reduced oxygen (O 2 ) levels (hypoxia) are present during embryogenesis and exposure to altitude and in pathologic conditions. During embryogenesis, myogenic progenitor cells reside in a hypoxic microenvironment, which may regulate their activity. Satellite cells are myogenic progenitor cells localized in a local environment, suggesting that the O 2 level could affect their activity during muscle regeneration. In this review, we present the idea that O 2 levels regulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying myogenesis and muscle regeneration in hypoxia and depict therapeutic strategies using changes in O 2 levels to promote muscle regeneration. Severe hypoxia (≤1% O 2 ) appears detrimental for myogenic differentiation in vitro, whereas a 3-6% O 2 level could promote myogenesis. Hypoxia impairs the regenerative capacity of injured muscles. Although it remains to be explored, hypoxia may contribute to the muscle damage observed in patients with pathologies associated with hypoxia (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Hypoxia affects satellite cell activity and myogenesis through mechanisms dependent and independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transplantation of hypoxia-conditioned myoblasts are beneficial procedures to enhance muscle regeneration in animals. These therapies may be clinically relevant to treatment of patients with severe muscle damage.-Chaillou, T. Lanner, J. T. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity. © FASEB.

  9. A Cross-Cultural Study of Behavioral Inhibition in Toddlers: East-West-North-South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Kenneth H.; Hemphill, Sheryl A.; Chen, Xinyin; Hastings, Paul; Sanson, Ann; Coco, Alida Lo; Zappulla, Carla; Chung, Ock-Boon; Park, Sung-Yun; Doh, Hyun Sim; Chen, Huichang; Sun, Ling; Yoon, Chong-Hee; Cui, Liyin

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of behavioral inhibition in toddlers was examined in five cultures. Participants in this study included 110 Australian, 108 Canadian, 151 Chinese, 104 Italian, and 113 South Korean toddlers and their mothers who were observed during a structured observational laboratory session. Matched procedures were used in each country, with…

  10. Inhibition of Citrinin Production in Penicillium citrinum Cultures by Neem [Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Kemmelmeier

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of different concentrations of aqueous neem leaf extract (3.12 to 50 mg/mL on growth and citrinin production in three isolates of Penicillium citrinum was investigated under laboratory conditions. Mycotoxin production by the isolates was suppressed, depending on the concentration of the plant extract added to culture media at the time of spore inoculation. Citrinin production in fungal mycelia grown for 21 days in culture media containing 3.12 mg/mL of the aqueous extract of neem leaf was inhibited by approximately 80% in three isolates of P. citrinum. High-performance liquid chromatography was performed to confirm the spectrophotometric results. Vegetative growth was assessed, but neem extract failed to inhibit it. Neem leaf extract showed inhibition of toxin production without retardation in fungal mycelia growth.

  11. Inhibition of freshwater algal species by co-culture with two fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yong; Du, Jingjing; Fang, Hao; Zhao, Guiying; Tian, Xingjun

    2013-05-01

    Microorganisms have attracted worldwide attention as possible agents for the inhibition of water blooms. Algae can usually be inhibited and degraded directly by fungi. In this study, the effects of Trichaptum abietinum 1302BG and Lopharia spadicea on different freshwater algal species, namely, Microcystis aeruginosa, Chlorella vulgaris, Glenodinium sp., Navicula sp., Cryptomonas ovata, and Euglena gracilis, were detected. After 24h, there was a significant inhibitory effect in all algal cultures with T. abietinum 1302BG, except E. gracilis, and all algal cultures with L. spadicea, except Navicula sp. and E. gracilis. The dried masses of two fungi increased while majority of the algal cells disappeared after 72 h of co-incubation with M. aeruginosa, C. vulgaris, Glenodinium sp., and C. ovata. Thus, the two fungi might inhibit the growth of different freshwater algal species and utilize the algal cells for their growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Polyphosphates inhibit extracellular matrix mineralization in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoac, Betty; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Millán, José Luis; McKee, Marc D

    2013-04-01

    Studies on various compounds of inorganic phosphate, as well as on organic phosphate added by post-translational phosphorylation of proteins, all demonstrate a central role for phosphate in biomineralization processes. Inorganic polyphosphates are chains of orthophosphates linked by phosphoanhydride bonds that can be up to hundreds of orthophosphates in length. The role of polyphosphates in mammalian systems, where they are ubiquitous in cells, tissues and bodily fluids, and are at particularly high levels in osteoblasts, is not well understood. In cell-free systems, polyphosphates inhibit hydroxyapatite nucleation, crystal formation and growth, and solubility. In animal studies, polyphosphate injections inhibit induced ectopic calcification. While recent work has proposed an integrated view of polyphosphate function in bone, little experimental data for bone are available. Here we demonstrate in osteoblast cultures producing an abundant collagenous matrix that normally show robust mineralization, that two polyphosphates (PolyP5 and PolyP65, polyphosphates of 5 and 65 phosphate residues in length) are potent mineralization inhibitors. Twelve-day MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cultures with added ascorbic acid (for collagen matrix assembly) and β-glycerophosphate (a source of phosphate for mineralization) were treated with either PolyP5 or PolyP65. Von Kossa staining and calcium quantification revealed that mineralization was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by both polyphosphates, with complete mineralization inhibition at 10μM. Cell proliferation and collagen assembly were unaffected by polyphosphate treatment, indicating that polyphosphate inhibition of mineralization results not from cell and matrix effects but from direct inhibition of mineralization. This was confirmed by showing that PolyP5 and PolyP65 bound to synthetic hydroxyapatite in a concentration-dependent manner. Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP, ALPL) efficiently hydrolyzed the two PolyPs as

  13. Falcarindiol inhibits nitric oxide-mediated neuronal death in lipopolysaccharide-treated organotypic hippocampal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Min; Lee, Pyeongjae; Son, Dongwook; Kim, Hocheol; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2003-10-27

    Excessive nitric oxide (NO) release from activated microglia has a predominant role in neuronal death. This study investigated the effect of falcarindiol, which was isolated from Cnidium officinale Makino, on the NO-mediated neuronal death in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated organotypic hippocampal cultures. Falcarindiol dose-dependently reduced inducible NO synthase (iNOS)-mediated NO production without cytotoxic effects on LPS-activated BV-2 and microglia. Predictably, falcarindiol inhibited neuronal death by reducing NO production in the LPS-treated organotypic hippocampal cultures. N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA), an iNOS inhibitor, also inhibited neuronal death at 500 microM. In contrast, massive neuronal death was induced by excessive NO production in the LPS-treated alone cultures. These results suggest that excessive NO production plays an important role in the neurotoxic effect, and falcarindiol is a potential inhibitor in NO-mediated neuronal death.

  14. Myogenesis in the basal bilaterian Symsagittifera roscoffensis (Acoela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanninger Andreas

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to increase the weak database concerning the organogenesis of Acoela – a clade regarded by many as the earliest extant offshoot of Bilateria and thus of particular interest for studies concerning the evolution of animal bodyplans – we analyzed the development of the musculature of Symsagittifera roscoffensis using F-actin labelling, confocal laserscanning microscopy, and 3D reconstruction software. Results At 40% of development between egg deposition and hatching short subepidermal fibres form. Muscle fibre development in the anterior body half precedes myogenesis in the posterior half. At 42% of development a grid of outer circular and inner longitudinal muscles is present in the bodywall. New circular muscles either branch off from present fibres or form adjacent to existing ones. The number of circular muscles is higher than that of the longitudinal muscles throughout all life cycle stages. Diagonal, circular and longitudinal muscles are initially rare but their number increases with time. The ventral side bears U-shaped muscles around the mouth, which in addition is surrounded by a sphincter muscle. With the exception of the region of the statocyst, dorsoventral muscles are present along the entire body of juveniles and adults, while adults additionally exhibit radially oriented internal muscles in the anterior tip. Outer diagonal muscles are present at the dorsal anterior tip of the adult. In adult animals, the male gonopore with its associated sexual organs expresses distinct muscles. No specific statocyst muscles were found. The muscle mantles of the needle-shaped sagittocysts are situated along the lateral edges of the animal and in the posterior end close to the male gonopore. In both juveniles and adults, non-muscular filaments, which stain positively for F-actin, are associated with certain sensory cells outside the bodywall musculature. Conclusion Compared to the myoanatomy of other acoel taxa

  15. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens are more robust to ammonia toxicity effect. It has been shown that bioaugmentation of a pure strain of a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) in an ammonia inhibited continuous anaerobic reactor can improve methane production more than 30%. Nevertheless, cultivation...... of a pure culture, to be used as bioaugmentation inoculum, poses technical difficulties due to the required sterile conditions and the special growing media. On the contrary acclimatized enrichment methanogenic cultures have lower requirements to sterility. In the present study, we used an enriched ammonia...

  16. A Thiopurine Drug Inhibits West Nile Virus Production in Cell Culture, but Not in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Pei-Yin; Keating, Julie A.; Hoover, Spencer; Striker, Rob; Bernard, Kristen A.

    2011-01-01

    Many viruses within the Flavivirus genus cause significant disease in humans; however, effective antivirals against these viruses are not currently available. We have previously shown that a thiopurine drug, 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr), inhibits replication of distantly related viruses within the Flaviviridae family in cell culture, including bovine viral diarrhea virus and hepatitis C virus replicon. Here we further examined the potential antiviral effect of 6MMPr on several dive...

  17. Human skeletal muscle fibroblasts stimulate in vitro myogenesis and in vivo muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Abigail L; Magnan, Mélanie; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Kjaer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Accumulation of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix is an unfavourable characteristic of many muscle diseases, muscle injury and sarcopenia. The extent of cross-talk between fibroblasts, as the source of matrix protein, and satellite cells in humans is unknown. We studied this in human muscle biopsies and cell-culture studies. We observed a strong stimulation of myogenesis by human fibroblasts in cell culture. In biopsies collected 30 days after a muscle injury protocol, fibroblast number increased to four times control levels, where fibroblasts were found to be preferentially located immediately surrounding regenerating muscle fibres. These novel findings indicate an important role for fibroblasts in supporting the regeneration of muscle fibres, potentially through direct stimulation of satellite cell differentiation and fusion, and contribute to understanding of cell-cell cross-talk during physiological and pathological muscle remodelling. Accumulation of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix is an unfavourable characteristic of many muscle diseases, muscle injury and sarcopenia. In addition to the indispensable role satellite cells play in muscle regeneration, there is emerging evidence in rodents for a regulatory influence on fibroblast activity. However, the influence of fibroblasts on satellite cells and muscle regeneration in humans is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate this in vitro and during in vivo regeneration in humans. Following a muscle injury protocol in young healthy men (n = 7), the number of fibroblasts (TCF7L2+), satellite cells (Pax7+), differentiating myogenic cells (myogenin+) and regenerating fibres (neonatal/embryonic myosin+) was determined from biopsy cross-sections. Fibroblasts and myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) were also isolated from human skeletal muscle (n = 4) and co-cultured using different cell ratios, with the two cell populations either in direct contact with each other or separated by a permeable

  18. Altering the Balance between Excitation and Inhibition in Cultured Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzakpasu, Rhonda

    2010-03-01

    How is the network temporal structure altered when the balance between excitation and inhibition is changed? Proper balance is essential for normal brain function, including cognitive processing, the representation of sensory information and motor control. When the balance is compromised, neurological disorders may result. We use a simple reduced experimental system to investigate how manipulating the number of inhibitory neurons in a network of cultured hippocampal neurons affects synchronized bursting activity, the most prominent temporal signature of cultured hippocampal networks. Inhibitory neurons are thought to control spike timing and modulate network excitability and their absence may lead to widespread synchronization. We culture dissociated hippocampal neurons with varying quantities of inhibitory neurons on an 8x8 grid of extracellular electrodes and study how inhibitory neurons modulate network temporal dynamics. We show that as the proportion of inhibitory neurons increase, there is a dramatic transition in the temporal pattern.

  19. Visualization of the melanosome transfer-inhibition in a mouse epidermal cell co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Jong; Kazi, Julhash U; Lee, You-Ree; Nguyen, Dung H; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Shin, Jeong-Hyun; Soh, Jae-Won; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2010-02-01

    Transfer of melanin-containing melanosomes from melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes results in skin pigmentation. To provide a more practical method of visualizing melanosomes in melanocytes as well as in keratinocytes, we attempted to use murine cell lines instead of human primary cells. We generated various fluorescent fusion proteins of tyrosinase, a melanin synthesis enzyme located in the melanosome, by using green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein. The intracellular localization of tyrosinase was then examined by fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Co-culture of murine melanocytes and keratinocytes was optimized and melanosome transfer was either stimulated with alphaMSH or partially inhibited by niacinamide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a murine co-culture model, in addition to human primary cell co-culture, can be a good tool for depigmenting agent screening by monitoring melanosome transfer.

  20. Methylglyoxal-bis-guanylhydrazone inhibits osteopontin expression and differentiation in cultured human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xia; Xu, Hua; McGrath, Michael S

    2018-01-01

    Monocyte activation and polarization play essential roles in many chronic inflammatory diseases. An imbalance of M1 and M2 macrophage activation (pro-inflammatory and alternatively activated, respectively) is believed to be a key aspect in the etiology of these diseases, thus a therapeutic approach that regulates macrophage activation could be of broad clinical relevance. Methylglyoxal-bis-guanylhydrazone (MGBG), a regulator of polyamine metabolism, has recently been shown to be concentrated in monocytes and macrophages, and interfere with HIV integration into the DNA of these cells in vitro. RNA expression analysis of monocytes from HIV+ and control donors with or without MGBG treatment revealed the only gene to be consistently down regulated by MGBG to be osteopontin (OPN). The elevated expression of this pro-inflammatory cytokine and monocyte chemoattractant is associated with various chronic inflammatory diseases. We demonstrate that MGBG is a potent inhibitor of secreted OPN (sOPN) in cultured monocytes with 50% inhibition achieved at 0.1 μM of the drug. Furthermore, inhibition of OPN RNA transcription in monocyte cultures occurs at similar concentrations of the drug. During differentiation of monocytes into macrophages in vitro, monocytes express cell surface CD16 and the cells undergo limited DNA synthesis as measured by uptake of BrdU. MGBG inhibited both activities at similar doses to those regulating OPN expression. In addition, monocyte treatment with MGBG inhibited differentiation into both M1 and M2 classes of macrophages at non-toxic doses. The inhibition of differentiation and anti-OPN effects of MGBG were specific for monocytes in that differentiated macrophages were nearly resistant to MGBG activities. Thus MGBG may have potential therapeutic utility in reducing or normalizing OPN levels and regulating monocyte activation in diseases that involve chronic inflammation.

  1. ROLE OF POLYAMINES IN INHIBITION OF ETHYLENE BIOSYNTHESIS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON RICE ANTHER CULTURE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iswari S. Dewi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The polyamines such as putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were reported to increase green plant regeneration in rice anther culture. Low response of anther culture of rice sub-species indica may be improved with the addition of putrescine in the culture media. Four experiments were conducted to study the role of polyamines in inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis and their effects on rice anther culture development. Anthers of two subspecies of rice, indica (IR64, Krowal, Jatiluhur and japonica (Taipei 309 were cultured onto media supplemented with putrescine (N6P and without putrescine (N6. Youngpanicles containing the anthers at mid-to-late nucleate microspores were cold pretreated at 5 + 2°C and incubated in the dark for 8 days before the anthers were cultured. Resultsshowed that medium without putrescine produced an earlier senescence of indica rice anther than that of japonica. The addition of 10-3 M putrescine into the culture media inhibited ethylene biosynthesis as anther senescence delayed, increased the three polyamines contents, and decreased the ACC content as well as ACC oxydase activity in anther-derived calli. In the anther and anther-derived calli of subspecies indica, the totalpolyamines content was lower (10.14 nM g-1 anther and 8.48 nM g-1 calli than that of subspecies japonica (12.61 nM g-1 anther and 10.16 nM g-1 calli, whereas the ethylene production was higher (32.31 nM g-1 anther and 2.48 nM g-1 calli than the japonica (31.68 nM g-1 anther and 1.76 nM g-1 calli. This study suggests that application of 10-3 M putrescine in anther culture of rice subspecies indica improves androgenesis by inhibitingearly senescence of cultured anthers and enhancing embryo or callus formation from microspores.

  2. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Robinson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM but not high (50 μM concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-AP. Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and RAP, a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs.

  3. Aspirin inhibits interleukin 1-induced prostaglandin H synthase expression in cultured endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, K.K.; Sanduja, R.; Tsai, A.L.; Ferhanoglu, B.; Loose-Mitchell, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxane, and prostacyclin. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, interleukin 1 (IL-1) is known to induce the synthesis of this enzyme, thereby raising the level of PGH synthase protein severalfold over the basal level. Pretreatment with aspirin at low concentrations inhibited more than 60% of the enzyme mass and also the cyclooxygenase activity in IL-1-induced cells with only minimal effects on the basal level of the synthase enzyme in cells without IL-1. Sodium salicylate exhibited a similar inhibitory action whereas indomethacin had no apparent effect. Similarly low levels of aspirin inhibited the increased L-[ 35 S]methionine incorporation into PGH synthase that was induced by IL0-1 and also suppressed expression of the 2.7-kilobase PGH synthase mRNA. These results suggest that in cultured endothelial cells a potent inhibition of eicosanoid biosynthetic capacity can be effected by aspirin or salicylate at the level of PGH synthase gene expression. The aspirin effect may well be due to degradation of salicylate

  4. Aspirin inhibits interleukin 1-induced prostaglandin H synthase expression in cultured endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.K.; Sanduja, R.; Tsai, A.L.; Ferhanoglu, B.; Loose-Mitchell, D.S. (Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxane, and prostacyclin. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, interleukin 1 (IL-1) is known to induce the synthesis of this enzyme, thereby raising the level of PGH synthase protein severalfold over the basal level. Pretreatment with aspirin at low concentrations inhibited more than 60% of the enzyme mass and also the cyclooxygenase activity in IL-1-induced cells with only minimal effects on the basal level of the synthase enzyme in cells without IL-1. Sodium salicylate exhibited a similar inhibitory action whereas indomethacin had no apparent effect. Similarly low levels of aspirin inhibited the increased L-({sup 35}S)methionine incorporation into PGH synthase that was induced by IL0-1 and also suppressed expression of the 2.7-kilobase PGH synthase mRNA. These results suggest that in cultured endothelial cells a potent inhibition of eicosanoid biosynthetic capacity can be effected by aspirin or salicylate at the level of PGH synthase gene expression. The aspirin effect may well be due to degradation of salicylate.

  5. Process for inhibiting the growth of a culture of lactic acid bacteria, and optionally lysing the bacterial cells, and uses of the resulting lysed culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Arjen; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan; Ledeboer, Aat M.

    1995-01-01

    The invention provides a process for inhibiting the growth of a culture of lactic acid bacteria, or a product containing such culture e.g. a cheese product, in which in the cells of the lactic acid bacteria a holin obtainable from bacteriophages of Gram-positive bacteria, esp. from bacteriophages of

  6. Inhibition of the Growth of Plasmodium falciparum in Culture by Stearylamine-Phosphatidylcholine Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulam Mustafa Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effect of stearylamine (SA in liposomes on the viability of Plasmodium falciparum in culture by studying the inhibition of incorporation of [3H]-hypoxanthine in the nucleic acid of parasites. Stearylamine in liposomes significantly inhibits the growth of the parasites depending on the phospholipids composition. The maximum inhibition was observed when SA was delivered through Soya phosphatidylcholine (SPC liposomes. The chain length of alkyl group and density of SA in liposomes play a significant role in inhibiting the growth of the parasites. Incorporation of either cholesterol or Distearylphosphatidylethanolamine−Methoxy-Polyethylene glycol-2000 (DSPE-mPEG-2000 in Soya phosphatidylcholine-stearylamine (SPC-SA liposomes improves the efficacy. Intraerythrocytic entry of intact SPC-SA liposomes into infected erythrocytes was visualized using fluorescent microscopy. No hemolysis was observed in uninfected erythrocytes, and slight hemolysis was noted in infected erythrocytes at high concentrations of SPC-SA liposomes. Overall, our data suggested SA in SPC-liposomes might have potential application in malaria chemotherapy.

  7. Inhibition of Reporter Genes by Small Interfering RNAs in Cell Culture and Living Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larashati, Sekar; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    ). But evidence of specific siRNA inhibition in living fish is still needed. Using the small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), messenger RNA (mRNA) can be targeted resulting in degradation of targeted transcript or translational repression. Reporter genes such as luciferase and green fluorescence protein (GFP) can......RNA interference is a mechanism for silencing specific genes. It has been applied in cell culture to inhibit expression of genes involved in disease including viral genes as recently shown for the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus or VHSV (Bohle et al., 2011...... embryonic kidney HEK293t cells was used because they are easy to transfect and generally show high expression of transfected genes. Various types of fish including albino trouts and transparent fish were used as animal models to get better visualization of reporter gene expression. High variability...

  8. Next-generation sequencing analysis of miRNA expression in control and FSHD myogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Colangelo

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence has demonstrated that miRNA sequences can regulate skeletal myogenesis by controlling the process of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. However, at present a deep analysis of miRNA expression in control and FSHD myoblasts during differentiation has not yet been derived. To close this gap, we used a next-generation sequencing (NGS approach applied to in vitro myogenesis. Furthermore, to minimize sample genetic heterogeneity and muscle-type specific patterns of gene expression, miRNA profiling from NGS data was filtered with FC ≥ 4 (log(2FC ≥ 2 and p-value<0.05, and its validation was derived by qRT-PCR on myoblasts from seven muscle districts. In particular, control myogenesis showed the modulation of 38 miRNAs, the majority of which (34 out 38 were up-regulated, including myomiRs (miR-1, -133a, -133b and -206. Approximately one third of the modulated miRNAs were not previously reported to be involved in muscle differentiation, and interestingly some of these (i.e. miR-874, -1290, -95 and -146a were previously shown to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. FSHD myogenesis evidenced a reduced number of modulated miRNAs than healthy muscle cells. The two processes shared nine miRNAs, including myomiRs, although with FC values lower in FSHD than in control cells. In addition, FSHD cells showed the modulation of six miRNAs (miR-1268, -1268b, -1908, 4258, -4508- and -4516 not evidenced in control cells and that therefore could be considered FSHD-specific, likewise three novel miRNAs that seem to be specifically expressed in FSHD myotubes. These data further clarify the impact of miRNA regulation during control myogenesis and strongly suggest that a complex dysregulation of miRNA expression characterizes FSHD, impairing two important features of myogenesis: cell cycle and muscle development. The derived miRNA profiling could represent a novel molecular signature for FSHD that includes diagnostic biomarkers and

  9. Inhibition of DNA synthesis by chemical carcinogens in cultures of initiated and normal proliferating rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novicki, D.L.; Rosenberg, M.R.; Michalopoulos, G.

    1985-01-01

    Rat hepatocytes in primary culture can be stimulated to replicate under the influence of rat serum and sparse plating conditions. Higher replication rates are induced by serum from two-thirds partially hepatectomized rats. The effects of carcinogens and noncarcinogens on the ability of hepatocytes to synthesize DNA were examined by measuring the incorporation of [3H]thymidine by liquid scintillation counting and autoradiography. Hepatocyte DNA synthesis was not decreased by ethanol or dimethyl sulfoxide at concentrations less than 0.5%. No effect was observed when 0.1 mM ketamine, Nembutal, hypoxanthine, sucrose, ascorbic acid, or benzo(e)pyrene was added to cultures of replicating hepatocytes. Estrogen, testosterone, tryptophan, and vitamin E inhibited DNA synthesis by approximately 50% at 0.1 mM, a concentration at which toxicity was noticeable. Several carcinogens requiring metabolic activation as well as the direct-acting carcinogen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine interfered with DNA synthesis. Aflatoxin B1 inhibited DNA synthesis by 50% (ID50) at concentrations between 1 X 10(-8) and 1 X 10(-7) M. The ID50 for 2-acetylaminofluorene was between 1 X 10(-7) and 1 X 10(-6) M. Benzo(a)pyrene and 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene inhibited DNA synthesis 50% between 1 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-4) M. Diethylnitrosamine and dimethylnitrosamine (ID50 between 1 X 10(-4) and 5 X 10(-4) M) and 1- and 2-naphthylamine (ID50 between 1 X 10(-5) and 5 X 10(-4) M) caused inhibition of DNA synthesis at concentrations which overlapped with concentrations that caused measurable toxicity

  10. Inhibition of microRNA 128 promotes excitability of cultured cortical neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, K Melodi; Gussow, Ayal B; Bradrick, Shelton S; Dugger, Sarah A; Gelfman, Sahar; Wang, Quanli; Petrovski, Slavé; Frankel, Wayne N; Boland, Michael J; Goldstein, David B

    2016-10-01

    Cultured neuronal networks monitored with microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have been used widely to evaluate pharmaceutical compounds for potential neurotoxic effects. A newer application of MEAs has been in the development of in vitro models of neurological disease. Here, we directly evaluated the utility of MEAs to recapitulate in vivo phenotypes of mature microRNA-128 (miR-128) deficiency, which causes fatal seizures in mice. We show that inhibition of miR-128 results in significantly increased neuronal activity in cultured neuronal networks derived from primary mouse cortical neurons. These results support the utility of MEAs in developing in vitro models of neuroexcitability disorders, such as epilepsy, and further suggest that MEAs provide an effective tool for the rapid identification of microRNAs that promote seizures when dysregulated. © 2016 McSweeney et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Prolactin inhibits the steroidogenesis in midfollicular phase human granulosa cells cultured in a chemically defined medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutie, E; Andino, N A

    1988-04-01

    In vitro studies were conducted on prolactin (PRL) effects on human granulosa cell steroidogenesis. Cells derived from healthy midfollicular phase follicles were cultured in a chemically defined medium supplemented with androstenedione (delta 4 A) 10(-7) M. Cultures treated with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) showed a dose-dependent increase of estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) secretion. The authors demonstrated that PRL (greater than or equal to 10 ng/ml) inhibits basal as well as FSH (10 ng/ml)-stimulated E2 and P secretion. This PRL effect was overcome only by FSH maximal stimulating doses (100 ng/ml). These results suggest a direct inhibitory effect of PRL on granulosa cell steroidogenesis acting as a negative modulator of FSH action. These effects might be related to the ovarian dysfunction observed in hyperprolactinemia.

  12. Cannabidiol inhibits synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal cultures and slices via multiple receptor pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledgerwood, CJ; Greenwood, SM; Brett, RR; Pratt, JA; Bushell, TJ

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabidiol (CBD) has emerged as an interesting compound with therapeutic potential in several CNS disorders. However, whether it can modulate synaptic activity in the CNS remains unclear. Here, we have investigated whether CBD modulates synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal cultures and acute slices. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effect of CBD on synaptic transmission was examined in rat hippocampal cultures and acute slices using whole cell patch clamp and standard extracellular recordings respectively. KEY RESULTS Cannabidiol decreased synaptic activity in hippocampal cultures in a concentration-dependent and Pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The effects of CBD in culture were significantly reduced in the presence of the cannabinoid receptor (CB1) inverse agonist, LY320135 but were unaffected by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY100135. In hippocampal slices, CBD inhibited basal synaptic transmission, an effect that was abolished by the proposed CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, in addition to LY320135 and WAY100135. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Cannabidiol reduces synaptic transmission in hippocampal in vitro preparations and we propose a role for both 5-HT1A and CB1 receptors in these CBD-mediated effects. These data offer some mechanistic insights into the effects of CBD and emphasize that further investigations into the actions of CBD in the CNS are required in order to elucidate the full therapeutic potential of CBD. PMID:20825410

  13. Inhibitive effects of gamma-ray on root tip cells mitosis for different types of cultured rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Mei; Wang Cailian; Zhao Kongnan; Xu Gang

    1988-01-01

    Studies on twelve varieties of different cultured rice showed that the mitotic indexdose relationship could be fitted by linear regression equations. The mitotic index was decreased with the increase of dose. The inhibitive effects on root tip cells mitosis were similar for different types of cultured rice but rather different from variety to variety

  14. Inhibition of DNA replication and repair by anthralin or danthron in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, J.M.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1982-07-01

    The comparative effects of the tumor promoter anthralin and its analog, danthron, on semiconservative DNA replication and DNA repair synthesis were studied in cultured human cells. Bromodeoxyuridine was used as density label together with /sup 3/H-thymidine to distinguish replication from repair synthesis in isopycnic CsCl gradients. Anthralin at 1.1 microgram inhibited replication in T98G cells by 50%. In cells treated with 0.4 or 1.3 microM anthralin and additive effect was observed on the inhibition of replication by ultraviolet light (254 nm). In cells irradiated with 20 J/m2, 2.3 microM anthralin was required to inhibit repair synthesis by 50%. Thus there was no selective inhibitory effect of anthralin on repair synthesis. Danthron exhibited no detectable effect on either semiconservative replication or repair synthesis at concentrations below about 5.0 microM. Neither compound stimulated repair synthesis in the absence of ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, anthralin and danthron do not appear to react with DNA to form adducts that are subject to excision repair. Although both compounds appear to intercalate into supercoiled DNA in vitro to a limited extent, the degree of unwinding introduced by the respective drugs does not correlate with their relative effects on DNA synthesis in vivo. Therefore the inhibitory effect of anthralin on DNA replication and repair synthesis in T98G cells does not appear to result from the direct interaction of the drug with DNA.

  15. Neferine inhibits cultured hepatic stellate cell activation and facilitates apoptosis: A possible molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Shi, Jinghong; Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia; Zhao, Juhui; Dong, Lei

    2011-01-10

    Neferine is a major alkaloid component of "Lian Zi Xin", embryos of the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner, Nymphaeaceae. Previous studies have shown that neferine has an inhibitory effect on pulmonary fibrosis through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities and inhibition of cytokines and NF-κB. However, it is unknown whether neferine also has an inhibitory effect on liver fibrosis through inhibition of TGF-β1 and collagen I and facilitation of apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells. This study examined the effects of neferine on cultured hepatic stellate (HSC-T6) cells and explored its possible action mechanisms by means of MTT assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow-cytometric annexin V-PI assay and Hoechst 33258 staining, as well as real-time PCR and western blotting. The results showed that neferine administration (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10μmol/l) significantly decreased the TGF-β1 and collagen I produced in HSC-T6 cells, and increased the HSC-T6 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Neferine treatment for 48h at concentrations of 6 and 10μmol/l significantly increased Bax and caspase 3 mRNAs and proteins, and reduced Bcl2 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNAs and proteins. Our data indicate that neferine efficiently inhibits cultured HSC-T6 cell activation and induces apoptosis by increasing Bax and caspase 3 expression via the mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Statins induce apoptosis in rat and human myotube cultures by inhibiting protein geranylgeranylation but not ubiquinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Timothy E.; Zhang, Xiaohua; Bleicher, Kimberly B.; Dysart, Gary; Loughlin, Amy F.; Schaefer, William H.; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2004-01-01

    Statins are widely used to treat lipid disorders. These drugs are safe and well tolerated; however, in <1% of patients, myopathy and/or rhabdomyolysis can develop. To better understand the mechanism of statin-induced myopathy, we examined the ability of structurally distinct statins to induce apoptosis in an optimized rat myotube model. Compound A (a lactone) and Cerivastatin (an open acid) induced apoptosis, as measured by TUNEL and active caspase 3 staining, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, an epimer of Compound A (Compound B) exhibited a much weaker apoptotic response. Statin-induced apoptosis was completely prevented by mevalonate or geranylgeraniol, but not by farnesol. Zaragozic acid A, a squalene synthase inhibitor, caused no apoptosis on its own and had no effect on Compound-A-induced myotoxicity, suggesting the apoptosis was not a result of cholesterol synthesis inhibition. The geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitors GGTI-2133 and GGTI-2147 caused apoptosis in myotubes; the farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277 exhibited a much weaker effect. In addition, the prenylation of rap1a, a geranylgeranylated protein, was inhibited by Compound A in myotubes at concentrations that induced apoptosis. A similar statin-induced apoptosis profile was seen in human myotube cultures but primary rat hepatocytes were about 200-fold more resistant to statin-induced apoptosis. Although the statin-induced hepatotoxicity could be attenuated with mevalonate, no effect was found with either geranylgeraniol or farnesol. In studies assessing ubiquinone levels after statin treatment in rat and human myotubes, there was no correlation between ubiquinone levels and apoptosis. Taken together, these observations suggest that statins cause apoptosis in myotube cultures in part by inhibiting the geranylgeranylation of proteins, but not by suppressing ubiquinone concentration. Furthermore, the data from primary hepatocytes suggests a cell-type differential

  17. A thiopurine drug inhibits West Nile virus production in cell culture, but not in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pei-Yin; Keating, Julie A; Hoover, Spencer; Striker, Rob; Bernard, Kristen A

    2011-01-01

    Many viruses within the Flavivirus genus cause significant disease in humans; however, effective antivirals against these viruses are not currently available. We have previously shown that a thiopurine drug, 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr), inhibits replication of distantly related viruses within the Flaviviridae family in cell culture, including bovine viral diarrhea virus and hepatitis C virus replicon. Here we further examined the potential antiviral effect of 6MMPr on several diverse flaviviruses. In cell culture, 6MMPr inhibited virus production of yellow fever virus, dengue virus-2 (DENV-2) and West Nile virus (WNV) in a dose-dependent manner, and DENV-2 was significantly more sensitive to 6MMPr treatment than WNV. We then explored the use of 6MMPr as an antiviral against WNV in an immunocompetent mouse model. Once a day treatment of mice with 0.5 mg 6MMPr was just below the toxic dose in our mouse model, and this dose was used in subsequent studies. Mice were treated with 6MMPr immediately after subcutaneous inoculation with WNV for eight consecutive days. Treatment with 6MMPr exacerbated weight loss in WNV-inoculated mice and did not significantly affect mortality. We hypothesized that 6MMPr has low bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS) and examined the effect of pre-treatment with 6MMPr on viral loads in the periphery and CNS. Pre-treatment with 6MMPr had no significant effect on viremia or viral titers in the periphery, but resulted in significantly higher viral loads in the brain, suggesting that the effect of 6MMPr is tissue-dependent. In conclusion, despite being a potent inhibitor of flaviviruses in cell culture, 6MMPr was not effective against West Nile disease in mice; however, further studies are warranted to reduce the toxicity and/or improve the bioavailability of this potential antiviral drug.

  18. A thiopurine drug inhibits West Nile virus production in cell culture, but not in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yin Lim

    Full Text Available Many viruses within the Flavivirus genus cause significant disease in humans; however, effective antivirals against these viruses are not currently available. We have previously shown that a thiopurine drug, 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr, inhibits replication of distantly related viruses within the Flaviviridae family in cell culture, including bovine viral diarrhea virus and hepatitis C virus replicon. Here we further examined the potential antiviral effect of 6MMPr on several diverse flaviviruses. In cell culture, 6MMPr inhibited virus production of yellow fever virus, dengue virus-2 (DENV-2 and West Nile virus (WNV in a dose-dependent manner, and DENV-2 was significantly more sensitive to 6MMPr treatment than WNV. We then explored the use of 6MMPr as an antiviral against WNV in an immunocompetent mouse model. Once a day treatment of mice with 0.5 mg 6MMPr was just below the toxic dose in our mouse model, and this dose was used in subsequent studies. Mice were treated with 6MMPr immediately after subcutaneous inoculation with WNV for eight consecutive days. Treatment with 6MMPr exacerbated weight loss in WNV-inoculated mice and did not significantly affect mortality. We hypothesized that 6MMPr has low bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS and examined the effect of pre-treatment with 6MMPr on viral loads in the periphery and CNS. Pre-treatment with 6MMPr had no significant effect on viremia or viral titers in the periphery, but resulted in significantly higher viral loads in the brain, suggesting that the effect of 6MMPr is tissue-dependent. In conclusion, despite being a potent inhibitor of flaviviruses in cell culture, 6MMPr was not effective against West Nile disease in mice; however, further studies are warranted to reduce the toxicity and/or improve the bioavailability of this potential antiviral drug.

  19. DIDS prevents ischemic membrane degradation in cultured hippocampal neurons by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Pamenter

    Full Text Available During stroke, cells in the infarct core exhibit rapid failure of their permeability barriers, which releases ions and inflammatory molecules that are deleterious to nearby tissue (the penumbra. Plasma membrane degradation is key to penumbral spread and is mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, which are released via vesicular exocytosis into the extracellular fluid in response to stress. DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid preserves membrane integrity in neurons challenged with an in vitro ischemic penumbral mimic (ischemic solution: IS and we asked whether this action was mediated via inhibition of MMP activity. In cultured murine hippocampal neurons challenged with IS, intracellular proMMP-2 and -9 expression increased 4-10 fold and extracellular latent and active MMP isoform expression increased 2-22 fold. MMP-mediated extracellular gelatinolytic activity increased ∼20-50 fold, causing detachment of 32.1±4.5% of cells from the matrix and extensive plasma membrane degradation (>60% of cells took up vital dyes and >60% of plasma membranes were fragmented or blebbed. DIDS abolished cellular detachment and membrane degradation in neurons and the pathology-induced extracellular expression of latent and active MMPs. DIDS similarly inhibited extracellular MMP expression and cellular detachment induced by the pro-apoptotic agent staurosporine or the general proteinase agonist 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA. Conversely, DIDS-treatment did not impair stress-induced intracellular proMMP production, nor the intracellular cleavage of proMMP-2 to the active form, suggesting DIDS interferes with the vesicular extrusion of MMPs rather than directly inhibiting proteinase expression or activation. In support of this hypothesis, an antagonist of the V-type vesicular ATPase also inhibited extracellular MMP expression to a similar degree as DIDS. In addition, in a proteinase-independent model of vesicular exocytosis, DIDS

  20. Simvastatin inhibits interferon-γ-induced MHC class II up-regulation in cultured astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glazenburg Lisa

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on their potent anti-inflammatory properties and a preliminary clinical trial, statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are being studied as possible candidates for multiple sclerosis (MS therapy. The pathogenesis of MS is unclear. One theory suggests that the development of autoimmune lesions in the central nervous system may be due to a failure of endogenous inhibitory control of MHC class II expression on astrocytes, allowing these cells to adapt an interferon (IFN-γ-induced antigen presenting phenotype. By using immunocytochemistry in cultured astrocytes derived from newborn Wistar rats we found that simvastatin at nanomolar concentrations inhibited, in a dose-response fashion, up to 70% of IFN-γ-induced MHC class II expression. This effect was reversed by the HMG-CoA reductase product mevalonate. Suppression of the antigen presenting function of astrocytes might contribute to the beneficial effects of statins in MS.

  1. Roles of Mitogen-Activating Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase-3 (MAP4K3) in Preterm Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell Myogenesis and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Activation Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chu-Yi; Yu, Mu-Xue; Dai, Jie-Min; Pan, Si-Nian; Lu, Zhen-Tong; Qiu, Xiao-Shan; Zhuang, Si-Qi

    2017-07-21

    BACKGROUND Preterm skeletal muscle genesis is a paradigm for myogenesis. The role of mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3) in preterm skeletal muscle satellite cells myogenesis or its relationship to mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity have not been previously elaborated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Small interfering RNA (siRNA) interference technology was used to inhibit MAP4K3 expression. Leucine stimulation experiments were performed following MAP4K3-siRNA interference. The differentiation of primary preterm skeletal muscle satellite cells was observed after siRNA-MAP4K3 interference. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of MAP4K3, MyHC, MyoD, myogenin, p-mTOR, and p-S6K1. The immunofluorescence fusion index of MyHC and myogenin were detected. MAP4K3 effects on preterm rat satellite cells differentiation and its relationship to mTORC1 activity are reported. RESULTS MAP4K3 siRNA knockdown inhibited myotube formation and both MyoD and myogenin expression in primary preterm rat skeletal muscle satellite cells, but MAP4K3 siRNA had no effect on the activity of mTORC1. In primary preterm rat skeletal muscle satellite cells, MAP4K3 knockdown resulted in significantly weaker, but not entirely blunted, leucine-induced mTORC1 signaling. CONCLUSIONS MAP4K3 positively regulates preterm skeletal muscle satellite cell myogenesis, but may not regulate mTORC1 activity. MAP4K3 may play a role in mTORC1 full activation in response to leucine.

  2. Inhibition by derivatives of diguanidines of cell proliferation in Ehrlich ascites cells grown in cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhonen-Hongisto, L; Pösö, H; Jänne, J

    1980-01-01

    The anti-proliferative effects of 1,1'-[(methylethanediylidene)dinitrilo]diguanidine [methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone)] and 1,1'-[(metHYLETHANEDIYLIDENE)dinitrilo]bis-(3-aminoguaNIDINE) HAVE BEEN STUDIED IN Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells grown in suspension cultures. Both compounds are potent inhibitors of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase from the tumour cells. In the presence of putrescine (but not in its absence), the inhibition produced by 1,1'-[methylethanediylidene)dinitrilo]bis-(3-aminoguanadine) was apparently irreversible, as judged by persistent depression of the enzyme activity even after extensive dialysis. The two compounds produced similar increases in adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activity, which resulted from a striking stabilization of the enzyme in cells grown in the presence of the drugs. The inhibitory effect of the two diguanidine derivatives on the synthesis of DNA and protein became evident after an exposure of 4--8 h. At that time, the only change seen in tumour polyamines in cells grown in the presence of the inhibitors was an increase in cellular putrescine. To find out whether the compounds initially interfered with the energy production of the tumour cells, the cultures were grown in the presence of uniformly labelled glucose, and the formation of lactate, as well as the oxidation of the sugar into CO2, were measured. The activation of glycolysis upon dilution of the tumour cells with fresh medium and the subsequent formation of labelled CO2 were siliar in control cells and in cells exposed to methylglyoxal bis(buanylhydrazone), 1,1'-[(methylethanediylidene)dinitrilo]bis-(3-aminoguanidine) or diaminopropanol. Only a marginal decrease in the cellular content of ATP was found in cells exposed to the inhibitors for 24 h. The diguanidine-induced growth inhibition was fully reversed by low concentrations of exogenous polyamines. However, the possibility remained that the reversal by polyamines was due to a decrease of intracellular

  3. Culture Supernatants of Lactobacillus gasseri and L. crispatus Inhibit Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Adhesion to HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yuko; Cho, Otomi; Sugita, Takashi; Ogishima, Daiki; Takeda, Satoru

    2018-03-30

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a common superficial infection of the vaginal mucous membranes caused by the fungus Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to assess the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of the culture supernatants of Lactobacillus gasseri and L. crispatus, the predominant microbiota in Asian healthy women, on C. albicans biofilm formation. The inhibition of C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells by Lactobacillus culture supernatant was also investigated. Candida albicans biofilm was formed on polystyrene flat-bottomed 96-well plates, and the inhibitory effects on the initial colonization and maturation phases were determined using the XTT reduction assay. The expression levels of biofilm formation-associated genes (HWP1, ECE1, ALS3, BCR1, EFG1, TEC1, and CPH1) were determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The inhibition of C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells by Lactobacillus culture supernatant was evaluated by enumerating viable C. albicans cells. The culture supernatants of both Lactobacillus species inhibited the initial colonization and maturation of C. albicans biofilm. The expression levels of all biofilm formation-related genes were downregulated in the presence of Lactobacillus culture supernatant. The culture supernatant also inhibited C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells. The culture supernatants of L. gasseri and L. crispatus inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation by downregulating biofilm formation-related genes and C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells. These findings support the notion that Lactobacillus metabolites may be useful alternatives to antifungal drugs for the management of VVC.

  4. Inhibition of cell growth by EGR-1 in human primary cultures from malignant glioma

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    Gagliardi Franco

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this work was to investigate in vitro the putative role of EGR-1 in the growth of glioma cells. EGR-1 expression was examined during the early passages in vitro of 17 primary cell lines grown from 3 grade III and from 14 grade IV malignant astrocytoma explants. The explanted tumors were genetically characterized at the p53, MDM2 and INK4a/ARF loci, and fibronectin expression and growth characteristics were examined. A recombinant adenovirus overexpressing EGR-1 was tested in the primary cell lines. Results Low levels of EGR-1 protein were found in all primary cultures examined, with lower values present in grade IV tumors and in cultures carrying wild-type copies of p53 gene. The levels of EGR-1 protein were significantly correlated to the amount of intracellular fibronectin, but only in tumors carrying wild-type copies of the p53 gene (R = 0,78, p = 0.0082. Duplication time, plating efficiency, colony formation in agarose, and contact inhibition were also altered in the p53 mutated tumor cultures compared to those carrying wild-type p53. Growth arrest was achieved in both types of tumor within 1–2 weeks following infection with a recombinant adenovirus overexpressing EGR-1 but not with the control adenovirus. Conclusions Suppression of EGR-1 is a common event in gliomas and in most cases this is achieved through down-regulation of gene expression. Expression of EGR-1 by recombinant adenovirus infection almost completely abolishes the growth of tumor cells in vitro, regardless of the mutational status of the p53 gene.

  5. Silver nanoparticles inhibit fish gill cell proliferation in protein-free culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura; Schirmer, Kristin

    2016-10-01

    While short-term exposures of vertebrate cells, such as from fish, can be performed in defined, serum-free media, long-term cultures generally require addition of growth factors and proteins, normally supplied with a serum supplement. However, proteins are known to alter nanoparticle properties by binding to nanoparticles. Therefore, in order to be able to study nanoparticle-cell interactions for extended periods, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1, was adapted to proliferate in a commercial, serum-free medium, InVitrus VP-6. The newly adapted cell strain was named RTgill-W1-pf (protein free). These cells proliferate at a speed similar to the RTgill-W1 cells cultured in a fully supplemented medium containing 5% fetal bovine serum. As well, they were successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and fully recovered after thawing. Yet, senescence set in after about 10 passages in InVitrus VP-6 medium, revealing that this medium cannot fully support long-term culture of the RTgill-W1 strain. The RTgill-W1-pf cell line was subsequently applied to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) on cell proliferation over a period of 12 days. Indeed, cell proliferation was inhibited by 10 μM AgNP. This effect correlated with high levels of silver being associated with the cells. The new cell line, RTgill-W1-pf, can serve as a unique representation of the gill cell-environment interface, offering novel opportunities to study nanoparticle-cell interactions without serum protein interference.

  6. Inhibition of Fusarium graminearum growth in flour gel cultures by hexane-soluble compounds from oat (Avena sativa L.) flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehlert, Douglas C; Rayas-Duarte, Patricia; McMullen, Michael S

    2011-12-01

    Fusarium head blight, incited by the fungus Fusarium graminearum, primarily affects wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgarum), while oat (Avena sativa) appears to be more resistant. Although this has generally been attributed to the open panicle of oats, we hypothesized that a chemical component of oats might contribute to this resistance. To test this hypothesis, we created culture media made of wheat, barley, and oat flour gels (6 g of flour in 20 ml of water, gelled by autoclaving) and inoculated these with plugs of F. graminearum from actively growing cultures. Fusarium growth was measured from the diameter of the fungal plaque. Plaque diameter was significantly smaller on oat flour cultures than on wheat or barley cultures after 40 to 80 h of growth. Ergosterol concentration was also significantly lower in oat cultures than in wheat cultures after growth. A hexane extract from oats added to wheat flour also inhibited Fusarium growth, and Fusarium grew better on hexane-defatted oat flour. The growth of Fusarium on oat flour was significantly and negatively affected by the oil concentration in the oat, in a linear relationship. A hexane-soluble chemical in oat flour appears to inhibit Fusarium growth and might contribute to oat's resistance to Fusarium head blight. Oxygenated fatty acids, including hydroxy, dihydroxy, and epoxy fatty acids, were identified in the hexane extracts and are likely candidates for causing the inhibition.

  7. Pitx2 defines alternate pathways acting through MyoD during limb and somitic myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'honoré, Aurore; Ouimette, Jean-François; Lavertu-Jolin, Marisol; Drouin, Jacques

    2010-11-01

    The MyoD gene is part of the core regulatory network that governs skeletal myogenesis and acts as an essential determinant of the myogenic cell fate. Although generic regulatory networks converging on this gene have been described, the specific mechanisms leading to MyoD expression in muscles of different ontology remain misunderstood. We now show that the homeobox gene Pitx2 is required for initial activation of the MyoD gene in limb muscle precursors through direct binding of Pitx2 to the MyoD core enhancer. Whereas Myf5 and Mrf4 are dispensable for limb muscle progenitor fate, inactivation of Myf5 and Mrf4 in Pitx2 mutants results in a drastic decrease of limb MyoD expression. Thus, Pitx2 and Myf5 define parallel genetic pathways for limb myogenesis. We show a similar dependence on Pitx2 and Myf5(Mrf4) in myotome, where MyoD expression is initially activated by Myf5 and Mrf4. In their absence, MyoD expression is eventually rescued by a Pax3-dependent mechanism. We now provide evidence that Pitx2 contributes to the rescue of MyoD expression and that it acts downstream of Pax3. We thus propose that myogenic differentiation of somite-derived muscle cells relies on two parallel genetic pathways, with the Pitx2 pathway being of primary importance for limb myogenesis but the Myf5 and Mrf4 pathway predominating in myotome. Muscle-specific wiring of regulatory networks composed of similar transcription factors thus underlies development of distinct skeletal muscles.

  8. Leptin impairs myogenesis in C2C12 cells through JAK/STAT and MEK signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijet, Maja; Pijet, Barbara; Litwiniuk, Anna; Pajak, Beata; Gajkowska, Barbara; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2013-02-01

    Reduced lean body mass in genetically obese (ob/ob) or anorectic/cachectic subjects prompted us to verify the hypothesis whether leptin, white adipose tissue cytokine, might be a negative organizer of myogenesis. Recombinant leptin (100 ng/mL) stimulated mitogenesis together with the raise in T(202/)Y(204)P-ERK1/2 protein expression. Concomitantly, it impaired cell viability and muscle fiber formation from C2C12 mouse myoblasts. Detailed acute and chronic studies with the use of metabolic inhibitors revealed that both JAK/STAT3 and MEK/MAPK but not PI3-K/AKT/GSK-3β signaling pathways were activated by leptin, and that STAT3 (Y(705)P-STAT3) and MEK (T(202/)Y(204)P-ERK1/2) mediate these effects. In contrary, insulin evoked PI3-K-dependent phosphorylation of AKT (S(473)) and GSK-3β (S(9)) and insulin surpassed leptin-dependent inhibition of myogenic differentiation in PI3-K-dependent manner. GSK-3β seems to play dual role in muscle development. Insulin-dependent effect on GSK-3β (S(9)P-GSK-3β) led to accelerated myotube construction. In contrary, leptin through MEK-dependent manner caused GSK-3β phosphorylation (Y(216)P-GSK-3β) with resultant drop in myoblast fusion. Summing up, partially opposite effects of insulin and leptin on skeletal muscle growth emphasize the importance of interplay between these cytokines. They determine how muscle mass is gained or lost. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quercetin inhibits adipogenesis of muscle progenitor cells in vitro

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    Tomoko Funakoshi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle satellite cells are committed myogenic progenitors capable of contributing to myogenesis to maintain adult muscle mass and function. Several experiments have demonstrated that muscle satellite cells can differentiate into adipocytes in vitro, supporting the mesenchymal differentiation potential of these cells. Moreover, muscle satellite cells may be a source of ectopic muscle adipocytes, explaining the lipid accumulation often observed in aged skeletal muscle (sarcopenia and in muscles of patients` with diabetes. Quercetin, a polyphenol, is one of the most abundant flavonoids distributed in edible plants, such as onions and apples, and possesses antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we examined whether quercetin inhibited the adipogenesis of muscle satellite cells in vitro with primary cells from rat limbs by culture in the presence of quercetin under adipogenic conditions. Morphological observations, Oil Red-O staining results, triglyceride content analysis, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that quercetin was capable of inhibiting the adipogenic induction of muscle satellite cells into adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner by suppressing the transcript levels of adipogenic markers, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and fatty acid binding protein 4. Our results suggested that quercetin inhibited the adipogenesis of muscle satellite cells in vitro by suppressing the transcription of adipogenic markers. Keywords: Quercetin, Muscle satellite cell, Differentiation, Intramuscular lipid

  10. Dynamic inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission by astrocyte-derived ATP in hippocampal cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Schuichi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Tsuda, Makoto; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2003-09-01

    Originally ascribed passive roles in the CNS, astrocytes are now known to have an active role in the regulation of synaptic transmission. Neuronal activity can evoke Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, and Ca2+ transients in astrocytes can evoke changes in neuronal activity. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to mediate such bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. We demonstrate here that ATP, a primary mediator of intercellular Ca2+ signaling among astrocytes, also mediates intercellular signaling between astrocytes and neurons in hippocampal cultures. Mechanical stimulation of astrocytes evoked Ca2+ waves mediated by the release of ATP and the activation of P2 receptors. Mechanically evoked Ca2+ waves led to decreased excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission in an ATP-dependent manner. Exogenous application of ATP does not affect postsynaptic glutamatergic responses but decreased presynaptic exocytotic events. Finally, we show that astrocytes exhibit spontaneous Ca2+ waves mediated by extracellular ATP and that inhibition of these Ca2+ responses enhanced excitatory glutamatergic transmission. We therefore conclude that ATP released from astrocytes exerts tonic and activity-dependent down-regulation of synaptic transmission via presynaptic mechanisms.

  11. NF-kappaB signaling: a tale of two pathways in skeletal myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkar, Nadine; Guttridge, Denis C

    2010-04-01

    NF-kappaB is a ubiquitiously expressed transcription factor that plays vital roles in innate immunity and other processes involving cellular survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Activation of NF-kappaB is controlled by an IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex that can direct either canonical (classical) NF-kappaB signaling by degrading the IkappaB inhibitor and releasing p65/p50 dimers to the nucleus, or causes p100 processing and nuclear translocation of RelB/p52 via a noncanonical (alternative) pathway. Under physiological conditions, NF-kappaB activity is transiently regulated, whereas constitutive activation of this transcription factor typically in the classical pathway is associated with a multitude of disease conditions, including those related to skeletal muscle. How NF-kappaB functions in muscle diseases is currently under intense investigation. Insight into this role of NF-kappaB may be gained by understanding at a more basic level how this transcription factor contributes to skeletal muscle cell differentiation. Recent data from knockout mice support that the classical NF-kappaB pathway functions as an inhibitor of skeletal myogenesis and muscle regeneration acting through multiple mechanisms. In contrast, alternative NF-kappaB signaling does not appear to be required for myofiber conversion, but instead functions in myotube homeostasis by regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. Additional knowledge of these signaling pathways in skeletal myogenesis should aid in the development of specific inhibitors that may be useful in treatments of muscle disorders.

  12. Inhibition Underlies the Effect of High Need for Closure on Cultural Closed-Mindedness under Mortality Salience

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    Dmitrij Agroskin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that people respond to reminders of mortality with closed-minded, ethnocentric attitudes has received extensive empirical support, largely from research in the Terror Management theory tradition. However, the basic motivational and neural processes that underlie this effect remain largely hypothetical. According to recent neuropsychological theorizing, mortality salience (MS effects on cultural closed-mindedness may be mediated by activity in the behavioral inhibition system (BIS, which leads to passive avoidance and decreased approach motivation. This should be especially true for people motivated to avoid unfamiliar and potentially threatening stimuli as reflected in a high need for closure (NFC. In two studies involving moderated mediation analyses, people high on trait NFC responded to MS with increased BIS activity (as indicated by EEG and the line bisection task, which is characteristic of inhibited approach motivation. BIS activity, in turn, predicted a reluctance to explore foreign cultures (Study 1 and generalized ethnocentric attitudes (Study 2. In a third study, inhibition was induced directly and caused an increase in ethnocentrism for people high on NFC. Moreover, the effect of the inhibition manipulation × NCF interaction on ethnocentrism was explained by increases in BIS-related affect (i.e., anxious inhibition at high NFC. To our knowledge, this research is the first to establish an empirical link between very basic, neurally-instantiated inhibitory processes and rather complex, higher-order manifestations of intergroup negativity. Our findings contribute to a fuller understanding of the cultural worldview defense phenomenon by illuminating the motivational underpinnings of cultural closed-mindedness in the wake of existential threat.

  13. Dienogest inhibits aromatase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostaglandin E₂ production in human endometriotic stromal cells in spheroid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kaoruko; Xu, Bing; Suganuma, Izumi; Kusuki, Izumi; Mita, Shizuka; Shimizu, Yutaka; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi; Kitawaki, Jo

    2012-02-01

    To determine the effect of dienogest (DNG) on the expression of aromatase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in human endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs). Experimental study in vitro. University hospital. Seventeen patients with ovarian endometrioma. ESCs from chocolate cyst linings of ovaries were treated with DNG. Expression of aromatase and COX-2 evaluated in spheroid cultures of human ESCs by real-time quantitative polymerase chain-reaction and immunocytochemistry, production of PGE(2) quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) DNA-binding examined by ELISA and immunocytochemistry. The pharmaceutical actions of DNG on the expression of aromatase and COX-2 and the production of PGE(2) were examined using spheroid cultures of human ESCs. More aromatase, COX-2, and PGE(2) were expressed in spheroid cultures than in conventional ESCs monolayers. In the spheroid cultures, DNG (10(-7) M) and progesterone (10(-7) M) inhibited the expression of aromatase, COX-2, and PGE(2). DNG also inhibited NF-κB DNA-binding activity and reduced the immunocytochemical protein expression of aromatase, COX-2, and NF-κB p50 nuclear localization. Because DNG inhibits aromatase and COX-2 expression as well as PGE(2) production in ESCs, these pharmacologic features might contribute to a therapeutic effect of DNG on endometriosis. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel RNA-binding activity of MYF5 enhances Ccnd1/Cyclin D1 mRNA translation during myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Amaresh C; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Martindale, Jennifer L; Di Germanio, Clara; Yang, Xiaoling; Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Noh, Ji Heon; Zhang, Yongqing; Lehrmann, Elin; Dudekula, Dawood B; De, Supriyo; Becker, Kevin G; White, Elizabeth J; Wilson, Gerald M; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-03-18

    Skeletal muscle contains long multinucleated and contractile structures known as muscle fibers, which arise from the fusion of myoblasts into multinucleated myotubes during myogenesis. The myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) MYF5 is the earliest to be expressed during myogenesis and functions as a transcription factor in muscle progenitor cells (satellite cells) and myocytes. In mouse C2C12 myocytes, MYF5 is implicated in the initial steps of myoblast differentiation into myotubes. Here, using ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation (RIP) analysis, we discovered a novel function for MYF5 as an RNA-binding protein which associated with a subset of myoblast mRNAs. One prominent MYF5 target was Ccnd1 mRNA, which encodes the key cell cycle regulator CCND1 (Cyclin D1). Biotin-RNA pulldown, UV-crosslinking and gel shift experiments indicated that MYF5 was capable of binding the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the coding region (CR) of Ccnd1 mRNA. Silencing MYF5 expression in proliferating myoblasts revealed that MYF5 promoted CCND1 translation and modestly increased transcription of Ccnd1 mRNA. Accordingly, overexpressing MYF5 in C2C12 cells upregulated CCND1 expression while silencing MYF5 reduced myoblast proliferation as well as differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. Moreover, MYF5 silencing reduced myogenesis, while ectopically restoring CCND1 abundance partially rescued the decrease in myogenesis seen after MYF5 silencing. We propose that MYF5 enhances early myogenesis in part by coordinately elevating Ccnd1 transcription and Ccnd1 mRNA translation. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Wnt and β-Catenin Signaling and Skeletal Muscle Myogenesis in Response to Muscle Damage and Resistance Exercise and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Newmire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The factors that regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy in human adults in response to resistance training (RT has largely focused on endogenous endocrine responses. However, the endocrine response to RT as having an obligatory role in muscle hypertrophy has come under scrutiny, as other mechanisms and pathways seem to also be involved in up-regulating muscle protein synthesis (MPS. Skeletal muscle myogenesis is a multifactorial process of tissue growth and repair in response to resistance training is regulated by many factors.  As a result, satellite cell-fused myogenesis is a possible factor in skeletal muscle regeneration and hypertrophy in response to RT.  The Wnt family ligands interact with various receptors and activate different downstream signaling pathways and have been classified as either canonical (β-catenin dependent or non-canonical (β-catenin independent.  Wnt is secreted from numerous tissues in a paracrine fashion. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a highly-regulated and intricate pathway that is essential to skeletal muscle myogenesis.  The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway may influence satellite cells to myogenic commitment, differentiation, and fusion into muscle fibers in response to injury or trauma, self-renewal, and normal basal turnover.  The current literature has shown that, in response mechanical overload from acute resistance exercise and chronic resistance training, that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is stimulated which may actuate the process of muscle repair and hypertrophy in response to exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this review is to elaborate on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling  pathway, the current literature investigating the relationship of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and its effects on myogenesis is response to muscle damage and resistance exercise and training.      Keywords: skeletal muscle, hypertrophy, myogenesis, cell signaling, protein synthesis, resistance

  16. Sumoylation of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor sharp-1 regulates recruitment of the histone methyltransferase G9a and function in myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaju; Shankar, Shilpa Rani; Kher, Devaki; Ling, Belinda Mei Tze; Taneja, Reshma

    2013-06-14

    Sumoylation is an important post-translational modification that alters the activity of many transcription factors. However, the mechanisms that link sumoylation to alterations in chromatin structure, which culminate in tissue specific gene expression, are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that SUMO modification of the transcription factor Sharp-1 is required for its full transcriptional repression activity and function as an inhibitor of skeletal muscle differentiation. Sharp-1 is modified by sumoylation at two conserved lysine residues 240 and 255. Mutation of these SUMO acceptor sites in Sharp-1 does not impact its subcellular localization but attenuates its ability to act as a transcriptional repressor and inhibit myogenic differentiation. Consistently, co-expression of the SUMO protease SENP1 with wild type Sharp-1 abrogates Sharp-1-dependent inhibition of myogenesis. Interestingly, sumoylation acts as a signal for recruitment of the co-repressor G9a. Thus, enrichment of G9a, and histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2), a signature of G9a activity, is dramatically reduced at muscle promoters in cells expressing sumoylation-defective Sharp-1. Our findings demonstrate how sumoylation of Sharp-1 exerts an impact on chromatin structure and transcriptional repression of muscle gene expression through recruitment of G9a.

  17. Sumoylation of the Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Sharp-1 Regulates Recruitment of the Histone Methyltransferase G9a and Function in Myogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaju; Shankar, Shilpa Rani; Kher, Devaki; Ling, Belinda Mei Tze; Taneja, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Sumoylation is an important post-translational modification that alters the activity of many transcription factors. However, the mechanisms that link sumoylation to alterations in chromatin structure, which culminate in tissue specific gene expression, are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that SUMO modification of the transcription factor Sharp-1 is required for its full transcriptional repression activity and function as an inhibitor of skeletal muscle differentiation. Sharp-1 is modified by sumoylation at two conserved lysine residues 240 and 255. Mutation of these SUMO acceptor sites in Sharp-1 does not impact its subcellular localization but attenuates its ability to act as a transcriptional repressor and inhibit myogenic differentiation. Consistently, co-expression of the SUMO protease SENP1 with wild type Sharp-1 abrogates Sharp-1-dependent inhibition of myogenesis. Interestingly, sumoylation acts as a signal for recruitment of the co-repressor G9a. Thus, enrichment of G9a, and histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2), a signature of G9a activity, is dramatically reduced at muscle promoters in cells expressing sumoylation-defective Sharp-1. Our findings demonstrate how sumoylation of Sharp-1 exerts an impact on chromatin structure and transcriptional repression of muscle gene expression through recruitment of G9a. PMID:23637228

  18. Inhibition of MAPK and PKC pathways by 60Co γ-radiation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Guanghong; Ma Yexin; Xiao Jianming

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the signal transduction pathways inhibited by 60 Co γ-radiation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Methods: The cultured VSMC were irradiated with 60 Co γ-radiation of 3.5, 7.0 and 14 Gy respectively. VSMC proliferation was measured by 3 H-TdR incorporation, while PKC, MAPK activities were determined by radioactivity assay. Results: Proliferation of VSMC was inhibited by 7.0, 14 Gy 60 Co γ-irradiation and the activities of PKC, MAPK were decreased significantly. Conclusion: Inhibitory effect of 7.0, 14 Gy 60 Co γ-irradiation on proliferation of VSMC might be resulted from decrease of the activity of PKC, MAPK

  19. Inhibition of Ulmus davidiana Planch (Ulmaceae) on bone resorption mediated by processing of cathepsin K in cultured mouse osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Woon; Park, Jun-Sung; Kim, Kap-Sung; Jin, Un-Ho; Kim, June-Ki; Suh, Seok-Jong; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-04-01

    Ulmus davidiana Planch (Ulmaceae) (UD) has long been known to be antiinflammatory in traditional Korean medicine. This experiment investigated the effects of UD on bone resorption using bone cell culture. Different concentrations of crude extract of UD were added to mouse bone cell culture. The mitochondrial activity of the bone cells after exposure of UD was determined by colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). It was demonstrated that UD has potential effects on bone cell culture without cytotoxicity. The most effective concentration of UD in bone cells was 100 microg/mL. Cathepsin K (Cat K) is the major cysteine protease expressed in osteoclasts and is thought to play a key role in matrix degradation during bone resorption. When mouse long bone cells including osteoclasts and osteoblasts were treated with UD, UD prevented the osteoclast-mediated intracellular processing of Cat K, suggesting that UD may disrupt the intracellular transport of pro Cat K. Since secreted proenzymes have the potential to reenter the cell via the mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, to prevent this possibility, UD was tested in the absence or presence of M6P. Inhibition of Cat K processing by UD was observed in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of M6P resulted in enhanced potency of UD. UD dose-dependently inhibited in vitro bone resorption with a potency similar to that observed for inhibition of Cat K processing. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The Culture of Pediococcus pentosaceus T1 Inhibits Listeria Proliferation in Salmon Fillets and Controls Maturation of Kimchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongho Jang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate the antilisterial effect of Pediococcus pentosaceus T1, which was isolated from kimchi, and to assess its potential for extending the shelf life of salmon and kimchi. Pediococcus pentosaceus T1 culture eff ectively inhibited proliferation of Listeria monocytogenes in a dose-dependent manner in a salmon-based medium. Antilisterial effect of the culture was stronger than that of nisin, an antibacterial peptide, as evidenced by lower minimum inhibitory concentration value (20 mg/mL compared to nisin (over 20 mg/mL. P. pentosaceus T1 culture also effectively inhibited the growth of Listeria in salmon fi llet. In particular, the culture (6 g per 100 mL showed a stronger inhibitory effect than sodium hypochlorite (0.2 mg/mL, a disinfectant used in food processing. In kimchi fermentation, the treatment with P. pentosaceus T1 culture suppressed changes of acidity and pH during maturation. The inhibitory eff ect of the culture on kimchi lactic acid bacteria, which include Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus sakei, led to a drastic decrease in maturation rates of kimchi. Moreover, sensory test on kimchi treated with P. pentosaceus T1 showed that the culture improved overall acceptability of kimchi, which can be observed in higher scores of sourness, texture, off-flavour and mouthfeel compared with untreated kimchi. The results of this study suggest that kimchi-derived P. pentosaceus T1 could be a potential antilisterial agent in fi sh products as well as a starter to control overmaturation of kimchi.

  1. Inhibition of in vitro myogenic differentiation by cellular transcription factor E2F1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J; Helin, K; Jin, P

    1995-01-01

    expression is irreversibly down-regulated during differentiation of C2C12 myocytes. Furthermore, deregulated E2F1 expression in C2C12 cells prevented myogenic differentiation. This inhibition of myogenesis was associated with the repression of myogenin expression and an elevated cyclin D1 expression...

  2. Manipulation of environmental oxygen modifies reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation during myogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel McCormick

    2016-08-01

    Data demonstrate that satellite cell proliferation increased when cells were grown in 6% O2 compared with 20% O2. Myoblasts grown in 20% O2 showed an increase in DCF fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myoblasts grown at 6% O2. Myotubes grown in 20% O2 also showed an increase in DCF and DAF-FM fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myotubes grown in 6% O2. The catalase and MnSOD contents were also increased in myoblasts and myotubes that were maintained in 20% O2 compared with myoblasts and myotubes grown in 6% O2. These data indicate that intracellular RONS activities in myoblasts and myotubes at rest are influenced by changes in environmental oxygen concentration and that the increased ROS may influence myogenesis in a negative manner.

  3. Shaping leg muscles in Drosophila: role of ladybird, a conserved regulator of appendicular myogenesis.

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    Tariq Maqbool

    Full Text Available Legs are locomotor appendages used by a variety of evolutionarily distant vertebrates and invertebrates. The primary biological leg function, locomotion, requires the formation of a specialised appendicular musculature. Here we report evidence that ladybird, an orthologue of the Lbx1 gene recognised as a hallmark of appendicular myogenesis in vertebrates, is expressed in leg myoblasts, and regulates the shape, ultrastructure and functional properties of leg muscles in Drosophila. Ladybird expression is progressively activated in myoblasts associated with the imaginal leg disc and precedes that of the founder cell marker dumbfounded. The RNAi-mediated attenuation of ladybird expression alters properties of developing myotubes, impairing their ability to grow and interact with the internal tendons and epithelial attachment sites. It also affects sarcomeric ultrastructure, resulting in reduced leg muscle performance and impaired mobility in surviving flies. The over-expression of ladybird also results in an abnormal pattern of dorsally located leg muscles, indicating different requirements for ladybird in dorsal versus ventral muscles. This differential effect is consistent with the higher level of Ladybird in ventrally located myoblasts and with positive ladybird regulation by extrinsic Wingless signalling from the ventral epithelium. In addition, ladybird expression correlates with that of FGF receptor Heartless and the read-out of FGF signalling downstream of FGF. FGF signals regulate the number of leg disc associated myoblasts and are able to accelerate myogenic differentiation by activating ladybird, leading to ectopic muscle fibre formation. A key role for ladybird in leg myogenesis is further supported by its capacity to repress vestigial and to down-regulate the vestigial-governed flight muscle developmental programme. Thus in Drosophila like in vertebrates, appendicular muscles develop from a specialised pool of myoblasts expressing

  4. A Pax3/Dmrt2/Myf5 regulatory cascade functions at the onset of myogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Sato

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available All skeletal muscle progenitor cells in the body derive from the dermomyotome, the dorsal epithelial domain of developing somites. These multipotent stem cells express Pax3, and this expression is maintained in the myogenic lineage where Pax3 plays an important role. Identification of Pax3 targets is therefore important for understanding the mechanisms that underlie the onset of myogenesis. In a microarray screen of Pax3-GFP sorted cells, with analysis on Pax3 gain and loss of function genetic backgrounds, we identify Dmrt2, expressed in the dermomyotome, as a Pax3 target. In vitro gel shift analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation with in vivo extracts show that Pax3 binds to a conserved 286 bp sequence, situated at -18 kb from Dmrt2. This sequence directs reporter transgene expression to the somite, and this is severely affected when the Pax3 site is mutated in the context of the locus. In Dmrt2 mutant embryos, somite maturation is perturbed and the skeletal muscle of the myotome is abnormal. We now report that the onset of myogenesis is also affected. This depends on activation, in the epaxial dermomyotome, of the myogenic determination gene, Myf5, through its early epaxial enhancer. This sequence contains sites that bind Dmrt2, which belongs to the DM class of DNA-binding proteins. Mutation of these sites compromises activity of the enhancer in transgenic embryos where the reporter transgene is under the control of the Myf5 epaxial enhancer. Transactivation of this site by Dmrt2 is demonstrated in vitro, and conditional overexpression of Dmrt2 in Pax3 expressing cells in the somite confirms the role of this factor in the activation of Myf5. These results reveal a novel genetic network, comprising a Pax3/Dmrt2/Myf5 regulatory cascade that operates in stem cells of the epaxial dermomyotome to initiate skeletal muscle formation.

  5. Shaping leg muscles in Drosophila: role of ladybird, a conserved regulator of appendicular myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tariq; Soler, Cedric; Jagla, Teresa; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Lodha, Neha; Palliyil, Sudhir; VijayRaghavan, K; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2006-12-27

    Legs are locomotor appendages used by a variety of evolutionarily distant vertebrates and invertebrates. The primary biological leg function, locomotion, requires the formation of a specialised appendicular musculature. Here we report evidence that ladybird, an orthologue of the Lbx1 gene recognised as a hallmark of appendicular myogenesis in vertebrates, is expressed in leg myoblasts, and regulates the shape, ultrastructure and functional properties of leg muscles in Drosophila. Ladybird expression is progressively activated in myoblasts associated with the imaginal leg disc and precedes that of the founder cell marker dumbfounded. The RNAi-mediated attenuation of ladybird expression alters properties of developing myotubes, impairing their ability to grow and interact with the internal tendons and epithelial attachment sites. It also affects sarcomeric ultrastructure, resulting in reduced leg muscle performance and impaired mobility in surviving flies. The over-expression of ladybird also results in an abnormal pattern of dorsally located leg muscles, indicating different requirements for ladybird in dorsal versus ventral muscles. This differential effect is consistent with the higher level of Ladybird in ventrally located myoblasts and with positive ladybird regulation by extrinsic Wingless signalling from the ventral epithelium. In addition, ladybird expression correlates with that of FGF receptor Heartless and the read-out of FGF signalling downstream of FGF. FGF signals regulate the number of leg disc associated myoblasts and are able to accelerate myogenic differentiation by activating ladybird, leading to ectopic muscle fibre formation. A key role for ladybird in leg myogenesis is further supported by its capacity to repress vestigial and to down-regulate the vestigial-governed flight muscle developmental programme. Thus in Drosophila like in vertebrates, appendicular muscles develop from a specialised pool of myoblasts expressing ladybird/Lbx1. The

  6. The role of Na+/K+-ATPase during chick skeletal myogenesis.

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    Taissa Neustadt Oliveira

    Full Text Available The formation of a vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber involves a series of sequential and interdependent events that occurs during embryogenesis. One of these events is myoblast fusion which has been widely studied, yet not completely understood. It was previously shown that during myoblast fusion there is an increase in the expression of Na+/K+-ATPase. This fact prompted us to search for a role of the enzyme during chick in vitro skeletal myogenesis. Chick myogenic cells were treated with the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor ouabain in four different concentrations (0.01-10 μM and analyzed. Our results show that 0.01, 0.1 and 1 μM ouabain did not induce changes in cell viability, whereas 10 μM induced a 45% decrease. We also observed a reduction in the number and thickness of multinucleated myotubes and a decrease in the number of myoblasts after 10 μM ouabain treatment. We tested the involvement of MEK-ERK and p38 signaling pathways in the ouabain-induced effects during myogenesis, since both pathways have been associated with Na+/K+-ATPase. The MEK-ERK inhibitor U0126 alone did not alter cell viability and did not change ouabain effect. The p38 inhibitor SB202190 alone or together with 10 μM ouabain did not alter cell viability. Our results show that the 10 μM ouabain effects in myofiber formation do not involve the MEK-ERK or the p38 signaling pathways, and therefore are probably related to the pump activity function of the Na+/K+-ATPase.

  7. TRAF6 regulates satellite stem cell self-renewal and function during regenerative myogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindi, Sajedah M.; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Satellite cells are a stem cell population within adult muscle and are responsible for myofiber regeneration upon injury. Satellite cell dysfunction has been shown to underlie the loss of skeletal muscle mass in many acquired and genetic muscle disorders. The transcription factor paired box-protein-7 (PAX7) is indispensable for supplementing the reservoir of satellite cells and driving regeneration in normal and diseased muscle. TNF receptor–associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an adaptor protein and an E3 ubiquitin ligase that mediates the activation of multiple cell signaling pathways in a context-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrated that TRAF6-mediated signaling is critical for homeostasis of satellite cells and their function during regenerative myogenesis. Selective deletion of Traf6 in satellite cells of adult mice led to profound muscle regeneration defects and dramatically reduced levels of PAX7 and late myogenesis markers. TRAF6 was required for the activation of MAPKs ERK1/2 and JNK1/2, which in turn activated the transcription factor c-JUN, which binds the Pax7 promoter and augments Pax7 expression. Moreover, TRAF6/c-JUN signaling repressed the levels of the microRNAs miR-1 and miR-206, which promote differentiation, to maintain PAX7 levels in satellite cells. We also determined that satellite cell–specific deletion of Traf6 exaggerates the dystrophic phenotype in the mdx (a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy) mouse by blunting the regeneration of injured myofibers. Collectively, our study reveals an essential role for TRAF6 in satellite stem cell function. PMID:26619121

  8. Uptake of barium and strontium by cress (Lepidium sativum) in water culture and the presence of an inhibiting soluble factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestling, O.; Kopp, P.; Burkart, W.

    1991-01-01

    Seeds of cress were sown in various densities on plastic grids placed in half-litre dishes filled with either a dilute salt solution or distilled water. After 2 days the radionuclides 133 Ba, 134 Cs and 85 Sr were added, and after another 5 days the plants were harvested and the radioactivity measured by γ-ray spectrometry. Plants in alternated sparse cultures concentrated less radioactivity of Ba and Sr than the corresponding non-alternated cultures. Furthermore, when water from very dense cultures on which plants had grown for a week was sterile-filtered and added to fresh cultures, it was shown that this conditioned water strongly inhibited the uptake of Ba and Sr. The difference in radionuclide concentration in the plants as a function of plant density disappeared when the concentrations of Ca and Mg in the nutrient solution were raised to 0.15 and 0.40 mM, respectively. Apparently a chelating substance, possibly excreted from the plant roots, is responsible for the inhibition of the uptake of bivalent cations, and this agent becomes saturated when bivalent cations are present at sufficiently high concentrations. (author)

  9. Nuclear bodies reorganize during myogenesis in vitro and are differentially disrupted by expression of FSHD-associated DUX4

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    Sachiko Homma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear bodies, such as nucleoli, PML bodies, and SC35 speckles, are dynamic sub-nuclear structures that regulate multiple genetic and epigenetic processes. Additional regulation is provided by RNA/DNA handling proteins, notably TDP-43 and FUS, which have been linked to ALS pathology. Previous work showed that mouse cell line myotubes have fewer but larger nucleoli than myoblasts, and we had found that nuclear aggregation of TDP-43 in human myotubes was induced by expression of DUX4-FL, a transcription factor that is aberrantly expressed and causes pathology in facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD. However, questions remained about nuclear bodies in human myogenesis and in muscle disease. Methods We examined nucleoli, PML bodies, SC35 speckles, TDP-43, and FUS in myoblasts and myotubes derived from healthy donors and from patients with FSHD, laminin-alpha-2-deficiency (MDC1A, and alpha-sarcoglycan-deficiency (LGMD2D. We further examined how these nuclear bodies and proteins were affected by DUX4-FL expression. Results We found that nucleoli, PML bodies, and SC35 speckles reorganized during differentiation in vitro, with all three becoming less abundant in myotube vs. myoblast nuclei. In addition, though PML bodies did not change in size, both nucleoli and SC35 speckles were larger in myotube than myoblast nuclei. Similar patterns of nuclear body reorganization occurred in healthy control, MDC1A, and LGMD2D cultures, as well as in the large fraction of nuclei that did not show DUX4-FL expression in FSHD cultures. In contrast, nuclei that expressed endogenous or exogenous DUX4-FL, though retaining normal nucleoli, showed disrupted morphology of some PML bodies and most SC35 speckles and also co-aggregation of FUS with TDP-43. Conclusions Nucleoli, PML bodies, and SC35 speckles reorganize during human myotube formation in vitro. These nuclear body reorganizations are likely needed to carry out the distinct gene transcription and

  10. Pertussis toxin treatment does not block inhibition by atrial natriuretic factor of aldosterone secretion in cultured bovine zona glomerulosa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lean, A.; Cantin, M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) potently inhibits PGE or forskolin-stimulation aldosterone secretion in bovine zona glomerulosa (ZG) by acting through specific high affinity receptors. In order to evaluate the functional role of the regulatory protein N/sub i/ and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity (AC) in ZG, the authors have studied the effect of treatment with PT on inhibition by ANF of aldosterone production. Primary cultures of ZG were treated for 18 hours in serum-free F12 medium with (0-100 ng/ml PT). No effect of PT pretreatment was observed either on basal, PGE-stimulated or ANF-inhibited levels of steroidogenesis. When membranes prepared from control ZG were ADP-ribosylated with [ 32 P] NAD in the presence of PT, two toxin-specific bands with 39 Kd and 41 Kd were documented on SDS gel. Cell pretreatment with as low as 1 ng/ml drastically reduced further labelling of these two bands while higher doses completely abolished them. Since PT treatment covalently modifies completely the toxin substrate without altering ANF inhibition of adrenal steroidogenesis, the authors conclude that N/sub i/ is not involved in the mode of action of ANF on aldosterone production

  11. TEAD1 inhibits prolactin gene expression in cultured human uterine decidual cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Cherie A.; Bachurski, Cindy J.; Schroeder, Jennifer; Stanek, Jerzy; Handwerger, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Forced overexpression of TEAD1 in human uterine fibroblast (HUF) and human endometrial stromal cells markedly inhibited prolactin promoter activity in both cell types in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal inhibition of greater than 90%. Conversely, the knockdown of TEAD1 expression in HUF cells with a TEAD1 siRNA resulted in a 75–80% increase in prolactin mRNA levels (P

  12. Policosanol inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis and enhances low density lipoprotein processing in cultured human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, R; Fernandez, S I; Del Rio, A; Gonzalez, R M; Fraga, V; Amor, A M; Mas, R M

    1994-01-01

    Policosanol is a mixture of aliphatic primary alcohols isolated and purified from sugar cane wax, that induces cholesterol-lowering effects in experimental models and human beings. When human lung fibroblasts were incubated with policosanol for 48 hours prior to the experiment, a dose dependent inhibition of 14C-acetate incorporation into total cholesterol was observed, whereas labeled mevalonate incorporation was not inhibited. Even when cholesterol synthesis was not strongly inhibited, low density lipoprotein (LDL) processing was markedly enhanced. Thus, LDL binding, internalization and degradation were significantly increased after policosanol treatment. In addition, despite the fact that'cholesterol generation was not inhibited at the lowest dose of policosanol assayed, LDL processing was significantly increased. The current data indicate that policosanol inhibits cholesterol synthesis at the earliest steps of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. On the other hand, this study suggests that the increase in LDL processing may be partially explained by the inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis, even though an sterol-independent mechanism might be responsible for the enhancement of LDL-receptor activity.

  13. Dienogest inhibits BrdU uptake with G0/G1 arrest in cultured endometriotic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Osuga, Yutaka; Morimoto, Chieko; Hirata, Tetsuya; Hirota, Yasushi; Yano, Tetsu; Taketani, Yuji

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the effect of dienogest on the proliferation of endometriotic stromal cells. Comparative and laboratory study. University of Tokyo Hospital. Endometriotic stromal cells were isolated and cultured from ovarian endometriomas of patients undergoing surgery. Dienogest was added to the cultured endometriotic stromal cells. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into DNA of the endometriotic stromal cells was measured by ELISA. Cell cycle analysis of the cultured endometriotic stromal cells was performed by flow cytometry. Dienogest at concentration of 10(-7) M and 10(-6) M significantly inhibited BrdU incorporation into DNA at 24 and 48 hours. Dienogest significantly increased the cells in G0/G1 phase and reduced the cells in S phase and G2/M phase in 24 and 48 hours. The present study indicates that dienogest can inhibit the proliferation of the endometriotic stromal cells with G0/G1 arrest, suggesting a possible direct effect of dienogest in the treatment of endometriosis.

  14. The Theory of Social Control and the Social Psychology of Dissatisfaction: Inhibition, regression and isolation in a cultural context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Selymes, PhD Candidate

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Theory of Social Control (TSC is grounded in satisfaction and happiness research. The study investigated the reasons behind relatively low levels of civil and personal satisfaction, subjective social well-being and experienced happiness in the post-communist Hungarian social context. The basic social process uncovered in the research is self-situating, which involves a continuous assessment of social control, which occurs on three psychological dimensions: activity, fairness and connectedness, operated via social flow. The culturally salient outcome of self-situating in Hungary is self-victimizing, meaning a subjective loss of control on all three dimensions. Some of the most important emotional-motivational consequences of self-victimizing are inhibition, regression and isolation, which contribute to various socio-cultural phenomenon such as distrust, bystander strategies, pessimism or anomie across a number of social situations. Based on the emerging theory, the concept of subjective social control is introduced and an expanded three-dimensional model of civil satisfaction, comfort and contribution, along with psychological and cultural implications, are discussed.Key words: social control, self-situating, self-victimizing, activity, fairness, connectedness, inhibition, fury, isolation

  15. Inhibition of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in Artemisia annua L.: a novel approach to reduce oxidative browning in plant tissue culture.

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    Andrew Maxwell Phineas Jones

    Full Text Available Oxidative browning is a common and often severe problem in plant tissue culture systems caused by the accumulation and oxidation of phenolic compounds. The current study was conducted to investigate a novel preventative approach to address this problem by inhibiting the activity of the phenylalanine ammonia lyase enzyme (PAL, thereby reducing the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds. This was accomplished by incorporating 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP, a competitive PAL inhibitor, into culture media of Artemisia annua as a model system. Addition of AIP into culture media resulted in significant reductions in visual tissue browning, a reduction in total phenol content, as well as absorbance and autoflourescence of tissue extracts. Reduced tissue browning was accompanied with a significant increase in growth on cytokinin based medium. Microscopic observations demonstrated that phenolic compounds accumulated in discrete cells and that these cells were more prevalent in brown tissue. These cells were highly plasmolyzed and often ruptured during examination, demonstrating a mechanism in which phenolics are released into media in this system. These data indicate that inhibiting phenylpropanoid biosynthesis with AIP is an effective approach to reduce tissue browning in A. annua. Additional experiments with Ulmus americana and Acer saccharum indicate this approach is effective in many species and it could have a wide application in systems where oxidative browning restricts the development of biotechnologies.

  16. Inhibition of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in Artemisia annua L.: a novel approach to reduce oxidative browning in plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew Maxwell Phineas; Saxena, Praveen Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative browning is a common and often severe problem in plant tissue culture systems caused by the accumulation and oxidation of phenolic compounds. The current study was conducted to investigate a novel preventative approach to address this problem by inhibiting the activity of the phenylalanine ammonia lyase enzyme (PAL), thereby reducing the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds. This was accomplished by incorporating 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), a competitive PAL inhibitor, into culture media of Artemisia annua as a model system. Addition of AIP into culture media resulted in significant reductions in visual tissue browning, a reduction in total phenol content, as well as absorbance and autoflourescence of tissue extracts. Reduced tissue browning was accompanied with a significant increase in growth on cytokinin based medium. Microscopic observations demonstrated that phenolic compounds accumulated in discrete cells and that these cells were more prevalent in brown tissue. These cells were highly plasmolyzed and often ruptured during examination, demonstrating a mechanism in which phenolics are released into media in this system. These data indicate that inhibiting phenylpropanoid biosynthesis with AIP is an effective approach to reduce tissue browning in A. annua. Additional experiments with Ulmus americana and Acer saccharum indicate this approach is effective in many species and it could have a wide application in systems where oxidative browning restricts the development of biotechnologies.

  17. Betulinic acid inhibits cell proliferation and fibronectin accumulation in rat glomerular mesangial cells cultured under high glucose condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Mei; Qi, Xue-Lin; Yang, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Xiu-de

    2016-05-01

    Glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation have been recognized as major pathogenic events in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Betulinic acid (BA), (3β-hydroxy-lup-20(29)-en-28-oic acid), is a naturally occurring pentacyclic lupane group triterpenoid, and it has been shown to possess glucose-lowering property. However, the role of BA on MC proliferation and ECM accumulation in diabetic condition remains unclear. So, in the present study, we investigated the role of BA on cell proliferation and ECM accumulation in rat glomerular MCs cultured under high glucose (HG) condition. In the current study, we demonstrated that BA suppressed HG-induced MC proliferation, arrested HG-induced cell-cycle progression, reversed HG-inhibited expression of p21(Waf1/Cip1) and p27(Kip1). It also suppressed HG-induced fibronectin (FN) expression in MCs. Furthermore, BA inhibited HG-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38MAPK in MCs. In conclusion, our present study demonstrated that BA inhibited HG-induced cell proliferation and FN expression in MCs via inhibiting ERK1/2 and p38MAPK pathways. Thus, BA may serve as a potential drug for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of release of inflammatory mediators in primary and cultured cells by a Chinese herbal medicine formula for allergic rhinitis

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    McPhee Sarah

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We demonstrated that a Chinese herbal formula, which we refer to as RCM-101, developed from a traditional Chinese medicine formula, reduced nasal and non-nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR. The present study in primary and cultured cells was undertaken to investigate the effects of RCM-101 on the production/release of inflammatory mediators known to be involved in SAR. Methods Compound 48/80-induced histamine release was studied in rat peritoneal mast cells. Production of leukotriene B4 induced by the calcium ionophore A23187 was studied in porcine neutrophils using an HPLC assay and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 production was studied in murine macrophage (Raw 264.7 cells by immune-enzyme assay. Expression of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 was determined in Raw 264.7 cells, using western blotting techniques. Results RCM-101 (1–100 μg/mL produced concentration-dependent inhibition of compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 release from Raw 264.7 cells. Over the range 1 – 10 μg/mL, it inhibited A23187-induced leukotriene B4 production in porcine neutrophils. In addition, RCM-101 (100 μg/mL inhibited the expression of COX-2 protein but did not affect that of COX-1. Conclusion The findings indicate that RCM-101 inhibits the release and/or synthesis of histamine, leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin E2 in cultured cells. These interactions of RCM-101 with multiple inflammatory mediators are likely to be related to its ability to reduce symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

  19. Inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis in cultured fibroblasts by D003, a mixture of very long chain saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, R; Más, R; Amor, A M; Rodeiros, I; Gonzalez, R M; Alfonso, J L

    2001-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of D003, a mixture of very long chain saturated fatty acids isolated and purified from sugar cane wax, on cholesterol biosynthesis in cultured fibroblasts. Cholesterol biosynthesis is regulated through feedback regulation of at least two sequentially acting enzymes, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase and reductase. They are up-regulated when sterol levels fall and down-regulated when sterol levels rise. The exposure of cultured fibroblasts to a lipid-depleted medium (LDM) and D003 (0.05-50 microg ml(-1)) for 12 h inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, cholesterol biosynthesis from 14C-labelled acetate (33-68%). The addition of D003 at concentrations inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis from labelled acetate significantly decreased incorporation of radioactivity from 3H2O into sterols, but not from 14C-mevalonate. These data indicate that D003 inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis by interfering with early steps of cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. We reasoned that D003 acts directly on HMG-CoA reductase, the main regulatory enzyme of cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. However, when enzyme activity was measured in cell extracts in the presence of various concentrations of D003 (0.5-50 microg ml(-1)), reductase activity was not inhibited. Thus, there was no evidence for a competitive or non-competitive inhibition of enzyme activity by D003. Treatment with D003 significantly suppressed (68%) the enzyme up-regulation when cells were cultured in LDM, which suggests a depression of de novo synthesis of HMG-CoA reductase and/or a stimulation of its degradation. However, since the suppressive action of D003 on cholesterol biosynthesis was observed in metabolic conditions under which synthase up-regulation was also enhanced, we cannot rule out a possible effect of D003 on HMG-CoA synthase. Thus, further studies are needed to clarify the precise mechanism of the inhibitory effect of D003 on cholesterol

  20. Preferred M2 Polarization by ASC-Based Hydrogel Accelerated Angiogenesis and Myogenesis in Volumetric Muscle Loss Rats

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    Hong Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Volumetric muscle loss (VML injury resulted from massive muscle defects and diseases for which there are still no effective therapeutic treatments. This study aimed to investigate the effects of rat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rASCs and rASCs-conditioned medium- (CM- based type I collagen hydrogel on macrophage (MP transition, myogenesis, and vascularization in the rat VML model. Laser Doppler results demonstrated much higher blood flow in the rASC- and CM-based hydrogel groups. qRT-PCR, hematoxylin and eosin, immunofluorescence, and Sirius Red staining manifested that both rASCs and CM-based hydrogel implantation accelerated muscle repair with upregulated angiogenesis and myogenesis, attenuated inflammation while facilitating M2 transition, and decreased the collagen deposition compared with the hydrogel group. In vitro experiments indicated that factors secreted from polarized M2 MPs could accelerate the migration and tube formation capacities of HUVECs. These results suggested that rASCs exerted immunomodulatory effects on MPs which further enhanced the proangiogenic potential on ECs to promote myogenesis and angiogenesis during muscle repair. These fundamental results support further clinical applications of ASCs for muscle loss injury.

  1. Irisin inhibition of growth hormone secretion in cultured tilapia pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Anji; Li, Xin; Jiang, Quan

    2017-01-05

    Irisin, the product of fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5) gene, is well-documented to be a regulator of energy metabolism. At present, not much is known about its biological function in non-mammalian species. In this study, a full-length tilapia FDNC5 was cloned and its tissue expression pattern has been confirmed. Based on the sequence obtained, we produced and purified recombinant irisin which could induce uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) gene expression in tilapia hepatocytes. Further, the rabbit polyclonal irisin antiserum was produced and its specificity was confirmed by antiserum preabsorption. In tilapia pituitary cells, irisin inhibited growth hormone (GH) gene expression and secretion and triggered rapid phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2, and p38 MAPK. Furthermore, irisin-inhibited GH mRNA expression could be prevented by inhibiting PI3K/Akt, MEK1/2, and p38 MAPK, respectively. Apparently, fish irisin can act directly at the pituitary level to inhibit GH transcript expression via multiple signaling pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of Dengue Virus 3 in Mammalian Cell Culture by Synthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Purpose: To evaluate the inhibition of Dengue virus 3 by synthetic siRNAs targeting the untranslated regions UTR and structural regions of DENV3 genome in Vero-81 cell line. Methods: Vero-81 cells transfected with synthetic siRNAs were challenged by DENV3. The effectiveness of siRNAs was confirmed by four ...

  3. Inhibition of dengue virus 3 in mammalian cell culture by synthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the inhibition of Dengue virus 3 by synthetic siRNAs targeting the untranslated regions UTR and structural regions of DENV3 genome in Vero-81 cell line. Methods: Vero-81 cells transfected with synthetic siRNAs were challenged by DENV3. The effectiveness of siRNAs was confirmed by four ...

  4. Use of Bacteriocinogenic Cultures without Inhibiting Cheese Associated Nonstarter Lactic Acid Bacteria; A Trial with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Rossi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocinogenic cultures can represent a natural way to increase the safety of cheeses made from raw milk, in which a relevant role in ripening and flavor formation is exerted by the nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB. Since the latter can be inhibited by bacteriocin producers, this study evaluated to which extent a nisinogenic culture inoculated at low initial levels can affect the growth rate and peptide degradation activity of the nisin-sensitive cheese isolate Lactobacillus plantarum LZ by comparison with its isogenic variant, L. plantarum LZNI, with increased immunity to nisin. A growth delay of the nisin sensitive strain was observed only when its initial number was 100-fold lower than the nisin producer and nisin was added as an inducer of its own production. In this case, the amount of free α-amino groups was significantly different between cultures of L. plantarum LZ and LZNI only at Day 1. Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC highlighted a few differences between the peptide profiles of co-cultures L. plantarum LZ and LZNI. However, results showed that the bacteriocin producer did not dramatically influence the behavior of the sensitive NSLAB and that the evaluation of the effects on microbial contaminants in cheese is worthwhile.

  5. The IL-8 release from cultured human keratinocytes, mediated by antibodies to bullous pemphigoid autoantigen 180, is inhibited by dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, E; Reimer, S; Kruse, N; Bröcker, E-B; Zillikens, D

    2001-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a subepidermal blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to the hemidesmosomal 180 kD BP autoantigen (BP180). However, the binding of autoantibodies to BP180 alone is not sufficient for blister formation in this disease and the infiltration of neutrophils into the skin is required. Dapsone and nicotinamide inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis and are used effectively in treating BP. IL-8 is a known chemoattractant for neutrophils and has been implicated in the inflammatory process of both human and experimental murine BP. We have recently shown that antibodies to BP180 mediate a dose and time-dependent release of IL-6 and IL-8 from cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). In the present study, we addressed the question whether dapsone or nicotinamide influence this cytokine release. We demonstrate that dapsone, but not nicotinamide, in its pharmacological range, inhibits the IL-8, but not the IL-6 release from NHEK, induced by anti-BP180 IgG, in a dose-dependent fashion as detected by ELISA. IL-8 mRNA levels, as determined by RT-PCR, were the same in cells treated with BP IgG alone compared to cells treated with BP IgG plus dapsone. This observation suggests that dapsone inhibits the BP IgG-induced IL-8 release from cultured NHEK by mechanisms at the post-transcriptional level. Our findings contribute to the understanding how dapsone leads to a reduced influx of neutrophils into BP lesions and, finally, to the cessation of blister formation in this disease. PMID:11359455

  6. Comparative expression profiling identifies differential roles for Myogenin and p38α MAPK signaling in myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi-Cai; Zha, Xiao-Hui; Faralli, Hervé; Yin, Hang; Louis-Jeune, Caroline; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Pranckeviciene, Erinija; Muñoz-Cànoves, Pura; Rudnicki, Michael A; Brand, Marjorie; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Dilworth, F Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation is mediated by a complex gene expression program requiring both the muscle-specific transcription factor Myogenin (Myog) and p38α MAPK (p38α) signaling. However, the relative contribution of Myog and p38α to the formation of mature myotubes remains unknown. Here, we have uncoupled the activity of Myog from that of p38α to gain insight into the individual roles of these proteins in myogenesis. Comparative expression profiling confirmed that Myog activates the expression of genes involved in muscle function. Furthermore, we found that in the absence of p38α signaling, Myog expression leads to the down-regulation of genes involved in cell cycle progression. Consistent with this, the expression of Myog is sufficient to induce cell cycle exit. Interestingly, p38α-defective, Myog-expressing myoblasts fail to form multinucleated myotubes, suggesting an important role for p38α in cell fusion. Through the analysis of p38α up-regulated genes, the tetraspanin CD53 was identified as a candidate fusion protein, a role confirmed both ex vivo in primary myoblasts, and in vivo during myofiber regeneration in mice. Thus, our study has revealed an unexpected role for Myog in mediating cell cycle exit and has identified an essential role for p38α in cell fusion through the up-regulation of CD53.

  7. Circ-ZNF609 Is a Circular RNA that Can Be Translated and Functions in Myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnini, Ivano; Di Timoteo, Gaia; Rossi, Francesca; Morlando, Mariangela; Briganti, Francesca; Sthandier, Olga; Fatica, Alessandro; Santini, Tiziana; Andronache, Adrian; Wade, Mark; Laneve, Pietro; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Bozzoni, Irene

    2017-04-06

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) constitute a family of transcripts with unique structures and still largely unknown functions. Their biogenesis, which proceeds via a back-splicing reaction, is fairly well characterized, whereas their role in the modulation of physiologically relevant processes is still unclear. Here we performed expression profiling of circRNAs during in vitro differentiation of murine and human myoblasts, and we identified conserved species regulated in myogenesis and altered in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A high-content functional genomic screen allowed the study of their functional role in muscle differentiation. One of them, circ-ZNF609, resulted in specifically controlling myoblast proliferation. Circ-ZNF609 contains an open reading frame spanning from the start codon, in common with the linear transcript, and terminating at an in-frame STOP codon, created upon circularization. Circ-ZNF609 is associated with heavy polysomes, and it is translated into a protein in a splicing-dependent and cap-independent manner, providing an example of a protein-coding circRNA in eukaryotes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Azelnidipine inhibits cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cell death induced by cyclic mechanical stretch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    Full Text Available Acute aortic dissection is the most common life-threatening vascular disease, with sudden onset of severe pain and a high fatality rate. Clarifying the detailed mechanism for aortic dissection is of great significance for establishing effective pharmacotherapy for this high mortality disease. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of biomechanical stretch, which mimics an acute rise in blood pressure using an experimental apparatus of stretching loads in vitro, on rat aortic smooth muscle cell (RASMC death. Then, we examined the effects of azelnidipine and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors on mechanical stretch-induced RASMC death. The major findings of the present study are as follows: (1 cyclic mechanical stretch on RASMC caused cell death in a time-dependent manner up to 4 h; (2 cyclic mechanical stretch on RASMC induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 activation with peaks at 10 min; (3 azelnidipine inhibited RASMC death in a concentration-dependent manner as well as inhibited JNK and p38 activation by mechanical stretch; and (4 SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor and SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor protected against stretch-induced RASMC death; (5 Antioxidants, diphenylene iodonium and tempol failed to inhibit stretch-induced RASMC death. On the basis of the above findings, we propose a possible mechanism where an acute rise in blood pressure increases biomechanical stress on the arterial walls, which induces RASMC death, and thus, may lead to aortic dissection. Azelnidipine may be used as a pharmacotherapeutic agent for prevention of aortic dissection independent of its blood pressure lowering effect.

  9. Effects of end-product inhibition of Cellulomonas uda anaerobic growth on cellobiose chemostat culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermoun, Z; Gaudin, C; Belaich, J P

    1988-01-01

    Cellulomonas uda was grown anaerobically in a chemostat with 3.33 and 11.41 mM cellobiose in the feed medium at dilution rates varying from 0.017 to 0.29/h. Unusual results obtained were analyzed by using curves simulating the steady-state biomass. This unusual behavior could be accounted for by a classical growth model taking end-product inhibition into account. Acetate has been identified to be the major inhibitor in the experimental conditions used. Parameters calculated from experimental observations gave theoretical curves of biomass production versus dilution rate which fitted the experimental points very well. PMID:3131311

  10. Radiation-induced inhibition of human endothelial cells replicating in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGowin, R.L.; Lewis, L.J.; Mason, R.E.; Borke, M.K.; Hoak, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of some tumors may depend upon the sensitivity of their microvasculature to radiation. Heretofore, the dose-response of human endothelial cells replicating in tissue culture has not been published. In studies reported here, we exposed flasks containing 4 to 7 x 10 4 genetically identical human endothelial cells to doses of x irradiation from 125 to 1000 rad. During the phase of logarithmic growth, cell counts were compared to those of an unirradiated control to construct a dose--response curve. Similar studies were performed with normal fibroblasts. We found that 160 rad suppressed endothelial cell replication by 37 percent. Although recovery was evident with doses of 500 rad, no net increase in cell number occurred in 3 weeks in flasks of endothelial cells that received 750 or 1000 rad. Fibroblasts were slightly less sensitive under these conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a radiation dose--response curve for human endothelial cells replicating in culture

  11. Cranberry Products Inhibit Adherence of P-Fimbriated Escherichia Coli to Primary Cultured Bladder and Vaginal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K.; Chou, M. Y.; Howell, A.; Wobbe, C.; Grady, R.; Stapleton, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cranberry proanthocyanidins have been identified as possible inhibitors of Escherichia coli adherence to uroepithelial cells. However, little is known about the dose range of this effect. Furthermore, it has not been studied directly in the urogenital system. To address these issues we tested the effect of a cranberry powder and proanthocyanidin extract on adherence of a P-fimbriated uropathogenic E. coli isolate to 2 new urogenital model systems, namely primary cultured bladder epithelial cells and vaginal epithelial cells. Materials and Methods E. coli IA2 was pre-incubated with a commercially available cranberry powder (9 mg proanthocyanidin per gm) or with increasing concentrations of proanthocyanidin extract. Adherence of E. coli IA2 to primary cultured bladder epithelial cells or vaginal epithelial cells was measured before and after exposure to these products. Results Cranberry powder decreased mean adherence of E. coli IA2 to vaginal epithelial cells from 18.6 to 1.8 bacteria per cell (p Cranberry products can inhibit E. coli adherence to biologically relevant model systems of primary cultured bladder and vaginal epithelial cells. This effect occurs in a dose dependent relationship. These findings provide further mechanistic evidence and biological plausibility for the role of cranberry products for preventing urinary tract infection. PMID:17509358

  12. A novel process-based model of microbial growth: self-inhibition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae aerobic fed-batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Landi, Carmine; Cartenì, Fabrizio; de Alteriis, Elisabetta; Giannino, Francesco; Paciello, Lucia; Parascandola, Palma

    2015-07-30

    Microbial population dynamics in bioreactors depend on both nutrients availability and changes in the growth environment. Research is still ongoing on the optimization of bioreactor yields focusing on the increase of the maximum achievable cell density. A new process-based model is proposed to describe the aerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultured on glucose as carbon and energy source. The model considers the main metabolic routes of glucose assimilation (fermentation to ethanol and respiration) and the occurrence of inhibition due to the accumulation of both ethanol and other self-produced toxic compounds in the medium. Model simulations reproduced data from classic and new experiments of yeast growth in batch and fed-batch cultures. Model and experimental results showed that the growth decline observed in prolonged fed-batch cultures had to be ascribed to self-produced inhibitory compounds other than ethanol. The presented results clarify the dynamics of microbial growth under different feeding conditions and highlight the relevance of the negative feedback by self-produced inhibitory compounds on the maximum cell densities achieved in a bioreactor.

  13. Alteration of cellular behavior and response to PI3K pathway inhibition by culture in 3D collagen gels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Fallica

    Full Text Available Most investigations into cancer cell drug response are performed with cells cultured on flat (2D tissue culture plastic. Emerging research has shown that the presence of a three-dimensional (3D extracellular matrix (ECM is critical for normal cell behavior including migration, adhesion, signaling, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigate differences between cancer cell signaling in 2D culture and a 3D ECM, employing real-time, live cell tracking to directly observe U2OS human osteosarcoma and MCF7 human breast cancer cells embedded in type 1 collagen gels. The activation of the important PI3K signaling pathway under these different growth conditions is studied, and the response to inhibition of both PI3K and mTOR with PI103 investigated. Cells grown in 3D gels show reduced proliferation and migration as well as reduced PI3K pathway activation when compared to cells grown in 2D. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that a collagen ECM can protect U2OS cells from PI103. Overall, our data suggests that 3D gels may provide a better medium for investigation of anti-cancer drugs than 2D monolayers, therefore allowing better understanding of cellular response and behavior in native like environments.

  14. Evaluation of antibiotics as a methodological procedure to inhibit free-living and biofilm bacteria in marine zooplankton culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa O. Agostini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a problem with keeping culture medium completely or partially free from bacteria. The use of prokaryotic metabolic inhibitors, such as antibiotics, is suggested as an alternative solution, although such substances should not harm non-target organisms. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments in inhibiting free-living and biofilm bacteria and their half-life in artificial marine environment using the copepod Acartia tonsa as bioindicador of non-harmful antibiotic combinations. Regarding to results, the application of 0.025 g L-1 penicillin G potassium + 0.08 g L-1 streptomycin sulphate + 0.04 g L-1 neomycin sulphate showed great potential for use in marine cultures and scientific experiments without lethal effects to non-target organisms. The effect of this combination starts within the first six hours of exposure and reduces up to 93 % the bacterial density, but the half-life is short, requiring replacement. No adverse changes in water quality were observed within 168 hours of exposure. As a conclusion, we can infer that this treatment was an effective procedure for zooplankton cultures and scientific experiments with the aim of measuring the role of free-living and biofilm in the marine community.

  15. Lunasin Inhibits Cell Proliferation via Apoptosis and Reduces the Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Cultured Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Jia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lunasin, a peptide with 43 amino acid residues and initially isolated and identified in soybean cotyledon, has gained extensive attention due to its anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. However, its treatment efficacy on rheumatoid arthritis (RA and corresponding mechanisms have not been reported. Herein, the synovial fibroblasts harvested and isolated from patients with RA were treated with lunasin at various concentrations to examine the proliferation, apoptosis status, and corresponding cell cycle of cultured RA synovial fibroblasts. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanisms of lunasin for RA treatment are explored through Western blot, real-time PCR, ELISA, and luciferase reporter assays. Lunasin significantly inhibited the proliferation and induced the apoptosis of cultured RA synovial fibroblasts. In addition, lunasin reduced the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3 and suppressed the activation of NF-κB in cultured RA synovial fibroblasts but did not reveal obvious modulation on the secretion and gene expression of MMP-1. Therefore, lunasin will have promising potential as a novel nutritional supplement or drug candidate for RA due to its potency of suppressing synovial cell proliferation and decreasing the production of proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs in synovial cells.

  16. Unanticipated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex culture inhibition by immune modulators, immune suppressants, a growth enhancer, and vitamins A and D: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Robert J; Su, Liya; Shahidi, Azra; Brown, William D; Clifford, Anya; Brown, Sheldon T

    2014-09-01

    The development of novel antibiotics to treat multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is time-consuming and expensive. Multiple immune modulators, immune suppressants, anti-inflammatories, and growth enhancers, and vitamins A and D, inhibit Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in culture. We studied the culture inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by these agents. Biosafety level two M. tuberculosis complex (ATCC 19015 and ATCC 25177) was studied in radiometric Bactec or MGIT culture. Agents evaluated included clofazimine, methotrexate, 6-mercaptopurine, cyclosporine A, rapamycin, tacrolimus, monensin, and vitamins A and D. All the agents mentioned above caused dose-dependent inhibition of the M. tuberculosis complex. There was no inhibition by the anti-inflammatory 5-aminosalicylic acid, which causes bacteriostatic inhibition of MAP. We conclude that, at a minimum, studies with virulent M. tuberculosis are indicated with the agents mentioned above, as well as with the thioamide 5-propothiouricil, which has previously been shown to inhibit the M. tuberculosis complex in culture. Our data additionally emphasize the importance of vitamins A and D in treating mycobacterial diseases. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of IL-2R and SLA class II expression on stimulated lymphocytes by a suppressor activity found in homogenates of African swine fever virus infected cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, A; Domínquez, J; Tomillo, J; Babín, M; Alonso, F

    1995-01-01

    Virus free supernatants (VFS) obtained by ultracentrifugation of homogenates of African swine fever (ASF) virus infected cultures inhibited the proliferative response and the expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of two activation molecules, the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) and the swine MHC class II antigens (SLA II), induced by several stimuli (lectins, PMA plus the calcium ionophore A23187 or specific antigen). This inhibition was time dependent: no effect was seen on IL-2R expression when VFS was added after 48 h, when the expression of this molecule reached its maximum. However at this time the proliferative response was still inhibited. The presence of VFS in the cultures was necessary to inhibit both the IL-2R expression and the proliferation of cells. In these conditions the addition of exogenous IL-2 to the cultures failed to restore the IL-2R expression and the proliferation shown by control stimulated cells. Furthermore, the IL-2 activity found in supernatants from cell cultures stimulated with Con A in the presence of VFS was even higher than in cultures stimulated without VFS. The inhibition observed suggests an important impairment of host immunocompetence in ASF infected swine.

  18. Growth inhibition of selected microorganisms by an association of dairy starter cultures and probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beniamino T. Cenci-Goga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Several growth curves for selected pathogens and hygiene indicators alone and vs selected dairy starter cultures (LAB and commercial probiotics have been performed. All strains for LAB and commercial probiotics were inoculated as pure cultures into skim milk to get an initial cocci:bacilli:enterocci ratio of 2:1:1 and a concentration of approximately 107 cfu mL–1 until challenge vs selected pathogens and hygiene indicators. Selected pathogens came from the collection of the Laboratorio di Ispezione degli Alimenti di O.A. or were reference strains (Escherichia coli, CSH26 K12, Staphylococcus aureus 27R, Salmonella Derby 27, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525, Listeria innocua ATCC 33090. Each strain was inoculated into skim milk to get an initial concentration of approximately 106 cfu mL–1. Growth curves in skim milk for the following challenges were studied: i sterility control; ii association LAB; iii association of LAB vs each selected pathogen or hygiene indicator; iv selected pathogen or hygiene indicator alone. The challenges were carried out in BHI broth and in skim milk at 37°C. The highest reduction was observed in milk but in general the association of LAB and the probiotic was able to limit the growth of pathogens and hygiene indicators.

  19. Enhancement of excision-repair efficiency by conditioned medium from density-inhibited cultures in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, S.

    1979-01-01

    Conditioned medium from density-inhibited V79 Chinese hamster cell cultures, given as a post-treatment to UV-irradiated homologous cells, was demonstrated to reduce the lethal action of ultraviolet light by temporarily blocking DNA replication. Since the increased survival was not affected by various nontoxic concentrations of caffeine, such protective effect would be attributable to the prolonged intervention of excision repair before DNA replication during the post-treatment period. The influence of conditioned medium on the UV-induced mutation at the ouabain-resistance locus was also examined and a significant decrease in mutation frequecy was noted. The observed reduction in killing and mutation as a result of post-incubation in conditioned medium, which delays DNA replication, would be interpreted as evidence that conditioned medium provides a longer period of time for an error-free excision-repair process, leaving lesion in DNA available for error-prone post-replication repair. (Auth.)

  20. Cocaine induces a mixed lysosomal lipidosis in cultured fibroblasts, by inactivation of acid sphingomyelinase and inhibition of phospholipase A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Lizarraga, Chantal; N'Kuli, Francisca; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Van Binst, Roger; Wallemacq, Pierre; Tulkens, Paul M; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Levade, Thierry; Courtoy, Pierre J

    2004-01-15

    This paper reports that cocaine may induce a lysosomal storage disorder. Indeed, culture of Rat-1 fibroblasts with 250-500 microM cocaine induced after 2-3 days a major accumulation in lysosomes of electron-dense lamellar structures. By subcellular fractionation, this was reflected by a selective decrease of the buoyant density of several lysosomal enzymes, indicating lysosomal lipid overload. Biochemical analysis confirmed an increased cellular content of major phospholipids and sphingomyelin, but not of cholesterol. Cocaine, a membrane-permeant weak base, is concentrated by acidotropic sequestration, because its accumulation was abrogated by the proton ionophore, monensin and the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin A1. At its estimated lysosomal concentration, cocaine almost completely inhibited phospholipase A1 activity on liposomes. Cell incubation with cocaine, but not with its inactive metabolite, benzoylecgonine, rapidly inactivated acid sphingomyelinase, as reflected by a 10-fold decrease in Vmax with identical Km. Acid sphingomyelinase inactivation was fully prevented by the thiol proteinases inhibitors, leupeptin and E64, indicating that cocaine induces selective sphingomyelinase proteolysis. Upon cocaine removal, acid sphingomyelinase activity was rapidly restored, pointing to its fast turnover. In contrast, the cellular content of several other lysosomal hydrolases was increased up to 2-fold. Together, these data show that acidotropic accumulation of cocaine in lysosomes rapidly inhibits acid phospholipase A1 and inactivates acid sphingomyelinase, which can explain induction of a mixed lysosomal lipidosis.

  1. Cocaine induces a mixed lysosomal lipidosis in cultured fibroblasts, by inactivation of acid sphingomyelinase and inhibition of phospholipase A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassogne, Marie-Cecile; Lizarraga, Chantal; N'Kuli, Francisca; Van Bambeke, Francoise; Van Binst, Roger; Wallemacq, Pierre; Tulkens, Paul M.; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Levade, Thierry; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports that cocaine may induce a lysosomal storage disorder. Indeed, culture of Rat-1 fibroblasts with 250-500 μM cocaine induced after 2-3 days a major accumulation in lysosomes of electron-dense lamellar structures. By subcellular fractionation, this was reflected by a selective decrease of the buoyant density of several lysosomal enzymes, indicating lysosomal lipid overload. Biochemical analysis confirmed an increased cellular content of major phospholipids and sphingomyelin, but not of cholesterol. Cocaine, a membrane-permeant weak base, is concentrated by acidotropic sequestration, because its accumulation was abrogated by the proton ionophore, monensin and the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin A 1 . At its estimated lysosomal concentration, cocaine almost completely inhibited phospholipase A 1 activity on liposomes. Cell incubation with cocaine, but not with its inactive metabolite, benzoylecgonine, rapidly inactivated acid sphingomyelinase, as reflected by a 10-fold decrease in V max with identical K m . Acid sphingomyelinase inactivation was fully prevented by the thiol proteinases inhibitors, leupeptin and E64, indicating that cocaine induces selective sphingomyelinase proteolysis. Upon cocaine removal, acid sphingomyelinase activity was rapidly restored, pointing to its fast turnover. In contrast, the cellular content of several other lysosomal hydrolases was increased up to 2-fold. Together, these data show that acidotropic accumulation of cocaine in lysosomes rapidly inhibits acid phospholipase A 1 and inactivates acid sphingomyelinase, which can explain induction of a mixed lysosomal lipidosis

  2. The anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin inhibits taurine transport in intestinal and renal cell culture models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Jakob Munk; Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Hansen, Steen H

    2014-01-01

    , such evidence does not preclude the involvement of other transporters. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to investigate if vigabatrin interacts with taurine transport. The uptake of taurine was measured in intestinal human Caco-2 and canine MDCK cell monolayers in the absence or presence of amino...... acids such as GABA and vigabatrin. Vigabatrin inhibits the uptake of taurine in Caco-2 and MDCK cells to 34±3 and 53±2%, respectively, at a concentration of 30mM. In Caco-2 cells the uptake of vigabatrin under neutral pH conditions is concentration-dependent and saturable with a Km-value of 27mM (log......Km is 1.43±0.09). In conclusion, the present study shows that vigabatrin was able to inhibit the uptake of taurine in intestinal and renal cell culture models. Furthermore, uptake of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells under neutral pH conditions was concentration-dependent and saturable and suggesting...

  3. Gabapentin Inhibits Protein Kinase C Epsilon Translocation in Cultured Sensory Neurons with Additive Effects When Coapplied with Paracetamol (Acetaminophen

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    Vittorio Vellani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gabapentin is a well-established anticonvulsant drug which is also effective for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Although the exact mechanism leading to relief of allodynia and hyperalgesia caused by neuropathy is not known, the blocking effect of gabapentin on voltage-dependent calcium channels has been proposed to be involved. In order to further evaluate its analgesic mechanisms, we tested the efficacy of gabapentin on protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε translocation in cultured peripheral neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRGs. We found that gabapentin significantly reduced PKCε translocation induced by the pronociceptive peptides bradykinin and prokineticin 2, involved in both inflammatory and chronic pain. We recently showed that paracetamol (acetaminophen, a very commonly used analgesic drug, also produces inhibition of PKCε. We tested the effect of the combined use of paracetamol and gabapentin, and we found that the inhibition of translocation adds up. Our study provides a novel mechanism of action for gabapentin in sensory neurons and suggests a mechanism of action for the combined use of paracetamol and gabapentin, which has recently been shown to be effective, with a cumulative behavior, in the control of postoperative pain in human patients.

  4. Effect of Cultured Celery Juice, Temperature, and Product Composition on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Kottapalli, Bala; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum may be of concern in prepared refrigerated meals, for which strict cold chain management cannot be guaranteed. This study evaluated the effect of temperature, product composition, and cultured celery juice powder (CCJP) as a source of nitrite on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in two experimental (meat- and vegetable-based) prepared meals. Data obtained from the challenge study were compared with a published mathematical model to determine whether the model is fail-safe with regard to the tested meals. Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin at appropriate intervals in samples stored at 10, 15, or 20°C for up to 8 weeks. None of the treatments stored at 10°C for 8 weeks supported toxin production by proteolytic C. botulinum. The addition of CCJP delayed toxin production by 1 and 3 weeks in cauliflower potatoes and in Dijon pork, respectively, stored at 15°C. Toxin production was delayed by 1 week at 20°C when CCJP was added to the cauliflower potatoes. This study found that the predictive model was fail-safe but was overly conservative for the experimental meals described. Finally, this study confirms that product composition, the addition of nitrite via CCJP, storage time, and temperature play important roles in the inhibition of toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum.

  5. Inhibition of aromatase activity by methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites in primary culture of human mammary fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M. van den; Heneweer, M.; Geest, M. de; Sanderson, T. [Inst. for Risk Assessment Sciences and Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Jong, P. de [St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bergman, A. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites (MeSO2-PCBs) are persistent contaminants and are ubiquitously present in humans and the environment. Lipophilicity of MeSO2- PCB metabolites is similar to the parent compounds and they have been detected in human milk, adipose, liver and lung tissue. 4- MeSO2-PCB-149 is the most abundant PCB metabolite in human adipose tissue and milk at a level of 1.5 ng/g lipids. Human blood concentration of 4-MeSO2-PCB-149 is approximately 0.03 nM. 3- MeSO2-PCB-101 is the predominant PCB metabolite in muscle and blubber in wildlife, such as otter, mink and grey seal. In the environment, they have been linked to chronic and reproductive toxicity in exposed mink. Additionaly, some MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs have been shown to be glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists. Since approximately 60% of all breast tumors are estrogen responsive, exposure to compounds that are able to alter estrogen synthesis through interference with the aromatase enzyme, can lead to changes in estrogen levels and possibly to accelerated or inhibit breast tumor growth. Therefore, it is important to identify exogenous compounds that can alter aromatase activity in addition to those compounds which have direct interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER). Aromatase (CYP19) comprises the ubiquitous flavoprotein, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and a unique cytochrome P450 that is exclusively expressed in estrogen producing cells. Previous studies have revealed that expression of the aromatase gene is regulated in a species- and tissue specific manner. In healthy breast tissue, the predominantly active aromatase promoter region I.4 is regulated by glucocorticoids and class I cytokines. Therefore, it is important to investigate possible aromatase inhibiting properties of MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs (as anti glucocorticoids?) in relevant human tissues. We used primary human mammary fibroblasts because of their role in breast cancer development. We compared the results in primary fibroblasts with

  6. Differential Expression Levels of Genes Related to Myogenesis During Embryogenesis of Quail and Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ban, Yaowei Liang, Zongsheng Zhao§*, Xiaojun Liu§ and Qingfeng Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the expression dynamics of genes during myogenesis in quail and chicken. Real-time PCR was used to detect mRNA expressions of MyoD, MyoG, MLP and MSTN in breast muscle of quail and chicken embryos during the period of embryonic days E7-17. Results showed that expression profiles of each gene displayed similar trend in the experiment period between quail and chicken, however, the expression concentration between the two species differed at the same time detected. MyoD mRNA expression in quail was significantly lower in the early phase of the experiment period (E7-9 (P<0.01 on E7; P<0.05 on both E8 and E9. For MyoG and MLP, the mRNA expressions were both lower in quail than that in chicken during the experiment period. Additionally, the embryonic day when quail reached its peak expression was earlier than that in chicken (MyoG: quail E12 vs. chicken E13; MLP: quail E14 vs. chicken E15, and the peak expression for both in quail was significantly lower than that in chicken (P<0.01 for both. For MSTN, expression in quail was significantly higher in quail than that in chicken at each time detected (P<0.01. It is concluded that differential expression of these genes might or at least partially contributed to the different development of muscle development in quail and chicken.

  7. Growth inhibition of foodborne pathogens by kimchi prepared with bacteriocin-producing starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ji Yoon; Chang, Hae Choon

    2011-01-01

    Kimchi (starter kimchi) was prepared with Leuconostoc citreum GJ7, a bacteriocin producer, with the objective of preventing growth and/or survival of foodborne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhi, and Staphylococcus aureus. Numbers of the pathogens inoculated to 5.41 to 5.63 log CFU/mL into the filtrate of freshly made starter kimchi remained stable for the first 12 h of incubation at 10 °C. Reductions of 2.69, 2.88, and 3.42 log CFU/mL were observed 48 h after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhi, and S. aureus, respectively. Use of the bacteriocin-producing starter culture for kimchi fermentation significantly reduced the numbers of pathogens in the filtrate. Reductions of 3.85, 4.45, and 5.19 log CFU/mL were observed 48 h after inoculation for E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhi, and S. aureus, respectively. Presumably, the antimicrobial activity came from the ingredients of kimchi such as sulfur-containing compounds, low pH (approximately pH 4.5) produced by the conversion of sugars into organic acids and the bacteriocins potentially produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), such as kimchicin GJ7. Together, these data suggest that addition of a starter culture capable of producing bacteriocins could serve as a strategy to protect the fermented product from delivering pathogens upon consumption and that the kimchi filtrate itself may be used as a food preservative. Practical Application: The adaptation of the starter fermentation into kimchi induced a faster die off of the pathogens as compared to natural fermentation. The in situ bateriocin-production by Leuc. citreum GJ7 in kimchi would act with antimicrobial kimchi ingredients in a synergistic manner to protect the fermented product from delivering pathogens upon consumption.

  8. Does the grass snake (Natrix natrix) (Squamata: Serpentes: Natricinae) fit the amniotes-specific model of myogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Damian; Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Posyniak, Ewelina; Rupik, Weronika; Daczewska, Małgorzata

    2017-07-01

    In the grass snake (Natrix natrix), the newly developed somites form vesicles that are located on both sides of the neural tube. The walls of the vesicles are composed of tightly connected epithelial cells surrounding the cavity (the somitocoel). Also, in the newly formed somites, the Pax3 protein can be observed in the somite wall cells. Subsequently, the somite splits into three compartments: the sclerotome, dermomyotome (with the dorsomedial [DM] and the ventrolateral [VL] lips) and the myotome. At this stage, the Pax3 protein is detected in both the DM and VL lips of the dermomyotome and in the mononucleated cells of the myotome, whereas the Pax7 protein is observed in the medial part of the dermomyotome and in some of the mononucleated cells of the myotome. The mononucleated cells then become elongated and form myotubes. As myogenesis proceeds, the myotome is filled with multinucleated myotubes accompanied by mononucleated, Pax7-positive cells (satellite cells) that are involved in muscle growth. The Pax3-positive progenitor muscle cells are no longer observed. Moreover, we have observed unique features in the differentiation of the muscles in these snakes. Specifically, our studies have revealed the presence of two classes of muscles in the myotomes. The first class is characterised by fast muscle fibres, with myofibrils equally distributed throughout the sarcoplasm. In the second class, composed of slow muscle fibres, the sarcoplasm is filled with lipid droplets. We assume that their storage could play a crucial role during hibernation in the adult snakes. We suggest that the model of myotomal myogenesis in reptiles, birds and mammals shows the same morphological and molecular character. We therefore believe that the grass snake, in spite of the unique features of its myogenesis, fits into the amniotes-specific model of trunk muscle development.

  9. Discovery of MicroRNAs associated with myogenesis by deep sequencing of serial developmental skeletal muscles in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Hou

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short, single-stranded non-coding RNAs that repress their target genes by binding their 3' UTRs. These RNAs play critical roles in myogenesis. To gain knowledge about miRNAs involved in the regulation of myogenesis, porcine longissimus muscles were collected from 18 developmental stages (33-, 40-, 45-, 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, 70-, 75-, 80-, 85-, 90-, 95-, 100- and 105-day post-gestation fetuses, 0 and 10-day postnatal piglets and adult pigs to identify miRNAs using Solexa sequencing technology. We detected 197 known miRNAs and 78 novel miRNAs according to comparison with known miRNAs in the miRBase (release 17.0 database. Moreover, variations in sequence length and single nucleotide polymorphisms were also observed in 110 known miRNAs. Expression analysis of the 11 most abundant miRNAs were conducted using quantitative PCR (qPCR in eleven tissues (longissimus muscles, leg muscles, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, small intestine and colon, and the results revealed that ssc-miR-378, ssc-miR-1 and ssc-miR-206 were abundantly expressed in skeletal muscles. During skeletal muscle development, the expression level of ssc-miR-378 was low at 33 days post-coitus (dpc, increased at 65 and 90 dpc, peaked at postnatal day 0, and finally declined and maintained a comparatively stable level. This expression profile suggested that ssc-miR-378 was a new candidate miRNA for myogenesis and participated in skeletal muscle development in pigs. Target prediction and KEGG pathway analysis suggested that bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2 and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1, both of which were relevant to proliferation and differentiation, might be the potential targets of miR-378. Luciferase activities of report vectors containing the 3'UTR of porcine BMP2 or MAPK1 were downregulated by miR-378, which suggested that miR-378 probably regulated myogenesis though the regulation of these two genes.

  10. Protein kinase C-delta inactivation inhibits the proliferation and survival of cancer stem cells in culture and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhihong; Forman, Lora W; Williams, Robert M; Faller, Douglas V

    2014-01-01

    CSCs in culture. PKCδ inhibition efficiently prevents tumor sphere outgrowth from tumor cell cultures, with exposure times as short as six hours. Small-molecule PKCδ inhibitors also inhibit human CSC growth in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. These findings suggest that the novel PKC isozyme PKCδ may represent a new molecular target for cancer stem cell populations

  11. Inhibition of growth of human breast cancer cells in culture by neutron capture using liposomes containing 10B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagië, H; Kobayashi, H; Takeda, Y; Yoshizaki, I; Nonaka, Y; Naka, S; Nojiri, A; Shinnkawa, H; Furuya, Y; Niwa, H; Ariki, K; Yasuhara, H; Eriguchi, M

    2002-03-01

    Cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy is effected by nuclear reaction between 10B and thermal neutrons with the release of alpha-particles (4He) and lithium-7 ions (7Li). 4He kills cells within 10 microm of the site of 4He generation, therefore it is theoretically possible to destroy tumour cells without affecting adjacent healthy tissue, given selective delivery of compounds containing 10B. Liposomes wore prepared by vortex dispersion of solutions containing 10B compounds with dried lipid films and the effects of those compounds on human breast cancer cells in culture were examined after thermal neutral irradiation. [3H]-TdR incorporation by MRKnu/nu-1 cells treated with 10B-containing liposomes showed 40% suppression compared with liposomes without 10B, at 2 x 1012 n/cm2 thermal neutron fluence. Inhibition of tumour cell growth with liposomes prepared with 100 mm 10B-compound was as significant as with those made with 500 ppm 10B solution. The concentration of 10B in liposomes was 76.5 +/- 3.4 microg/mL. Boronated liposomes can thus deliver sufficient 10B atoms to this line of breast cancer cells in culture to effect cytotoxicity and suppression of growth after thermal neutron irradiation.

  12. 6-Gingerol inhibits hair shaft growth in cultured human hair follicles and modulates hair growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yong; Sun, Yabin; Wang, Wenjun; Du, Benjun; Xiao, Shun-e; Hu, Yijue; Hu, Zhiqi

    2013-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been traditionally used to check hair loss and stimulate hair growth in East Asia. Several companies produce shampoo containing an extract of ginger claimed to have anti-hair loss and hair growth promotion properties. However, there is no scientific evidence to back up these claims. This study was undertaken to measure 6-gingerol, the main active component of ginger, on hair shaft elongation in vitro and hair growth in vivo, and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in vivo and in vitro. 6-Gingerol suppressed hair growth in hair follicles in culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth inhibition of DPCs by 6-gingerol in vitro may reflect a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were obtained in vivo. The results of this study showed that 6-gingerol does not have the ability to promote hair growth, on the contrary, can suppress human hair growth via its inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects on DPCs in vitro, and can cause prolongation of telogen phase in vivo. Thus, 6-gingerol rather than being a hair growth stimulating drug, it is a potential hair growth suppressive drug; i.e. for hair removal.

  13. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide inhibits gli1 gene expression and proliferation in primary medulloblastoma derived tumorsphere cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Joseph R; Resnick, Daniel Z; Niewiadomski, Pawel; Dong, Hongmei; Liau, Linda M; Waschek, James A

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is critical for the expansion of granule neuron precursors (GNPs) within the external granular layer (EGL) during cerebellar development. Aberrant HH signaling within GNPs is thought to give rise to medulloblastoma (MB) - the most commonly-observed form of malignant pediatric brain tumor. Evidence in both invertebrates and vertebrates indicates that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) antagonizes HH signalling. Receptors specific for the neuropeptide pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP, gene name ADCYAP1) are expressed in GNPs. PACAP has been shown to protect GNPs from apoptosis in vitro, and to interact with HH signaling to regulate GNP proliferation. PACAP/ptch1 double mutant mice exhibit an increased incidence of MB compared to ptch1 mice, indicating that PACAP may regulate HH pathway-mediated MB pathogenesis. Primary MB tumorsphere cultures were prepared from thirteen ptch1 +/- /p53 +/- double mutant mice and treated with the smoothened (SMO) agonist purmorphamine, the SMO antagonist SANT-1, the neuropeptide PACAP, the PKA activator forskolin, and the PKA inhibitor H89. Gene expression of gli1 and [ 3 H]-thymidine incorporation were assessed to determine drug effects on HH pathway activity and proliferation, respectively. PKA activity was determined in cell extracts by Western blotting using a phospho-PKA substrate antibody. Primary tumor cells cultured for 1-week under serum-free conditions grew as tumorspheres and were found to express PAC1 receptor transcripts. Gli1 gene expression was significantly reduced by SANT-1, PACAP and forskolin, but was unaffected by purmorphamine. The attenuation of gli1 gene expression by PACAP was reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89, which also blocked PKA activation. Treatment of tumorsphere cultures with PACAP, forskolin, and SANT-1 for 24 or 48 hours reduced proliferation. Primary tumorspheres derived from ptch1 +/- /p53 +/- mice exhibit constitutive HH pathway activity

  14. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide inhibits gli1 gene expression and proliferation in primary medulloblastoma derived tumorsphere cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hongmei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hedgehog (HH signaling is critical for the expansion of granule neuron precursors (GNPs within the external granular layer (EGL during cerebellar development. Aberrant HH signaling within GNPs is thought to give rise to medulloblastoma (MB - the most commonly-observed form of malignant pediatric brain tumor. Evidence in both invertebrates and vertebrates indicates that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA antagonizes HH signalling. Receptors specific for the neuropeptide pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP, gene name ADCYAP1 are expressed in GNPs. PACAP has been shown to protect GNPs from apoptosis in vitro, and to interact with HH signaling to regulate GNP proliferation. PACAP/ptch1 double mutant mice exhibit an increased incidence of MB compared to ptch1 mice, indicating that PACAP may regulate HH pathway-mediated MB pathogenesis. Methods Primary MB tumorsphere cultures were prepared from thirteen ptch1+/-/p53+/- double mutant mice and treated with the smoothened (SMO agonist purmorphamine, the SMO antagonist SANT-1, the neuropeptide PACAP, the PKA activator forskolin, and the PKA inhibitor H89. Gene expression of gli1 and [3H]-thymidine incorporation were assessed to determine drug effects on HH pathway activity and proliferation, respectively. PKA activity was determined in cell extracts by Western blotting using a phospho-PKA substrate antibody. Results Primary tumor cells cultured for 1-week under serum-free conditions grew as tumorspheres and were found to express PAC1 receptor transcripts. Gli1 gene expression was significantly reduced by SANT-1, PACAP and forskolin, but was unaffected by purmorphamine. The attenuation of gli1 gene expression by PACAP was reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89, which also blocked PKA activation. Treatment of tumorsphere cultures with PACAP, forskolin, and SANT-1 for 24 or 48 hours reduced proliferation. Conclusions Primary tumorspheres derived from ptch1+/-/p53

  15. The chalcone butein from Rhus verniciflua Stokes inhibits clonogenic growth of human breast cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Jenny

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Butein (3,4,2',4'-tetrahydroxychalone, a plant polyphenol, is a major biologically active component of the stems of Rhus verniciflua Stokes. It has long been used as a food additive in Korea and as an herbal medicine throughout Asia. Recently, butein has been shown to suppress the functions of fibroblasts. Because fibroblasts are believed to play an important role in promoting the growth of breast cancer cells, we investigated the ability of butein to inhibit the clonogenic growth of small numbers of breast cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts in vitro. Methods We first measured the clonogenic growth of small numbers of the UACC-812 human breast cancer cell line co-cultured on monolayers of serum-activated, human fibroblasts in the presence of butein (2 μg/mL or various other modulators of fibroblast function (troglitazone-1 μg/mL; GW9662-1 μM; meloxican-1 μM; and 3,4 dehydroproline-10 μg/mL. In a subsequent experiment, we measured the dose-response effect on the clonogenic growth of UACC-812 breast cancer cells by pre-incubating the fibroblasts with varying concentrations of butein (10 μg/ml-1.25 μg/mL. Finally, we measured the clonogenic growth of primary breast cancer cells obtained from 5 clinical specimens with normal fibroblasts and with fibroblasts that had been pre-treated with a fixed dose of butein (2.5 μg/mL. Results Of the five modulators of fibroblast function that we tested, butein was by far the most potent inhibitor of clonogenic growth of UACC-812 breast cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. Pre-treatment of fibroblasts with concentrations of butein as low as 2.5 μg/mL nearly abolished subsequent clonogenic growth of UACC-812 breast cancer cells co-cultured with the fibroblasts. A similar dose of butein had no effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured in the absence of fibroblasts. Significantly, clonogenic growth of the primary breast cancer cells was also

  16. Reduction of hepatitis C virus NS5A hyperphosphorylation by selective inhibition of cellular kinases activates viral RNA replication in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neddermann, Petra; Quintavalle, Manuela; Di Pietro, Chiara; Clementi, Angelica; Cerretani, Mauro; Altamura, Sergio; Bartholomew, Linda; De Francesco, Raffaele

    2004-12-01

    Efficient replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic RNA in cell culture requires the introduction of adaptive mutations. In this report we describe a system which enables efficient replication of the Con1 subgenomic replicon in Huh7 cells without the introduction of adaptive mutations. The starting hypothesis was that high amounts of the NS5A hyperphosphorylated form, p58, inhibit replication and that reduction of p58 by inhibition of specific kinase(s) below a certain threshold enables HCV replication. Upon screening of a panel of kinase inhibitors, we selected three compounds which inhibited NS5A phosphorylation in vitro and the formation of NS5A p58 in cell culture. Cells, transfected with the HCV Con1 wild-type sequence, support HCV RNA replication upon addition of any of the three compounds. The effect of the kinase inhibitors was found to be synergistic with coadaptive mutations in NS3. This is the first direct demonstration that the presence of high amounts of NS5A-p58 causes inhibition of HCV RNA replication in cell culture and that this inhibition can be relieved by kinase inhibitors.

  17. Inhibition of bacterial growth in sweet cheese whey by carbon dioxide as determined by culture-independent community profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Raquel; Xue, Tian; Weeks, Mike; Turner, Mark S; Bansal, Nidhi

    2016-01-18

    Whey is a valuable co-product from cheese making that serves as a raw material for a wide range of products. Its rich nutritional content lends itself to rapid spoilage, thus it typically needs to be pasteurised and refrigerated promptly. Despite the extensive literature on milk spoilage bacteria, little is known about the spoilage bacteria of whey. The utility of carbon dioxide (CO2) to extend the shelf-life of raw milk and cottage cheese has been well established, but its application in whey preservation has not yet been explored. This study aims to characterise the microbial populations of fresh and spoiled sweet whey by culture-independent community profiling using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and to determine whether carbonation is effective in inhibiting bacterial growth in sweet whey. The microbiota of raw Cheddar and Mozzarella whey was dominated by cheese starter bacteria. After pasteurisation, two out of the three samples studied became dominated by diverse environmental bacteria from various phyla, with Proteobacteria being the most dominant. Diverse microbial profiles were maintained until spoilage occurred, when the entire population was dominated by just one or two genera. Whey spoilage bacteria were found to be similar to those of milk. Pasteurised Cheddar and Mozzarella whey was spoiled by Bacillus sp. or Pseudomonas sp., and raw Mozzarella whey was spoiled by Pseudomonas sp., Serratia sp., and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. CO2 was effective in inhibiting bacterial growth of pasteurised Cheddar and Mozzarella whey stored at 15°C and raw Mozzarella whey stored at 4°C. The spoilage bacteria of the carbonated samples were similar to those of the non-carbonated controls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Unanticipated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex culture inhibition by immune modulators, immune suppressants, a growth enhancer, and vitamins A and D: clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Greenstein

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that, at a minimum, studies with virulent M. tuberculosis are indicated with the agents mentioned above, as well as with the thioamide 5-propothiouricil, which has previously been shown to inhibit the M. tuberculosis complex in culture. Our data additionally emphasize the importance of vitamins A and D in treating mycobacterial diseases.

  19. Myogenesis in the sea urchin embryo: the molecular fingerprint of the myoblast precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchin larvae the circumesophageal fibers form a prominent muscle system of mesodermal origin. Although the morphology and later development of this muscle system has been well-described, little is known about the molecular signature of these cells or their precise origin in the early embryo. As an invertebrate deuterostome that is more closely related to the vertebrates than other commonly used model systems in myogenesis, the sea urchin fills an important phylogenetic gap and provides a unique perspective on the evolution of muscle cell development. Results Here, we present a comprehensive description of the development of the sea urchin larval circumesophageal muscle lineage beginning with its mesodermal origin using high-resolution localization of the expression of several myogenic transcriptional regulators and differentiation genes. A few myoblasts are bilaterally distributed at the oral vegetal side of the tip of the archenteron and first appear at the late gastrula stage. The expression of the differentiation genes Myosin Heavy Chain, Tropomyosin I and II, as well as the regulatory genes MyoD2, FoxF, FoxC, FoxL1, Myocardin, Twist, and Tbx6 uniquely identify these cells. Interestingly, evolutionarily conserved myogenic factors such as Mef2, MyoR and Six1/2 are not expressed in sea urchin myoblasts but are found in other mesodermal domains of the tip of the archenteron. The regulatory states of these domains were characterized in detail. Moreover, using a combinatorial analysis of gene expression we followed the development of the FoxF/FoxC positive cells from the onset of expression to the end of gastrulation. Our data allowed us to build a complete map of the Non-Skeletogenic Mesoderm at the very early gastrula stage, in which specific molecular signatures identify the precursors of different cell types. Among them, a small group of cells within the FoxY domain, which also express FoxC and SoxE, have been identified as plausible myoblast

  20. Myogenesis in the sea urchin embryo: the molecular fingerprint of the myoblast precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrikou, Carmen; Iovene, Edmondo; Rizzo, Francesca; Oliveri, Paola; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2013-12-02

    In sea urchin larvae the circumesophageal fibers form a prominent muscle system of mesodermal origin. Although the morphology and later development of this muscle system has been well-described, little is known about the molecular signature of these cells or their precise origin in the early embryo. As an invertebrate deuterostome that is more closely related to the vertebrates than other commonly used model systems in myogenesis, the sea urchin fills an important phylogenetic gap and provides a unique perspective on the evolution of muscle cell development. Here, we present a comprehensive description of the development of the sea urchin larval circumesophageal muscle lineage beginning with its mesodermal origin using high-resolution localization of the expression of several myogenic transcriptional regulators and differentiation genes. A few myoblasts are bilaterally distributed at the oral vegetal side of the tip of the archenteron and first appear at the late gastrula stage. The expression of the differentiation genes Myosin Heavy Chain, Tropomyosin I and II, as well as the regulatory genes MyoD2, FoxF, FoxC, FoxL1, Myocardin, Twist, and Tbx6 uniquely identify these cells. Interestingly, evolutionarily conserved myogenic factors such as Mef2, MyoR and Six1/2 are not expressed in sea urchin myoblasts but are found in other mesodermal domains of the tip of the archenteron. The regulatory states of these domains were characterized in detail. Moreover, using a combinatorial analysis of gene expression we followed the development of the FoxF/FoxC positive cells from the onset of expression to the end of gastrulation. Our data allowed us to build a complete map of the Non-Skeletogenic Mesoderm at the very early gastrula stage, in which specific molecular signatures identify the precursors of different cell types. Among them, a small group of cells within the FoxY domain, which also express FoxC and SoxE, have been identified as plausible myoblast precursors. Together

  1. Preirradiation of medium induces a subsequent stimulation or inhibition of growth according to the physiological state in Synechococcus lividus in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conter, A.

    1987-01-01

    The proliferation of Synechococcus lividus cells grown in preirradiated medium was compared with the proliferation of cells grown in a shielded or freshly prepared medium. Aging of medium in a shielded chamber resulted in a slight inhibiting effect on growth in every phase of the cell cycle which was used. Preirradiation of medium resulted in a stimulation of growth observed on Day 7 in cultures inoculated with cells selected in the deceleration phase and an inhibition of growth in cultures inoculated with exponentially growing cells. Addition of catalase (100 U X ml-1) counteracted the stimulating effect but did not modify the inhibiting effect induced by preirradiated medium. Results demonstrated the indirect effect of low doses of irradiation, implying the presence of hydrogen peroxide in radiostimulation and other radioproducts in the inhibitory effect

  2. Inhibition of Ras farnesylation by lovastatin leads to downregulation of proliferation and migration in primary cultured human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouterfa, H L; Sattelmeyer, V; Czub, S; Vordermark, D; Roosen, K; Tonn, J C

    2000-01-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are the most common primary intracranial human tumors. All therapeutic approaches are limited due to their high proliferative capacity and their ability to diffusely invade the brain. Amplification of tyrosine kinase receptors and their signaling pathways have been implicated as contributing to the molecular pathogenesis of astrocytomas, providing possible new targets for therapeutic intervention. In particular, astrocytomas, although lacking oncogenic Ras mutations, have elevated levels of activated Ras. Lovastatin, an inhibitor of the beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutary CoA reductase (HMG-CoA-reductase), is currently used to treat patients with hypercholesterolemia. In addition, it inhibits isoprenylation of several members of the Ras superfamily of proteins and therefore has multiple cellular effects including the reduction of proliferation. In this study, we investigated the impact of lovastatin on two human glioma cell lines and on 15 primary cell cultures established from biopsies of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM,) Proliferation of glioma cell lines and primary tumor cells was determined by cell counting and by using the MTT assay. The cell morphology was analyzed by staining of actin filaments with phalloidin. Apoptosis was measured using the TUNEL assay. To investigate the influence of this drug on glioma cell motility, tumor cell migration was investigated using three dimensional spheroid disintegration assays. In addition, tumor cell invasion was analyzed with a confrontational assay between tumor spheroids and rat brain aggregates. Inhibition of farnesyl biosynthesis using lovastatin led to a block in Ras mediated signaling, indicated by lower MAPK activity. Consequently, tumor cell proliferation was reduced up to 80%. Lovastatin appeared to decrease glioma viability by inducing apoptosis, as indicated by morphological changes and increase of TUNEL positive cells. Lovastatin acts through isoprenoid depletion, because

  3. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, YM529/ONO-5920 (a novel minodronic acid), inhibits RANKL expression in a cultured bone marrow stromal cell line ST2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Shozo; Tsubaki, Masanobu; Hoshino, Mayumi; Namimatsu, Ayumi; Uji, Hiromi; Yoshioka, Shohei; Tanimori, Yoshihiro; Yanae, Masashi; Iwaki, Masahiro; Irimajiri, Kiyohiro

    2005-01-01

    Increase in bone resorption by osteoclasts can cause metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis. Recent attention has been paid to the receptor activator of the NF-κB ligand (RANKL), an accelerator of osteoclast differentiation. RANKL is expressed on the bone marrow-derived stromal cell membrane and induces the differentiation of osteoclasts by binding to RANK expressed on the osteoclast precursor cell membrane. Since the inhibition of RANKL expression can lead to the inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption, the clinical application of RANKL inhibition could be expected to have a major effect on metabolic bone disease therapy. In this study, we investigated whether or not YM529/ONO-5920, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (a novel minodronic acid), inhibits RANKL expression in a bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2 cells). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the administration of YM529/ONO-5920 to ST2 cells inhibited RANKL mRNA expression and reduced RANKL proteins as assessed by Western blot analysis. The inhibition of RANKL mRNA expression was reversed when geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), an intermediate in the mevalonate pathway, was used in combination. Furthermore, YM529/ONO-5920 reduced phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and similarly, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor, inhibited RANKL expression. Pretreatment with GGPP reversed the YM529/ONO-5920-induced decrease in phosphorylation of ERK. Furthermore, YM529/ONO-5920 decreased TRAP-positive cells in co-culture of ST2 cells and an osteoclast cell line, C7 cells, and this decrease was inhibited by pretreatment with GGPP. This indicates that YM529/ONO-5920 inhibits GGPP biosynthesis in the mevalonate pathway and then signal transduction in the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, thereby inhibiting RANKL expression on ST2 cells. These results suggest a newly elucidated action of bisphosphonates in

  4. Repair of wounded monolayers of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells is inhibited by calcium spirulan, a novel sulfated polysaccharide isolated from Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Inomata, Yuki; Hamada, Chieko; Yamamoto, Chika; Shimada, Satomi; Lee, Jung-Bum; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2002-03-08

    Calcium spirulan (Ca-SP) is a novel sulfated polysaccharide isolated from a blue-green alga Spirulina platensis. Ca-SP inhibits thrombin by activation of heparin cofactor II. Therefore, it could serve as an origin of anti-atherogenic medicines. Since maintenance of vascular endothelial cell monolayers is important for prevention of vascular lesions such as atherosclerosis, the effect of Ca-SP at 20 microg/ml or less on the repair of wounded bovine aortic endothelial cell monolayers in culture was investigated in the present study. When the monolayers were wounded and cultured in the presence of Ca-SP, the polysaccharide inhibited the appearance of the cells in the wounded area. The inhibition was also observed even when the repair was promoted by excess basic fibroblast growth factor, which is one of the autocrine growth factors that are involved in the endothelial cell monolayer maintenance. On the other hand, Ca-SP inhibited the cell growth and the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the acid-insoluble fraction of proliferating endothelial cells, suggesting that Ca-SP inhibits endothelial cell proliferation. From these results, it is concluded that Ca-SP may retard the repair process of damaged vascular endothelium through inhibition of vascular endothelial cell proliferation by induction of a lower ability to respond to stimulation by endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor.

  5. Nonlethal Levels of Zeaxanthin Inhibit Cell Migration, Invasion, and Secretion of MMP-2 via NF-κB Pathway in Cultured Human Uveal Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chao Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeaxanthin at nonlethal dosages (3–10 μM significantly inhibited the cell migration of cultured uveal melanoma cells (C918 cell line as determined by wound healing assay and Boyden chamber assay. Matrigel invasion assay showed that cell invasion of uveal melanoma cells could be significantly inhibited by zeaxanthin. Secretion of MMP-2 by melanoma cells was significantly inhibited by zeaxanthin in a dose-dependent manner as measured by ELISA kit. Zeaxanthin also significantly inhibited the NF-κB levels in nuclear extracts of the UM cells, which is the upstream of the MMP-2 secretion. These results suggest that zeaxanthin might be a potentially therapeutic approach in the prevention of metastasis in uveal melanoma.

  6. Tetranectin is a novel marker for myogenesis during embryonic development, muscle regeneration, and muscle cell differentiation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Iba, K; Durkin, M E

    1998-01-01

    cells in dystrophic mdx mice. Murine C2C12 myogenic cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells can undergo muscle cell differentiation in vitro. Tetranectin is not expressed in the undifferentiated myogenic cells, but during the progression of muscle differentiation, tetranectin mRNA is induced......Tetranectin, a plasminogen-binding protein with a C-type lectin domain, is found in both serum and the extracellular matrix. In the present study we report that tetranectin is closely associated with myogenesis during embryonic development, skeletal muscle regeneration, and muscle cell......, and both cytoplasmic and cell surface tetranectin immunostaining become apparent. Finally, we demonstrate that while tetranectin mRNA is translated to a similar degree in developing limbs and lung, the protein does not seem to be tissue associated in the lung as it is in the limbs. This indicates...

  7. Co-culture with human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibits inflammatory activity and increases cell proliferation of sodium nitroprusside-stimulated chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jae-Sung; Jung, Yeon-Hwa; Cho, Mi-Young; Yeo, Jee Eun; Choi, Yun-Jin; Kim, Yong Il; Koh, Yong-Gon, E-mail: yonseranglab@daum.net

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes improves anti-inflammation. • Co-culture system produces IGF-1. • Co-culture system suppresses inflammatory genes expression. • Co-culture system improves cell proliferation. • Exogenous IGF-1 inhibits inflammatory activity in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. - Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) are primarily chronic inflammatory diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into cells of the mesodermal lineage, and to regulate immunomodulatory activity. Specifically, MSCs have been shown to secrete insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). The purpose of the present study was to examine the inhibitory effects on inflammatory activity from a co-culture of human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hSDMSCs) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-stimulated chondrocytes. First, chondrocytes were treated with SNP to generate an in vitro model of RA or OA. Next, the co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes reduced inflammatory cytokine secretion, inhibited expression of inflammation activity-related genes, generated IGF-1 secretion, and increased the chondrocyte proliferation rate. To evaluate the effect of IGF-1 on inhibition of inflammation, chondrocytes pre-treated with IGF-1 were treated with SNP, and then the production of inflammatory cytokines was analyzed. Treatment with IGF-1 was shown to significantly reduce inflammatory cytokine secretion in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that hSDMSCs offer a new strategy to promote cell-based cartilage regeneration in RA or OA.

  8. Larval myogenesis in Echinodermata: conserved features and morphological diversity between class-specific larval forms of Echinoidae, Asteroidea, and Holothuroidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Odintsova, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    The myogenesis of class-specific larval forms of three classes belonging to the phylum Echinodermata (Echinoidae, Asteroidea, and Holothuroidea) was investigated via gross-anatomy and comparative morphology of larval muscles. Using staining with phalloidin and antibodies against the muscle proteins, with subsequent CLSM and 3D imaging, we have examined myogenesis in the larvae from the gastrula stage to pre-metamorphosis larval stages. We have shown that temporal and spatial expression of muscle proteins is similar in echinoidea and asteroidea larvae but differs in holothuroidea larvae at early developmental stages. New insights regarding the protein composition of maturing muscular fibrils during development in echinoderm larvae were detected. The first differentiating muscle structures in all tested classes have been found to be circular esophageal muscles that are associated with larval feeding. During early differentiation of echinoderm larval muscle cells, we observed that the expression patterns of the muscle proteins were not uniform but with a characteristic diffuse distribution, which is typical for smooth muscle. An unusual pattern of expression of the muscle proteins was detected in larval sphincters: the thick muscle proteins were first expressed during the early developmental stages, whereas F-actin appeared at later stages. In addition, paired star-shaped muscles were revealed in the mature Echinoidae plutei, but were absent in the Asteroidea, and Holothuroidea larvae. All tested species of Echinodermata exhibited both conserved features of muscle morphology during development indicating a common life history strategy and a planktonic habitat, and also an extensive morphological diversity representing specific anatomical adaptations during development. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dienogest, a synthetic progestin, inhibits prostaglandin E2 production and aromatase expression by human endometrial epithelial cells in a spheroid culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yutaka; Mita, Shizuka; Takeuchi, Takashi; Notsu, Tatsuto; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi; Kyo, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is a major mediator in the pathophysiology, and pathogenesis of gynecological diseases associated with abnormal endometrial disease with proliferation and inflammation, such as endometriosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of dienogest, a selective progesterone receptor agonist, on PGE(2) production and the expression of aromatase, an estrogen synthase, in human immortalized endometrial epithelial cells. Compared with monolayer culture, the cells showed enhanced PGE(2) production and expression of the PGE(2) synthases cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and microsomal prostaglandin E(2) synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in a spheroid culture system. Dienogest inhibited PGE(2) production and this effect was reversed by RU486, a progesterone receptor antagonist. Dienogest inhibited the PGE(2) synthases mRNA and protein expression, and the nuclear factor-κB activation. Moreover, the suppressive effect of dienogest on PGE(2) production was sustained 24h after the drug was withdrawn. Dienogest but not COX inhibitors inhibited aromatase expression. These results suggest that progesterone receptor activation reduces the gene expressions of COX-2, mPGES-1, and aromatase. Our findings suggest that the pharmacological mechanism of dienogest includes the direct inhibition of PGE(2) synthase and aromatase expression and may contribute to the therapeutic effect on the progression of endometriosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mps1 (Monopolar Spindle 1) Protein Inhibition Affects Cellular Growth and Pro-Embryogenic Masses Morphology in Embryogenic Cultures of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douétts-Peres, Jackellinne C; Cruz, Marco Antônio L; Reis, Ricardo S; Heringer, Angelo S; de Oliveira, Eduardo A G; Elbl, Paula M; Floh, Eny I S; Silveira, Vanildo; Santa-Catarina, Claudete

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient tool for studying processes based on cell growth and development. The fine regulation of the cell cycle is essential for proper embryo formation during the process of somatic embryogenesis. The aims of the present work were to identify and perform a structural and functional characterization of Mps1 and to analyze the effects of the inhibition of this protein on cellular growth and pro-embryogenic mass (PEM) morphology in embryogenic cultures of A. angustifolia. A single-copy Mps1 gene named AaMps1 was retrieved from the A. angustifolia transcriptome database, and through a mass spectrometry approach, AaMps1 was identified and quantified in embryogenic cultures. The Mps1 inhibitor SP600125 (10 μM) inhibited cellular growth and changed PEMs, and these effects were accompanied by a reduction in AaMps1 protein levels in embryogenic cultures. Our work has identified the Mps1 protein in a gymnosperm species for the first time, and we have shown that inhibiting Mps1 affects cellular growth and PEM differentiation during A. angustifolia somatic embryogenesis. These data will be useful for better understanding cell cycle control during somatic embryogenesis in plants.

  11. The Culture ofPediococcus pentosaceusT1 Inhibits 
ListeriaProliferation in Salmon Fillets and Controls Maturation of Kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seongho; Lee, Dongyun; Jang, Il Sang; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the antilisterial effect of Pediococcus pentosaceus T1, which was isolated from kimchi, and to assess its potential for extending the shelf life of salmon and kimchi. Pediococcus pentosaceus T1 culture effectively inhibited proliferation of Listeria monocytogenes in a dose-dependent manner in a salmon-based medium. Antilisterial effect of the culture was stronger than that of nisin, an antibacterial peptide, as evidenced by lower minimum inhibitory concentration value (20 mg/mL) compared to nisin (over 20 mg/mL). P. pentosaceus T1 culture also effectively inhibited the growth of Listeria in salmon fillet. In particular, the culture (6 g per 100 mL) showed a stronger inhibitory effect than sodium hypochlorite (0.2 mg/mL), a disinfectant used in food processing. In kimchi fermentation, the treatment with P. pentosaceus T1 culture suppressed changes of acidity and pH during maturation. The inhibitory effect of the culture on kimchi lactic acid bacteria, which include Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus sakei , led to a drastic decrease in maturation rates of kimchi. Moreover, sensory test on kimchi treated with P. pentosaceus T1 showed that the culture improved overall acceptability of kimchi, which can be observed in higher scores of sourness, texture, off-flavour and mouthfeel compared with untreated kimchi. The results of this study suggest that kimchi-derived P. pentosaceus T1 could be a potential antilisterial agent in fish products as well as a starter to control overmaturation of kimchi.

  12. Kruppel-like factor 2 inhibit the angiogenesis of cultured human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Xiao-Qing, E-mail: zeng.xiaoqing@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Na, E-mail: Linala.2009@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Pan, Du-Yi, E-mail: lasikesmi@hotmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Miao, Qing, E-mail: sadsadvenus@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Ma, Gui-Fen, E-mail: ma.guifen@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Yi-Mei, E-mail: liuyimei1988@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Tseng, Yu-Jen, E-mail: dianatseng14@gmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Feng, E-mail: li.feng2@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Xu, Li-Li, E-mail: xu.lili3@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Shi-Yao, E-mail: chen.shiyao@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Institute of Endoscopic Research of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-09-04

    Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) is a crucial anti-angiogenic factor. However, its precise role in hepatic angiogenesis induced by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) remain unclear. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of KLF2 on angiogenesis of LSECs and to explore the corresponding mechanism. Cultured human LSECs were infected with different lentiviruses to overexpress or suppress KLF2 expression. The CCK-8 assay, transwell migration assay and tube formation test, were used to investigate the roles of KLF2 in the proliferation, migration and vessel tube formation of LSECs, respectively. The expression and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were detected by western blot. We discovered that the up-regulation of KLF2 expression dramatically inhibited proliferation, migration and tube formation in treated LSECs. Correspondingly, down-regulation of KLF2 expression significantly promoted proliferation, migration and tube formation in treated LSECs. Additionally, KLF2 inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 pathway, followed by the function of KLF2 in the angiogenesis of LSECs disrupted. In conclusion, KLF2 suppressed the angiogenesis of LSECs through inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, and vessel tube formation. These functions of KLF2 may be mediated through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Overexpression of KLF2 inhibits the proliferation and migration of LSECs. • Overexpression of KLF2 inhibits the angiogenesis of LSECs. • ERK1/2 signaling pathway involved in the anti-angiogenic process of KLF2 on LSECs.

  13. Cultural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur F. LaPage

    1971-01-01

    A critical look at outdoor recreation research and some underlying premises. The author focuses on the concept of culture as communication and how it influences our perception of problems and our search for solutions. Both outdoor recreation and science are viewed as subcultures that have their own bodies of mythology, making recreation problems more difficult to...

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG inhibits invasion of cultured human respiratory cells by prtF1-positive macrolide-resistant group A streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princivalli, M S; Paoletti, C; Magi, G; Palmieri, C; Ferrante, L; Facinelli, B

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to determine whether the probiotic strain Lactobacillus GG, which is extensively used in the treatment and prevention of intestinal disorders, is able to inhibit invasion of cultured human respiratory cells by macrolide-resistant group A streptococci (GAS) carrying the prtF1 gene, which encodes the fibronectin (Fn)-binding invasin F1. Eight prtF1-positive erythromycin-resistant GAS strains were used to infect A549 monolayers in competition and displacement assays with Lactobacillus GG. Live (L-LGG) and heat-killed (HK-LGG) lactobacilli and their spent culture supernatant (SCS) significantly reduced (P Lactobacillus GG against GAS was detected. Both L-LGG and HK-LGG and all prtF1-positive GAS induced a strong agglutination reaction using Fn-coated particles. Lactobacillus GG exerts an antagonistic action against GAS by inhibiting cell invasion. Competitive binding of Lactobacillus GG and GAS to Fn might be involved in the inhibition process. The finding that Lactobacillus GG can prevent in vitro invasion of respiratory cells by GAS suggests new applications for this probiotic strain and warrants further studies of its capacity to prevent GAS throat infections.

  15. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  16. Damage of neuroblastoma cell SH-SY5Y mediated by MPP+ inhibits proliferation of T-cell leukemia Jurkat by co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuli; Awan, Umer Farooq; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Luna; Qing, Hong; Ma, Hong; Deng, Yulin

    2014-06-13

    The adaptive immune system has implications in pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Research data demonstrated that the peripheral CD4+ T-cell population decreased in pathogenesis of PD. The effect of damaged dopaminergic neurons on peripheral T cells of PD is still unknown. In this study, we constructed a neuronal and glial cells co-culture model by using human neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y and gliomas cells U87. After the co-culture cells were treated with neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) for 24 h, the conditioned media was harvested and used to cultivate T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells for another 24 h. We then analyzed the cell proliferation, cell cycle and necrosis effect of Jurkat cells. The results showed that co-culture medium of SH-SY5Y and U87 cells with MPP+ treatment inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells compared to control medium without MPP+, even though the same concentration of MPP+ had very little toxicity to the Jurkat cell. Furthermore, co-culture medium with low concentration of MPP+ (100 µM) arrested Jurkat cells cycle in G2/M phase through increasing cell cycle division 2 (CDC2) and CyclinB1 expression level, whereas co-culture medium with high concentration of MPP+ (500 µM) induced Jurkat cell necrosis through cellular swelling and membrane breakage. Our data implies that damaged dopamine neurons with glial cells can lead to the reduced number or inhibited proliferation activity of peripheral T cells.

  17. Damage of Neuroblastoma Cell SH-SY5Y Mediated by MPP+ Inhibits Proliferation of T-Cell Leukemia Jurkat by Co-Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuli Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune system has implications in pathology of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Research data demonstrated that the peripheral CD4+ T-cell population decreased in pathogenesis of PD. The effect of damaged dopaminergic neurons on peripheral T cells of PD is still unknown. In this study, we constructed a neuronal and glial cells co-culture model by using human neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y and gliomas cells U87. After the co-culture cells were treated with neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ for 24 h, the conditioned media was harvested and used to cultivate T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells for another 24 h. We then analyzed the cell proliferation, cell cycle and necrosis effect of Jurkat cells. The results showed that co-culture medium of SH-SY5Y and U87 cells with MPP+ treatment inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells compared to control medium without MPP+, even though the same concentration of MPP+ had very little toxicity to the Jurkat cell. Furthermore, co-culture medium with low concentration of MPP+ (100 µM arrested Jurkat cells cycle in G2/M phase through increasing cell cycle division 2 (CDC2 and CyclinB1 expression level, whereas co-culture medium with high concentration of MPP+ (500 µM induced Jurkat cell necrosis through cellular swelling and membrane breakage. Our data implies that damaged dopamine neurons with glial cells can lead to the reduced number or inhibited proliferation activity of peripheral T cells.

  18. Evidence for inhibition of steroid hormone secretion by arginine vasotocin (AVT) in tissue culture of isolated ovarian follicular cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoklosowa, S.; Gregoraszczuk, E.; Galas, J.; Rzasa, J.

    1994-01-01

    Two follicular compartments, granulosa (G) and theca interna (T) cells isolated from porcine ovaries were cultured alone or in co-culture (GT). Cells were grown as monolayers in a control medium without hormone and in a media supplemented with arginine-vasotocin (AVT) at a concentration of either 10 -7 M or 2x10 -7 M. Progesterone (P4), estrogen (E2) and androgen (A) concentrations in the culture media were taken as measures of the effect of AVT on the function of follicular cells. Steroids were analyzed by radioimmunoassay. AVT action in this culture system was expressed as a decrease in progesterone secretion by cultures of granulosa cells alone, and specially as a change in the pattern of estradiol and androgen secretion by co-cultures. Control T and G cells cultured alone secreted small amounts of A (238.0 pg/10 5 cells, respectively), and E2 272.5 pg/10 5 cells, 10.6 pg/10 5 cells, respectively) while in co-culture these two cell types interacted and the result of this positive interaction was a significant increase in secretion of these two steroids (941.0 pg/10 5 cell androgen secretion and 854.1 pg/10 5 cells estradiol secretion). This phenomenon is similar to that observed in the intact follicle 'in vivo'. AVT introduced to the culture medium impaired the effect of this positive interaction of mixed G and T cells on the production of high levels of E2 and A by untreated co-cultures. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  19. Ikarisoside A inhibits acetylcholine-induced catecholamine secretion and synthesis by suppressing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-ion channels in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojia; Toyohira, Yumiko; Horisita, Takafumi; Satoh, Noriaki; Takahashi, Keita; Zhang, Han; Iinuma, Munekazu; Yoshinaga, Yukari; Ueno, Susumu; Tsutsui, Masato; Sata, Takeyoshi; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2015-12-01

    Ikarisoside A is a natural flavonol glycoside derived from plants of the genus Epimedium, which have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as tonics, antirheumatics, and aphrodisiacs. Here, we report the effects of ikarisoside A and three other flavonol glycosides on catecholamine secretion and synthesis in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. We found that ikarisoside A (1-100 μM), but not icariin, epimedin C, or epimedoside A, concentration-dependently inhibited the secretion of catecholamines induced by acetylcholine, a physiological secretagogue and agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Ikarisoside A had little effect on catecholamine secretion induced by veratridine and 56 mM K(+). Ikarisoside A (1-100 μM) also inhibited (22)Na(+) influx and (45)Ca(2+) influx induced by acetylcholine in a concentration-dependent manner similar to that of catecholamine secretion. In Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, ikarisoside A (0.1-100 μM) directly inhibited the current evoked by acetylcholine. It also suppressed (14)C-catecholamine synthesis and tyrosine hydroxylase activity induced by acetylcholine at 1-100 μM and 10-100 μM, respectively. The present findings suggest that ikarisoside A inhibits acetylcholine-induced catecholamine secretion and synthesis by suppression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-ion channels in bovine adrenal medullary cells.

  20. Triterpene Acids from Rose Hip Powder Inhibit Self-antigen- and LPS-induced Cytokine Production and CD4(+) T-cell Proliferation in Human Mononuclear Cell Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Lasse; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2012-01-01

    on the cytokine production and proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cells induced by a self-antigen, human thyroglobulin and by lipopolysaccharide in cultures of normal mononuclear cells. The triterpene acid mixture inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-a and IL-6 with estimated IC(50) values...... in the range 35-56¿µg/mL, the Th1 cytokines interferon-¿ and IL-2 (IC(50) values 10-20¿µg/mL) and the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 (IC(50) values 18-21¿µg/mL). Moreover, the mixture also inhibited CD4(+) T-cell and CD19(+) B-cell proliferation (IC(50) value 22 and 12¿µg/mL, respectively). Together...

  1. Production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inhibited by H2S but resumes in a co-culture with P. stutzeri: applications for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Ma, Fang; Shi, Rongjiu; Zhang, Jie; Han, Siqin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria and H2S exist widely in oil production systems, and in situ production of rhamnolipids is promising for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). However, information of the effect of S(2-) on rhamnolipids production is scarce. Two facultative anaerobic rhamnolipids-producing bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and WJ-1, were used. Above 10 mg S(2-)/l, both cell growth and rhamnolipids production were inhibited. A large inoculum (9%, v/v) failed to completely relieve the inhibitory effect of 10 mg S(2-)/l. Below 30 mg S(2-)/l, both strains resumed rhamnolipid production through co-culturing with the denitrifying and sulphide-removing strain Pseudomonas stutzeri DQ1. H2S has a direct but reversible inhibitory effect on rhamnolipids production. Control of H2S in oilfields is indispensable to MEOR, and the co-culture method is effective in restoring rhamnolipid production in presence of S(2-).

  2. Exosomes from differentiating human skeletal muscle cells trigger myogenesis of stem cells and provide biochemical cues for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Suk; Yoon, Hwa In; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Choi, Young Chan; Yang, Seong Hyun; Kim, In-San; Cho, Yong Woo

    2016-01-28

    Exosomes released from skeletal muscle cells play important roles in myogenesis and muscle development via the transfer of specific signal molecules. In this study, we investigated whether exosomes secreted during myotube differentiation from human skeletal myoblasts (HSkM) could induce a cellular response from human adipose-derived stem cells (HASCs) and enhance muscle regeneration in a muscle laceration mouse model. The exosomes contained various signal molecules including myogenic growth factors related to muscle development, such as insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), and platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA). Interestingly, exosome-treated HASCs fused with neighboring cells at early time points and exhibited a myotube-like phenotype with increased expression of myogenic proteins (myosin heavy chain and desmin). On day 21, mRNAs of terminal myogenic genes were also up-regulated in exosome-treated HASCs. Moreover, in vivo studies demonstrated that exosomes from differentiating HSkM reduced the fibrotic area and increased the number of regenerated myofibers in the injury site, resulting in significant improvement of skeletal muscle regeneration. Our findings suggest that exosomes act as a biochemical cue directing stem cell differentiation and provide a cell-free therapeutic approach for muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extracellular Vesicles Released by Oxidatively Injured or Intact C2C12 Myotubes Promote Distinct Responses Converging toward Myogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Guescini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Myogenic differentiation is triggered, among other situations, in response to muscle damage for regenerative purposes. It has been shown that during myogenic differentiation, myotubes release extracellular vesicles (EVs which participate in the signalling pattern of the microenvironment. Here we investigated whether EVs released by myotubes exposed or not to mild oxidative stress modulate the behaviour of targeted differentiating myoblasts and macrophages to promote myogenesis. We found that EVs released by oxidatively challenged myotubes (H2O2-EVs are characterized by an increased loading of nucleic acids, mainly DNA. In addition, incubation of myoblasts with H2O2-EVs resulted in a significant decrease of myotube diameter, myogenin mRNA levels and myosin heavy chain expression along with an upregulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen: these effects collectively lead to an increase of recipient myoblast proliferation. Notably, the EVs from untreated myotubes induced an opposite trend in myoblasts, that is, a slight pro-differentiation effect. Finally, H2O2-EVs were capable of eliciting an increased interleukin 6 mRNA expression in RAW264.7 macrophages. Notably, this is the first demonstration that myotubes communicate with surrounding macrophages via EV release. Collectively, the data reported herein suggest that myotubes, depending on their conditions, release EVs carrying differential signals which could contribute to finely and coherently orchestrate the muscle regeneration process.

  4. Bioactivity of tempe by inhibiting adhesion of ETEC to intestinal cells, as influenced by fermentation substrates and starter pure cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Nout, M.J.R.; Meulen, van der J.; Gruppen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Soya bean tempe is known for its bioactivity in reducing the severity of diarrhoea in piglets. This bioactivity is caused by an inhibition of the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to intestinal cells. In this paper, we assessed the bioactive effect of soya tempe on a range of ETEC

  5. CYCLOSPORINE-A BLOCKS BILE-ACID SYNTHESIS IN CULTURED-HEPATOCYTES BY SPECIFIC-INHIBITION OF CHENODEOXYCHOLIC ACID SYNTHESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PRINCEN, HMG; WOLTHERS, BG; VONK, RJ; KUIPERS, F

    1991-01-01

    Bile acid synthesis, determined by conversion of [4-C-14]cholesterol into bile acids in rat and human hepatocytes and by measurement of mass production of bile acids in rat hepatocytes, was dose-dependently decreased by cyclosporin A, with 52% (rat) and 45% (human) inhibition at 10-mu-M. The

  6. Higher Anti-Liver Fibrosis Effect of Cordyceps militaris-Fermented Product Cultured with Deep Ocean Water via Inhibiting Proinflammatory Factors and Fibrosis-Related Factors Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Ping; Lee, Chun-Lin

    2017-06-08

    Deep ocean water (DOW) has been shown to enhance the functional components of fungi, resulting in increased health benefits. Therefore, using DOW for culturing fungi can enhance the cordycepin and adenosine of Cordyceps militaris (CM) and its protective effects on the liver. In this study, the antiliver fibrosis effects and mechanisms of ultrapure water-cultured CM (UCM), DOW-cultured CM (DCM), synthetic water-cultured CM, DOW, cordycepin, and adenosine were compared in the liver fibrosis mice induced by intraperitoneal injections of thioacetamide (TAA). The results indicated that DCM exhibited superior performance in reducing liver collagen accumulation, mitigating liver injuries, inhibiting proinflammatory factors and fibrosis-related factor (TGF-β1, Smad2/3, α-SMA, COL1A1) expression compared with UCM. DOW, cordycepin, and adenosine also performed antiliver fibrosis effect. Therefore, because DCM is rich in DOW and functional components, it can achieve anti-liver fibrosis effects through multiple pathways. These ameliorative effects are considerably superior to those of UCM.

  7. Higher Anti-Liver Fibrosis Effect of Cordyceps militaris-Fermented Product Cultured with Deep Ocean Water via Inhibiting Proinflammatory Factors and Fibrosis-Related Factors Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ping Hung

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep ocean water (DOW has been shown to enhance the functional components of fungi, resulting in increased health benefits. Therefore, using DOW for culturing fungi can enhance the cordycepin and adenosine of Cordyceps militaris (CM and its protective effects on the liver. In this study, the antiliver fibrosis effects and mechanisms of ultrapure water-cultured CM (UCM, DOW-cultured CM (DCM, synthetic water-cultured CM, DOW, cordycepin, and adenosine were compared in the liver fibrosis mice induced by intraperitoneal injections of thioacetamide (TAA. The results indicated that DCM exhibited superior performance in reducing liver collagen accumulation, mitigating liver injuries, inhibiting proinflammatory factors and fibrosis-related factor (TGF-β1, Smad2/3, α-SMA, COL1A1 expression compared with UCM. DOW, cordycepin, and adenosine also performed antiliver fibrosis effect. Therefore, because DCM is rich in DOW and functional components, it can achieve anti-liver fibrosis effects through multiple pathways. These ameliorative effects are considerably superior to those of UCM.

  8. The role of lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus sp yel133) from beef in inhibiting of microbial contaminants on various fillers of starter culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunilas; Mirwandhono, E.

    2018-02-01

    The role of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) on the starter culture can be seen from the ability to grow and suppress the growth of microbial contaminants (fungi). The research aimed to investigate the role of LAB (Lactobacillus sp YEL133) in inhibiting microbial contaminants (fungi) on starter cultures of various fillers. The materials used in this research was Lactobacillus sp YEL133 from beef and various fillers (rice flour, corn starch and wheat flour). The research methods used completely randomized design (CRD) with 3 treatments and 4 replications. The treatments of this research was P1(rice flour), P2 (corn starch) and P3 (wheat flour) that inoculated with Lactobacillus sp YEL133. Parameters which is observed such as: growth of lactic acid bacteria, total microbes and total fungi as microbial contaminants. The results showed that the starter culture with a filler material of rice flour produce lactic acid bacteria and microbes were highly significant (P <0.01) for corn starch and wheat flour, as well as able to suppress the growth of microbial contaminants (fungi). The conclusion of the research is the use Lactobacillus sp YEL133 can suppress the growth of fungi on the starter culture using rice flour.

  9. Methylprednisolone inhibits the proliferation and affects the differentiation of rat spinal cord-derived neural progenitor cells cultured in low oxygen conditions by inhibiting HIF-1α and Hes1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhao; Wang, Peng; Li, Shiyuan; Yang, Jiewen; Liang, Xinjun; Tang, Yong; Li, Yuxi; Yang, Rui; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2014-09-01

    Although there is much controversy over the use of methylprednisolone (MP), it is one of the main drugs used in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). The induction of the proliferation and differentiation of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is considered a promising mode of treatment for SCI. However, the effects of MP on spinal cord-derived endogenous NPCs in a low oxygen enviroment remain to be delineated. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of MP on NPCs cultured under low oxygen conditions in vitro and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. Fetal rat spinal cord-derived NPCs were harvested and divided into 4 groups: 2 groups of cells cultured under normal oxygen conditions and treated with or without MP, and 2 groups incubated in 3% O2 (low oxygen) treated in a similar manner. We found that MP induced suppressive effects on NPC proliferation even under low oxygen conditions (3% O2). The proportion of nestin-positive NPCs decreased from 51.8±2.46% to 36.17±3.55% following the addition of MP and decreased more significantly to 27.20±2.68% in the cells cultured in 3% O2. In addition, a smaller number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells and a greater number of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)-positive cells was observed following the addition of MP under both normal (normoxic) and low oxygen (hypoxic) conditions. In response to MP treatment, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the Notch signaling pathway downstream protein, Hes1, but not the upstream Notch-1 intracelluar domain (NICD), were inhibited. After blocking NICD with a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) MP still inhibited the expression of Hes1. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the MP-induced inhibition of proliferation and its effects on differentiation and suggest that HIF-1α and Hes1 play an important role in this effect.

  10. Bisphenol A Inhibits Follicle Growth and Induces Atresia in Cultured Mouse Antral Follicles Independently of the Genomic Estrogenic Pathway1

    OpenAIRE

    Peretz, Jackye; Craig, Zelieann R.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic chemical used to manufacture many commonly used plastic and epoxy resin-based products. BPA ubiquitously binds to estrogen receptors throughout the body, including estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) in the ovary. Few studies have investigated the effects of BPA on ovarian antral follicles. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that BPA alters cell cycle regulators and induces atresia in antral follicles via the genomic estrogenic pathway, inhibiting follicle growth. To...

  11. Effects of gamma irradiation on the plasma membrane of suspension-cultured apple cells. Rapid irreversible inhibition of H+-ATPase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, C.-Z.; Montillet, J.-L.; Triantaphylides, C.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation, used in post-harvest treatment of fruit and vegetables. were investigated on cultured apple cells (Pyrus malus L. cv. Royal Red) on a short-term period. Irradiation (2 kGy) induced an increase of passive ion effluxes from cells and a decrease of cell capacity to regulate external pH. These alterations are likely due to effects on plasma membrane structure and function and were further investigated by studying the effects of irradiation on plasma membrane H + -ATPase activity. Plasma membrane-enriched vesicles were prepared and the H + -ATPase activity was characterized. Irradiation of the vesicles induced a dose dependent inhibition of H + -ATPase activity. The loss of enzyme activity was immediate, even at low doses (0.5 kGy), and was not reversed by the addition of 2mM dithiothreitol. This inhibition may be the result of an irreversible oxidation of enzyme sulfhydryl moieties and/or the result of changes induced within the lipid bilayer affecting the membrane-enzyme interactions. Further analysis of the H + -ATPase activity was carried out on vesicles obtained from irradiated cells confirming the previous results. In vivo recovery of activity was not observed within 5 h following the treatment, thus explaining the decrease of cell capacity to regulate external pH. This rapid irreversible inhibition of the plasma membrane H + -ATPase must be considered as one of the most important primary biochemical events occurring in irradiated plant material. (author)

  12. Peroxidized mineral oil increases the oxidant status of culture media and inhibits in vitro porcine embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, C A; Nohalez, A; Ceron, J J; Rubio, C P; Roca, J; Cuello, C; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Martinez, E A; Gil, M A

    2017-11-01

    The use of oils with undetected alterations is a long-recognized problem for in vitro embryo production systems. Since peroxides in oils have been associated with reduced embryo production outcomes, our goals were (1) to evaluate the effects of a batch of mineral oil (MO) that was suspected to be altered on the in vitro production of pig embryos and (2) to determine oil peroxide values throughout culture and the transfer of oxidant agents from oil to culture media. Sunflower oil, which has a completely different chemical composition than MO but a higher oxidative status, and unaltered MO were used as controls. Oocyte maturation, fertilization and embryo development were affected differently depending on the oil overlay used. While the suspected MO was not able to sustain in vitro maturation and fertilization, the oocytes incubated in the presence of sunflower oil were matured and fertilized similarly to those of the unaltered MO group. Moreover, the cleavage rate of presumed zygotes cultured under the suspected MO was severely reduced compared with those cultured under the other oils, and none of the cleaved embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. Although the cleavage rates in the sunflower oil and unaltered MO groups were similar, embryos cultured under sunflower oil also failed to develop to the blastocyst stage. Our results revealed that the suspected MO and sunflower oil had similar levels of peroxides and that these levels were much higher than those of the unaltered MO. The total oxidant status was higher in media incubated under peroxidized oils than in fresh media or media incubated without an oil overlay or under unaltered MO, indicating that oxidant agents were transferred to the incubation media. However, unlike the sunflower oil group, the culture media incubated under the suspected MO had high levels of total oxidant status and low levels of hydrogen peroxide and reactive oxygen species, suggesting the presence of other unknown oxidant agents in

  13. Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian HUDREA

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultural orientations of an organization can be its greatest strength, providing the basis for problem solving, cooperation, and communication. Culture, however, can also inhibit needed changes. Cultural changes typically happen slowly – but without cultural change, many other organizational changes are doomed to fail. The dominant culture of an organization is a major contributor to its success. But, of course, no organizational culture is purely one type or another. And the existence of secondary cultures can provide the basis for change. Therefore, organizations need to understand the cultural environments and values.

  14. Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein mediates the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of melatonin release in photoreceptive chick pineal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, B.L.; Takahashi, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The avian pineal gland is a photoreceptive organ that has been shown to contain postjunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors that inhibit melatonin synthesis and/or release upon receptor activation. Physiological response and [32P]ADP ribosylation experiments were performed to investigate whether pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) were involved in the transduction of the alpha 2-adrenergic signal. For physiological response studies, the effects of pertussis toxin on melatonin release in dissociated cell cultures exposed to norepinephrine were assessed. Pertussis toxin blocked alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin-induced blockade appeared to be noncompetitive. One and 10 ng/ml doses of pertussis toxin partially blocked and a 100 ng/ml dose completely blocked norepinephrine-induced inhibition. Pertussis toxin-catalyzed [32P]ADP ribosylation of G-proteins in chick pineal cell membranes was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Membranes were prepared from cells that had been pretreated with 0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. In the absence of pertussis toxin pretreatment, two major proteins of 40K and 41K mol wt (Mr) were labeled by [32P]NAD. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of pineal cells abolished [32P] radiolabeling of the 40K Mr G-protein in a dose-dependent manner. The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of both cAMP efflux and melatonin release, as assessed by RIA of medium samples collected before membrane preparation, was also blocked in a dose-dependent manner by pertussis toxin. Collectively, these results suggest that a pertussis toxin-sensitive 40K Mr G-protein labeled by [32P]NAD may be functionally associated with alpha 2-adrenergic signal transduction in chick pineal cells

  15. Augmentation by L-Dopa of growth inhibition and melanin formation of X-irradiated Harding-Passey melanoma cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schachtschabel, D.O.; Pfab, R.; Hess, F.; Paul, N.

    1988-07-01

    Treatment of exponentially proliferating melanogenic Harding-Passey melanoma cells in monolayer culture (HPM-73 line) with a single dose of X-irradiation (up to 8 Gy) or continuously (for several weeks) with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-Dopa) up to 5x10/sup -4/ M resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation, but not in death of all cells. Actually, 8 Gy-irradiated or L-Dopa (2x10/sup -4/ M)-treated cultures finally reached the cell number and cell density of controls. However, a combination of a single dose of radiation (8 Gy) followed by L-Dopa (2x10/sup -4/ M)-treatment resulted in destruction of all cells. Melanin formation was stimulated by L-dopa-treatment or X-irradiation, and was further elevated by the combined application of radiation and L-Dopa-exposure. Whether the effects of exogenously applied L-Dopa, an intermediary metabolite of melanin synthesis, are due to the conversion to growth-inhibitory metabolites (quinones, radicals, etc.) inside or outside the cell, was discussed. The latter might result from release (due to membrane damage or cell desintegration) of tyrosinase or/and melanosomes into the culture medium with the consequence of extracellular synthesis of potentially cytotoxic metabolites from medium substrates. Further, endocytosis of exogenous melanosomes and tyrosinase with potentially harmful effects is feasible. An application of such a combination therapy of melanoma to clinical medicine should be considered.

  16. Augmentation by L-Dopa of growth inhibition and melanin formation of X-irradiated Harding-Passey melanoma cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachtschabel, D.O.; Pfab, R.; Hess, F.; Paul, N.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of exponentially proliferating melanogenic Harding-Passey melanoma cells in monolayer culture (HPM-73 line) with a single dose of X-irradiation (up to 8 Gy) or continuously (for several weeks) with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-Dopa) up to 5x10 -4 M resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation, but not in death of all cells. Actually, 8 Gy-irradiated or L-Dopa (2x10 -4 M)-treated cultures finally reached the cell number and cell density of controls. However, a combination of a single dose of radiation (8 Gy) followed by L-Dopa (2x10 -4 M)-treatment resulted in destruction of all cells. Melanin formation was stimulated by L-dopa-treatment or X-irradiation, and was further elevated by the combined application of radiation and L-Dopa-exposure. Whether the effects of exogenously applied L-Dopa, an intermediary metabolite of melanin synthesis, are due to the conversion to growth-inhibitory metabolites (quinones, radicals, etc.) inside or outside the cell, was discussed. The latter might result from release (due to membrane damage or cell desintegration) of tyrosinase or/and melanosomes into the culture medium with the consequence of extracellular synthesis of potentially cytotoxic metabolites from medium substrates. Further, endocytosis of exogenous melanosomes and tyrosinase with potentially harmful effects is feasible. An application of such a combination therapy of melanoma to clinical medicine should be considered. (orig.) [de

  17. Increasing platelet concentration in platelet-rich plasma inhibits anterior cruciate ligament cell function in three-dimensional culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ryu; Cheng, Mingyu; Murray, Martha M

    2014-02-01

    Tissue engineering is one new strategy being developed to treat ACL ruptures. One such approach is bio-enhanced ACL repair, where a suture repair is supplemented with a bio-active scaffold containing platelets. However, the optimal concentration of platelets to stimulate ACL healing is not known. We hypothesized that increasing platelet concentrations in the scaffold would enhance critical cell behaviors. Porcine ACL fibroblasts were obtained from explant culture and suspended in platelet poor plasma (PPP), 1× platelet-rich plasma (PRP), 3× PRP, 5× PRP, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The cell suspensions were cultured in a 3D collagen scaffold. Cellular metabolism (MTT assay), apoptosis (TUNEL assay), and gene expression for type I and type III collagen were measured. 1× PRP significantly outperformed 5× PRP in all parameters studied: Type I and III collagen gene expression, apoptosis prevention, and cell metabolism stimulation. ACL fibroblasts cultured with 1× PRP had the highest type I and type III collagen gene expression. 1× PRP and PPP groups had the highest cell metabolism and lowest apoptosis rates. Concentration of platelets had significant effects on the behavior of ACL fibroblasts; thus, it is an important parameter that should be specified in clinical or basic science studies. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Eelgrass slabs, a soilless culture substrate that inhibits adhesion of fungi and oomycetes and enhances antioxidant activity in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meot-Duros, Laetitia; Le Floch, Gaëtan; Meot, Benoit; Letousey, Patricia; Jacob, Bruno; Barbier, Georges

    2011-10-26

    Composed of a marine plant, Zostera sp., eelgrass slabs are a novel organic substrate for soilless cultures used in tomato production. The benefit of using eelgrass slabs for growing tomatoes was assessed by comparing it with coconut fiber slabs in regard to contamination by Pythium spp. and to the antioxidant properties of tomato fruits. First, tomato root contamination by Pythium spp. was studied by direct plate counting, and a molecular comparison of fungal and oomycete communities was conducted using PCR-DHPLC. Second, the antioxidant properties of tomato fruits were analyzed by measuring total phenol and carotenoid contents and by evaluating radical scavenging activity. Compared to plants grown on coconut fiber slabs, those on eelgrass slabs presented a lower rate of Pythium spp. root contamination. Moreover, culture on eelgrass slabs produced fruits with better radical scavenging activity and higher total phenol content compared to controls. Carotenoid content was not affected by the type of substrate. This study highlights the value of detrital leaves of Zostera sp. as a substrate for soilless culture that reduces root contamination and also promotes the production of tomato fruits with better nutritional value.

  19. The effect of delivering the chemokine SDF-1α in a matrix-bound manner on myogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadir, Rabia; Almodovar, Jorge; Mertani, Hichem C.; Bruckert, Franz; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Weidenhaupt, Marianne; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Picart, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Several chemokines are important in muscle myogenesis and in the recruitment of muscle precursors during muscle regeneration. Among these, the SDF-1α chemokine (CXCL12) is a potent chemoattractant known to be involved in muscle repair. SDF-1α was loaded in polyelectrolyte multilayer films made of poly(l-lysine) and hyaluronan to be delivered locally to myoblast cells in a matrix-bound manner. The adsorbed amounts of SDF-1α were tuned over a large range from 100 ng/cm2 to 5 μg/cm2, depending on the initial concentration of SDF-1α in solution, its pH, and on the film crosslinking extent. Matrix-bound SDF-1α induced a striking increase in myoblast spreading, which was revealed when it was delivered from weakly crosslinked films. It also significantly enhanced cell migration in a dose-dependent manner, which again depended on its presentation by the biopolymeric film. The low-crosslinked film was the most efficient in boosting cell migration. Furthermore, matrix-bound SDF-1α also increased the expression of myogenic markers but the fusion index decreased in a dose-dependent manner with the adsorbed amount of SDF-1α. At high adsorbed amounts of SDF-1α, a large number of Troponin T-positive cells had only one nucleus. Overall, this work reveals the importance of the presentation mode of SDF-1α to emphasize its effect on myogenic processes. These films may be further used to provide insight into the role of SDF-1α presented by a biomaterial in physiological or pathological processes. PMID:24612919

  20. Ganoderma Lucidum polysaccharides protect against MPP(+) and rotenone-induced apoptosis in primary dopaminergic cell cultures through inhibiting oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shan-Shan; Cui, Xiao-Lan; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the progressive neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) which is responsible for disabling motor abnormalities in more than 6.5 million people worldwide. Polysaccharides are the main active constituents from Ganoderma lucidum which is characterized with anti-oxidant, antitumor and immunostimulant properties. In the present study, primary dopaminergic cell cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were used to investigate the neuroprotective effects and the potential mechanisms of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons induced by the neurotoxins methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP(+)) and rotenone. Results revealed that GLP can protect dopamine neurons against MPP(+) and rotenone at the concentrations of 100, 50 and 25 μg/ml in primary mesencephalic cultures in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, either with or without neurotoxin treatment, GLP treatment elevated the survival of THir neurons, and increased the length of neurites of dopaminergic neurons. The Trolox equivalent anti-oxidant capacity (TEAC) of GLP was determined to be 199.53 μmol Trolox/g extract, and the decrease of mitochondrial complex I activity induced by MPP(+) and rotenone was elevated by GLP treatment (100, 50, 25 and 12.5 μg/ml) in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, GLP dramatically decreased the relative number of apoptotic cells and increased the declining mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by MPP(+) and rotenone in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, GLP treatment reduced the ROS formation induced by MPP(+) and rotenone at the concentrations of 100, 50 and 25 μg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Our study indicates that GLP possesses neuroprotective properties against MPP(+) and rotenone neurotoxicity through suppressing oxidative stress in primary mesencephalic dopaminergic cell culture owning to its antioxidant activities.

  1. Directed in vitro myogenesis of human embryonic stem cells and their in vivo engraftment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsung Hwang

    Full Text Available Development of human embryonic stem cell (hESC-based therapy requires derivation of in vitro expandable cell populations that can readily differentiate to specified cell types and engraft upon transplantation. Here, we report that hESCs can differentiate into skeletal muscle cells without genetic manipulation. This is achieved through the isolation of cells expressing a mesodermal marker, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRA, following embryoid body (EB formation. The ESC-derived cells differentiated into myoblasts in vitro as evident by upregulation of various myogenic genes, irrespective of the presence of serum in the medium. This result is further corroborated by the presence of sarcomeric myosin and desmin, markers for terminally differentiated cells. When transplanted in vivo, these pre-myogenically committed cells were viable in tibialis anterior muscles 14 days post-implantation. These hESC-derived cells, which readily undergo myogenic differentiation in culture medium containing serum, could be a viable cell source for skeletal muscle repair and tissue engineering to ameliorate various muscle wasting diseases.

  2. Inhibition of spontaneous induction of lambdoid prophages in Escherichia coli cultures: simple procedures with possible biotechnological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrobel Borys

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections of bacterial cultures by bacteriophages are serious problems in biotechnological laboratories. Apart from such infections, prophage induction in the host cells may also be dangerous. Escherichia coli is a commonly used host in biotechnological production, and many laboratory strains of this bacterium harbour lambdoid prophages. These prophages may be induced under certain conditions leading to phage lytic development. This is fatal for further cultivations as relatively low, though still significant, numbers of phages may be overlooked. Thus, subsequent cultures of non-lysogenic strains may be infected and destroyed by such phage. Results Here we report that slow growth of bacteria decreases deleterious effects of spontaneous lambdoid prophage induction. Moreover, replacement of glucose with glycerol in a medium stimulates lysogenic development of the phage after infection of E. coli cells. A plasmid was constructed overexpressing the phage 434 cI gene, coding for the repressor of phage promoters which are necessary for lytic development. Overproduction of the cI repressor abolished spontaneous induction of the λimm434 prophage. Conclusions Simple procedures that alleviate problems with spontaneous induction of lambdoid prophage and subsequent infection of E. coli strains by these phages are described. Low bacterial growth rate, replacement of glucose with glycerol in a medium and overproduction of the cI repressor minimise the risk of prophage induction during cultivation of lysogenic bacteria and subsequent infection of other bacterial strains.

  3. Chinese yellow wine inhibits production of homocysteine-induced extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hangyuan; Wang, Ping; You, Binquan; Xing, Yangbo; Lee, Jong-Dae

    2007-06-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of Chinese yellow wine is associated with a reduced risk of coronary disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that participate in extracellular matrix degradation have been involved in atherosclerotic plaque growth and instability. The present research aimed to study the effects of Chinese yellow wine on the production of homocysteine (Hcy)-induced extracellular MMP-2 in cultured rats vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We examined the effects of different Hcy levels (0-1000 micromol/l) on MMP-2 production, and the effects of Chinese yellow wine with low alcohol concentrations (12-19%) on Hcy-induced MMP-2 in cultured rat (VSMCs) using gelatin zymography and western blotting. We further compared the changes of MMP-2 under various treatments for 12, 24 and 48 h. Hcy (50-1000 micromol/l) increased the production of MMP-2 significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Increased production of MMP-2 induced by Hcy was reduced by extracellularly added Chinese yellow wine. Production of MMP-2 under various treatments for 48 h increased more than 12 and 24 h. Extracellularly added Chinese yellow wine decreased Hcy-induced MMP-2 secretion. The inhibitory effect of yellow wine on the activation of MMP-2 might contribute to their beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system.

  4. Beta1 integrin inhibitory antibody induces apoptosis of breast cancer cells, inhibits growth, and distinguishes malignant from normal phenotype in three dimensional cultures and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Catherine C; Zhang, Hui; Pallavicini, Maria; Gray, Joe W; Baehner, Frederick; Park, Chong J; Bissell, Mina J

    2006-02-01

    Current therapeutic approaches to cancer are designed to target molecules that contribute to malignant behavior but leave normal tissues intact. beta(1) integrin is a candidate target well known for mediating cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions that influence diverse cellular functions; its aberrant expression has been implicated in breast cancer progression and resistance to cytotoxic therapy. The addition of beta(1) integrin inhibitory agents to breast cancer cells at a single-cell stage in a laminin-rich ECM (three-dimensional lrECM) culture was shown to down-modulate beta(1) integrin signaling, resulting in malignant reversion. To investigate beta(1) integrin as a therapeutic target, we modified the three-dimensional lrECM protocol to approximate the clinical situation: before treatment, we allowed nonmalignant cells to form organized acinar structures and malignant cells to form tumor-like colonies. We then tested the ability of beta(1) integrin inhibitory antibody, AIIB2, to inhibit tumor cell growth in several breast cancer cell lines (T4-2, MDA-MB-231, BT474, SKBR3, and MCF-7) and one nonmalignant cell line (S-1). We show that beta(1) integrin inhibition resulted in a significant loss of cancer cells, associated with a decrease in proliferation and increase in apoptosis, and a global change in the composition of residual colonies. In contrast, nonmalignant cells that formed tissue-like structures remained resistant. Moreover, these cancer cell-specific antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects were confirmed in vivo with no discernible toxicity to animals. Our findings indicate that beta(1) integrin is a promising therapeutic target, and that the three-dimensional lrECM culture assay can be used to effectively distinguish malignant and normal tissue response to therapy.

  5. A small molecule inhibitor of dengue virus type 2 protease inhibits the replication of all four dengue virus serotypes in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Rajendra; Beesetti, Hemalatha; Tyagi, Poornima; Khanna, Ira; Jain, Swatantra K; Jeankumar, Variam U; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam

    2015-02-08

    Dengue has emerged as the most significant of arboviral diseases in the 21st century. It is endemic to >100 tropical and sub-tropical countries around the world placing an estimated 3.6 billion people at risk. It is caused by four genetically similar but antigenically distinct, serotypes of dengue viruses. There is neither a vaccine to prevent nor a drug to treat dengue infections, at the present time. The major objective of this work was to explore the possibility of identifying a small molecule inhibitor of the dengue virus protease and assessing its ability to suppress viral replication in cultured cells. We cloned, expressed and purified recombinant dengue virus type 2 protease. Using an optimized and validated fluorogenic peptide substrate cleavage assay to monitor the activity of this cloned dengue protease we randomly screened ~1000 small molecules from an 'in-house' library to identify potential dengue protease inhibitors. A benzimidazole derivative, named MB21, was found to be the most potent in inhibiting the cloned protease (IC₅₀ = 5.95 μM). In silico docking analysis indicated that MB21 binds to the protease in the vicinity of the active site. Analysis of kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction suggested that MB21 presumably functions as a mixed type inhibitor. Significantly, this molecule identified as an inhibitor of dengue type 2 protease was also effective in inhibiting each one of the four serotypes of dengue viruses in infected cells in culture, based on analysis of viral antigen synthesis and infectious virus production. Interestingly, MB21 did not manifest any discernible cytotoxicity. This work strengthens the notion that a single drug molecule can be effective against all four dengue virus serotypes. The molecule MB21 could be a potential candidate for 'hit-to-lead' optimization, and may pave the way towards developing a pan-dengue virus antiviral drug.

  6. Depsidones inhibit aromatase activity and tumor cell proliferation in a co-culture of human primary breast adipose fibroblasts and T47D breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chottanapund, Suthat; Van Duursen, M B M; Zwartsen, Anne; Timtavorn, Supatchaya; Navasumrit, Panida; Kittakoop, Prasat; Sureram, Sanya; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Van den Berg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Naturally occurring depsidones from the marine fungus Aspergillus unguis are known to have substantial anti-cancer activity, but their mechanism of action remains elusive. The purpose of this study was to examine the anti-aromatase activity of two common depsidones, unguinol and aspergillusidone A, in a co-culture system of human primary breast adipose fibroblasts and hormonal responsive T47D breast tumor cells. Using this in vitro model it was shown that these depsidones inhibit the growth of T47D tumor cells most likely via inhibition of aromatase (CYP19) activity. The IC 50 values of these depisidones were compared with the aromatase inhibitors letrozole and exemestane. Letrozole and exemestane had IC 50 values of respectively, 0.19 and 0.14 μM, while those for Unguinol and Aspergillusidone A were respectively, 9.7 and 7.3 μM. Our results indicate that among the depsidones there maybe aromatase inhibitors with possible pharmacotherapeutical relevance.

  7. Inhibition of miR122a by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant increases intestinal occludin expression and protects mice from alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyang; Zhao, Cuiqing; Dong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Fengyuan; Li, Xiaokun; McClain, Craig; Yang, Shulin; Feng, Wenke

    2015-05-05

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) has a high morbidity and mortality. Chronic alcohol consumption causes disruption of intestinal microflora homeostasis, intestinal tight junction barrier dysfunction, increased endotoxemia, and eventually liver steatosis/steatohepatitis. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the bacteria-free LGG culture supernatant (LGGs) have been shown to promote intestinal epithelial integrity and protect intestinal barrier function in ALD. However, little is known about how LGGs mechanistically works to increase intestinal tight junction proteins. Here we show that chronic ethanol exposure increased intestinal miR122a expression, which decreased occludin expression leading to increased intestinal permeability. Moreover, LGGs supplementation decreased ethanol-elevated miR122a level and attenuated ethanol-induced liver injury in mice. Similar to the effect of ethanol exposure, overexpression of miR122a in Caco-2 monolayers markedly decreased occludin protein levels. In contrast, inhibition of miR122a increased occludin expression. We conclude that LGGs supplementation functions in intestinal integrity by inhibition of miR122a, leading to occludin restoration in mice exposed to chronic ethanol. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. PARP Inhibition Prevents Ethanol-Induced Neuroinflammatory Signaling and Neurodegeneration in Rat Adult-Age Brain Slice Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajuddin, Nuzhath; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2018-01-01

    Using rat adult-age hippocampal-entorhinal cortical (HEC) slice cultures, we examined the role of poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase (PARP) in binge ethanol’s brain inflammatory and neurodegenerative mechanisms. Activated by DNA strand breaks, PARP (principally PARP1 in the brain) promotes DNA repair via poly [ADP-ribose] (PAR) products, but PARP overactivation triggers regulated neuronal necrosis (e.g., parthanatos). Previously, we found that brain PARP1 levels were upregulated by neurotoxic ethanol binges in adult rats and HEC slices, and PARP inhibitor PJ34 abrogated slice neurodegeneration. Binged HEC slices also exhibited increased Ca+2-dependent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoenzymes (cPLA2 IVA and sPLA2 IIA) that mobilize proinflammatory ω6 arachidonic acid (ARA). We now find in 4-day–binged HEC slice cultures (100 mM ethanol) that PARP1 elevations after two overnight binges precede PAR, cPLA2, and sPLA2 enhancements by 1 day and high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), an ethanol-responsive alarmin that augments proinflammatory cytokines via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), by 2 days. After verifying that PJ34 effectively blocks PARP activity (↑PAR), we demonstrated that, like PJ34, three other PARP inhibitors—olaparib, veliparib, and 4-aminobenzamide—provided neuroprotection from ethanol. Importantly, PJ34 and olaparib also prevented ethanol’s amplification of the PLA2 isoenzymes, and two PLA2 inhibitors were neuroprotective—thus coupling PARP to PLA2, with PLA2 activity promoting neurodegeneration. Also, PJ34 and olaparib blocked ethanol-induced HMGB1 elevations, linking brain PARP induction to TLR4 activation. The results provide evidence in adult brains that induction of PARP1 may mediate dual neuroinflammatory pathways (PLA2→phospholipid→ARA and HMGB1→TLR4→proinflammatory cytokines) that are complicit in binge ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:29339456

  9. Promoter polymorphisms in genes involved in porcine myogenesis influence their transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorni, Silvia; Tilesi, Francesca; Bicorgna, Silvia; Iacoponi, Francesca; Willems, Daniela; Gargani, Maria; D'Andrea, MariaSilvia; Pilla, Fabio; Valentini, Alessio

    2014-11-07

    hence presumably of the GDF8 gene, in both CHO and C2C12 cultured cells. In vitro the MYOD1-A allelic variant could up-regulate the expression of MYOD1 gene. Additionally, we could assess a different response of in vitro gene expression according to cell type used to transfect constructs, suggesting that MyoD activation is regulated by mechanisms that are specific of myoblasts.

  10. Binding of galectin-1 to breast cancer cells MCF7 induces apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in vitro in a 2D- and 3D- cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Pamina; Mayer, Barbara; Wiest, Irmi; Schulze, Sandra; Jeschke, Udo; Weissenbacher, Tobias

    2016-11-08

    Galectin-1 (gal-1) belongs to the family of β-galactoside-binding proteins which primarily recognizes the Galβ1-4GlcNAc sequences of oligosaccharides associated with several cell surface glycoconjugates. The lectin recognizes correspondent glycoepitopes on human breast cancer cells. Galectin-1 is expressed both in normal and malignant tissues. Lymphatic organs naturally possessing high rates of apoptotic cells, express high levels of Galectin-1. Furthermore galectin-1 can initiate T cell apoptosis. Binding of galectin-1 to trophoblast tumor cells presenting the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) carbohydrate antigen inhibits tumor cell proliferation. In this study we examined the impact galectin-1 has in vitro on cell proliferation, apoptotic potential and metabolic activity of MCF-7 and T-47D breast cancer cells in dependence to their expression of the Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) tumor antigen. For proliferation and apoptosis assays cells were grown in presence of 10, 30 and 60 μg gal-1/ml medium. Cell proliferation was determined by a BrdU uptake ELISA. Detection of apoptotic cells was done by M30 cyto death staining, in situ nick translation and by a nucleosome ELISA method. Furthermore we studied the impact galectin-1 has on the metabolic activity of MCF-7 and T-47D cells in a homotypic three-dimensional spheroid cell culture model mimicking a micro tumour environment. Gal-1 inhibited proliferation of MCF-7 cells (strong expression of the TF epitope) but did not significantly change proliferation of T-47D cells (weak expression of the TF epitope). The incubation of MCF-7 cells with gal-1 raised number of apoptotic cells significantly. Treating the spheroids with 30 μg/ml galectin-1 in addition to standard chemotherapeutic regimes (FEC, TAC) resulted in further suppression of the metabolic activity in MCF-7 cells whereas T-47D cells were not affected. Our results demonstrate that galectin-1 can inhibit proliferation und metabolic cell activity and induce

  11. 17-DMAG inhibits the multiplication of several Babesia species and Theileria equi on in vitro cultures, and Babesia microti in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guswanto, Azirwan; Nugraha, Arifin Budiman; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Tayebwa, Dickson Stuart; Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; Batiha, Gaber El-Saber; Gantuya, Sambuu; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2018-02-27

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a chaperone protein that stabilizes cells during stress or non-stress responses. Previous reports have shown that Hsp90 is a potential drug target to suppress the multiplication of several protozoan parasites. In this study, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), an Hsp90 inhibitor, was evaluated for its inhibitory effect on five in vitro cultures of Babesia and Theileria species, including B. bovis, B. bigemina, B. divergens, B. caballi, and T. equi, and on the multiplication of a B. microti-infected mouse model. 17-DMAG showed the inhibitory effect in all of the species tested. The half maximum inhibition concentration (IC 50 ) of 17-DMAG on B. bovis, B. bigemina, B. divergens, B. caballi, and T. equi was 77.6 ± 2.9, 62.4 ± 1.9, 183.8 ± 3.2, 88.5 ± 9.6, and 307.7 ± 7.2 nM, respectively. The toxicity assay on MDBK and NIH/3T3 cell lines showed that 17-DMAG affected the viability of cells with an IC 50 of 15.5 ± 4 and 8.8 ± 2 μM, respectively. Since the IC 50 s were much lower on the parasites than on the host cell lines, the selectivity index were high for all tested species. Furthermore, the two-drug combination of 17-DMAG with diminazene aceturate (DA) and atovaquone (AV) showed synergism or addition on in vitro cultures of Babesia and Theileria parasites. In the mouse model, 17-DMAG at a concentration of 30 mg/kg BW effectively inhibited the multiplication of B. microti. Moreover, if combined with DA or AV, 17-DMAG showed a comparable inhibition at the half dose. Taken together, these results indicate that 17-DMAG is a potent drug for treating piroplamosis. The data warrant further evaluation of 17-DMAG as an antibabesial drug and as an option in combination with atovaquone for the treatment of human babesiosis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Hypoxia inhibits mineralization ability of human dental pulp cells treated with TEGDMA but increases cell survival in accordance with the culture time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncel Torun, Zeynep; Torun, Deniz; Demirkaya, Kadriye; Yavuz, Süleyman Tolga; Sarper, Meral; Avcu, Ferit

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity and mineralization effects of TEGDMA in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) under hypoxic and normoxic culture conditions. Cell viability was evaluated using XTT assay after incubation periods of 24, 48, or 72h. The expression of mineralization-related genes (osteonectin, osteopontin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, collagen type 1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction at 24 and 72h. In XTT assay, viability was higher in 0.3, 1, 2, 4, and 5mM groups in the presence of 21% O 2 after 24h (p0.05). In the gene expression study, TEGDMA-treated hDPCs showed lower mineralization potential in the presence of 3% than with 21% O 2 (p<0.05). hDPCs revealed higher HO 1 expression in 0.3 and 1mM groups under hypoxic than under normoxic conditions after a 72-h time period (p<0.001). Hypoxic conditions increased cell survival in accordance with the culture period but inhibited the odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs treated with TEGDMA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Novel YY1-miR-1 regulatory circuit in skeletal myogenesis revealed by genome-wide prediction of YY1-miRNA network.

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    Leina Lu

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally, and mounting evidence supports the prevalence and functional significance of their interplay with transcription factors (TFs. Here we describe the identification of a regulatory circuit between muscle miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133 and miR-206 and Yin Yang 1 (YY1, an epigenetic repressor of skeletal myogenesis in mouse. Genome-wide identification of potential down-stream targets of YY1 by combining computational prediction with expression profiling data reveals a large number of putative miRNA targets of YY1 during skeletal myoblasts differentiation into myotubes with muscle miRs ranking on top of the list. The subsequent experimental results demonstrate that YY1 indeed represses muscle miRs expression in myoblasts and the repression is mediated through multiple enhancers and recruitment of Polycomb complex to several YY1 binding sites. YY1 regulating miR-1 is functionally important for both C2C12 myogenic differentiation and injury-induced muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-1 in turn targets YY1, thus forming a negative feedback loop. Together, these results identify a novel regulatory circuit required for skeletal myogenesis and reinforce the idea that regulatory circuitries involving miRNAs and TFs are prevalent mechanisms.

  14. Genome-wide RNA-seq and ChIP-seq reveal Linc-YY1 function in regulating YY1/PRC2 activity during skeletal myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kun; Zhou, Liang; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Huating; Sun, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Little is known how lincRNAs are involved in skeletal myogenesis. Here we describe the discovery and functional annotation of Linc-YY1, a novel lincRNA originating from the promoter of the transcription factor (TF) Yin Yang 1 (YY1). Starting from whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (a.k.a. RNA-seq) data from muscle C2C12 cells, a series of bioinformatics analysis was applied towards the identification of hundreds of high-confidence novel lincRNAs. Genome-wide approaches were then employed to demonstrate that Linc-YY1 functions to promote myogenesis through associating with YY1 and regulating YY1/PRC2 transcriptional activity in trans. Here we describe the details of the ChIP-seq, RNA-seq experiments, and data analysis procedures associated with the study published by Zhou and colleagues in the Nature Communications Journal in 2015 Zhou et al. (2015) [1]. The data was deposited on NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) with accession number GSE74049.

  15. Melatonin Protects Cultured Tobacco Cells against Lead-Induced Cell Death via Inhibition of Cytochrome c Translocation

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    Agnieszka Kobylińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin was discovered in plants more than two decades ago and, especially in the last decade, it has captured the interests of plant biologists. Beyond its possible participation in photoperiod processes and its role as a direct free radical scavenger as well as an indirect antioxidant, melatonin is also involved in plant defense strategies/reactions. However, the mechanisms that this indoleamine activates to improve plant stress tolerance still require identification and clarification. In the present report, the ability of exogenous melatonin to protect Nicotiana tabacum L. line Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2 suspension cells against the toxic exposure to lead was examined. Studies related to cell proliferation and viability, DNA fragmentation, possible translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, cell morphology after fluorescence staining and also the in situ accumulation of superoxide radicals measured via the nitro blue tetrazolium reducing test, were conducted. This work establishes a novel finding by correcting the inhibition of release of mitochondrial ctytocrome c in to the cytoplasm with the high accumulation of superoxide radicals. The results show that pretreatment with 200 nm of melatonin protected tobacco cells from DNA damage caused by lead. Melatonin, as an efficacious antioxidant, limited superoxide radical accumulation as well as cytochrome c release thereby, it likely prevents the activation of the cascade of processes leading to cell death. Fluorescence staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide documented that lead-stressed cells additionally treated with melatonin displayed intact nuclei. The results revealed that melatonin at proper dosage could significantly increase BY-2 cell proliferation and protected them against death. It was proved that melatonin could function as an effective priming agent to promote survival of tobacco cells under harmful lead-induced stress conditions.

  16. Comparative larval myogenesis and adult myoanatomy of the rhynchonelliform (articulate brachiopods Argyrotheca cordata, A. cistellula, and Terebratalia transversa

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    Wanninger Andreas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite significant methodological progress, Brachiopoda remains one of the lophotrochozoan phyla for which no recent ontogenetic data employing modern methodologies such as fluorescence labelling and confocal microscopy are available. This is particularly astonishing given the ongoing controversy concerning its phylogenetic position. In order to contribute new morphogenetic data for phylogenetic and evolutionary inferences, we describe herein the ontogeny and myoanatomy of larvae and adults of the rhynchonelliform brachiopods Argyrotheca cordata, A. cistellula, and Terebratalia transversa using fluorescence F-actin labelling combined with confocal laserscanning microscopy. Results Fully grown larvae of A. cordata and T. transversa consist of three distinct body regions, namely an apical lobe, a mantle lobe with four bundles of setae, and a pedicle lobe. Myogenesis is very similar in these two species. The first anlagen of the musculature develop in the pedicle lobe, followed by setae muscles and the mantle lobe musculature. Late-stage larvae show a network of strong pedicle muscles, central mantle muscles, longitudinal muscles running from the mantle to the pedicle lobe, setae pouch muscles, setae muscles, a U-shaped muscle, serial mantle muscles, and apical longitudinal as well as apical transversal muscles. Fully developed A. cistellula larvae differ from the former species in that they have only two visible body lobes and lack setae. Nevertheless, we found corresponding muscle systems to all muscles present in the former two species, except for the musculature associated with the setae, in larvae of A. cistellula. With our survey of the adult myoanatomy of A. cordata and A. cistellula and the juvenile muscular architecture of T. transversa we confirm the presence of adductors, diductors, dorsal and ventral pedicle adjustors, mantle margin muscles, a distinct musculature of the intestine, and striated muscle fibres in the

  17. Diversity of culturable root-associated/endophytic bacteria and their chitinolytic and aflatoxin inhibition activity of peanut plant in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yan, Pei-Sheng; Ding, Qing-Long; Wu, Qin-Xi; Wang, Zhong-Bo; Peng, Jie

    2013-01-01

    A total of 72 isolates of root-associated/endophytic (RAE) bacteria were isolated from peanut plants grown in the main producing areas of 6 provinces in China. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of these isolates were determined and phylogenetic analyses revealed that 72 isolates belonged to the classes Bacilli (49 isolates) and Gammaproteobacteria (23 isolates). The majority of RAE bacteria in Bacilli belonged to 2 genera, Bacillus and Lysinibacillus (48 and 1) while those in Gammaproteobacteria belonged to the genera Enterobacter, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, and Pseudomonas (7, 11, 3 and 2 isolates, respectively). This is the first report of Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus isolate as biocontrol agent against AFs. All of the selected RAE bacteria showed inhibitory activities against Aspergillus parasiticus (A. parasiticus) growth and/or aflatoxins (AFs) production by visual agar plate assay and tip culture method. Most of the RAE bacteria strains (96 % strains) were determined to have decreased mycelia growth or AFs production levels by >50 % (p chitinolytic activity and 22 strains (30 % strains) of identified RAE bacteria degraded colloidal chitin on the chitin medium plate. Ten selected chitinolytic RAE bacteria were tested for antifungal activity on peanuts and most of them significantly decreased mycelial growth and AFs production levels by >90 %. These results showed a wide distribution of biological control bacteria against AFs in Chinese peanut main producing areas and the selected RAE bacteria could potentially be utilized for the biocontrol of toxicogenic fungi.

  18. Ricinoleic acid inhibits methanogenesis and fatty acid biohydrogenation in ruminal digesta from sheep and in bacterial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Morales, E; Mata Espinosa, M A; McKain, N; Wallace, R J

    2012-12-01

    Ricinoleic acid (RA; 12-hydroxy-cis-9-18:1) is the main fatty acid component of castor oil. Although a precursor for CLA synthesis in lactic acid bacteria, RA was found previously not to form CLA in ruminal digesta but to have some inhibitory properties. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of RA to modulate ruminal biohydrogenation and methanogenesis. Ruminal digesta from 4 sheep receiving a mixed hay-concentrate diet was incubated in vitro with 0.167 g/L of linoleic acid (LA; cis-9,cis-12-18:2) or with a combination of LA and RA or LA and castor oil (LA, RA, and castor oil added to a final concentration of 0.167 g/L) in the presence and absence of lipase. The CLA rumenic acid (cis-9,trans-11-18:2) accumulated when either RA or castor oil and lipase was present. Vaccenic acid (VA; trans-11-18:1) also accumulated, and a decrease of the rate of production of stearic acid (SA; 18:0) was observed. When LA was incubated with castor oil in the absence of lipase, no effects on biohydrogenation were observed. Ricinoleic acid at 0.02 g/L did not affect growth of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens but it inhibited growth of Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus. Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus but not B. fibrisolvens metabolized RA to 12-hydroxystearate. Linoleic acid metabolism by B. proteoclasticus appeared to be unaffected by RA addition whereas rumenic acid accumulation increased (P = 0.015 at 12 h) when RA was added. A 28% decrease (P = 0.004) in methane was obtained in 24 h in vitro incubations of diluted buffered ruminal fluid with added 0.2 g RA/L. There was no effect on the total concentration of VFA after 24 h as a result of RA addition, but the molar proportions of acetate and butyrate were decreased (P = 0.041 and P methane emissions. In vivo studies are now required to confirm the potential of these additives.

  19. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in deli-style turkey breast formulated with cultured celery powder and/or cultured sugar-vinegar blend during storage at 4°c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; McDonnell, Lindsey M; Sheehan, Vivien; Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Glass, Kathleen A

    2014-10-01

    Fermentation-derived nitrite (NO2) from vegetable sources is increasingly used as a "clean label" alternative to conventional NaNO2. Previous results suggested that processed meats cured with NO2 derived from a "natural" source had lower antimicrobial activity than did meats produced with chemical NaNO2; however, the differences were likely due to NO2 concentration rather than source. The objective of this study was to compare the antilisterial properties of traditional and clean label alternative curing approaches when combined with antimicrobials in deli-style turkey. Listeria monocytogenes inhibition by NO2 from synthetic and natural sources was validated in deli-style turkey (73 to 74% moisture, 1.8% salt, pH 6.4). Products were prepared with 0, 80, or 120 mg/kg NO2 using purified NaNO2 or cultured celery powder. Additional treatments were supplemented with 3.8% lactate-diacetate blend (LD) or 1% cultured sugar-vinegar blend (DF). Sliced cooked products were surface inoculated with L. monocytogenes at 3 log CFU/g, vacuum packaged, and stored at 4°C for 12 weeks. Results revealed an average 2.4-log increase in L. monocytogenes at 3 weeks in the control without antimicrobials, a 1.3-log increase at 4 weeks for both 80 mg/kg NO2 treatments, and a 1.5-log increase at 6 weeks for the 120 mg/kg NO2 treatments. No significant difference (P > 0.05) in growth inhibition was found between NO2 sources when equivalent concentrations were added. In uncured turkey with 3.8% LD or 1% DF, growth was delayed until 6 weeks, whereas supplementation with LD or DF and 80 mg/kg NO2 from either source delayed listerial growth through 12 weeks. This study confirmed that the concentration of NO2, rather than the source, is a primary factor in enhancing the safety of ready-to-eat meats. Both conventional NO2 treatments and a clean label solution consisting of a fermentation-derived antimicrobial combined with 80 mg/kg naturally derived NO2 inhibited L. monocytogenes through 12 weeks of

  20. Cultural Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Cultural neuroscience issues from the apparently incompatible combination of neuroscience and cultural psychology. A brief literature sampling suggests, instead, several preliminary topics that demonstrate proof of possibilities: cultural differences in both lower-level processes (e.g. perception, number representation) and higher-order processes (e.g. inferring others’ emotions, contemplating the self) are beginning to shed new light on both culture and cognition. Candidates for future cultural neuroscience research include cultural variations in the default (resting) network, which may be social; regulation and inhibition of feelings, thoughts, and actions; prejudice and dehumanization; and neural signatures of fundamental warmth and competence judgments. PMID:23874143

  1. Inhibition of DNA virus: Herpes-1 (HSV-1 in cellular culture replication, through an antioxidant treatment extracted from rosemary spice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Assunção Portari Mancini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate antiviral properties in antioxidants from spices. Phenolic compounds extracted from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinallis, L by hot water, had their antioxidant activity determined by spectrophotometry using β carotene/linoleic acid system. The rosemary extract was evaluated by antiviral assay of Herpes Virus type-1 (HSV-1 replication in VERO cells, in the presence or absence of the spice. 10,000 TCID50/mL of the HSV-1 was kept for 3 h at 4º C, with 300 ppm of rosemary extract, and 100 ppm of butyl hydroxyl toluene (BHT. Then, these viruses were inoculated in VERO cells incubated at 37º C in CO2-5 %, for seven days. Daily, they were examined and the end point was based on 100% of CPE in virus control (without antioxidants. The HSV-1 replication inhibition percentage (IP measured the antiviral action from antioxidants, showing viral reductions of the 82.0, 82.5%, in the presence of rosemary and rosemary + BHT, respectively. As an extension, cell test corresponded to the similar viral decrease (IP = 85.0 and 86.3% in both aforementioned situations. Results lead to conclude that phenolic compounds from rosemary revealed an antiviral action on herpesvirus-1.Neste estudo foi avaliada a ação antiviral de antioxidantes de especiaria. Extrato aquoso de alecrim (Rosmarinus officinalis, L, que apresentou atividade antioxidante através de espectrofotometria usando o sistema β caroteno/ácido linoléico, foi avaliado em ensaios com vírus herpes-1 na replicação em células VERO. Nestes ensaios foram utilizados 10.000 TCID50%/mL do vírus HSV-1, mantidos em contato com 300 ppm do extrato de alecrim e com 100 ppm de butil hidroxi tolueno (BHT, durante 3h a 4°C. Esses vírus, em seguida, foram inoculados em células VERO incubadas a 37 °C/5% de CO2 por sete dias. Pelo efeito citopático (ECP e o "end point" de ECP do controle de vírus (sem antioxidante, foi possível observar que houve reduções na replicação viral de 82

  2. Interleukin-1beta-induced release of matrix proteins into culture media causes inhibition of mineralization of nodules formed by periodontal ligament cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, H H; Lin, W L; Cho, M I

    1999-05-01

    The mechanism by which interleukin-1beta (IL-1) inhibits the formation of mineralized tissue nodules by periodontal ligament (PDL) cells in vitro was investigated through the processes of morphological analysis, immunoprecipitation, and Northern blot analysis. PDL cells were obtained from a 2-day-old coagulum in tooth socket and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) containing 10% fetal bone serum (FBS) and antibiotics. Confluent cells were grown for up to 3 weeks in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), beta-glycerophosphate (GP), and dexamethasone (Dex), or IL-1. PDL cells cultured in the presence of GP and AA did not differentiate, but those treated with Dex, GP, and AA (Dex group) underwent differentiation, showing four stages (confluent, multilayer, nodule, and mineralization) of disparate morphological characteristics. In contrast, the cells treated with IL-1, Dex, GP, and AA (IL-1 group) did form multilayers but failed to form mineralized nodules. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the Dex-induced mineralized nodules contain multilayers of fibroblastic cells, numerous collagen fibrils, and dense globular as well as fused electron dense patches that are associated with numerous apatite crystals. The nodule-like structures in the IL-1 group were also comprised of multilayered fibroblastic cells, but they contained only a small number of collagen fibrils, and no dense globular or fused patches. Von Kossa staining confirmed the presence of numerous mineralized nodules in the Dex group and their scarceness in the IL-1 group. Northern blot analysis of IL-1-treated cells, however, revealed the presence of mRNAs for type I collagen (Col I), secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), osteopontin (OPN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteocalcin (OC), whose expression patterns and levels were comparable to those of the Dex group. Immunoprecipitation analysis of OPN and BSP in the cell/matrix layers and the culture

  3. Inhibition of β-amyloid1-42 internalization attenuates neuronal death by stabilizing the endosomal-lysosomal system in rat cortical cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, M S; Baker, G B; Todd, K G; Kar, S

    2011-03-31

    A number of recent studies have indicated that accumulation of β amyloid (Aβ) peptides within neurons is an early event which may trigger degeneration of neurons and subsequent development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. However, very little is known about the internalization and/or subcellular sites involved in trafficking of Aβ peptides into the neurons that are vulnerable in AD pathology. To address this issue we evaluated internalization of fluoroscein conjugated Aβ1-42 (FAβ1-42) and subsequent alteration of endosomal-lysosomal (EL) markers such as cathepsin D, Rab5 and Rab7 in rat cortical cultured neurons. It is evident from our results that internalization of FAβ1-42, which occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner, triggered degeneration of neurons along with increased levels and/or altered distribution of cathepsin D, Rab5 and Rab7. Our results further revealed that FAβ1-42 internalization was attenuated by phenylarsine oxide (a general inhibitor of endocytosis) and sucrose (an inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis) but not by antagonists of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. Additionally, inhibition of FAβ1-42 endocytosis not only protected neurons against toxicity but also reversed the altered levels/distributions of EL markers. These results, taken together, suggest that internalization of exogenous Aβ1-42, which is partly mediated via a clathrin-dependent process, can lead to degeneration of neurons, possibly by activating the EL system. Inhibition of FAβ endocytosis attenuated toxicity, thus suggesting a potential strategy for preventing loss of neurons in AD pathology. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of the Jak-STAT pathway prevents CNTF-mediated survival of axotomized oxytocinergic magnocellular neurons in organotypic cultures of the rat supraoptic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askvig, Jason M.; Lo, David Y.; Sudbeck, Adam W.; Behm, Kathryn E.; Leiphon, Laura J.; Watt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) enhances survival and process outgrowth from magnocellular neurons in the paraventricular (PVN) and the supraoptic (SON) nuclei. However, the mechanisms by which CNTF facilitates these processes remain to be determined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the immediate signal transduction events that occur within the rat SON following administration of exogenous rat recombinant CNTF (rrCNTF) and to determine the contribution of those intracellular signaling pathway(s) to neuronal survival and process outgrowth, respectively. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis demonstrated that axonal injury and acute unilateral pressure injection of 100 ng/μl of rrCNTF directly over the rat SON resulted in a rapid and transient increase in phosphorylated-STAT3 (pSTAT3) in astrocytes but not neurons in the SON in vivo. Utilizing rat hypothalamic organotypic explant cultures, we then demonstrated that administration of 25 ng/ml rrCNTF for 14 days significantly increased the survival and process outgrowth of OT magnocellular neurons. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of the Jak-STAT pathway via AG490 and cucurbitacin I significantly reduced the survival of OT magnocellular neurons in the SON and PVN; however, the contribution of the Jak-STAT pathway to CNTF-mediated process outgrowth remains to be determined. Together, these data indicate that CNTF-induced survival of OT magnocellular neurons is mediated indirectly through astrocytes via the Jak-STAT signaling pathway. PMID:23123407

  5. Effect of Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) on survivability, extent of proteolysis and ACE inhibition of potential probiotic cultures in fermented milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basannavar, Santosh; Pothuraju, Ramesh; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In the present investigation, the effect of Aloe vera gel powder on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, extent of proteolysis during fermentation and survival of Lactobacillus casei NCDC19 during storage of fermented milk was studied. Among the different cultures screened for ACE inhibitory activity, Lactobacillus casei NCDC 19 exhibited the highest ACE inhibition (approx. 40%) as well as extent of proteolysis (0.37, Abs₃₄₀). In the presence of Aloe vera (0.5% and 1% w/v) an increase in extent of proteolysis (0.460 ± 0.047 and 0.480 ± 0.027) and percent ACE inhibitory activity (44.32 ± 2.83 and 47.52 ± 1.83) was observed in comparison to control. Aloe vera powder addition also led to an increase in viable counts (>11 log cfu mL⁻¹) of L. casei NCDC 19 in fermented milk during storage for 7 days and the counts were maintained in sufficiently higher numbers. The study suggests Aloe vera to be a good functional ingredient which can be further explored for different health attributes. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Bisphenol A down-regulates rate-limiting Cyp11a1 to acutely inhibit steroidogenesis in cultured mouse antral follicles

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    Peretz, Jackye, E-mail: peretz@illinois.edu [2001 South Lincoln Ave, 3211 VMBSB, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu [2001 South Lincoln Ave, 3223 VMBSB, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the backbone of polycarbonate plastic products and the epoxy resin lining of aluminum cans. Previous studies have shown that exposure to BPA decreases sex steroid hormone production in mouse antral follicles. The current study tests the hypothesis that BPA first decreases the expression levels of the steroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse antral follicles, leading to a decrease in sex steroid hormone production in vitro. Further, the current study tests the hypothesis that these effects are acute and reversible after removal of BPA. Exposure to BPA (10 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL) significantly decreased expression of Cyp11a1 and StAR beginning at 18 h and 72 h, respectively, compared to controls. Exposure to BPA (10 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL) significantly decreased progesterone levels beginning at 24 h and decreased androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels at 72 h and 96 h compared to controls. Further, after removing BPA from the culture media at 20 h, expression of Cyp11a1 and progesterone levels were restored to control levels by 48 h and 72 h, respectively. Additionally, expression of StAR and levels of androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol never decreased compared to controls. These data suggest that BPA acutely decreases expression of Cyp11a1 as early as 18 h and this reduction in Cyp11a1 may lead to a decrease in progesterone production by 24 h, followed by a decrease in androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol production and expression of StAR at 72 h. Therefore, BPA exposure likely targets Cyp11a1 and steroidogenesis, but these effects are reversible with removal of BPA exposure. - Highlights: • BPA may target Cyp11a1 to inhibit steroidogenesis in antral follicles. • BPA may decrease the expression of Cyp11a1 prior to inhibiting steroidogenesis. • The adverse effects of BPA on steroidogenesis in antral follicles are reversible.

  7. Gastrodin inhibits expression of inducible NO synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and proinflammatory cytokines in cultured LPS-stimulated microglia via MAPK pathways.

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    Ji-Nan Dai

    Full Text Available Microglial activation plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases by producing several proinflammatory enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines. The phenolic glucoside gastrodin, a main constituent of a Chinese herbal medicine, has been known to display anti-inflammatory properties. The current study investigates the potential mechanisms whereby gastrodin affects the expression of potentially pro-inflammatory proteins by cultured murine microglial BV-2 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS.BV-2 cells were pretreated with gastrodin (30, 40, and 60 µM for 1 h and then stimulated with LPS (1 µg/ml for another 4 h. The effects on proinflammatory enzymes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β, are analysed by double-immunofluorescence labeling and RT-PCR assay. To reveal the mechanisms of action of gastrodin we investigated the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs cascades and their downstream transcription factors, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE-binding protein (CREB. Gastrodin significantly reduced the LPS-induced protein and mRNA expression levels of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β and NF-κB. LPS (1 µg/ml, 30 min-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK and this was inhibited by pretreatment of BV-2 cells with different concentrations of gastrodin (30, 40, and 60 µM. In addition, gastrodin blocked LPS-induced phosphorylation of inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α (and hence the activation of NF-κB and of CREB, respectively.This study indicates that gastrodin significantly attenuate levels of neurotoxic proinflammatory mediators and proinflammatory cytokines by inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway and phosphorylation of MAPKs in LPS

  8. Astragaloside IV suppresses transforming growth factor-β1 induced fibrosis of cultured mouse renal fibroblasts via inhibition of the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways

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    Che, Xiajing; Wang, Qin; Xie, Yuanyuan; Xu, Weijia; Shao, Xinghua; Mou, Shan, E-mail: shan_mou@126.com; Ni, Zhaohui, E-mail: doctor_nzh@126.com

    2015-09-04

    Renal fibrosis, a progressive process characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) leading to organ dysfunction, is a characteristic of chronic kidney diseases. Among fibrogenic factors known to regulate the renal fibrotic process, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a central role. In the present study, we examined the effect of Astragaloside IV (AS-IV), a component of the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Astragalus membranaceus, on the processes associated with renal fibrosis in cultured mouse renal fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1. RT-PCR, western blotting, immunofluorescence staining and collagen assays showed that AS-IV suppressed TGF-β1 induced fibroblast proliferation, transdifferentiation, and ECM production in a dose-dependent manner. Examination of the underlying mechanisms showed that the effect of AS-IV on the inhibition of fibroblast differentiation and ECM formation were mediated by its modulation of the activity of the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that AS-IV alleviates renal interstitial fibrosis via a mechanism involving the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of AS-IV for the treatment of chronic kidney diseases. - Highlights: • AS-IV suppressed TGF-β1 induced renal fibroblast proliferation. • AS-IV suppressed TGF-β1 induced renal fibroblast transdifferentiation. • AS-IV suppressed TGF-β1 induced ECM production. • AS-IV alleviates renal fibrosis via the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

  9. Leptin promotes osteoblast differentiation and mineralization of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeadin, Melec G.; Butcher, Martin K.; Shaughnessy, Stephen G. [Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Werstuck, Geoff H., E-mail: Geoff.Werstuck@taari.ca [Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Leptin promotes osteoblast differentiation of primary smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Leptin regulates the expression of genes involved in osteoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constitutively active GSK-3{beta} attenuates leptin-induced osteoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This suggests that leptin signals through GSK-3{beta} to promote osteoblast differentiation. -- Abstract: In this study, we begin to investigate the underlying mechanism of leptin-induced vascular calcification. We found that treatment of cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells (BASMCs) with leptin (0.5-4 {mu}g/ml) induced osteoblast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that leptin significantly increased the mRNA expression of osteopontin and bone sialoprotein, while down-regulating matrix gla protein (MGP) expression in BASMCs. Key factors implicated in osteoblast differentiation, including members of the Wnt signaling pathway, were examined. Exposure to leptin enhanced phosphorylation of GSK-3{beta} on serine-9 thereby inhibiting activity and promoting the nuclear accumulation of {beta}-catenin. Transfection of BASMCs with an adenovirus that expressed constitutively active GSK-3{beta} (Ad-GSK-3{beta} S9A) resulted in a >2-fold increase in GSK-3{beta} activity and a significant decrease in leptin-induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. In addition, qRT-PCR analysis showed that GSK-3{beta} activation resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of osteopontin and bone sialoprotein, but a marked increase in MGP mRNA expression. When taken together, our results suggest a mechanism by which leptin promotes osteoblast differentiation and vascular calcification in vivo.

  10. Higher Anti-Liver Fibrosis Effect of Cordyceps militaris-Fermented Product Cultured with Deep Ocean Water via Inhibiting Proinflammatory Factors and Fibrosis-Related Factors Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Yu-Ping; Lee, Chun-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Deep ocean water (DOW) has been shown to enhance the functional components of fungi, resulting in increased health benefits. Therefore, using DOW for culturing fungi can enhance the cordycepin and adenosine of Cordyceps militaris (CM) and its protective effects on the liver. In this study, the antiliver fibrosis effects and mechanisms of ultrapure water-cultured CM (UCM), DOW-cultured CM (DCM), synthetic water-cultured CM, DOW, cordycepin, and adenosine were compared in the liver fibrosis mic...

  11. Inhibition of nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity by in vitro phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2. Differential phosphorylation of NDP kinases in HeLa cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, R M; Engel, M; Sauane, M

    1996-01-01

    that in vitro protein kinase CK2 catalyzed phosphorylation of human NDPK A inhibits its enzymatic activity by inhibiting the first step of its ping-pong mechanism of catalysis: its autophosphorylation. Upon in vivo 32P labeling of HeLa cells, we observed that both human NDPKs, A and B, were autophosphorylated...

  12. 8-prenylnaringenin and tamoxifen inhibit the shedding of irradiated epithelial cells and increase the latency period of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Cell culture and murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryck, Tine de; Impe, Annouchka van; Bracke, Marc E. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Vanhoecke, Barbara W. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent (Belgium); Heyerick, Arne [Ghent University, Laboratory of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Ghent (Belgium); Vakaet, Luc; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent (Belgium); Mueller, Doreen [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Margret [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden and German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, CCC, and CD-Laboratory RadOnc, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    The major component in the pathogenesis of oral radiation-induced mucositis is progressive epithelial hypoplasia and eventual ulceration. Irradiation inhibits cell proliferation, while cell loss at the surface continues. We conceived to slow down this desquamation by increasing intercellular adhesion, regulated by the E-cadherin/catenin complex. We investigated if 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) or tamoxifen (TAM) decrease the shedding of irradiated human buccal epithelial cells in vitro and thus delay the ulcerative phase of radiation-induced mucositis in vivo. In vitro, aggregates of buccal epithelial cells were irradiated and cultured in suspension for 11 days. 8-PN or TAM were investigated regarding their effect on cell shedding. In vivo, the lower tongue surface of mice was irradiated with graded single doses of 25 kV X-rays. The incidence, latency, and duration of the resulting mucosal ulcerations were analyzed after topical treatment with 8-PN, TAM or solvent. 8-PN or TAM prevented the volume reduction of the irradiated cell aggregates during the incubation period. This was the result of a higher residual cell number in the treated versus the untreated irradiated aggregates. In vivo, topical treatment with 8-PN or TAM significantly increased the latency of mucositis from 10.9 to 12.1 and 12.4 days respectively, while the ulcer incidence was unchanged. 8-PN and TAM prevent volume reduction of irradiated cell aggregates in suspension culture. In the tongues of mice, these compounds increase the latency period. This suggests a role for these compounds for the amelioration of radiation-induced mucositis in the treatment of head and neck tumors. (orig.) [German] Die wesentliche Komponente in der Pathogenese der radiogenen Mukositis ist eine progressive epitheliale Hypoplasie und letztendlich Ulzeration. Die Bestrahlung hemmt die Zellproliferation, waehrend der Zellverlust an der Oberflaeche fortbesteht. Wir versuchten, diese Desquamation durch eine Stimulation der

  13. Inhibition of DNA synthesis in cultured lymphocytes and tumor cells by extracts of betel nut, tobacco, and miang leaf, plant substances associated with cancer of the ororespiratory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J A; Huber, S A; Lucas, Z J

    1979-12-01

    The high incidence of oropharyngeal, esophageal, and laryngeal cancers in certain parts of the world has been ascribed to conjugated tannins found in certain folk medicinal herbs. We extracted miang leaf and betel nut with phosphate-buffered saline (0.14 M NaCl, 0.15 M potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.4) and found that the extracts inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes and by rat mammary tumor and mouse L-cells in logarithmic growth. Pretreating the lymphocytes for 1 or 4 hr with the extracts inhibited phytohemagglutinin-induced thymidine incorporation 72 hr later. At concentrations of 2.5 volumes % or lower, miang and betel nut extracts inhibited thymidine incorporation by 40 to 98% without any apparent signs of toxicity as demonstrated by the 66Rb equilibrium assay. In addition, neither extract inhibited cytotoxicity of rat mammary tumor cells by immune syngeneic spleen cells. The molecular weights of the inhibitory factors were between 1,000 and 10,000 daltons as determined by ultrafiltration and were unaffected by boiling for 3 min or by treatment with alcohol and, therefore, are probably not proteins. This in vitro demonstration of inhibition of DNA synthesis by these plant extracts presumably enriched for conjugated tannins may relate to inhibition of growth of rats and chicks fed conjugated tanin-contaminated sorghum feed. The carcinogenic potential of either these extracts or conjugated tannins is not yet established.

  14. MicroRNA-17-92 Regulates the Transcription Factor E2F3b during Myogenesis In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiong Tang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Myogenic differentiation, which occurs during muscle development, is a highly ordered process that can be regulated by E2F transcription factors. Available data show that E2F3b, but not E2F3a, is upregulated and required for myogenic differentiation. However, the regulation of E2F3b expression in myogenic differentiation is not well understood. To investigate whether E2Fb expression is controlled by miRNAs, we used bioinformatics to combine the database of microRNAs downregulated during myogenesis and those predicted to target E2F3. This identified miR-17 and miR-20a as miRNAs potentially involved in E2F3 regulation. We found that miR-17-92 controls the expression of E2F3b in C2C12 cells during myogenic differentiation. Moreover, we confirmed that miR-20a regulates the expression of E2F3b proteins in vivo using a muscle regeneration model.

  15. Independent channels for miRNA biosynthesis ensure efficient static and dynamic control in the regulation of the early stages of myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Jonathan; De Martino, Andrea

    2017-10-07

    Motivated by recent experimental work, we define and study a deterministic model of the complex miRNA-based regulatory circuit that putatively controls the early stage of myogenesis in human. We aim in particular at a quantitative understanding of (i) the roles played by the separate and independent miRNA biosynthesis channels (one involving a miRNA-decoy system regulated by an exogenous controller, the other given by transcription from a distinct genomic locus) that appear to be crucial for the differentiation program, and of (ii) how competition to bind miRNAs can efficiently control molecular levels in such an interconnected architecture. We show that optimal static control via the miRNA-decoy system constrains kinetic parameters in narrow ranges where the channels are tightly cross-linked. On the other hand, the alternative locus for miRNA transcription can ensure that the fast concentration shifts required by the differentiation program are achieved, specifically via non-linear response of the target to even modest surges in the miRNA transcription rate. While static, competition-mediated regulation can be achieved by the miRNA-decoy system alone, both channels are essential for the circuit's overall functionality, suggesting that that this type of joint control may represent a minimal optimal architecture in different contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca2+ signaling mediates delayed myogenesis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy fetal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Cassinelli, Letizia; Colleoni, Federica; Parolini, Daniele; Giovanella, Umberto; Maciotta, Simona; Colombo, Augusto; Meregalli, Mirella; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle wasting and premature death. The defective gene is dystrophin, a structural protein, absence of which causes membrane fragility and myofiber necrosis. Several lines of evidence showed that in adult DMD patients dystrophin is involved in signaling pathways that regulate calcium homeostasis and differentiation programs. However, secondary aspects of the disease, such as inflammation and fibrosis development, might represent a bias in the analysis. Because fetal muscle is not influenced by gravity and does not suffer from mechanical load and/or inflammation, we investigated 12-week-old fetal DMD skeletal muscles, highlighting for the first time early alterations in signaling pathways mediated by the absence of dystrophin itself. We found that PLC/IP3/IP3R/Ryr1/Ca(2+) signaling is widely active in fetal DMD skeletal muscles and, through the calcium-dependent PKCα protein, exerts a fundamental regulatory role in delaying myogenesis and in myofiber commitment. These data provide new insights into the origin of DMD pathology during muscle development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Prevention of the β-amyloid peptide-induced inflammatory process by inhibition of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase in primary murine mixed co-cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terro F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There has been little success with anti-inflammatory drugs in AD, while the promise of anti-inflammatory treatment is more evident in experimental models. A new anti-inflammatory strategy requires a better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Among the plethora of signaling pathways activated by β-amyloid (Aβ peptides, the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB pathway could be an interesting target. In virus-infected cells, double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR controls the NF-κB signaling pathway. It is well-known that PKR is activated in AD. This led us to study the effect of a specific inhibitor of PKR on the Aβ42-induced inflammatory response in primary mixed murine co-cultures, allowing interactions between neurons, astrocytes and microglia. Methods Primary mixed murine co-cultures were prepared in three steps: a primary culture of astrocytes and microglia for 14 days, then a primary culture of neurons and astrocytes which were cultured with microglia purified from the first culture. Before exposure to Aβ neurotoxicity (72 h, co-cultures were treated with compound C16, a specific inhibitor of PKR. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, interleukin (IL-1β, and IL-6 were assessed by ELISA. Levels of PT451-PKR and activation of IκB, NF-κB and caspase-3 were assessed by western blotting. Apoptosis was also followed using annexin V-FITC immunostaining kit. Subcellular distribution of PT451-PKR was assessed by confocal immunofluorescence and morphological structure of cells by scanning electron microscopy. Data were analysed using one-way ANOVA followed by a Newman-Keuls' post hoc test Results In these co-cultures, PKR inhibition prevented Aβ42-induced activation of IκB and NF-κB, strongly decreased production and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα and interleukin (IL-1β, and limited apoptosis. Conclusion In spite of the

  18. DNA methyltransferase inhibitor CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zirong; Jin, Guorong; Lin, Shuibin; Lin, Xiumei; Gu, Yumei; Zhu, Yujuan; Hu, Chengbin; Zhang, Qingjiong; Wu, Lizi; Shen, Huangxuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. ► CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors and structural proteins. ► CDA-II inhibited proliferation and migration of C2C12 myoblasts. -- Abstract: CDA-II (cell differentiation agent II), isolated from healthy human urine, is a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. Previous studies indicated that CDA-II played important roles in the regulation of cell growth and certain differentiation processes. However, it has not been determined whether CDA-II affects skeletal myogenesis. In this study, we investigated effects of CDA-II treatment on skeletal muscle progenitor cell differentiation, migration and proliferation. We found that CDA-II blocked differentiation of murine myoblasts C2C12 in a dose-dependent manner. CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors, such as Myogenin and Mef2c, and structural proteins, such as myosin heavy chain (Myh3), light chain (Mylpf) and MCK. Moreover, CDA-II inhibited C1C12 cell migration and proliferation. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that CDA-II inhibits growth and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells, suggesting that the use of CDA-II might affect skeletal muscle functions.

  19. Inhibition of gamma-ray dose-rate effects by D/sup 2/O and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase in cultured mammalian L5178Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, A.M.; Tanaka, O.; Matsudaira, H.

    1984-06-01

    Effects of deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) and 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, on cell proliferation and survival were studied in cultured mammalian L5178Y cells under growing conditions and after acute and low-dose-rate irradiation at about 0.1 to 0.4 Gy/hr of ..gamma.. rays. Growth of irradiated and unirradiated cells was inhibited by 45% D/sub 2/O but not by 3-aminobenzamide at 10mM, except for treatments longer than 30 hr. The presence of these agents either alone or in combination during irradiation at low dose rates suppressed almost totally the decrease in cell killing due to the decrease in dose rate. Among other inhibitors tested, theobromine and theophylline were found to be effective in eliminating the dose-rate effects of ..gamma.. rays. Possible mechanisms underlying the inhibition are discussed.

  20. Endogenous levels of Echinacea alkylamides and ketones are important contributors to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide production in cultured macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaLone, Carlie A; Rizshsky, Ludmila; Hammer, Kimberly D P; Wu, Lankun; Solco, Avery K S; Yum, Manyu; Nikolau, Basil J; Wurtele, Eve S; Murphy, Patricia A; Kim, Meehye; Birt, Diane F

    2009-10-14

    Because of the popularity of Echinacea as a dietary supplement, researchers have been actively investigating which Echinacea constituent or groups of constituents are necessary for immune-modulating bioactivities. Our prior studies indicate that alkylamides may play an important role in the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) production. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation, employed to elucidate interacting anti-inflammatory constituents from ethanol extracts of Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida, and Echinacea tennesseensis, identified fractions containing alkylamides and ketones as key anti-inflammatory contributors using lipopolysaccharide-induced PGE(2) production in RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Nitric oxide (NO) production and parallel cytotoxicity screens were also employed to substantiate an anti-inflammatory response. E. pallida showed significant inhibition of PGE(2) with a first round fraction, containing gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) peaks for Bauer ketones 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24, with 23 and 24 identified as significant contributors to this PGE(2) inhibition. Chemically synthesized Bauer ketones 21 and 23 at 1 microM each significantly inhibited both PGE(2) and NO production. Three rounds of fractionation were produced from an E. angustifolia extract. GC-MS analysis identified the presence of Bauer ketone 23 in third round fraction 3D32 and Bauer alkylamide 11 making up 96% of third round fraction 3E40. Synthetic Bauer ketone 23 inhibited PGE(2) production to 83% of control, and synthetic Bauer alkylamide 11 significantly inhibited PGE(2) and NO production at the endogenous concentrations determined to be present in their respective fraction; thus, each constituent partially explained the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of their respective fraction. From this study, two key contributors to the anti-inflammatory properties of E. angustifolia were identified as Bauer alkylamide 11 and

  1. Stimulation of a Cd-binding protein, and inhibition of the vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein, by zinc or cadmium in organ-cultured embryonic chick duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradino, R.A.; Fullmer, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    Embryonic chick duodenum maintained in organ culture responds to 1 α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 in the culture medium by de novo synthesis of a specific calcium-binding protein (CaBP). The addition of Cd 2+ (3-5 x 10 -5 M) or Zn 2+ (10 -5 -10 -4 M) to the medium inhibited CaBP, but stimulated biosynthesis of a Cd-binding protein (CdBP). CdBP in duodenal homogenate supernatants was assessed in two ways: first, by its 109 Cd-binding activity ( 109 CdBA) using a competitive ion exchange procedure; and, second, by the extent of [ 35 S]-cystine incorporation into a specific peak or band after gel filtration or analytical polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis, respectively. Regardless of whether cadmium- or zinc-stimulated, the 35 S-labeled CdBP - the only protein significantly labeled under the conditions employed - migrated identically upon gel filtration and electrophoresis, and comigrated with purified chick liver Cd-metallothionein. Neither actinomycin D nor α-amanitin, in concentrations sufficient to severely inhibit CaBP, significantly reduced CdBP production. However, cycloheximide did inhibit either Cd 2+ - or Zn 2+ -stimulated CdBP by about 50% at an inhibitor concentration which abolished CaBP. The inhibitor studies, coupled with the observations of extensive incorporation of [ 35 S]cystine into CdBP, suggest that the metals stimulated biosynthesis by a mechanism operating at the translational level. The organ-cultured duodenum seems well suited for studies of the regulation of CdBP biosynthesis especially since it responds predictably to the steroid hormone, 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 , in the induction of another specific protein, CaBP, at the transcriptional level. The biosynthesis of CaBP thus may serve as a convenient control in studies of CdBP production under various experimental conditions

  2. Inhibition of Primary Clinical Isolates of Human Parainfluenza Virus by DAS181 in Cell Culture and in a Cotton Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, B. G.; Hayden, R.T.; Hurwitz, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    DAS181 is a novel drug in development for the treatment of influenza as well as human parainfluenza viruses (hPIV). Previous studies demonstrated that DAS181 inhibited laboratory strains of hPIV, but no tests were conducted with primary clinical isolates of hPIV. To fill this gap, we studied six primary isolates including hPIV-2 and hPIV-3. First tests showed that the amplification of all viruses in vitro was reproducibly inhibited with DAS181 drug concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 1 nM....

  3. Tetracycline and Glutathione Inhibit Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity: An In Vitro Study Using Culture Supernatants of L929 and Dalton Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanan Kendre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetracycline and glutathione inhibited the protease activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expressed by mouse fibrosarcoma cells (L929 and Dalton lymphoma cells, respectively. The inhibitory activity of the tetracycline may be due to its ability to chelate metal ions such as calcium and zinc. Gelatin-zymography technique was used to demonstrate the inhibitory activity of both tetracycline and glutathione. The intensity of the bands corresponding to metalloproteinase activity in zymography gel was reduced in the presence of 50–100 μg/mL of tetracycline. The presence of 10–100 μg/mL of tetracycline in the medium increased the adherence of L929 cancer cells. These results clearly indicate the antimetastatic property of tetracycline. Reduced glutathione, a compound which is produced endogenously by the cells to maintain the redox status, was shown to inhibit the matrix metalloproteinase activity (in vitro. Therefore, it is assumed that decreased glutathione levels in synovial fluids or plasma might increase the activity of MMP. Reduced glutathione at 100 μg/mL inhibited the metalloproteinase activity in gelatin-zymographic gel. As both tetracycline and glutathione exhibited an inhibitory effect on matrix metalloproteinase activity, it was of great interest to check their clinical effects on various MMP associated pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis and arthritis. Here we report that tetracycline and reduced glutathione inhibited the activity of MMP2 completely and activity of MMP9 partly.

  4. Tanshinone IIA inhibits AGEs-induced proliferation and migration of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells by suppressing ERK1/2 MAPK signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs play a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease. Our current study sought to explore the effects of tanshinone IIA on the proliferation and migration of VSMCs induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs. Materials and Methods: In this study, we examined the effects of tanshinone IIA by cell proliferation assay and cell migration assay. And we explored the underlying mechanism by Western blotting. Results: AGEs significantly induced the proliferation and migration of VSMCs, but treatment with tanshinone IIA attenuated these effects. AGEs could increase the activity of the ERK1/2 and p38 pathways but not the JNK pathway. Treatment with tanshinone IIA inhibited the AGEs-induced activation of the ERK1/2 pathway but not the p38 pathway.   Conclusion: Tanshinone IIA inhibits AGEs-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs by suppressing the ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathway.

  5. Titrated extract of Centella asiatica increases hair inductive property through inhibition of STAT signaling pathway in three-dimensional spheroid cultured human dermal papilla cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeong Min; An, Sungkwan; Lee, Junwoo; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Jae Nam; Kim, Young Sam; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; Bae, Seunghee

    2017-12-01

    Dermal papilla (DP) is a pivotal part of hair follicle, and the smaller size of the DP is related with the hair loss. In this study, we investigated the effect of titrated extract of Centella asiatica (TECA) on hair growth inductive property on 3D spheroid cultured human DP cells (HDP cells). Significantly increased effect of TECA on cell viability was only shown in 3D sphered HPD cells, not in 2D cultured HDP cells. Also, TECA treatment increased the sphere size of HDP cells. The luciferase activity of STAT reporter genes and the expression of STAT-targeted genes, SOCS1 and SOCS3, were significantly decreased. Also, TECA treatment increased the expression of the hair growth-related signature genes in 3D sphered HDP cells. Furthermore, TECA led to downregulation of the level of phosphorylated STAT proteins in 3D sphered HDP cells. Overall, TECA activates the potential of hair inductive capacity in HDP cells.

  6. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Sørensen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present...... study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo...... synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis...

  7. Down-regulation of transcobalamin receptor TCblR/CD320 by siRNA inhibits cobalamin uptake and proliferation of cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Shao-Chiang [School of Graduate Studies, SUNY-Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203 (United States); Nakayama, Yasumi; Sequeira, Jeffrey M. [Department of Medicine, Cell Biology, SUNY-Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203 (United States); Quadros, Edward V., E-mail: Edward.Quadros@downstate.edu [Department of Medicine, Cell Biology, SUNY-Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203 (United States); School of Graduate Studies, SUNY-Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The clinical phenotype of cobalamin (Cbl) deficiency is dictated by the essential role of this vitamin in two key enzymatic reactions. Multiple proteins and receptors participate in the absorption, transport and delivery of this vitamin to tissue cells. Cellular uptake of Cbl is mediated by transcobalamin (TC), a plasma protein and a transmembrane receptor (TCblR) with high affinity for TC saturated with Cbl. Knockdown of TCblR with siRNA results in decreased TC-Cbl uptake. The ensuing Cbl deficiency leads to an increase in doubling time and decreased proliferation of these cells. The study confirms the seminal role of this receptor in the cellular uptake of Cbl and its down-regulation as a potential strategy to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells.

  8. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis of alanine increased leading to an elevated content intra- as well as extracellularly of this amino acid. Treatment with MSO led to a dramatic decrease in glutamine content and increased the intracellular contents of glutamate and aspartate. The large increase in alanine during exposure to MSO underlines the importance of the GDH and ALAT biosynthetic pathway for ammonia fixation, and it points to the use of a GS inhibitor to ameliorate the brain toxicity and edema induced by hyperammonemia, events likely related to glutamine synthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Triterpene acids from rose hip powder inhibit self-antigen- and LPS-induced cytokine production and CD4⁺ T-cell proliferation in human mononuclear cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaby, Lasse; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2012-08-01

    A triterpene acid mixture consisting of oleanolic, ursolic and betulinic acid isolated from a standardized rose hip powder (Rosa canina L.) has been shown to inhibit interleukin (IL)-6 release from Mono Mac 6 cells. The present study examined the effects of the triterpene acid mixture on the cytokine production and proliferation of CD4⁺ T cells and CD19⁺ B cells induced by a self-antigen, human thyroglobulin and by lipopolysaccharide in cultures of normal mononuclear cells. The triterpene acid mixture inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6 with estimated IC₅₀ values in the range 35-56 µg/mL, the Th1 cytokines interferon-γ and IL-2 (IC₅₀ values 10-20 µg/mL) and the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 (IC₅₀ values 18-21 µg/mL). Moreover, the mixture also inhibited CD4⁺ T-cell and CD19⁺ B-cell proliferation (IC₅₀ value 22 and 12 µg/mL, respectively). Together, these data demonstrate that oleanolic, ursolic and betulinic acid are active immunomodulatory constituents of the standardized rose hip powder. However, since the estimated IC₅₀ values are in the µg/mL range, it is questionable whether the content of the triterpene acids in the standardized rose hip powder, alone, can explain the reported clinical effects. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Bumetanide-induced NKCC1 inhibition attenuates oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced decrease in proliferative activity and cell cycle progression arrest in cultured OPCs via p-38 MAPKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peicai; Tang, Ronghua; Yu, Zhiyuan; Huang, Shanshan; Xie, Minjie; Luo, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-10

    The Na-K-Cl co-transporter 1 (NKCC1; a member of the cation-chloride co-transporter family) mediates the coupled movement of Na(+) and/or K(+) with Cl(-) across the plasma membrane of cells (Haas and Forbush, 2000, Annu. Rev. Physiol., 62, 515-534; Russell, 2000, Physiol. Rev., 80, 211-276). Although it acts as an important regulator of cell volume, secretion, and modulator of cell apoptosis and proliferation (Chen et al., 2005, J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab., 25, 54-66; Kahle et al., 2008, Nat. Clin. Pract. Neurol., 4, 490-503; Kidokoro et al., 2014, Am. J. Physiol. Ren. Physiol., 306, F1155-F1160; Wang et al., 2011, Cell. Physiol. Biochem., 28, 703-714), NKCC1׳s effects on oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have not been characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and to what extent inhibition of NKCC1 alters oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced cell cycle progression. In the present study, we demonstrated that inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide attenuates the decrease in OGD-induced DNA synthesis in cultured OPCs. Western blots showed that NKCC1 inhibition led to an increased expression of cyclin D1, CDK 4, and cyclin E in OGD-treated cells. Furthermore, our results showed bumetanide attenuated the decrease in OGD-induced proliferation and arrest of cell cycle progression via the P-38 MAPK signaling cascade. Thus, NKCC1 plays important roles in the proliferation of OPCs under OGD-induced stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinetics of sugars consumption and ethanol inhibition in carob pulp fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in batch and fed-batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Costa, Maria Emília; Tavares, Catarina; Raposo, Sara; Rodrigues, Brígida; Peinado, José M

    2012-05-01

    The waste materials from the carob processing industry are a potential resource for second-generation bioethanol production. These by-products are small carob kibbles with a high content of soluble sugars (45-50%). Batch and fed-batch Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentations of high density sugar from carob pods were analyzed in terms of the kinetics of sugars consumption and ethanol inhibition. In all the batch runs, 90-95% of the total sugar was consumed and transformed into ethanol with a yield close to the theoretical maximum (0.47-0.50 g/g), and a final ethanol concentration of 100-110 g/l. In fed-batch runs, fresh carob extract was added when glucose had been consumed. This addition and the subsequent decrease of ethanol concentrations by dilution increased the final ethanol production up to 130 g/l. It seems that invertase activity and yeast tolerance to ethanol are the main factors to be controlled in carob fermentations. The efficiency of highly concentrated carob fermentation makes it a very promising process for use in a second-generation ethanol biorefinery.

  12. Brain alanine formation as an ammonia-scavenging pathway during hyperammonemia: effects of glutamine synthetase inhibition in rats and astrocyte–neuron co-cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Kukolj, Eva; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Schousboe, Arne; Keiding, Susanne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2013-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is a major etiological toxic factor in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Brain ammonia detoxification occurs primarily in astrocytes by glutamine synthetase (GS), and it has been proposed that elevated glutamine levels during hyperammonemia lead to astrocyte swelling and cerebral edema. However, ammonia may also be detoxified by the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) leading to trapping of ammonia in alanine, which in vivo likely leaves the brain. Our aim was to investigate whether the GS inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) enhances incorporation of 15NH4+ in alanine during acute hyperammonemia. We observed a fourfold increased amount of 15NH4 incorporation in brain alanine in rats treated with MSO. Furthermore, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes exposed to 15NH4Cl in the absence or presence of MSO demonstrated a dose-dependent incorporation of 15NH4 into alanine together with increased 15N incorporation in glutamate. These findings provide evidence that ammonia is detoxified by the concerted action of GDH and ALAT both in vivo and in vitro, a mechanism that is accelerated in the presence of MSO thereby reducing the glutamine level in brain. Thus, GS could be a potential drug target in the treatment of hyperammonemia in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23673435

  13. Brain alanine formation as an ammonia-scavenging pathway during hyperammonemia: effects of glutamine synthetase inhibition in rats and astrocyte-neuron co-cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Kukolj, Eva; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Schousboe, Arne; Keiding, Susanne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2013-08-01

    Hyperammonemia is a major etiological toxic factor in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Brain ammonia detoxification occurs primarily in astrocytes by glutamine synthetase (GS), and it has been proposed that elevated glutamine levels during hyperammonemia lead to astrocyte swelling and cerebral edema. However, ammonia may also be detoxified by the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) leading to trapping of ammonia in alanine, which in vivo likely leaves the brain. Our aim was to investigate whether the GS inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) enhances incorporation of (15)NH4(+) in alanine during acute hyperammonemia. We observed a fourfold increased amount of (15)NH4 incorporation in brain alanine in rats treated with MSO. Furthermore, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes exposed to (15)NH4Cl in the absence or presence of MSO demonstrated a dose-dependent incorporation of (15)NH4 into alanine together with increased (15)N incorporation in glutamate. These findings provide evidence that ammonia is detoxified by the concerted action of GDH and ALAT both in vivo and in vitro, a mechanism that is accelerated in the presence of MSO thereby reducing the glutamine level in brain. Thus, GS could be a potential drug target in the treatment of hyperammonemia in patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

  14. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication in cultured cells and in vivo using 2'-O-guanidinopropyl modified siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimani, Musa D; Ely, Abdullah; Buff, Maximilian C R; Bernhardt, Stefan; Engels, Joachim W; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2013-10-15

    Silencing hepatitis B virus (HBV) gene expression with exogenous activators of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway has shown promise as a new mode of treating infection with the virus. However, optimizing efficacy, specificity, pharmacokinetics and stability of RNAi activators remains a priority before clinical application of this promising therapeutic approach is realised. Chemical modification of synthetic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) provides the means to address these goals. This study aimed to assess the benefits of incorporating nucleotides with 2'-O-guanidinopropyl (GP) modifications into siRNAs that target HBV. Single GP residues were incorporated at nucleotide positions from 2 to 21 of the antisense strand of a previously characterised effective antiHBV siRNA. When tested in cultured cells, siRNAs with GP moieties at selected positions improved silencing efficacy. Stability of chemically modified siRNAs in 80% serum was moderately improved and better silencing effects were observed without evidence for toxicity or induction of an interferon response. Moreover, partially complementary target sequences were less susceptible to silencing by siRNAs with GP residues located in the seed region. Hydrodynamic co-injection of siRNAs with a replication-competent HBV plasmid resulted in highly effective knock down of markers of viral replication in mice. Evidence for improved efficacy, reduced off target effects and good silencing in vivo indicate that GP-modifications of siRNAs may be used to enhance their therapeutic utility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cytokine modulation by stress hormones and antagonist specific hormonal inhibition in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) head kidney primary cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansari, Ali Reza; Parra, David; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Tort, Lluís

    2017-09-01

    A tight interaction between endocrine and immune systems takes place mainly due to the key role of head kidney in both hormone and cytokine secretion, particularly under stress situations in which the physiological response promotes the synthesis and release of stress hormones which may lead into immunomodulation as side effect. Although such interaction has been previously investigated, this study evaluated for the first time the effect of stress-associated hormones together with their receptor antagonists on the expression of cytokine genes in head kidney primary cell culture (HKPCC) of the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the seawater gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata). The results showed a striking difference when comparing the response obtained in trout and seabream. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) decreased the expression of immune-related genes in sea bream but not in rainbow trout and this cortisol effect was reverted by the antagonist mifepristone but not spironolactone. On the other hand, while adrenaline reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) in rainbow trout, the opposite effect was observed in sea bream showing an increased expression (IL-1β, IL-6). Interestingly, this effect was reverted by antagonist propranolol but not phentolamine. Overall, our results confirm the regional interaction between endocrine and cytokine messengers and a clear difference in the sensitivity to the hormonal stimuli between the two species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Myokines in Myogenesis and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Tora; Green, Charlotte; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2012-01-01

    . The myokine concept provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs within the muscle itself. New biotechnological patents are published based on the identification of new myokines, and these myokines and their receptors will potentially serve...

  17. Palmitate-induced ER stress and inhibition of protein synthesis in cultured myotubes does not require Toll-like receptor 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben D Perry

    Full Text Available Saturated fatty acids, such as palmitate, are elevated in metabolically dysfunctional conditions like type 2 diabetes mellitus. Palmitate has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity and suppress protein synthesis while upregulating proteolytic systems in skeletal muscle. Increased sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and subsequent activation of the unfolded protein response may contribute to the palmitate-induced impairment of muscle protein synthesis. In some cell types, ER stress occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. Given the link between ER stress and suppression of protein synthesis, we investigated whether palmitate induces markers of ER stress and protein synthesis by activating TLR4 in cultured mouse C2C12 myotubes. Myotubes were treated with vehicle, a TLR4-specific ligand (lipopolysaccharides, palmitate, or a combination of palmitate plus a TLR4-specific inhibitor (TAK-242. Inflammatory indicators of TLR4 activation (IL-6 and TNFα and markers of ER stress were measured, and protein synthesis was assessed using puromycin incorporation. Palmitate substantially increased the levels of IL-6, TNF-α, CHOP, XBP1s, and ATF 4 mRNAs and augmented the levels of CHOP, XBP1s, phospho-PERK and phospho-eIF2α proteins. The TLR4 antagonist attenuated both acute palmitate and LPS-induced increases in IL-6 and TNFα, but did not reduce ER stress signaling with either 6 h or 24 h palmitate treatment. Similarly, treating myotubes with palmitate for 6 h caused a 43% decline in protein synthesis consistent with an increase in phospho-eIF2α, and the TLR4 antagonist did not alter these responses. These results suggest that palmitate does not induce ER stress through TLR4 in muscle, and that palmitate impairs protein synthesis in skeletal muscle in part by induction of ER stress.

  18. Inhibition of COX1/2 alters the host response and reduces ECM scaffold mediated constructive tissue remodeling in a rodent model of skeletal muscle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearth, Christopher L; Slivka, Peter F; Stewart, Scott A; Keane, Timothy J; Tay, Justin K; Londono, Ricardo; Goh, Qingnian; Pizza, Francis X; Badylak, Stephen F

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has been used as a biologic scaffold material to both reinforce the surgical repair of soft tissue and serve as an inductive template to promote a constructive tissue remodeling response. Success of such an approach is dependent on macrophage-mediated degradation and remodeling of the biologic scaffold. Macrophage phenotype during these processes is a predictive factor of the eventual remodeling outcome. ECM scaffolds have been shown to promote an anti-inflammatory or M2-like macrophage phenotype in vitro that includes secretion of downstream products of cycolooxygenases 1 and 2 (COX1/2). The present study investigated the effect of a common COX1/2 inhibitor (Aspirin) on macrophage phenotype and tissue remodeling in a rodent model of ECM scaffold treated skeletal muscle injury. Inhibition of COX1/2 reduced the constructive remodeling response by hindering myogenesis and collagen deposition in the defect area. The inhibited response was correlated with a reduction in M2-like macrophages in the defect area. The effects of Aspirin on macrophage phenotype were corroborated using an established in vitro macrophage model which showed a reduction in both ECM induced prostaglandin secretion and expression of a marker of M2-like macrophages (CD206). These results raise questions regarding the common peri-surgical administration of COX1/2 inhibitors when biologic scaffold materials are used to facilitate muscle repair/regeneration. COX1/2 inhibitors such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely administered post-surgically for analgesic purposes. While COX1/2 inhibitors are important in pain management, they have also been shown to delay or diminish the healing process, which calls to question their clinical use for treating musculotendinous injuries. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of a common NSAID, Aspirin, on the constructive remodeling response mediated by an ECM scaffold (UBM) in a rat skeletal

  19. Identificação de micoplasmas pela inibição de crescimento de amostras isoladas de culturas celulares Identification of mycoplasma samples isolated from cell cultures by the growth inhibition test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Timenetsky

    1992-02-01

    assayed by the growth inhibition test. It is known that Mycoplasma orale is the most common human mycoplasma contaminant of cell cultures, the major vehicle of contamination being mouth pippeting, while commercial bovine serum in the main source for Mycoplasma arginini and Acholeplasma laidlawii. M. arginini was found in 18 (48.65% of the cell samples tested, A. laidlawii in 15 (40.55%, and M. orale in two (5.40%. Two other samples could not be identified by the antisera used (antisera against M. arginini, M. orale, Mycoplasma hyorhinis and A. laidlawii their characteristics being "fried egg" colonies, digitonine sensitivity, Dienes stained, positive glucose catabolism, negative arginini hydrolysis, and negative tetrazolium reduction. No more than one type of mycoplasma was found in each cell culture. In the light of the results of the study, it is suggested that: a cell cultures should be tested for mycoplasma on a routine basis; b microbial control techniques be unproved; c mouth pippeting be abolished; d serum and cell culture media components purchased be of certified quality; e the presence of mycoplasma when cell lines are exchanged among institutions be investigated; f data obtained when mycoplasma infected cell cultures are used be carefully evaluated.

  20. A specific bioassay for the inhibition of flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J

    1972-06-01

    A bioassay for the inhibition of flowering involving the in vitro culture of excised, partially-induced, apices of Viscaria candida is described. This bioassay has been used to detect flowering inhibition in extracts from Kalanchoe blossfeldiana.

  1. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin enhances cell proliferation and increases the number of desmin-positive cells in myoblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilho, Débora M; Soares, Carolina P; Morrot, Alexandre; Thiago, Leandro S; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Costa, Manoel L; Mermelstein, Cláudia

    2012-11-05

    Skeletal myogenesis comprises myoblast replication and differentiation into striated multinucleated myotubes. Agents that interfere with myoblast replication are important tools for the understanding of myogenesis. Recently, we showed that cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) enhances the differentiation step in chick-cultured myogenic cells, involving the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. However, the effects of cholesterol depletion on myoblast replication have not been carefully studied. Here we show that MCD treatment increases cell proliferation in primary chick myogenic cell cultures. Treatment of myogenic cells with the anti-mitotic reagent cytosine arabinoside, immediately following cholesterol depletion, blocks the MCD-induced effects on proliferation. Cholesterol depletion induced an increase in the number of desmin-positive mononucleated cells, and an increase in desmin expression. MCD induces an increase in the expression of the cell cycle regulator p53 and the master switch gene MyoD1. Treatment with BIO, a specific inhibitor of GSK3β, induced effects similar to MCD on cell proliferation; while treatment with Dkk1, a specific inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, neutralized the effects of MCD. These findings indicate that rapid changes in the cholesterol content in cell membranes of myoblasts can induce cell proliferation, possibly by the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-regulation, ego depletion, and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-12-01

    Inhibition is a major form of self-regulation. As such, it depends on self-awareness and comparing oneself to standards and is also susceptible to fluctuations in willpower resources. Ego depletion is the state of reduced willpower caused by prior exertion of self-control. Ego depletion undermines inhibition both because restraints are weaker and because urges are felt more intensely than usual. Conscious inhibition of desires is a pervasive feature of everyday life and may be a requirement of life in civilized, cultural society, and in that sense it goes to the evolved core of human nature. Intentional inhibition not only restrains antisocial impulses but can also facilitate optimal performance, such as during test taking. Self-regulation and ego depletion- may also affect less intentional forms of inhibition, even chronic tendencies to inhibit. Broadly stated, inhibition is necessary for human social life and nearly all societies encourage and enforce it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Spillane, Darryn S. Willoughby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS, myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05. Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p 0.05. Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05. In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation.

  4. Fecal culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parasites exam Alternative Names Stool culture; Culture - stool; Gastroenteritis fecal culture Images Salmonella typhi organism Yersinia enterocolitica organism Campylobacter jejuni organism Clostridium difficile organism References Beavis, KG, ...

  5. TNF inhibits Notch-1 in skeletal muscle cells by Ezh2 and DNA methylation mediated repression: implications in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnali Acharyya

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical NF-kappaB signaling functions as a negative regulator of skeletal myogenesis through potentially multiple mechanisms. The inhibitory actions of TNFalpha on skeletal muscle differentiation are mediated in part through sustained NF-kappaB activity. In dystrophic muscles, NF-kappaB activity is compartmentalized to myofibers to inhibit regeneration by limiting the number of myogenic progenitor cells. This regulation coincides with elevated levels of muscle derived TNFalpha that is also under IKKbeta and NF-kappaB control.Based on these findings we speculated that in DMD, TNFalpha secreted from myotubes inhibits regeneration by directly acting on satellite cells. Analysis of several satellite cell regulators revealed that TNFalpha is capable of inhibiting Notch-1 in satellite cells and C2C12 myoblasts, which was also found to be dependent on NF-kappaB. Notch-1 inhibition occurred at the mRNA level suggesting a transcriptional repression mechanism. Unlike its classical mode of action, TNFalpha stimulated the recruitment of Ezh2 and Dnmt-3b to coordinate histone and DNA methylation, respectively. Dnmt-3b recruitment was dependent on Ezh2.We propose that in dystrophic muscles, elevated levels of TNFalpha and NF-kappaB inhibit the regenerative potential of satellite cells via epigenetic silencing of the Notch-1 gene.

  6. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Mike; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2016-03-01

    This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS), myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11)] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10)] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p 0.05). Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation. Key pointsIn response to 56 days of heavy resistance training and HC or HPC supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting serum IGF-1 GH, or HGF.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting increases in total muscle protein content or the myogenic markers, total DNA and muscle cMet content.In response to 56 days of a daily supplemental dose of 94 g of protein and 196 g of carbohydrate, the HPC group was no more effective than 312 g of carbohydrate in the HC group in increasing muscle strength and mass due to its ability to elevate serum anabolic hormones and growth factors and markers of myogenic activation of satellite cells.

  7. Inhibition d'Escherichia coli O157:H7 dans un lait de chèvre à lactoperoxydase activée fermenté par des cultures de souches pures ou indigènes de bactéries lactiques

    OpenAIRE

    Parry-Hanson, Angela; Jooste, Piet; Buys, Elna

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The lactoperoxidase (LP) system has been reported to inhibit the production of acid by lactic starter cultures and can result in the survival and growth of acid-adapted enteropathogens in LP-activated fermented milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the LP system on growth and acid production by single strains and indigenous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in fermented goat's milk. LP-activated raw and paste...

  8. Urine culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  9. Inhibitory effect of a tyrosine-fructose Maillard reaction product, 2,4-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl-2-butenal on amyloid-β generation and inflammatory reactions via inhibition of NF-κB and STAT3 activation in cultured astrocytes and microglial BV-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Im Seup

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloidogenesis is linked to neuroinflammation. The tyrosine-fructose Maillard reaction product, 2,4-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl-2-butenal, possesses anti-inflammatory properties in cultured macrophages, and in an arthritis animal model. Because astrocytes and microglia are responsible for amyloidogenesis and inflammatory reactions in the brain, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic effects of 2,4-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl-2-butenal in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated astrocytes and microglial BV-2 cells. Methods Cultured astrocytes and microglial BV-2 cells were treated with LPS (1 μg/ml for 24 h, in the presence (1, 2, 5 μM or absence of 2,4-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl-2-butenal, and harvested. We performed molecular biological analyses to determine the levels of inflammatory and amyloid-related proteins and molecules, cytokines, Aβ, and secretases activity. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB DNA binding activity was determined using gel mobility shift assays. Results We found that 2,4-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl-2-butenal (1, 2, 5 μM suppresses the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 as well as the production of nitric oxide (NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β in LPS (1 μg/ml-stimulated astrocytes and microglial BV-2 cells. Further, 2,4-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl-2-butenal inhibited the transcriptional and DNA binding activity of NF-κB--a transcription factor that regulates genes involved in neuroinflammation and amyloidogenesis via inhibition of IκB degradation as well as nuclear translocation of p50 and p65. Consistent with the inhibitory effect on inflammatory reactions, 2,4-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl-2-butenal inhibited LPS-elevated Aβ42 levels through attenuation of β- and γ-secretase activities. Moreover, studies using signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 siRNA and a pharmacological inhibitor showed that 2

  10. Safeguards Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  11. The transcription coactivator ASC-1 is a regulator of skeletal myogenesis, and its deficiency causes a novel form of congenital muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davignon, Laurianne; Chauveau, Claire; Julien, Cédric; Dill, Corinne; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Cabet, Eva; Buendia, Brigitte; Lilienbaum, Alain; Rendu, John; Minot, Marie Christine; Guichet, Agnès; Allamand, Valérie; Vadrot, Nathalie; Fauré, Julien; Odent, Sylvie; Lazaro, Leïla; Leroy, Jean Paul; Marcorelles, Pascale; Dubourg, Odile; Ferreiro, Ana

    2016-04-15

    Despite recent progress in the genetic characterization of congenital muscle diseases, the genes responsible for a significant proportion of cases remain unknown. We analysed two branches of a large consanguineous family in which four patients presented with a severe new phenotype, clinically marked by neonatal-onset muscle weakness predominantly involving axial muscles, life-threatening respiratory failure, skin abnormalities and joint hyperlaxity without contractures. Muscle biopsies showed the unreported association of multi-minicores, caps and dystrophic lesions. Genome-wide linkage analysis followed by gene and exome sequencing in patients identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in TRIP4 encoding Activating Signal Cointegrator-1 (ASC-1), a poorly characterized transcription coactivator never associated with muscle or with human inherited disease. This mutation resulted in TRIP4 mRNA decay to around 10% of control levels and absence of detectable protein in patient cells. ASC-1 levels were higher in axial than in limb muscles in mouse, and increased during differentiation in C2C12 myogenic cells. Depletion of ASC-1 in cultured muscle cells from a patient and in Trip4 knocked-down C2C12 led to a significant reduction in myotube diameter ex vivo and in vitro, without changes in fusion index or markers of initial myogenic differentiation. This work reports the first TRIP4 mutation and defines a novel form of congenital muscle disease, expanding their histological, clinical and molecular spectrum. We establish the importance of ASC-1 in human skeletal muscle, identify transcriptional co-regulation as novel pathophysiological pathway, define ASC-1 as a regulator of late myogenic differentiation and suggest defects in myotube growth as a novel myopathic mechanism. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. INHIBITION IN SPEAKING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isna Humaera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The most common problem encountered by the learner in the language acquisition process is learner inhibition. Inhibition refers to a temperamental tendency to display wariness, fearfulness, or restrain in response to unfamiliar people, objects, and situations. There are some factors that cause inhibition, such as lack of motivation, shyness, self-confidence, self-esteem, and language ego. There are also levels of inhibition, it refers to kinds of inhibition and caused of inhibition itself. Teacher can support their students to reduce their inhibition effect by many ways, one of them by creating good classroom management including establishing good rapport between teacher and learners.

  13. Culture matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Zeba

    Zebaa Arif reflects on changes during her career as a mental health nurse in relation to cultural care issues: Cultural awareness is becoming embedded in patient care. All aspects of care are influenced by cultural beliefs and should form part of assessment. Leadership is essential in influencing cultural care, as is organisational commitment.

  14. Cultural entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Klamer (Arjo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCultural entrepreneurship is a new character in the cultural sector. This paper characterizes the cultural entrepreneur paying homage to the hermeneutic approach of Don Lavoie and others. The challenge is to render the "cultural" meaningful. An invention is the highlighting of the

  15. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Equol exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Equol exposure increases follicle atresia. • Equol exposure inhibits sex steroid hormone levels. • Equol exposure inhibits mRNA levels of certain steroidogenic enzymes.

  16. Co-culture with bone marrow stromal cells protects PC12 neuronal cells from tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the tumor necrosis factor receptor/caspase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Jing; Tang, Ling; Yu, Xin; Sui, Yi; Zhang, Chaodong

    2015-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), derived from the mesoderm, have been applied in the repair and reconstruction of injured tissues. The present study was conducted to explore the effects of BMSCs on cell viability of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated PC12 cells. PC12 cells were co-cultured with BMSCs under TNF-α treatment, with normal PC12 cells as controls. Results from an MTT assay indicated that BMSCs significantly increased cell growth and proliferation of TNF-α-treated PC12 cells (survival rates were 56.71 and 76.86% for the positive control (PC) and co-culture group, respectively). Furthermore, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that TNF-α increased PC12-cell apoptosis from 3.49 to 40.74% in the negative control and PC group, and the apoptotic rate was significantly reduced upon co-culture with BMSCs to 16.97%. In addition, data from reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses illustrated that TNF-α-induced upregulation in TNF receptor (TNFR)-1 (TNFR1) and caspase-8 expression in PC12 cells were partially reversed by co-culture with BMSCs. In conclusion, the present study suggested that BMSCs protect PC12 cells against stimulation with TNF-α, which is partially mediated through the TNFR/caspase signaling pathway. The results of the present study also suggested a therapeutic use of BMSCs in clinical neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Inhibition of NF-κB improves the stress resistance and myogenic differentiation of MDSPCs isolated from naturally aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Proto

    Full Text Available A decline in the regenerative capacity of adult stem cells with aging is well documented. As a result of this decline, the efficacy of autologous stem cell therapies is likely to decline with increasing donor age. In these cases, strategies to restore the function of aged stem cells would have clinical utility. Globally, the transcription factor NF-κB is up-regulated in aged tissues. Given the negative role that NF-κB plays in myogenesis, we investigated whether the age-related decline in the function of muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells (MDSPCs could be improved by inhibition of NF-κB. Herein, we demonstrate that pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of NF-κB activation increases myogenic differentiation and improves resistance to oxidative stress. Our results suggest that MDSPC "aging" may be reversible, and that pharmacologic targeting of pathways such as NF-κB may enhance the efficacy of cell-based therapies.

  18. Mitochondrial Alterations (Inhibition of Mitochondrial Protein Expression, Oxidative Metabolism, and Ultrastructure) Induced by Linezolid and Tedizolid at Clinically Relevant Concentrations in Cultured Human HL-60 Promyelocytes and THP-1 Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Tamara V; Payen, Valéry L; Sonveaux, Pierre; Muccioli, Giulio G; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2018-03-01

    Linezolid, the first clinically available oxazolidinone antibiotic, causes potentially severe toxicities (myelosuppression, lactic acidosis, and neuropathies) ascribed to impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis and consecutive mitochondrial dysfunction. Tedizolid, a newly approved oxazolidinone, shows an enhanced activity compared to linezolid but is also a more potent inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. We compared linezolid and tedizolid for (i) inhibition of the expression of subunit I of cytochrome c -oxidase (CYTox I; Western blot analysis), (ii) cytochrome c -oxidase activity (biochemical assay), (iii) mitochondrial oxidative metabolism (Seahorse technology), and (iv) alteration of mitochondrial ultrastructure (electron microscopy) using HL-60 promyelocytes and THP-1 monocytes exposed to microbiologically (multiples of modal MIC against Staphylococcus aureus ) and therapeutically ( C min - C max ) pertinent concentrations. Both drugs caused a rapid and complete (48 to 72 h) inhibition of CYTox I expression, cytochrome c -oxidase activity, and spare respiratory capacity, with conspicuous swelling of the mitochondrial matrix and loss of their cristae. Globally, tedizolid was a more potent inhibitor than linezolid. For both drugs, all effects were quickly (48 to 72 h) and fully reversible upon drug withdrawal. Using an alternation of exposure to and withdrawal from drug mimicking their approved schedule of administration (twice daily and once daily [qD] for linezolid and tedizolid, respectively), only partial inhibition of CYTox I expression was noted for up to 96 h. Thus, rapid reversal of toxic effects upon discontinuous administration may mitigate oxazolidinone toxicity. Since tedizolid is given qD, this may help to explain its reported lower preclinical and clinical toxicity. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. PT-1 selectively activates AMPK-γ1 complexes in mouse skeletal muscle, but activates all three γ subunit complexes in cultured human cells by inhibiting the respiratory chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Ross, Fiona A; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    strategy to combat diseases such as cancer and type 2 diabetes. We report that the AMPK activator PT-1 selectively increased the activity of γ1- but not γ3-containing complexes in incubated mouse muscle. PT-1 increased the AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of the autophagy-regulating kinase ULK1 on Ser555...... AMPK by direct binding between the kinase and auto-inhibitory domains of the α subunit. We show instead that PT-1 activates AMPK indirectly by inhibiting the respiratory chain and increasing cellular AMP:ATP and/or ADP:ATP ratios. Consistent with this mechanism, PT-1 failed to activate AMPK in HEK-293...

  20. A co-culture device with a tunable stiffness to understand combinatorial cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nikhil; Grover, Gregory N; Vincent, Ludovic G; Evans, Samantha C; Choi, Yu Suk; Spencer, Katrina H; Hui, Elliot E; Engler, Adam J; Christman, Karen L

    2013-11-01

    Cell behavior on 2-D in vitro cultures is continually being improved to better mimic in vivo physiological conditions by combining niche cues including multiple cell types and substrate stiffness, which are well known to impact cell phenotype. However, no system exists in which a user can systematically examine cell behavior on a substrate with a specific stiffness (elastic modulus) in culture with a different cell type, while maintaining distinct cell populations. We demonstrate the modification of a silicon reconfigurable co-culture system with a covalently linked hydrogel of user-defined stiffness. This device allows the user to control whether two separate cell populations are in contact with each other or only experience paracrine interactions on substrates of controllable stiffness. To illustrate the utility of this device, we examined the role of substrate stiffness combined with myoblast co-culture on adipose derived stem cell (ASC) differentiation and found that the presence of myoblasts and a 10 kPa substrate stiffness increased ASC myogenesis versus co-culture on stiff substrates. As this example highlights, this technology better controls the in vitro microenvironment, allowing the user to develop a more thorough understanding of the combined effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  1. Inhibiting Intuitive Thinking in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2015-01-01

    The papers in this issue describe recent collaborative research into the role of inhibition of intuitive thinking in mathematics education. This commentary reflects on this research from a mathematics education perspective and draws attention to some of the challenges that arise in collaboration between research fields with different cultures,…

  2. Culturing Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  3. Bile culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - bile ... is placed in a special dish called a culture medium to see if bacteria, viruses, or fungi ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Body fluid - anaerobic culture. In: ... . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:225-226. Kim AY, ...

  4. Substituted Indoleacetic Acids Tested in Tissue Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1978-01-01

    Monochloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot induction in tobacco tissue cultures about as much as IAA. Dichloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot formation less. Other substituted IAA except 5-fluoro- and 5-bromoindole-3-acetic acid were less active than IAA. Callus growth was quite variable...

  5. Substituted Indoleacetic Acids Tested in Tissue Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1978-01-01

    Monochloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot induction in tobacco tissue cultures about as much as IAA. Dichloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot formation less. Other substituted IAA except 5-fluoro- and 5-bromoindole-3-acetic acid were less active than IAA. Callus growth was quite variable and not...... and not correlated with auxin strength measured in the Avena coleoptile test....

  6. Cultural tourism and tourism cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Presenting a comprehensive and dynamic understanding of cultural tourism, this volume examines cultural mediators and how they help tourists appreciate foreign cultures. It also shows how tourism experiences are strategically crafted by mediators, the complexity of the mediation process, and how...... various products are mediated differently. A number of different products are investigated, including destination brand identities, "living" cultures and everyday life, art and history. The author illustrates his arguments by comparing the tourism strategies of Copenhagen and Singapore, and demonstrates...

  7. Transiently expressed pattern during myogenesis and candidate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    pattern of Tmem8C in goose, it appears that infusion occurred in the E15 and E19 periods in LM and E19 in BM, which is a few days later than in chicken and duck. Li et al. proposed that the development of BM lags behind that of LM in embryonic phases in duck, and suggested this might be related to the environmental ...

  8. Transiently expressed pattern during myogenesis and candidate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, we obtained the coding sequence (CDS) of Tmem8Cin goose, predicted miRNAs that can act on the 3' UTR, analysed expression profiles of this gene in breast and leg muscles (BM and LM) during the embryonic period and neonatal stages, and identified miRNAs that might affect the targeted gene. The results ...

  9. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on MYOGENESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wold, Barbara

    2001-05-04

    The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  10. Transiently expressed pattern during myogenesis and candidate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KE HE

    a SMARTer RACE 5 and 3 kit, using BM from four-week- old geese as a template. Since gene expression was not abun- dant in adults, we used nested PCR to obtain a distinct product (table 1). Purification and infusion cloning of RACE products were processed with the appending kits in the SMARTer RACE 5 and 3 kit.

  11. Transiently expressed pattern during myogenesis and candidate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KE HE

    be the potential binding sites of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs)), and the dN/dS ratio indicated purifying selection acting on this gene, facilitating conservatism in vertebrates. Q-PCR indicated Tmem8C had a peak expression pattern, reaching its highest expression levels in stage E15 in LM and E19 in BM, and then ...

  12. Transiently expressed pattern during myogenesis and candidate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    useful information about this gene and its candidate miRNAs in goose. Key words: Tmem8C, Myoblast ... proliferation and cell growth by controlling the G(1)- to S-phase transition in the cell cycle, and reducing the hyperplasia of .... architecture retrieval tool of BLAST (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST). SignalP3.0 server.

  13. Transiently expressed pattern during myogenesis and candidate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    phylogenetic trees), some conservative characteristics (e.g., six transmembrane domains and two E-boxes in the 5 UTR might be the potential ... highest expression levels in stage E15 in LM and E19 in BM, and then dropping transiently in E23 (P < 0.05). ..... maximum likelihood, evolutionary distance, and maximum par-.

  14. Transiently expressed pattern during myogenesis and candidate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, it has been shown that. miRNAs also play important roles in skeletal muscle devel- opment (Li et al. .... Dalian, China) on a real-time PCR detection system accord- ing to the manufacturer's protocol. The primers ... Dual-Glo Luciferase assay system (Promega) was taken to measure firefly and Renilla luciferase ...

  15. Culture evolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, Andrew; Hinde, Robert A.; Laland, Kevin N.; Stringer, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Culture pervades human lives and has allowed our species to create niches all around the world and its oceans, in ways quite unlike any other primate. Indeed, our cultural nature appears so distinctive that it is often thought to separate humanity from the rest of nature and the Darwinian forces that shape it. A contrary view arises through the recent discoveries of a diverse range of disciplines, here brought together to illustrate the scope of a burgeoning field of cultural evolution and to facilitate cross-disciplinary fertilization. Each approach emphasizes important linkages between culture and evolutionary biology rather than quarantining one from the other. Recent studies reveal that processes important in cultural transmission are more widespread and significant across the animal kingdom than earlier recognized, with important implications for evolutionary theory. Recent archaeological discoveries have pushed back the origins of human culture to much more ancient times than traditionally thought. These developments suggest previously unidentified continuities between animal and human culture. A third new array of discoveries concerns the later diversification of human cultures, where the operations of Darwinian-like processes are identified, in part, through scientific methods borrowed from biology. Finally, surprising discoveries have been made about the imprint of cultural evolution in the predispositions of human minds for cultural transmission. PMID:21357216

  16. Culture evolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, Andrew; Hinde, Robert A; Laland, Kevin N; Stringer, Christopher B

    2011-04-12

    Culture pervades human lives and has allowed our species to create niches all around the world and its oceans, in ways quite unlike any other primate. Indeed, our cultural nature appears so distinctive that it is often thought to separate humanity from the rest of nature and the Darwinian forces that shape it. A contrary view arises through the recent discoveries of a diverse range of disciplines, here brought together to illustrate the scope of a burgeoning field of cultural evolution and to facilitate cross-disciplinary fertilization. Each approach emphasizes important linkages between culture and evolutionary biology rather than quarantining one from the other. Recent studies reveal that processes important in cultural transmission are more widespread and significant across the animal kingdom than earlier recognized, with important implications for evolutionary theory. Recent archaeological discoveries have pushed back the origins of human culture to much more ancient times than traditionally thought. These developments suggest previously unidentified continuities between animal and human culture. A third new array of discoveries concerns the later diversification of human cultures, where the operations of Darwinian-like processes are identified, in part, through scientific methods borrowed from biology. Finally, surprising discoveries have been made about the imprint of cultural evolution in the predispositions of human minds for cultural transmission.

  17. Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Spatial Culture – A Humanities Perspective Abstract of introductory essay by Henrik Reeh Secured by alliances between socio-political development and cultural practices, a new field of humanistic studies in spatial culture has developed since the 1990s. To focus on links between urban culture...... and modern society is, however, an intellectual practice which has a much longer history. Already in the 1980s, the debate on the modern and the postmodern cited Paris and Los Angeles as spatio-cultural illustrations of these major philosophical concepts. Earlier, in the history of critical studies, the work...... Foucault considered a constitutive feature of 20th-century thinking and one that continues to occupy intellectual and cultural debates in the third millennium. A conceptual framework is, nevertheless, necessary, if the humanities are to adequa-tely address city and space – themes that have long been...

  18. Australine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that inhibits amyloglucosidase and glycoprotein processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tropea, J.E.; Molyneux, R.J.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pan, Y.T.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Australine is a polyhydroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid that was isolated from the seeds of the Australian tree Castanospermum australe and characterized by NMR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since swainsonine and catanospermine are polyhydroxylated indolizidine alkaloids that inhibit specific glycosidases, the authors tested australine against a variety of exoglycosidases to determine whether it would inhibit any of these enzymes. This alkaloid proved to be a good inhibitor of the α-glucosidase amyloglucosidase (50% inhibition at 5.8 μM), but it did not inhibit β-glucosidase, α- or β-mannosidase, or α- or β-galactosidase. The inhibition of amyloglucosidase was of a competitive nature. Australine also inhibited the glycoprotein processing enzyme glucosidase I, but had only slight activity toward glucosidase II. When incubated with cultured cells, this alkaloid inhibited glycoprotein processing at the glucosidase I step and caused the accumulation of glycoproteins with Glc 3 Man 7-9 (GlcNAc) 2 -oligosaccharides

  19. Manuscript Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What do Mesoamerica, Greece, Byzantium, Island, Chad, Ethiopia, India, Tibet, China and Japan have in common? Like many other cultures of the world, they share a particular form of cultural heritage: ancient handwritten documents. In 2007, scholars from some20 countries around the world gathered...... at the University of Copenhagen for a workshop on manuscripts to compare notes. This event led to the publication of this volume, which brings together16 articles on philological, cultural, and material aspects of manuscripts in search for a common ground across disciplines and cultures....

  20. Skin or nail culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  1. Cultural Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  2. Connecting Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugegaard, Rikke; Mynster Christensen, Maya

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of cultural dynamics in the area of operations is essential in to the accomplishment of military missions in international operations. The aim of this handbook is to introduce a tool enabling the use of culture as part of the military operational planning process....

  3. Culture Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2007-01-01

    by certain representations and embedded in certain norms and values. The analytical framework is applied on a case of cultural urban branding. The case is the harbour front in Aalborg, Denmark where a number of flagship architecture projects and cultural institutions are being planned. It is shown how...

  4. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  5. Culture Clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Sheila; Olson, Hope

    1996-01-01

    Discusses two basic cultures within the library science field, one that emphasizes "soft-edged" traditional service and the other newer culture which has evolved around information technology and entrepreneurial drive. Topics include historical background; university pressures on library schools to be "tech-oriented";…

  6. Pellet culture model for human primary osteoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    K Jähn; RG Richards; CW Archer; MJ Stoddart

    2010-01-01

    In vitro monolayer culture of human primary osteoblasts (hOBs) often shows unsatisfactory results for extracellular matrix deposition, maturation and calcification. Nevertheless, monolayer culture is still the method of choice for in vitro differentiation of primary osteoblasts. We believe that the delay in mature ECM production by the monolayer cultured osteoblasts is determined by their state of cell maturation. A functional relationship between the inhibition of osteoblast proliferation an...

  7. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla SD

    2016-07-01

    cells. In silico analyses identified a binding pocket for PAF/WEB-2086 in the predicted PAFr structure.Conclusion: WEB-2086 represents an innovative class of candidate drugs for inhibiting PAFr-dependent lung infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of smoking-related COPD. Keywords: airway epithelium, NTHi, pneumococci, WEB-2086, platelet-activating factor receptor, PAFr antagonist

  8. Avatar Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koda, Tomoko; Ishida, Toru; Rehm, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Avatars are increasingly used to express our emotions in our online communications. Such avatars are used based on the assumption that avatar expressions are interpreted universally among all cultures. This paper investigated cross-cultural evaluations of avatar expressions designed by Japanese...... and Western designers. The goals of the study were: (1) to investigate cultural differences in avatar expression evaluation and apply findings from psychological studies of human facial expression recognition, (2) to identify expressions and design features that cause cultural differences in avatar facial...... expression interpretation. The results of our study confirmed that (1) there are cultural differences in interpreting avatars’ facial expressions, and the psychological theory that suggests physical proximity affects facial expression recognition accuracy is also applicable to avatar facial expressions, (2...

  9. CULTURAL TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana POP

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will try to analyse the cultural tourism. We will start by referring to the complex concepts of tourism and culture and to the synergies existing between them. We will define cultural tourism and present its appearance and evolution as well as its importance as a modern form of tourism. We will present the various types of cultural tourism with their characteristics and the specific features of cultural tourists according to their interests. We will also mention that there are advantages and disadvantages for any kind of tourism depending on the position – local communities, companies or tourists. For the future we will refer to the new partnership between UNWTO and UNESCO.

  10. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26876617

  11. Culture Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Warner-Søderholm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Whether managers are concerned with financial issues, marketing, or human resource management (HRM, cultural values and practices do matter. The purpose of this article is to understand Norwegian managers’ cultural values within the cross-cultural landscape of her neighbors in the “Scandinavian cluster.” Clearly, subtle but disturbing differences may surface even when representatives from similar cultures work together. As a follow on from the GLOBE project, data based on the GLOBE instrument were collected on culture and communication values in Norway from 710 Norwegian middle managers for this present study. Although the Scandinavian cultures appear ostensibly similar, the results illustrate that research can reveal subtle but important cultural differences in nations that are similar yet dissimilar. All three Scandinavian societies appear intrinsically egalitarian; they appear to value low Power Distance, directness, and consensus in decision making and to promote Gender Egalitarianism. Nevertheless, there are significant differences in the degrees of commitment to these values by each individual Scandinavian partner. These differences need to be understood and appreciated to avoid misunderstandings.

  12. Digging culture and doing culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andries van den Broek; Jos de Haan; Frank Huysmans

    2009-01-01

    Original title: Cultuurbewonderaars en cultuurbeoefenaars. There are people who love art and culture and there are people who practise it; people who enjoy it and people who are themselves creative in their leisure time. Who are these culture-lovers and practitioners? How has participation in

  13. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukraroff, C.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of Safety Culture was defined after Chernobyl's nuclear accident in 1986. It has not been exempt from discussion interpretations, adding riders, etc..., over the last 24 years because it has to do with human behavior and performance in the organizations. Safety Culture is not an easy task to define, assess and monitor. The proof of it is that today we still discussing and writing about it. How has been the evolution of Safety Culture at the Juzbado Factory since 1985 to today?. What is the strategy that we will be following in the future. (Author)

  14. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  15. Rectal culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an infection of the rectum, such as gonorrhea . It may also be done instead of a ... infection. This may be: Bacterial infection Parasitic enterocolitis Gonorrhea Sometimes a culture shows that you are a ...

  16. Stool Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... illness by producing toxins . These bacteria may be cultured , but many of the tests used to detect ... been contaminated with pathogenic bacteria, such as undercooked meat or raw eggs, or the same food that ...

  17. Exometabolomic Profiling of Bacterial Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Anders Hans

    as the application into other food matrices. The scope of the thesis was to develop and apply a chromatography mass spectrometry based metabolomic footprint workflow for the investigation of the mechanisms behind the antifungal properties of a co‐culture, consisting of Lactobacillus paracasei (LAB A...... chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Data from the untargeted LC/MS analysis was processed using feature selection and subsequent multivariate data analysis. The antifungal properties of the co‐culture were composed of several components when fermented in the model system. The major contribution came from......Selected bacterial cultures are used on an industrial scale for biopreservation of fresh fermented dairy products. The selected cultures provide efficient inhibition of yeasts and molds and serve as an alternative to the use of purified or synthetic antimicrobials. Despite the fact that numerous...

  18. Cultural tourism and tourism cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Presenting a comprehensive and dynamic understanding of cultural tourism, this volume examines cultural mediators and how they help tourists appreciate foreign cultures. It also shows how tourism experiences are strategically crafted by mediators, the complexity of the mediation process, and how...... various products are mediated differently. A number of different products are investigated, including destination brand identities, "living" cultures and everyday life, art and history. The author illustrates his arguments by comparing the tourism strategies of Copenhagen and Singapore, and demonstrates...... how tourism is an agent for social change. The author also offers an original and refreshing way of understanding tourist behaviour through the concept of the "versatile tourist". The book's empirical cases and dialogic framework provide new and deep insights into tourism activities. In his...

  19. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A Cultural Sexuality or a Sexual Culture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandermeersch, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    P. Vandermeersch, A Cultural Sexuality or a Sexual Culture? In: F. VAN DE VIJVER & G. HUTSCHEMAEKERS (ed.), The Investigation of Culture. Current Issues in Cultural Psychology, Tilburg, Tilburg University Press, 1990, 43-58.

  1. Advertising cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malefyt, Timothy de Waal; Moeran, Brian

    to the relationship between advertizing and anthropology. The link between them may come as a surprise to those who consider advertizing to be firmly rooted in commerce and anthropology in culture. Through the lens of anthropologists, this book not only shows how anthropology and advertizing are connected...... and how anthropology can be used to give an informed cultural understanding of the consumer. From constructing a "Japaneseness" that appeals to two very different Western audiences, to tracking the changes, in the post World War II period, in advertizing, and considering how people can be influenced...... by language and symbols, this book is an innovative mix of business strategy and cultural theory. Its pioneering work should provide a valuable guide to consumer behaviour for practitioners and students alike, and should pave the way for a new and exciting area of research....

  2. Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    , the notion of aesthetics (taken in the original signification of aisthesis: sensory perception) helped to map the relations between city, human experience, and various forms of art and culture. Delving into our simultaneously optical and tactical reception of space (a dialectics pointed out by Walter...... Benjamin), studies in urbanity and aesthetics may highlight mul-tisensory everyday practices that pass unnoticed in the current era of visual domination. A humanistic approach to urban and spatial cultures should also learn from German sociologist and philosopher Georg Simmel’s hypothesis of a modern need......: Memory”, and ”Staging and Interpretation: Places”....

  3. Mayan Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter Bent

    1992-01-01

    The social categories « Maya » and « mestizo » habe been applied to denote the Yucatec Mayan people in Mexico. The A. examines the cluster of perceived attributes (schemata) evoked by the terms and how they relate to each other. He shows that there is an incongruency between them along the lines ...... of local and academic categorization, which is an implication of the different social spaces in which they arise. In spite of the incongruency and the cultural plurality evoked by their usage, the A. argues that the people of Yucatec share a single culture....

  4. Information cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouvig, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest a genealogy of the concept of information beyond the 20th century. The article discusses how the concept of information culture might provide a way of formulating such a genealogic strategy. The article approaches this purpose by providing a general...... narrative of premodern information cultures, examining works on early-modern scholars and 18th century savants and discussion of what seems to be a Foucauldian rupture in the conceptualization of information in 19th century England. The findings of the article are situated in the thinking that a genealogy...

  5. Cultural Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qingxin

    2007-01-01

    Culture has already played an important role in the global market. It not only affects products, but also impacts on usability evaluation methods. This project aims to examine in the established thinking aloud usability evaluation method (TA UEM), how does the evaluator build a supportive...... relationship and communicate effectively with the user in order to find relevant usability problems in culturally localized applications. It includes three parts, pilot study, field study and experiments, to get both qualitative data and quantitative data. From this project, we hope to find an effective way...

  6. Combined PDGFR and HDAC Inhibition Overcomes PTEN Disruption in Chordoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Zhang, Ying; Kassam, Amin B.; Park, Myung-Jin; Gardner, Paul; Prevedello, Daniel; Henry, Stephanie; Horbinski, Craig; Beumer, Jan H.; Tawbi, Hussein; Williams, Brian J.; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Abounader, Roger; Park, Deric M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The majority of chordomas show activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR). Based on in vitro intertumoral variation in response to recombinant PDGF protein and PDGFR inhibition, and variable tumor response to imatinib, we hypothesized that chordomas resistant to PDGFR inhibition may possess downstream activation of the pathway. Methods Molecular profiling was performed on 23 consecutive chordoma primary tissue specimens. Primary cultures established from 20 o...

  7. Cultural Politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotsky, Sandra

    1991-01-01

    Multicultural education has at least two faces--an academic one and an ideological one. Encouraging the balkanization of U.S. culture threatens to undermine the academic integrity of the social studies curriculum. Offers suggestions to make sure that schools are offering an academically rigorous multicultural curriculum, not political…

  8. Grindr Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shield, Andrew DJ

    2018-01-01

    intersections of sexuality with other socio-cultural categories such as race and migration background, but also gender and ability. I find that user experiences with exclusion and discrimination can be related to Grindr’s interface, such as its drop-down menus, the discourses circulated by Grindr users...

  9. Black Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks passed down a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  10. Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  11. callus culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    steve

    capacity in comparison to those of grown on 75%. NH4NO3 depleted media under the same light regime. Light dependent secondary metabolite production. Initially, we have cultured wounded grape leaf explants in the dark for callus induction and monitoring possible pigmentation and phenolics accumulation. Supplemen-.

  12. Cultural Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qingxin

    2007-01-01

    Culture has already played an important role in the global market. It not only affects products, but also impacts on usability evaluation methods. This project aims to examine in the established thinking aloud usability evaluation method (TA UEM), how does the evaluator build a supportive...

  13. Hydroponic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steucek, G. L.; Yurkiewicz, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a hydroponic culture technique suitable for student exercises in biology. This technique of growing plants in nutrient solutions enhances plant growth, and is an excellent way to obtain intact plants with root systems free of soil or other particulate matter. (JR)

  14. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show that sideroc......Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show...

  15. Cultured Trash, Not Trash Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Taufiqurrohman, Taufiqurrohman; Utomo, Setyo; Wibowo, Purwo Adi

    2017-01-01

    As civilized creature, human actually can manage trash as well as possible although it is often stereotyped as a vain thing. This article gives the proof that trash can be cultured as well so that a society can take benefits from the existence of it. This article parses ways of orderly managing it at schools, in this case two schools in Jepara. The results say that trash can be cultured by having an organization to manage the Trash Bank at schools and to train students to classify and recycle...

  16. Gentamycin inhibits the growth of Malassezia pachydermatis in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aspiroz, C.; Gilaberte, Y.; Rezusta, A.; Boekhout, T.; Rubio, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Malassezia pachydermatis is a yeast of importance in both veterinary and human medicine. Aims: To know if M. pachydermatis grow on micological media with high concentrations of gentamycin. Methods: Twenty M. pachydermatis strains were streaked on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar plates with

  17. Bioassays for the determination of nitrification inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunditz, Camilla

    1999-07-01

    Requirements for nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment plants were introduced in Sweden in the early 1990's. This was a governmental move to reduce the nitrogen discharges to the Baltic and Kattegat in order to prevent eutrophication. The nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants is performed by nitrifying bacteria. These are susceptible to inhibition and it is of great importance that the influent water does not contain toxic compounds. Therefore, there is a need for assays for the determination of nitrification inhibition. This thesis describes the development and applications of such bioassays. Pure cultures of Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. These cultures were used as test organisms in the development of bioassays for nitrification inhibition measurements. The assays are based on two different principles; cell suspensions of the bacteria, performed in test tubes, and mediated amperometric biosensors with the bacteria immobilised. Ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation are studied separately without interference from other organisms, which makes it easier to interpret the results. The cell suspension assays were applied to samples of industrial and municipal wastewater. The Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter assays showed to have different inhibition patterns. A large percentage of the Swedish municipal wastewater treatment plants were found to receive inhibitory influent water, but the inhibition level was generally low. Compared to an assay based on activated sludge, the screening method, the pure culture assays found more samples of influent water strongly inhibitory or stimulating. The highest correlation was found between the screening method and the Nitrosomonas assay. The Nitrobacter assay was found to be the most sensitive method. Assessment of toxicity of a number of chemical substances was studied using the biosensors, together with the cell suspension assays

  18. Identification of the receptors for somatostatin (SST) and cortistatin (CST) in chickens and investigation of the roles of cSST28, cSST14, and cCST14 in inhibiting cGHRH1-27NH2-induced growth hormone secretion in cultured chicken pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fengyan; Huang, Guian; Gao, Shunyu; Li, Juan; Yan, Zhenxin; Wang, Yajun

    2014-03-25

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are proposed to mediate the actions of somatostatin (SST) and its related peptide, cortistatin (CST), in vertebrates. However, the identity, functionality, and tissue expression of these receptors remain largely unknown in most non-mammalian vertebrates including birds. In this study, five SSTRs (named cSSTR1, cSSTR2, cSSTR3, cSSTR4, cSSTR5) were cloned from chicken brain by RT-PCR. Using a pGL3-CRE-luciferase reporter system, we demonstrated that activation of each cSSTR expressed in CHO cells by cSST28, cSST14 and cCST14 treatment could inhibit forskolin-induced luciferase activity of CHO cells, indicating the functional coupling of all cSSTRs to Gi protein(s). Interestingly, cSSTR1-4 expressed in CHO cells could be activated by cSST28, cSST14 and cCST14 with high potencies, suggesting that they may function as the receptors common for these peptides. In contrast, cSSTR5 could be potently activated by cSST28 only, indicating that it is a cSST28-specific receptor. Using RT-PCR, wide expression of cSSTRs was detected in chicken tissues including pituitary. In accordance with their expression in pituitary, cSST28, cSST14, and cCST14 were demonstrated to inhibit basal and novel cGHRH1-27NH2-induced GH secretion in cultured chicken pituitary cells dose-dependently (0-10nM) by Western blot analysis, suggesting the involvement of cSSTR(s) common for these peptides in mediating their inhibitory actions. Collectively, our study establishes a molecular basis to elucidate the roles of SST/CST in birds and provide insights into the roles of SST/CST in vertebrates, such as their conserved actions on pituitary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Talking Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    When Danish businesses move production abroad, ‘culture’ is often seen as a huge challenge to the successful outcome of cross-border collaboration. Therefore, business leaders often seek information and guidelines of how to cope in the vast amount of literature on culture and intercultural...... communication. Much of this literature is based on functionalist approaches providing the dos and don’ts of intercultural encounters. This involves inter alia conceptualising ‘culture’ as a relatively fixed, homogeneous entity of values, attitudes and norms shared by members of a group, often leading readers...... to adopt dichotomised understandings and discourses about other cultures (see e.g. Hofstede 2001; Jandt 1998; Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner 1997). However, experience shows that the world in which intercultural encounters take place is not as simple and easy to categorise as these approaches may suggest...

  20. MARKETING CULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gómez Ramírez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza la definición de "Marketing" Cultural y la adaptación y beneficios del "marketing" tradicional respecto al conjunto de manifestaciones artísticas de las diversas industrias involucradas en el sector cultural o artístico; asimismo, se desagregan los conceptos básicos que lo componen como factor de éxito en dichas empresas. Se hace uso de la exposición de casos específicos para ilustrar la articulación de estos dos conceptos aparentemente contrapuestos, cultura y "marketing", y registra algunas reflexiones para que el lector se involucre en la construcción del concepto aquí presentado.

  1. Cultural neurolinguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chunhui; Dong, Qi

    2009-01-01

    As the only species that evolved to possess a language faculty, humans have been surprisingly generative in creating a diverse array of language systems. These systems vary in phonology, morphology, syntax, and written forms. Before the advent of modern brain-imaging techniques, little was known about how differences across languages are reflected in the brain. This chapter aims to provide an overview of an emerging area of research - cultural neurolinguistics - that examines systematic cross...

  2. Cultural neurolinguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chunhui; Dong, Qi

    2009-01-01

    As the only species that evolved to possess a language faculty, humans have been surprisingly generative in creating a diverse array of language systems. These systems vary in phonology, morphology, syntax, and written forms. Before the advent of modern brain-imaging techniques, little was known about how differences across languages are reflected in the brain. This chapter aims to provide an overview of an emerging area of research - cultural neurolinguistics - that examines systematic cross-cultural/crosslinguistic variations in the neural networks of languages. We first briefly describe general brain networks for written and spoken languages. We then discuss language-specific brain regions by highlighting differences in neural bases of different scripts (logographic vs. alphabetic scripts), orthographies (transparent vs. nontransparent orthographies), and tonality (tonal vs. atonal languages). We also discuss neural basis of second language and the role of native language experience in second-language acquisition. In the last section, we outline a general model that integrates culture and neural bases of language and discuss future directions of research in this area.

  3. TV Inhibiting Creative Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intellect, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Television may be inhibiting our ability to create new ideas, according to Eric Somers, assistant professor of journalism at Drake University. Discusses television's role as facilitator of information and how it should improve to increase organization and the creative process. (Editor/RK)

  4. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  5. The challenge of cultural gerontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Julia; Martin, Wendy

    2015-06-01

    Over the last decade, Cultural Gerontology has emerged as one of the most vibrant elements of writing about age (Twigg, J., & Martin, W. (Eds.) (2015). The Routledge handbook of cultural gerontology. London: Routledge). Reflecting the wider Cultural Turn, it has expanded the field of gerontology beyond all recognition. No longer confined to frailty, or the dominance of medical and social welfare perspectives, cultural gerontology addresses the nature and experience of later years in the widest sense. In this review, we will explore how the Cultural Turn, which occurred across the social sciences and humanities in the late 20th century, came to influence age studies. We will analyze the impulses that led to the emergence of the field and the forces that have inhibited or delayed its development. We will explore how cultural gerontology has recast aging studies, widening its theoretical and substantive scope, taking it into new territory intellectually and politically, presenting this in terms of 4 broad themes that characterize the work: subjectivity and identity; the body and embodiment; representation and the visual; and time and space. Finally, we will briefly address whether there are problems in the approach. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Differentiation and sarcomere formation in skeletal myocytes directly prepared from human induced pluripotent stem cells using a sphere-based culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwlawat, Saowanee; Lynch, Eileen; Glaser, Jennifer; Smit-Oistad, Ivy; Jeffrey, Jeremy; Van Dyke, Jonathan M; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    Human induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising resource for propagation of myogenic progenitors. Our group recently reported a unique protocol for the derivation of myogenic progenitors directly (without genetic modification) from human pluripotent cells using free-floating spherical culture. Here we expand our previous efforts and attempt to determine how differentiation duration, culture surface coatings, and nutrient supplements in the medium influence progenitor differentiation and formation of skeletal myotubes containing sarcomeric structures. A long differentiation period (over 6 weeks) promoted the differentiation of iPSC-derived myogenic progenitors and subsequent myotube formation. These iPSC-derived myotubes contained representative sarcomeric structures, consisting of organized myosin and actin filaments, and could spontaneously contract. We also found that a bioengineering approach using three-dimensional (3D) artificial muscle constructs could facilitate the formation of elongated myotubes. Lastly, we determined how culture surface coating matrices and different supplements would influence terminal differentiation. While both Matrigel and laminin coatings showed comparable effects on muscle differentiation, B27 serum-free supplement in the differentiation medium significantly enhanced myogenesis compared to horse serum. Our findings support the possibility to create an in vitro model of contractile sarcomeric myofibrils for disease modeling and drug screening to study neuromuscular diseases. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Samani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. According to the importance of the embodiment of robots in the sense of presence, the influence of robots in communication culture is anticipated. The sustainability of robotics culture based on diversity for cultural communities for various acceptance modalities is explored in order to anticipate the creation of different attributes of culture between robots and humans in the future.

  8. Myocyte-derived Tnfsf14 is a survival factor necessary for myoblast differentiation and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldemer-Streyer, R J; Chen, J

    2015-12-31

    Adult skeletal muscle tissue has a uniquely robust capacity for regeneration, which gradually declines with aging or is compromised in muscle diseases. The cellular mechanisms regulating adult myogenesis remain incompletely understood. Here we identify the cytokine tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (Tnfsf14) as a positive regulator of myoblast differentiation in culture and muscle regeneration in vivo. We find that Tnfsf14, as well as its cognate receptors herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR), are expressed in both differentiating myocytes and regenerating myofibers. Depletion of Tnfsf14 or either receptor inhibits myoblast differentiation and promotes apoptosis. Our results also suggest that Tnfsf14 regulates myogenesis by supporting cell survival and maintaining a sufficient pool of cells for fusion. In addition, we show that Akt mediates the survival and myogenic function of Tnfsf14. Importantly, local knockdown of Tnfsf14 is found to impair injury-induced muscle regeneration in a mouse model, affirming an important physiological role for Tnfsf14 in myogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate that localized overexpression of Tnfsf14 potently enhances muscle regeneration, and that this regenerative capacity of Tnfsf14 is dependent on Akt signaling. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel regulator of skeletal myogenesis and implicate Tnfsf14 in future therapeutic development.

  9. La arquitectura cultural. / Cultural architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobos, Jorge

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo releva la Arquitectura Cultural, que es plural y diversa en términos estéticos y conceptuales. Sugiere la apertura a otras dinámicas de comprensión de lo arquitectónico, a otras lógicas de construcción de las ciudades. Para aclarar el concepto se expone un breve ejemplo práctico./This article points out the "cultural architecture", which is plural and diverse in concept and aesthetic terms. It suggests the opening to other dinamics of comprehention of the architectural issue and the building of cities. The article presents a brief empirical example that clarifies the conceptual approach.

  10. Shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks in the methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal fermentation: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio M. Ungerfeld

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Maximizing the flow of metabolic hydrogen ([H] in the rumen away from CH4 and towards volatile fatty acids (VFA would increase the efficiency of ruminant production and decrease its environmental impact. The objectives of this meta-analysis were: i To quantify shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks when inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis in vitro; and ii To understand the variation in shifts of metabolic hydrogen sinks among experiments and between batch and continuous cultures systems when methanogenesis is inhibited. Batch (28 experiments, N=193 and continuous (16 experiments, N=79 culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were compiled. Inhibiting methanogenesis generally resulted in less fermentation and digestion in most batch culture, but not in most continuous culture, experiments. Inhibiting CH4 production in batch cultures resulted in redirection of metabolic hydrogen towards propionate and H2 but not butyrate. In continuous cultures, there was no overall metabolic hydrogen redirection towards propionate or butyrate, and H2 as a proportion of metabolic hydrogen spared from CH4 production was numerically smaller compared to batch cultures. Dihydrogen accumulation was affected by type of substrate and methanogenesis inhibitor, with highly fermentable substrates resulting in greater redirection of metabolic hydrogen towards H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and some oils causing small or no H2 accumulation. In both batch and continuous culture, there was a decrease in metabolic hydrogen recovered as the sum of propionate, butyrate, CH4 and H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and it is speculated that as CH4 production decreases metabolic hydrogen could be increasingly incorporated into formate, microbial biomass, and, perhaps, reductive acetogenesis in continuous cultures. Energetic benefits of inhibiting methanogenesis depended on the inhibitor and its concentration and on the in vitro system.

  11. Inhibition by 2-deoxy-D-ribose of DNA synthesis and growth in Raji cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, F.

    1988-01-01

    When Raji cells were cultured for 3 days in serum-free medium, addition of 2-deoxy-D-ribose at the start of culture inhibited incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine and cell division. At deoxyribose concentrations between 1 and 5 mM, viability was 80% or greater after 3 days of culture even though 5 mM deoxyribose inhibited thymidine incorporation 95-99%. Inhibition by deoxyribose could be completely reversed if the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium up to 8 hr after the start of culture. The inhibition was specific for deoxyribose since other monosaccharides had no effect. Inhibition of DNA synthesis did not appear to be due to depletion of essential nutrients in the medium since the percentage inhibition of thymidine incorporation by cells cultured either in suboptimal serum-free media or in media supplemented with 0.025-5% human AB serum was similar. When DNA repair synthesis was measured as hydroxyurea-resistant thymidine incorporation, addition of deoxyribose to Raji cultures caused increased thymidine incorporation. These results, together with data from others,suggest that deoxyribose damages DNA

  12. Black Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Khristin Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united.  The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape from poverty of enslavement and to establish a way of life through tradition. A way of personal freedoms was through getting a good education that lead to a better foundation and a better way of life.

  13. Culture Jamming Versus Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardia Acynthia Putri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This literature study researched Adbusters, the anti-commercial organization, and described the organization’s activities and media usage, mainly in the period of 2007-2010, which critized the populer culture. Adbusters is an organization which performs “Culture Jamming”; a rebellious act reacting towards commercialism domination in many aspects including popular culture. Compared to other similar organizations, Adbusters has been executing more various activisms using several media which other organizations do not use. This study used the Adbusters’ official website and blogs as main data sources. The data of Adbusters’ activities and media usage were categorized and analyzed, thus the tendency of its development can be described. This study also analyzed Adbusters’ activity using Media Hegemony Theory and Political Economy Media Theory. The media has been dominated by a certain group that owns politic and economic power, so the information flow has been dominated by them. Media and its contents have been commercialized, thus capitalism and commercialism have been considered as a common system that should run the world. Adbusters has been trying to stop the domination and change the society’s way of thinking into a more critical way of thinking.   Abstrak: Studi literatur ini meneliti tentang Adbusters, sebuah organisasi anti komersial, dengan mendeskripsikan aktivitas serta penggunaan media organisasi tersebut dari tahun 2007-2010 dalam mengkritisi budaya populer. Adbusters adalah organisasi yang melakukan Culture Jamming, aksi perlawanan terhadap dominasi komersialisme di segala aspek termasuk popular culture. Dibandingkan dengan organisasi lain yang serupa, aktivitas Adbusters lebih bervariasi dan menggunakan media-media yang tidak biasa digunakan organisasi lain. Penelitian ini menggunakan situs online resmi Adbusters sebagai sumber data utama. Data mengenai aktivitas dan

  14. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Samani, Hooman; Saadatian, Elham; Pang, Natalie; Polydorou, Doros; Fernando, Owen Noel Newton; Nakatsu, Ryohei; Koh, Jeffrey Tzu Kwan Valino

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. Ac...

  15. Inhibiting the inevitable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    conservation is to ‘buy time’ for the object. Inhibitive conservation of plastics involves the removal or reduction of factors causing or accelerating degradation including light, oxygen, acids, relative humidity and acidic breakdown products. Specific approaches to conservation have been developed......Once plastics objects are registered in museum collections, the institution becomes responsible for their long term preservation, until the end of their useful lifetime. Plastics appear to deteriorate faster than other materials in museum collections and have a useful lifetime between 5 and 25...... years. Preventive or inhibitive conservation involves controlling the environments in which objects are placed during storage and display, with the aim of slowing the major deterioration reactions. Once in progress, degradation of plastics cannot be stopped or reversed, so the aim of preventive...

  16. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  17. A fusion-inhibiting peptide against Rift Valley fever virus inhibits multiple, diverse viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Koehler

    Full Text Available For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus, Class II (Andes virus, or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors.

  18. Culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Culture-lovers and Culture-leavers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank Huysmans; Andries van den Broek; Jos de Haan

    2005-01-01

    Who are the people in the Netherlands with an active interest in cultural heritage and the performing arts, and who prefer to leave these forms of culture alone? Have the size and composition of the groups of 'culture-lovers' and 'culture-leavers' changed since the end of the 1970s? These are the

  20. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  1. Adolescent Sexuality and Culture: South African Mothers` Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explores South African mothers' perspective on adolescent sexuality within their cultural prism. Forty-four (44) mothers were purposefully selected for the study. Data was collected through six focus group discussions. The results indicated that culturally embedded reasons inhibited mothers from effectively ...

  2. Inhibition of bacterial quorum sensing by vanilla extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, J H; Rukayadi, Y; Hwang, J-K

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to search for a novel quorum sensing inhibitor and analyse its inhibitory activity. Quorum sensing inhibition was monitored using the Tn-5 mutant, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Vanilla beans (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) were extracted using 75% (v/v) aqueous methanol and added to C. violaceum CV026 cultures. Inhibitory activity was measured by quantifying violacein production using a spectrophotometer. The results have revealed that vanilla extract significantly reduced violacein production in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating inhibition of quorum sensing. Vanilla, a widely used spice and flavour, can inhibit bacterial quorum sensing. The results suggest that the intake of vanilla-containing food materials might promote human health by inhibiting quorum sensing and preventing bacterial pathogenesis. Further studies are required to isolate specific substances from vanilla extract acting as quorum sensing inhibitors.

  3. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J.; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M.; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny. PMID:26933816

  4. Somatomedins inhibit protein degradation in muscle cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, R.A.; Blann, D.L.; Bauer, C.A.; Hossner, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    Protein degradation has been measured in cultures of L6 myotubes as the rate of release of trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity after prelabeling cell protein with [ 3 H] leucine. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1), ovine somatomedin (oSM) and insulin (I), at concentrations from 10 -11 M to 10 -7 M (5 x 10 -7 M-oSM) were added at the beginning of a 4-hour degradation period to determine the effects of these hormones on inducible proteolysis occurring in serum-free media. In addition the effects of fetal bovine serum, at concentrations from 1% to 30%, on protein degradation were determined in parallel experiments to relate serum inhibition of proteolysis to somatomedin actions. Results from this study indicate the apparent half maximal inhibition of proteolysis (18%, 15%, 11%) occurred at .4nM-IGF-1, .6nM-oSM and 4nM-I, respectively. Thus protein degradation was approximately 10 times more sensitive to somatomedins than insulin. The half maximal inhibition of proteolysis (15%) observed with serum occurred at 7.7%. The magnitude of the response between IFG-I and serum (37% vs. 31%) was similar. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that somatomedins are important factors in regulating growth and development of muscle

  5. Pellet culture model for human primary osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähn, K; Richards, R G; Archer, C W; Stoddart, M J

    2010-09-06

    In vitro monolayer culture of human primary osteoblasts (hOBs) often shows unsatisfactory results for extracellular matrix deposition, maturation and calcification. Nevertheless, monolayer culture is still the method of choice for in vitro differentiation of primary osteoblasts. We believe that the delay in mature ECM production by the monolayer cultured osteoblasts is determined by their state of cell maturation. A functional relationship between the inhibition of osteoblast proliferation and the induction of genes associated with matrix maturation was suggested within a monolayer culture model for rat calvarial osteoblasts. We hypothesize, that a pellet culture model could be utilized to decrease initial proliferation and increase the transformation of osteoblasts into a more mature phenotype. We performed pellet cultures using hOBs and compared their differentiation potential to 2D monolayer cultures. Using the pellet culture model, we were able to generate a population of cuboidal shaped central osteoblastic cells. Increased proliferation, as seen during low-density monolayer culture, was absent in pellet cultures and monolayers seeded at 40,000 cells/cm2. Moreover, the expression pattern of phenotypic markers Runx2, osterix, osteocalcin, col I and E11 mRNA was significantly different depending on whether the cells were cultured in low density monolayer, high density monolayer or pellet culture. We conclude that the transformation of the osteoblast phenotype in vitro to a more mature stage can be achieved more rapidly in 3D culture. Moreover, that dense monolayer leads to the formation of more mature osteoblasts than low-density seeded monolayer, while hOB cells in pellets seem to have transformed even further along the osteoblast phenotype.

  6. Pellet culture model for human primary osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Jähn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro monolayer culture of human primary osteoblasts (hOBs often shows unsatisfactory results for extracellular matrix deposition, maturation and calcification. Nevertheless, monolayer culture is still the method of choice for in vitro differentiation of primary osteoblasts. We believe that the delay in mature ECM production by the monolayer cultured osteoblasts is determined by their state of cell maturation. A functional relationship between the inhibition of osteoblast proliferation and the induction of genes associated with matrix maturation was suggested within a monolayer culture model for rat calvarial osteoblasts. We hypothesize, that a pellet culture model could be utilized to decrease initial proliferation and increase the transformation of osteoblasts into a more mature phenotype. We performed pellet cultures using hOBs and compared their differentiation potential to 2D monolayer cultures. Using the pellet culture model, we were able to generate a population of cuboidal shaped central osteoblastic cells. Increased proliferation, as seen during low-density monolayer culture, was absent in pellet cultures and monolayers seeded at 40,000 cells/cm2. Moreover, the expression pattern of phenotypic markers Runx2, osterix, osteocalcin, col I and E11 mRNA was significantly different depending on whether the cells were cultured in low density monolayer, high density monolayer or pellet culture. We conclude that the transformation of the osteoblast phenotype in vitro to a more mature stage can be achieved more rapidly in 3D culture. Moreover, that dense monolayer leads to the formation of more mature osteoblasts than low-density seeded monolayer, while hOB cells in pellets seem to have transformed even further along the osteoblast phenotype.

  7. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  8. Australine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that inhibits amyloglucosidase and glycoprotein processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tropea, J.E.; Molyneux, R.J.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pan, Y.T.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (USA))

    1989-03-07

    Australine is a polyhydroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid that was isolated from the seeds of the Australian tree Castanospermum australe and characterized by NMR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since swainsonine and catanospermine are polyhydroxylated indolizidine alkaloids that inhibit specific glycosidases, the authors tested australine against a variety of exoglycosidases to determine whether it would inhibit any of these enzymes. This alkaloid proved to be a good inhibitor of the {alpha}-glucosidase amyloglucosidase (50% inhibition at 5.8 {mu}M), but it did not inhibit {beta}-glucosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase. The inhibition of amyloglucosidase was of a competitive nature. Australine also inhibited the glycoprotein processing enzyme glucosidase I, but had only slight activity toward glucosidase II. When incubated with cultured cells, this alkaloid inhibited glycoprotein processing at the glucosidase I step and caused the accumulation of glycoproteins with Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 7-9}(GlcNAc){sub 2}-oligosaccharides.

  9. Cultural Humility and Hospital Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Joshua N; Boan, David; Davis, Don E; Aten, Jamie D; Ruiz, John M; Maryon, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Hospital safety culture is an integral part of providing high quality care for patients, as well as promoting a safe and healthy environment for healthcare workers. In this article, we explore the extent to which cultural humility, which involves openness to cultural diverse individuals and groups, is related to hospital safety culture. A sample of 2011 hospital employees from four hospitals completed measures of organizational cultural humility and hospital safety culture. Higher perceptions of organizational cultural humility were associated with higher levels of general perceptions of hospital safety, as well as more positive ratings on non-punitive response to error (i.e., mistakes of staff are not held against them), handoffs and transitions, and organizational learning. The cultural humility of one's organization may be an important factor to help improve hospital safety culture. We conclude by discussing potential directions for future research.

  10. CONNECTION BETWEEN ECONOMICS, CULTURE AND CULTURAL DIPLOMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agil Valiyev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, culture is one of the main feeble factors of economic development.  The leading role of culture in economic development should be argued as multiplied: so, on firstly, as domestic value, on secondly, as a main factor of regional economic development advanced to raised gravity of different regions for residents, tourists and investors, on thirdly, as major parameters of social development based on tolerance, creativity and knowledge. To the different international experiences, culture is main part of economic development in our life. Cultural diversities are combined into a main reason economic development model. The article consist of explainations about the understanding of culture, cultural diplomacy and economics, approach on conflicts between culture and economics, to find how affecting of culture to economic development, the role of culture in economic development of Azerbaijan. The article can be considered as a useful resource  for experts and researchers conducting research in this field.

  11. Dihydrotestosterone inhibits hair growth in mice by inhibiting insulin-like growth factor-I production in dermal papillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Harada, Naoaki; Okajima, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrated that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) production in dermal papillae was increased and hair growth was promoted after sensory neuron stimulation in mice. Although the androgen metabolite dihydrotestosterone (DHT) inhibits hair growth by negatively modulating growth-regulatory effects of dermal papillae, relationship between androgen metabolism and IGF-I production in dermal papillae is not fully understood. We examined whether DHT inhibits IGF-I production by inhibiting sensory neuron stimulation, thereby preventing hair growth in mice. Effect of DHT on sensory neuron stimulation was examined using cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons isolated from mice. DHT inhibits calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from cultured DRG neurons. The non-steroidal androgen-receptor antagonist flutamide reversed DHT-induced inhibition of CGRP release. Dermal levels of IGF-I and IGF-I mRNA, and the number of IGF-I-positive fibroblasts around hair follicles were increased at 6h after CGRP administration. DHT administration for 3weeks decreased dermal levels of CGRP, IGF-I, and IGF-I mRNA in mice. Immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I and the number of proliferating cells in hair follicles were decreased and hair re-growth was inhibited in animals administered DHT. Co-administration of flutamide and CGRP reversed these changes induced by DHT administration. These observations suggest that DHT may decrease IGF-I production in dermal papillae by inhibiting sensory neuron stimulation through interaction with the androgen receptor, thereby inhibiting hair growth in mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chloroform degradation in methanogenic methanol enrichment cultures and by Methanosarcina barkeri 227.

    OpenAIRE

    Bagley, D M; Gossett, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of methanol addition and consumption on chloroform degradation rate and product distribution in methanogenic methanol enrichment cultures and in cultures of Methanosarcina barkeri 227 were investigated. Degradation of chloroform with initial concentrations up to 27.3 microM in enrichment cultures and 4.8 microM in pure cultures was stimulated by the addition of methanol. However, methanol consumption was inhibited by as little as 2.5 microM chloroform in enrichment cultures and 0....

  13. [Penicillium-inhibiting yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Ahrendts, M R; Carrillo, L

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to establish the in vitro and in vivo inhibition of post-harvest pathogenic moulds by yeasts in order to make a biocontrol product. Post-harvest pathogenic moulds Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum, P. ulaiense, Phyllosticta sp., Galactomyces geotrichum and yeasts belonging to genera Brettanomyces, Candida, Cryptococcus, Kloeckera, Pichia, Rhodotorula were isolated from citrus fruits. Some yeasts strains were also isolated from other sources. The yeasts were identified by their macro and micro-morphology and physiological tests. The in vitro and in vivo activities against P. digitatum or P. ulaiense were different. Candida cantarellii and one strain of Pichia subpelliculosa produced a significant reduction of the lesion area caused by the pathogenic moulds P. digitatum and P. ulaiense, and could be used in a biocontrol product formulation.

  14. Mechanism of inhibited growth of Bacillus pumilus by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, D L; Odame-Darkwah, J K

    1994-04-01

    Physiological studies were conducted in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of inhibition of Bacillus pumilus by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. Inhibition of B. pumilus by P. shermanii occurred in media supplemented with 1% glucose, indicating that glucose utilization by the latter bacterium was not responsible for growth inhibition of the former bacterium. The medium pH in which P. shermanii inhibited the growth of B. pumilus was 4.3. Propionic acid was positively identified in the culture medium in which B. pumilus was inhibited by P. shermanii. The presence of propionic acid and a low medium pH may account for the inhibition of B. pumilus by P. shermanii. Sodium lactate concentrations of 0.8-1.0% were essential for the continuous growth of and propionic acid production by P. shermanii. Thus, use of P. shermanii to inhibit B. pumilus in foods would likely require a lactate source.

  15. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Function in Astrocytes: Implications for Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloboueva, Ludmila A.; Suh, Sang Won; Swanson, Raymond A.; Giffard, Rona G.

    2011-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that astrocytes protect neurons against ischemic injury. Although astrocytes are more resistant to some insults than neurons, few studies offer insight into the real time changes of astrocytic protective functions with stress. Mitochondria are one of the primary targets of ischemic injury in astrocytes. We investigated the time course of changes in astrocytic ATP levels, plasma membrane potential, and glutamate uptake, a key protective function, induced by mitochondrial inhibition. Our results show that significant functional change precedes reduction in astrocytic viability with mitochondrial inhibition. Using the mitochondrial inhibitor fluorocitrate (FC, 0.25 mM) that is preferentially taken by astrocytes we found that inhibition of astrocyte mitochondria increased vulnerability of co-cultured neurons to glutamate toxicity. In our studies the rates of FC-induced astrocytic mitochondrial depolarization were accelerated in mixed astrocyte/neuron cultures. We hypothesized that the more rapid mitochondrial depolarization was promoted by an additional energetic demand imposed be the co-cultured neurons. To test this hypothesis we exposed pure astrocytic cultures to 0.01 –1 mM aspartate as a metabolic load. Aspartate application accelerated the rates of FC-induced mitochondrial depolarization, and, at 1 mM, induced astrocytic death, suggesting that strong energetic demands during ischemia can compromise astrocytic function and viability. PMID:17488276

  16. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts through the Toll-like receptor 4-nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway and myoblast-derived tumor necrosis factor-α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Ono

    Full Text Available Circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS concentrations are often elevated in patients with sepsis or with various endogenous diseases that are associated with metabolic endotoxemia. Involuntary loss of skeletal muscle, termed muscle wasting, is commonly observed in these conditions, suggesting that circulating LPS might play an essential role in its development. Although impairment of muscle regeneration is an important determinant of skeletal muscle wasting, it is unclear whether LPS affects this process and, if so, by what mechanism. Here, we used the C2C12 myoblast cell line to investigate the effects of LPS on myogenesis.C2C12 myoblasts were grown to 80% confluence and induced to differentiate in the absence or presence of LPS (0.1 or 1 μg/mL; TAK-242 (1 μM, a specific inhibitor of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 signaling; and a tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α neutralizing antibody (5 μg/mL. Expression of a skeletal muscle differentiation marker (myosin heavy chain II, two essential myogenic regulatory factors (myogenin and MyoD, and a muscle negative regulatory factor (myostatin was analyzed by western blotting. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB DNA-binding activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.LPS dose-dependently and significantly decreased the formation of multinucleated myotubes and the expression of myosin heavy chain II, myogenin, and MyoD, and increased NF-κB DNA-binding activity and myostatin expression. The inhibitory effect of LPS on myogenic differentiation was reversible, suggesting that it was not caused by nonspecific toxicity. Both TAK-242 and anti-TNF-α reduced the LPS-induced increase in NF-κB DNA-binding activity, downregulation of myogenic regulatory factors, and upregulation of myostatin, thereby partially rescuing the impairment of myogenesis.Our data suggest that LPS inhibits myogenic differentiation via a TLR4-NF-κB-dependent pathway and an autocrine/paracrine TNF-α-induced pathway. These pathways

  17. Cultural Analysis - towards cross-cultural understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullestrup, Hans

    The book considers intercultural understanding and co-action, partly by means of general insight into concept of culture and the dimensions which bring about cultural differences, and partly as a methodology to analyse a certain culture - whether one's own or others'. This leads towards...... an understanding of cultural complexity and cultural differences among people. Furthermore, the book provides a discussion of a number of ethical issues, which almost invariably will arise when people meet and co-act across cultural boundaries. Cultural Analysis consists of four parts. The first part offers...... a theoretical/abstract proposal for cultural understanding. The second part presents a theoretical/abstract proposal for under-standing intercultural plurality and complexity. The third part provides an empirical model for the analysis of intercultural co-action. Finally, the fourth part present and discusses...

  18. Exploring Culture : Exercises, Stories and Synthetic Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A unique training book containing over 100 culture awareness exercises, dialogues, stories incidents and simulations that bring to life Geert Hofstede's five dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: power distance, collectivism versus individualism, femininity versus masculinity, uncertainly

  19. Revisiting cultural awareness and cultural relevancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Hashem, Naji

    2015-10-01

    Comments on the original article by Christopher et al. (see record 2014-20055-001) regarding critical cultural awareness. The more insights and exploration of the meaning and influence of culture we receive, the better. There is no single treatment of any personal or collective culture(s) that can be inherently complete or totally exhaustive. New hermeneutics and skills are always needed, appreciated, and refreshing. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Dehistoricized Cultural Identity and Cultural Othering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiguo, Qu

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that each culture has its own distinctive identity has been generally accepted in the discussion of cultural identities. Quite often identity formation is not perceived as a dynamic and interactive ongoing process that engages other cultures and involves change in its responses to different challenges at different times. I will…

  1. Cultural Understanding Through Cross-Cultural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Jean-Francois

    1986-01-01

    A college course used an explicit intercultural approach and collective research activities to compare French and American cultures and to examine the reasons for cultural attitudes and culture conflict. Class assignments dealt with contrastive analyses of American and French institutions like advertising, cinema, feminism, etc. (MSE)

  2. Microalgal Culture Collection Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Milford Microalgal culture Collection holds over 200 live cultures representing 13 classes of of algae. The cultures are maintained in three different growing...

  3. Urethral discharge culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genital exudate culture; Culture - genital discharge or exudate; Urethritis - culture ... Augenbraun MH, McCormack WM. Urethritis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. ...

  4. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... Normal values depend on the test being performed. Normal results are reported as "no growth" and are a sign ...

  5. Organizations, projects and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Cleeff; Pieter van Nispen tot Pannerden

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: to explore and demonstrate the effects of organizational culture on projects, in particular project culture and project management style. Methodology/approach: descriptive and explorative; through students’ groups. Findings: the cultural relationship between organizations, their projects

  6. Lymph node culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - lymph node ... or viruses grow. This process is called a culture. Sometimes, special stains are also used to identify specific cells or microorganisms before culture results are available. If needle aspiration does not ...

  7. Routine sputum culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, ... . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:409- ...

  8. Cross-cultural awareness

    OpenAIRE

    БУРЯК Н.Ю.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the importance of cultural awareness for businesspeople when they go abroad. It also gives some cultural advice and factors which are thought to be the most important in creating a culture.

  9. Developing cultural sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruddock, Heidi; Turner, deSalle

    2007-01-01

    Title. Developing cultural sensitivity: nursing students’ experiences of a study abroad programme Aim. This paper is a report of a study to explore whether having an international learning experience as part of a nursing education programme promoted cultural sensitivity in nursing students....... Background. Many countries are becoming culturally diverse, but healthcare systems and nursing education often remain mono-cultural and focused on the norms and needs of the majority culture. To meet the needs of all members of multicultural societies, nurses need to develop cultural sensitivity...... on the deliver of culturally sensitive care. Keywords: cultural sensitivity, nursing students, empirical research, report, interviews, study abroad programmes, phenomenology...

  10. Inhibition of the Rumen Ciliate Entodinium caudatum by Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansol Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Axenic cultures of free-living aerobic ciliates, such as Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium aurelia, have been established and routinely used in laboratory research, greatly facilitating, or enabling characterization of their metabolism, physiology, and ecology. Ruminal protozoa are anaerobic ciliates, and they play important roles in feed digestion and fermentation. Although, repeatedly attempted, no laboratory-maintainable axenic culture of ruminal ciliates has been established. When axenic ciliate cultures are developed, antibiotics are required to eliminate the accompanying bacteria. Ruminal ciliates gradually lose viability upon antibiotic treatments, and the resultant axenic cultures can only last for short periods of time. The objective of this study was to evaluate eight antibiotics that have been evaluated in developing axenic cultures of ruminal ciliates, for their toxicity to Entodinium caudatum, which is the most predominant ruminal ciliate species. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM showed that the antibiotics damaged both the cell surface and nuclei of E. caudatum and increased accumulation of intracellular glycogen. Combinations of the three least toxic antibiotics failed to eliminate the bacteria that are present in the E. caudatum culture. The combination of ampicillin, carbenicillin, streptomycin, and oxytetracycline was able to eliminate all the bacteria, but the resultant axenic E. caudatum culture gradually lost viability. Adding the bacterial fraction (live separated from an untreated E. caudatum culture reversed the viability decline and recovered the growth of the treated E. caudatum culture, whereas feeding nine strains of live bacteria isolated from E. caudatum cells, either individually or in combination, could not. Nutritional and metabolic dependence on its associated bacteria, accompanied with direct and indirect inhibition by antibiotics, makes it difficult to establish an axenic culture of E

  11. Safeguards Culture: Analogies from Safety Culture and Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, K.

    2013-01-01

    The terminology of 'safeguards culture' has been used loosely by safeguards experts as an essential element for establishing an organizational environment of stakeholders for the effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards. However, unlike the other two triplet brothers/ sisters of 3S's (Safety, Security, Safeguards), there is no formally established definition of safeguards culture. In the case of safety culture, INSAG (the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group) has extensively dealt with its concept, elaborating its definition and key characteristics, and published its report, INSAG-4, as the IAEA Safety Series 75. On the other hand, security culture has also been defined by AdSec (the Advisory Group on Nuclear Security). In this paper, a provisional definition of safeguards culture is made on the analogies of safety culture and security culture, and an effort is made to describe essential elements of safeguards culture. It is proposed for SAGSI (the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation) to formally consider the definition of safeguards culture and its characteristics. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (author)

  12. FROM CULTURAL IMPOTENCE TO CULTURAL AMPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Владимирович Суханов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural space of any state is formed by a population that is within its borders. In this article, the author introduces a new cultural definitions «cultural impotence» and «cultural amputation», justifying their use, both in terms of population of the Russian Federation and the European Union and America. The article analyzes the state of society and the cultural factors that influence the development of society in Russia, there are options to bring the country out of a deep cultural crisis. Also established a close relationship between the domestic policy of the state and development of culture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-1

  13. Phosphatidic acid inhibits ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated macrophage migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Presa, Natalia; Simón, Jorge; Trueba, Miguel; Gangoiti, Patricia; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2014-12-15

    Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) was recently demonstrated to potently induce cell migration. This action could only be observed when C1P was applied exogenously to cells in culture, and was inhibited by pertussis toxin. However, the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly understood. In this work, we found that phosphatidic acid (PA), which is structurally related to C1P, displaced radiolabeled C1P from its membrane-binding site and inhibited C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. This effect was independent of the saturated fatty acid chain length or the presence of a double bond in each of the fatty acyl chains of PA. Treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with exogenous phospholipase D (PLD), an enzyme that produces PA from membrane phospholipids, also inhibited C1P-stimulated cell migration. Likewise, PA or exogenous PLD inhibited C1P-stimulated extracellularly regulated kinases (ERK) 1 and 2 phosphorylation, leading to inhibition of cell migration. However, PA did not inhibit C1P-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. It is concluded that PA is a physiological regulator of C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. These actions of PA may have important implications in the control of pathophysiological functions that are regulated by C1P, including inflammation and various cellular processes associated with cell migration such as organogenesis or tumor metastasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. T-cell activation. VI. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibodies in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röpke, M; Röpke, C; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1993-01-01

    Murine T splenocytes stimulated in primary allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) were incubated with soluble anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies induced inhibition in the cytotoxicity of the responding population and this inhibition...

  15. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show that sideroc......Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show...... findings are consistent with an important role for siderocalin in protection against M.tb infection and suggest that exogenously administered siderocalin may have therapeutic applications in tuberculosis....

  16. Growth inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Bech Hansen, T.; Garrido, P.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: This study elucidates the mechanisms by which a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola inhibits growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Methods and Results: Listeria monocytogenes was exposed to live cultures of a bacteriocin-negative variant of C. piscicola A9b in co-culture, in a diffusion...... chamber system, and to a cell-free supernatant. Suppression of maximum cell density (0-3.5 log units) of L. monocytogenes was proportional to initial levels of C. pisciola (10(3)-10(7) CFU ml(-1)). Cell-to-cell contact was not required to cause inhibition. The cell-free C. piscicola supernatant caused...... a decrease in L. monocytogenes maximum cell density, which was abolished by glucose addition but not by amino acid, vitamin or mineral addition. The fermentate also gave rise to a longer lag phase and a reduction in growth rate. These effects were independent of glucose and may have been caused by acetate...

  17. Creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship across cultures theory and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Carayannis, Elias

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this volume is to further develop the relationship between culture and manifold phenomena of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship in order to promote further and better understanding how, why, and when these phenomena are manifested themselves across different cultures.   Currently, cross-cultural research is one of the most dynamically and rapidly growing areas. At the same time, creativity, inventiveness, innovation, and entrepreneurship are championed in the literature as the critical element that is vital not just for companies, but also for the development of societies. A sizable body of research demonstrates that cultural differences may foster or inhibit creative, inventive, innovative and entrepreneurial activities; and each culture has its own strengths and weaknesses in these regards.  Better understanding of cultural diversity in these phenomena can help to build on strengths and overcome weaknesses.   Cross-cultural studies in this field represent a comparatively new class of ...

  18. The genotoxicity of sodium arsenite in human lymphocyte culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhabit, O.H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Sodium arsenite was tested for its clastogenic effect alone and in combination with x-irradiation on whole blood culture and on isolated lymphocyte culture. The results showed a significant difference in the yield of aberrations induced with respect to the culture time 48 hr whole blood culture showed significant increase in gaps and breaks whereas isolated lymphocytes culture showed significant inhibition of cell cycle and 75% of the lymphocytes were in first cell cycle at 72 hr. Arsenite showed co-mutagenicity with different doses of x-ray delivered immediately or few hours after treatment of the culture with SA. The results suggest that SA also is mutagenic at the dose level used and provide support for the indispensability of whole blood culture for evaluation of the in vivo effect any suspected mutagen. Using isolated lymphocytes appear to have problems leading to extensive cell cycle delay

  19. Factors that Inhibit Globally Distributed Software Development Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Deanna House

    2013-01-01

    Globally distributed teams can frequently have problems specifically related to the distance and differences among team members. This paper synthesizes literature related to globally distributed software development teams to find the factors that inhibit team success. This research indicates that cultural differences, trust, communication, shared mental models, temporal agility, and work transitions can all cause problems on globally distributed software development teams. This research ca...

  20. Madecassoside Inhibits Melanin Synthesis by Blocking Ultraviolet-Induced Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Eunsun Jung; Jung-A Lee; Seoungwoo Shin; Kyung-Baeg Roh; Jang-Hyun Kim; Deokhoon Park

    2013-01-01

    Madecassoside (MA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from Centella asitica (L.), is used as a therapeutic agent in wound healing and also as an anti-inflammatory and anti-aging agent. However, the involvement of MA in skin-pigmentation has not been reported. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of MA on ultraviolet (UV)-induced melanogenesis and mechanisms in a co-culture system of keratinocytes and melanocytes. MA significantly inhibited UVR-induced melanin synthesis and mel...

  1. Applications Research of Microbial Ecological Preparation in Sea Cucumber Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiahui; Wang, Guangyu

    2017-12-01

    At present, micro ecological preparation is widely applied in aquaculture with good effect. The application of micro ecological preparation in sea cucumber culture can effectively improve the economic benefits. The micro ecological preparation can play the role of inhibiting harmful bacteria, purifying water quality and saving culture cost in the process of sea cucumber culture. We should select appropriate bacteria, guarantee stable environment and use with long-term in the applications of microbial ecological preparation in sea cucumber culture to obtain good effects.

  2. Aluminum Trichloride Inhibits the Rat Osteoblasts Mineralization In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Miao; Huo, Hui; Cao, Zheng; Han, Yanfei; Gao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is an accumulative toxic metal. Excessive Al accumulation inhibits osteoblasts mineralization and induces osteoporosis. However, the inhibition mechanism of Al on the mineralization is not fully understood. Thus, in this study, the rat osteoblasts were cultured and exposed to 0 mmol L -1 (control group, CG) and 0.52 mmol L -1 aluminum trichloride (AlCl 3 , treatment group, TG) for 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. We found that mineralized matrix nodules, the activity of bone alkaline phosphatase, the concentration of extracellular calcium, the mRNA expression of type-I collagen, the mRNA and protein expressions of osteopontin, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein were all decreased, while the concentration of extracellular phosphorus was increased in TG compared with CG with time prolonged. Taken together, these results indicated that AlCl 3 inhibited osteoblasts mineralization in vitro.

  3. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    that siderocalin expression is upregulated following M.tb infection of mouse macrophage cell lines and primary murine alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, siderocalin added exogenously as a recombinant protein or overexpressed in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line inhibited the intracellular growth of the pathogen......Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show....... A variant form of siderocalin, which is expressed only in the macrophage cytosol, inhibited intracellular M.tb growth as effectively as the normal, secreted form, an observation that provides mechanistic insight into how siderocalin might influence iron acquisition by the bacteria in the phagosome. Our...

  4. Inhibition of the mixed leukocyte reaction by alloantisera in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonker, M.; Leeuwen, A. van; Rood, J.J. van

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of MLC(mixed leukocyte culture)-inhibiting antibodies was determined in 42 pregnancy sera. MLC's were carried out between the cells from the serum donor and her husband in the presence of nonimmune AB serum and the test serum. Fifty per cent of the sera reduced the MLC response to less than 40% of the control values. Only four sera had lymphocytotoxic activity. The inhibition was strong against the specific immunizor, less strong against random unrelated cells and weak against cells which were SD(serologically defined)-identical with the serum donor. Absorptions with lymphocytes and platelets were carried out. Lymphocytes removed activity in three of the four sera tested. Platelets removed activity from one serum. It was concluded that both anti-LD(lymphocyte defined) and anti-SD antibodies were able to inhibit the MLR (mixed leukocyte reaction) at the stimulator cell level. (author)

  5. Many Forms of Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam B.

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists interested in culture have focused primarily on East-West differences in individualism-collectivism, or independent-interdependent self-construal. As important as this dimension is, there are many other forms of culture with many dimensions of cultural variability. Selecting from among the many understudied cultures in psychology,…

  6. HPT: The Culture Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Roger M.; Wittkuhn, Klaus D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the challenges in managing performance across national cultures and within changing corporate cultures. Describes two human performance technology tools that can help performance consultants understand different cultures and provide the basis for successful management action: the culture audit and the systems model that can be adapted…

  7. Journal of Cultural Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Cultural Studies was established in 1999 as an independent tool for research development in Africa. It is published by the Nigerian Group for the Study of African Cultures (NIGSAC), a non-profit organisation which focuses on cultural and development issues in Africa. The journal aims to explore the varied socio-cultural ...

  8. Reflections on Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lisette

    1999-01-01

    Examines aspects of cross-cultural studies, delineates a concept of culture, explores the interplay of culture and ethics, and analyzes the shifting cultural and economic values as issues that either the economists or the humanists will deal with under the banner of the future global village. (Author/VWL)

  9. Aging in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Helene H

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the empirical studies that test socioemotional aging across cultures. The review focuses on comparisons between Western (mostly North Americans and Germans) and Eastern cultures (mostly Chinese) in areas including age-related personality, social relationships, and cognition. Based on the review, I argue that aging is a meaning-making process. Individuals from each cultural context internalize cultural values with age. These internalized cultural values become goals that guide adult development. When individuals from different cultures each pursue their own goals with age, cultural differences in socioemotional aging occur.

  10. Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia species, inhibits adrenergic contraction of human prostate strips and induces stromal cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Herrmann

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Honokiol inhibits smooth muscle contraction in the human prostate, and induces cell death in cultured stromal cells. Because prostate smooth muscle tone and prostate growth may cause LUTS, it appears possible that honokiol improves voiding symptoms.

  11. Rho kinase inhibitors block melanoma cell migration and inhibit metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadok, Amine; McCarthy, Afshan; Caldwell, John; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D; Yeo, Maggie; Hooper, Steven; Sahai, Erik; Kuemper, Sandra; Mardakheh, Faraz K; Marshall, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new therapeutic opportunities for metastatic melanoma. Fragment-based screening has led to the discovery of orally available, ATP-competitive AKT kinase inhibitors, AT13148 and CCT129254. These compounds also inhibit the Rho-kinases ROCK 1 and ROCK 2 and we show they potently inhibit ROCK activity in melanoma cells in culture and in vivo. Treatment of melanoma cells with CCT129254 or AT13148 dramatically reduces cell invasion, impairing both "amoeboid-like" and mesenchymal-like modes of invasion in culture. Intravital imaging shows that CCT129254 or AT13148 treatment reduces the motility of melanoma cells in vivo. CCT129254 inhibits melanoma metastasis when administered 2 days after orthotopic intradermal injection of the cells, or when treatment starts after metastases have arisen. Mechanistically, our data suggest that inhibition of ROCK reduces the ability of melanoma cells to efficiently colonize the lungs. These results suggest that these novel inhibitors of ROCK may be beneficial in the treatment of metastasis. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. PDGF-BB inhibits intervertebral disc cell apoptosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presciutti, Steven M; Paglia, David N; Karukonda, Teja; Soung, Do Yu; Guzzo, Rosa; Drissi, Hicham; Moss, Isaac L

    2014-09-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) results in deterioration of the spinal motion segment and can lead to debilitating back pain. Given the established mitotic and anti-apoptotic effects of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB) in a variety of cell types we postulated that rhPDGF-BB might delay disc cell degeneration through inhibition of apoptosis. To address this hypothesis, we treated human IVD cells isolated from five independent patients with rhPDGF-BB in monolayer and 3D pellet cultures. The anti-apoptotic potential, cell proliferative capacity, morphology/pellet differentiation, and gene expression of PDGF-treated IVD cells were evaluated via flow cytometry/immunohistochemistry, MTT assays, histology, and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. We found that rhPDGF-BB treatment significantly inhibited cell apoptosis, increased cell proliferation and matrix production, and maintained mRNA expression of critical extracellular matrix genes. This study suggests two possible mechanisms for the anti-degenerative effects of rhPDGF-BB on human IVD cells. First, PDGF treatment strongly inhibited IVD cell apoptosis in 3D cultures. Second, rhPDGF-BB acts as an anabolic agent, promoting maintenance of IVD cell phenotype in 3D culture, based on the molecular and protein expression analysis. We speculate that rhPDGF-BB may be used as a biologic treatment to target early degenerative IVD disease in the future. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ammonium inhibition of nitrogenase activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, H.; Burris, R.H. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1989-06-01

    The effect of oxygen, ammonium ion, and amino acids on nitrogenase activity in the root-associated N{sub 2}-fixing bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae was investigated in comparison with Azospirillum spp. and Rhodospirillum rubrum. H. seropedicae is microaerophilic, and its optimal dissolved oxygen level is from 0.04 to 0.2 kPa for dinitrogen fixation but higher when it is supplied with fixed nitrogen. No nitrogenase activity was detected when the dissolved O{sub 2} level corresponded to 4.0 kPa. Ammonium, a product of the nitrogenase reaction, reversible inhibited nitrogenase activity when added to derepressed cell cultures. However, the inhibition of nitrogenase activity was only partial even with concentrations of ammonium chloride as high as 20 mM. Amides such as glutamine and asparagine partially inhibited nitrogenase activity, but glutamate did not. Nitrogenase in crude extracts prepared from ammonium-inhibited cells showed activity as high as in extracts from N{sub 2}-fixing cells. The pattern of the dinitrogenase and the dinitrogenase reductase revealed by the immunoblotting technique did not change upon ammonium chloride treatment of cells in vivo. No homologous sequences were detected with the draT-draG probe from Azospirillum lipoferum. There is no clear evidence that ADP-ribosylation of the dinitrogenase reductase is involved in the ammonium inhibition of H. seropedicae. The uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone decreased the intracellular ATP concentration and inhibited the nitrogenase activity of whole cells. The ATP pool was significantly disturbed when cultures were treated with ammonium in vivo.

  14. Conceptualizing cultures of violence and cultural change

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, J. Carter

    2007-01-01

    The historiography of violence has undergone a distinct cultural turn as attention has shifted from examining violence as a clearly defined (and countable) social problem to analysing its historically defined 'social meaning'. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the relationship between 'violence' and 'culture' is still being established. How are 'cultures of violence' formed? What impact do they have on violent behaviour? How do they change? This essay examines some of the conceptual aspects...

  15. The induction of cellular senescence in dental follicle cells inhibits the osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Gresser, Jan; Ettl, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Dental stem cells such as human dental follicle cells (DFCs) have opened new promising treatment alternatives for today's dental health issues such as periodontal tissue regeneration. However, cellular senescence represents a restricting factor to cultured stem cells, resulting in limited lifespan and reduced cell differentiation potential. Therefore, this study evaluated if and how DFCs exhibit features of cellular senescence after being expanded in cell culture. The cell proliferation of DFCs decreased, while the cell size increased during prolonged cell culture. Moreover, DFCs expressed the senescence-associated β-galactosidase after a prolonged cell culture. The onset of senescence inhibited both the induction of osteoblast markers RUNX2 and osteopontin and the biomineralization of DFCs after stimulation of the osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, we showed that a prolonged cell culture induces cellular senescence and inhibits the osteogenic differentiation in DFCs.

  16. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse...... and, perhaps, unfamiliar intellectual traditions, perspectives and concerns, the symposium will demonstrate how local knowledge of problems enables researchers and practitioners to better understand the dynamics of cultural diversity within the topic of athlete career development and assistance....

  17. Organizational Culture and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A. Martinez; Nancy Beaulieu; Robert Gibbons; Peter Pronovost; Thomas Wang

    2015-01-01

    Organizations are all around us. Culture is trickier—to analyze and even to see. We consider both the effect of management on culture and the effect of culture on performance. We begin by describing an intervention that dramatically improved outcomes and conspicuously included a culture-change component. We then use details from this intervention to describe potential empirical analyses of the association between organizational culture and performance in this and similar settings. Finally, we...

  18. Interspecies competition and inhibition within the oral microbial flora: environmental factors influence the inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by Streptococcus oligofermentans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Ligeng; Wu, Fei; Chu, Lei; Liu, Xinxin; Xia, Keke; Wang, Yinghui

    2012-06-01

    Dental caries is a bacterial infectious disease. Streptococcus mutans is the primary pathogen that causes dental caries. Streptococcus oligofermentans is a new oral streptococcal species that can inhibit the growth of S. mutans specifically. The study aimed to assess the inhibition of S. mutans by S. oligofermentans under different oral environmental conditions. The inhibition under different carbohydrate and oxygen conditions was investigated in vitro using an interspecies interaction assay. The 4-aminoantipyine (4-ATTP) method was used to measure the yield and the initial production rate of H(2) O(2) in S. oligofermentans. The inhibitory effect was enhanced when the bacteria were cultured with carbohydrates and under aerobic conditions, or when S. oligofermentans was inoculated earlier than S. mutans. The initial synthesis rates of H(2) O(2) by S. oligofermentans were higher in the presence of carbohydrates and in aerobic culture conditions. In terms of the total H(2) O(2) yield, the effect of the environmental conditions was as follows: no carbohydrates > sucrose> glucose, and aerobic conditions > anaerobic conditions. We conclude that the presence of carbohydrate and oxygen significantly affect the ability of S. oligofermentans to inhibit the growth of S. mutans. The difference in inhibitory effect may be attributed to changes in the capacity of S. oligofermentans to produce H(2) O(2) . © 2012 Eur J Oral Sci.

  19. Selective inhibition of distracting input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, MaryAnn P; Crittenden, Ben M; Jensen, Ole; Stokes, Mark G

    2017-10-16

    We review a series of studies exploring distractor suppression. It is often assumed that preparatory distractor suppression is controlled via top-down mechanisms of attention akin to those that prepare brain areas for target enhancement. Here, we consider two alternative mechanisms: secondary inhibition and expectation suppression within a predictive coding framework. We draw on behavioural studies, evidence from neuroimaging and some animal studies. We conclude that there is very limited evidence for selective top-down control of preparatory inhibition. By contrast, we argue that distractor suppression often relies secondary inhibition of non-target items (relatively non-selective inhibition) and on statistical regularities of the environment, learned through direct experience. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Concepts of inhibition in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auroux, Y; Bourrat, M M; Brun, J P

    1978-01-01

    Following a historical approach, the authors first describe the original development of the concept of inhibition in neurophysiology and then analyze the subsequent adaptations made in psychiatry around such concept including those of: -- Pavlov, Hull, Watson and the behaviorists, -- Freud and the Freudian School, -- clinicians and psychopharmacologists. The concept of inhibition has thus various meanings in psychiatry. Although some unity is achieved on the semiological level, this aspect cannot explain the extent of the process.

  1. Family, alcohol, and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, L A

    1989-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s a small but rich tradition of anthropological and sociological studies of family culture, cultural context, and alcohol has developed. Ideally, ethnographic analysis of a cultural group and in-depth holistic examination of family process are incorporated in such research. In conducting family, culture, and alcohol investigations, researchers are encouraged to reexamine some conceptual assumptions: (1) their working definition of culture; (2) their relative emphasis on family culture or cultural context; (3) their attention to socialization as an active process in the transmission of culture within and across generations; and (4) their adoption of a holistic and cross-generational perspective. To apply this line of research to preventive and intervention strategies, two questions are especially relevant: Why are particular alcohol traditions established and maintained within families? What incentives and constraints from the family's cultural context help create, preserve, and/or terminate particular drinking practices?

  2. Cultural Literacy: Negotiating Language, Culture, and Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ellen Riojas; Flores, Belinda Bustos

    2007-01-01

    Our schools see increasing numbers of students who reflect the wide diversity of this country's population, but too often these differences--culture, language, socioeconomic backgrounds, ethnicity are viewed from negative or deficit perspectives when they are, in fact, the cultural capital that enriches discussion, broadens viewpoints, and…

  3. What Is so "Cultural" About Cultural Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Albinsson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The term “cultural entrepreneurship” has been increasingly used during the new millennium, mirroring the rapidly growing importance of the “quaternary sector of the economy,” i.e. knowledge-based industries, including culture. Exploration of the literature in which the term “cultural entrepreneurship” is used does not bring a solid, clear-cut, and unambiguous understanding of its definition or meaning. The aim of this paper is to present various uses of the concept and to bring about some clarity in how the concept can be understood. Two overarching uses of the cultural entrepreneurship concept have been found: 1. the anthropologist’s and institutional economist’s use, which indicates the dynamic development of intangible cultural features such as symbols, myths, languages, beliefs, values, norms, rituals, and attitudes in and between societies, and 2. the arts development use, which indicates the dynamic development of cultural services, tangible goods, and individual or collective career promotion. Most authors use a cultural entrepreneurship concept without defining it. Authors could apply more precise definitions by using a quadruple bottom-line framework to position themselves in the nexus of financial, social, artistic, and cultural perspectives.

  4. Cultural commodity chains, cultural clusters, or cultural production chains?

    OpenAIRE

    Andy C. Pratt

    2008-01-01

    The paper begins with a discussion of the definition of cultural industries. The paper's three main themes are concerned with, first: 1) a contestation of the generic application of the global commodity chain concept, 2) the need for a unique focus on cultural industries associated with the particular nature of its production process, and 3) the role of embedded judgments of quality is an integral part of this process. Second, the paper suggests that a restyled focus on production chains (inv...

  5. Robotic art, culture and cultural imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romic, Bojana

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years there has been an ongoing debate about the notion and (possible) function of robotic culture; with the development of the new generation of drones, as well as the advancement in social and health robotics, questions about robot culture seem to open a variety of discussions...... – beginning with the inquiry of how can we grasp the notion of culture, as an umbrella term for the range of habitual and technological practices, in relation to equally heterogeneous field of robotics. This article aims to accentuate the importance of cultural imagination of robots in situating the robotic...... research, observing it 'as a mixed register of fantasy and an actual practice' (Kakoudaki, 2007). The emphasis will be put on the robotic art which, I argue, is in the fluid state of exchange with other areas of robotic research, equally benefiting from the larger context of cultural imagination of robots...

  6. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Inhibits Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang W. Bachtiar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2, synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  7. Inhibition of growth of Trichophyton tonsurans by Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J; Mauch, A; Galle, S; Murphy, P; Arendt, E K; Coffey, A

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were to identify antifungal lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and characterize their activity against the dermatophyte Trichophyton tonsurans. A total of 165 different LAB were isolated and initially screened for anti-Penicillium expansum activity. Five strains, which exhibited strong inhibitory activity, were then tested against the dermatophyte T. tonsurans DSM12285, where they also caused inhibition as observed by large fungal clearing on agar surface. The strongest inhibition was seen with Lactobacillus reuteri R2. When freeze-dried cell-free supernatant powder from this strain was incorporated in culture medium at concentrations >1%, growth of fungal colony was inhibited. Conidia germination was also inhibited under these conditions as determined by microscopy. The anti-T. tonsurans activity of Lact. reuteri R2 was not affected neither by heat treatment nor by proteolytic treatment using pronase E and proteinase K, indicating that the responsible agent(s) were nonproteinaceous in nature. Lactobacillus reuteri R2 was identified as having strong inhibitory activity against the dermatophyte T. tonsurans DSMZ12285. LAB are naturally associated with many foods and are well recognized for their biopreservative properties. The use of these and/or their products may well provide alternative safe approaches for the inhibition of dermatophytic fungi. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. IGF-1 receptor inhibition by picropodophyllin in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Nelon, Laura D.; Keller, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Igf1r is overexpressed and activated in a Sonic Hedgehog driven model of medulloblastoma. → Picropodophyllin targets and abrogates IGF signaling in medulloblastoma. → Picropodophyllin inhibits medulloblastoma tumor cell growth by induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (Igf1r) is a multifunctional membrane-associated tyrosine kinase associated with regulation of transformation, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Increased IGF pathway activity has been reported in human and murine medulloblastoma. Tumors from our genetically-engineered medulloblastoma mouse model over-express Igf1r, and thus this mouse model is a good platform with which to study the role of Igf1r in tumor progression. We hypothesize that inhibition of IGF pathway in medulloblastoma can slow or inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. To test our hypothesis, we tested the role of IGF in tumor growth in vitro by treatment with the tyrosine kinase small molecule inhibitor, picropodophyllin (PPP), which strongly inhibits the IGF pathway. Our results demonstrate that PPP-mediated downregulation of the IGF pathway inhibits mouse tumor cell growth and induces apoptotic cell death in vitro in primary medulloblastoma cultures that are most reflective of tumor cell behavior in vivo.

  9. Combined PDGFR and HDAC Inhibition Overcomes PTEN Disruption in Chordoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hee Lee

    Full Text Available The majority of chordomas show activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR. Based on in vitro intertumoral variation in response to recombinant PDGF protein and PDGFR inhibition, and variable tumor response to imatinib, we hypothesized that chordomas resistant to PDGFR inhibition may possess downstream activation of the pathway.Molecular profiling was performed on 23 consecutive chordoma primary tissue specimens. Primary cultures established from 20 of the 23 specimens, and chordoma cell lines, UCH-1 and UCH-2, were used for in vitro experiments.Loss of heterozygosity (LOH at the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN locus was observed in 6 specimens (26%. PTEN disruption statistically correlated with increased Ki-67 proliferation index, an established marker of poor outcome for chordoma. Compared to wild type, PTEN deficient chordomas displayed increased proliferative rate, and responded less favorably to PDGFR inhibition. PTEN gene restoration abrogated this growth advantage. Chordomas are characterized by intratumoral hypoxia and local invasion, and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors are capable of attenuating both hypoxic signaling and cell migration. The combination of PDGFR and HDAC inhibition effectively disrupted growth and invasion of PTEN deficient chordoma cells.Loss of heterozygosity of the PTEN gene seen in a subset of chordomas is associated with aggressive in vitro behavior and strongly correlates with increased Ki-67 proliferative index. Combined inhibition of PDGFR and HDAC attenuates proliferation and invasion in chordoma cells deficient for PTEN.

  10. Combined PDGFR and HDAC Inhibition Overcomes PTEN Disruption in Chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Zhang, Ying; Kassam, Amin B; Park, Myung-Jin; Gardner, Paul; Prevedello, Daniel; Henry, Stephanie; Horbinski, Craig; Beumer, Jan H; Tawbi, Hussein; Williams, Brian J; Shaffrey, Mark E; Egorin, Merrill J; Abounader, Roger; Park, Deric M

    2015-01-01

    The majority of chordomas show activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR). Based on in vitro intertumoral variation in response to recombinant PDGF protein and PDGFR inhibition, and variable tumor response to imatinib, we hypothesized that chordomas resistant to PDGFR inhibition may possess downstream activation of the pathway. Molecular profiling was performed on 23 consecutive chordoma primary tissue specimens. Primary cultures established from 20 of the 23 specimens, and chordoma cell lines, UCH-1 and UCH-2, were used for in vitro experiments. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) locus was observed in 6 specimens (26%). PTEN disruption statistically correlated with increased Ki-67 proliferation index, an established marker of poor outcome for chordoma. Compared to wild type, PTEN deficient chordomas displayed increased proliferative rate, and responded less favorably to PDGFR inhibition. PTEN gene restoration abrogated this growth advantage. Chordomas are characterized by intratumoral hypoxia and local invasion, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are capable of attenuating both hypoxic signaling and cell migration. The combination of PDGFR and HDAC inhibition effectively disrupted growth and invasion of PTEN deficient chordoma cells. Loss of heterozygosity of the PTEN gene seen in a subset of chordomas is associated with aggressive in vitro behavior and strongly correlates with increased Ki-67 proliferative index. Combined inhibition of PDGFR and HDAC attenuates proliferation and invasion in chordoma cells deficient for PTEN.

  11. Culture Wars in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In the 1960s high and low culture were brought into sharp conflict i Denmark. In 1961 a Ministry of Culture was established for the first time. The first minister of culture, the social democrat Julius Bomholt, saw art and culture as an important part of education for democracy that should be made...... available to everyone. The general public, however, raised demands for more popular and relaxing entertainment. The confrontation between the cultural elite and popular opinion escalated to a series of veritable culture wars....

  12. Culture as Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    A collection of essays 2011-2014 By following, and reproducing, the cultural turn, the rhetoric of cultural mix and hybridism is disseminated today primarily in its crossing of trade barriers. Cultures reduced to their exchange value function as capital - an accumulative, speculative and, ultimat......A collection of essays 2011-2014 By following, and reproducing, the cultural turn, the rhetoric of cultural mix and hybridism is disseminated today primarily in its crossing of trade barriers. Cultures reduced to their exchange value function as capital - an accumulative, speculative and...

  13. Mechanisms of caffeine-induced inhibition of UVB carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan H Conney

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sunlight-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the United States with more than 2 million cases per year. Several studies have shown an inhibitory effect of caffeine administration on UVB-induced skin cancer in mice, and these studies are paralleled by epidemiology studies that indicate an inhibitory effect of coffee drinking on nonmelanoma skin cancer in humans. Strikingly, decaffeinated coffee consumption had no such inhibitory effect.Mechanism studies indicate that caffeine has a sunscreen effect that inhibits UVB-induced formation of thymine dimers and sunburn lesions in the epidermis of mice. In addition, caffeine administration has a biological effect that enhances UVB-induced apoptosis thereby enhancing the elimination of damaged precancerous cells, and caffeine administration also enhances apoptosis in tumors. Caffeine administration enhances UVB-induced apoptosis by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Exploration of the p53-independent effect indicated that caffeine administration enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the UVB-induced increase in ATR-mediated formation of phospho-Chk1 (Ser345 and abolishing the UVB-induced decrease in cyclin B1 which resulted in caffeine-induced premature and lethal mitosis in mouse skin. In studies with cultured primary human keratinocytes, inhibition of ATR with siRNA against ATR inhibited Chk1 phosphorylation and enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis. Transgenic mice with decreased epidermal ATR function that were irradiated chronically with UVB had 69% fewer tumors at the end of the study compared with irradiated littermate controls with normal ATR function. These results, which indicate that genetic inhibition of ATR (like pharmacologic inhibition of ATR via caffeine inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis and supports the concept that ATR-mediated phosphorylation of Chk1 is an important target for caffeine’s inhibitory effect on UVB-induced carcinogenesis.

  14. Comparison of Acute Toxicity of Algal Metabolites Using Bioluminescence Inhibition Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansa Jeswani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are reported to degrade hazardous compounds. However, algae, especially cyanobacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites which may be toxic to flora, fauna and human beings. The aim of this study was selection of an appropriate algal culture for biological treatment of biomass gasification wastewater based on acute toxicity considerations. The three algae that were selected were Spirulina sp., Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium. Acute toxicity of the metabolites produced by these algal cultures was tested at the end of log phase using the standard bioluminescence inhibition assay based on Vibrio fischeri NRRLB 11174. Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium dominated by cyanobacteria such as Phormidium, Chroococcus and Oscillatoria did not release much toxic metabolites at the end of log phase and caused only about 20% inhibition in bioluminescence. In comparison, Spirulina sp. released toxic metabolites and caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition at 3/5 times dilution of the culture supernatant (EC50.

  15. Culture Media and Individual Hosts Affect the Recovery of Culturable Bacterial Diversity from Amphibian Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Daniel; Walke, Jenifer B; Gajewski, Zachary; Becker, Matthew H; Swartwout, Meredith C; Belden, Lisa K

    2017-01-01

    One current challenge in microbial ecology is elucidating the functional roles of the large diversity of free-living and host-associated bacteria identified by culture-independent molecular methods. Importantly, the characterization of this immense bacterial diversity will likely require merging data from culture-independent approaches with work on bacterial isolates in culture. Amphibian skin bacterial communities have become a recent focus of work in host-associated microbial systems due to the potential role of these skin bacteria in host defense against the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which is associated with global amphibian population declines and extinctions. As there is evidence that some skin bacteria may inhibit growth of Bd and prevent infection in some cases, there is interest in using these bacteria as probiotic therapy for conservation of at-risk amphibians. In this study, we used skin swabs from American toads ( Anaxyrus americanus ) to: (1) assess the diversity and community structure of culturable amphibian skin bacteria grown on high and low nutrient culture media, (2) determine which culture media recover the highest proportion of the total skin bacterial community of individual toads relative to culture-independent data, and (3) assess whether the plated communities from the distinct media types vary in their ability to inhibit Bd growth in in-vitro assays. Overall, we found that culture media with low nutrient concentrations facilitated the growth of more diverse bacterial taxa and grew distinct communities relative to media with higher nutrient concentrations. Use of low nutrient media also resulted in culturing proportionally more of the bacterial diversity on individual toads relative to the overall community defined using culture-independent methods. However, while there were differences in diversity among media types, the variation among individual hosts was greater than variation among media types, suggesting

  16. Bile canalicular dynamics in hepatocyte sandwich cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Raymond; Karlsson, Johan; Günther, Georgia; Beattie, Lynette; Wrangborg, David; Hammad, Seddik; Begher-Tibbe, Brigitte; Vartak, Amruta; Melega, Simone; Kaye, Paul M; Hengstler, Jan G; Jirstrand, Mats

    2015-10-01

    Many substances are hepatotoxic due to their ability to cause intrahepatic cholestasis. Therefore, there is a high demand for in vitro systems for the identification of cholestatic properties of new compounds. Primary hepatocytes cultivated in collagen sandwich cultures are known to establish bile canaliculi which enclose secreted biliary components. Cholestatic compounds are mainly known to inhibit bile excretion dynamics, but may also alter canalicular volume, or hepatocellular morphology. So far, techniques to assess time-resolved morphological changes of bile canaliculi in sandwich cultures are not available. In this study, we developed an automated system that quantifies dynamics of bile canaliculi recorded in conventional time-lapse image sequences. We validated the hepatocyte sandwich culture system as an appropriate model to study bile canaliculi in vitro by showing structural similarity measured as bile canaliculi length per hepatocyte to that observed in vivo. Moreover, bile canalicular excretion kinetics of CMFDA (5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate) in sandwich cultures resembled closely the kinetics observed in vivo. The developed quantification technique enabled the quantification of dynamic changes in individual bile canaliculi. With this technique, we were able to clearly distinguish between sandwich cultures supplemented with dexamethasone and insulin from control cultures. In conclusion, the automated quantification system offers the possibility to systematically study the causal relationship between disturbed bile canalicular dynamics and cholestasis.

  17. Innate inhibition of adaptive immunity: Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced IL-6 inhibits macrophage responses to IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabhushanam, Vijaya; Solache, Alejandra; Ting, Li-Min; Escaron, Claire J; Zhang, Jennifer Y; Ernst, Joel D

    2003-11-01

    In humans and in mice, control of the intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), requires IFN-gamma. Although the adaptive immune response results in production of substantial amounts of IFN-gamma in response to Mtb, the immune response is unable to eradicate the infection in most cases. We have previously reported evidence that Mtb inhibits macrophage responses to IFN-gamma, suggesting that this may limit the ability of IFN-gamma to stimulate macrophages to kill Mtb. We have also observed that uninfected macrophages, adjacent to infected macrophages in culture, exhibit decreased responses to IFN-gamma. Here we report that IL-6 secreted by Mtb-infected macrophages inhibits the responses of uninfected macrophages to IFN-gamma. IL-6 selectively inhibits a subset of IFN-gamma-responsive genes at the level of transcriptional activation without inhibiting activation or function of STAT1. Inhibition of macrophage responses to IFN-gamma by IL-6 requires new protein synthesis, but this effect is not attributable to suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 or 3. These results reveal a novel function for IL-6 and indicate that IL-6 secreted by Mtb-infected macrophages may contribute to the inability of the cellular immune response to eradicate infection.

  18. Nordic cultural policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A critical view on Nordic Cultural Policy 1961-2008 - Aims, measures, forms of organisation, state og national identity......A critical view on Nordic Cultural Policy 1961-2008 - Aims, measures, forms of organisation, state og national identity...

  19. Plant tissue culture techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  20. Naval Aviation Culture Workshops

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubio, Robert V

    2008-01-01

    .... Organizational culture impacts a unit's performance -- for better or for worse. This research defines organizational culture and describes the dynamic relationships among individuals, groups, and leaders. Two case studies (NASA and U.S. Airways...

  1. Armenian Cultural Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Astronomy is the reflection of sky events in various fields of nations' culture. In foreign literature this field is also called "Astronomy in Culture" or "Astronomy and Culture". Cultural astronomy is the set of interdisciplinary fields studying the astronomical systems of current or ancient societies and cultures. It is manifested in Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Poetry, Art, Linguistics and other fields. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to this sphere, particularly international organizations were established, conferences are held and journals are published. Armenia is also rich in cultural astronomy. The present paper focuses on Armenian archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy, including many creations related to astronomical knowledge; calendars, rock art, mythology, etc. On the other hand, this subject is rather poorly developed in Armenia; there are only individual studies on various related issues (especially many studies related to Anania Shirakatsi) but not coordinated actions to manage this important field of investigation.

  2. Developing Cultural Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Fırat Altay

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at emphasizing the issue of teaching of culture in foreign languageteaching. In this respect, the reasons of teaching culture in foreign language classes arefocused on initially. So, the justifications of teaching culture are considered and explainedand by the help of a dialogue. Right after this, ways of developing cultural awareness is takeninto account. At this step, types of courses to develop cultural awareness are dealt with.Developing cultural awareness in class is another aspect to handle. Besides, ways ofdeveloping cultural awareness outside the class are worked on. Whether there are dangers ofusing culture in foreign language class is explained in dangers and problems part. In theconclusion, ideas of the writer on the subject as final remarks are clarified.

  3. Culture and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuri

    2017-12-01

    A large body of research in Western cultures has demonstrated the psychological and health effects of social class. This review outlines a cultural psychological approach to social stratification by comparing psychological and health manifestations of social class across Western and East Asian cultures. These comparisons suggest that cultural meaning systems shape how people make meaning and respond to material/structural conditions associated with social class, thereby leading to culturally divergent manifestations of social class. Specifically, unlike their counterparts in Western cultures, individuals of high social class in East Asian cultures tend to show high conformity and other-orientated psychological attributes. In addition, cultures differ in how social class impacts health (i.e. on which bases, through which pathways, and to what extent). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  5. Rectal culture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  6. The Politics of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Storey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview over the evolution of thinking about "culture" in the work of Raymond Williams. With the introduction of Antonio Gramsci's concept of hegemony culture came to be understood as consisting of not only shared, but contested meanings as well. On the basis of this redefinition by Williams, cultural studies was able to delineate culture as the production, circulation, and consumption of meanings that become embodied and embedded in social practice.

  7. Organizational culture & employee behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tianya

    2015-01-01

    Organizations are among the key units of the society. During their establishment and development, a specific kind of organizational culture eventually appears. The purpose of organizational culture is to improve solidarity and cohesion, and to stimulate employees' enthusiasm and creativity to improve the organization’s economic efficiency. In addition, organizational culture greatly influences employee behavior. The aim of this study is to find out how organizational culture affects employ...

  8. Urine, faeces and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, M.

    This article looks upon the importance of considering cultural aspects in relation to toilet technologies. It is outlined how culture theoretically can be seen as an integrated part of every day actions and technology.......This article looks upon the importance of considering cultural aspects in relation to toilet technologies. It is outlined how culture theoretically can be seen as an integrated part of every day actions and technology....

  9. Culture as Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    A collection of essays 2011-2014 By following, and reproducing, the cultural turn, the rhetoric of cultural mix and hybridism is disseminated today primarily in its crossing of trade barriers. Cultures reduced to their exchange value function as capital - an accumulative, speculative and...

  10. Personal Space Across Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh-Olesen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    —constitutes one of the main areas of interest, dividing cultures into either contact or low-contact cultures. Examples of proxetics—human spatial behavior studied in terms of universal spacing patterns and cultural similarities—are presented. Finally, future directions for the study of PS in the digital age...

  11. Animal culture: chimpanzee conformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Carel P

    2012-05-22

    Culture-like phenomena in wild animals have received much attention, but how good is the evidence and how similar are they to human culture? New data on chimpanzees suggest their culture may even have an element of conformity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cultural Exploration through Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diversity in the United States means that all students must understand multiple cultural perspectives and identities. Educators need to facilitate learning engagements that highlight the complexities of culture and cultural identity, going beyond surface characteristics such as foods, holidays, and clothing that are often the focus in…

  13. Sport and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annet Tiessen-Raaphorst; Andries van den Broek

    2016-01-01

    Oringinal title: Sport en cultuur Many people derive enjoyment from sport and culture in their free time: attending matches, performances, exhibitions or festivals, following sport and culture via the media or participating in a sport or cultural activity. Who takes part in which activities? Does

  14. Cross-Cultural Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannen, Deborah

    A two-part presentation on cross-cultural communication consists of a discussion of cultural differences in interpersonal communication and an article from a Greek English-language publication concerning telephone use skills in a foreign country. Cultural differences in communication are divided into eight types and illustrated: (1) when to talk;…

  15. Resolving conflicting safety cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slider, J.E.; Patterson, M.

    1993-01-01

    Several nuclear power plant sites have been wounded in the crossfire between two distinct corporate cultures. The traditional utility culture lies on one side and that of the nuclear navy on the other. The two corporate cultures lead to different perceptions of open-quotes safety culture.close quotes This clash of safety cultures obscures a very important point about nuclear plant operations: Safety depends on organizational learning. Organizational learning provides the foundation for a perception of safety culture that transcends the conflict between utility and nuclear navy cultures. Corporate culture may be defined as the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs shared by employees of a given company. Safety culture is the part of corporate culture concerning shared attitudes and beliefs affecting individual or public safety. If the safety culture promotes behaviors that lead to greater safety, employees will tend to open-quotes do the right thingclose quotes even when circumstances and formal guidance alone do not ensure that actions will be correct. Safety culture has become particularly important to nuclear plant owners and regulators as they have sought to establish and maintain a high level of safety in today's plants

  16. Bio-Culturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2007-01-01

    The article argues on the basis of analyses of successful films for children that not only cultural determinants but also innate determinats are important, and that film studies should combine cultural studies with cognitive theory, evolutionary theory and neuroscience, an approach that is called...... Bio-culturalism....

  17. TESOL and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Dwight

    1999-01-01

    Looks at the question of how culture is understood in the Teaching English as a Second/Other-Language (TESOL) profession. Examines the perspectives toward culture implicitly or explicitly expressed in recent "TESOL Quarterly" articles, and concludes that different views of culture exist in the field. (Author/VWL)

  18. Extending Cultural Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecken, Ted J.; Court, Deborah

    1992-01-01

    Advocates defining cultural literacy to recognize the mass media's role in transmitting and maintaining cultural stereotypes and shaping values and beliefs. Distinguishes between ideational and material aspects of culture. Advocates teaching critical thinking and respect for persons in light of questionable moral perspectives in certain media…

  19. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate…

  20. Culture and Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractDiscourses on culture and development vary according to their conceptions of culture and of development and according to their standpoint. The ‘culture and development’ problematic has typically: (1) arisen from a conception of ‘culture’ as a relatively fixed, homogeneous set of mental

  1. Peritoneal fluid culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... The peritoneal fluid culture may be negative, even if you have ... diagnosis of peritonitis is based on other factors, in addition ...

  2. Selling cultural heritage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis explores the value of cultural and archaeological heritage through a focus on multinational corporations (MNCs) across industries and their involvement with cultural heritage. Research to date has focused mainly on industries where MNCs have a direct impact on cultural or archaeological

  3. Decrease in susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to mefloquine in continuous culture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockelman, C. R.; Monkolkeha, S.; Tanariya, P.

    1981-01-01

    Chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, line FCK from Thailand, was tested for susceptibility to mefloquine in continuous culture. The drug resulted in 50% schizont inhibition at the level of 8.0 nmol/ml of culture when tested for the first time. After three months of discontinuous exposure to mefloquine at increasing levels, the sensitivity of the parasite decreased. A concentration as high as 128 nmol/ml eventually was required for 50% inhibition of growth. PMID:7018728

  4. Decrease in susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to mefloquine in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockelman, C R; Monkolkeha, S; Tanariya, P

    1981-01-01

    Chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, line FCK from Thailand, was tested for susceptibility to mefloquine in continuous culture. The drug resulted in 50% schizont inhibition at the level of 8.0 nmol/ml of culture when tested for the first time. After three months of discontinuous exposure to mefloquine at increasing levels, the sensitivity of the parasite decreased. A concentration as high as 128 nmol/ml eventually was required for 50% inhibition of growth.

  5. Culture Differences and English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Language is a part of culture, and plays a very important role in the development of the culture. Some sociologists consider it as the keystone of culture. They believe, without language, culture would not be available. At the same time, language is influenced and shaped by culture, it reflects culture. Therefore, culture plays a very important…

  6. Inhibition of colony-spreading activity of Staphylococcus aureus by secretion of δ-hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2012-05-04

    Staphylococcus aureus spreads on the surface of soft agar, a phenomenon we termed "colony spreading." Here, we found that S. aureus culture supernatant inhibited colony spreading. We purified δ-hemolysin (Hld, δ-toxin), a major protein secreted from S. aureus, as a compound that inhibits colony spreading. The culture supernatants of hld-disrupted mutants had 30-fold lower colony-spreading inhibitory activity than those of the parent strain. Furthermore, hld-disrupted mutants had higher colony-spreading ability than the parent strain. These results suggest that S. aureus negatively regulates colony spreading by secreting δ-hemolysin.

  7. Inhibition of Colony-spreading Activity of Staphylococcus aureus by Secretion of δ-Hemolysin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus spreads on the surface of soft agar, a phenomenon we termed “colony spreading.” Here, we found that S. aureus culture supernatant inhibited colony spreading. We purified δ-hemolysin (Hld, δ-toxin), a major protein secreted from S. aureus, as a compound that inhibits colony spreading. The culture supernatants of hld-disrupted mutants had 30-fold lower colony-spreading inhibitory activity than those of the parent strain. Furthermore, hld-disrupted mutants had higher colony-spreading ability than the parent strain. These results suggest that S. aureus negatively regulates colony spreading by secreting δ-hemolysin. PMID:22411996

  8. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schnyder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. Methods: The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. Results: As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. Conclusions: In summary

  9. Culture and Negotiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Anne Marie; Kumar, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    The literature on cross-cultural negotiation has expanded considerably over the past few decades, but the findings are often ambiguous and sometimes even contradictory. This introduction highlights the critical areas where objections are commonly raised about the relevance of national culture......, the applicability of typologies that treat cultures as static, and the problem of ambiguous terminology. It may not be surprising that studies contradict each other given the ambiguity of the national cultural construct and variations in the context of the negotiating situations that are studied. The articles...... in this issue contribute to deepening our understanding about cross-cultural negotiation processes....

  10. Managing culture in IJVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to extend a cultural sense-making perspective to the context of international joint ventures. The dominant literature on cultural issues in this inter-firm setting has been criticized for relying on a narrow view of culture mainly as a country-level construct. The paper...... argues that dynamic aspects of culture as enacted by key individual actors and constructed in a given context are far more relevant and critical for the joint venture’s managerial process. With evidence from four Danish – Vietnamese joint ventures, the paper proposes a way of managing culture in IJVs...

  11. Homo economicus belief inhibits trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqiang Xin

    Full Text Available As a foundational concept in economics, the homo economicus assumption regards humans as rational and self-interested actors. In contrast, trust requires individuals to believe partners' benevolence and unselfishness. Thus, the homo economicus belief may inhibit trust. The present three experiments demonstrated that the direct exposure to homo economicus belief can weaken trust. And economic situations like profit calculation can also activate individuals' homo economicus belief and inhibit their trust. It seems that people's increasing homo economicus belief may serve as one cause of the worldwide decline of trust.

  12. Homo economicus belief inhibits trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ziqiang; Liu, Guofang

    2013-01-01

    As a foundational concept in economics, the homo economicus assumption regards humans as rational and self-interested actors. In contrast, trust requires individuals to believe partners' benevolence and unselfishness. Thus, the homo economicus belief may inhibit trust. The present three experiments demonstrated that the direct exposure to homo economicus belief can weaken trust. And economic situations like profit calculation can also activate individuals' homo economicus belief and inhibit their trust. It seems that people's increasing homo economicus belief may serve as one cause of the worldwide decline of trust.

  13. Myogenesis in the basal bilaterian Symsagittifera roscoffensis (Acoela)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semmler, Henrike; Bailly, Xavier; Wanninger, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    muscles are present along the entire body of juveniles and adults, while adults additionally exhibit radially oriented internal muscles in the anterior tip. Outer diagonal muscles are present at the dorsal anterior tip of the adult. In adult animals, the male gonopore with its associated sexual organs...

  14. Cultural aspects of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharajh, Hari D; Abdool, Petal S

    2005-09-08

    Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  15. Cultural effects on mindreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Zapata, Daniel; Slaughter, Virginia; Henry, Julie D

    2016-01-01

    People from other cultural backgrounds sometimes seem inscrutable. We identified a potential cause of this phenomenon in two experiments demonstrating that adults' mental state inferences are influenced by the cultural identity of the target. We adapted White, Hill, Happé, and Frith's (2009) Strange Stories to create matched intra-cultural and cross-cultural mindreading and control conditions. Experiment 1 showed that Australian participants were faster to respond and received higher scores in the intra-cultural mindreading condition relative to the cross-cultural mindreading condition, but performance in the control conditions was equivalent. Experiment 2 replicated this pattern in independent samples of Australian and Chilean participants. These findings have important implications for cross-cultural communication and understanding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. IL-17 inhibits chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kondo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineages, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Here we investigated the effects of IL-17, a key cytokine in chronic inflammation, on chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs. METHODS: Human bone marrow MSCs were pellet cultured in chondrogenic induction medium containing TGF-β3. Chondrogenic differentiation was detected by cartilage matrix accumulation and chondrogenic marker gene expression. RESULTS: Over-expression of cartilage matrix and chondrogenic marker genes was noted in chondrogenic cultures, but was inhibited by IL-17 in a dose-dependent manner. Expression and phosphorylation of SOX9, the master transcription factor for chondrogenesis, were induced within 2 days and phosphorylated SOX9 was stably maintained until day 21. IL-17 did not alter total SOX9 expression, but significantly suppressed SOX9 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. At day 7, IL-17 also suppressed the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA, which is known to phosphorylate SOX9. H89, a selective PKA inhibitor, also suppressed SOX9 phosphorylation, expression of chondrogenic markers and cartilage matrix, and also decreased chondrogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17 inhibited chondrogenesis of human MSCs through the suppression of PKA activity and SOX9 phosphorylation. These results suggest that chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs can be inhibited by a mechanism triggered by IL-17 under chronic inflammation.

  17. Madecassoside inhibits melanin synthesis by blocking ultraviolet-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunsun; Lee, Jung-A; Shin, Seoungwoo; Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Kim, Jang-Hyun; Park, Deokhoon

    2013-12-16

    Madecassoside (MA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from Centella asitica (L.), is used as a therapeutic agent in wound healing and also as an anti-inflammatory and anti-aging agent. However, the involvement of MA in skin-pigmentation has not been reported. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of MA on ultraviolet (UV)-induced melanogenesis and mechanisms in a co-culture system of keratinocytes and melanocytes. MA significantly inhibited UVR-induced melanin synthesis and melanosome transfer in the co-culture system. These effects were further demonstrated by the MA-induced inhibition of protease-activated receptor-2 expression and its signaling pathway, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2 alpha in keratinocytes. The clinical efficacy of MA was confirmed on artificially tanned human skin. MA significantly reduced UV-induced melanin index at 8 weeks after topical application. Overall, the study demonstrated significant benefits of MA use in the inhibition of hyperpigmentation caused by UV irradiation.

  18. Madecassoside Inhibits Melanin Synthesis by Blocking Ultraviolet-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsun Jung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Madecassoside (MA, a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from Centella asitica (L., is used as a therapeutic agent in wound healing and also as an anti-inflammatory and anti-aging agent. However, the involvement of MA in skin-pigmentation has not been reported. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of MA on ultraviolet (UV-induced melanogenesis and mechanisms in a co-culture system of keratinocytes and melanocytes. MA significantly inhibited UVR-induced melanin synthesis and melanosome transfer in the co-culture system. These effects were further demonstrated by the MA-induced inhibition of protease-activated receptor-2 expression and its signaling pathway, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2 alpha in keratinocytes. The clinical efficacy of MA was confirmed on artificially tanned human skin. MA significantly reduced UV-induced melanin index at 8 weeks after topical application. Overall, the study demonstrated significant benefits of MA use in the inhibition of hyperpigmentation caused by UV irradiation.

  19. Safeguards Culture: Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2009-05-27

    Abstract: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper builds on that theoretical discussion to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Paper: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop on “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges,” in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper, coauthored by Karyn R. Durbin and Andrew Van Duzer, described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper updates that theoretical discussion, and seeks to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Implicit in this discussion is an understanding that improving a culture is not an end in itself, but is one method of improving the underlying discipline, that is safety, security, or safeguards. Culture can be defined as a way of life, or general customs and beliefs of a particular group of people at a particular time. There are internationally accepted definitions of safety culture and nuclear security culture. As yet, there is no official agreed upon definition of safeguards culture. At the end of the paper I will propose my definition. At the Santa Fe Workshop the summary by the Co-Chairs of Working Group 1, “The Further Evolution of Safeguards,” noted: “It is clear that ‘safeguards culture

  20. Endophytic Fungi Associated With Turmeric (Curcuma longa L. Can Inhibit Histamine-Forming Bacteria in Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eris Septiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turmeric (Curcuma longa L. is a medicinal plant that is commonly used as spice and preservative. Many types of endophytic fungi have been reported as being associated with medicinal plants and able to synthesize secondary metabolites. In this study, endophytic fungi were isolated from all plant parts of turmeric plants. Identification of the endophytic fungi was done using morphological characteristics and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of ribosomal DNA. The dual culture method was used for screening antibacterial activity of the endophytic fungi against Morganella morganii, a common histamine-producing bacteria. The disc diffusion method was used to test the ability of water fractions of selected endophytic fungi to inhibit M. morganii growth. Two-dimensional thin layer chromatography was used to determine the fungal extract inhibition activity on histamine formation. In total, 11 endophytic fungi were successfully isolated and identified as Arthrobotrys foliicola, Cochliobolus kusanoi, Daldinia eschscholzii, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium solani, Fusarium verticillioides, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and Phaeosphaeria ammophilae. Five isolates showed inhibition activity against M. morganii in the dual culture tests. Based on the disc diffusion assay, A. foliicola and F. verticillioides inhibited the growth of M. morganii as a histamine-producing bacteria, and inhibiting histamine formation in fish. The best effects in inhibiting growth of the histamine-producing bacteria and histamine formation inhibition in fish were produced with F. verticillioides water fraction at 0°C incubation.

  1. Making Safety Culture a Corporate Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svenningsson, J.

    2016-01-01

    Safety Culture is something that we have actively worked with in the nuclear industry for a long time. Formally, it has been on the agenda since the Chernobyl accident. However, the work with creating a safe organizational culture can of course be traced back even further in time. Over the years a lot has happened in how we are approaching the concept of safety culture and especially how we look upon the human being as a part of the system and how we as humans interact with the organization and technology. For an organization to have a culture that promotes safety it is essential to create an ownership of safety with all workers within the site. To create this ownership it is vital to have the undivided commitment of the management. It all starts with the fundamental values of the organization. These values must then be concluded in firm expectations of behaviors that apply to all workers and management. This could be referred to as expectation of a Professional Behavior that allows us to live up to the company values. At OKG nuclear power plant, a successful Business Improvement Program was recently carried out with intention to develop and contribute to the maturity of the organization in terms of safety. One of the sub-programs of the program was called Professional Behavior - With purpose of making safety into a corporate culture. At OKG, Safety culture is something that systematically been addressed and worked with since 2004. Even though the Safety Culture program could be considered to already have reached a certain level of maturity the Business Improvement program helped the organization to lay the foundation for further development by clarify expected behaviors that was firmly cemented in to the corporate values.

  2. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Culture Conversion with Bedaquiline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diacon, Andreas H.; Pym, Alexander; Grobusch, Martin P.; de Los Rios, Jorge M.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vasilyeva, Irina; Leimane, Vaira; Andries, Koen; Bakare, Nyasha; de Marez, Tine; Haxaire-Theeuwes, Myriam; Lounis, Nacer; Meyvisch, Paul; de Paepe, Els; van Heeswijk, Rolf P. G.; Dannemann, Brian; Rolla, Valeria; Dalcomo, Margreth; Gripp, Karla; Escada, Rodrigo; Tavares, Isabel; Borga, Liamar; Thomas, Aleyamma; Rekha, Banu; Nair, Dina; Chandrasekar, Chockalingam; Parthasarathy, Ramavaran Thiruvengadaraj; Sekhar, Gomathi; Ganesh, Krishnamoorthy; Rajagopalan, Krishnakumar; Rajapandian, Gangadevi; Dorairajalu, Rajendran; Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Banavaliker, Jayant; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu; Gulati, Vinay; Mahmud, Hanif; Gupta, Arvind; Bhatnagar, Anuj; Jain, Vipin; Hari, Smriti; Gupta, Yogesh Kumar; Vaid, Ashok; Cirule, Andra; Dravniece, Gunta; Skripconoka, Vija; Kuksa, Liga; Kreigere, Edite; Ramos, Carlos Rafael Seas; Amat y Leon, Ivan Arapovic; Huaman, Jorge Antonio Centeno; Carbajal, Roy German Duenas; Sasaki, Christian Andres Yoshiyama; Yllanes, Maria Angelica Garcia; Izzara, Mario Vilcahauman; Campos, Porfirio Fortunato Changa; Oviedo, Luis Enrique Bustinza; Zavala, Leslie Levano; Esquen, Cinthia Salome Hurtado; Fuertes, Carlos Eduardo Zamudio; Carrefio, Gabriela Carriquiry; Castañeda, Isaias Manuel Rolando; Ayala, Jesus Renato; Chavez, Eduardo Romulo Ticona; Onofre, Wilfredo Vargas; Paucar, Juan Genaro Sosa; Herrera, Elias Rodrigo Aliaga; Medina, Jamie Ismael Soria; Barraza, José Carlos Masciotti; Mateo, Domingo Elias Gómez-Sanchez; Reyna, Ruben Marino Azañero; Senmache, Jorge de los Rios; Vasquez, Christian Juan Galvez; Vargas, Zully Haydee Ruiz; Galvan, Blanca Luz Parra; Aparcana, Karin Marlene Reyes; Diaz, Dina Vera; Gonong, Joven Roque; Raymond, Lawrence; Llacer, Roxas Lee; Alvarez-Tiu, Aileen; Erokhin, Vladislav; Demikhova, Olga; Bagdasarian, Tatevik; Gorlova, Svetlana; Tikhonov, Alexey; Diacon, Andreas; Hanekom, Madeleine; Noveljic, Zoja; Patientia, Ramonde; Siwendu, Sweetness; Rustomjee, Roxana; Reddy, Carl; Osburn, Lancelot Garth; Ramjee, Aruna; Ntshanga, Sbongile Pumzile; Gabela, Lerato; Chirkut, Shivani; Fortuin-de Smidt, Melony C.; Narasimooloo, Ronelle; Quantrill, John Richard Yarr; Master, Iqbal Haroon; Gumede, Thulani Bethwell; Chotoo, Sunitha; Conradie, Francesca; Mahanyele, N. Russel; Dziewiecki, Alicja; Menezes, Collin N.; Sanne, Ian Mathias; John, Melanie-Anne; Kayumba, Jean Michel; Page-Shipp, Liesl; Kruger, Dawid; Schroeder, Irene; Leeuwner, Louwrens L.; O'Reilly, Cathryn Louise; Joubert, Myrtle; Coetzee, Corlia; Krause, Stephanie Rene; McPherson, Reinard; Muller, Louise; Chuchottaworn, Charoen; Sangsayunh, Piamplarp; Bangpattanasiri, Kittima; Wiwatworapan, Tawatchai; Anantasetagoon, Tanakorn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bedaquiline (Sirturo, TMC207), a diarylquinoline that inhibits mycobacterial ATP synthase, has been associated with accelerated sputum-culture conversion in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, when added to a preferred background regimen for 8 weeks. METHODS In this phase 2b

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on plant tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hell, K.G.

    1978-01-01

    A short review is done of the biological effects of ionizing radiations on plant tissues kept in culture, from the work of Gladys King, in 1949, with X-ray irradiated tobacco. The role of plant hormones is discussed in the processes of growth inhibition and growth restoration of irradiated tissues, as well as morphogenesis. Radioresistance of cells kept in culture and the use of ionizing radiations as mutagens are also commented. Some aspects of the biological effects of ionizing radiations that need to be investigated are discussed, and the problem of genome instability of plant tissues kept in culture is pointed out. (M.A.) [pt

  4. Feasibility of the use of stillborn piglets in the study of myogenesis and development of vital organsViabilidade do uso de leitões natimortos nos estudos de miogênese e desenvolvimento de órgãos vitais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Drociunas Pacheco

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to study the feasibility of the use of stillborn piglets in the studies of myogenesis and the development of vital organs. For this, was used litters from genetic Topigs x Danbred of 82 sows between 1st to 7 th order of parturition. In total were monitored 82 parturitions, at the end of the parturitions, all piglets were weighed and identified according to birth order. From this procedure we calculated the average weight of litters with a history of stillbirths. The piglets weighing close to or equal to the average weight of litter, and that similar to the weight of stillborn piglets from the litters, were sacrificed. In total 28 piglets were slaughtered and 30 stillbirths were used. In both classes (stillbirths and live births sacrificed were collected, the semitendinosus muscle, heart, brain and liver. Data were analyzed using Anova, correlations and regression procedure of SAEG. Results suggested that piglets which born alive have a greater muscular area when compared to stillborn (60. 50 vs. 42.71 ?m. In addition a strong correlation (P Objetivou-se estudar a viabilidade do uso de leitões natimortos nos estudos de miogênese e desenvolvimento de órgãos vitais. Utilizou-se leitegadas provenientes da genética Topigs x Danbred de 82 matrizes suínas entre 1ª à 7ª ordem de parto. No total foram monitorados 82 partos. Ao término dos partos, todos os leitões foram pesados e identificados, de acordo com a ordem de nascimento. A partir deste procedimento foi calculado o peso médio das leitegadas que apresentaram histórico de natimortos. Os leitões que apresentaram peso próximo ou igual ao peso médio da leitegada, e peso semelhante ao dos leitões natimortos provenientes das respectivas leitegadas, foram sacrificados. No total, 28 leitões foram abatidos e 30 natimortos foram utilizados. Em ambas as classes (natimortos e nascidos vivos sacrificados foram coletados, o músculo semitendinoso, coração, cérebro e f

  5. Testing of Biologically Inhibiting Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill Madsen, Thomas; Larsen, Erup

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this course is to examine a newly developed biologically inhibiting material with regards to galvanic corrosion and electrochemical properties. More in detail, the concern was how the material would react when exposed to cleaning agents, here under CIP cleaning (Cleaning...

  6. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  7. Characterizing European cultural landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tieskens, Koen F.; Schulp, Catharina J E; Levers, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Almost all rural areas in Europe have been shaped or altered by humans and can be considered cultural landscapes, many of which now are considered to entail valuable cultural heritage. Current dynamics in land management have put cultural landscapes under a huge pressure of agricultural intensifi......Almost all rural areas in Europe have been shaped or altered by humans and can be considered cultural landscapes, many of which now are considered to entail valuable cultural heritage. Current dynamics in land management have put cultural landscapes under a huge pressure of agricultural...... intensification and land abandonment. To prevent the loss of cultural landscapes, knowledge on the location of different types of cultural landscapes is needed. In this paper, we present a characterization of European cultural landscapes based on the prevalence of three key dimensions of cultural landscapes......: landscape structure, management intensity, and value and meaning. We mapped these dimensions across Europe at a 1-km resolution by combining proxies on management intensity and landscape structure with new indicators such as social media usage and registered traditional food products. We integrated...

  8. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 APA*

  9. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on early stages of activation of human lymphocytes: inhibition is independent of effects on DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellanos, G; Owens, T; Rudd, C

    1982-01-01

    before mitogen was added to the cultures, but were unaffected if irradiation occurred after 16 h of culture in presence of Con A. Cells irradiated with 84 ergs/mm2 at the onset of culture with mitogen did not show the early increase of cation pump function which is a characteristic of stimulated......Low doses (30-84 ergs/mm2, 1 erg = 10(7) J) of ultraviolet radiation (UV) caused severe inhibition of the proliferation of human lymphocytes in vitro. Greatest inhibition was produced when resting cells were irradiated immediately prior to stimulation with concanavalin A (Con A); this was true...... lymphocytes, when this was measured by means of 86Rb uptake after 2-4 h culture. The mitogen-stimulated activation of cation pump function has previously been shown to be unaffected by concentrations of cycloheximide and actinomycin D which produce virtually complete inhibition of protein and RNA synthesis...

  10. Cultural Influences on Intertemporal Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    literature (in English) on Arab culture is explored to contrast how that culture reasons about time and events, with respect to Western cultures. A number...concepts about risk that are prevalent in Western culture, and applying these concepts to existing literature (in English) on Arab culture that...identifies how cultural factors influence intertemporal reasoning, with a focus on Arab culture. Two additional cultures, Pashtun and Somali, were studied

  11. Economic impact of cultural tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Zadel, Zrinka; Bogdan, Sinisa

    2013-01-01

    The subject of analysis in the paper is economic impact of cultural tourism and identification of the main factors which directly affect cultural tourism revenues. Most countries do not have a statistical system of monitoring and analysing individual factors of cultural tourism such as the number of arrivals of cultural tourists and consumption of cultural tourists. Therefore, it is hard to assess the economic impact of cultural tourism. In cultural tourism, cultural assets are prepared and p...

  12. Inhibition of Brevibacterium linens by Probiotics from Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M. Knox

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Brevibacterium linens is an important species in dairy products rendering a specific taste and aroma to numerous smear ripened and blue veined cheeses due to proteolysis. However, the presence of the species in South African blue veined cheeses is undesirable and consumers demand the product void of the species. Accordingly, numerous methods including microbial inhibition using fungi and bacterial probiotic cultures with possible inhibitory effects were applied in an attempt to inhibit the species. None of the fungi, however, proved to be successful, whereas Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis, two typical probiotic species applied in dairy products, showed inhibitory effects against B. linens when tested using the spot-on-lawn assay.

  13. Updating cultural capital theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prieur, Annick; Savage, Mike

    2011-01-01

    than absolute terms, and that a field analytic perspective provides the means of understanding cultural capital as such a relative entity. Second, the move from the empirical observation of oppositions to the conceptualisation of cultural capital also demands that the functioning of features......This paper considers how the analysis of cultural engagement can be elaborated through a reworking of the concept of cultural capital, as originally derived from Bourdieu’s (1984) Distinction. Drawing on detailed studies of the UK and Aalborg, Denmark, we show that despite the weakening......, and art); and (c) an international and a local or national orientation stand out as the most important. We discuss whether these oppositions can usefully be conceptualised as cultural capital. We argue that such a conceptualisation demands, first, that cultural capital is understood in relative rather...

  14. Music, culture and identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilir Ramadani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available At the time of globalization it is difficult to pretend avoiding music culture and identity from political, cultural and social developments. Thus, it is impossible for the music to be unshakable and to represent national identity by not taking and giving nothing to culture. The dynamics of life and the rapid development of technology make it impossible for the culture to remain unaffected in terms of sharing experiences social experiences. Culture represents our current course, both in terms of politics, also in the social and human aspects. Through the technology it is possible for our children to be equal with children of all other countries, to exchange information and to connect directly with all countries of the world. Musical education is one of the main factors of cultural development and preservation of national identity. Identity consists of everything we posses and reflect. We are those who distinguish from each other and have a common denominator compared to other nations.

  15. Culture and Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    INTRODUCTION The present publication deals with issues of imagination and creativity as a notion, philosophy – and social and cultural form, with point of departure in current debates on visual culture. Whereas these debates cover a large ground, spanning from media studies over design to cultural...... studies, they seldom reflect on the basic fact that visual culture in its present form indicates a huge collective creativity in some capacity, implicating the entire postwar era. From early focuses on the possible social and cultural roles of the image in the 1950s and 60s - e.g. in work of Roland...... Barthes and Daniel Boorstin - to the present day, forms of visual culture have proliferated through a variety of collective dimensions, as reflected for instance in the curriculums of visual communication within design education and studies of image representation and pictorial cognition in art history...

  16. Ethics, evolution and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; Danielson, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Recent work in the fields of evolutionary ethics and moral psychology appears to be converging on a single empirically- and evolutionary-based science of morality or ethics. To date, however, these fields have failed to provide an adequate conceptualisation of how culture affects the content and distribution of moral norms. This is particularly important for a large class of moral norms relating to rapidly changing technological or social environments, such as norms regarding the acceptability of genetically modified organisms. Here we suggest that a science of morality/ethics can benefit from adopting a cultural evolution or gene-culture coevolution approach, which treats culture as a second, separate evolutionary system that acts in parallel to biological/genetic evolution. This cultural evolution approach brings with it a set of established theoretical concepts (e.g. different cultural transmission mechanisms) and empirical methods (e.g. evolutionary game theory) that can significantly improve our understanding of human morality.

  17. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider......The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material...

  18. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material......, physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider...

  19. Nature/culture/seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place in anthropological categories of "nature" and "culture." Seawater as nature appears as potentiality of form and uncontainable flux; it moves faster than culture - with culture frequently figured through land-based metaphors - even as culture seeks to channel water's (nature's) flow. Seawater as culture manifests as a medium of pleasure, sustenance, travel, disaster. I argue that, although seawater's qualities in early anthropology were portrayed impressionistically, today technical, scientific descriptions of water's form prevail. For example, processes of globalization - which may also be called "oceanization" - are often described as "currents," "flows," and "circulations." Examining sea-set ethnography, maritime anthropologies, and contemporary social theory, I propose that seawater has operated as a “theory machine” for generating insights about human cultural organization. I develop this argument with ethnography from the Sargasso Sea and in the Sea Islands. I conclude with a critique of appeals to water's form in social theory.

  20. Nuclear Safeguards Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, T.

    2015-01-01

    The paper will consider safeguards culture both at the IAEA and among member states. It will do so through the lens of organizational culture theory and taking into account developments in safeguards since the Iraq case of the early 1990s. The study will seek to identify the current characteristics of safeguards culture and how it has evolved since the 93+2 programme was initiated, as well as considering the roles of the most important purveyors of such culture, including member states and their national safeguards authorities, the General Conference and Board of Governors, the Director General, the Secretariat as a whole, the Safeguards Department and the inspectorate. The question of what might be an optimal safeguards culture at the Agency and among member states will be investigated, along with the issue of how such a culture might be engendered or encouraged. (author)