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Sample records for culture infective doses

  1. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

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    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  2. Cytokine response and outcome of infection depends on the infective dose of parasites in experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus.

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    Dematteis, Sylvia; Rottenberg, Martin; Baz, Adriana

    2003-04-01

    We here analysed whether the cytokine responses in early and late experimental infection with Echinococcus granulosus depend on the dose of parasites to which the host is exposed. To this purpose Balb/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with either 500 or 2000 protoscoleces. Splenocytes of mice were obtained at days 3, 7, 14 and 21 and also on week 37 post-infection and cultured in vitro with protoscolex antigens. Type-1 and type-2 cytokines were analysed in supernatants by ELISA. Results showed that the inoculation of 500 protoscoleces induced an early type-0 and a late type-2 cytokine response, whereas the inoculation of 2000 protoscoleces induced an early type-2 and a late type-0 cytokine response. Parasite growth was lower in the group inoculated with the low infective dose. These results indicate that the cytokine response during the infection by the helminth E. granulosus depends on the dose of parasites to which the host has been exposed.

  3. Culture Negative Infective Endocarditits: a Changing Paradigm

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, A

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, the modified Duke\\'s criteria, based primarily on positive blood cultures, is used to diagnose Infective Endocarditis (IE). However, reports demonstrate that 31% of cases are diagnosed as Culture Negative Infective Endocarditis (CNIE)1. Consequently, empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics are prescribed to cover unidentified organisms and, as a result, antibiotic therapy may be compromised. Molecular diagnostic techniques aid with identifying causative organisms in cases of CNIE and we question if the increasing use of such technologies will change the local epidemiology of CNIE. We present the first case of Tropheryma whipplei Infective Endocarditis (TWIE) reported in Ireland.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa dose response and bathing water infection.

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    Roser, D J; van den Akker, B; Boase, S; Haas, C N; Ashbolt, N J; Rice, S A

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the opportunistic pathogen mostly implicated in folliculitis and acute otitis externa in pools and hot tubs. Nevertheless, infection risks remain poorly quantified. This paper reviews disease aetiologies and bacterial skin colonization science to advance dose-response theory development. Three model forms are identified for predicting disease likelihood from pathogen density. Two are based on Furumoto & Mickey's exponential 'single-hit' model and predict infection likelihood and severity (lesions/m2), respectively. 'Third-generation', mechanistic, dose-response algorithm development is additionally scoped. The proposed formulation integrates dispersion, epidermal interaction, and follicle invasion. The review also details uncertainties needing consideration which pertain to water quality, outbreaks, exposure time, infection sites, biofilms, cerumen, environmental factors (e.g. skin saturation, hydrodynamics), and whether P. aeruginosa is endogenous or exogenous. The review's findings are used to propose a conceptual infection model and identify research priorities including pool dose-response modelling, epidermis ecology and infection likelihood-based hygiene management.

  5. Comparison of post cesarean infection after single dose versus three doses of prophylactic antibiotic regimen

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    Farnaz Mohammadian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cesarean delivery is a surgical operation which is applied to prevent maternal and fetal complications. Cesarean delivery isn’t without complication and has some complications such as infection. Postoperative infection includes endometritis, wound infection and septic pelvic thrombophlebitis that depend to prophylactic antibiotics and surgical technique. The aim of this study was comparison of post operative infection after single dose and three doses of prophylactic antibiotic regimens. . Material and Methods: This double blind randomized clinical trial was performed on all pregnant women referd to the Vali-Asr Hospital of Zanjan University of Medical Sciences and underwent cesarean delivery during one year from starting study. Participants subsequently were randomized into two groups: A (recieved single dose of prophylactic antibiotic and B (recieved three doses of prophylactic antibiotic. Subjects were checked up for the clinical signs of infection during hospitalization and 10 days after discharge. The results were analyzed by SPSS Software Ver16 and Chi-Square Test. Results: During one year, 146 pregnant women with cesarean delivery entered 2 equal groups (A and B which each group had 73 subjects. During hospitalization after cesarean delivery, 5(6.8% patients of group A and 2(2.7% patients of group B had fever. There was no significant correlation between the two groups. Conclusion: There was no significant correlation between single dose and three doses of prophylactic antibiotic regimens in groups A and B. Therefore, it seems thatthere is no need to use three doses of prophylactic antibiotic for cesarean delivery.Therfore, because of drug resistance and economic loss, single dose of prophylactic antibiotic is recommended for prevention of post cesarean infection

  6. Cryptosporidium cell culture infectivity assay design.

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    King, B J; Keegan, A R; Robinson, B S; Monis, P T

    2011-05-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium, which cause the gastrointestinal disease cryptosporidiosis, still represent a significant cause of water-borne disease worldwide. While intensive efforts have been invested in the development of techniques for parasite culture, in vitro growth has been hampered by a number of factors including low levels of infectivity as well as delayed life-cycle development and poor synchronicity. In this study we examined factors affecting the timing of contact between excysted sporozoites and target host cells and the subsequent impact of this upon the establishment of infection. We demonstrate that excystation rate impacts upon establishment of infection and that in our standard assay format the majority of sporozoites are not close enough to the cell monolayer when they are released from the oocyst to successfully establish infection. However, this can be easily overcome by centrifugation of oocysts onto the cell monolayer, resulting in approximately 4-fold increases in sporozoite attachment and subsequent infection. We further demonstrate that excystation procedures can be tailored to control excystation rate to match the assay end purpose and that excystation rate can influence data interpretation. Finally, the addition of both a centrifugation and washing step post-sporozoite attachment may be appropriate when considering the design of in vitro culture experiments for developmental analysis and stage-specific gene expression as this appears to increase the synchronicity of early developmental stages.

  7. Quantitative-PCR Assessment of Cryptosporidium parvum Cell Culture Infection

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    Di Giovanni, George D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative TaqMan PCR method was developed for assessing the Cryptosporidium parvum infection of in vitro cultivated human ileocecal adenocarcinoma (HCT-8) cell cultures. This method, termed cell culture quantitative sequence detection (CC-QSD), has numerous applications, several of which are presented. CC-QSD was used to investigate parasite infection in cell culture over time, the effects of oocyst treatment on infectivity and infectivity assessment of different C. parvum isolates. CC-Q...

  8. Cultured corneas show dendritic spread and restrict herpes simplex virus infection that is not observed with cultured corneal cells

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    Thakkar, Neel; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Agelidis, Alex; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Mangano, Kyle; Patel, Shrey; Tekin, Sati Zeynep; Shukla, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) causes life-long morbidities in humans. While fever blisters are more common, occasionally the cornea is infected resulting in vision loss. A very intriguing aspect of HSV-1 corneal infection is that the virus spread is normally restricted to only a small fraction of cells on the corneal surface that connect with each other in a dendritic fashion. Here, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the susceptibility of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells to HSV-1 infection, we infected HCE cells at three different dosages of HSV-1 and measured the outcomes in terms of viral entry, gene and protein expression, viral replication and cytokine induction. In cultured cells, infectivity and cytokine induction were observed even at the minimum viral dosage tested, while a more pronounced dose-restricted infectivity was seen in ex vivo cultures of porcine corneas. Use of fluorescent HSV-1 virions demonstrated a pattern of viral spread ex vivo that mimics clinical findings. We conclude that HCE cell cultures are highly susceptible to infection whereas the cultured corneas demonstrate a higher ability to restrict the infection even in the absence of systemic immune system. The restriction is helped in part by local interferon response and the unique cellular architecture of the cornea. PMID:28198435

  9. Once versus twice daily gentamicin dosing for infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholtz, Kristine; Larsen, Carsten Toftager; Schaadt, Bente

    2011-01-01

    to half-life, mean CRP and leukocytes. Results: Baseline GFR was similar in the two groups. Both groups displayed a significant fall in GFR from admission to discharge. The mean decrease in GFR was as follows: with once daily gentamicin, 17.0% (95% confidence interval 7.5– 26.5), and with twice daily......Objectives: The aim of this randomized study was to investigate the effects of once versus twice daily gentamicin dosing on renal function and measures of infectious disease in a population with infective endocarditis (IE). Methods: Seventy-one IE patients needing gentamicin treatment according...... to guidelines were randomized to either once (n = 37) or twice daily (n = 34) doses of gentamicin. Kidney function (glomerular filtration rate, GFR) was measured with an isotope method ( 51 Cr-EDTA) at the beginning of treatment and at discharge. Treatment efficacy was assessed by C-reactive protein (CRP) time...

  10. Comparison of in vitro cell culture and a mouse assay for measuring infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum.

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    Rochelle, Paul A; Marshall, Marilyn M; Mead, Jan R; Johnson, Anne M; Korich, Dick G; Rosen, Jeffrey S; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-08-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the "gold standard," mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  11. Salmonella enteritidis deposition in eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with different oral doses.

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    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Guard, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to Salmonella Enteritidis testing and control programs in commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk-reduction requires a detailed and comprehensive understanding of how Salmonella Enteritidis infections in hens result in deposition of the pathogen inside eggs. The present study sought to resolve some incompletely defined aspects of the relationship between Salmonella Enteritidis oral-exposure dose levels in experimentally infected laying hens and the frequency and location of subsequent egg contamination. In two trials, groups of specific-pathogen-free hens were experimentally inoculated with oral doses of 10(4), 10(6), or 10(8) CFU of a phage type 4 Salmonella Enteritidis strain. Eggs were collected 5 to 23 days postinoculation, and the yolk and albumen of each egg were cultured separately to detect Salmonella Enteritidis contamination. Larger oral doses of Salmonella Enteritidis administered to hens were associated with significant increases in the frequencies of both yolk and albumen contamination. Moreover, Salmonella Enteritidis was found in the albumen of a far-higher proportion of contaminated eggs from hens given the largest dose than from the other two groups. Salmonella Enteritidis contamination was detected in 0.7% of yolk and 0.2% of albumen samples after inoculation of hens with 10(4) CFU, 4.0% of yolk and 1.7% of albumen samples after inoculation with 10(6) CFU, and 6.5% of yolk and 10.8% of albumen samples after inoculation with 10(8) CFU. These results demonstrate that oral-exposure doses of Salmonella Enteritidis for laying hens can significantly affect both the frequency and location of deposition of this pathogen inside eggs.

  12. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

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    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  13. Bartonella henselae Infective Endocarditis Detected by a Prolonged Blood Culture

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    Mito, Tsutomu; Hirota, Yusuke; Suzuki, Shingo; Noda, Kazutaka; Uehara, Takanori; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese man was admitted with a 4-month history of fatigue and exertional dyspnea. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a vegetation on the aortic valve and severe aortic regurgitation. Accordingly, infective endocarditis and heart failure were diagnosed. Although a blood culture was negative on day 7 after admission, a prolonged blood culture with subculture was performed according to the patient's history of contact with cats. Consequently, Bartonella henselae was isolated. Bartonella species are fastidious bacteria that cause blood culture-negative infective endocarditis. This case demonstrates that B. henselae may be detected by prolonged incubation of blood cultures. PMID:27746451

  14. Study on application of high doses plasmodium berghei in cell culture

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    Spencer, L. M.; De Santis, M.; Davila, J.; Foinquinos, A.; Salcedo, E.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2012-02-01

    Malaria, one of the most important infection disease problems in the world, is caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. This disease is responsible for hundreds of the millions of clinical cases and more than one million deaths per year, for this reason, malaria is a priority and the WHO estimates that half of the world population is at risk. In this work we study how the absorbed dose inactivates the parasite (Plasmodium berghei) in rodent model (BALB/c mice), by applying X-ray irradiation. The dose was increased from 10 to 50 Gy in parasitized red blood cells (PRBC) with merozoite stage using in vitro short cultures. Also the reduction of the irradiation effect was determined by intra-peritoneal inoculations of irradiated parasites. Afterwards, the parasitaemia was assessed daily on smears made from tail blood and stained with Giemsa's reagent. Besides, the effect of irradiation was evaluated using an immunological test as indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The results of this study showed that the most effective radiation for inactivation of parasites is about 50 Gy and the immunofluorescence pattern showed a different distribution of the fluorescence on parasites. These results showed direct correlation between the effect of irradiated parasites and parasitaemia in the group of mice infected with RBC after 50 Gy irradiation. Our results indicated that the threshold is between 30 to 50 Gy to inactivate the parasites.

  15. The role of culture media on embryonation and subsequent infectivity of Capillaria obsignata eggs.

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    Tiersch, K M; Daş, G; Samson-Himmelstjerna, G V; Gauly, M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether infectivity of Capillaria obsignata eggs depends on media culture used for embryonation. Intact female worms were kept in one of following four media: 0.5 % formalin, 2 % formalin, 0.1 % potassium dichromate and 0.1 N sulfuric acid. Embryonation rates of the eggs were quantified either daily in intact females for 16 days, or weekly in disrupted females. Infectivity of the embryonated eggs was tested through an experimental infection of chickens with a single dose of 250 eggs/ bird. The vast majority of the eggs (>82 %) in the first two thirds of the uteri was able to complete embryonation, irrespective of the culture media used for incubation. However, only 32.6 % of total eggs could be harvested after disruption of the intact females. Embryonation rates of the eggs from disrupted worms were different among four culture media, with 0.1 N sulfuric acid resulting in the highest embryonation rate (44.2 %). All the experimentally infected birds harboured mature worms, with varying establishment rates depending on the culture media (P media. However, disruption of the intact females results in lower number of harvestable embryonated eggs, with a considerable variation due to culture media used. With the exception of 0.1 % potassium dichromate, any of the three media, particularly 0.1 N sulfuric acid, can be suggested for embryonation of C. obsignata eggs.

  16. CT patterns of fungal pulmonary infections of the lung: Comparison of standard-dose and simulated low-dose CT

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    Christe, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.christe@insel.ch [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Lin, Margaret C., E-mail: mc_lin@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Yen, Andrew C., E-mail: acyen@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Hallett, Rich L., E-mail: xraydoc97@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Roychoudhury, Kingshuk, E-mail: kingshuk@statucc.ie [Statistics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Schmitzberger, Florian, E-mail: florians@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Fleischmann, Dominik, E-mail: d.fleischmann@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Leung, Ann N., E-mail: aleung@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Rubin, Geoffry D., E-mail: grubin@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Vock, Peter, E-mail: peter.vock@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Roos, Justus E., E-mail: justus.roos@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of radiation dose reduction on the appearance and visual quantification of specific CT patterns of fungal infection in immuno-compromised patients. Materials and methods: Raw data of thoracic CT scans (64 × 0.75 mm, 120 kVp, 300 reference mAs) from 41 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary fungal infection were collected. In 32 patients fungal infection could be proven (median age of 55.5 years, range 35–83). A total of 267 cuboids showing CT patterns of fungal infection and 27 cubes having no disease were reconstructed at the original and 6 simulated tube currents of 100, 40, 30, 20, 10, and 5 reference mAs. Eight specific fungal CT patterns were analyzed by three radiologists: 76 ground glass opacities, 42 ground glass nodules, 51 mixed, part solid, part ground glass nodules, 36 solid nodules, 5 lobulated nodules, 6 spiculated nodules, 14 cavitary nodules, and 37 foci of air-space disease. The standard of reference was a consensus subjective interpretation by experts whom were not readers in the study. Results: The mean sensitivity and standard deviation for detecting pathological cuboids/disease using standard dose CT was 0.91 ± 0.07. Decreasing dose did not affect sensitivity significantly until the lowest dose level of 5 mAs (0.87 ± 0.10, p = 0.012). Nodular pattern discrimination was impaired below the dose level of 30 reference mAs: specificity for fungal ‘mixed nodules’ decreased significantly at 20, 10 and 5 reference mAs (p < 0.05). At lower dose levels, classification drifted from ‘solid’ to ‘mixed nodule’, although no lesion was missed. Conclusion: Our simulation data suggest that tube current levels can be reduced from 300 to 30 reference mAs without impairing the diagnostic information of specific CT patterns of pulmonary fungal infections.

  17. Evaluation of a single dose versus a divided dose regimen of amoxycillin in treatment of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in pigs.

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    Lauritzen, B; Lykkesfeldt, J; Friis, C

    2005-08-01

    The theory of a time-dependent effect of amoxycillin was examined in a model of porcine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Ap)-infection using clinically relevant dosage regimens. Twenty hours after infection of fourteen pigs, when clinical signs of pneumonia were present, one group of pigs received a single dose of amoxycillin (20 mg/kg, i.m.), whereas another group received four doses of 5 mg/kg injected at 8-h intervals. A similar AUC of the plasma amoxycillin concentration versus time curve was obtained in the two groups, whereas the maximum concentration was threefold higher using the single high dose. Plasma amoxycillin was above the MIC for twice as long using the fractionated dosage scheme. The condition of the animals was evaluated by clinical and haematological observations combined with quantification of biochemical infection markers: C-reactive protein, zinc and ascorbic acid. Within 48 h of treatment, the pigs in both treatment groups recovered clinically. No significant differences in the time-course of clinical observations or plasma concentrations of the biomarkers of infection were observed between the two treatments. In conclusion, the efficacy of these two dosage regimens of amoxycillin was not significantly different in treatment of acute Ap-infection in pigs.

  18. Repeat urine cultures in children with urinary tract infection

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    Risky Vitria Prasetyo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs are the second leading cause of infection in children, following respiratory tract infections. Repeat urine cultures after antibiotic treatment are routinely obtained in clinical practice to verify proof of bacteriologic cure. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommended repeat cultures, due to increased cost and discomfort to patients. Objective To determine the frequency of positive repeat urine cultures after 3 days of antibiotics in children with UTIs. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on children with UTIs who visited the Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Child Health at Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya from January 2006 to December 2011. Results of repeat urine cultures were obtained after 3 days of antibiotic treatment. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results Of the 779 pediatric UTI cases, repeat urine cultures were performed in 264 (33.9% cases. Of the 264 patients who comprised our study, there were similar numbers of girls and boys (50.4% vs. 49.6%, respectively. The mean age of patients was 43.9 (SD 1.59 months and 35.5% of subjects were aged under 1 year. In the initial urine cultures of our subjects, Escherichia coli was the most common organism found, with 92 cases (34.8%, compared to 58 cases (21.9% of Klebsiella pneumoniae and 29 cases (10.9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Rrepeat urine cultures showed no bacterial growth in 168 cases (63.6%. Conclusion Mostly negative repeat urine cultures will probably obviate the need of this test in daily routine practice. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:170-4].

  19. A comparative study of Multiple versus Single infection doses of ...

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    kemrilib

    Protective immunity has been shown to be impacted on the Olive baboon ... to light for 5 consecutive weeks to exclude wild S. haematobium infection. .... Devices, Palo Alto, CA). Adult worm .... group had mild cellular infiltration along the veins.

  20. Extended application of dose-response models of infection on injectable insulin products in vials

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    Mostafa Essam Eissa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial contamination from in-use application of multidose pharmaceutical products constitutes health hazard to the consumer especially when considering injectable medicines. In the present study, an attempt has been made to integrate dose-response models of infections with pharmacopeial preservative efficacy test (PET in a single simulation study that supposed accidental reuse of hypodermic syringe. Probability risk ratio of infection from assumed equal doses of two types of microbes by two routes of infection was greater than 1300 at most equivalent administration doses when considering the same reduction factor for both bacteria in the antimicrobial efficacy test (AET. The probability of infection would diminish much more rapidly for Staphylococcus aureus rather than Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The short interval of product administration increased the risk of infection with regular-type of Insulin vials. The current quantitative study provided extension and made the best use of the standard AET but also highlighted its limitations.

  1. Low-Dose UVA Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultured Human Dermal Fibroblasts

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    Zhongrong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the mechanism of the adaptive response induced by low-dose ultraviolet A (UVA radiation. Methods. Cultured dermal fibroblasts were irradiated by a lethal dose of UVA (86.4 J/cm2 with preirradiation of single or repetitive low dose of UVA (7.2 J/cm2. Alterations of cellular morphology were observed by light microscope and electron microscope. Cell cycle and cellular apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometer. The extent of DNA damage was determined by single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE. Results. The cultured dermal fibroblasts, with pretreatment of single or repetitive irradiation of 7.2 J/cm2 UVA relieved toxic reaction of cellular morphology and arrest of cell cycle, decreased apoptosis ratio, reduced DNA chain breakage, and accelerated DNA repair caused by subsequent 86.4 J/cm2 UVA irradiation. Compared with nonpretreatment groups, all those differences were significant (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Conclusions. The adaptation reaction might depend on the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA irradiation. Low-dose UVA radiation might induce adaptive response that may protect cultured dermal fibroblasts from the subsequent challenged dose of UVA damage. The duration and protective capability of the adaptive reaction might be related to the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA Irradiation.

  2. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability

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    Leslie Chávez-Galán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies.

  3. Taenia crassiceps Infection Attenuates Multiple Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

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    Arlett Espinoza-Jiménez; Irma Rivera-Montoya; Roberto Cárdenas-Arreola; Liborio Morán; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2010-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps, like other helminths, can exert regulatory effects on the immune system of its host. This study investigates the effect of chronic T. crassiceps infection on the outcome of Multiple Low Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes (MLDS). Healthy or previously T. crassiceps-infected mice received MLDS and type 1 diabetes (T1D) symptoms were evaluated for 6 weeks following the induction of MLDS. T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed lower blood glucose levels throughout the study. A...

  4. Low dose of lipopolysaccharide pretreatment can alleviate the inflammatory response in wound infection mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wang; Yang Liu; Yan-Rui Zhao; Jun-Lin Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:To assess the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pretreatment on wound infection mouse model and evaluate the biological safety of the optimal pretreatment dose in vivo.Methods:Mice were pretreated with LPS of different doses at 48 and 24 h before femoral medial longitudinal incision was made and infected with different bacteria.Results:It is showed that 0.5 mg/kg/time of LPS pretreatment can significantly alleviate the inflammation in mouse model infected with methicillin-resistances Staphylococcus aureus,methicillin-sensitive S.aureus,Pseudomonas aeruginosa,or Escherichia coli compared with doses of 0.25 mg/kg/time,1 mg/kg/time,and 1.5 mg/kg/time.Conclusions:LP5 pretreatment can alleviate the inflammation in mouse model and the optimal dose is 0.5 mg/kg/time,and meanwhile it does not damage organs' function.

  5. Dose Response of MARV/Angola Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques following IM or Aerosol Exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C Johnston

    Full Text Available Marburg virus infection in humans causes a hemorrhagic disease with a high case fatality rate. Countermeasure development requires the use of well-characterized animal models that mimic human disease. To further characterize the cynomolgus macaque model of MARV/Angola, two independent dose response studies were performed using the intramuscular or aerosol routes of exposure. All animals succumbed at the lowest target dose; therefore, a dose effect could not be determined. For intramuscular-exposed animals, 100 PFU was the first target dose that was not significantly different than higher target doses in terms of time to disposition, clinical pathology, and histopathology. Although a significant difference was not observed between aerosol-exposed animals in the 10 PFU and 100 PFU target dose groups, 100 PFU was determined to be the lowest target dose that could be consistently obtained and accurately titrated in aerosol studies.

  6. Improved Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection by Culturing Periprosthetic Tissue Specimens in Blood Culture Bottles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha N. Peel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite known low sensitivity, culture of periprosthetic tissue specimens on agars and in broths is routine. Culture of periprosthetic tissue samples in blood culture bottles (BCBs is potentially more convenient, but it has been evaluated in a limited way and has not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of inoculation of periprosthetic tissue specimens into blood culture bottles with standard agar and thioglycolate broth culture, applying Bayesian latent class modeling (LCM in addition to applying the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection. This prospective cohort study was conducted over a 9-month period (August 2013 to April 2014 at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and included all consecutive patients undergoing revision arthroplasty. Overall, 369 subjects were studied; 117 (32% met IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection, and 82% had late chronic infection. Applying LCM, inoculation of tissues into BCBs was associated with a 47% improvement in sensitivity compared to the sensitivity of conventional agar and broth cultures (92.1 versus 62.6%, respectively; this magnitude of change was similar when IDSA criteria were applied (60.7 versus 44.4%, respectively; P = 0.003. The time to microorganism detection was shorter with BCBs than with standard media (P < 0.0001, with aerobic and anaerobic BCBs yielding positive results within a median of 21 and 23 h, respectively. Results of our study demonstrate that the semiautomated method of periprosthetic tissue culture in blood culture bottles is more sensitive than and as specific as agar and thioglycolate broth cultures and yields results faster.

  7. The effect of single dose versus two doses of praziquantel on Schistosoma haematobium infection and pathology among school-aged children in Mali

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacko, M.; Magnussen, Pascal; Traoré, M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of two doses of 40 mg/kg praziquantel with 2 weeks interval versus a standard single dose of 40 mg/kg on cure rates, egg reduction, intensity of infection, and micro-haematuria in Schistosoma haematobium infections. A randomised controlled interventi...

  8. Moles of a Substance per Cell Is a Highly Informative Dosing Metric in Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doskey, Claire M; van 't Erve, Thomas J; Wagner, Brett A; Buettner, Garry R

    2015-01-01

    The biological consequences upon exposure of cells in culture to a dose of xenobiotic are not only dependent on biological variables, but also the physical aspects of experiments e.g. cell number and media volume. Dependence on physical aspects is often overlooked due to the unrecognized ambiguity in the dominant metric used to express exposure, i.e. initial concentration of xenobiotic delivered to the culture medium over the cells. We hypothesize that for many xenobiotics, specifying dose as moles per cell will reduce this ambiguity. Dose as moles per cell can also provide additional information not easily obtainable with traditional dosing metrics. Here, 1,4-benzoquinone and oligomycin A are used as model compounds to investigate moles per cell as an informative dosing metric. Mechanistic insight into reactions with intracellular molecules, differences between sequential and bolus addition of xenobiotic and the influence of cell volume and protein content on toxicity are also investigated. When the dose of 1,4-benzoquinone or oligomycin A was specified as moles per cell, toxicity was independent of the physical conditions used (number of cells, volume of medium). When using moles per cell as a dose-metric, direct quantitative comparisons can be made between biochemical or biological endpoints and the dose of xenobiotic applied. For example, the toxicity of 1,4-benzoquinone correlated inversely with intracellular volume for all five cell lines exposed (C6, MDA-MB231, A549, MIA PaCa-2, and HepG2). Moles per cell is a useful and informative dosing metric in cell culture. This dosing metric is a scalable parameter that: can reduce ambiguity between experiments having different physical conditions; provides additional mechanistic information; allows direct comparison between different cells; affords a more uniform platform for experimental design; addresses the important issue of repeatability of experimental results, and could increase the translatability of

  9. Moles of a Substance per Cell Is a Highly Informative Dosing Metric in Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Doskey

    Full Text Available The biological consequences upon exposure of cells in culture to a dose of xenobiotic are not only dependent on biological variables, but also the physical aspects of experiments e.g. cell number and media volume. Dependence on physical aspects is often overlooked due to the unrecognized ambiguity in the dominant metric used to express exposure, i.e. initial concentration of xenobiotic delivered to the culture medium over the cells. We hypothesize that for many xenobiotics, specifying dose as moles per cell will reduce this ambiguity. Dose as moles per cell can also provide additional information not easily obtainable with traditional dosing metrics.Here, 1,4-benzoquinone and oligomycin A are used as model compounds to investigate moles per cell as an informative dosing metric. Mechanistic insight into reactions with intracellular molecules, differences between sequential and bolus addition of xenobiotic and the influence of cell volume and protein content on toxicity are also investigated.When the dose of 1,4-benzoquinone or oligomycin A was specified as moles per cell, toxicity was independent of the physical conditions used (number of cells, volume of medium. When using moles per cell as a dose-metric, direct quantitative comparisons can be made between biochemical or biological endpoints and the dose of xenobiotic applied. For example, the toxicity of 1,4-benzoquinone correlated inversely with intracellular volume for all five cell lines exposed (C6, MDA-MB231, A549, MIA PaCa-2, and HepG2.Moles per cell is a useful and informative dosing metric in cell culture. This dosing metric is a scalable parameter that: can reduce ambiguity between experiments having different physical conditions; provides additional mechanistic information; allows direct comparison between different cells; affords a more uniform platform for experimental design; addresses the important issue of repeatability of experimental results, and could increase the

  10. The effect of host age and inoculation dose on infection dynamics of Angiostrongylus vasorum in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Pia; Monrad, Jesper; Kapel, Christian M. O.; Kristensen, Annemarie T.; Jensen, Asger L.; Thamsborg, Stig M

    2017-01-01

    Background Infections and clinical cases of Angiostrongylus vasorum in dogs are found increasingly across Europe, thus rendering knowledge on its infection biology more important. We used red foxes as a carnivore model to examine the effect of host age and infection dose on the establishment of adult A. vasorum in single experimental infections. Methods Fourteen juvenile and fourteen adult red foxes, free of metastrongyloid infections, were given a low (50) or high (200) dose of third-stage l...

  11. Optimizing ribavirin dose in HIV/hepatitis C (HCV co-infected individuals treated for HCV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Farley

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C (HCV and HIV share common transmission pathways and the acquisition of both viruses are relatively common. Concurrent treatment for HCV with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART should be considered in HIV co-infected individuals to decrease the progression of liver damage. Adverse effects and less satisfactory treatment outcomes are often concerns when treating co-infected individuals. Although, direct acting antivirals (DAAs may increase SVR, they may not be possible because of drug-drug interactions. he objective of this study is to investigate the difference in response rates of HCV treatment in HIV co-infected inmates with varying doses of ribavirin. Retrospective medical chart reviews of 52 HCV/HIV co-infected inmates who underwent HCV therapy between 2003 and 2010. All received standard doses of pegylated interferon alpha 2a or 2b and 800–1600 mg of ribavirin depending on weight. The recommended dosage for genotypes 2 and 3 is 800 mg/day. For other genotypes, if weight is<75 kg, the recommended ribavirin dose is 1000 mg/day or 1200 mg/day if>75 kg. Efficacy was defined as attaining sustained virological response (SVR six months post treatment. Univariate analyses was performed using SPSS-18; Chi-square test with p-value<0.05 was defined significant. 52 co-infected (3 females & 49 males were identified. Mean age was 40±7 years. Caucasians accounted for 84.6%; First Nations for 13.5% and Asians 1.9%. 36 were concurrently on HAART. The genotype distribution was: geno 1, 66.0%; geno 2, 7.5%; geno 3, 26.4%. SVR by ribavirin dosage ratio (actual dosage/recommended dosage:=1.0; 41.2% (14/34,>1.0; 58.8% (20/34. Doses greater than 1.5 times were associated with higher adverse events and lower SVR. Suboptimal doses of weight-based ribavirin may be contributing to a lower treatment response in HCV/HIV co-infectants. In our experience, the optimal dose of ribavirin is between 1 and 1.2 times the current recommended dose. We

  12. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  13. Low-dose growth hormone therapy reduces inflammation in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindboe, Johanne Bjerre; Langkilde, Anne; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has drastically increased the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients. However, HIV-infected patients exhibit increased inflammation and 33-58% exhibit a characteristic fat re-distribution termed HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS...... to investigate the impact of low-dose rhGH therapy on inflammation in HIV-infected patients. METHODS: Forty-six cART-treated HIV-infected men were included in the HIV-GH low-dose (HIGH/Low) study: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial. Subjects were randomized 3:2 to 0.7 mg/day rhGH, or placebo......). Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) has been tested as treatment of HALS. Low-dose rhGH therapy improves thymopoiesis and fat distribution in HIV-infected patients and appears to be well tolerated. However, since high-dose rhGH is associated with adverse events related to inflammation, we wanted...

  14. Antibody response against Trichinella spiralis in experimentally infected rats is dose dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franssen Frits FJ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Domestic pigs are the main representatives of the domestic cycle of Trichinella spiralis that play a role in transmission to humans. In Europe, backyard pigs of small household farms are the most important risks for humans to obtain trichinellosis. Rats might play a role in the transmission of Trichinella spiralis from domestic to sylvatic animals and vice versa. In order to be able to investigate the role of wild rats in the epidemiology of T. spiralis in The Netherlands, we studied the dynamics of antibody response after T. spiralis infections in experimental rats, using infection doses ranging from very low (10 muscle larvae, ML, per rat to very high (16 000 ML per rat. To evaluate the feasibility of rats surviving high infection doses with T. spiralis, clinical and pathological parameters were quantified. Serological tools for detecting T. spiralis in rats were developed to quantitatively study the correlation between parasite load and immunological response. The results show that an infection dose-dependent antibody response was developed in rats after infection with as low as 10 ML up to a level of 10 000 ML. A positive correlation was found between the number of recovered ML and serum antibody levels, although specific measured antibody levels correspond to a wide range of LPG values. Serum antibodies of rats that were infected even with 10 or 25 ML could readily be detected by use of the T. spiralis western blot 2 weeks post infection. We conclude that based on these low infection doses, serologic tests are a useful tool to survey T. spiralis in wild rats.

  15. Antibody response against Trichinella spiralis in experimentally infected rats is dose dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Frits F J; Fonville, Manoj; Takumi, Katsuhisa; Vallée, Isabelle; Grasset, Aurélie; Koedam, Marie A; Wester, Piet W; Boireau, Pascal; van der Giessen, Joke W B

    2011-11-30

    Domestic pigs are the main representatives of the domestic cycle of Trichinella spiralis that play a role in transmission to humans. In Europe, backyard pigs of small household farms are the most important risks for humans to obtain trichinellosis. Rats might play a role in the transmission of Trichinella spiralis from domestic to sylvatic animals and vice versa. In order to be able to investigate the role of wild rats in the epidemiology of T. spiralis in The Netherlands, we studied the dynamics of antibody response after T. spiralis infections in experimental rats, using infection doses ranging from very low (10 muscle larvae, ML, per rat) to very high (16,000 ML per rat). To evaluate the feasibility of rats surviving high infection doses with T. spiralis, clinical and pathological parameters were quantified. Serological tools for detecting T. spiralis in rats were developed to quantitatively study the correlation between parasite load and immunological response. The results show that an infection dose-dependent antibody response was developed in rats after infection with as low as 10 ML up to a level of 10,000 ML. A positive correlation was found between the number of recovered ML and serum antibody levels, although specific measured antibody levels correspond to a wide range of LPG values. Serum antibodies of rats that were infected even with 10 or 25 ML could readily be detected by use of the T. spiralis western blot 2 weeks post infection. We conclude that based on these low infection doses, serologic tests are a useful tool to survey T. spiralis in wild rats.

  16. West Nile virus infection in American Robins: new insights on dose response.

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    Kaci K VanDalen

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a vector-borne pathogen that was first detected in the United States in 1999. The natural transmission cycle of WNV involves mosquito vectors and avian hosts, which vary in their competency to transmit the virus. American robins are an abundant backyard species in the United States and appear to have an important role in the amplification and dissemination of WNV. In this study we examine the response of American robins to infection with various WNV doses within the range of those administered by some natural mosquito vectors. Thirty American robins were assigned a WNV dosage treatment and needle inoculated with 10(0.95 PFU, 10(1.26 PFU, 10(2.15 PFU, or 10(3.15 PFU. Serum samples were tested for the presence of infectious WNV and/or antibodies, while oral swabs were tested for the presence of WNV RNA. Five of the 30 (17% robins had neutralizing antibodies to WNV prior to the experiment and none developed viremia or shed WNV RNA. The proportion of WNV-seronegative birds that became viremic after WNV inoculation increased in a dose dependent manner. At the lowest dose, only 40% (2/5 of the inoculated birds developed productive infections while at the highest dose, 100% (7/7 of the birds became viremic. Oral shedding of WNV RNA followed a similar trend where robins inoculated with the lower two doses were less likely to shed viral RNA (25% than robins inoculated with one of the higher doses (92%. Viremia titers and morbidity did not increase in a dose dependent manner; only two birds succumbed to infection and, interestingly, both were inoculated with the lowest dose of WNV. It is clear that the disease ecology of WNV is a complex interplay of hosts, vectors, and viral dose delivered.

  17. West Nile virus infection in American Robins: new insights on dose response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDalen, Kaci K; Hall, Jeffrey S; Clark, Larry; McLean, Robert G; Smeraski, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a vector-borne pathogen that was first detected in the United States in 1999. The natural transmission cycle of WNV involves mosquito vectors and avian hosts, which vary in their competency to transmit the virus. American robins are an abundant backyard species in the United States and appear to have an important role in the amplification and dissemination of WNV. In this study we examine the response of American robins to infection with various WNV doses within the range of those administered by some natural mosquito vectors. Thirty American robins were assigned a WNV dosage treatment and needle inoculated with 10(0.95) PFU, 10(1.26) PFU, 10(2.15) PFU, or 10(3.15) PFU. Serum samples were tested for the presence of infectious WNV and/or antibodies, while oral swabs were tested for the presence of WNV RNA. Five of the 30 (17%) robins had neutralizing antibodies to WNV prior to the experiment and none developed viremia or shed WNV RNA. The proportion of WNV-seronegative birds that became viremic after WNV inoculation increased in a dose dependent manner. At the lowest dose, only 40% (2/5) of the inoculated birds developed productive infections while at the highest dose, 100% (7/7) of the birds became viremic. Oral shedding of WNV RNA followed a similar trend where robins inoculated with the lower two doses were less likely to shed viral RNA (25%) than robins inoculated with one of the higher doses (92%). Viremia titers and morbidity did not increase in a dose dependent manner; only two birds succumbed to infection and, interestingly, both were inoculated with the lowest dose of WNV. It is clear that the disease ecology of WNV is a complex interplay of hosts, vectors, and viral dose delivered.

  18. Early syphilis treatment in HIV-infected patients: single dose vs. three doses of benzathine penicillin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Silva, M; Azevedo, C; Azevedo, F; Lisboa, C

    2016-10-01

    Current treatment guidelines for early stages of syphilis are the same regardless of HIV serostatus. There is still controversy about the best treatment for syphilis in HIV patients and the current recommendations are based on limited data. The primary goal of this study was to compare the serological response rates to a single dose vs. three weekly doses of benzathine penicillin G (BPG) in HIV-infected patients with early syphilis and to assess the adequacy of current recommendations. Clinical and laboratory data of HIV patients with early syphilis treated in Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic between January 2000 and December 2014 were recorded. A good serological response was defined as a ≥4-fold decline in Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) titre within 12 months after treatment. Serological failure was defined as a lack of at least fourfold decrease in VDRL titres within 12 months after treatment. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 60 patients were enrolled in the study. Seventeen (28.3%) patients were treated with a single dose of BPG, while in 43 (71.7%) patients, three weekly doses were used. Fifty eight (96.7%) had a good serological response at 12 months and seroconversion was confirmed in 29 (48.3%) patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the two treatment groups regarding serological response, seroconversion rate and the time needed to obtain a good serological response. Furthermore, treatment response was not affected by the number of CD4 cells. The results of our study support the current international treatment guidelines, recommending early syphilis treatment with a single dose of BPG in HIV patients. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. Short Term, Low Dose Simvastatin Pretreatment Alters Memory Immune Function Following Secondary Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelser, Lisa K; Walker, Callum; Burns, Erin M; Curry, Michael; Black, Nathanael; Metzler, Jennifer A; McDowell, Susan A; Bruns, Heather A

    Statins are potent modulators of immune responses, resulting in their ability to enhance host survival from primary bacterial infections. Alterations in primary immune responses that may be beneficial for survival following infection may also result in alterations in the generation of the immunologic memory response and subsequently affect immune responses mounted during secondary bacterial infection. In this study, we report that levels of total serum IgG2c, following primary infection, were decreased in simvastatin pretreated mice, and investigate the effect of simvastatin treatment, prior to primary infection, on immune responses activated during secondary S. aureus infection. A secondary infection model was implemented whereby simvastatin pretreated and control mice were reinfected with S. aureus 14 days after primary infection, with no additional simvastatin treatment, and assessed for survival and alterations in immune function. While survivability to secondary S. aureus infection was not different between simvastatin pretreated and control mice, memory B and T lymphocyte functions were altered. Memory B cells, isolated 14 days after secondary infection, from simvastatin pretreated mice and stimulated ex vivo produced increased levels of IgG1 compared to memory B cells isolated from control mice, while levels of IgM and IgG2c remained similar. Furthermore, memory B and T lymphocytes from simvastatin pretreated mice exhibited a decreased proliferative response when stimulated ex vivo compared to memory cells isolated from control mice. These findings demonstrate the ability of a short term, low dose simvastatin treatment to modulate memory immune function.

  20. Dose responses for Colletotrichum lindemuthianum elicitor-mediated enzyme induction in French bean cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R A; Dey, P M; Murphy, D L; Whitehead, I M

    1981-03-01

    The induction of L-phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) and flavanone synthase in French bean cell suspension cultures in response to heat-released elicitor from cell walls of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is highly dependent upon elicitor concentration. The elicitor dose-response curve for PAL induction shows two maxima at around 17.5 and 50 μg elicitor carbohydrate per ml culture, whereas the flavanone synthase response shows one maximum at around 100 μg ml(-1). The PAL response is independent of the elicitor concentration present during the lag phase of enzyme induction; if the initial elicitor concentration is increased after 2 h by addition of extra elicitor, or decreased by dilution of the cultures, the dose response curves obtained reflect the concentration of elicitor present at the time of harvest. PAL induction is not prevented by addition of methyl sugar derivatives to the cultures; α-methyl-D-glucoside, itself a weak elicitor of PAL activity, elicits a multiphasic PAL response when increasing concentrations are added in the presence of Colletotrichum elicitor. Eight fractions with different monosaccharide compositions, obtained from the crude elicitor by gel-filtration, each elicit different dose-responses for PAL induction; the response to unfractionated elicitor is not the sum of the response to the isolated fractions. There is no correlation between the ability of the fractions to induce PAL in the cultures and their ability to act as elicitors of isoflavonoid phytoalexin accumulation in bean hypocotyls.

  1. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic based dosing of ciprofloxacin in complicated urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sabo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ciprofloxacin is often used in treatment of complicated urinary tract infections in areas with high rates of resistance to first line agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of ciprofloxacin in standard dosing regimens in treatment of complicated urinary tract infections. Plasma concentration curves were simulated and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and post-antibiotic effect were determined. Ciprofloxacin MIC ranged from 0.0156 for Gram-negative and to 0.125-0.5 µg/mL for Gram-positive bacteria. Both dosing regimens were suitable for eradication of Gram-negative bacteria, with slight supremacy of 750 mg/12 hours over 500 mg/12 hours dosing regimen. Even though all strains were fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin, pharmaco-kinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters did not meet target thresholds for pathogens with MIC over 0.1-0.2 µg/mL regardless of the administered dose. Ciprofloxacin remains an excellent choice for treatment of complicated urinary tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, but in infection caused by Gram-positive strains, deeper analysis is necessary in order to achieve optimal results.

  2. Low dose lopinavir/ritonavir tablet achieves adequate pharmacokinetic parameters in HIV-infected Thai adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinklom, A.; Puthanakit, T.; Gorowara, M.; Phasomsap, C.; Kerr, S.; Sriheara, C.; Ananworanich, J.; Burger, D.M.; Ruxrungtham, K.; Pancharoen, C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) is an effective and commonly used protease inhibitor in HIV-infected adolescents. Previous data showed high plasma concentrations of LPV in Thai patients. This study determined the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of a low-dose LPV/r tablet (70% of standard dos

  3. Linezolid concentrations in infected soft tissue and bone following repetitive doses in diabetic patients with bacterial foot infections1

    OpenAIRE

    Traunmüller, Friederike; Schintler, Michael V.; Spendel, Stephan; Popovic, Martin; Mauric, Oliver; Scharnagl, Erwin; Joukhadar, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The present study aimed at assessing unbound extracellular concentrations of linezolid in inflamed soft tissue and bone of diabetic patients suffering from severe bacterial foot infections. Linezolid was administered intravenously twice daily at a dosage of 600mg. At steady-state conditions, the microdialysis technique was utilised to sample serially interstitial space fluid from inflamed subcutaneous adipose tissue and metatarsal bone from 0?8h post dose in three represen...

  4. Minimum Effective Dose of Cattle and Sheep BSE for Oral Sheep Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian McGovern

    Full Text Available The minimum dose required to cause infection of Romney and Suffolk sheep of the ARQ/ARQ or ARQ/ARR prion protein gene genotypes following oral inoculation with Romney or Suffolk a sheep Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE-derived or cattle BSE-derived agent was investigated using doses ranging from 0.0005g to 5g. ARQ/ARQ sheep which were methionine (M / threonine (T heterozygous or T/T homozygous at codon 112 of the Prnp gene, dosed ARQ/ARR sheep and undosed controls did not show any evidence of infection. Within groups of susceptible sheep, the minimum effective oral dose of BSE was found to be 0.05g, with higher attack rates following inoculation with the 5g dose. Surprisingly, this study found no effect of dose on survival time suggesting a possible lack of homogeneity within the inoculum. All clinical BSE cases showed PrPd accumulation in brain; however, following cattle BSE inoculation, LRS involvement within Romney recipients was found to be significantly lower than within the Suffolk sheep inoculated group which is in agreement with previous reports.

  5. Monitoring infection: from blood culture to polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Malte; Lehmann, Lutz Eric; Zhang, XiangHong; Stüber, Frank

    2013-06-01

    In patients with sepsis, diagnosis of blood stream infection (BSI) is a key concern to the therapist. Direct verification of pathogens in the blood stream executed by blood cultures (BC) still is regarded as the gold standard up to date. The quickest possible initiation of an appropriate antimicrobial therapy is a cornerstone of an effective therapy. Moreover, in this view BC can also serve to identify antimicrobial agents to target the pathogen. However, when employing BC the time needed until microbiological results are available ranges from 24 up to 72 h. Moreover, infections caused by multiple pathogens often remain undetected and concurrent antibiotic therapy may lower the overall sensitivity. Alternative pathogen characterization can be performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based amplification methods. Results using PCR can be obtained within 6-8 h. Therefore, the time delay until an appropriate therapy can be reduced enormously. Moreover, these methods have the potential to enhance the sensitivity in the diagnosis of blood stream infections. Therefore, PCR based methods might be a valuable adjunct to present procedures of diagnosing bacteraemia.

  6. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  7. Oral dosing with papaya latex is an effective anthelmintic treatment for sheep infected with Haemonchus contortus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnan Alison A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cysteine proteinases in papaya latex have been shown to have potent anthelmintic properties in monogastric hosts such as rodents, pigs and humans, but this has not been demonstrated in ruminants. Methods In two experiments, sheep were infected concurrently with 5,000 infective larvae of Haemonchus contortus and 10,000 infective larvae of Trichostrongylus colubriformis and were then treated with the supernatant from a suspension of papaya latex from day 28 to day 32 post-infection. Faecal egg counts were monitored from a week before treatment until the end of the experiment and worm burdens were assessed on day 35 post-infection. Results We found that the soluble fraction of papaya latex had a potent in vivo effect on the abomasal nematode H. contortus, but not on the small intestinal nematode T. colubriformis. This effect was dose-dependent and at tolerated levels of gavage with papaya latex (117 μmol of active papaya latex supernatant for 4 days, the H. contortus worm burdens were reduced by 98%. Repeated treatment, daily for 4 days, was more effective than a single dose, but efficacy was not enhanced by concurrent treatment with the antacid cimetidine. Conclusions Our results provide support for the idea that cysteine proteinases derived from papaya latex may be developed into novel anthelmintics for the treatment of lumenal stages of gastro-intestinal nematode infections in sheep, particularly those parasitizing the abomasum.

  8. Experimental infection of pigs with three dose levels of Trichuris suis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen S.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to follow the course of Trichuris suisinfection in pigs given infective eggs at low (400 eggs, medium (4,000 eggs and high inoculation dose (40,000 eggs, respectively. Interestingly, despite a 100-fold difference in dose level no significant difference was found in either blood parameters, total faecal egg excretion, fecundity or worm burdens at necropsy 12 weeks post inoculation. The highest and lowest median faecal egg output was found in the medium and high dose group, respectively. With increasing dose level, worm size, establishment and prevalence of T. suis positive pigs decreased while worms were dislocated aborally. In addition there was a highly significant correlation between female worm burden and faecal egg excretion.

  9. Effects of various doses of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection in ovariectomized guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; Hough, A J; Cohen, C; Barron, A L

    1985-01-01

    The effect of various doses of estradiol on genital tract infection by the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) was investigated in ovariectomized guinea pigs. Prolongation of infection, as determined by chlamydial inclusion counts of cells in Giemsa-stained smears of vaginal scrapings, was observed in animals receiving daily doses of 1.0, 10.0, 100.0, or 1000 micrograms of estradiol. In contrast to controls, ascending infection resulting in endometritis was found in animals receiving doses of greater than or equal to 1.0 microgram of estradiol per day. Response to estradiol treatment was reflected in an increase in cervical-uterine wet weight and uterine wall thickness. No differences were observed in time of appearance of antibody titers to GPIC in serum, but a delay in appearance of IgA antibody to GPIC in genital secretions was found in estradiol-treated animals receiving doses of greater than or equal to 1.0 microgram per day.

  10. Does health care role and experience influence perception of safety culture related to preventing infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Barbara I; Harris, Anthony D; Richards, Cheryl L; Belton, Beverly M; Dembry, Louise-Marie; Morton, David J; Xiao, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Growing evidence reveals the importance of improving safety culture in efforts to eliminate health care-associated infections. This multisite, cross-sectional survey examined the association between professional role and health care experience on infection prevention safety culture at 5 hospitals. The findings suggest that frontline health care technicians are less directly engaged in improvement efforts and safety education than other staff and that infection prevention safety culture varies more by hospital than by staff position and experience.

  11. Taenia crassiceps Infection Attenuates Multiple Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

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    Arlett Espinoza-Jiménez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Taenia crassiceps, like other helminths, can exert regulatory effects on the immune system of its host. This study investigates the effect of chronic T. crassiceps infection on the outcome of Multiple Low Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes (MLDS. Healthy or previously T. crassiceps-infected mice received MLDS and type 1 diabetes (T1D symptoms were evaluated for 6 weeks following the induction of MLDS. T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed lower blood glucose levels throughout the study. A significantly lower percentage of T. crassiceps-infected mice (40% developed T1D compared to the uninfected group (100%. Insulitis was remarkably absent in T. crassiceps-infected mice, which had normal pancreatic insulin content, whereas uninfected mice showed a dramatic reduction in pancreatic insulin. Infected mice that received MLDS did not show an increase in their regulatory T cell population, however, they had a greater number of alternatively activated macrophages, higher levels of the cytokine IL-4, and lower levels of TNF-α. Therefore, infection with T. crassiceps causes an immunomodulation that modifies the incidence and development of MLDS-induced autoimmune diabetes.

  12. Effect of single-dose ivermectin therapy on human Onchocerca volvulus infection with onchocercal ocular involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, H S; White, A T; Greene, B M; D'Anna, S A; Keyvan-Larijani, E; Aziz, M A; Williams, P N; Taylor, H R

    1988-08-01

    Ivermectin has shown promise as a potentially safe and effective microfilaricidal drug for the treatment of onchocerciasis. Several limited studies have shown it to have fewer side effects, especially ocular complications, than the currently available drug, diethylcarbamazine. The detailed ocular findings in 200 moderately to heavily infected Liberians who were enrolled in a safety and dose-finding study are presented. They received either 0, 100, 150, or 200 micrograms/kg of ivermectin and were followed up for 12 months. In clinical studies so far carried out ivermectin in a dose of 100, 150, or 200 micrograms/kg has not been associated with any major adverse reactions nor were there any sight-threatening effects even in the presence of severe ocular disease. Each of these doses significantly reduced the ocular microfilaria load for at least 12 months when compared with either the placebo (p less than 0.05) or pretreatment values (p less than 0.001). However, the 100 and 150 micrograms/kg doses caused fewer minor side effects than the higher dose. These results confirm that ivermectin in a single oral dose may be a safe and effective microfilaricidal drug for the treatment of onchocerciasis and that it appears to be free of major ocular side effects.

  13. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4+ T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4+ T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4+ T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  14. Intranasal infection with Chlamydia abortus induces dose-dependent latency and abortion in sheep.

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    David Longbottom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Latency is a key feature of the animal pathogen Chlamydia abortus, where infection remains inapparent in the non-pregnant animal and only becomes evident during a subsequent pregnancy. Often the first sign that an animal is infected is abortion occurring late in gestation. Despite this, little is understood of the underlying mechanisms that control latency or the recrudescence of infection that occurs during subsequent pregnancy. The aim of this study was to develop an experimental model of latency by mimicking the natural route of infection through the intranasal inoculation of non-pregnant sheep with C. abortus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three groups of sheep (groups 1, 2 and 3 were experimentally infected with different doses of C. abortus (5×10(3, 5×10(5 and 5×10(7 inclusion forming units (IFU, respectively prior to mating and monitored over 2 breeding cycles for clinical, microbiological, pathological, immunological and serological outcomes. Two further groups received either negative control inoculum (group 4a,b or were inoculated subcutaneously on day 70 of gestation with 2×10(6 IFU C. abortus (group 5. Animals in groups 1, 2 and 5 experienced an abortion rate of 50-67%, while only one animal aborted in group 3 and none in group 4a,b. Pathological, microbiological, immunological and serological analyses support the view that the maternal protective immune response is influenced by initial exposure to the bacterium. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results show that intranasal administration of non-pregnant sheep with a low/medium dose of C. abortus results in a latent infection that leads in a subsequent pregnancy to infection of the placenta and abortion. In contrast a high dose stimulates protective immunity, resulting in a much lower abortion rate. This model will be useful in understanding the mechanisms of infection underlying latency and onset of disease, as well as in the development of novel therapeutics and

  15. Dose-dependent DNA ruptures induced by the procarcinogen dimethylnitrosamine on primary rat liver cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Figueroa, T; López-Revilla, R; Villa-Treviño, S

    1979-08-01

    The effect of certain procarcinogens, among which demethylnitrosamine (DMN) is included, has been difficult to detect in several short-term assays. An alternative system, in which DMN effects could be easily quantitated, might be useful in studies of chemical carcinogenesis and environmental contamination. To develop such a system, we tested the possibility of measuring the amount of breakage produced by DMN on radiolabeled DNA of primary liver cultures. Rat liver cells were isolated 20 to 24 hr after partial hepatectomy, cultured, and pulse labeled in vitro with [3H]thymidine. Radioactively labeled cultures were treated with DMN or with the direct carcinogen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and then lysed directly onto alkaline sucrose gradients. DMN and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine caused a dose-dependent reduction in the molecular weight of DNA, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine being approximately 1000 times more potent than DMN. DNA breaks appeared to be carcinogen specific and not due to cell death since treatment with high doses of cycloheximide, a noncarcinogenic hepatotoxic, was without significant effect. Our data indicate that detection of DNA breaks constitutes a more sensitive assay of DMN effects than does unscheduled DNA synthesis in primary liver cultures. Therefore, it could be useful to extend our work to determine the general applicability of quantitation of DNA breaks in liver cells as a short-term assay for the identification of possible carcinogens and procarcinogens.

  16. Safety and Adherence for 12 Weekly Doses of Isoniazid and Rifapentine for Pediatric Tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andrea T; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    Traditional treatment of tuberculosis infection (TBI) is efficacious, but adherence is low. Eighty children with TBI received a 12-dose once-weekly isoniazid/rifapentine regimen; 79 (99%) completed therapy, 94% reported no adverse events, 1 child had mildly elevated transaminases but 1 adolescent later developed pulmonary TB. Isoniazid/rifapentine is safe, is well tolerated and has much higher completion rates than traditional TBI regimens.

  17. Curcumin alleviates matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -9 activities during eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in cultured cells and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Parag; De, Ronita; Pal, Ipsita; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Saha, Dhira Rani; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2011-01-21

    Current therapy-regimens against Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infections have considerable failure rates and adverse side effects that urge the quest for an effective alternative therapy. We have shown that curcumin is capable of eradicating Hp-infection in mice. Here we examine the mechanism by which curcumin protects Hp infection in cultured cells and mice. Since, MMP-3 and -9 are inflammatory molecules associated to the pathogenesis of Hp-infection, we investigated the role of curcumin on inflammatory MMPs as well as proinflammatory molecules. Curcumin dose dependently suppressed MMP-3 and -9 expression in Hp infected human gastric epithelial (AGS) cells. Consistently, Hp-eradication by curcumin-therapy involved significant downregulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities and expression in both cytotoxic associated gene (cag)(+ve) and cag(-ve) Hp-infected mouse gastric tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate that the conventional triple therapy (TT) alleviated MMP-3 and -9 activities less efficiently than curcumin and curcumin's action on MMPs was linked to decreased pro-inflammatory molecules and activator protein-1 activation in Hp-infected gastric tissues. Although both curcumin and TT were associated with MMP-3 and -9 downregulation during Hp-eradication, but unlike TT, curcumin enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and inhibitor of kappa B-α. These data indicate that curcumin-mediated healing of Hp-infection involves regulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities.

  18. Curcumin alleviates matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -9 activities during eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in cultured cells and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Kundu

    Full Text Available Current therapy-regimens against Helicobacter pylori (Hp infections have considerable failure rates and adverse side effects that urge the quest for an effective alternative therapy. We have shown that curcumin is capable of eradicating Hp-infection in mice. Here we examine the mechanism by which curcumin protects Hp infection in cultured cells and mice. Since, MMP-3 and -9 are inflammatory molecules associated to the pathogenesis of Hp-infection, we investigated the role of curcumin on inflammatory MMPs as well as proinflammatory molecules. Curcumin dose dependently suppressed MMP-3 and -9 expression in Hp infected human gastric epithelial (AGS cells. Consistently, Hp-eradication by curcumin-therapy involved significant downregulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities and expression in both cytotoxic associated gene (cag(+ve and cag(-ve Hp-infected mouse gastric tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate that the conventional triple therapy (TT alleviated MMP-3 and -9 activities less efficiently than curcumin and curcumin's action on MMPs was linked to decreased pro-inflammatory molecules and activator protein-1 activation in Hp-infected gastric tissues. Although both curcumin and TT were associated with MMP-3 and -9 downregulation during Hp-eradication, but unlike TT, curcumin enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and inhibitor of kappa B-α. These data indicate that curcumin-mediated healing of Hp-infection involves regulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities.

  19. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir fixed-dose combination for treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehra, V; Tan, E M; Rizza, S A; Temesgen, Z

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 accounts for 8-13% of all chronic HCV infections worldwide. Patients with HCV genotype 4 have been reported to have poor treatment responses to PEGylated interferon and ribavirin regimens. Recently a single tablet, fixed-dose combination of sofosbuvir, an RNA-directed RNA polymerase (NS5B) inhibitor, and ledipasvir, a nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) inhibitor, has been approved for treatment of chronic HCV infection. Two studies using the fixed-dose combination in chronic HCV genotype 4 for 12 weeks reported sustained virologic response rates at 12 weeks (SVR12) of 93-95%. Data also support the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir in chronic HCV genotype 4 and HIV co-infection. Administered as a single once-daily oral regimen, this ribavirin- and interferon-free regimen is well tolerated, with low potential for adverse effects and represents a significant advancement in the treatment of chronic HCV genotype 4 infection.

  20. A Single Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Dose Improves B Cell Memory in Previously Infected Subjects

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    Erin M. Scherer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although licensed human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines are most efficacious in persons never infected with HPV, they also reduce infection and disease in previously infected subjects, indicating natural immunity is not entirely protective against HPV re-infection. The aim of this exploratory study was to examine the B cell memory elicited by HPV infection and evaluate whether vaccination merely boosts antibody (Ab levels in previously infected subjects or also improves the quality of B cell memory. Toward this end, the memory B cells (Bmem of five unvaccinated, HPV-seropositive subjects were isolated and characterized, and subject recall responses to a single HPV vaccine dose were analyzed. Vaccination boosted Ab levels 24- to 930-fold (median 77-fold and Bmem numbers 3- to 27-fold (median 6-fold. In addition, Abs cloned from naturally elicited Bmem were generally non-neutralizing, whereas all those isolated following vaccination were neutralizing. Moreover, Ab and plasmablast responses indicative of memory recall responses were only observed in two subjects. These results suggest HPV vaccination augments both the magnitude and quality of natural immunity and demonstrate that sexually active persons could also benefit from HPV vaccination. This study may have important public policy implications, especially for the older ‘catch-up’ group within the vaccine's target population.

  1. Experimental feline enteric coronavirus infection reveals an aberrant infection pattern and shedding of mutants with impaired infectivity in enterocyte cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarets, Lowiese M. B.; Vermeulen, Ben L.; Theuns, Sebastiaan; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Roukaerts, Inge D. M.; Acar, Delphine D.; Olyslaegers, Dominique A. J.; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Nauwynck, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) results from mutations in the viral genome during a common feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) infection. Since many virological and immunological data on FECV infections are lacking, the present study investigated these missing links during experimental infection of three SPF cats with FECV strain UCD. Two cats showed mild clinical signs, faecal shedding of infectious virus from 4 dpi, a cell-associated viraemia at inconsistent time points from 5 dpi, a highly neutralising antibody response from 9 dpi, and no major abnormalities in leukocyte numbers. Faecal shedding lasted for 28–56 days, but virus shed during this stage was less infectious in enterocyte cultures and affected by mutations. Remarkably, in the other cat neither clinical signs nor acute shedding were seen, but virus was detected in blood cells from 3 dpi, and shedding of non-enterotropic, mutated viruses suddenly occurred from 14 dpi onwards. Neutralising antibodies arose from 21 dpi. Leukocyte numbers were not different compared to the other cats, except for the CD8+ regulatory T cells. These data indicate that FECV can infect immune cells even in the absence of intestinal replication and raise the hypothesis that the gradual adaptation to these cells can allow non-enterotropic mutants to arise. PMID:26822958

  2. Bone marrow aspiration, biopsy, and culture in the evaluation of HIV-infected patients for invasive mycobacteria and histoplasma infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpek, G; Lee, S M; Gagnon, D R; Cooley, T P; Wright, D G

    2001-06-01

    Bone marrow (BM) aspiration and biopsy are used commonly in clinical practice to diagnose invasive tissue infections caused by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare (MAC), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), and Histoplasma capsulatum (HC) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) infection. However, the value of these invasive procedures relative to other diagnostic approaches has not been clearly defined. To determine the value of BM culture and BM histology in the diagnosis of opportunistic MAC/TB and HC infections in immunosuppressed patients with HIV, we retrospectively reviewed the records of 56 adult patients with HIV who underwent a single BM aspiration, biopsy, and culture because of unexplained fever and/or other clinical features suggestive of MAC/TB or HC infection. Thirty-two patients (57%) were ultimately diagnosed with MAC/TB or HC infection by positive cultures of BM, blood, sputum, or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or by the histologic detection of organisms in biopsies of BM or other tissues. The diagnostic sensitivity of BM cultures was equal to that of blood cultures (20/32, or 63%). Granuloma and/or histologically apparent organisms were seen in BM biopsy specimens in 11 of 32 individuals (34%) ultimately diagnosed with MAC/TB or HC infections. Among these 11 cases, both granuloma and acid-fast staining organisms were found in the BM biopsy specimens of 2 individuals for whom both BM and blood cultures were negative. Certain clinical symptoms and signs at the time of BM examination were found by logistic regression analysis to be significantly associated with a subsequent diagnosis of MAC/TB or HC infections; these included high fever, long duration of febrile days prior to BM examination, and elevated direct bilirubin. In conclusion, while the diagnostic sensitivity of BM cultures was found to be no greater than that of blood cultures in detecting MAC/TB or HC infections in immunosuppressed HIV+ patients, histopathologic examination of BM

  3. The effect of bacterial dose and foal age at challenge on Rhodococcus equi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, M; Loynachan, A; Sun, L; Oliveira, A; Breheny, P; Horohov, D W

    2013-12-27

    While Rhodococcus equi remains the most common cause of subacute or chronic granulomatous bronchopneumonia in foals, development of a relevant model to study R. equi infection has proven difficult. The objective of this study was to identify a challenge dose of R. equi that resulted in slow progressive disease, spontaneous regression of lung lesions and age-dependent susceptibility. Foals less than one-week of age were challenged intratracheally using either 10(6), 10(5), 10(4), 10(3) or 10(2) cfu of R. equi. Two doses (10(3) cfu and 10(5) cfu) were used to challenge 2 and 3-week-old, and 3 and 6-week-old foals, respectively. Physical examination, thoracic ultrasound and blood work were performed. Foals were euthanized at the end of the study or when clinical signs of pneumonia developed. All foals were necropsied and their lung lesions scored. Foals challenged with low concentrations of R. equi developed slow progressive pneumonia and approximately 50% of the foals recovered spontaneously. Likewise, macroscopic (>1cm diameter) pyogranulomatous lesions were only observed when low doses of R. equi were used. Clinical pneumonia was not seen after low dose challenge in the 3-week-old foals or in the 6-week-old foals. This study demonstrates that the use of low doses of R. equi to challenge neonatal foals provides an improved model for studying this disease. Furthermore, susceptibility to R. equi infection was shown to diminish early in the foal's life, as has been reported in the field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. New, combined, and reduced dosing treatment protocols cure Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Juan M; Craft, Julie M; Crowe, Byron D; Ketchie, Sarah A; Tarleton, Rick L

    2014-01-01

    The development of treatment protocols with reduced toxicity and equivalent or improved efficacy for Trypanosoma cruzi infection is a priority. We tested the effectiveness of benznidazole (BZ), nifurtimox (NFX), other prospective drugs in intermittent and combined treatment protocols to cure T. cruzi infection initiated with susceptible and drug-resistant parasite strains. A 40-day course of BZ, NFX, or the oxaborale AN4169 cured 100% of mice, whereas posaconazole (POS), and NTLA-1 (a nitro-triazole) cured approximately 90% and 20% of mice, respectively. Reducing the overall dosage of BZ or NFX by using an intermittent (once every 5 days) schedule or combining 5 daily doses of POS with 7 intermittent doses of BZ also provided approximately 100% cure. T. cruzi strains resistant to BZ were also found to be resistant to other drugs (POS), and extending the time of treatment or combining drugs did not increase cure rates with these isolates. Thus, dosing schedules for anti-T. cruzi compounds should be determined empirically, and compounds targeting different pathways may be combined to yield effective therapies with reduced toxicity. This work also suggests that standard treatment protocols using BZ and NFX may be significantly overdosing patients, perhaps contributing to the adverse events.

  5. The effect of host age and inoculation dose on infection dynamics of Angiostrongylus vasorum in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webster, Pia; Monrad, Jesper; Kapel, Christian M O;

    2017-01-01

    , as reflected in high establishment rates. Although severe clinical disease was never observed in the foxes, A. vasorum infections in red foxes appear to be chronic and moreover, to resemble infections in dogs. The results underline the red fox as a suitable model as well as natural reservoir for the parasite.......Background: Infections and clinical cases of Angiostrongylus vasorum in dogs are found increasingly across Europe, thus rendering knowledge on its infection biology more important. We used red foxes as a carnivore model to examine the effect of host age and infection dose on the establishment...... of adult A. vasorum in single experimental infections. Methods: Fourteen juvenile and fourteen adult red foxes, free of metastrongyloid infections, were given a low (50) or high (200) dose of third-stage larvae (L3) of A. vasorum. Two groups of three foxes of each age group served as uninfected controls...

  6. Experimental infection of cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) with varying doses of West Nile virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterle, P.T.; Nemeth, N.M.; VanDalen, Kaci K.; Sullivan, H.; Bentler, K.T.; Young, G.R.; McLean, R.G.; Clark, L.; Smeraski, C.; Hall, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) were inoculated with differing doses of West Nile virus (WNV) to evaluate their potential role as reservoir hosts in nature. Swallows often nest in large colonies in habitats and months associated with high mosquito abundance and early WNV transmission in North America. Additionally, cliff swallow diet consists of insects, including mosquitoes, leading to an additional potential route of WNV infection. The average peak viremia titer among infected cliff swallows was 106.3 plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL serum and the reservoir competence index was 0.34. There was no correlation between dose and probability of becoming infected or viremia peak and duration. Oral shedding was detected from 2 to 14 days post-inoculation with an average peak titer of 1044 PFU/swab. These results suggest that cliff swallows are competent reservoir hosts of WNV and therefore, they may play a role in early seasonal amplification and maintenance of WNV. Copyright ?? 2009 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. A study of vehicles for dosing rodent whole embryo culture with non aqueous soluble compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine-Rauch, Karen A; Zhang, Qin; Kleinman, Mark; Lawton, Richard; Welsh, Michael J

    2004-05-01

    In rodent whole embryo culture (WEC), finding vehicles for non-aqueous-soluble compounds has been problematic due to developmental toxicity associated with many solvents. The purpose of this study was to identify alternative vehicles for insoluble compounds. In WEC, we evaluated carrier solutions containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glycerol as well as the solvents, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol, for relative teratogenicity and delivery of the insoluble teratogen, all-trans retinoic acid (RA). At a concentration of glycerol carrier solutions were not teratogenic, although both inhibited robust formation of yolk sac vasculature. Both solutions delivered RA to the cultured rat embryos at higher doses. In summary, all four solvents/solutions may have utility as vehicles dependent upon the chemical properties of the compound to be solubilized.

  8. The additional value of blood cultures in patients with complicated urinary tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, V.; Prins, J.M.; Opmeer, B.C.; Reijke, T.M. de; Hulscher, M.E.; Geerlings, S.E.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated 800 hospitalized patients with a complicated urinary tract infection, from whom both a blood and a urine culture were obtained on the first day of antibiotic treatment. Urine cultures were positive in 70% of patients, and blood cultures were positive in 29%. In 7% of patients, uropathog

  9. One dose versus three weekly doses of benzathine penicillin G for patients co-infected with HIV and early syphilis: a multicenter, prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jui Yang

    Full Text Available One dose of benzathine penicillin G (BPG has been recommended for HIV-infected patients with early syphilis (primary, secondary, and early latent syphilis in the sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, but clinical data to support such a recommendation are limited.We prospectively observed the serological response to 1 or 3 weekly doses of BPG in HIV-infected adults who sought treatment of early syphilis at 8 hospitals around Taiwan. Rapid plasma reagin (RPR titers were followed every 3-6 months after treatment. The serological response was defined as a 4-fold or greater decline in RPR titers at 12 months of treatment. The missing values were treated by following the last-observed-carried-forward principle. We hypothesized that 1 dose was non-inferior to 3 weekly doses of BPG with the non-inferiority margin for the difference of serological response set to 10%.Between 2007 and 2012, 573 patients completed at least 12 months of follow-up: 295 (51.5% receiving 1 dose of BPG (1-dose group and 278 (48.5% 3 doses (3-dose group. Overall, 198 patients (67.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 61.4-72.5% in the 1-dose group achieved serological response at 12 months, as did 208 patients (74.8%; 95% CI, 69.3-79.8% in the 3-dose group (one-sided 95% CI of the difference, 15.1%. In the multivariate analysis, secondary syphilis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.90; 95% CI 1.17-3.09, RPR titer ≥32 (AOR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.38-2.69, and 3 doses of BPG (AOR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.20-2.36 were independently associated with a serological response. The time to the first episode of treatment failure was 1184 (standard deviation [SD], 70.5 and 1436 (SD, 80.0 days for 1- and 3-dose group, respectively.Single-dose BPG resulted in a higher serological failure rate and shorter time to treatment failure than 3 weekly doses of BPG in the treatment of early syphilis in HIV-infected patients.

  10. Pediatric and Adult High-Grade Glioma Stem Cell Culture Models Are Permissive to Lytic Infection with Parvovirus H-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josupeit, Rafael; Bender, Sebastian; Kern, Sonja; Leuchs, Barbara; Hielscher, Thomas; Herold-Mende, Christel; Schlehofer, Jörg R; Dinsart, Christiane; Witt, Olaf; Rommelaere, Jean; Lacroix, Jeannine

    2016-05-19

    Combining virus-induced cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic effects, oncolytic virotherapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for high-grade glioma (HGG). A clinical trial has recently provided evidence for the clinical safety of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) in adult glioblastoma relapse patients. The present study assesses the efficacy of H-1PV in eliminating HGG initiating cells. H-1PV was able to enter and to transduce all HGG neurosphere culture models (n = 6), including cultures derived from adult glioblastoma, pediatric glioblastoma, and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Cytotoxic effects induced by the virus have been observed in all HGG neurospheres at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) doses of input virus between 1 and 10 plaque forming units per cell. H-1PV infection at this dose range was able to prevent tumorigenicity of NCH421k glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) "stem-like" cells in NOD/SCID mice. Interestingly NCH421R, an isogenic subclone with equal capacity of xenograft formation, but resistant to H-1PV infection could be isolated from the parental NCH421k culture. To reveal changes in gene expression associated with H-1PV resistance we performed a comparative gene expression analysis in these subclones. Several dysregulated genes encoding receptor proteins, endocytosis factors or regulators innate antiviral responses were identified and represent intriguing candidates for to further study molecular mechanisms of H-1PV resistance.

  11. Pediatric and Adult High-Grade Glioma Stem Cell Culture Models Are Permissive to Lytic Infection with Parvovirus H-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Josupeit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Combining virus-induced cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic effects, oncolytic virotherapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for high-grade glioma (HGG. A clinical trial has recently provided evidence for the clinical safety of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV in adult glioblastoma relapse patients. The present study assesses the efficacy of H-1PV in eliminating HGG initiating cells. H-1PV was able to enter and to transduce all HGG neurosphere culture models (n = 6, including cultures derived from adult glioblastoma, pediatric glioblastoma, and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Cytotoxic effects induced by the virus have been observed in all HGG neurospheres at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 doses of input virus between 1 and 10 plaque forming units per cell. H-1PV infection at this dose range was able to prevent tumorigenicity of NCH421k glioblastoma multiforme (GBM “stem-like” cells in NOD/SCID mice. Interestingly NCH421R, an isogenic subclone with equal capacity of xenograft formation, but resistant to H-1PV infection could be isolated from the parental NCH421k culture. To reveal changes in gene expression associated with H-1PV resistance we performed a comparative gene expression analysis in these subclones. Several dysregulated genes encoding receptor proteins, endocytosis factors or regulators innate antiviral responses were identified and represent intriguing candidates for to further study molecular mechanisms of H-1PV resistance.

  12. Tetanus and diphtheria antibodies and response to a booster dose in Brazilian HIV-1-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Tatiana C S; Succi, Regina C M; Weckx, Lily Y; Tavares-Lopes, L; de Moraes-Pinto, M Isabel

    2004-09-09

    Tetanus and diphtheria (Td) antibodies were studied in HIV-1-infected women during puerperium. HIV group (n=61) was compared with Control group (n=101). Twenty-one women from HIV and 13 from Control group who had antibody levels lower than 0.1 IU/mL received a booster with Td vaccine. Antibodies were assessed by double antigen ELISA. Mean tetanus and diphtheria antibody levels from HIV group were lower than those from Control group. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that tetanus and diphtheria antibody levels were decreased by HIV-1-infection, and that was independent of the reduction due to the time interval between last booster and antibody assessment. After a booster dose, both groups had an increase in mean tetanus and diphtheria antibody levels, but in Control group the levels were higher than in HIV group.

  13. Association of suction drain tips culture with postoperative infection in benign thyroid surgeries

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    Seyed Ziaeddin Rasihashemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wound infection is a rare complication after thyroid surgery. Because of controversy concerning with routine use of the drain by surgeons and its being considered a foreign body material, we aimed to evaluate the clinical significance and relevance of the drain tip culture and wound infection. Materials and methods: From March 2014 to March 2015, 150 consecutive patients undergoing thyroid surgery were studied. Wound infection was defined as occurring within the first 14 days from surgery. While we were suspicious to wound infection, sterile wound sampling was performed and sent to microbiology laboratory. Results: Postoperative infection developed in 4 patients (2.6% during 2 weeks follow up. The sensitivity and specificity of the drain tip culture were 15% and 82%, respectively with a positive predictive value of 7.6%. Prolonged operative time was an independent risk factor for wound infection. There was no significant relationship between drain tip culture and wound infection. Conclusion: Routine use of the surgical drain can increase the incidence of the wound infection. However, the drain tip culture was not a predictor for wound complications after thyroid surgeries.   Key Words: Thyroid; Wound infection; Drain; Culture;

  14. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. II. Active and passive immunization as protection against a lethal bacterial dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1990-01-01

    Immunization against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and thymus-bearing LEW rats. Active immunization was performed with formalin-killed whole cell vaccine or sublethal infection prior to the lethal infection. After vaccination with killed bacteria the euthymic anim...

  15. Anthelmintic efficacy and dose determination of Albizia anthelmintica against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected Ugandan sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradé, J T; Arble, B L; Weladji, R B; Van Damme, P

    2008-11-07

    Weight loss, stunted growth, and death caused by gastrointestinal parasites are major constraints to livestock productivity, especially in tropical and developing countries where regular use, and misuse, of anthelmintics has led to nematode resistance. Albizia anthelmintica Brong. (Fabaceae) is traditionally employed throughout East Africa to treat helminth parasitosis in livestock. Reported efficacy has varied from 90% against mixed nematodes to just 19% against Haemonchus contortus alone. The objective of this study was to assess the anthelmintic effect of A. anthelmintica against naturally occurring infections of mixed gastrointestinal parasites, and to establish an effective treatment dose, in sheep under pastoral field conditions of northern Uganda. A. anthelmintica bark was collected and prepared according to local custom and packed into gel capsules. Fifty-five young female local mixed-breed lambs were randomly assigned to six groups, including a positive control group that received levamisole (synthetic anthelmintic) and a negative control group that received no treatment. Following the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) dose determination guidelines, the other four groups were treated with varying doses of A. anthelmintica. Statistical analyses (using generalized linear models) were performed to assess treatment effect. There was a significant treatment (group) effect on parasite egg/oocyte counts per gram (EPG) for nematodes, but not for coccidia. The most effective dose against nematodes (0.8g, 58.7mg/kg) closely approximates what is usually given by traditional healers, 0.9g/adult sheep. It provided major and significant reduction in EPG as compared to the negative control. Anthelmintic efficacy was estimated using percent faecal egg count reduction (FECR). Other than the positive control, animals in the standard dose group showed the greatest decline in shedding of nematode eggs, with an FECR of 78%. This study

  16. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágata Carolina Cevey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE.

  17. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Penas, Federico Nicolás; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl) due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE) of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE.

  18. Risk Factors for Upper GI Damage in Low-Dose Aspirin Users and the Interaction Between H. pylori Infection and Low-Dose Aspirin Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, low-dose aspirin is widely administered at low dose as an antithrombotic drug for the prevention of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. However, aspirin, even at a low dose, can induce varying degrees of gastroduodenal mucosal injury (erosion, ulcer, ulcer bleeding). Hence, co-prescription of proton pump inhibitors with low-dose aspirin is recommended for those at high risk for adverse gastroduodenal events. At present, a history of peptic ulcer, especially that of complicated ulcer, is the most important risk factor for low-dose aspirin-associated gastroduodenal adverse events. Additionally, concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including COX-2 selective inhibitors, anti-platelet agents, anti-coagulants, and oral corticosteroid is recognized to increase the risk for adverse gastroduodenal events in low-dose aspirin users. H. pylori infection could also be associated with the increased risk for adverse gastroduodenal events in low-dose aspirin users, especially in patients with histories of peptic ulcers. Therefore, eradication therapy for such patients can prevent ulcer recurrence. However, the efficacy of eradication therapy on low-dose aspirin-related gastroduodenal lesions in unselected H. pylori-positive lowdose aspirin users without histories of peptic ulcers remains to be clarified.

  19. Iridovirus infection of cell cultures from the Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus

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    W.B. Hunter

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We here report the development and viral infection of a Diaprepes root weevil cell culture. Embryonic tissues of the root weevil were used to establish cell cultures for use in screening viral pathogens as potential biological control agents. Tissues were seeded into a prepared solution of insect medium and kept at a temperature of 24°C. The cell culture had primarily fibroblast-like morphology with some epithelial monolayers. Root weevil cells were successfully infected in vitro with a known insect virus, Invertebrate Iridescent Virus 6. Potential uses of insect cell cultures and insect viruses are discussed.

  20. Early infections in patients undergoing high-dose treatment with stem cell support: a comparison of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, A O; Arpi, M.; Gang, U.J.O.;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Infections are life-threatening complications in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell support (HDT). Knowledge of the infectious pathogens is essential to make a safe outpatient setting. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 208 patients treated with HDT...... related mortality was similar between the groups. Conclusion: The frequency of isolated pathogens, positive blood cultures, and the diversity of pathogens were higher in MM patients as compared to NHL patients. However, this did not translate into higher transplantation-related mortality, probably because...

  1. Sarcocystis neurona infection in gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mice: comparative infectivity of sporocysts in two strains of KO mice, effect of trypsin digestion on merozoite viability, and infectivity of bradyzoites to KO mice and cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Sundar, N; Kwok, O C H; Saville, W J A

    2013-09-01

    The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is the primary cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM). EPM or EPM-like illness has been reported in horses, sea otters, and several other mammals. The gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mouse is often used as a model to study biology and discovery of new therapies against S. neurona because it is difficult to induce clinical EPM in other hosts, including horses. In the present study, infectivity of three life cycle stages (merozoites, bradyzoites, sporozoites) to KO mice and cell culture was studied. Two strains of KO mice (C57-black, and BALB/c-derived, referred here as black or white) were inoculated orally graded doses of S. neurona sporocysts; 12 sporocysts were infective to both strains of mice and all infected mice died or became ill within 70 days post-inoculation. Although there was no difference in infectivity of sporocysts to the two strains of KO mice, the disease was more severe in black mice. S. neurona bradyzoites were not infectious to KO mice and cell culture. S. neurona merozoites survived 120 min incubation in 0.25% trypsin, indicating that trypsin digestion can be used to recover S. neurona from tissues of acutely infected animals. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Optimizing Antibiotic Dosing Strategies for the Treatment of Gram-negative Infections in the Era of Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monogue, Marguerite L; Kuti, Joseph L; Nicolau, David P

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative organisms are an increasing source of concern within the healthcare setting due to their common presence as a cause of infection and emerging resistance to current therapies. However, current antimicrobial dosing recommendations may be insufficient for the treatment of gram-negative infections. Applying knowledge of an antibiotic's pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile when designing a dosing regimen leads to a greater likelihood of achieving optimal exposure, including against gram-negative pathogens with higher MICs. Additionally, administering antibiotics directly to the site of infection, such as via aerosolization for pneumonia, is another method to achieve optimized drug exposure at the site of infection. Incorporating these treatment strategies into clinical practice will assist antimicrobial stewardship programs in successfully treating gram-negative infections.

  3. Detection and identification of microbes in prosthetic joint infections by culture and molecular methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Ehrlich, Garth

    Bacterial biofilms have been observed in many device-related infections including orthopedic implants. This mode of growth makes the infection difficult to treat and constitutes a challenge to current sampling procedures and culture practices to obtain a reliable diagnosis. The aim of the study...

  4. Population structure of mixed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is strain genotype and culture medium dependent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanekom, M.; Streicher, E.M.; Berg, D. Van den; Cox, H.; McDermid, C.; Bosman, M.; Pittius, N.C. Gey van; Victor, T.C.; Kidd, M.; Soolingen, D. van; Helden, P.D. van; Warren, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Molecular genotyping methods have shown infection with more than one Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain genotype in a single sputum culture, indicating mixed infection. AIM: This study aimed to develop a PCR-based genotyping tool to determine the population structure of M. tuberculosis st

  5. COMPARISON OF TISSUE CULTURE AND ANIMAL MODELS FOR ASSESSMENT OF CRYPTOSPRIDIUM PARVUM INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data from three different disinfection studies using both cell culture and mouse infectivity to assess Cryptosporidium parvum inactivation were evaluated in a total of 35 comparison including process controls and treated samples. C. parvum infectivity in the in vitro FDM-MPN assa...

  6. Transcriptional profiles of chicken embryo cell cultures following infection with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Handberg, K.J.; Juul-Madsen, H.R.

    2007-01-01

    -host interaction, we measured steady-state levels of transcripts from 28 cellular genes of chicken embryo (CE) cell cultures infected with IBDV vaccine stain Bursine-2 during a 7-day infection course by use of the quantitative real-time RT-PCR SYBR green method. Of the genes tested, 21 genes (IRF-1, IFN 1...

  7. Teicoplanin inhibits Ebola pseudovirus infection in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yizhuo; Cui, Rui; Li, Guiming; Gao, Qianqian; Yuan, Shilin; Altmeyer, Ralf; Zou, Gang

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no approved antiviral therapy for treatment of Ebola virus disease. To discover readily available approved drugs that can be rapidly repurposed for treatment of Ebola virus infections, we screened 1280 FDA-approved drugs and identified glycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin inhibiting Ebola pseudovirus infection by blocking virus entry in the low micromolar range. Teicoplanin could be evaluated further and incorporated into ongoing clinical studies.

  8. Infection of Cultured Thin Cell Layer Roots of Lycopersicon esculentum by Meloidogyne incognita

    OpenAIRE

    Radin, D. N.; Eisenback, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A new aseptic culture system for studying interactions between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and Meloidogyne incognita is described. Epidermal thin cell layer explants from peduncles of tomato produced up to 20 adventitious roots per culture in 4-9 days on Murashige &Scoog medium plus kinetin and indole acetic acid. Rooted cultures were transferred to Gamborg's B-5 medium and inoculated with infective second-stage juveniles. Gall formation was apparent 5 days after inoculation and egg prod...

  9. Antiretroviral therapy outcomes in HIV-infected children after adjusting protease inhibitor dosing during tuberculosis treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordula Frohoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modification of ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r-based antiretroviral therapy is required for HIV-infected children co-treated for tuberculosis (TB. We aimed to determine virologic and toxicity outcomes among TB/HIV co-treated children with the following modifications to their antiretroviral therapy (ART: (1 super-boosted LPV/r, (2 double-dose LPV/r or (3 ritonavir. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A medical record review was conducted at two clinical sites in Johannesburg, South Africa. The records of children 6-24 months of age initiating LPV/r-based therapy were reviewed. Children co-treated for TB were categorized based on the modifications made to their ART regimen and were compared to children of the same age at each site not treated for TB. Included are 526 children, 294 (56% co-treated for TB. All co-treated children had more severe HIV disease, including lower CD4 percents and worse growth indicators, than comparisons. Children in the super-boosted group (n = 156 were as likely to be virally suppressed (<400 copies/ml at 6 months as comparisons (69.2% vs. 74.8%, p = 0.36. Children in the double-dose (n = 47 and ritonavir groups (n = 91 were significantly less likely to be virally suppressed at 6 months (53.1% and 49.3% than comparisons (74.8% and 82.1%; p = 0.02 and p<0.0001, respectively. At 12 months only children in the ritonavir group still had lower rates of virological suppression relative to comparisons (63.9% vs 83.3% p<0.05. Grade 1 or greater ALT elevations were more common in the super-boosted (75% than double-dose (54.6% or ritonavir (33.9% groups (p = 0.09 and p<0.0001 but grade 3/4 elevations were observed in 3 (13.6% of the super-boosted, 7 (15.9% of the double-dose and 5 (8.9% of the ritonavir group (p = 0.81 and p = 0.29. CONCLUSION: Good short-term virologic outcomes were achieved in children co-treated for TB and HIV who received super-boosted LPV/r. Treatment limiting toxicity was

  10. Single-Ascending-Dose Pharmacokinetic Study of Tribendimidine in Opisthorchis viverrini-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthaler, Urs; Sayasone, Somphou; Vanobbergen, Fiona; Penny, Melissa A.; Odermatt, Peter; Huwyler, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Praziquantel is the only drug available for the treatment of Opisthorchis viverrini infections. Tribendimidine has emerged as a potential treatment alternative; however, its pharmacokinetic (PK) properties have not been sufficiently studied to date. Via two phase IIa dose-finding studies, 68 O. viverrini patients were treated with 25- to 600-mg doses of tribendimidine using 50- and 200-mg tablet formulations. Plasma, blood, and dried blood spots (DBS) were sampled at selected time points. The two main metabolites of tribendimidine, active deacetylated amidantel (dADT) and acetylated dADT (adADT), were analyzed in plasma, blood, and DBS. PK parameters were estimated by noncompartmental analysis. An acceptable agreement among plasma and DBS concentrations was observed, with a mean bias of ≤10%, and 60% dADT and 74% adADT concentrations being within ±20% margins. We found that 200-mg tribendimidine tablets possess immediate floating characteristics, which led to variable time to maximal concentration of drug (Tmax) values (2 to 24 h) between individuals. Dose proportionality was observed for dADT from 25 to 200 mg using 50-mg tablets, but at higher dosages (200 to 600 mg), saturation occurred. The median ratio of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24) of dADT to the AUC0–24 of adADT ranged from 0.8 to 26.4, suggesting substantial differences in acetylation rates. Cure rates ranged from 11% (25-mg dose) to 100% (400-mg dose). Cured patients showed significantly higher dADT maximal serum concentrations (Cmax) and AUC0–24 values than uncured patients. Tribendimidine is a promising drug for the treatment of opisthorchiasis. However, the tablet formulation should be optimized to achieve consistent absorption among patients. Further studies are warranted to assess the large differences between individuals in the rate of metabolic turnover of dADT to adADT. (This study has been registered with the ISRCTN Registry under no. ISRCTN

  11. Posttreatment Reactions After Single-Dose Diethylcarbamazine or Ivermectin in Subjects With Loa loa Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Jesica A; Legrand, Fanny; Gounoue, Raceline; Nchinda, Godwin; Montavon, Céline; Bopda, Jean; Tchana, Steve Mbickmen; Ondigui, Bienvenu Etogo; Nguluwe, Konrad; Fay, Michael P; Makiya, Michelle; Metenou, Simon; Nutman, Thomas B; Kamgno, Joseph; Klion, Amy D

    2017-04-15

    Severe adverse reactions have been observed in individuals with Loa loa infection treated with either diethylcarbamazine (DEC), the drug of choice for loiasis, or ivermectin (IVM), which is used in mass drug administration programs for control of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in Africa. In this study, posttreatment clinical and immunologic reactions were compared following single-dose therapy with DEC or IVM to assess whether these reactions have the same underlying pathophysiology. Twelve patients with loiasis and microfilarial counts single-dose DEC (8 mg/kg) or IVM (200 µg/kg). Clinical and laboratory assessments were performed at 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours and 5, 7, 9, and 14 days posttreatment. Posttreatment adverse events were similar following DEC or IVM, but peaked earlier in subjects who received DEC, consistent with a trend toward more rapid and complete microfilarial clearance in the DEC group. After a transient rise (post-IVM) or fall (post-DEC) in the first 24 hours posttreatment, the eosinophil count rose significantly in both groups, peaking at day 5 in the DEC group and day 9 in the IVM group. Serum interleukin 5 levels and eosinophil activation, as assessed by surface expression of CD69 and serum levels of eosinophil granule proteins, were increased posttreatment in both groups. Despite differences in eosinophil and lymphocyte counts during the first 24 hours posttreatment, the overall pattern of hematologic and immunologic changes suggest that posttreatment reactions following DEC and IVM share a common pathophysiology. NCT01593722.

  12. Determination of the Infectious Dose of Helicobacter pylori during Primary and Secondary Infection in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Solnick, Jay V.; Hansen, Lori M.; Canfield, Don R.; Parsonnet, Julie

    2001-01-01

    We sought to determine the infectious dose of Helicobacter pylori during primary and secondary infection in the rhesus monkey and to determine whether preinoculation acid suppression is necessary to produce colonization. Mixed inoculation with three human-derived strains showed that H. pylori J166 is particularly adapted to colonization of rhesus monkeys, since it outcompeted two other strains. The minimum infectious dose of H. pylori J166 was 104 bacteria in specific-pathogen (H. pylori)-fre...

  13. Comparative Study of Effectiveness of Long Term Low Dose of Naldixic Acid and Cotrimoxazole in Patients with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Amirhassani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Urinary tract infections (UTI are a common cause of morbidity and its diagnosis and treatment can lead to health. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of the long- term low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis with Cotrimoxazole and Nalidixic-acid in the patients with recurrent UTI.Materials & Methods: This study is a before and after clinical trial without control group done on 100 patients with recurrent UTI who had referred to Ekbatan Hospital. These patients had no urologic findings in clinical and para-clinical evaluations. These patients were treated by Cotrimoxazole or Nalidixic-acid in long term-low dose Antibiotic prophylaxis method according to urine culture and antibiogram. These patients followed with urine cultures in the therapeutic and 6 month follow-up periods. Also, we evaluated the differences between age, gender, type of microorganism, marital status, re-infection time and number of recurrences before treatment.Results: Our study includes 100 patients (83% female and 17% male. The mean+/-SD age of the patients in the group treated with Cotrimoxazole (group A was 15.57+/-13.03 and in the patients treated with Nalidixic-acid (group B was 13.67+/-10.9 years. 74% of the patients who were treated with Cotrimoxazole were single and this number was 66% for the nalidixic-acid group. E.coli, kelebsiella and proteous account for 80%, 18% and 2% of infections in the Cotrimoxazole group, respectively. These microorganisms account for 62%, 34% and 4% of infections in the nalidixic-acid group respectively. The re-infection rate for the Cotrimoxazole group was 18% which 82% of them were successfully treated. The re-infection rate for nalidixic-acid was 12% which 88% of them showed a good response to nalidixic-acid. In fact, in this study Nalidixic-acid was as effective as Cotrimoxazole. Conclusion: The long term-low dose antibiotic prophylaxis is very effective in the treatment of recurrent UTI and in our study Nalidixic

  14. Competition between Plasmodium falciparum strains in clinical infections during in vitro culture adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kexuan; Sun, Ling; Lin, Yingxue; Fan, Qi; Zhao, Zhenjun; Hao, Mingming; Feng, Guohua; Wu, Yanrui; Cui, Liwang; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the dynamics of parasite populations during in vitro culture adaptation in 15 mixed Plasmodium falciparum infections, which were collected from a hypoendemic area near the China-Myanmar border. Allele types at the msp1 block 2 in the initial clinical samples and during subsequent culture were quantified weekly using a quantitative PCR method. All mixed infections carried two allele types based on the msp1 genotyping result. We also genotyped several polymorphic sites in the dhfr, dhps and mdr1 genes on day 0 and day 28, which showed that most of the common sites analyzed were monomorphic. Two of the three clinical samples mixed at dhps 581 remained stable while one changed to wild-type during the culture. During in vitro culture, we observed a gradual loss of parasite populations with 10 of the 15 mixed infections becoming monoclonal by day 28 based on the msp1 allele type. In most cases, the more abundant msp1 allele types in the clinical blood samples at the beginning of culture became the sole or predominant allele types on day 28. These results suggest that some parasites may have growth advantages and the loss of parasite populations during culture adaptation of mixed infections may lead to biased results when comparing the phenotypes such as drug sensitivity of the culture-adapted parasites.

  15. Culture-and nonculture-based antibiotics for complicated soft tissue infections are comparable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Irwanto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Data collected in 2010 from Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital indicate that complicated skin and soft tissue infections accounted for more than 10% of cases. Etiological diagnoses are based on the findings on bacterial culture and thus evaluation of the effectiveness of bacterial culture becomes a necessity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the operational effectiveness of bacterial culture for etiological diagnosis of complicated skin and soft tissue infections. Methods This was a historical cohort study using secondary data of patients with complicated skin and soft tissue infections admitted for hospitalization to Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta from July 2011 to July 2012. The 90 subjects meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria were divided into 2 groups of 45 patients each. Group 1 comprised patients who received initial antibiotic therapy according to cultural results, while the patients in group 2 received initial antibiotic therapy without reference to cultural results. Successful diagnostic culture was assessed by the absence of therapeutic failure. Therapeutic failure was determined using 3 parameters that had to be fulfilled, viz. absence of antibiotic escalation, repeat operations, and clinical deterioration. The latter parameter was assessed by clinical judgement of the attending physician. Results After controlling for confounding variables (age, severity of infection, comorbidity, there was no statistical difference in therapeutic success between culture-based and non-culture based initial antibiotic therapies (OR=0.45, p=0.085. Conclusion This study demonstrates the ineffectiveness of bacterial culture as a diagnostic criterion for appropriate antibiotic therapy of complicated skin and soft tissue infections.

  16. Simulation of TGF-Beta Activation by Low-Dose HZE Radiation in a Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    High charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei comprised in the galactic cosmic rays are main contributors to space radiation risk. They induce many lesions in living matter such as non-specific oxidative damage and the double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered key precursors of early and late effects of radiation. There is increasing evidence that cells respond collectively rather than individually to radiation, suggesting the importance of cell signaling1. The transforming growth factor (TGF ) is a signaling peptide that is expressed in nearly all cell type and regulates a large array of cellular processes2. TGF have been shown to mediate cellular response to DNA damage3 and to induce apoptosis in non-irradiated cells cocultured with irradiated cells4. TFG molecules are secreted by cells in an inactive complex known as the latency-associated peptide (LAP). TGF is released from the LAP by a conformational change triggered by proteases, thrombospondin-1, integrins, acidic conditions and .OH radical5. TGF then binds to cells receptors and activates a cascade of events mediated by Smad proteins6, which might interfere with the repair of DNA. Meanwhile, increasingly sophisticated Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have appeared recently in the literature7 and can be applied to study the interaction of molecules with receptors. These BD computer models have contributed to the elucidation of signal transduction, ligand accumulation and autocrine loops in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EFGR) system8. To investigate the possible roles of TGF in an irradiated cell culture, our Monte-Carlo simulation codes of the radiation track structure9 will be used to calculate the activation of TFG triggered by .OH produced by low doses of HZE ions. The TGF molecules will then be followed by a BD algorithm in a medium representative of a cell culture to estimate the number of activated receptors.

  17. Simulation of TGF-Beta Activation by Low-Dose HZE Radiation in a Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    High charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei comprised in the galactic cosmic rays are main contributors to space radiation risk. They induce many lesions in living matter such as non-specific oxidative damage and the double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered key precursors of early and late effects of radiation. There is increasing evidence that cells respond collectively rather than individually to radiation, suggesting the importance of cell signaling1. The transforming growth factor (TGF ) is a signaling peptide that is expressed in nearly all cell type and regulates a large array of cellular processes2. TGF have been shown to mediate cellular response to DNA damage3 and to induce apoptosis in non-irradiated cells cocultured with irradiated cells4. TFG molecules are secreted by cells in an inactive complex known as the latency-associated peptide (LAP). TGF is released from the LAP by a conformational change triggered by proteases, thrombospondin-1, integrins, acidic conditions and .OH radical5. TGF then binds to cells receptors and activates a cascade of events mediated by Smad proteins6, which might interfere with the repair of DNA. Meanwhile, increasingly sophisticated Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have appeared recently in the literature7 and can be applied to study the interaction of molecules with receptors. These BD computer models have contributed to the elucidation of signal transduction, ligand accumulation and autocrine loops in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EFGR) system8. To investigate the possible roles of TGF in an irradiated cell culture, our Monte-Carlo simulation codes of the radiation track structure9 will be used to calculate the activation of TFG triggered by .OH produced by low doses of HZE ions. The TGF molecules will then be followed by a BD algorithm in a medium representative of a cell culture to estimate the number of activated receptors.

  18. Single-dose fluconazole versus standard 2-week therapy for oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients: a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamza, O.J.; Matee, M.I.N.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Moshi, M.J.; Simon, E.N.; Mugusi, F.; Mikx, F.H.M.; Lee, H.A.L. van der; Verweij, P.E.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection affecting patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because of convenience, cost, and reluctance to complicate antiretroviral treatment regimens, single-dose fluconazole may be a favorable regimen for

  19. Exposure to sublethal doses of fipronil and thiacloprid highly increases mortality of honeybees previously infected by Nosema ceranae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Vidau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The honeybee, Apis mellifera, is undergoing a worldwide decline whose origin is still in debate. Studies performed for twenty years suggest that this decline may involve both infectious diseases and exposure to pesticides. Joint action of pathogens and chemicals are known to threaten several organisms but the combined effects of these stressors were poorly investigated in honeybees. Our study was designed to explore the effect of Nosema ceranae infection on honeybee sensitivity to sublethal doses of the insecticides fipronil and thiacloprid. METHODOLOGY/FINDING: Five days after their emergence, honeybees were divided in 6 experimental groups: (i uninfected controls, (ii infected with N. ceranae, (iii uninfected and exposed to fipronil, (iv uninfected and exposed to thiacloprid, (v infected with N. ceranae and exposed 10 days post-infection (p.i. to fipronil, and (vi infected with N. ceranae and exposed 10 days p.i. to thiacloprid. Honeybee mortality and insecticide consumption were analyzed daily and the intestinal spore content was evaluated 20 days after infection. A significant increase in honeybee mortality was observed when N. ceranae-infected honeybees were exposed to sublethal doses of insecticides. Surprisingly, exposures to fipronil and thiacloprid had opposite effects on microsporidian spore production. Analysis of the honeybee detoxification system 10 days p.i. showed that N. ceranae infection induced an increase in glutathione-S-transferase activity in midgut and fat body but not in 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: After exposure to sublethal doses of fipronil or thiacloprid a higher mortality was observed in N. ceranae-infected honeybees than in uninfected ones. The synergistic effect of N. ceranae and insecticide on honeybee mortality, however, did not appear strongly linked to a decrease of the insect detoxification system. These data support the hypothesis that the combination of the

  20. Randomized controlled trial of Hepatitis B virus vaccine in HIV-1-infected patients comparing two different doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Palacios Guillermo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is not infrequent as both share same route of exposure. The risk of developing chronic hepatitis B virus is 6%, in general population but can reach 10–20% in HBV/HIV co-infected patients. When compared to general population, the response rate to HBV vaccine in HIV-infected patients is diminished, so previous studies have tried to improve this response using variety of schedules, doses and co-administration of immunomodulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two doses of recombinant HBV vaccine (10 or 40 μg, IM at 0, 1 and 6 months. Vaccination response was measured 30–50 days after last dose; titers of >9.9 IU/L were considered positive. Results Seventy-nine patients were included, 48 patients (60.7% serconverted. Thirty-nine patients (49.3% received 10 μg vaccine dose, 24 patients (61.5% seroconverted. Forty patients (50.7% received 40 μg vaccine dose, 24 (60% seroconverted. There were no differences between two doses. A statistically significant higher seroconversion rate was found for patients with CD4 cell counts at vaccination ≥ 200 cel/mm3 (33 of 38 patients, 86.8%, compared with those with CD4 4 count 3 were significantly associated with non serologic response (p = 0.003. None other variables such as gender, age, risk exposure for HIV, viral load, type or duration of HAART or AIDS-defining illness, were asociated with seroconversion. Conclusion In this study, an increase dose of HBV vaccine did not show to increase the rate of response in HIV infected subjects. The only significant findings associated to the response rate was that a CD4 count ≥ 200 cel/mm3, we suggest this threshold at which HIV patients should be vaccinated.

  1. Diagnosing herpesvirus infections by real time amplification and rapid culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Guldemeester; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractProcedures using real-time technique were developed to demonstrate the presence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2, varicella zoster virus (VZV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in miscellaneous clinical specimens. The assays were compared to rapid culture using centrifugation fo

  2. Cell culture and animal infection with distinct Trypanosoma cruzi strains expressing red and green fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, S F; DaRocha, W D; Freitas, J M; Oliveira, L A; Kitten, G T; Machado, C R; Pena, S D J; Chiari, E; Macedo, A M; Teixeira, S M R

    2008-03-01

    Different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were transfected with an expression vector that allows the integration of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) genes into the beta-tubulin locus by homologous recombination. The sites of integration of the GFP and RFP markers were determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot analyses. Cloned cell lines selected from transfected epimastigote populations maintained high levels of fluorescent protein expression even after 6 months of in vitro culture of epimastigotes in the absence of drug selection. Fluorescent trypomastigotes and amastigotes were observed within Vero cells in culture as well as in hearts and diaphragms of infected mice. The infectivity of the GFP- and RFP-expressing parasites in tissue culture cells was comparable to wild type populations. Furthermore, GFP- and RFP-expressing parasites were able to produce similar levels of parasitemia in mice compared with wild type parasites. Cell cultures infected simultaneously with two cloned cell lines from the same parasite strain, each one expressing a distinct fluorescent marker, showed that at least two different parasites are able to infect the same cell. Double-infected cells were also detected when GFP- and RFP-expressing parasites were derived from strains belonging to two distinct T. cruzi lineages. These results show the usefulness of parasites expressing GFP and RFP for the study of various aspects of T. cruzi infection including the mechanisms of cell invasion, genetic exchange among parasites and the differential tissue distribution in animal models of Chagas disease.

  3. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells: Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genzel Yvonne

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus production capacities. A detailed metabolic characterization of an influenza infected adherent cell line (MDCK was carried out based on extracellular and intracellular measurements of metabolite concentrations. Results For most metabolites the comparison of infected (human influenza A/PR/8/34 and mock-infected cells showed a very similar behavior during the first 10-12 h post infection (pi. Significant changes were observed after about 12 h pi: (1 uptake of extracellular glucose and lactate release into the cell culture supernatant were clearly increased in infected cells compared to mock-infected cells. At the same time (12 h pi intracellular metabolite concentrations of the upper part of glycolysis were significantly increased. On the contrary, nucleoside triphosphate concentrations of infected cells dropped clearly after 12 h pi. This behaviour was observed for two different human influenza A/PR/8/34 strains at slightly different time points. Conclusions Comparing these results with literature values for the time course of infection with same influenza strains, underline the hypothesis that influenza infection only represents a minor additional burden for host cell metabolism. The metabolic changes observed after12 h pi are most probably caused by the onset of apoptosis in infected cells. The comparison of experimental data from two variants of the A/PR/8/34 virus strain (RKI versus NIBSC with different productivities and infection dynamics showed comparable metabolic patterns but a clearly different timely behavior. Thus, infection dynamics are obviously reflected in host cell metabolism.

  4. The Influence of Infective Dose on the Virulence of a Generalist Pathogen in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Zebra Fish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnula, Hanna; Mappes, Johanna; Valkonen, Janne K; Sundberg, Lotta-Riina

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen density and genetic diversity fluctuate in the outside-host environment during and between epidemics, affecting disease emergence and the severity and probability of infections. Although the importance of these factors for pathogen virulence and infection probability has been acknowledged, their interactive effects are not well understood. We studied how an infective dose in an environmentally transmitted opportunistic fish pathogen, Flavobacterium columnare, affects its virulence both in rainbow trout, which are frequently infected at fish farms, and in zebra fish, a host that is not naturally infected by F. columnare. We used previously isolated strains of confirmed high and low virulence in a single infection and in a co-infection. Infection success (measured as host morbidity) correlated positively with dose when the hosts were exposed to the high-virulence strain, but no response for the dose increase was found when the hosts were exposed to the low-virulence strain. Interestingly, the co-infection resulted in poorer infection success than the single infection with the high-virulence strain. The rainbow trout were more susceptible to the infection than the zebra fish but, in both species, the effects of the doses and the strains were qualitatively similar. We suggest that as an increase in dose can lead to increased host morbidity, both the interstrain interactions and differences in infectivity in different hosts may influence the severity and consequently the evolution of disease. Our results also confirm that the zebra fish is a good laboratory model to study F. columnare infection.

  5. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi R. Verrier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis D virus (HDV infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments.

  6. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Schuster, Catherine; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments. PMID:27657111

  7. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE EVIDENCE OF VIRUS INFECTION IN CULTURED MARINE FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Electron microscope investigation on the red sea bream (Pagrosomus major), bastard halibut (Paralichthys olivaceus) and stone flounder (Kareius bicoloratus) in North China revealed virus infection in the bodies of the dead and diseased fish. These viruses included the lymphocystis disease virus (LDV), parvovirus, globular virus, and a kind of baculavirus which was not discovered and reported before and is now tentatively named baculavirus of stone flounder (Kareius bicoloratus).

  8. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Coyne G; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and encounters the

  9. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, M G; Willemink, M J; Pompe, E; van der Bruggen, T; van Rhenen, A; Lammers, J W J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071697624; Wessels, F; Sprengers, R W; de Jong, Pim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/287955672; Minnema, M C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/171618149

    2017-01-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore

  10. High-dose survival in the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection is accompanied by suppressed DTH but unaffected T-cell cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Volkert, M

    1985-01-01

    cells and infected sensitive targets in the central nervous system. On the other hand, high doses of virus caused a clear suppression of the LCMV-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). In addition, when splenocytes from high-dose animals were transferred either intravenously or locally...... in mice infected with these doses of virus. In the high-dose mice we found generally higher organ virus titres and serum interferon titres than in the low-dose mice. Since we could demonstrate that virus-specific T-cell cytotoxicity in spleen, peripheral blood, and meningeal exudate was similar after...... intracerebral infection with large and small virus doses, and since the LCMV infection in the brain qualitatively and quantitatively was independent of the size of virus inoculum, the explanation for the survival of the high-dose animals is obviously not lack of possibilities for interaction between cytotoxic T...

  11. Therapeutical trials with antimicrobial agents and cultured cecal microflora in Salmonella infantis infections in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuna, E; Nurmi, E

    1979-09-01

    The efficacy of short antimicrobial therapy was examined in chicks infected with S. infantis on the day of hatching. An attempt was made to prevent the reappearance of salmonellae by treating the chicks with a culture of cecal microflora to re-establish the normal intestinal flora. The following drugs were used: neomycin/polymyxin, oxytetracyline/neomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, furazolidone, and trimethoprim/sulphadiazine. The oxytetracycline/neomycin therapy was most effective, but reappearance of the infection was not avoided. Combined therapy with other antimicrobials and the culture reduced the number of infected chicks compared with the respective control groups. A slight reduction was also found when the culture was used alone without any preceding antimicrobial treatment.

  12. Comparison of the therapeutic dose of warfarin in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients: a study of clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B S; Mokoena, T

    2017-01-01

    Background People infected with HIV are prone to venous thrombosis. Treatment of thrombosis is primarily with warfarin. No studies have addressed the effects of HIV infection on warfarin dose. The aims of this study were to determine whether the therapeutic dose of warfarin and induction time to therapeutic dose in HIV-infected patients differ from that in HIV-uninfected patients. Methods A prospective and retrospective descriptive study of induction time to therapeutic warfarin dose, as well as of ambulant therapeutic warfarin dose, was performed. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients being treated after deep venous thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism were compared. Sex and use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) were also compared in the groups. Results 234 patients were entered into the study. Induction time to therapeutic warfarin dose did not differ between the 2 groups. The mean therapeutic dose of warfarin was higher in the HIV-infected than the HIV-uninfected group: 6.06 vs 5.72 mg/day, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.29). There was no difference in therapeutic warfarin dose between ARV-naïve groups—HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected patients not on ARVs. Conclusions There appears to be little effect of HIV infection on warfarin dosing. Warfarin therapy should be administered conventionally in HIV-infected patients. PMID:28179414

  13. Florfenicol residues in Rainbow Trout after oral dosing in recirculating and flow-through culture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Hess, Karina R.; Bernady, Jeffry A.; Gaikowski, M. P.; Whitsel, Melissa; Endris, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaflor is a feed premix for fish containing the broad spectrum antibacterial agent florfenicol (FFC) incorporated at a ratio of 50% (w/w). To enhance the effectiveness of FFC for salmonids infected with certain isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum causing coldwater disease, the FFC dose must be increased from the standard 10 mg·kg−1 body weight (BW)·d−1 for 10 consecutive days. A residue depletion study was conducted to determine whether FFC residues remaining in the fillet tissue after treating fish at an increased dose would be safe for human consumption. Groups of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (total n = 144; weight range, 126–617 g) were treated with FFC at 20 mg·kg−1 BW·d−1 for 10 d in a flow-through system (FTS) and a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) each with a water temperature of ∼13°C. The two-tank RAS included a nontreated tank containing 77 fish. Fish were taken from each tank (treated tank, n = 16; nontreated tank, n = 8) at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 120, 240, 360, and 480 h posttreatment. Florfenicol amine (FFA) concentrations (the FFC marker residue) in skin-on fillets from treated fish were greatest at 12 h posttreatment (11.58 μg/g) in the RAS and were greatest at 6 h posttreatment (11.09 μg/g) in the FTS. The half-lives for FFA in skin-on fillets from the RAS and FTS were 20.3 and 19.7 h, respectively. Assimilation of FFC residues in the fillets of nontreated fish sharing the RAS with FFC-treated fish was minimal. Florfenicol water concentrations peaked in the RAS-treated tank and nontreated tanks at 10 h (453 μg/L) and 11 h (442 μg/L) posttreatment, respectively. Monitoring of nitrite concentrations throughout the study indicated the nitrogen oxidation efficiency of the RAS biofilter was minimally impacted by the FFC treatment.

  14. Susceptibility of primary culture neurons from rats of different ages to encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Weiping; Ikegami, Hisashi; Nakayama, Yumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Katayama, Kei-ichi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Doi, Kunio

    2003-10-01

    The changes in susceptibility of neurons to the D variant of EMC virus (EMC-D) (10(6) PFU/well) were investigated in developing hippocampal primary cultures from postnatal days of 1, 7, and 56 Fischer 344 rats (P1, P7, and P56) for up to 12 h after infection (12 HAI). The virus titer of primary culture neurons increased at 1 HAI, decreased at 2 HAI, increased at 3 HAI, peaked at 8 HAI, and decreased at 12 HAI in all age groups. The titers at 1 and 8 HAI were lowest in P56 cultures. The virus titer of neurons was always higher than that of culture media, especially at 1 HAI, in P1 cultures, whereas the former was lower than the latter from 2 to 3 HAI in P7 cultures and from 2 to 4 HAI in P56 cultures, respectively. Signals of viral RNA detected by in situ hybridization were first observed in the peripheral cytoplasm of neurons at 1 HAI in P1 and P7 cultures and at 4 HAI in P56 cultures, respectively. The signals spread to a large or whole area of cytoplasm and also to processes thereafter. The number of viral RNA-positive neurons and the amount of signals decreased with age. The present results indicated that the susceptibility of primary culture neurons to EMC-D decreased with age but viral replication still occurred in P56 cultures.

  15. Combined therapy of Salmonella infection in chickens by antimicrobial agents followed by cultured cecal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuna, E; Schneitz, C; Nurmi, E

    1980-06-01

    Week-old chickens infected with Salmonella infantis when one day old were treated with antimicrobial drugs either given alone or followed by peroral inoculation of bacterial culture. The bacteria were derived from the cecal contents of adult chickens. The antimicrobial drugs used were: neomycin, neomycin plus oxytetracycline, neomycin plus polymyxin, and sulfadiazine plus trimethoprim. The combined therapy with oxytetracycline plus neomycin and bacterial culture seemed to be the most effective, although the efficacy varied between the parallel trials. Sulfadiazine plus trimethoprim followed by treatment with the bacterial culture decreased the infection rate. The bacterial culture alone also had a slight anti-salmonella effect. When only antimicrobials were given, salmonellae rapidly reappeared in the intestines when the therapy was stopped.

  16. A Comparison of Tissue versus Swab Culturing of Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Huang; Ying Cao; Mengchen Zou; Xiangrong Luo; Ya Jiang; Yaoming Xue; Fang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare the efficacy of swabbing versus tissue biopsy for microbiological diagnosis of diabetic foot infection. Methods. This was a prospective trial. Fifty-six patients with diabetic foot infection were divided into the following 3 groups according to the PEDIS grading system: grade 2 (n = 10), grade 3 (n = 29), and grade 4 (n = 17). Two specimens were collected from each wound for microbial culturing after debridement, including a superficial swab and a deep tissue punch biops...

  17. Hepatitis B virus infection and replication in primarily cultured human fetal hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Lin; Qun Chen; Li-Ye Yang; Wen-Yu Li; Xi-Biao Cao; Jiao-Ren Wu; You-Peng Peng; Mo-Rui Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the infection and replication of hepatitis B virus(HBV)in primarily cultured human fetal hepatocytes(HFHs).METHODS:The human fetal hepatocytes were cultured in serum-free medium,HBV-positive serum was added into the medium to study the susceptibility of hepatocytes to HBV infection.The supernatant was collected for ELISA assay of HBsAg and HBeAg,and quantitative fluorescence PCR for HBV-DNA assay daily.Albumin and HBcAg,CK8 and CK18 expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry in cultured hepatocytes.Content of lactate dehydrogenate(LDH)was measured to find out the integrity of the cell membrane.RESULTS:A stable hepatocyte culture system was established.HBV could infect the hepatocytes and replicate,and HBcAg expression could be detected by immunohistochemistry in hepatocyte-like cells.HBV-DNA in the supernatant could be detected from d 2 to d 18 and HBsAg and HBeAg were positive on d 3-d 18 after HBV infection.HBV in medium increased from d 0 to d 6 and subsequently decreased as the cells were progressively loosing their hepatocyte phenotypes.CONCLUSION:HBV could infect human fetal hepatocytes and replicate.This in vitro model allowed a detailed Study on early events associated with human HBV entry into cells and subsequent replication.

  18. Zinc oxide tetrapods inhibit herpes simplex virus infection of cultured corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Neil; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Hadigal, Satvik; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Adelung, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Infection of the human cornea by herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) can cause significant vision loss. The purpose of this study was to develop an ex vivo model to visualize viral growth and spread in the cornea. The model was also used to analyze cytokine production and study the antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods. Methods A β-galactosidase-expressing recombinant virus, HSV-1(KOS)tk12, was used to demonstrate the ability of the virus to enter and develop blue plaques on human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells and corneal tissues. Freshly obtained porcine corneas were cultured and then scratched before infection with HSV-1(KOS)tk12. The blue plaques on the corneas were imaged using a stereomicroscope. Western blot analysis for HSV-1 proteins was performed to verify HSV-1 infection of the cornea. Using the ex vivo model, zinc oxide tetrapods were tested for their anti-HSV-1 potential, and a cytokine profile was developed to assess the effects of the treatment. Results Cultured corneas and the use of β-galactosidase-expressing HSV-1(KOS)tk12 virus can provide an attractive ex vivo model to visualize and study HSV-1 entry and spread of the infection in tissues. We found that unlike cultured HCE cells, which demonstrated nearly 100% infectivity, HSV-1 infection of the cultured cornea was more restrictive and took longer to develop. We also found that the zinc oxide tetrapod–shaped nano- and microstructures inhibited HSV infection of the cultured cells, as well as the cultured corneas. The cytokine profile of the infected samples was consistent with previous studies of HSV-1 corneal infection. Conclusions The ability to visualize HSV-1 growth and spread in corneal tissues can provide new details about HSV-1 infection of the cornea and the efficacy of new cornea-specific antiviral drug candidates. The ex vivo model also demonstrates antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods and adequately portrays the drug delivery issues that cornea-specific treatments

  19. Differential association of fluconazole dose and dose/MIC ratio with mortality in patients with Candida albicans and non-albicans bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosh-Nissimov, T; Ben-Ami, R

    2015-11-01

    Targeting fluconazole therapy to achieve predefined pharmacodynamic goals has been suggested as a means of optimizing the treatment of patients with candidaemia. However, data regarding species-specific dosing targets are inconclusive. We retrospectively analysed a cohort of 75 adult patients with Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) who received initial treatment with fluconazole for ≥48 h (36 Candida albicans and 39 non-albicans Candida (NAC)). Fluconazole dose, the dose/MIC ratio and the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24)/MIC ratio were determined for each patient, and classification and regression tree analysis was used to determine breakpoints for significant interactions with 30-day survival. Both fluconazole exposure parameters and patient-related and disease-related variables were assessed in univariable and multivariable survival models. The crude 30-day mortality rate was 32% (44% and 21% for C. albicans and NAC, respectively). An average fluconazole dose of >200 mg/day, a dose/MIC ratio of >400 and an AUC24/MIC ratio of >400 were associated with a higher 30-day survival rate and better microbiological response in patients with C. albicans BSI but not in those with NAC BSI. Baseline chronic kidney disease was a risk factor for fluconazole underdosing and mortality. Severity of sepsis (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score) was the only significant predictor of death in patients with NAC BSI. We conclude that, although pharmacodynamic target-directed fluconazole dosing may help to optimize outcomes for patients with C. albicans BSI, additional studies are needed to define the role of fluconazole in the treatment of NAC BSI.

  20. Clinical identification of bacteria in human chronic wound infections: culturing vs. 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoads Daniel D; Cox Stephen B; Rees Eric J; Sun Yan; Wolcott Randall D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic wounds affect millions of people and cost billions of dollars in the United States each year. These wounds harbor polymicrobial biofilm communities, which can be difficult to elucidate using culturing methods. Clinical molecular microbiological methods are increasingly being employed to investigate the microbiota of chronic infections, including wounds, as part of standard patient care. However, molecular testing is more sensitive than culturing, which results in m...

  1. Culture-Proven Thorn-Associated Infections in Arizona: 10-Year Experience at Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sierra C; Budavari, Adriane I; Kusne, Shimon; Zhang, Nan; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; Blair, Janis E

    2017-01-01

    Thorn injuries are common in the desert Southwest; however, the frequency and microbiology of thorn-associated infections have not been systematically described. Most information comes from case reports describing infections from atypical or environmental microorganisms. Our aim was to summarize the spectrum of thorn-associated infections. We conducted a retrospective review of electronic health records for patients presenting to our institution from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2014 for treatment of thorn-associated injuries and then focused on the patients with cultures. Of 2758 records reviewed, 1327 patients had thorn-associated injuries; however, only 58 (4.4%) had cultures. Of these patients, 37 (64%) had positive findings; 5 had polymicrobial infection. The most commonly identified organisms were Staphylococcus aureus (n = 22, 59.0%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species (n = 8, 21.6%). Other pathogens included Nocardia species (n = 3, 8.1%), Streptococcus species (n = 2, 5.4%), Gram-negative bacteria (n = 2, 5.4%), Aspergillus species (n = 2, 5.4%), Paecilomyces lilacinus (n = 1, 2.7%), and Candida species (n = 1, 2.7%). There were no infections caused by Pantoea agglomerans, Sporothrix schenckii, or Coccidioides spp. In contrast to most published case reports, we found that typical cutaneous microorganisms, such as Staphylococcus species, caused the majority of culture-positive, thorn-related infections.

  2. Population structure of mixed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is strain genotype and culture medium dependent.

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    Madeleine Hanekom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular genotyping methods have shown infection with more than one Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain genotype in a single sputum culture, indicating mixed infection. AIM: This study aimed to develop a PCR-based genotyping tool to determine the population structure of M. tuberculosis strain genotypes in primary Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tubes (MGIT and Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ cultures to identify mixed infections and to establish whether the growth media influenced the recovery of certain strain genotypes. METHOD: A convenience sample of 206 paired MGIT and LJ M. tuberculosis cultures from pulmonary tuberculosis patients resident in Khayelitsha, South Africa were genotyped using an in-house PCR-based method to detect defined M. tuberculosis strain genotypes. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of the PCR-based method for detecting Beijing, Haarlem, S-family, and LAM genotypes was 100%, and 75% and 50% for detecting the Low Copy Clade, respectively. Thirty-one (15% of the 206 cases showed the presence of more than one M. tuberculosis strain genotype. Strains of the Beijing and Haarlem genotypes were significantly more associated with a mixed infection (on both media when compared to infections with a single strain (Beijing MGIT p = 0.02; LJ, p<0.01 and (Haarlem: MGIT p<0.01; LJ, p = 0.01. Strains with the Beijing genotype were less likely to be with "other genotype" strains (p<0.01 while LAM, Haarlem, S-family and LCC occurred independently with the Beijing genotype. CONCLUSION: The PCR-based method was able to identify mixed infection in at least 15% of the cases. LJ media was more sensitive in detecting mixed infections than MGIT media, implying that the growth characteristics of M. tuberculosis on different media may influence our ability to detect mixed infections. The Beijing and Haarlem genotypes were more likely to occur in a mixed infection than any of the other genotypes tested suggesting pathogen

  3. The influence of poverty and culture on the transmission of parasitic infections in rural nicaraguan villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karan, Abraar; Chapman, Gretchen B; Galvani, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections cause one of the largest global burdens of disease. To identify possible areas for interventions, a structured questionnaire addressing knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding parasitic infections as well as the less studied role of culture and resource availability was presented to mothers of school-age children in rural communities around San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. We determined that access to resources influenced knowledge, attitude, and behaviors that may be relevant to transmission of parasitic infections. For example, having access to a clinic and prior knowledge about parasites was positively correlated with the practice of having fencing for animals, having fewer barefoot children, and treating children for parasites. We also found that cultural beliefs may contribute to parasitic transmission. Manifestations of machismo culture and faith in traditional medicines conflicted with healthy practices. We identified significant cultural myths that prevented healthy behaviors, including the beliefs that cutting a child's nails can cause tetanus and that showering after a hot day caused sickness. The use of traditional medicine was positively correlated with the belief in these cultural myths. Our study demonstrates that the traditional knowledge, attitude, and practice model could benefit from including components that examine resource availability and culture.

  4. The Influence of Poverty and Culture on the Transmission of Parasitic Infections in Rural Nicaraguan Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraar Karan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasitic infections cause one of the largest global burdens of disease. To identify possible areas for interventions, a structured questionnaire addressing knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding parasitic infections as well as the less studied role of culture and resource availability was presented to mothers of school-age children in rural communities around San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. We determined that access to resources influenced knowledge, attitude, and behaviors that may be relevant to transmission of parasitic infections. For example, having access to a clinic and prior knowledge about parasites was positively correlated with the practice of having fencing for animals, having fewer barefoot children, and treating children for parasites. We also found that cultural beliefs may contribute to parasitic transmission. Manifestations of machismo culture and faith in traditional medicines conflicted with healthy practices. We identified significant cultural myths that prevented healthy behaviors, including the beliefs that cutting a child’s nails can cause tetanus and that showering after a hot day caused sickness. The use of traditional medicine was positively correlated with the belief in these cultural myths. Our study demonstrates that the traditional knowledge, attitude, and practice model could benefit from including components that examine resource availability and culture.

  5. Dose-response relationship of cadmium or radiation-induced embryotoxicity in mouse whole embryo culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Kiyohito; Kawamata, Akitoshi; Matsuoka, Masato; Wakisaka, Takashi; Fujiki, Yoshishige (Asahi University School of Dentistry, Gifu (Japan))

    1988-12-01

    Mouse embryos of B6C3F/sub 1/ strain were exposed in vitro to 1.2 to 2.2 {mu}M cadmium chloride (Cd) or to 100 to 320 R x-rays, and the effects of the exposure on development were examined after 39 h of culture. Development of embryos was assessed from lethality, formation of the neural tube defect, diameter and protein of yolk sac, crown-rump and head lengths, embryonic protein, and number of somites. Incidence of the neural tube defect increased from 3.4 to 100% by 1.2 to 2.0 {mu}M Cd, while embryo deaths increased from 13.8 to 93.3% by 2.0 to 2.2 {mu}M Cd. Embryonic protein was significantly reduced at the teratogenic range, but the number of somites was only affected by 1.6 to 2.0 {mu}M Cd. X-irradiation at 100 to 320 R induced the neural tube defect in 2.9 to 72.7% of the embryos. An embryolethal effect was observed only at the 320 R dose. Crown-rump and head lengths and embryonic protein were significantly affected at the teratogenic range, but the diameter and protein of yolk sac and number of somites were hardly affected. Cadmium- or radiation-induced response data of both teratogenicity and endpoints indicating inhibition of embryonic development were acceptably fitted to a linear log-probit regression. These regressions suggest that as an estimation of interference in development of embryos, embryonic protein and head length are sensitive endpoints while the number of somites is an insensitive criterion. (author).

  6. Periodontal infection in cancer patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, JE; Epstein, JB; Raber, J; van Dissel, JT; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Guiot, HFL; van der Velden, U

    2002-01-01

    The infected and inflamed periodontium can act as a focus for systemic infection in neutropenic cancer patients. The incidence of these oral infections is unknown, but probably underestimated. Periodontal infections can easily be overlooked, primarily because symptoms of gingival inflammation may be

  7. Stages of restricted HIV-1 infection in astrocyte cultures derived from human fetal brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messam, C A; Major, E O

    2000-05-01

    The predominant cell types infected by HIV-1 in AIDS associated encephalopathy are cells of the macrophage/microglial lineage. There has been consistent evidence, however, that astrocytes also become infected although not at the same frequency or level of multiplication as microglial cells. HIV-1 antigens and/or nucleic acid have been identified in astrocytes in brain autopsy tissue from both adult and pediatric AIDS cases. In cell cultures, HIV-1 infection of astrocytes results in an initial productive but non-cytopathogenic infection that diminishes to a viral persistence or latent state. Understanding the nature of HIV-1 infection of astrocytes, which represents the largest population of cells in the brain, will contribute to the understanding of AIDS encephalopathy and the dementia that occurs in nearly one-quarter of all AIDS patients.

  8. Dose finding of 3'deoxyadenosine and deoxycoformycin for the treatment of Trypanosoma evansi infection: An effective and nontoxic dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Rosa, Luciana; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Oliveira, Camila B; Gressler, Lucas T; Arnold, Caroline B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Sagrillo, Michele; Sangoi, Manuela; Moresco, Rafael; Mendes, Ricardo E; Weiss, Paulo E; Miletti, Luiz C; Monteiro, Silvia G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of using 3'deoxyadenosine (Cordycepin - adenosine analogue) combined with deoxycoformycin (Pentostatin - an adenosine deaminase inhibitor) in mice infected with Trypanosoma evansi. We show that the combination of Cordycepin (2.0 mg kg(-1)) and Pentostatin (0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mg kg(1)) is effective in the clearance of T. evansi, although at the higher concentrations of Pentostatin 2 mg kg(-1) some toxicity was observed in the liver and kidney. Since the Cordycepin 2.0 mg kg(-1) and Pentostatin 0.2 mg kg(-1) combination was effective and had low toxicity, we recommend this as a therapeutic option for a T. evansi mouse model.

  9. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells: Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, J.B.; Wahl, A.S.; Freund, S.; Genzel, Y.; Reichl, U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus

  10. Characterization of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in a culture collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.S. Zanetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in our culture collection did not grow or grew poorly and showed lysis on the culture plates when removed from the collection and inoculated on MacConkey agar. One hypothesis was that bacteriophages had infected and killed those clinical isolates. To check the best storage conditions to maintain viable P. aeruginosa for a longer time, clinical isolates were stored at various temperatures and were grown monthly. We investigated the presence of phage in 10 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa stored in our culture collection. Four strains of P. aeruginosa were infected by phages that were characterized by electron microscopy and isolated to assess their ability to infect. The best condition to maintain the viability of the strains during storage was in water at room temperature. Three Siphoviridae and two Myoviridae phages were visualized and characterized by morphology. We confirmed the presence of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates, and their ability to infect and lyse alternative hosts. Strain PAO1, however, did not show lysis to any phage. Mucoid and multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa showed lysis to 50% of the phages tested.

  11. Low efficacy of single-dose albendazole and mebendazole against hookworm and effect on concomitant helminth infection in Lao PDR.

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    Phonepasong Ayé Soukhathammavong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Albendazole and mebendazole are increasingly deployed for preventive chemotherapy targeting soil-transmitted helminth (STH infections. We assessed the efficacy of single oral doses of albendazole (400 mg and mebendazole (500 mg for the treatment of hookworm infection in school-aged children in Lao PDR. Since Opisthorchis viverrini is co-endemic in our study setting, the effect of the two drugs could also be determined against this liver fluke. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a randomized, open-label, two-arm trial. In total, 200 children infected with hookworm (determined by quadruplicate Kato-Katz thick smears derived from two stool samples were randomly assigned to albendazole (n=100 and mebendazole (n=100. Cure rate (CR; percentage of children who became egg-negative after treatment, and egg reduction rate (ERR; reduction in the geometric mean fecal egg count at treatment follow-up compared to baseline at 21-23 days posttreatment were used as primary outcome measures. Adverse events were monitored 3 hours post treatment. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Single-dose albendazole and mebendazole resulted in CRs of 36.0% and 17.6% (odds ratio: 0.4; 95% confidence interval: 0.2-0.8; P=0.01, and ERRs of 86.7% and 76.3%, respectively. In children co-infected with O. viverrini, albendazole and mebendazole showed low CRs (33.3% and 24.2%, respectively and moderate ERRs (82.1% and 78.2%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both albendazole and mebendazole showed disappointing CRs against hookworm, but albendazole cured infection and reduced intensity of infection with a higher efficacy than mebendazole. Single-dose administrations showed an effect against O. viverrini, and hence it will be interesting to monitor potential ancillary benefits of a preventive chemotherapy strategy that targets STHs in areas where opisthorchiasis is co-endemic. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29126001.

  12. Is a single positive blood culture for Enterococcus species representative of infection or contamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindai, K; Strerath, M S; Hess, T; Safdar, N

    2014-11-01

    Data on the clinical outcomes of patients with a single compared with multiple positive blood cultures for Enterococcus species is limited. We undertook a retrospective cohort study in adults with at least one positive blood culture for Enterococcus species in a single institution. Clinical outcomes included death and elimination of infection. We included 471 positive blood cultures from 206 enterococcal positive blood culture episodes in 189 patients. Multiple positive blood cultures for Enterococcus species occurred in 110/206 (53.4 %) episodes; 31.6 % of patients had diabetes mellitus; 42.9 % of patients had solid or hematologic malignancy; 26.5 % of patients were solid organ transplant recipients; hospital-acquired and healthcare-associated acquisition represented 55.3 % and 33.0 % of episodes, respectively. Thirty-five patients died and 110 episodes of enterococcal bloodstream infection were successfully treated. In the multivariable analysis, multiple positive blood cultures were not statistically significantly associated with an increased likelihood of in-hospital death [odds ratio (OR) 1.00, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.42-2.40] or elimination (OR 1.41, 95 % CI 0.76-2.64) compared with single positive blood cultures. Hematologic malignancy and diabetes mellitus were independently associated with in-hospital death (OR 2.83, 95 % Cl 1.02-7.82; OR 2.79, 95 % Cl 1.16-6.70, respectively). Infectious disease consultation was associated with a greater likelihood of elimination (OR 2.50, 95 % Cl 1.32-4.72). The clinical outcomes of patients with single versus multiple positive blood cultures with Enterococcus species were similar in our institution. Further studies should examine efficient methods to detect contamination versus true infection.

  13. Apparent reduction of ADAM10 in scrapie-infected cultured cells and in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cao; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Zhang, Jin; Shi, Qi; Wang, Jing; Tian, Chan; Gao, Chen; Xiao, Kang; Ren, Ke; Zhou, Wei; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-12-01

    It has been described that A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM10) may involve in the physiopathology of prion diseases, but the direct molecular basis still remains unsolved. In this study, we confirmed that ADAM10 was able to cleave recombinant human prion protein in vitro. Using immunoprecipitation tests (IP) and immunofluorescent assays (IFA), reliable molecular interaction between the native cellular form of PrP (PrP(C)) and ADAM10 was observed not only in various cultured neuronal cell lines but also in brain homogenates of healthy hamsters and mice. Only mature ADAM10 (after removal of its prodomain) molecules showed the binding activity with the native PrP(C). Remarkably more prion protein (PrP)-ADAM10 complexes were detected in the membrane fraction of cultured cells. In the scrapie-infected SMB cell model, the endogenous ADAM10 levels, especially the mature ADAM10, were significantly decreased in the fraction of cell membrane. IP and IFA tests of prion-infected SMB-S15 cells confirmed no detectable PrP-ADAM10 complex in the cellular lysates and PrP-ADAM10 co-localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the levels of ADAM10 in the brain homogenates of scrapie agent 263K-infected hamsters and agent ME7-infected mice were also almost diminished at the terminal stage, showing time-dependent decreases during the incubation period. Our data here provide the solid molecular basis for the endoproteolysis of ADAM10 on PrP molecules and interaction between ADAM10 and PrP(C). Obvious loss of ADAM10 during prion infection in vitro and in vivo highlights that ADAM10 may play essential pathophysiological roles in prion replication and accumulation.

  14. Viral Dose and Immunosuppression Modulate the Progression of Acute BVDV-1 Infection in Calves: Evidence of Long Term Persistence after Intra-Nasal Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Strong

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV infection of cattle causes a diverse range of clinical outcomes from being asymptomatic, or a transient mild disease, to producing severe cases of acute disease leading to death. Four groups of calves were challenged with a type 1 BVDV strain, originating from a severe outbreak of BVDV in England, to study the effect of viral dose and immunosuppression on the viral replication and transmission of BVDV. Three groups received increasing amounts of virus: Group A received 10(2.55TCID50/ml, group B 10(5.25TCID50/ml and group C 10(6.7TCID 50/ml. A fourth group (D was inoculated with a medium dose (10(5.25TCID50/ml and concomitantly treated with dexamethasone (DMS to assess the effects of chemically induced immunosuppression. Naïve calves were added as sentinel animals to assess virus transmission. The outcome of infection was dose dependent with animals given a higher dose developing severe disease and more pronounced viral replication. Despite virus being shed by the low-dose infection group, BVD was not transmitted to sentinel calves. Administration of dexamethasone (DMS resulted in more severe clinical signs, prolonged viraemia and virus shedding. Using PCR techniques, viral RNA was detected in blood, several weeks after the limit of infectious virus recovery. Finally, a recently developed strand-specific RT-PCR detected negative strand viral RNA, indicative of actively replicating virus, in blood samples from convalescent animals, as late as 85 days post inoculation. This detection of long term replicating virus may indicate the way in which the virus persists and/or is reintroduced within herds.

  15. Confirmation of Chlamydophila abortus in infected cell culture using Indirect Immunofluorescence technique

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    Krishnan Nair G

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila abortus (C. abortus is an important abortifacient agent in bovines and ovines. Clinical diagnosis of the disease is often difficult. An early diagnosis can be achieved based on direct demonstration of the organism in clinical material and through the cultural recovery of the organism in embryonated chicken egg. For confirmatory diagnosis antigen detection methods or serological techniques can be adopted. The present study is aimed at the confirmatory diagnosis of C. abortus infection by indirect immunofluorescence technique following the isolation of the organism in cell culture. Specific apple green fluorescing inclusions of C. abortus in McCoy cell lines was detected from 72 h to 96 h post infection employing anti-chlamydial group specific monoclonal antibodies. Thus, a confirmatory diagnosis of the infection was possible with this study. [Vet. World 2011; 4(10.000: 473-474

  16. Detection and quantification of poliovirus infection using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Montiel Felipe T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a globalized word, prevention of infectious diseases is a major challenge. Rapid detection of viable virus particles in water and other environmental samples is essential to public health risk assessment, homeland security and environmental protection. Current virus detection methods, especially assessing viral infectivity, are complex and time-consuming, making point-of-care detection a challenge. Faster, more sensitive, highly specific methods are needed to quantify potentially hazardous viral pathogens and to determine if suspected materials contain viable viral particles. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy combined with cellular-based sensing, may offer a precise way to detect specific viruses. This approach utilizes infrared light to monitor changes in molecular components of cells by tracking changes in absorbance patterns produced following virus infection. In this work poliovirus (PV1 was used to evaluate the utility of FTIR spectroscopy with cell culture for rapid detection of infective virus particles. Results Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK cells infected with different virus titers were studied at 1 - 12 hours post-infection (h.p.i.. A partial least squares (PLS regression method was used to analyze and model cellular responses to different infection titers and times post-infection. The model performs best at 8 h.p.i., resulting in an estimated root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV of 17 plaque forming units (PFU/ml when using low titers of infection of 10 and 100 PFU/ml. Higher titers, from 103 to 106 PFU/ml, could also be reliably detected. Conclusions This approach to poliovirus detection and quantification using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture could potentially be extended to compare biochemical cell responses to infection with different viruses. This virus detection method could feasibly be adapted to an automated scheme for use in areas such as water safety monitoring and

  17. Identification of XMRV infection-associated microRNAs in four cell types in culture.

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    Ketha V K Mohan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: XMRV is a gammaretrovirus that was thought to be associated with prostate cancer (PC and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS in humans until recently. The virus is culturable in various cells of human origin like the lymphocytes, NK cells, neuronal cells, and prostate cell lines. MicroRNAs (miRNA, which regulate gene expression, were so far not identified in cells infected with XMRV in culture. METHODS: Two prostate cell lines (LNCaP and DU145 and two primary cells, Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes [PBL] and Monocyte-derived Macrophages [MDM] were infected with XMRV. Total mRNA was extracted from mock- and virus-infected cells at 6, 24 and 48 hours post infection and evaluated for microRNA profile in a microarray. RESULTS: MicroRNA expression profiles of XMRV-infected continuous prostate cancer cell lines differ from that of virus-infected primary cells (PBL and MDMs. miR-193a-3p and miRPlus-E1245 observed to be specific to XMRV infection in all 4 cell types. While miR-193a-3p levels were down regulated miRPlus-E1245 on the other hand exhibited varied expression profile between the 4 cell types. DISCUSSION: The present study clearly demonstrates that cellular microRNAs are expressed during XMRV infection of human cells and this is the first report demonstrating the regulation of miR193a-3p and miRPlus-E1245 during XMRV infection in four different human cell types.

  18. Rapid, targeted and culture-free viral infectivity assay in drop-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Rotem, Assaf; Zhang, Huidan; Chang, Connie B; Basu, Anindita; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Koehler, Stephan A; Ren, Yukun; Lin, Jeffrey S; Pipas, James M; Feldman, Andrew B; Wobus, Christiane E; Weitz, David A

    2015-10-07

    A key viral property is infectivity, and its accurate measurement is crucial for the understanding of viral evolution, disease and treatment. Currently viral infectivity is measured using plaque assays, which involve prolonged culturing of host cells, and whose measurement is unable to differentiate between specific strains and is prone to low number fluctuation. We developed a rapid, targeted and culture-free infectivity assay using high-throughput drop-based microfluidics. Single infectious viruses are incubated in a large number of picoliter drops with host cells for one viral replication cycle followed by in-drop gene-specific amplification to detect infection events. Using murine noroviruses (MNV) as a model system, we measure their infectivity and determine the efficacy of a neutralizing antibody for different variants of MNV. Our results are comparable to traditional plaque-based assays and plaque reduction neutralization tests. However, the fast, low-cost, highly accurate genomic-based assay promises to be a superior method for drug screening and isolation of resistant viral strains. Moreover our technique can be adapted to measuring the infectivity of other pathogens, such as bacteria and fungi.

  19. The effect of host age and inoculation dose on infection dynamics of Angiostrongylus vasorum in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webster, Pia; Monrad, Jesper; Kapel, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Infections and clinical cases of Angiostrongylus vasorum in dogs are found increasingly across Europe, thus rendering knowledge on its infection biology more important. We used red foxes as a carnivore model to examine the effect of host age and infection dose on the establishment of ...

  20. Clinical identification of bacteria in human chronic wound infections: culturing vs. 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing

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    Rhoads Daniel D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic wounds affect millions of people and cost billions of dollars in the United States each year. These wounds harbor polymicrobial biofilm communities, which can be difficult to elucidate using culturing methods. Clinical molecular microbiological methods are increasingly being employed to investigate the microbiota of chronic infections, including wounds, as part of standard patient care. However, molecular testing is more sensitive than culturing, which results in markedly different results being reported to clinicians. This study compares the results of aerobic culturing and molecular testing (culture-free 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing, and it examines the relative abundance score that is generated by the molecular test and the usefulness of the relative abundance score in predicting the likelihood that the same organism would be detected by culture. Methods Parallel samples from 51 chronic wounds were studied using aerobic culturing and 16S DNA sequencing for the identification of bacteria. Results One hundred forty-five (145 unique genera were identified using molecular methods, and 68 of these genera were aerotolerant. Fourteen (14 unique genera were identified using aerobic culture methods. One-third (31/92 of the cultures were determined to be Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis with higher relative abundance scores were more likely to be detected by culture as demonstrated with regression modeling. Conclusion Discordance between molecular and culture testing is often observed. However, culture-free 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing and its relative abundance score can provide clinicians with insight into which bacteria are most abundant in a sample and which are most likely to be detected by culture.

  1. Outcomes in culture positive and culture negative ascitic fluid infection in patients with viral cirrhosis: cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ailia W

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascitic fluid infection (AFI in cirrhotic patients has a high morbidity and mortality. It has two variants namely, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP and culture negative neutrocytic ascites (CNNA. The aim of this study was to determine the outcome in cirrhotic patients with culture positive (SBP and culture negative neutrocytic ascites. Methods We analyzed 675 consecutive hepatitis B and/or C related cirrhosis patients with ascites admitted in our hospital from November 2005 to December 2007. Of these, 187 patients had AFI; clinical and laboratory parameters of these patients including causes of cirrhosis, Child Turcotte Pugh (CTP score were recorded. Results Out of 187 patients with AFI, 44 (23.5% had SBP while 143 (76.4% had CNNA. Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection was the most common cause of cirrhosis in 139 (74.3% patients. Patients with SBP had high CTP score as compared to CNNA (12.52 ± 1.45 vs. 11.44 ± 1.66; p 9/L as compared to CNNA (132 ± 91 × 109/L, p = 0.005. We found a high creatinine (mg/dl (1.95 ± 1.0 vs. 1.44 ± 0.85, (p = 0.003 and high prothrombin time (PT in seconds (24.8 ± 6.6 vs. 22.4 ± 7.2 (p = 0.04 in SBP as compared to CNNA. More patients with SBP (14/44; 31.8% had blood culture positivity as compare to CNNA (14/143; 9.8%, p = 0.002. Escherichia. Coli was the commonest organism in blood culture in 15/28 (53.5% patients. SBP group had a higher mortality (11/44; 25% as compared to CNNA (12/143; 8.4%, p = 0.003. On multiple logistic regression analysis, creatinine >1.1 mg/dl and positive blood culture were the independent predictors of mortality in patients with SBP. Conclusion Patients with SBP have a higher mortality than CNNA. Independent predictors of mortality in SBP are raised serum creatinine and a positive blood culture.

  2. Clinical improvement in feline herpesvirus 1 infected cats by oral low dose of interleukin-12 plus interferon-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorito, Filomena; Cantiello, Antonietta; Granato, Giovanna Elvira; Navas, Luigi; Diffidenti, Carmine; De Martino, Luisa; Maharajan, Veeramani; Olivieri, Fabio; Pagnini, Ugo; Iovane, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1) is a widespread cat pathogen inducing rhinitis, conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers. To alleviate acute FHV-1-induced disease, antiviral agents are used often with antibiotics. But sometimes, these treatments, as well as conventional doses of cytokines have moderate efficacy and/or collateral effects. Herein we have investigated the effects of low dose interleukin (IL)-12 plus interferon (IFN)-gamma, prepared by Sequential Kinetic Activated (SKA), on the treatment of FHV-1 infection. Twenty-five, unvaccinated FHV-1-positive cats were recruited into a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Fifteen cats were treated for 6 months with oral low doses of SKA IL-12 plus IFN-gamma and 10 cats were treated with placebo. At 1, 6 and 12 months (follow-up) after the beginning of treatment, clinical assessment, PCR assay and blood count were carried out. At follow-up, in treated group, we observed significant (pcats (80%). In placebo, 10/10 cats were PCR-positive, with improvements (30%) or worsening (70%) in clinical signs. Blood values were normal in both groups. Our results show that the low dose therapy, based on activated solutions of IL-12 plus IFN-gamma, represents a novel approach to treat FHV-1 infection in cats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Effectiveness of intervention by the infection control team for cancer patients with a positive blood culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Kaoru; Ohi, Yukimasa; Kawanishi, Fumiko; Shibata, Yuriko; Hosomi, Makoto; Goto, Emi; Nishihara, Masami; Katsumata, Takahiro; Ukimura, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Cancer patients at a high risk of acquiring infectious diseases should be maintained in a facility where good infection control practices are followed. At our hospital, the infection control team(ICT)provides expertise, education, and support to the staff, helping them maintain proper standards, thereby minimizing the risks of infection. The ICT(established in 2004)has implemented infection control programs by employing an appropriate number of staff members after the revision of medical treatment fees in 2011. Our intervention program includes 2 general policies, namely, ordering and collection of blood cultures and intervention for the medical care of patients with positive blood cultures. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of our intervention for cancer patients with a positive blood culture. During the surveillance period(April 2011 to July 2012), 42 positive cases were determined to be infectious. ICT intervention was required in 37 cases. Our suggestions were accepted in 92%(34/37)of the cases, and improved outcome was estimated in 65%(22/34)of the cases. The results of our study contribute to the scientific bases on which routine clinical practices could be promoted in the future.

  4. Antiviral activity produced by an IPNV-carrier EPC cell culture confers resistance to VHSV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, María Teresa; García-Valtanen, Pablo; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2013-10-25

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), a fish birnavirus, can establish a persistent infection on epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC) cells producing a carrier state where a small fraction of IPNV-infected cells is maintained in the culture after continuous subculture. The EPC(IPNV) cells are resistant to challenge with IPNV as well as to challenge with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a rhabdovirus. In this work, the antiviral effect of the IPNV carrier culture conditioned medium (EPC(IPNV)-CM) was tested and analyzed in detail. EPC cells treated with the carrier culture supernatant become protected against VHSV challenge. Size-fractionation by filtration and acid and heat treatment showed that the IPNV persistently infected cells release an acid-resistant soluble factor in the molecular weight fraction bellow 50 kDa. The capacity of the EPC(IPNV)-CM to induce cytokine genes in EPC cells was also determined by real-time RT-PCR. We found that there is a positive correlation between up-regulation of mx gene expression in EPC cells treated with EPC(IPNV)-CM and protection against VHSV challenge. Our findings indicate that the control of IPNV multiplication in the carrier culture as well as the interference with rhabdovirus replication are connected to the production and release of an antiviral (interferon-like) factor to the medium.

  5. [Use of transport medium in sputum bacterial culture examination of lower airway infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Masato; Kitaguchi, Sayako; Ichihashi, Hideo; Tsuji, Fumio; Ohmori, Takashi; Haraguchi, Ryuta; Tohda, Yuji

    2006-06-01

    Our medical institution does not have a bacterial culture facility, requiring outsourcing of bacterial culture tests. Due to the time elapsed from the time of specimen collection to culturing, the identification of causative bacteria in respiratory tract infections tends to be difficult. We therefore used transport medium for sputum bacteria examinations. Expectorated purulent or purulent-mucous sputum specimens were collected from 32 patients with lower respiratory tract infection. We divided each of the sputum specimens into the two treatment groups: transport medium (Seedswab gamma2) ndar and stad disinfection container. Paired samples prepared from each patient were sent out for bacterial culture together. The time elapsed from collection to delivery to the lab were as follows: day 0 (same day, n = 14 patients), day 1 (n = 15), day 2 (n = 2), and day 3 (n = 1). The identified causative bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 6 patients), Haemophilus influenzae (n =5), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 4), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 2), Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 2), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1), and Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 1). Samples prepared by each of the two methods gave similar results. The utility of transport medium for examination of general bacteria for lower airway infection from sputum samples was not demonstrated. The rate of detection of bacteria decreased, when the transport of samples was delayed. Therefore, we need to send the sputum specimens as quickly as possible.

  6. Infection of Cultured Thin Cell Layer Roots of Lycopersicon esculentum by Meloidogyne incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, D N; Eisenback, J D

    1991-10-01

    A new aseptic culture system for studying interactions between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and Meloidogyne incognita is described. Epidermal thin cell layer explants from peduncles of tomato produced up to 20 adventitious roots per culture in 4-9 days on Murashige &Scoog medium plus kinetin and indole acetic acid. Rooted cultures were transferred to Gamborg's B-5 medium and inoculated with infective second-stage juveniles. Gall formation was apparent 5 days after inoculation and egg production by mature females occurred within 25 days at 25 C in the susceptible genotypes Rutgers and Red Alert. Resistant genotypes LA655, LA656, and LA1022 exhibited a characteristic hypersensitive response. This system provides large numbers of cultured root tips for studies on the molecular basis of the host-parasite relationship.

  7. Ambroxol inhibits rhinovirus infection in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Nadine, Lusamba Kalonji; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2014-04-01

    The mucolytic drug ambroxol hydrochloride reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the frequency of exacerbation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the inhibitory effects of ambroxol on rhinovirus infection, the major cause of COPD exacerbations, have not been studied. We examined the effects of ambroxol on type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) infection, a major RV group, in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells. RV14 infection increased virus titers and cytokine content in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells. Ambroxol (100 nM) reduced RV14 titers and cytokine concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells after RV14 infection, in addition to reducing susceptibility to RV14 infection. Ambroxol also reduced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), the receptor for RV14, and the number of acidic endosomes from which RV14 RNA enters the cytoplasm. In addition, ambroxol reduced the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the nucleus. These results suggest that ambroxol inhibits RV14 infection partly by reducing ICAM-1 and acidic endosomes via the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Ambroxol may modulate airway inflammation by reducing the production of cytokines in rhinovirus infection.

  8. Lowbury Lecture 2013. Cultural determinants of infection control behaviour: understanding drivers and implementing effective change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M A

    2014-03-01

    Despite dealing with biomedical practices, infection prevention and control (IPC) is essentially a behavioural science. Human behaviour is influenced by various factors, including culture. Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions proposes that national cultures vary along consistent dimensions which can be grouped and scored as specific constructs. Studies have reported that three Hofstede constructs--power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and masculinity--show significant association with several key performance indicators relevant to IPC and antibiotic stewardship. In addition, national meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) levels within Europe correlate well with general quality-of-care indices, including preventive strategies and patient rights. This suggests that IPC may be simply a microcosm of overall quality and safety standards within hospitals and countries. Effective improvement would therefore need to address underlying and embedded core cultural values relevant to patient safety and quality of care. Successful IPC strategies are likely to be those that are compatible with the cultural background where they are implemented. To this end, content analysis of many current IPC improvement tools identifies elements of strong compatibility with cultures that are low in uncertainty avoidance and power distance, and high in individualism and masculinity. However, this cultural combination is largely restricted to Anglo-Saxon countries, where most of the recent improvements in healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) incidence have taken place. There is a paucity of research on IPC behaviour change in different cultural backgrounds, especially countries that score high for power distance and/or uncertainty avoidance. This information is vital to inform IPC campaigns in these countries, which often show high HCAI prevalence.

  9. DIAGNOSIS OF CULTURE POSITIVE URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS AND THEIR ANTIMICROBIAL SENSITIVITY PROFILE IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

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    Prince Sreekumar Pius

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Urinary tract infection is very common all over the world and in India more than 10 million cases are reported per year. It is one of the common infections diagnosed in the outpatients as well as the hospitalised patients. Empirical treatment of community acquired urinary tract infections are determined by the antibiotic sensitivity in a population. This study was conducted to determine the antimicrobial sensitivity amongst the uropathogens to help establish local guidelines on treatment of urinary tract infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, we collected 1306 samples from patients in whom we suspected to have urinary tract infection based on clinical signs and symptoms (e.g. with fever (greater than 38°C without another explanation or from a patient who had at least one urinary symptom (dysuria, urgency, frequency, or suprapubic pain or tenderness in our hospital during January 2016-June 2016. RESULTS Urine cultures were positive for 18% of the patients. Among these cultures, Klebsiella pneumonia (41%, Escherichia coli (35% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (7% were the common organisms found. Highest antimicrobial sensitivity amongst these pathogens was found with cefoperazone/sulbactam and amikacin. CONCLUSION Cefoperazone/sulbactam and amikacin were the highly sensitive systemic antibiotics while ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin were the sensitive oral antibiotics in our locality.

  10. A Comparison of Tissue versus Swab Culturing of Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds

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    Ying Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the efficacy of swabbing versus tissue biopsy for microbiological diagnosis of diabetic foot infection. Methods. This was a prospective trial. Fifty-six patients with diabetic foot infection were divided into the following 3 groups according to the PEDIS grading system: grade 2 (n=10, grade 3 (n=29, and grade 4 (n=17. Two specimens were collected from each wound for microbial culturing after debridement, including a superficial swab and a deep tissue punch biopsy specimen. Results. Swab culturing identified all of the microorganisms isolated from the corresponding deep tissue specimens in 9/10 of grade 2 wounds (90.0%, and this proportion decreased to 12/29 (41.4% and 7/17 (41.2% for grades 3 and 4 wounds, respectively (p=0.02. Moreover, the sensitivity for identifying Gram-negative bacteria, such as E. coli and Citrobacter, by swabbing was low (33.3%. In addition, some Gram-negative bacteria, such as Serratia and Ralstonia pickettii, were isolated from deep tissues but not from swabs. Conclusions. Swab culturing may be reliable for identification of pathogens in diabetic foot wounds classified as grade 2. However, it is advisable to culture deep tissue specimens for wounds of grade ≥3 because swab culturing is associated with a high risk of missing pathogens, especially Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. The Influence of Infective Dose on the Virulence of a Generalist Pathogen in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and Zebra Fish (Danio rerio.

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    Hanna Kinnula

    Full Text Available Pathogen density and genetic diversity fluctuate in the outside-host environment during and between epidemics, affecting disease emergence and the severity and probability of infections. Although the importance of these factors for pathogen virulence and infection probability has been acknowledged, their interactive effects are not well understood. We studied how an infective dose in an environmentally transmitted opportunistic fish pathogen, Flavobacterium columnare, affects its virulence both in rainbow trout, which are frequently infected at fish farms, and in zebra fish, a host that is not naturally infected by F. columnare. We used previously isolated strains of confirmed high and low virulence in a single infection and in a co-infection. Infection success (measured as host morbidity correlated positively with dose when the hosts were exposed to the high-virulence strain, but no response for the dose increase was found when the hosts were exposed to the low-virulence strain. Interestingly, the co-infection resulted in poorer infection success than the single infection with the high-virulence strain. The rainbow trout were more susceptible to the infection than the zebra fish but, in both species, the effects of the doses and the strains were qualitatively similar. We suggest that as an increase in dose can lead to increased host morbidity, both the interstrain interactions and differences in infectivity in different hosts may influence the severity and consequently the evolution of disease. Our results also confirm that the zebra fish is a good laboratory model to study F. columnare infection.

  12. Evaluation of a simple Theileria annulata culture protocol from experimentally infected bovine whole blood

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    Gharbi M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We have evaluated a new simple technique using whole blood from experimentally infected cattle for the isolation and cultivation of Theileria annulata. The study was carried out on 20 Holstein-Frisian bovines that had been experimentally infected with a virulent lethal dose of Theileria annulata. This technique has been compared to the classical peripheral blood monocyte isolation with Ficoll carried out on 22 experimentally infected Holstein-Friesian calves. The effectiveness of the reference technique was estimated to 86.4%, whilst the effectiveness of the new technique was 100%. Moreover, this new technique leads to time and money saving estimated to € 3.06 per sample. It decreases the contamination risks by reducing the steps of sample manipulation.

  13. Evaluation of a simple Theileria annulata culture protocol from experimentally infected bovine whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, M; Latrach, R; Sassi, L; Darghouth, M A

    2012-08-01

    We have evaluated a new simple technique using whole blood from experimentally infected cattle for the isolation and cultivation of Theileria annulata. The study was carried out on 20 Holstein-Frisian bovines that had been experimentally infected with a virulent lethal dose of Theileria annulata. This technique has been compared to the classical peripheral blood monocyte isolation with Ficoll carried out on 22 experimentally infected Holstein-Friesian calves. The effectiveness of the reference technique was estimated to 86.4%, whilst the effectiveness of the new technique was 100%. Moreover, this new technique leads to time and money saving estimated to € 3.06 per sample. It decreases the contamination risks by reducing the steps of sample manipulation.

  14. Metagenomic analysis for detecting pathogens in culture-negative infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yuto; Aoki, Kotaro; Okuma, Shinnosuke; Sato, Takahiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Pathogen identification is important for proper diagnosis and optimal treatment of infective endocarditis (IE). Blood and valve cultures are the gold standard for detecting pathogens responsible for IE. However, these tests only detect culturable pathogens, and have low sensitivity, especially in patients previously treated with antibiotics. Culture-negative IE is still a major clinical problem and a diagnostic challenge. Recently, metagenomic analysis using next generation sequencing has been used to detect pathogens directly from clinical samples. However, there are very few reports of the use of metagenomic analysis for pathogen identification in culture-negative IE cases and the usefulness of this new method is unknown. Here, we report a case of successful pathogen detection with metagenomic analysis in a patient of culture-negative IE. The patient underwent valve replacement surgery and received antibiotics for 5 weeks and survived. Using metagenomic analysis of resected vegetation, we detected Abiotrophia defectiva, which is often associated with culture-negative IE due to its fastidious growth. This method may be useful for pathogen identification in future cases of culture-negative IE.

  15. INFECTION AFTER RADICAL ABDOMINAL HYSTERECTOMY AND PELVIC LYMPHADENECTOMY - PREVENTION OF INFECTION WITH A 2-DOSE PERIOPERATIVE ANTIBIOTIC-PROPHYLAXIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOUMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Surgical site-related infections occurred in 21% of 87 consecutive patients undergoing radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHPL) without planned peri-operative prophylaxis. A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 68 consecutive RHPL patients.

  16. Predicting Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Tract Infection Patients with Prior Urine Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Yaakov; Geffen, Yuval; Andreassen, Steen; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2016-08-01

    To improve antibiotic prescribing, we sought to establish the probability of a resistant organism in urine culture given a previous resistant culture in a setting endemic for multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We performed a retrospective analysis of inpatients with paired positive urine cultures. We focused on ciprofloxacin-resistant (cipro(r)) Gram-negative bacteria, extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), and carbapenem-resistant nonfermenters (CRNF). Comparisons were made between the frequency of each resistance phenotype following a previous culture with the same phenotype and the overall frequency of that phenotype, and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. We performed a regression to assess the effects of other variables on the likelihood of a repeat resistant culture. A total of 4,409 patients (52.5% women; median age, 70 years) with 19,546 paired positive urine cultures were analyzed. The frequencies of cipro(r) bacteria, ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, CRE, and CRNF among all cultures were 47.7%, 30.6%, 1.7%, and 2.6%, respectively. ORs for repeated resistance phenotypes were 1.87, 3.19, 48.25, and 19.02 for cipro(r) bacteria, ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, CRE, and CRNF, respectively (P cultures and the presence of an intervening nonresistant culture significantly reduced the chances of a repeat resistant culture. Associations were statistically significant over the duration of follow-up (60 months) for CRE and for up to 6 months for all other pathogens. Knowledge of microbiology results in the six preceding months may assist with antibiotic stewardship and improve the appropriateness of empirical treatment for urinary tract infections (UTIs).

  17. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

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    Vanessa Salvadego de Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS. For each medium, six groups (n=4 were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX. S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p<0.05. We can conclude that the culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity.

  18. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Vanessa Salvadego; Ccahuana-Vásquez, Renzo Alberto; Tedesco, Alcides Fabiano; Lyra, Luzia; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH) for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB) was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS). For each medium, six groups (n = 4) were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h) and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX). S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p < 0.05). We can conclude that the culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity. PMID:27293967

  19. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Vanessa Salvadego; Ccahuana-Vásquez, Renzo Alberto; Tedesco, Alcides Fabiano; Lyra, Luzia; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH) for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB) was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS). For each medium, six groups (n = 4) were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h) and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX). S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity.

  20. Development of subsequent bloodstream infection in patients with positive Hickman catheter blood cultures and negative peripheral blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Ho; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Lee, Dae Ho; Suh, Cheolwon; Kim, Sung-Han

    2011-05-01

    There are limited data on the incidence of subsequent bloodstream infection (BSI) and the effect of systemic antibiotics in patients who had positive catheter-drawn blood cultures (CBC) and negative peripheral blood cultures (PBC). We retrospectively reviewed all paired blood cultures from patients with Hickman catheter in the hematology-oncology ward between January 1997 and December 2008. There were 112 episodes with positive CBC and negative PBC. Nine episodes (8.0%; 95% CI, 3.0-13.1%) led to subsequent BSI within 28 days. Subsequent BSI developed in 6 of 31 episodes (19%) where empiric antibiotics were inappropriate but in 3 of 81 episodes (4%) where empiric antibiotics were appropriate (P = 0.01). Subsequent candidemia (50%, 2 of 4) was more common than subsequent bacteremia (6%, 7 of 108) (P = 0.03). In conclusion, for patients with positive CBC and negative PBC, the overall incidence of subsequent BSI was 8.0%, and inappropriate empiric antibiotics was associated with subsequent BSI.

  1. Increasing effect of a high dose of PG-1 peptide on the infectivity of Chlamydophila abortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Manuela; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Gennaro, Renato; Benincasa, Monica; Di Paolo, Maria; Shurdhi, Alisa; Ostanello, Fabio; Baldelli, Raffaella; Cevenini, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    Cathelicidins are antimicrobial peptides, stored by mammalian leukocytes, showing an antimicrobial activity against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and enveloped viruses. In accordance with other authors, we reported in a previous study that the protegrin-1 (PG-1), at 80 microg mL(-1), inhibited the in vitro growth of Chlamydia trachomatis serovars D, H and L2; however, we observed an increased infectivity of some animal chlamydial species after their treatment with the same PG-1 concentration. In this study, the treatment of LLC-MK2 cells with PG-1 before chlamydial infection resulted in an increased infectivity of Chlamydophila abortus probably due to their easier entry into the host cells, whereas no increase in S26/3 infectivity was detected in LLC-MK2 cells treated with PG-1 postchlamydial infection.

  2. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

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    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  3. Discordances Between Serology and Culture for Strongyloides in an Ethiopian Adopted Child With Multiple Parasitic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Sulleiro, Elena; Zarzuela, Francesc; Ruiz, Edurne; Clavería, Isabel; Espasa, Mateu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: infectious diseases screening of international adoptees is complex because of the concurrence of different pathogens in a child at same time. We describe an international adopted child born at Ethiopia infected by 5 different pathogens (Hymenolepis nana, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Trichuris trichiura), 2 of them S. stercoralis and E. histolytica with a capacity to develop severe clinical complications if not detected promptly with appropriate diagnosis tests. Concerns of the patient: according to the screening protocol a stool sample is always processed for culture addressed to find out protozoan and helminthic pathogens but not specifically for S. stercoralis. Only, when eosinophilia is detected 3 serial stool samples are collected to rule out intestinal parasitic infection including S. stercoralis. Interventions: in our case, S. stercoralis would not have been detected if we had followed the protocol because eosinophilia was absent and its specific serology was negative. Fortunately, the initial inclusion of the feces charcoal culture for S. stercoralis allowed us to detect this infection. Outcomes: discordances between direct methods such as culture and indirect as serology or antigen test forces us to be very cautious before ruling out S. stercoralis or E. histolytica infection, respectively. Also, if a child from tropical areas has persistent symptoms (such as diarrhea or fever) that have not been treated we have to rule out other infections that have not been detected yet. Main lessons: The introduction of different sequencing tests and the insistence to find out pathogens such as S. stercoralis or E. histolytica was determinant to be able to cure this symptomatic child and to prevent potential severe clinical forms in case of immunosuppression. PMID:26962825

  4. Porcine deltacoronavirus infection: Etiology, cell culture for virus isolation and propagation, molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwonil; Hu, Hui; Saif, Linda J

    2016-12-02

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) (family Coronaviridae, genus Deltacoronavirus) is a novel swine enteropathogenic coronavirus that causes acute diarrhea/vomiting, dehydration and mortality in seronegative neonatal piglets. PDCoV diarrhea was first reported in the US in early 2014, concurrently with co-circulation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) (family Coronaviridae, genus Alphacoronavirus). The origin of PDCoV in pigs and also its sudden emergence or route of introduction into the US still remains unclear. In the US, since 2013-2014, the newly emerged PDCoV and PEDV have spread nationwide, causing a high number of pig deaths and significant economic impacts. The current US PDCoV strains are enteropathogenic and infect villous epithelial cells of the entire small and large intestines although the jejunum and ileum are the primary sites of infection. Similar to PEDV infections, PDCoV infections also cause acute, severe atrophic enteritis accompanied by transient viremia (viral RNA) that leads to severe diarrhea and/or vomiting, followed by dehydration as the potential cause of death in nursing piglets. At present, differential diagnosis of PDCoV, PEDV, and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is essential to control viral diarrheas in US swine. Cell culture-adapted US PDCoV (TC-PDCoV) strains have been isolated and propagated by us and in several other laboratories. TC-PDCoV strains will be useful to develop serologic assays and to evaluate if serial cell-culture passage attenuates TC-PDCoV as a potential vaccine candidate strain. A comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of epidemic PDCoV strains is currently needed to prevent and control the disease in affected regions and to develop an effective vaccine. This review focuses on the etiology, cell culture isolation and propagation, molecular epidemiology, disease mechanisms and pathogenesis of PDCoV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

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    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7{+-}12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1{+-}25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive ({>=}50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62{+-}66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3{+-}157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection.

  6. Whole genome characterization of non-tissue culture adapted HRSV strains in severely infected children

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    Kumaria Rajni

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is the most important virus causing lower respiratory infection in young children. The complete genetic characterization of RSV clinical strains is a prerequisite for understanding HRSV infection in the clinical context. Current information about the genetic structure of the HRSV genome has largely been obtained using tissue culture adapted viruses. During tissue culture adaptation genetic changes can be introduced into the virus genome, which may obscure subtle variations in the genetic structure of different RSV strains. Methods In this study we describe a novel Sanger sequencing strategy which allowed the complete genetic characterisation of 14 clinical HRSV strains. The viruses were sequenced directly in the nasal washes of severely hospitalized children, and without prior passage of the viruses in tissue culture. Results The analysis of nucleotide sequences suggested that vRNA length is a variable factor among primary strains, while the phylogenetic analysis suggests selective pressure for change. The G gene showed the greatest sequence variation (2-6.4%, while small hydrophobic protein and matrix genes were completely conserved across all clinical strains studied. A number of sequence changes in the F, L, M2-1 and M2-2 genes were observed that have not been described in laboratory isolates. The gene junction regions showed more sequence variability, and in particular the intergenic regions showed a highest level of sequence variation. Although the clinical strains grew slower than the HRSVA2 virus isolate in tissue culture, the HRSVA2 isolate and clinical strains formed similar virus structures such as virus filaments and inclusion bodies in infected cells; supporting the clinical relevance of these virus structures. Conclusion This is the first report to describe the complete genetic characterization of HRSV clinical strains that have been sequenced directly from clinical

  7. Four-times-daily Dosing of Rabeprazole with Sitafloxacin, High-Dose Amoxicillin, or Both for Metronidazole-Resistant Infection with Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Sahara, Shu; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Kagami, Takuma; Ban, Hiromitsu; Otsuka, Taketo; Andoh, Akira; Furuta, Takahisa

    2017-02-01

    The bacterial resistance of Helicobacter pylori to antimicrobial agents such as clarithromycin and metronidazole has been increasing worldwide, leading to the failure of eradication treatment. Here, we present an eradication regimen consisting of four-times-daily dosing (q.i.d.) of rabeprazole with potent acid inhibition. To investigate the efficacy of eradication therapy with rabeprazole q.i.d. and amoxicillin or sitafloxacin in Japanese infected with a metronidazole-resistant strain. We retrospectively investigated the efficacy of eradication regimens with rabeprazole q.i.d. for 7 days in 111 Japanese pooled patients infected with a metronidazole-resistant strain of H. pylori at Hamamatsu University School of Medicine Hospital or the Shiga University of Medical Science Hospital: 1, with sitafloxacin 100 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) (n = 82); 2, with amoxicillin 500 mg q.i.d. (n = 15); and 3, with amoxicillin q.i.d. and sitafloxacin b.i.d.-combined regimen (n = 14). Eradication status was assessed at 8 weeks via a (13) C-urea breath test. Eradication rate on intention-to-treat analysis was 93.7% (95% confidence interval: 87.4-97.4%, 104/111), irrespective of the high prevalence of strains resistant to clarithromycin (81.1%, 90/111) and levofloxacin (42.3%, 47/111). No significant differences in eradication rates were observed among the different treatment regimens (p = .408), eradication history (p = .096) and different CYP2C19 genotypes (p = .789). On multivariate analysis, no significant risk factor for eradication failure by therapy with potent acid inhibition was seen. In Japanese patients infected with metronidazole-resistant strains of H. pylori, eradication rates exceeding 90% can be achieved using appropriate dosing of antibiotic agents with strain susceptibility (amoxicillin q.i.d. and/or sitafloxacin b.i.d.) together with acid inhibition for a full 24 h and rabeprazole 10 mg q.i.d. These findings may be further evidence for dual therapy with rabeprazole q

  8. Correlation between plasma component levels of cultured fish and resistance to bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maita, M.; Satoh, K.-I.; Fukuda, Y.; Lee, H.-K.; Winton, J.R.; Okamoto, N.

    1998-01-01

    Mortalities of yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata artificially infected with Lactococcus garvieae and of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss artificially infected with Vibrio anguillarum were compared with the levels of plasma components measured prior to challenge. The levels of plasma total cholesterol, free cholesterol and phospholipid of fish surviving infection were significantly higher in both yellowtail and rainbow trout than those of fish which died during the challenge test. Mortality of yellowtail with plasma total cholesterol levels lower than 250 mg/100 ml was significantly higher than that of fish which had cholesterol levels higher than 275 mg/100 ml (p < 0.05). Rainbow trout whose cholesterol was lower than 520 mg/100 ml suffered a significantly higher mortality due to vibriosis than fish having cholesterol levels higher than 560 mg/100 ml (p < 0.005). These results indicate that low levels of plasma lipid components may be an indicator of lowered disease resistance in cultured fish.

  9. Factors affecting the infectivity of tissues from pigs with classical swine fever: thermal inactivation rates and oral infectious dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Lucie; Haines, Felicity J; Everett, Helen E; Crudgington, Bentley; Johns, Helen L; Clifford, Derek; Drew, Trevor W; Crooke, Helen R

    2015-03-23

    Outbreaks of classical swine fever are often associated with ingestion of pig meat or products derived from infected pigs. Assessment of the disease risks associated with material of porcine origin requires knowledge on the likely amount of virus in the original material, how long the virus may remain viable within the resulting product and how much of that product would need to be ingested to result in infection. Using material from pigs infected with CSFV, we determined the viable virus concentrations in tissues that comprise the majority of pork products. Decimal reduction values (D values), the time required to reduce the viable virus load by 90% (or 1 log10), were determined at temperatures of relevance for chilling, cooking, composting and ambient storage. The rate of CSFV inactivation varied in different tissues. At lower temperatures, virus remained viable for substantially longer in muscle and serum compared to lymphoid and fat tissues. To enable estimation of the temperature dependence of inactivation, the temperature change required to change the D values by 90% (Z values) were determined as 13 °C, 14 °C, 12 °C and 10 °C for lymph node, fat, muscle and serum, respectively. The amount of virus required to infect 50% of pigs by ingestion was determined by feeding groups of animals with moderately and highly virulent CSFV. Interestingly, the virulent virus did not initiate infection at a lower dose than the moderately virulent strain. Although higher than for intranasal inoculation, the amount of virus required for infection via ingestion is present in only a few grams of tissue from infected animals.

  10. Immune response after one or two doses of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) monovalent, AS03-adjuvanted vaccine in HIV infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bybeck Nielsen, Allan; Nielsen, Henriette Schjønning; Nielsen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Continued research is needed to evaluate and improve the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in HIV infected patients. We aimed to determine the antibody responses after one or two doses of the AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in HIV infected patients. METHOD......: Following the influenza season 2009/2010, 219 HIV infected patients were included and divided into three groups depending on whether they received none (n=60), one (n=31) or two (n=128) doses of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. At inclusion, antibody titers for all patients were analyzed and compared.......7% and seroconversion rate of 86.7%. CONCLUSION: A single dose of AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine created an adequate immune response in HIV infected patients lasting as long as 4-9 months. Two doses improved the immunogenicity further....

  11. Immunogenicity of One Dose of Vero Cell Culture-Derived Japanese Encephalitis (JE) Vaccine in Adults Previously Vaccinated with Mouse Brain-Derived JE Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    Naval Health Research Center Immunogenicity of One Dose of Vero Cell Culture-derived Japanese Encephalitis (JE) Vaccine in Adults Previously...www.elsev ier .com/ locate /vacc ine mmunogenicity of one dose of Vero cell culture-derived Japanese encephalitis JE) vaccine in adults...derived Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine (JE-VC) as a booster among individuals who previously received inactivated mouse brain-derived

  12. Borna disease virus infection perturbs energy metabolites and amino acids in cultured human oligodendroglia cells.

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    Rongzhong Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Borna disease virus is a neurotropic, non-cytolytic virus that has been widely employed in neuroscientific research. Previous studies have revealed that metabolic perturbations are associated with Borna disease viral infection. However, the pathophysiological mechanism underlying its mode of action remains unclear. METHODOLOGY: Human oligodendroglia cells infected with the human strain Borna disease virus Hu-H1 and non-infected matched control cells were cultured in vitro. At day 14 post-infection, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic approach was used to differentiate the metabonomic profiles of 28 independent intracellular samples from Borna disease virus-infected cells (n = 14 and matched control cells (n = 14. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was performed to demonstrate that the whole metabonomic patterns enabled discrimination between the two groups, and further statistical testing was applied to determine which individual metabolites displayed significant differences between the two groups. FINDINGS: Metabonomic profiling revealed perturbations in 23 metabolites, 19 of which were deemed individually significant: nine energy metabolites (α-glucose, acetate, choline, creatine, formate, myo-inositol, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, pyruvate, succinate and ten amino acids (aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrosine, valine. Partial least squares discriminant analysis demonstrated that the whole metabolic patterns enabled statistical discrimination between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Borna disease viral infection perturbs the metabonomic profiles of several metabolites in human oligodendroglia cells cultured in vitro. The findings suggest that Borna disease virus manipulates the host cell's metabolic network to support viral replication and proliferation.

  13. Postoperative Infection Rates in Patients with a Negative Baseline Urine Culture Undergoing Ureteroscopic Stone Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martov, Alexey; Gravas, Stavros; Etemadian, Masoud;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To examine the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis on postoperative infection rate in patients with negative urine cultures undergoing ureteroscopy (URS). Patients and Methods: Using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) URS Global Study database...... in both groups. Factors predictive of postoperative UTI or fever were female gender, Crohn's and cardiovascular disease, a high stone burden, and an ASA score of II or higher. Conclusions: In patients with a negative baseline urine culture undergoing URS for ureteral or renal stones, rates......, patients with a negative baseline urine culture undergoing URS for ureteral stones (n=1141) or kidney stones (n=184) not receiving antibiotic prophylaxis were matched with those who were predefined by risk factors, including gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, and ureteral stent...

  14. Differential gene expression analysis of in vitro duck hepatitis B virus infected primary duck hepatocyte cultures

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    Issac Aneesh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human hepatitis B virus (HBV, a member of the hepadna viridae, causes acute or chronic hepatitis B, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV infection, a dependable and reproducible model for hepadna viral studies, does not result in HCC unlike chronic HBV infection. Information on differential gene expression in DHBV infection might help to compare corresponding changes during HBV infection, and to delineate the reasons for this difference. Findings A subtractive hybridization cDNA library screening of in vitro DHBV infected, cultured primary duck hepatocytes (PDH identified cDNAs of 42 up-regulated and 36 down-regulated genes coding for proteins associated with signal transduction, cellular respiration, transcription, translation, ubiquitin/proteasome pathway, apoptosis, and membrane and cytoskeletal organization. Those coding for both novel as well as previously reported proteins in HBV/DHBV infection were present in the library. An inverse modulation of the cDNAs of ten proteins, reported to play role in human HCC, such as that of Y-box binding protein1, Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase isoform 1B, ribosomal protein L35a, Ferritin, α-enolase, Acid α-glucosidase and Caspase 3, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, Filamin and Pyruvate dehydrogenase, was also observed in this in vitro study. Conclusions The present study identified cDNAs of a number of genes that are differentially modulated in in vitro DHBV infection of primary duck hepatocytes. Further correlation of this differential gene expression in in vivo infection models would be valuable to understand the little known aspects of the hepadnavirus biology.

  15. Penicillin G Treatment in Infective Endocarditis Patients - Does Standard Dosing Result in Therapeutic Plasma Concentrations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Wiggers, Henrik; Bibby, Bo Martin;

    2016-01-01

    Penicillin G is frequently used to treat infective endocarditis (IE) caused by streptococci, penicillin-susceptible staphylococci and enterococci. Appropriate antibiotic exposure is essential for survival and reduces the risk of complications and drug resistance development. We determined...

  16. Small doses, big troubles: modeling growth dynamics of organisms affecting microalgal production cultures in closed photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forehead, Hugh I; O'Kelly, Charles J

    2013-02-01

    The destruction of mass cultures of microalgae by biological contamination of culture medium is a pervasive and expensive problem, in industry and research. A mathematical model has been formulated that attempts to explain contaminant growth dynamics in closed photobioreactors (PBRs). The model simulates an initial growth phase without PBR dilution, followed by a production phase in which culture is intermittently removed. Contaminants can be introduced at any of these stages. The model shows how exponential growth from low initial inocula can lead to "explosive" growth in the population of contaminants, appearing days to weeks after inoculation. Principal influences are contaminant growth rate, PBR dilution rate, and the size of initial contaminant inoculum. Predictions corresponded closely with observed behavior of two contaminants, Uronema sp. and Neoparamoeba sp., found in operating PBRs. A simple, cheap and effective protocol was developed for short-term prediction of contamination in PBRs, using microscopy and archived samples.

  17. Exposure to low-dose bisphenol A impairs meiosis in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model: a physiotoxicogenomic approach.

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    Sazan Ali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bisphenol A (BPA is one of the most widespread chemicals in the world and is suspected of being responsible for male reproductive impairments. Nevertheless, its molecular mode of action on spermatogenesis is unclear. This work combines physiology and toxicogenomics to identify mechanisms by which BPA affects the timing of meiosis and induces germ-cell abnormalities. METHODS: We used a rat seminiferous tubule culture model mimicking the in vivo adult rat situation. BPA (1 nM and 10 nM was added to the culture medium. Transcriptomic and meiotic studies were performed on the same cultures at the same exposure times (days 8, 14, and 21. Transcriptomics was performed using pangenomic rat microarrays. Immunocytochemistry was conducted with an anti-SCP3 antibody. RESULTS: The gene expression analysis showed that the total number of differentially expressed transcripts was time but not dose dependent. We focused on 120 genes directly involved in the first meiotic prophase, sustaining immunocytochemistry. Sixty-two genes were directly involved in pairing and recombination, some of them with high fold changes. Immunocytochemistry indicated alteration of meiotic progression in the presence of BPA, with increased leptotene and decreased diplotene spermatocyte percentages and partial meiotic arrest at the pachytene checkpoint. Morphological abnormalities were observed at all stages of the meiotic prophase. The prevalent abnormalities were total asynapsis and apoptosis. Transcriptomic analysis sustained immunocytological observations. CONCLUSION: We showed that low doses of BPA alter numerous genes expression, especially those involved in the reproductive system, and severely impair crucial events of the meiotic prophase leading to partial arrest of meiosis in rat seminiferous tubule cultures.

  18. [A retrospective study of the relationship between bacterial numbers from central venous catheter tip cultures and blood cultures for evaluating central line-associated bloodstream infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Nakayama, Asami; Yonetamari, Jun; Ando, Kohei; Miyazaki, Takashi; Ohta, Hirotoshi; Furuta, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tamayo; Ito, Hiroyasu; Murakami, Nobuo; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is an infectious disease requiring special attention. It is a common cause of nosocomial infections; catheter insertion into the central veins particularly increases the risk of infection (CLA-BSI: central line-associated bloodstream infection). We examined the relationship between the number of bacterial colonies cultured from shredded central venous catheter (CVC) tips and from blood cultures in our hospital from 2011 to 2012. Coagulase-negative staphylococci topped the list of microbe isolated from the CVC tip culture, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida spp. S. aureus and Candida spp., with growth of over 15 colony-forming units in the CVC tip culture, were also detected at high rates in the blood culture. However, gramnegative bacilli (Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa) did not show a similar increase in colony number in the CVC tip culture. Because microbes adhering to shredded catheter tips are readily detected by culture, this method is useful as a routine diagnostic test. In addition, prompt clinical reporting of the bacterial number of serious CLA-BSI-causing S. aureus and Candida spp. isolated from CVC tips could contribute to earlier CLA-BSI diagnosis.

  19. Pharmacokinetic interaction between rifampin and the combination of indinavir and low-dose ritonavir in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, U S; Andersen, A B; Klitgaard, N A;

    2004-01-01

    of indinavir (800 mg) and ritonavir (100 mg) twice a day was performed to evaluate whether the inducing effect of rifampin on the drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 could be overcome by the inhibitory effect of ritonavir. Pharmacokinetic evaluations of steady-state concentrations of indinavir......Rifampin is an important drug in the treatment of tuberculosis, but administration of rifampin in combination with protease inhibitors is complicated because of drug-drug interactions. A prospective, controlled, multiple-dose study involving 6 HIV-infected patients receiving a combination...

  20. Sublethal pesticide doses negatively affect survival and the cellular responses in American foulbrood-infected honeybee larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Javier Hernández; Krainer, Sophie; Engert, Antonia; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Riessberger-Gallé, Ulrike; Crailsheim, Karl

    2017-02-01

    Disclosing interactions between pesticides and bee infections is of most interest to understand challenges that pollinators are facing and to which extent bee health is compromised. Here, we address the individual and combined effect that three different pesticides (dimethoate, clothianidin and fluvalinate) and an American foulbrood (AFB) infection have on mortality and the cellular immune response of honeybee larvae. We demonstrate for the first time a synergistic interaction when larvae are exposed to sublethal doses of dimethoate or clothianidin in combination with Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of AFB. A significantly higher mortality than the expected sum of the effects of each individual stressor was observed in co-exposed larvae, which was in parallel with a drastic reduction of the total and differential hemocyte counts. Our results underline that characterizing the cellular response of larvae to individual and combined stressors allows unmasking previously undetected sublethal effects of pesticides in colony health.

  1. Sublethal pesticide doses negatively affect survival and the cellular responses in American foulbrood-infected honeybee larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Javier Hernández; Krainer, Sophie; Engert, Antonia; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Riessberger-Gallé, Ulrike; Crailsheim, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Disclosing interactions between pesticides and bee infections is of most interest to understand challenges that pollinators are facing and to which extent bee health is compromised. Here, we address the individual and combined effect that three different pesticides (dimethoate, clothianidin and fluvalinate) and an American foulbrood (AFB) infection have on mortality and the cellular immune response of honeybee larvae. We demonstrate for the first time a synergistic interaction when larvae are exposed to sublethal doses of dimethoate or clothianidin in combination with Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of AFB. A significantly higher mortality than the expected sum of the effects of each individual stressor was observed in co-exposed larvae, which was in parallel with a drastic reduction of the total and differential hemocyte counts. Our results underline that characterizing the cellular response of larvae to individual and combined stressors allows unmasking previously undetected sublethal effects of pesticides in colony health. PMID:28145462

  2. Single versus double dose praziquantel comparison on efficacy and Schistosoma mansoni re-infection in preschool-age children in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalugwa, Allen; Nuwaha, Fred; Tukahebwa, Edridah Muheki;

    2015-01-01

    treatments was assessed and compared 1 month after the second treatment. Re-infection with S. mansoni was assessed in the same children 8 months following the second treatment. CRs were non-significantly higher in children treated with two 40 mg/kg PZQ doses (85.5%; 290/339) compared to a single dose (83...

  3. Adenovirus respiratory infection: significant increase in diagnosis using PCR comparing with antigen detection and culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Stroparo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV respiratory infections are usually described as being associated with high mortality rates. Laboratory diagnosis is essential for the establishment of the appropriate therapy, and for guiding the implementation of preventive measures in order to prevent the spread of the infection. Aiming to analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the laboratorial diagnosis methods available, we compared antigen detection by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IF, and a specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR, to detect AdV in respiratory samples collected from patients admitted to hospital with acute respiratory disease. Positive samples were inoculated into a cell culture to confirm the results. We analyzed 381 samples from the nasopharyngeal aspirates collected during the year 2008; of these, 2.6% tested were positive for adenovirus through IF and 10% through PCR; positive isolation was obtained in 40% and 26% of these cases, respectively. Most infected patients were children under six months of age, and despite of the fact that a significant number of patients required intensive care, the mortality rate was low (5%. In conclusion, molecular methods were found to be useful for rapid diagnosis of adenovirus infections with higher sensitivity than antigen detection; their introduction permitted a significant increase in diagnoses of adenovirus infections.

  4. Francisella Infection in Cultured Tilapia in Thailand and the Inflammatory Cytokine Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantrakajorn, Sasibha; Wongtavatchai, Janenuj

    2016-06-01

    Francisella infections developed in freshwater Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and red tilapia Oreochromis spp. farms in Thailand during 2012-2014. The diseased fish were lethargic and pale in color and showed numerous white nodules in their enlarged spleens. Histopathological examination and electron microscopy suggested that the white nodules were multifocal granulomas consisting of coccobacilli within vacuolated cells. Isolation of Francisella-like bacteria was achieved from 42 of 100 samples, while polymerase chain reaction confirmed Francisella infections in all samples. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from samples obtained from three different geographical culture areas revealed more than 99% similarity with F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis. The influence of Francisella infection on inflammatory cytokines was determined on splenic cells of fish intraperitoneally injected with the bacteria (0.8 × 10(5) colony-forming units per fish). Infected tilapia showed significantly greater expression of the pro-inflammatory genes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrotic factor-α (TNF-α) within 24 h postinjection (hpi) and for up to 96 hpi. However, down-regulation of an anti-inflammatory gene, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was observed as early as 24 hpi. This investigation demonstrates that an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to the infection may account for the substantial number of granulomas in fish hematopoietic tissues that was found in the later stage of the disease. Received September 9, 2015; accepted December 13, 2015.

  5. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Therapy of Blood Culture Positive Healthcare-Associated Infections in Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina Laine

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the quality of antimicrobial therapy (AMT used for invasive healthcare-associated infections (HAIs in paediatrics is scarce. Influence of the final information about the isolated pathogen on the subsequent targeted AMT was investigated in our study.Data on 149 children (0-17 years with blood culture positive HAIs were collected. The causative microbes under investigation were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, streptococci, Gram negative rods, and mixed infections were likewise included. For adjusting the antimicrobial regimen, an expert panel evaluated the quality of the targeted AMT and the delay of 72 hours after final microbiology results. AMT was regarded as inappropriate if the pathogen was totally resistant to the used antimicrobials (i or if the chosen therapy was of not optimal efficacy against the pathogen (ii.17% of the patients received inappropriate AMT. Half of these infections 13/26 (50% were treated with an antimicrobial to which the isolate was resistant. Three (3/13, 23% of these patients received antimicrobials which were totally ineffective according to in vitro data. Suboptimal or too broad spectrum AMT was administered to 13/26 (50% patients. The most common causes of inappropriate use were the use of beta-lactams in oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis infections and vancomycin given in oxacillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infections.Approximately 17% of the selected cohort received inappropriate AMT. More attention should be paid to the appropriate use of antimicrobials, and training of prescribers should be urgently provided.

  6. Factors influencing catheter-related infections in the Dutch multicenter study on high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral SCT in high-risk breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, P; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Mulder, Nanno; Rodenhuis, S; Bontenbal, M; van der Wall, E; van Hoesel, Q G; Smit, W M; Hupperets, P; Voest, E E; Nooij, M A; Boezen, H M; van der Graaf, W T A

    2008-01-01

    Neutropenia following high-dose chemotherapy leads to a high incidence of infectious complications, of which central venous catheter-related infections predominate. Catheter-related infections and associated risk factors in 392 patients participating in a randomized adjuvant breast cancer trial and

  7. Factors influencing catheter-related infections in the Dutch multicenter study on high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral SCT in high-risk breast cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, P.; Vries, E.G. de; Mulder, N.H.; Rodenhuis, S.; Bontenbal, M.; Wall, E. van der; Hoesel, Q.G.C.M. van; Smit, W.M.; Hupperets, P.; Voest, E.E.; Nooij, M.A.; Boezen, H.M.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der

    2008-01-01

    Neutropenia following high-dose chemotherapy leads to a high incidence of infectious complications, of which central venous catheter-related infections predominate. Catheter-related infections and associated risk factors in 392 patients participating in a randomized adjuvant breast cancer trial and

  8. Efficacy of a single high oxfendazole dose against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Luis; Saumell, Carlos; Fusé, Luis; Moreno, Laura; Ceballos, Laura; Domingue, Gilbert; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste; Lanusse, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    The goal of the current experiment was to assess the clinical efficacy of oxfendazole (OFZ) administered as a single oral dose (30 mg/kg) to pigs naturally parasitized with Ascaris suum, Oesophagostomum spp., Metastrongylus spp. and Trichuris suis. Thirty-six local ecotype piglets were divided into three independent experiments, named I, II and III (n=12 each), respectively. Each experiment involved two different groups (n=6): Untreated Control and OFZ treated. Animals were naturally parasitized with A. suum (Experiments I, II and III), Oesophagostomum spp. (Experiments I and II), T. suis (Experiments II and III) and Metastrongylus spp. (Experiment I). Pigs in the treated group received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30 mg/kg dose. At five (5) days post-treatment, animals were sacrificed and the clinical efficacy of the OFZ treatment was established following the currently available WAAVP guidelines for a controlled efficacy test. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse events during the study. OFZ treatment given as a single 30 mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against all the nematode parasites present in the three experiments. In conclusion, under the current experimental conditions, OFZ orally administered to naturally parasitized piglets at a single dose of 30 mg/kg was safe and highly efficacious (100%) against adult stages of A. suum, Oesophagostomum spp., T. suis and Metastrongylus spp.

  9. Low doses of nanodiamonds and silica nanoparticles have beneficial hormetic effects in normal human skin fibroblasts in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytych, Jennifer; Wnuk, Maciej; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2016-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (ND) and silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NP) have been much investigated for their toxicity at high doses, little is known about their biological activity at low concentrations. Here we report the biphasic dose response of ND and SiO2-NP in modulating normal human facial skin fibroblasts (FSF1) in culture. ND and SiO2-NP at low concentration (up to 0.5 μg/ml) had beneficial effects on FSF1 in terms of increasing their proliferation and metabolic activity. Exposure of FSF1 cells to low levels of NP enhanced their wound healing ability in vitro and slowed down aging during serial passaging as measured by maintenance of youthful morphology, reduction in the rate of loss of telomeres, and the over all proliferative characteristics. Furthermore, NP treatment induced the activation of Nrf2- and FOXO3A-mediated cellular stress responses, including an increased expression of heme oxygenease (HO-1), sirtuin (SIRT1), and DNA methyltransferase II (DNMT2). These results imply that ND and SiO2-NP at low doses are potential hormetins, which exert mild stress-induced beneficial hormetic effects through improved survival, longevity, maintenance, repair and function of human cells.

  10. Short-term Disulfiram to Reverse Latent HIV Infection: A Phase 2 Dose Escalation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Julian H.; McMahon, James H.; Chang, Christina C.; Lee, Sulggi A.; Hartogensis, Wendy; Bumpus, Namandje; Savic, Rada; Roney, Janine; Hoh, Rebecca; Solomon, Ajantha; Piatak, Michael; Gorelick, Robert J.; Lifson, Jeff; Bacchetti, Peter; Deeks, Steven G.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disulfiram activates HIV transcription in a primary T-cell model of HIV latency and in a pilot clinical study increased plasma HIV RNA in individuals with adequate diulfiram exposure. Methods We conducted a prospective dose escalation study in order to optimise disulfiram exposure. Thirty people with HIV on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) were enrolled, allocated sequentially to one of three dosing cohorts and received disulfiram daily for three days at a dose of 500mg, 1000mg or 2000mg. The primary endpoint was cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV RNA in CD4+ T-cells. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01944371. Findings The estimated fold increases in CA-US HIV RNA during and post-disulfiram for each cohort were: 500mg: 1·7 (95% confidence interval 1·3 – 2·2) and 2·1 (1·5 – 2·9); 1000mg: 1·9 (1·6 – 2·4) and 2·5 (1·9 – 3·3); and 2000mg: 1·6 (1·2 – 2·1) and 2·1 (1·5 – 3·1) respectively (p<0·003 for all). Disulfiram was well tolerated at all doses. Interpretation Short-term administration of disulfiram resulted in increases in CA-US HIV RNA at all doses, consistent with activating HIV latency. Disulfiram may be suited for future studies of combination and prolonged therapy to activate latent HIV. PMID:26614966

  11. Value of bacterial culture of vaginal swabs in diagnosis of vaginal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenadić Dane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Vaginal and cervical swab culture is still very common procedure in our country’s everyday practice whereas simple and rapid diagnostic methods have been very rarely used. The aim of this study was to show that the employment of simple and rapid diagnostic tools [vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy (VFWMM, vaginal pH and potassium hydroxide (KOH test] offers better assessment of vaginal environment than standard microbiologic culture commonly used in Serbia. Methods. This prospective study included 505 asymptomatic pregnant women undergoing VFWMM, test with 10% KOH, determination of vaginal pH and standard culture of cervicovaginal swabs. Combining findings from the procedures was used to make diagnoses of bacterial vaginosis (BV and vaginitis. In addition, the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN was determined in each sample and analyzed along with other findings. Infections with Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis were confirmed or excluded by microscopic examination. Results. In 36 (6% patients cervicovaginal swab cultures retrieved several aerobes and facultative anaerobes, whereas in 52 (11% women Candida albicans was isolated. Based on VFWMM findings and clinical criteria 96 (19% women had BV, 19 (4% vaginitis, and 72 (14% candidiasis. Of 115 women with BV and vaginitis, pH 4.5 was found in 5, and of 390 with normal findings 83 (21% had vaginal pH 4.5. Elevated numbers of PMN were found in 154 (30% women - in 83 (54% of them VFWMM was normal. Specificity and sensitivity of KOH test and vaginal pH determination in defining pathological vaginal flora were 95% and 81%, and 79% and 91%, respectively. Conclusion. Cervicovaginal swab culture is expensive but almost non-informative test in clinical practice. The use of simpler and rapid methods as vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy, KOH test and vaginal pH offers better results in diagnosis, and probably in the treatment and prevention of sequels of vaginal

  12. Pressure-driven microfluidic perfusion culture device for integrated dose-response assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Cell-based assays are widely used in the various stages of drug discovery. Advances in microfluidic systems over the past two decades have enabled them to become a powerful tool for cell-based assays to achieve both reliability and high throughput. The interface between the micro-world and macro-world is important in industrial assay processes. Therefore, microfluidic cell-based assays using pressure-driven liquid handling are an ideal platform for integrated assays. The aim of this article is to review recent advancements in microfluidic cell-based assays focusing on a pressure-driven perfusion culture device. Here, we review the development of microfluidic cell-based assay devices and discuss the techniques involved in designing a microfluidic network, device fabrication, liquid and cell manipulation, and detection schemes for pressure-driven perfusion culture devices. Finally, we describe recent progress in semiautomatic and reliable pressure-driven microfluidic cell-based assays.

  13. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1994-01-01

    on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...... to CD4 and that post binding events may be common to the infection of lymphocytes. Anti HIV-1 sera showed neutralizing activity against heterologous and even autologous escape virus. This finding, together with the observation that monocytes and M phi s are infected in vivo, suggests that protection...

  14. Assessment of central venous catheter-associated infections using semi-quantitative or quantitative culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Pizzolitto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Semiquantitative (Maki and quantitative (Brun- Buisson culture techniques were employed in the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI in patients who have a short-term central venous catheter (inserted for 30 days. The diagnosis of CRBSI was based on the results of semiquantitative and quantitative culture of material from the removed catheters. Catheter tips (118 from 100 patients were evaluated by both methods. Semiquantitative analysis revealed 34 catheters (28.8% colonized by ≥15 colonyforming units (cfu, while quantitative cultures (34 catheters, 28.8% showed the growth of ≥103 cfu/mL. Bacteremia was confirmed in four patients by isolating microorganisms of identical species from both catheters and blood samples. Using the semiquantitative culture technique on short-term central venous catheter tips, we have shown that with a cut-off level of ≥15 cfu, the technique had 100.0% sensitivity, specificity of 68.4%, 25.0% positive predictive value (PPV and 100.0% negative predictive value (NPV, efficiency of 71.4% and a prevalence of 9.5%. The quantitative method, with a cut-off limit of ≥103 cfu/mL, gave identical values: the sensitivity was 100.0%, specificity 68.4%, positive predictive value (PPV 25.0%, negative predictive value (NPV 100.0%, efficiency 71.4% and prevalence 9.5%. We concluded that the semiquantitative and quantitative culture methods, evaluated in parallel, for the first time in Brazil, have similar sensitivity and specificity. Keywords: central venous catheter; semi-quantitative culture; quantitative culture; catheter-related bacteremia.

  15. Comparison of culture and qPCR for the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in not chronically infected cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boboli Hedwige

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major respiratory pathogen causing severe lung infections among CF patients, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Once infection is established, early antibiotic treatment is able to postpone the transition to chronic lung infection. In order to optimize the early detection, we compared the sensitivity of microbiological culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR for the detection of P. aeruginosa in respiratory samples of not chronically infected CF patients. Results In this national study, we followed CF patients during periods between 1 to 15 months. For a total of 852 samples, 729 (86% remained P. aeruginosa negative by both culture and qPCR, whereas 89 samples (10% were positive by both culture and qPCR. Twenty-six samples were negative by culture but positive by qPCR, and 10 samples were positive by culture but remained negative by qPCR. Five of the 26 patients with a culture negative, qPCR positive sample became later P. aeruginosa positive both by culture and qPCR. Conclusion Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that qPCR may have a predictive value for impending P. aeruginosa infection for only a limited number of patients.

  16. Salmonella Enteritidis deposition in eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with different oral doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to SE testing and control programs in commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk reduction requires a detailed and...

  17. Course and transmission characteristics of oral low-dose infection of domestic pigs and European wild boar with a Caucasian African swine fever virus isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietschmann, Jana; Guinat, Claire; Beer, Martin; Pronin, Valery; Tauscher, Kerstin; Petrov, Anja; Keil, Günther; Blome, Sandra

    2015-07-01

    In 2007, African swine fever virus (ASFV) was introduced into the Transcaucasian countries and Russia. Since then, it has spread alarmingly and reached the European Union. ASFV strains are highly virulent and lead to almost 100% mortality under experimental conditions. However, the possibility of dose-dependent disease courses has been discussed. For this reason, a study was undertaken to assess the risk of chronic disease and the establishment of carriers upon low-dose oronasal infection of domestic pigs and European wild boar. It was demonstrated that very low doses of ASFV are sufficient to infect especially weak or runted animals by the oronasal route. Some of these animals did not show clinical signs indicative of ASF, and they developed almost no fever. However, no changes were observed in individual animal regarding the onset, course and outcome of infection as assessed by diagnostic tests. After amplification of ASFV by these animals, pen- and stablemates became infected and developed acute lethal disease with similar characteristics in all animals. Thus, we found no indication of prolonged or chronic individual courses upon low-dose infection in either species. The scattered onset of clinical signs and pathogen detection within and among groups confirms moderate contagiosity that is strongly linked with blood contact. In conclusion, the prolonged course at the "herd level" together with the exceptionally low dose that proved to be sufficient to infect a runted wild boar could be important for disease dynamics in wild-boar populations and in backyard settings.

  18. HCMV-infection in a human arterial organ culture model: effects on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rössler Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of infections with the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV for the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis is still unclear. Both a clear correlation and no correlation at all have been reported in clinical, mostly serological studies. In our study we employed a human non-injury ex vivo organ culture model to investigate the effect of an in vitro permissive HCMV-infection on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia for a period of 56 days. Results During routine-nephrectomies parts of renal arteries from 71 patients were obtained and prepared as human organ cultures. Cell free HCMV infection was performed with the fibroblast adapted HCMV strain AD169, the endotheliotropic strain TB40E, and a clinical isolate (AN 365. After 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 56 days in culture staining of HCMV-antigens was carried out and reactive cell proliferation and neointimal thickening were analysed. Successful HCMV-infection was accomplished with all three virus strains studied. During the first 21 days in organ culture no cell proliferation or neointimal hyperplasia was detected. At day 35 and day 56 moderate cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia was found both in HCMV-infected segments and mock infected controls. Neointimal hyperplasia in productively HCMV-infected segments was lower than in non infected at day 35 and day 56, but relatively higher after infection with the endotheliotropic TB40E in comparison with the two other strains. Conclusion The data do not support the hypothesis that HCMV-infection triggers restenosis via a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia in comparison to non infected controls. Interestingly however, even after lytic infection, a virus strain specific difference was observed.

  19. Expression of herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs in cell culture models of quiescent and latent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurak, Igor; Hackenberg, Michael; Kim, Ju Youn; Pesola, Jean M; Everett, Roger D; Preston, Chris M; Wilson, Angus C; Coen, Donald M

    2014-02-01

    To facilitate studies of herpes simplex virus 1 latency, cell culture models of quiescent or latent infection have been developed. Using deep sequencing, we analyzed the expression of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) in two models employing human fibroblasts and one using rat neurons. In all cases, the expression patterns differed from that in productively infected cells, with the rat neuron pattern most closely resembling that found in latently infected human or mouse ganglia in vivo.

  20. Single versus double dose praziquantel comparison on efficacy and Schistosoma mansoni re-infection in preschool-age children in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalugwa, Allen; Nuwaha, Fred; Tukahebwa, Edridah Muheki;

    2015-01-01

    , abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. Overall re-infection rate 8 months post treatment was 44.5%. CONCLUSIONS: PZQ is efficacious and relatively safe to use in preschool-age children but there is still an unmet need to improve its formulation to suit small children. Two PZQ doses lead to significant......BACKGROUND: Schistosoma mansoni infection is proven to be a major health problem of preschool-age children in sub-Saharan Africa, yet this age category is not part of the schistosomiasis control program. The objective of this study was to compare the impact of single and double dose praziquantel...... (PZQ) treatment on cure rates (CRs), egg reduction rates (ERRs) and re-infection rates 8 months later, in children aged 1-5 years living along Lake Victoria, Uganda. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Infected children (n= 1017) were randomized to receive either a single or double dose of PZQ. Initially...

  1. Clinical monitoring and correlates of nephropathy in SIV-infected macaques during high-dose antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebblewaite Diane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many preclinical AIDS research studies, antiretroviral therapy (ART is administered to experimentally simian immunodeficiency (SIV-infected rhesus macaques for reduction of viral load to undetectable levels. Prolonged treatment of macaques with a high dose of PMPA (9-[2-(r-(phosphonomethoxy propyl] adenine or tenofovir; 30 mg/kg of body weight subcutaneously once daily can result in proximal renal tubular dysfunction, a Fanconi-like syndrome characterized by glucosuria, aminoaciduria, hypophosphatemia, and bone pathology. In contrast, chronic administration of a low dose of PMPA (10 mg/kg subcutaneously once daily starting at birth does not seem to be associated with any adverse health effects within 3 years of treatment. In contrast to PMPA, limited information on systemic toxicity in rhesus monkeys is available for FTC (5-fluoro-1-(2R,5S-[2-(hydroxymethyl-1,3-oxathiolan-5-yl]cytosine; emtricitabine and stavudine (d4T. Results In this study, the clinical and biochemical correlates of tubular nephrosis in SIV-infected rhesus macaques associated with systemic administration of high-dose ART consisting of the three nucleoside analog inhibitors PMPA, FTC, and d4T were investigated. It was found that acute renal failure was uncommon (7.1% of treated animals and that morphologic evidence of nephropathy, which persisted for more than 300 days following discontinuation of the drug cocktail, was more frequent (52.4% of treated animals. While parameters from single time points lacked predictive value, biochemical alterations in Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN and phosphorus were frequently identified longitudinally in the blood of ART-treated animals that developed evidence of nephropathy, and these longitudinal changes correlated with disease severity. Conclusions Recommendations are proposed to limit the impact of drug-induced renal disease in future SIV macaque studies.

  2. Choice and doses of antibacterial agents for cement spacers in treatment of prosthetic joint infections: review of published studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarikov, D; Demian, H; Rubin, D; Alexander, J; Nambiar, S

    2012-12-01

    Addition of antibacterial drugs to interim antibacterial cement spacers (ACSs) is considered to be standard of care for surgical revision in prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). We reviewed published studies evaluating the choice and doses of antibacterials in spacers. We conducted a PubMed search of all clinical study reports evaluating the use of ACSS in a 2-stage hip or knee arthroplasty for treatment of PJI (1988 through August 2011). The trial design, antibacterials used, and end points studied were analyzed. No randomized trials were found comparing either ACSs with different concentrations of antibacterials or ACSs with or without antibacterials. Most of the studies were uncontrolled and used various time points to evaluate the outcome. Twenty publications that reported doses of antibacterials in spacers and had a follow-up of ≥ 24 months after the second stage were selected for review. Most ACSs included vancomycin and aminoglycosides. The doses of aminoglycosides and vancomycin ranged from 0.25 to 4.8 g and from 1 to 4 g, respectively, per 4 g of cement. No association between reported eradication of the infection and antibacterial load was found. Published data do not allow evaluation of whether antibacterials in temporary cement spacers provide additional benefits in the treatment of PJI, compared with systemic antibacterials, and are not sufficient to support recommendations on dosages. Complications of ACSs have not been consistently analyzed. Prospective randomized trials comparing spacers with and without antibacterials or spacers with different loads of antibacterials are needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ACSs.

  3. Randomized, controlled, assessor-blind clinical trial to assess the efficacy of single- versus repeated-dose albendazole to treat ascaris lumbricoides, trichuris trichiura, and hookworm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegnika, Ayola A; Zinsou, Jeannot F; Issifou, Saadou; Ateba-Ngoa, Ulysse; Kassa, Roland F; Feugap, Eliane N; Honkpehedji, Yabo J; Dejon Agobe, Jean-Claude; Kenguele, Hilaire M; Massinga-Loembe, Marguerite; Agnandji, Selidji T; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Ramharter, Michael; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G; Lell, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    In many regions where soil-transmitted helminth infections are endemic, single-dose albendazole is used in mass drug administration programs to control infections. There are little data on the efficacy of the standard single-dose administration compared to that of alternative regimens. We conducted a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial to determine the efficacies of standard and extended albendazole treatment against soil-transmitted helminth infection in Gabon. A total of 175 children were included. Adequate cure rates and egg reduction rates above 85% were found with a single dose of albendazole for Ascaris infection, 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73, 96) and 93.8% (CI, 87.6, 100), respectively, while two doses were necessary for hookworm infestation (92% [CI, 78, 100] and 92% [CI, 78, 100], respectively). However, while a 3-day regimen was not sufficient to cure Trichuris (cure rate, 83% [CI, 73, 93]), this regimen reduced the number of eggs up to 90.6% (CI, 83.1, 100). The rate ratios of two- and three-dose regimens compared to a single-dose treatment were 1.7 (CI, 1.1, 2.5) and 2.1 (CI, 1.5, 2.9) for Trichuris and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) for hookworm. Albendazole was safe and well tolerated in all regimens. A single-dose albendazole treatment considerably reduces Ascaris infection but has only a moderate effect on hookworm and Trichuris infections. The single-dose option may still be the preferred regimen because it balances efficacy, safety, and compliance during mass drug administration, keeping in mind that asymptomatic low-level helminth carriage may also have beneficial effects. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01192802.).

  4. H1N1pdm09 adjuvanted vaccination in HIV-infected adults: a randomized trial of two single versus two double doses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Santini-Oliveira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of severe disease from pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09, vaccination was recommended as a prevention strategy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and persistence of the immune response after vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09 with an adjuvanted vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected adults using two single and two double doses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Open label, randomized trial to evaluate the immune response following H1N1pdm09 vaccination in HIV-infected participants compared to HIV-negative controls (NCT01155037. HIV-infected participants were randomized to receive 2 single (3.75 µg hemagglutinin or 2 double (7.5 µg hemagglutinin doses of the vaccine, 21 days apart. Controls received one dose of the vaccine. The primary endpoint was seroconversion as measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay. Two hundred fifty six HIV-infected participants (129 and 127 randomized to single and double doses, respectively and 71 HIV-negative controls were enrolled. Among HIV-infected participants, seroconversion increased from 46.7% and 51.7% after the first dose to 77.2% and 83.8% after the second dose of the vaccine using single and double doses, respectively. Participants aged >40 years showed higher seroconversion compared to younger participants. Seroconversion among HIV-infected women and those with nadir CD440 years or with nadir CD4<200 cells/mm(3, to achieve antibody levels that are both higher and more sustained. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01155037.

  5. H1N1pdm09 Adjuvanted Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults: A Randomized Trial of Two Single versus Two Double Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Camacho, Luiz A. B.; Souza, Thiago M. L.; Luz, Paula M.; Vasconcellos, Mauricio T. L.; Giacoia-Gripp, Carmem B. W.; Morgado, Mariza G.; Nunes, Estevão P.; Lemos, Alberto S.; Ferreira, Ana C. G.; Moreira, Ronaldo I.; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Siqueira, Marilda M.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Background Since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are at increased risk of severe disease from pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09), vaccination was recommended as a prevention strategy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and persistence of the immune response after vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09) with an adjuvanted vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults using two single and two double doses. Methodology/Principal Findings Open label, randomized trial to evaluate the immune response following H1N1pdm09 vaccination in HIV-infected participants compared to HIV-negative controls (NCT01155037). HIV-infected participants were randomized to receive 2 single (3.75 µg hemagglutinin) or 2 double (7.5 µg hemagglutinin) doses of the vaccine, 21 days apart. Controls received one dose of the vaccine. The primary endpoint was seroconversion as measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay. Two hundred fifty six HIV-infected participants (129 and 127 randomized to single and double doses, respectively) and 71 HIV-negative controls were enrolled. Among HIV-infected participants, seroconversion increased from 46.7% and 51.7% after the first dose to 77.2% and 83.8% after the second dose of the vaccine using single and double doses, respectively. Participants aged >40 years showed higher seroconversion compared to younger participants. Seroconversion among HIV-infected women and those with nadir CD440 years or with nadir CD4<200 cells/mm3, to achieve antibody levels that are both higher and more sustained. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01155037 PMID:22761759

  6. Isolation of a Polyoma-Nucleoprotein Complex from Infected Mouse-Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Melvin H.; Miller, Henry I.; Hendler, Sheldon

    1971-01-01

    A complex containing polyoma (py) DNA and protein (py complex) was isolated from polyoma-infected mouse-cell cultures. The complex sedimented unimodally at about 55 S. When labeled for long periods (2-3 hr) between 20 and 40 hr after infection, most of the [3H]DNA in the py complex was in the form of covalently closed, circular polyoma DNA (component I). When labeled for 5 min, the [3H]DNA in the py complex was nicked in one or both of the strands, as shown by alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation. Under all conditions studied, no free py DNA was extracted from mouse cells by the two methods described. PMID:4324998

  7. Effect of age, dose and antibiotic therapy on the development of Clostridium difficile infection in neonatal piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Paulo H E; Madson, Darin M; Ramirez, Alejandro; Rowe, Eric; Lizer, Joshua T; Songer, J Glenn

    2013-08-01

    Piglet diarrhea is associated with increased pre-weaning mortality, poor growth rates, and variation in weight at weaning. Clostridium difficile is a known cause of enteric disease in neonatal piglets, yet risk factors associated with C. difficile infection in piglets are unknown. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the consistency and severity of lesions in piglets challenged with C. difficile at different bacterial doses (DOSAGE experiment), (2) evaluate the use of antibiotics as a contributing risk factor in 1-day-old piglets (ANTIMICROBIAL experiment), and (3) to provide a clinical and histological evaluation of C. difficile infection in 10-day-old piglets (AGE experiment). One hundred and eleven conventional neonatal pigs were snatch farrowed and divided into experimental groups addressing the objectives. In the DOSAGE experiment, 40 1-day-old piglets were sham inoculated or challenged with varying amounts of C. difficile heat shocked spores and euthanized 72 h post infection. Results indicate a clear trend for disease development as bacterial numbers increase. In the ANTIMICROBIAL experiment, 39 1-day-old piglets were challenged and then treated with one of four different antibiotics after 16 h. No significant difference in disease development was found. Thirty-three 10-day-old piglets were given varying doses of C. difficile in the AGE experiment. Disease and lesions were reproduced in 10-day-old piglets. Combined results indicate that C. difficile dosage appears to be an important factor that influences the appearance and severity of lesions, 10-day-old pigs can develop disease associated with C. difficile, and antibiotic administration following inoculation may not be a major contributor for disease in neonatal piglets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Doses of corrective phosphating in land rice high in first year of culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Lange

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of phosphorus levels in coverage of the morphological and productive components in rice plant upland. The study was conducted in the municipality of Alta Floresta - MT, in the agricultural year 2007/2008 in a randomized block design with five treatments (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kg ha-1 of P2O5 following the recommendations of Sousa et al., (2006 , with four replications. They evaluated the length between node, plant height, stem diameter, number of tillers, number of panicles, number of grains per panicle, percentage of grains " full ", weight of 100 grains and grain yield . The match only had no influence on weight of 100 grains and length from node. The highest yield was obtained in corrective dose of 168 kg ha-1 of P2O5.

  9. Antimicrobial-Loaded Bone Cement Does Not Negatively Influence Sonicate Fluid Culture Positivity for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Hwa; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Hanssen, Arlen D; Abdel, Matthew P; Patel, Robin

    2016-06-01

    We compared culture results to investigate the influence of antimicrobial-loaded cement on sonicate fluid culture positivity for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection. Fifty-four subjects were assessed. The sensitivities of sonicate fluid culture were 77.8% (14 of 18) in subjects with an antimicrobial-loaded cemented prosthesis and 58.3% (21 of 36) in subjects with an antimicrobial-free prosthesis.

  10. Volatile organic compounds generated by cultures of bacteria and viruses associated with respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Qader, Amir; Lieberman, David; Shemer Avni, Yonat; Svobodin, Natali; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Sagi, Orli; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory infections (RI) can be viral or bacterial in origin. In either case, the invasion of the pathogen results in production and release of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The present study examines the VOCs released from cultures of five viruses (influenza A, influenza B, adenovirus, respiratory syncitial virus and parainfluenza 1 virus), three bacteria (Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae and Legionella pneumophila) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolated colonies. Our results demonstrate the involvement of inflammation-induced VOCs. Two significant VOCs were identified as associated with infectious bacterial activity, heptane and methylcyclohexane. These two VOCs have been linked in previous studies to oxidative stress effects. In order to distinguish between bacterial and viral positive cultures, we performed principal component analysis including peak identity (retention time) and VOC concentration (i.e. area under the peak) revealing 1-hexanol and 1-heptadecene to be good predictors.

  11. Quantitative assessment of organizational culture within hospitals and its relevance to infection prevention and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M A; Waisfisz, B; Frank, U

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that organizational culture (OC) is an important driver of infection prevention and control (IPC) behaviour among healthcare workers. This study examined OC in seven European hospitals using a validated assessment tool based on Hofstede's model, and identified significant variations in OC scores. Hospitals with low prevalence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) exhibited high scores for change facilitation and change readiness, whereas hospitals with high prevalence of MRSA exhibited low scores for these determinants. It is possible to use tools, available outside health care, to study OC within hospitals and gain better insight into IPC behaviour change strategies.

  12. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment and Impact on Short-Term Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osthoff, Michael; Sidler, Jan A; Lakatos, Botond; Frei, Reno; Dangel, Marc; Weisser, Maja; Battegay, Manuel; Widmer, Andreas F

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection is associated with considerable mortality. Experimental models suggest a direct antistaphylococcal effect of acetylsalicylic acid, but evidence from human studies is scarce. We aimed to estimate the effect of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid therapy on mortality in bloodstream infections caused by S. aureus compared with Escherichia coli. Retrospective cohort study based on observational data from 838 and 602 episodes of S. aureus and E. coli bloodstream infection, respectively. Swiss tertiary referral center. Adult patients with S. aureus and E. coli bloodstream infection, respectively, categorized according to low-dose acetylsalicylic acid therapy as outpatient or inpatient before bacteremia. None. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was analyzed in a total of 314 propensity score-matched S. aureus bloodstream infection and in 268 E. coli bloodstream infection patients, respectively (1:1 match of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid users and nonusers). S. aureus bloodstream infection cases and controls were equally matched for relevant confounders except treatment with statins, which was strongly associated with a low-dose acetylsalicylic acid use (p < 0.001). At day 30, 12.1% of cases and 27.4% of controls had died (hazard ratio, 0.40; p < 0.001). Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid use was associated with a reduced 30-day all-cause mortality in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.21-0.69; p = 0.001) of matched patients and also of the entire cohort (n = 689) after adjustment for the propensity score (hazard ratio, 0.58, 95% CI, 0.34-0.98; p = 0.04). In contrast, low-dose acetylsalicylic acid use was not associated with the primary endpoint in patients with E. coli bloodstream infection (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.40-1.55; p = 0.8). Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid at the time of bloodstream infection was strongly associated with a reduced short-term mortality in patients with S. aureus bloodstream infection. Future

  13. Comparison of Uriswab to alternative methods for urine culture collection and transport: confirmation of standard culture methodology for investigation of urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Robert P; Turnbull, Lee-Ann; Gauchier-Pitts, Kaylee; Bennett, Tracy; Dyrland, Debbie; Blonski, Susan

    2016-08-01

    The ability to isolate and identify causative agents of urinary tract infections relies primarily on the quality of the urine sample that is submitted to the microbiology. The most important factors are the method of collection, the maintenance of viability of the potential pathogens during transport, and standardization of the culturing of the urine sample. This report is a composite of several investigations comparing collection and transport on urine culture paddles, with a preservative urine sponge (Uriswab), and a comparison of Uriswab with the BD preservative transport tube as methods of preservation of urinary pathogens. Primary studies showed that Uriswab maintained significantly more urinary pathogens than the urine culture paddle with fewer mixed or contaminated cultures. The two preservative transport systems were comparable for maintenance of viability of the pathogens, but there were fewer mixed cultures when samples were collected with Uriswab. This study confirms the importance of a standard volume of 1 μL of urine for culture.

  14. Ultrastructural Pathology of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection in Cultured Mouse Nervous System Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Nicholas J.; Schneider, Joseph F.; Rosen, Moshe; Belisle, Elizabeth H.

    1974-01-01

    Mouse spinal cord-ganglia cultures were innoculated with murine cytomegalo-virus 14 days after explantation. Intranuclear virus was first observed 4 days after infection. The viruses, which occurred in four forms, were observed in increasing numbers during the ensuing 4 days. Differences were noted in the relative prevalence of certain of these forms in older as compared to younger cultures. This suggests that variations in virus form are related to virus maturation. Cytoplasmic viruses were occasionally observed, but their site of origin is not certain. A variety of cytoplasmic inclusions were seen, particularly in the older cultures. It seems likely that they represent specific cell responses to the presence of the virus. They were not observed in the control cultures, even though some of the latter did show severe degenerative changes. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Figs 3-4p[477]-dFig 8Fig 9Fig 10Figs 11-12Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 16Figs 17-18Fig 19 PMID:4360827

  15. The efficacy and safety of high-dose arbekacin sulfate therapy (once-daily treatment) in patients with MRSA infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Izumikawa, Koichi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Fukuda, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akira; Inoue, Yuichi; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    The efficacy and safety of once-daily high-dose arbekacin sulfate therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection were evaluated, with analysis of their relationship to blood drug levels. The study was conducted in patients with pneumonia or sepsis, the cause of which was suspected to be MRSA, who were admitted to the Nagasaki University Hospital or its affiliated hospitals between January 2009 and December 2010. The initial drug dose was set at a level expected to yield the goal peak of 20 μg/ml and a trough level of less than 2 μg/ml, using the Habekacin Therapeutic Drug Monitoring analysis software. Thirteen patients were enrolled: 10 patients had pneumonia and 3 patients had sepsis. Patient mean age was 72.0 years; mean initial drug dose was 269.2 mg. Clinical efficacy at completion of treatment and bacterial eradication-reduction were achieved in 66.7% (6/9) and 62.5% (5/8) of patients, respectively. Incidence of adverse reactions was 38.5% (5/13). In analysis of efficacy in relationship to serum drug levels, the peak drug level was 22.7 ± 5.50 μg/ml, on average, and 15 μg/ml or higher in all 6 responders. Also, in patients with renal dysfunction, it seemed to be essential to ensure a certain peak drug level and to control the trough level appropriately. Although the number of patients was limited, once-daily high-dose arbekacin sulfate therapy may be highly effective, without posing any major safety problems. Further larger-scale studies are needed.

  16. Role of IFN-gamma and LPS on Neuron/Glial Co-Cultures Infected by Neospora caninum

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    Erica Etelvina Viana De Jesus

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neospora caninum causes cattle abortion and neurological symptoms in dogs. Although infection is usually asymptomatic, classical neurological symptoms of neosporosis may be associated with encephalitis. This parasite can grow in brain endothelial cells without markedly damages, but it can modulate the cellular environment to promote its survival in the brain. In previous studies, we described that IFN-γ decreased the parasite proliferation and down regulated nitric oxide production in astrocyte/microglia cultures. However, it remains unclear how glial cells respond to N. caninum in the presence of neurons. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of 300 IU/mL IFN-γ or 1.0 μg/mL of LPS on infected rat neuron/glial co-cultures. After 72 hours of infection, LPS did not affect the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. However, IFN-γ decreased this parameter by 15.5 and 12.0% in uninfected and infected cells, respectively. The number of tachyzoites decreased 54.1 and 44.3% in cells stimulated with IFN-γ and LPS, respectively. Infection or LPS treatment did not change NO production. On the other hand, IFN-γ induced increased nitrite release in 55.7%, but the infection reverted this induction. IL-10 levels increased only in infected cultures (treated or not, meanwhile PGE2 release was improved in IFN-γ/infected or LPS/infected cells. Although IFN-γ significantly reduced the neurite length in uninfected cultures (42.64%; p < 0.001, this inflammatory cytokine reverted the impairment of neurite outgrowth induced by the infection (81.39%. The results suggest a neuroprotective potential response of glia to N. caninum infection under IFN-γ stimulus. This observation contributes to understand the immune mediated mechanisms of neosporosis in CNS

  17. Dose verification by OSLDs in the irradiation of cell cultures; Verificacion de dosis mediante OSLDs, en la irradiacion de cultivos celulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meca C, E. A.; Bourel, V. [Ce. De. Te. Centro Especializado en Terapia Radiante, Viamonte 1861, C1056 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Notcovich, C.; Duran, H., E-mail: edarmeca@gmail.com [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnologia, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    The determination of value of irradiation dose presents difficulties when targets are irradiated located in regions where electronic equilibrium of charged particle is not reached, as in the case of irradiation -in vitro- of cell lines monolayer-cultured, in culture dishes or flasks covered with culture medium. The present study aimed to implement a methodology for dose verification in irradiation of cells in culture media by optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry (OSLD). For the determination of the absorbed dose in terms of cell proliferation OSL dosimeters of aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) were used, which were calibrated to the irradiation conditions of culture medium and at doses that ranged from 0.1 to 15 Gy obtained with a linear accelerator of 6 MV photons. Intercomparison measurements were performed with an ionization chamber of 6 cm{sup 3}. Different geometries were evaluated by varying the thicknesses of solid water, air and cell culture medium. The results showed deviations below 2.2% when compared with the obtained doses of OSLDs and planning system used. Also deviations were observed below 3.4% by eccentric points of the irradiation plane, finding homogeneous dose distribution. Uncertainty in the readings was less than 2%. The proposed methodology contributes a contribution in the dose verification in this type of irradiations, eliminating from the calculation uncertainties, potential errors in settling irradiation or possible equipment failure with which is radiating. It also provides certainty about the survival curves to be plotted with the experimental data. (Author)

  18. Retrovirus-induced osteopetrosis in mice. Effects of viral infection on osteogenic differentiation in skeletoblast cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J.; Casser-Bette, M.; Murray, A. B.; Luz, A.; Erfle, V.

    1987-01-01

    Newborn female strain NMRI mice were injected with a mouse retrovirus (OA MuLV) known to induce osteopetrosis. Primary skeletoblast cell cultures were established from humeri and calvaria of 3-day-old, 7-day-old, and 28-day-old animals. Infectious ecotropic MuLV was found in all humerus cultures from infected animals and in 7-day and 28-day calvaria cell cultures. Levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were markedly higher in cultures of calvaria and humeri from infected mice than in those from controls. In vitro infection of undifferentiated periosteal cells was followed by a decrease in cell growth and an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. In contrast, differentiated osteoblast-like cells were barely susceptible to OA MuLV infection, and the virus did not influence their cell growth or differentiation. Electron-microscopic studies of skeletal tissue from infected old osteopetrotic mice showed virus particles associated with and budding from osteocytes and accumulated in devitalized osteocyte lacunae. The results indicate that progenitor cells of the osteoblastic lineage represent the target cells for OA MuLV in bone tissue, that virus infection induces an increase in osteoblastic activity, and that infected cells produce virus until full development of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:2827489

  19. Low Doses of Celecoxib Stimulate Human Endometrium Growth in A Three-Dimensional Culture Model

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    Mohammad Rasool Khazaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The endometrium plays a pivotal role in implantation and pregnancy. CyclooxygenaseII (COX-2 has an important function in biological processes such as cellproliferation and inflammation. Celecoxib is a selective inhibitor of COX-2 with numerouspharmacologic functions. The aim of present study is to investigate the effects ofcelecoxib on the human endometrium in a three-dimensional (3D culture model.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, normal human endometria (n=10obtained from reproductive age women were cut into 1×1 mm sections. Endometrialexplants were placed between two layers of fibrin gel. To create the fibrin gel, we poureda thin layer of fibrinogen solution [3 mg/ml in medium 199 (M199] into each well of a24-well culture dish and added thrombin enzyme. Endometrial fragments were placed inthe center of each well and covered with a second layer of fibrinogen solution. M199 supplementedwith L-glutamine, fetal bovine serum (FBS, 5% and antibiotics were addedto each well. The media in each experimental well contained either1, 10 or 50 μM ofcelecoxib. At the end of the study, we calculated endometrial tissue growth changes byscoring methods and determined the percentage of angiogenesis. Data were analyzed bythe Kruskal-Wallis method. P<0.05 was considered significant.Results: The growth scores were as follows: control (1.37 ± 0.16, 1 μM (1.96 ± 0.28,10 μM (2.01 ± 0.25, and 50 μM (1.17 ± 0.14 celecoxib, all of which were significantlydifferent. The angiogenesis percentages were: 25.56 ± 6.72% (control, 31.98 ± 6.18% (1μM, 42.67 ± 7.27% (10 μM and 23.44 ± 4.03% (50 μM, which were not significantlydifferent from each other.

  20. Characteristics of testicular lesions in mice infected with a low dose of encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi-Ueno, Aito; Nakayama, Yumi; Doi, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the characteristics of testicular lesions induced in mice with a low dose (10 plaque forming units/mouse) of the D variant of encephalomyocarditis (EMC-D) virus. The virus titers of blood and testis peaked at 5 days post-inoculation (5 DPI) and were no longer detected at 14 DPI. The IFN-gamma and iNOS mRNAs expression in the testis and spleen detected by RT-PCR was prominently elevated at 7 DPI, although the expression level of TNF-alpha mRNA was not affected. Signals of viral RNA were clearly detected in degenerative germinal epithelia (in situ hybridization) at 7 DPI, which were surrounded by a small number of macrophages and a few CD4 + T cells and CD8 + T cells (immunohistochemistry). Signals were no longer detected at 21 DPI when seminiferous tubules were highly degenerative and accompanied with infiltration of many macrophages and a small numbers of CD4 + T cells and CD8 + T cells. At 35 DPI, marked atrophy of germinal epithelia composed of Sertoli cells alone was observed, and there were almost no infiltrating cells detected. The present results suggest that macrophages may play an important role in the development of testicular lesions induced in mice with a low dose of EMC-D.

  1. Does low dose13C-urea breath test maintain a satisfactory accuracy in diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection?

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    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The standard doses of 13C-urea in 13C-urea breath test is 75 mg. OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of 13C-urea breath test containing 25 mg of 13C-urea comparing with the standard doses of 75 mg in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. METHODS: Two hundred seventy adult patients (96 males, 174 females, median age 41 years performed the standard 13C-urea breath test (75 mg 13C-urea and repeated the 13C-urea breath test using only 25 mg of 13C-urea within a 2 week interval. The test was performed using an infrared isotope analyzer. Patients were considered positive if delta over baseline was >4.0‰ at the gold standard test. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one (59.6% patients were H. pylori negative and 109 (40.4% were positive by the gold standard test. Using receiver operating characteristic analysis we established a cut-off value of 3.4% as the best value of 25 mg 13C-urea breath test to discriminate positive and negative patients, considering the H. pylori prevalence (95% CI: 23.9-37.3 at our setting. Therefore, we obtained to 25 mg 13C-urea breath test a diagnostic accuracy of 92.9% (95% CI: 88.1-97.9, sensitivity 83.5% (95% CI: 75.4-89.3, specificity 99.4% (95% CI: 96.6-99.9, positive predictive value 98.3% (95% CI: 92.4-99.4, and negative predictive value 93.0% (95% CI: 88.6-96.1. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose 13C-urea breath test (25 mg 13C-urea does not reach accuracy sufficient to be recommended in clinical setting where a 30% prevalence of H. pylori infection is observed. Further studies should be done to determine the diagnostic accuracy of low doses of 13C-urea in the urea breath test.

  2. Staphylococcus species and their Methicillin-Resistance in 7424 Blood Cultures for Suspected Bloodstream Infections

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    Ariana ALMAŞ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of Staphylococcus species in bloodstream infections and to assess their susceptibility to methicillin. Material and Methods: Between January 1st 2008 - December 31st 2010, 7424 blood culture sets were submitted to the Laboratory Department of the Hospital for Clinical Infectious Diseases in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The blood cultures were performed using BacT/Alert until January 2010 and BacT/Alert 3D automated system (bioMérieux after that date. The blood culture bottles were incubated at 37°C in a continuously monitoring system for up to 7 days. The strain identifications were performed by conventional methods, ApiStaph galleries and Vitek 2 Compact system. Susceptibility to methicillin was determined by disk diffusion method with cefoxitin disk and by using Vitek 2 Compact system. Results: From the total number of performed blood cultures, 568 were positive with Staphylococcus species. From 168 bacteriemic episodes 103 were with Staphylococcus aureus. Among 65 coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates, Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most frequently isolated species (34, followed by Staphylococcus hominis (15, Staphylococcus haemolyticus (8, Staphylococcus saprophyticus (3, Staphylococcus cohnii (1, Staphylococcus auricularis (1, and 3 strains that were not identified at species level. Methicillin resistance was encountered in 53.40% of Staphylococcus aureus strains and in 80% of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Conclusions: An important percentage of blood cultures were contaminated with Staphylococcus species. The main species identified in true bacteriemia cases were Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The percentage of methicillin-resistance, proved to be high not only for coagulase-negative staphylococci but also for Staphylococcus aureus.

  3. [Increase in the production of oncovirus type C by an L929 cell culture as a result of BCG infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitsunova, N V; Gosteva, V V; Kim, A A; Bykovskiĭ, A F

    1984-01-01

    The effect of BCG infection of L929 cells on replication of oncovirus type C was studied. Ultrathin sections of the BCG-infected culture were examined electron microscopically 1, 3, 6, 8, and 10 days postinfection. Most microorganisms with the morphology typical of mycobacteria were found inside phagosomes. The number of extracellular virions as well as budding and abnormal forms per one cell contour was counted. BCG-infected cells were found to produce significantly more virus than the controls. The difference was maximal 3 days postinoculation. Possible reasons for the increased oncovirus production by continuous cell lines after infection with BCG are discussed.

  4. Effect of low doses γ-irradiation on oxidative stress and secondary metabolites production of rosemary ( Rosmarinus officinalis L.) callus culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Beltagi, Hossam S.; Ahmed, Osama K.; El-Desouky, Wael

    2011-09-01

    Effect of various γ-irradiation doses (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 G) on the enhancement of secondary metabolites production and antioxidant properties of rosemary callus culture was investigated. The obtained data showed a highly metabolic modification of chemical constituents and various antioxidant defense enzymes (APX, CAT, SOD and GR), which gradually increased in response to radiation doses, while reduced (GSH), ascorbic acid (AsA) contents, total soluble protein, total soluble amino acids, total soluble sugars and PAL activity positively correlated with the increased doses. On the other hands the high irradiation levels significantly increased the accumulation of various oxidative burst (MDA, H 2O 2 and O 2-). Meanwhile, higher doses of gamma irradiation positively enhanced secondary products accumulation of total phenols and total flavonoids in rosemary callus culture.

  5. Ability of procalcitonin to diagnose bacterial infection and bacteria types compared with blood culture findings

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    Watanabe Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yuji Watanabe,1,2 Nozomi Oikawa,1,2 Maya Hariu,1,2 Ryota Fuke,1 Masafumi Seki1 1Division of Infectious Diseases and Infection Control, 2Laboratory for Clinical Microbiology, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University Hospital, Sendai City, Miyagi, Japan Abstract: Procalcitonin (PCT and C-reactive protein serve as biomarkers of infection in patients with sepsis/bacteremia. The present study assessed the clinical characteristics of 280 patients with suspected sepsis who were admitted to Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University Hospital between January 2012 and December 2013. Among the patients, 133 and 147 were positive and negative for PCT, respectively. Patients who were PCT positive were older and more frequently male, had reduced levels of platelets and albumin, and increased levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and C-reactive protein. Patients who were PCT positive had significantly higher blood culture positivity compared with those who were PCT negative, and the sensitivity and specificity of PCT for detecting positive blood cultures were 74.5% and 59.1%, respectively. Escherichia coli was detected in PCT-positive patients, whereas Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were frequently detected in PCT-negative patients. Levels of PCT were higher in the patients infected with gram-negative rods than those with gram-positive cocci. Furthermore, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing bacteria cases showed higher levels of PCT than those of non-ESBL cases. These results suggest that PCT may be a useful biomarker of sepsis, and it might serve as a strong tool to detect patients with severe gram-negative rod bacteremia including ESBL-producing bacteria cases early due to its relative high sensitivity. Keywords: biomarker, sepsis, Escherichia coli, gram-negative rods, ESBL

  6. Predictors of infection after 754 cranioplasty operations and the value of intraoperative cultures for cryopreserved bone flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Ryan P; Abecassis, I Josh; Hanson, Josiah F; Barber, Jason; Nerva, John D; Emerson, Samuel N; Ene, Chibawanye I; Chowdhary, Michelle M; Levitt, Michael R; Ko, Andrew L; Dellit, Timothy H; Chesnut, Randall M

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim was to report the largest study on predictors of infection after cranioplasty and to assess the predictive value of intraoperative bone flap cultures before cryopreservation. METHODS They retrospectively examined all cranioplasties performed between March 2004 and November 2014. Throughout this study period, the standard protocol during initial craniectomy was to obtain a culture swab of the extracted autologous bone flap (ABF)-prior to its placement in cytostorage-to screen for microbial contamination. Two consecutive protocols were employed for the use and interpretation of the intraoperative swab culture results: A) From March 2004 through June 2013, any culture-positive ABF (+ABF) was discarded and a custom synthetic prosthesis was implanted at the time of cranioplasty. B) From July 2013 through November 2014, any ABF with a skin flora organism was not discarded. Instead, cryopreservation was maintained and the +ABF was reimplanted after a 10-minute soak in bacitracin irrigation as well as a 3-minute soak in betadine. RESULTS Over the 10.75-year period, 754 cranioplasty procedures were performed. The median time from craniectomy to cranioplasty was 123 days. Median follow-up after cranioplasty was 237 days for protocol A and 225 days for protocol B. The overall infection rate after cranioplasty was 6.6% (50 cases) occurring at a median postoperative Day 31. Staphylococcus spp. were involved as the causative organisms in 60% of cases. Culture swabs taken at the time of initial craniectomy were available for 640 ABFs as 114 ABFs were not salvageable. One hundred twenty-six (20%) were culture positive. Eighty-nine +ABFs occurred during protocol A and were discarded in favor of a synthetic prosthesis at the time of cranioplasty, whereas 37 +ABFs occurred under protocol B and were reimplanted at the time of cranioplasty. Cranioplasty material did not affect the postcranioplasty infection rate. There was no significant difference in the

  7. Correlation of metabolic changes of infected paulownia tissue culture with PWB-MLO pathogenic mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田国忠; 黄钦才; 袁巧平; 张锡津

    1995-01-01

    Paulownia sp.tissue culture plantlets infected with paulownia witches’ broom mycoplasma-likeorganism (PWB-MLO) expressed a typical witches’ broom symptom.The results determined by transmissionelectron microscopy and DAPI staining fluorescence microscopy showed that the severity of the symptom wasdirectly related with MLO concentration in the sieve tubes of the phloem.The results of the analysis ofendogenous hormones and phenolic compounds by HPLC revealed that in all cases,the free IAA content ofthe diseased plant apparently lower than that of the healthy,and the free IAA concentration had strikinglypositive correlation with catechol concentration changes (r=0.90,n= 11).The changes of cytokinin (Z +ZR,iPA),GA3 and ABA were shown less relation with MLO infection.The differences of peroxidase andisoenzyme,IAA oxidase and phenylanine ammonia lyase (PAL) between the extract of infected plants andthat of uninfected as well as different effects of NAA and catechol additions on MS media could further re-flect the nature of the relationship and the interaction among MLOs,catechol and the free IAA concentration.

  8. Maximum growth rate of Mycobacterium avium in continuous culture or chronically infected BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C M; Taylor, M A; Dennis, M W

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a human pathogen which may cause either chronic or disseminated disease and the organism exhibits a slow rate of growth. This study provides information on the growth rate of the organism in chronically infected mice and its maximal growth rate in vitro. M. avium was grown in continuous culture, limited for nitrogen with 0.5 mM ammonium chloride and dilution rates that ranged from 0.054 to 0.153 h-1. The steady-state concentration of ammonia nitrogen and M. avium cells for each dilution rate were determined. The bacterial saturation constant for growth-limiting ammonia was 0.29 mM (4 micrograms nitrogen/ml) and, from this, the maximal growth rate for M. avium was estimated to be 0.206 h-1 or a doubling time of 3.4 h. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 3 x 10(6) colony-forming units and a chronic infection resulted, typical of virulent M. avium strains. During a period of 3 months, the number of mycobacteria remained constant in the lungs, but increased 30-fold and 8,900-fold, respectively, in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. The latter increase appeared to be due to proliferation in situ. The generation time of M. avium in the mesenteric lymph nodes was estimated to be 7 days.

  9. Single Versus Double Dose Praziquantel Comparison on Efficacy and Schistosoma mansoni Re-Infection in Preschool-Age Children in Uganda: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Allen Nalugwa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni infection is proven to be a major health problem of preschool-age children in sub-Saharan Africa, yet this age category is not part of the schistosomiasis control program. The objective of this study was to compare the impact of single and double dose praziquantel (PZQ treatment on cure rates (CRs, egg reduction rates (ERRs and re-infection rates 8 months later, in children aged 1-5 years living along Lake Victoria, Uganda.Infected children (n= 1017 were randomized to receive either a single or double dose of PZQ. Initially all children were treated with a single standard oral dose 40 mg/kg body weight of PZQ. Two weeks later a second dose was administered to children in the double dose treatment arm. Side effects were monitored at 30 minutes to 24 hours after each treatment. Efficacy in terms of CRs and ERRs for the two treatments was assessed and compared 1 month after the second treatment. Re-infection with S. mansoni was assessed in the same children 8 months following the second treatment. CRs were non-significantly higher in children treated with two 40 mg/kg PZQ doses (85.5%; 290/339 compared to a single dose (83.2%; 297/357. ERRs were significantly higher in the double dose with 99.3 (95%CI: 99.2-99.5 compared with 98.9 (95%CI: 98.7-99.1 using a single dose, (P = 0.01. Side effects occurred more frequently during the first round of drug administration and were mild and short-lived; these included vomiting, abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. Overall re-infection rate 8 months post treatment was 44.5%.PZQ is efficacious and relatively safe to use in preschool-age children but there is still an unmet need to improve its formulation to suit small children. Two PZQ doses lead to significant reduction in egg excretion compared to a single dose. Re-infection rates with S. mansoni 8 months post treatment is the same among children irrespective of the treatment regimen.

  10. Organotypic slice cultures from rat brain tissue: a new approach for Naegleria fowleri CNS infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianinazzi, C; Schild, M; Müller, N; Leib, S L; Simon, F; Nuñez, S; Joss, P; Gottstein, B

    2005-12-01

    The free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the aetiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a disease leading to death in the vast majority of cases. In patients suffering from PAM, and in corresponding animal models, the brain undergoes a massive inflammatory response, followed by haemorrhage and severe tissue necrosis. Both, in vivo and in vitro models are currently being used to study PAM infection. However, animal models may pose ethical issues, are dependent upon availability of specific infrastructural facilities, and are time-consuming and costly. Conversely, cell cultures lack the complex organ-specific morphology found in vivo, and thus, findings obtained in vitro do not necessarily reflect the situation in vivo. The present study reports infection of organotypic slice cultures from rat brain with N. fowleri and compares the findings in this culture system with in vivo infection in a rat model of PAM, that proved complementary to that of mice. We found that brain morphology, as present in vivo, is well retained in organotypic slice cultures, and that infection time-course including tissue damage parallels the observations in vivo in the rat. Therefore, organotypic slice cultures from rat brain offer a new in vitro approach to study N. fowleri infection in the context of PAM.

  11. On-line monitoring of respiration in recombinant-baculovirus infected and uninfected insect cell bioreactor cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, A A; Bédard, C; Tom, R; Perret, S; Jardin, B

    1996-04-05

    Respiration rates in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cell bioreactor cultures were successfully measured on-line using two methods: The O(2) uptake rate (OUR) was determined using gas phase pO(2) values imposed by a dissolved oxygen controller and the CO(2) evolution rate (CER) was measured using an infrared detector. The measurement methods were accurate, reliable, and relatively inexpensive. The CER was routinely determined in bioreactor cultures used for the production of several recombinant proteins. Simple linear relationships between viable cell densities and both OUR and CER in exponentially growing cultures were used to predict viable cell density. Respiration measurements were also used to follow the progress of baculoviral infections in Sf-9 cultures. Infection led to increases in volumetric and per-cell respiration rates. The relationships between respiration and several other culture parameters, including viable cell density, cell protein, cell volume, glucose consumption, lactate production, viral titer, and recombinant beta-galactosidase accumulation, were examined. The extent of the increase in CER following infection and the time postinfection at which maximum CER was attained were negatively correlated with the multiplicity of infection (MOI) at multiplicities below the level required to infect all the cells in a culture. Delays in the respiration peak related to the MOI employed were correlated with delays in the peak in recombinant protein accumulation. DO levels in the range 5-100% did not exert any major effects on viable cell densities, CER, or product titer in cultures infected with a baculovirus expressing recombinant beta-galactosidase.

  12. Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae infection of human astrocytes and microglia in culture displays an active, rather than a persistent, phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreses-Werringloer, Ute; Gérard, Hervé C; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A; Hudson, Alan P

    2006-10-01

    The intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae can cause persistent infections during which its morphologic, molecular, and pathogenic characteristics differ importantly from those of active infection. This bacterium was identified within astrocytes and microglia in the brain of late-onset Alzheimer disease patients. We investigated whether infection of these two host cell types displays an active or persistent growth phenotype. The human astrocytoma and microglioma cell lines U-87 MG and CHME-5 (respectively) and the human epithelial cell line HEp-2 were infected by the standard method with C pneumoniae strain AR-39. Cultures were harvested at 24, 48, and 72 hours postinfection and subjected to analysis of inclusion morphology. DNA and RNA were prepared from portions of each infected culture sample and analyzed for relative chromosome accumulation and presence or absence of several specific bacterial mRNAs. Astrocytes and microglial cells infected in vitro with C pneumoniae displayed inclusions that were indistinguishable from those characteristic of active infection of the standard HEp-2 host cell line. Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that the relative accumulation of chlamydial chromosome over time during infection of these two cell lines also was virtually identical to that in actively infected HEp-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analyses showed that mRNA from ftsK, pyk, and other chlamydial genes whose expression is abrogated during persistent infection were easily identifiable in infected CHME-5 and U-87 MG cells. In cultured human astrocytes and microglia, C pneumoniae displays an active, not a persistent, growth phenotype. This indicates normal passage through the developmental cycle with its probable concomitant destruction by lysis of some portion of host cells at the termination of that cycle.

  13. Reduced dose of foscarnet as preemptive therapy for cytomegalovirus infection following reduced-intensity cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narimatsu, H; Kami, M; Kato, D; Matsumura, T; Murashige, N; Kusumi, E; Yuji, K; Hori, A; Shibata, T; Masuoka, K; Wake, A; Miyakoshi, S; Morinaga, S; Taniguchi, S

    2007-03-01

    Although foscarnet is a promising alternative for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, its toxicity can be significant in patients with advanced age. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 123 patients (median age of 55; range, 17-79) who received reduced-intensity cord blood transplantation (RI-CBT). Patients preemptively received reduced-dose foscarnet 30 mg/kg twice daily when CMV antigenemia exceeded 10/50,000. Sixty-three patients developed CMV antigenemia on a median of day 34, and 29 received foscarnet preemptively. The median level of CMV antigenemia at the initiation of foscarnet was 30. Median duration of foscarnet administration was 24 days. Adverse effects included electrolyte abnormalities (n=19), renal impairment (n=13), and skin eruption requiring discontinuation of foscarnet (n=1). Preemptive therapy of foscarnet was completed in 18 patients. Seven patients died during foscarnet use without developing CMV disease. The remaining 3 developed CMV enterocolitis 5, 14, and 17 days after initiation of foscarnet. All of them were successfully treated with ganciclovir or foscarnet. Reduced dose of foscarnet is beneficial to control CMV reactivation following RI-CBT; however, it has considerable toxicities in RI-CBT recipients with advanced age. Further studies are warranted to minimize toxicities and identify optimal dosages.

  14. Successful low-dose leflunomide treatment for ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus infection with high-level antigenemia in a kidney transplant: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shinya; Shinoda, Kazunobu; Tamaki, Satoshi; Kono, Hidaka; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Ken; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-09-01

    Ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus infection is sometimes life-threatening for organ transplant recipients. Foscarnet is an alternative, although it may potentially worsen the preexistent impaired renal function. Here we report the case of a successful low-dose leflunomide treatment in a kidney transplant recipient with very high viral replication, who underwent kidney transplantation 10 years before. Administering 10mg leflunomide daily for 5 months without a loading dose completely cleared the ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus strains.

  15. Immune memory-boosting dose of rapamycin impairs macrophage vesicle acidification and curtails glycolysis in effector CD8 cells, impairing defense against acute infections

    OpenAIRE

    Emily L. Goldberg; Megan J. Smithey; Lutes, Lydia K.; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Direct mTORC1 inhibition by short-term low-dose rapamycin treatment has recently been shown to improve CD8 T cell immunological memory. While these studies focused on memory development, the impact of low-dose rapamycin on the primary immune response, particularly as it relates to functional effector immunity, is far less clear. We investigated the impact of acute rapamycin treatment on immune effector cell function during the primary immune response to several acute infections. We found that...

  16. Chronical cervical infections and dysplasia (CIN I, CIN II): Vaginal vitamin D (high dose) treatment: A new effective method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Uebbing, C; Schlett, S; Craiut, Id; Antal, L; Olah, H

    2014-01-01

    In a small praxis/ambulance study we evaluated data of 200 women with chronical recurrent cervical infections and with a cervix dysplasia (CIN 1, CIN 2). who got after the primary therapy a treatment with vitamin D vaginal suppositories (12.500 IU, 3 nights a week, for 6 weeks). We found that - when compared with the lactobacillus vaginal suppositories - the high dose vitamin D vaginal treatment might be more effective. Vitamin D showed very good anti-inflammatory effects. In the survey after six weeks therapy 79% of the women had "less vaginal problems," "less discharge" and "less problems with the sexual intercourse." Objectively after six weeks therapy only 7% of the patients still had bacterial and/or fungal vaginal infections that required a treatment. We found that vitamin D is reabsorbed by the vaginal mucosa, but the reabsorption may be individually very different. In the CIN 1 group we found six weeks after treatment good antidysplastic effects, in the CIN 2 group we often found no or only temporary antidysplastic effects. So this vaginal vitamin D treatment method might be an option for the therapy and prevention of chronical cervical infections and maybe of a cervic dysplasia CIN 1 (good antiinflammatory effects, antidysplastic effects). This small study is not representative. We need much bigger studies with much more dates and with a longer follow up. Caution: At the moment we do not know, if the vaginal vitamin D treatment with 12500 IE is possible in pregnancy. We have no experience. Therefore we recommend an effective contraception during the application.

  17. Significance of higher drug concentration in erythrocytes of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum and treated orally with mefloquine at single doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yi; Xue, Jian; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Hao-Bing; Xiao, Shu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to understand the pharmacokinetic feature of mefloquine measured by erythrocytes and plasma in Schistosoma japonicum (S. j.)-infected mice and non-infected mice after oral administration of the drug at single doses. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used to measure the plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of mefloquine at varying intervals posttreatment. Our results demonstrated that in non-infected mice treated orally with mefloquine at an ineffective dose of 50 mg/kg or effective dose of 200 mg/kg for 2-72 h, the erythrocyte-to-plasma ratios of mefloquine were 5.8-11.2 or 2-14.2. On the other hand, in S. j.-infected mice treated with the same single doses of the drug, the erythrocyte and plasma drug concentration ratios were 3.1-4.6 or 2.9-8.5, manifesting that either in infected mice or in non-infected mice that received oral mefloquine resulted in higher concentration of mefloquine in erythrocytes than that in plasma. Unexpectedly, under oral administration of mefloquine at a higher single dose of 200 mg/kg, the pharmacokinetic parameter C max values for plasma from S. j.-infected and non-infected mice were 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 μg/mL, respectively, which were below the determined in vitro LC50 (50 % lethal concentration) value of 4.93 μg/mL. Therefore, the plasma concentration of mefloquine may display a little effect against schistosomes during the treatment. Although the values of T 1/2 and AUC0-∞ for erythrocytes were significantly longer and higher in infected mice than those of corresponding non-infect mice that received the same single mefloqine dose of 50 mg/kg, the C max value was only 2.6 ± 0.4 μg/mL lower than the determined in vitro LC50, which may explain why this low single dose is ineffective against schistosomes in vivo. After administration of higher mefloquine dose of 200 mg/kg, the C max value for erythrocytes in infected mice was 30 % (7.4 ± 0

  18. Subnormal and waning immunity to tetanus toxoid in previously vaccinated HIV-infected children and response to booster doses of the vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shahana A; Matin, Fazle

    2013-12-01

    Little is known regarding waning immunity to tetanus toxoid (TT) in HIV-infected children and the need for booster doses before the recommended interval of 5-10 years. Anti-tetanus antibodies were assessed by ELISA in 24 HIV-infected and 24 control children. A protective level (>0.1 IU/ml) of TT antibodies was observed in 62% of HIV-infected children and in 100% of controls. HIV-infected children with five doses had a significantly (p=0.01) lower prevalence of protective immunity compared to controls. Follow-up anti-TT antibody levels in nine HIV-infected children declined from 1.27 to 0.26 IU/ml, but levels did not decline in the seven controls; five of the seven (71%) children with a non-protective level of antibodies responded with a level>0.16 IU/ml following one booster dose of the vaccine. HIV-infected children may need TT boosters before the recommended 5-10 years.

  19. Comparative usefulness of inflammatory markers to indicate bacterial infection-analyzed according to blood culture results and related clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hirokazu; Shirano, Michinori; Kasamatsu, Yu; Morimura, Ayumi; Iida, Ko; Kishi, Tomomi; Goto, Tetsushi; Okamoto, Saki; Ehara, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    To assess relationships of inflammatory markers and 2 related clinical factors with blood culture results, we retrospectively investigated inpatients' blood culture and blood chemistry findings that were recorded from January to December 2014 using electronic medical records and analyzed the data of 852 subjects (426 culture-positive and 426 culture-negative). Results suggested that the risk of positive blood culture statistically increased as inflammatory marker levels and the number of related factors increased. Concerning the effectiveness of inflammatory markers, when the outcome definition was also changed for C-reactive protein (CRP), the odds ratio had a similar value, whereas when the outcome definition of blood culture positivity was used for procalcitonin (PCT), the greatest effectiveness of that was detected. Therefore, the current results suggest that PCT is more useful than CRP as an auxiliary indication of bacterial infection.

  20. Cytomegalovirus reactivation after low-dose steroid treatment for hemolytic anemia in a patient with primary Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troselj-Vukic, Biserka; Milotic, Irena; Milotic, Franko; Crnic-Martinovic, Marija; Grahovac, Blazenka

    2007-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus reactivation is a well described event occurring after intensive therapeutic suppression of the immune function in patients with latent infection. Treatment protocols for suppression of the immune response often include high-dose steroids. However, it is not known whether even a low-dose steroid treatment can reactivate latent cytomegalovirus in otherwise healthy persons. We documented cytomegalovirus reactivation after low-dose steroid treatment for autoimmune hemolytic anemia as a complication of Epstein-Barr virus mononucleosis in an immunocompetent 21-year-old man.

  1. Infection in a rat model reactivates attenuated virulence after long-term axenic culture of Acanthamoeba spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina De Marco Verissimo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged culturing of many microorganisms leads to the loss of virulence and a reduction of their infective capacity. However, little is known about the changes in the pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba after long culture periods. Our study evaluated the effect of prolonged culturing on the invasiveness of different isolates of Acanthamoeba in an in vivo rat model. ATCC strains of Acanthamoeba, isolates from the environment and clinical cases were evaluated. The in vivo model was effective in establishing the infection and differentiating the pathogenicity of the isolates and re-isolates. The amoebae cultured in the laboratory for long periods were less virulent than those that were recently isolated, confirming the importance of passing Acanthamoeba strains in animal models.

  2. Infection in a rat model reactivates attenuated virulence after long-term axenic culture of Acanthamoeba spp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veríssimo, Carolina De Marco; Maschio, Vinícius José; Correa, Ana Paula Folmer; Brandelli, Adriano; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged culturing of many microorganisms leads to the loss of virulence and a reduction of their infective capacity. However, little is known about the changes in the pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba after long culture periods. Our study evaluated the effect of prolonged culturing on the invasiveness of different isolates of Acanthamoeba in an in vivo rat model. ATCC strains of Acanthamoeba, isolates from the environment and clinical cases were evaluated. The in vivo model was effective in establishing the infection and differentiating the pathogenicity of the isolates and re-isolates. The amoebae cultured in the laboratory for long periods were less virulent than those that were recently isolated, confirming the importance of passing Acanthamoeba strains in animal models. PMID:24271042

  3. Clean-voided urine culture in surveying populations for urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switzer, S.

    1959-07-01

    As part of a large-scale epidemiologic survey of A Bomb survivors being conducted by the ABCC in Hiroshima, the feasibility of male and female subjects collecting their own clean-voided specimens was tested. Clean-voided, midstream urine specimens were obtained from 441 ambulant, non-hospital subjects and examined by means of the Gram-stain and quantitative culture technique. Collection was performed by the subjects themselves after appropriate instruction, and this yielded specimens satisfactory for quantitative study. The gram-stain of the urinary sediment proved efficient in presaging true bacilluria. The presence of abundant Gram-negative organisms in a fresh urine sediment may be considered presumptive evidence of a urinary tract infection. Utilizing pre-poured, selective media, it was found that counts exceeding 50,000 to 100,000 col./ml. indicate true bacteriuria and will be confirmed by repeated studies. 9 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Development of Dose-Response Models of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Infection in Nonhuman Primates for Assessing the Risk of Transfusion-Transmitted Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Luisa; Anderson, Steven A.; Asher, David M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Estimates for the risk of transmitting variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) via blood transfusion have relied largely on data from rodent experiments, but the relationship between dose (amount of infected blood) and response (vCJD infection) has never been well quantified. The goal of this study was to develop a dose-response model based on nonhuman primate data to better estimate the likelihood of transfusion-transmitted vCJD (TTvCJD) in humans. Our model used dose-response data from nonhuman primates inoculated intracerebrally (i.c.) with brain tissues of patients with sporadic and familial CJD. We analyzed the data statistically by using a beta-Poisson dose-response model. We further adjusted model parameters to account for the differences in infectivity between blood and brain tissue and in transmission efficiency between intravenous (i.v.) and i.c. routes to estimate dose-dependent TTvCJD infection. The model estimates a mean infection rate of 76% among recipients who receive one unit of whole blood collected from an infected donor near the end of the incubation period. The nonhuman primate model provides estimates that are more consistent with those derived from a risk analysis of transfused nonleukoreduced red blood cells in the United Kingdom than prior estimates based on rodent models. IMPORTANCE TTvCJD was recently identified as one of three emerging infectious diseases posing the greatest immediate threat to the safety of the blood supply. Cases of TTvCJD were reported in recipients of nonleukoreduced red blood cells and coagulation factor VIII manufactured from blood of United Kingdom donors. As the quantity of abnormal prions (the causative agent of TTvCJD) varies significantly in different blood components and products, it is necessary to quantify the dose-response relationship for a wide range of doses for the vCJD agent in transfused blood and plasma derivatives. In this paper, we suggest the first mechanistic dose-response model for

  5. Comparison of outcomes between patients with single versus multiple positive blood cultures for Enterococcus: Infection versus illusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Kimberly C; Zasowski, Evan J; Lagnf, Abdalhamid M; Rybak, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci represent one of the most common causative pathogens of bloodstream infections (BSIs). There is debate in the literature regarding the clinical importance of single versus multiple positive blood cultures for Enterococci. This single-center retrospective study found that patients with multiple positive blood cultures experienced increased inpatient mortality and a shorter median survival. Additionally, BSIs >6.7 days resulted in approximately 20% increased mortality. These results are preliminary and require further exploration.

  6. Parasites infecting the cultured oyster Crassostrea gasar (Adanson, 1757) in Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; Vianna, Rogério Tubino; Vieira, Cairé Barreto; Farias, Natanael Dantas; Da Silva, Patricia Mirella

    2015-05-01

    The oyster Crassostrea gasar is a species widely used as food and a source of income for the local population of the estuaries of Northeast Brazil. Perkinsus marinus and Perkinsus olseni are deleterious parasites for oyster farming and were recently detected in Brazil. In this study, a histopathologic survey of the oyster C. gasar cultured in the estuary of the River Mamanguape (Paraíba State) was performed. Adult oysters were collected in December 2011 and March, May, August and October 2012 and processed for histology and Perkinsus sp. identification by molecular analyses. Histopathological analysis revealed the presence of parasitic organisms including viral gametocytic hypertrophy, prokaryote-like colonies, protozoans (Perkinsus sp. and Nematopsis sp.) and metazoans (Tylocephalum sp. and cestodes). Other commensal organisms were also detected (the protozoan Ancistrocoma sp. and the turbellarian Urastoma sp.). The protozoan parasite Perkinsus sp. had the highest overall prevalence among the symbiotic organisms studied (48.9%), followed by Nematopsis sp. (36.3%). The other organisms were only sporadically observed. Only the protozoan Perkinsus sp. caused alterations in the oysters' infected organs. Molecular analyses confirmed the presence of P. marinus, P. olseni and Perkinsus beihaiensis infecting the oyster C. gasar. This is the first report of P. beihaiensis in this oyster species.

  7. Meganuclease-mediated Inhibition of HSV1 Infection in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Stéphanie; Huot, Nicolas; Mahiet, Charlotte; Arnould, Sylvain; Barradeau, Sébastien; Clerre, Diane Le; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Jacqmarcq, Cécile; Chapellier, Benoît; Ergani, Ayla; Desseaux, Carole; Cédrone, Frédéric; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Pâques, Frédéric; Labetoulle, Marc; Smith, Julianne

    2011-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is a major health problem. As for most viral diseases, current antiviral treatments are based on the inhibition of viral replication once it has already started. As a consequence, they impair neither the viral cycle at its early stages nor the latent form of the virus, and thus cannot be considered as real preventive treatments. Latent HSV1 virus could be addressed by rare cutting endonucleases, such as meganucleases. With the aim of a proof of concept study, we generated several meganucleases recognizing HSV1 sequences, and assessed their antiviral activity in cultured cells. We demonstrate that expression of these proteins in African green monkey kidney fibroblast (COS-7) and BSR cells inhibits infection by HSV1, at low and moderate multiplicities of infection (MOIs), inducing a significant reduction of the viral load. Furthermore, the remaining viral genomes display a high rate of mutation (up to 16%) at the meganuclease cleavage site, consistent with a mechanism of action based on the cleavage of the viral genome. This specific mechanism of action qualifies meganucleases as an alternative class of antiviral agent, with the potential to address replicative as well as latent DNA viral forms.

  8. Rickettsia-like organism infection in a freshwater cultured fish Ophiocephalus argus C.in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qionglin; JIA Weizhang; HAN Xianpu; CAI Taozhen; GONG Xiaoning; SUN Xiaofeng

    2004-01-01

    From 2001 to 2002,a new and emergent infectious disease of Ophiocephalus argus occurred in a fishery in Hubei Province,China,with an incidence of 60%~70% and a mortality as high as 100%.The diseased fish showed an enlarged abdomen,the millet-like nodules in internal organs,and the swollen kidney which was composed of 5~10 sarcoma-like bodies in cream or gray-white colour or ulcerated into beandregs-like substance.Light microscopic observation revealed the basophilic or acidphilic inclusions in cytoplasm of the cells and the granulomas,a diffusive chronic inflammation in internal organs.Further analysis under an electron microscope indicated that the intracytoplasmic inclusions were rickettsia-like organisms (RLOs) that are either spherical or coccoid,with variable size,ranging from 0.5~1.5 μm in diameter,and enclosed within membrane-bound cytoplasmic vacuoles.RLO had a central nucleoid region with some fine filamentous structures and an electron-dense granule.Its cytoplasm contained abundant ribosomal bodies.Occasionally,RLO appeared to be divided by binary fission.RLOs were also observed in the homogenized tissue of infected fish.The results suggested that the death of cultured O.Argus was caused by RLO infection.

  9. Inhibition of alphavirus infection in cell culture and in mice with antisense morpholino oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paessler, Slobodan; Rijnbrand, Rene; Stein, David A; Ni, Haolin; Yun, Nadezhda E; Dziuba, Natallia; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Seregin, Alexey; Ma, Yinghong; Blouch, Robert; Iversen, Patrick L; Zacks, Michele A

    2008-07-05

    The genus Alphavirus contains members that threaten human health, both as natural pathogens and as potential biological weapons. Peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMO) enter cells readily and can inhibit viral replication through sequence-specific steric blockade of viral RNA. Sindbis virus (SINV) has low pathogenicity in humans and is regularly utilized as a model alphavirus. PPMO targeting the 5'-terminal and AUG translation start site regions of the SINV genome blocked the production of infectious SINV in tissue culture. PPMO designed against corresponding regions in Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) were likewise found to be effective in vitro against several strains of VEEV. Mice treated with PPMO before and after VEEV infection were completely protected from lethal outcome while mice receiving only post-infection PPMO treatment were partially protected. Levels of virus in tissue samples correlated with animal survival. Uninfected mice suffered no apparent ill-effects from PPMO treatment. Thus, PPMO appear promising as candidates for therapeutic development against alphaviruses.

  10. Long-term high-physiological-dose growth hormone reduces intra-abdominal fat in HIV-infected patients with a neutral effect on glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Haugaard, S B; Jensen, Frank Krieger;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of long-term high-physiological-dose recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy on fat distribution and glucose metabolism in HIV-infected patients. METHODS: Forty-six HIV-infected Caucasian men on highly active antiretroviral......, glucose tolerance, and total plasma cholesterol and triglycerides did not significantly change during intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Daily 0.7 mg rhGH treatment for 40 weeks reduced abdominal visceral fat and trunk fat mass in HIV-infected patients. This treatment appeared to be safe with respect to glucose...

  11. Diagnosis of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus infection in dairy goats by ELISA, PCR and Viral Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneum, S; Rukkwamsuk, T

    2017-03-01

    For preventive and control strategies of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus (CAEV) infection in dairy goats, performance of the available diagnostic tests was described as one of the most important and necessary aspects. The study aimed at evaluating the diagnostic test performance, including PCR, ELISA and viral culture, for CAEV infection in dairy goats in Thailand. Blood samples of 29 dairy goats from five low- to medium-prevalence herds and one very low-prevalence herd were collected for PCR and ELISA methods. The performance of these two diagnostic methods was evaluated by comparing with cytopathic effects (CPE) in the co-cultivation of CAEV and primary synovial cells. Results indicated that sensitivity, specificity were, respectively, 69.6%, 100%, for PCR; and 95.7%, 83.3% for ELISA. The PCR assay tended to have lower sensitivity and higher specificity than ELISA. When multiple tests were applied, parallel testing provided sensitivity and specificity of 98.7% and 83.3%, while series testing showed sensitivity and specificity of 66.6% and 100% respectively. These results indicated that combination of ELISA and PCR provided some advantages and possibly offered optimal methods to detect CAEV-infected goats. Kappa value of the agreement between PCR and ELISA test was 0.34, indicating fair agreement. Regarding the possibility of antigenic variation between CAEV strains used in both PCR and ELISA assays, the actual circulating CAEV strain should be reviewed in order to develop and enhance the diagnostic tests using the CAE viral antigens derived from specific local strains of Thailand.

  12. First report of Fusarium oxysporum species complex infection in zebrafish culturing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulatunga, D C M; Dananjaya, S H S; Park, B K; Kim, C-H; Lee, J; De Zoysa, M

    2017-04-01

    Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) is a highly diverse fungus. Recently, F. oxysporum infection was identified from zebrafish (Danio rerio) culturing system in Korea. Initially, a rapid whitish smudge was appeared in the water with the fungal blooming on walls of fish tanks. Microscopic studies were conducted on fungal hyphae, colony pigmentation and chlamydospore formation and the presence of macro- and microspores confirmed that the isolated fungus as F. oxysporum. Furthermore, isolated F. oxysporum was confirmed by internal transcribed spacer sequencing which matched (100%) to nine F. oxysporum sequences available in GenBank. Experimental hypodermic injection of F. oxysporum into adult zebrafish showed the development of fungal mycelium and pathogenicity similar to signs observed. Histopathologic results revealed a presence of F. oxysporum hyphae in zebrafish muscle. Fusarium oxysporum growth was increased with sea salt in a concentration-dependent manner. Antifungal susceptibility results revealed that F. oxysporum is resistant to copper sulphate (up to 200 μg mL(-1) ) and sensitive to nystatin (up to 40 μg mL(-1) ). This is the first report of FOSC from zebrafish culture system, suggesting it appears as an emerging pathogen, thus posing a significant risk on zebrafish facilities in the world. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Bacillus cereus from blood cultures: virulence genes, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors for blood stream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Toshinobu; Notake, Shigeyuki; Tamai, Kiyoko; Yanagisawa, Hideji

    2011-11-01

    We characterized the profiles of virulence genes and antimicrobial susceptibility of Bacillus cereus isolates from blood cultures as well as the risk factors for blood stream infections (BSIs). The diversity of virulence gene patterns was found to be wide among 15 B. cereus isolates from BSIs and also among 11 isolates from contaminated blood cultures. The MicroScan broth microdilution method yielded results corresponding with those of the agar dilution (reference) method for levofloxacin, linezolid, and vancomycin, while the Etest results were consistent with the reference results for clindamycin, gentamicin, imipenem, levofloxacin, and linezolid. Compared with the reference values, however, some isolates showed marked differences of the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for ampicillin and clindamycin when determined using the MicroScan method, or the MICs for ampicillin, meropenem, and vancomycin when determined using the Etest method. Significantly more patients were treated with antimicrobials for more than 3 days during the 3-month period before isolation in the BSI group. Prior antimicrobial therapy may be a risk factor for BSIs due to B. cereus.

  14. [Infection progress of arbuscular mycorrhizae on tissue-cultured plantlets of Pinellia ternata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xuelian; Guo, Qiaosheng; Liu, Zuoyi; Zhu, Guosheng; Liu, Yongxiang

    2011-01-01

    To study the Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) formation progress and infection characteristics between tissue culture plantlets of Pinellia ternata and Glomus mosseae. The tissue culture plantlets of P. ternata were inoculated with G. mosseae, the formation of AM were sampled and observed with microscopy by staining. The hyphae of G. mosseae began to penetrate the root epidermis after 10 days of inoculation. Lots of intracellular hyphae formed in cortex cells at the 15th day. Arbuscules started to form and there were some hyphae on the root at the 20th day. At the 25th day, many arbuscules formed and most as Arum type. Some arbuscles started to disintegrate at the 30th day, and a few of vesicles occurred. Lots of spores formed after 35 days. At the 40th day, some vesicles began to decline. The hand section showed that the intercellular hyphae gradually formed in intercellular space, and the hyphae branched in cortex cells and occupied most cell lumen finally. It is expounded that P. ternata and G. mosseae could recognize each other quickly and form a symbiont system.

  15. Vertebral infection with Candida albicans failing caspofungin and fluconazole combination therapy but successfully treated with high dose liposomal amphotericin B and flucytosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Storm

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A patient with Candida spondylitis failed two weeks of fluconazole combined with caspofungin, and the infection relapsed despite six weeks of liposomal amphotericin B followed by two months of fluconazole. Six months therapy with high dose liposomal amphotericin B combined with flucytosine effectively cured the patient.

  16. Randomized Trial Evaluating the Impact of Ribavirin Mono-Therapy and Double Dosing on Viral Kinetics, Ribavirin Pharmacokinetics and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldenström, Jesper; Westin, Johan; Nyström, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard-of-care (...

  17. Low-dose gamma irradiation following hot Water immersion of Papaya (Carica Papaya linn.) fruits provides additional control of postharvest fungal infection to extend shelf life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, M.H.A.; Grout, Brian William Wilson; Continella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose gamma irradiation (0.08 kGy over 10 min), a level significantly below that required to satisfy the majority of international quarantine regulations, has been employed to provide a significant reduction in visible fungal infection on papaya fruit surfaces. This is appropriate for local...

  18. A randomized, single-ascending-dose, ivermectin-controlled, double-blind study of moxidectin in Onchocerca volvulus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwablah Awadzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Control of onchocerciasis as a public health problem in Africa relies on annual mass ivermectin distribution. New tools are needed to achieve elimination of infection. This study determined in a small number of Onchocerca volvulus infected individuals whether moxidectin, a veterinary anthelminthic, is safe enough to administer it in a future large study to further characterize moxidectin's safety and efficacy. Effects on the parasite were also assessed.Men and women from a forest area in South-eastern Ghana without ivermectin mass distribution received a single oral dose of 2 mg (N = 44, 4 mg (N = 45 or 8 mg (N = 38 moxidectin or 150 µg/kg ivermectin (N = 45 with 18 months follow up. All ivermectin and 97%-100% of moxidectin treated participants had Mazzotti reactions. Statistically significantly higher percentages of participants treated with 8 mg moxidectin than participants treated with ivermectin experienced pruritus (87% vs. 56%, rash (63% vs. 42%, increased pulse rate (61% vs. 36% and decreased mean arterial pressure upon 2 minutes standing still after ≥5 minutes supine relative to pre-treatment (61% vs. 27%. These reactions resolved without treatment. In the 8 mg moxidectin and ivermectin arms, the mean±SD number of microfilariae/mg skin were 22.9±21.1 and 21.2±16.4 pre-treatment and 0.0±0.0 and 1.1±4.2 at nadir reached 1 and 3 months after treatment, respectively. At 6 months, values were 0.0±0.0 and 1.6±4.5, at 12 months 0.4±0.9 and 3.4±4.4 and at 18 months 1.8±3.3 and 4.0±4.8, respectively, in the 8 mg moxidectin and ivermectin arm. The reduction from pre-treatment values was significantly higher after 8 mg moxidectin than after ivermectin treatment throughout follow up (p<0.01.The 8 mg dose of moxidectin was safe enough to initiate the large study. Provided its results confirm those from this study, availability of moxidectin to control programmes could help them achieve onchocerciasis elimination

  19. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L; Koenning, Stephen R; Davis, Eric L; Opperman, Charles H; Lommel, Steven A; Mitchum, Melissa G; Sit, Tim L

    2017-01-01

    Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines) from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC) and Missouri (MO). The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2), and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO). Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst) and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst), but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation.

  20. Evaluation of Real-time PCR and Pyrosequencing for Screening Incubating Blood Culture Bottles from Adults with Suspected Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Chase D.; Moore, Miranda S.; May, Larissa S.; McCarroll, Matthew; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular platforms can identify bacteria associated with bloodstream infections, but require positive culture bottles as starting material. Here we describe results of screening 1140 blood cultures at 8 hours post-inoculation, from 918 eligible adults being evaluated for bloodstream infection. DNA was extracted and analyzed by 16S and/or 23S rRNA real-time PCR/Pyrosequencing. Compared to culture, PCR/Pyrosequencing displayed 90.9% sensitivity, 99.6% specificity, 95.7% PPV, and 99.1% NPV. Overall concordance rate was 98.9% (1127/1140). In four cases with molecular-positive/culture-negative results, medical chart reviews provided evidence of identical bacteria from subsequent blood or concomitant urine/sputum cultures. Nine culture-positive/molecular-negative cases were associated with either polymicrobial growth, grew only in the anaerobic bottle of the clinical pair, and/or were detected by PCR/Pyrosequencing after 8 hours. In summary, this approach accurately detected and identified bacteria in ~91% of culture-confirmed cases significantly sooner than the phenotypic identification was available, having the potential to improve antibiotic stewardship. PMID:25534615

  1. Evaluation of real-time PCR and pyrosequencing for screening incubating blood culture bottles from adults with suspected bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Chase D; Moore, Miranda S; May, Larissa S; McCarroll, Matthew G; Jordan, Jeanne A

    2015-03-01

    Several molecular platforms can identify bacteria associated with bloodstream infections but require positive culture bottles as starting material. Here, we describe results of screening 1140 blood cultures at 8h postinoculation, from 918 eligible adults being evaluated for bloodstream infection. DNA was extracted and analyzed by 16S and/or 23S rRNA real-time PCR/pyrosequencing. Compared to culture, PCR/pyrosequencing displayed 90.9% sensitivity, 99.6% specificity, 95.7% positive predictive value, and 99.1% negative predictive value. Overall concordance rate was 98.9% (1127/1140). In 4 cases with molecular-positive/culture-negative results, medical chart reviews provided evidence of identical bacteria from subsequent blood or concomitant urine/sputum cultures. Nine culture-positive/molecular-negative cases were associated with either polymicrobial growth, grew only in the anaerobic bottle of the clinical pair, and/or were detected by PCR/pyrosequencing after 8h. In summary, this approach accurately detected and identified bacteria in ~91% of culture-confirmed cases significantly sooner than the phenotypic identification was available, having the potential to improve antibiotic stewardship.

  2. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this in...

  3. Bacteroides fragilis in biopsies of patients with major abscesses and diabetic foot infections: direct molecular versus culture-based detection

    OpenAIRE

    Stappers, Mark H. T.; Hagen, Ferry; Reimnitz, Peter; Mouton, Johan W.; Meis, Jacques F.; Gyssens, Inge C

    2016-01-01

    Direct determination by pathogen-specific real-time PCR assay for Bacteroides fragilis was compared to culture in major abscess and diabetic foot infection biopsy samples. Real-time PCR resulted in an increased detection rate of 12% for B. fragilis and could improve the detection of B. fragilis in clinical samples. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnostic Approach to Ocular Infections Using Various Techniques From Conventional Culture to Next-Generation Sequencing Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Hiroshi; Hotta, Fumika; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Imaohji, Haruyuki; Miyazaki, Chika; Hirose, Miou; Kusaka, Shunji; Fukuda, Masahiko; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2017-09-11

    Ocular infection is caused by both endogenous (resident) and exogenous (environmental) microbes. As the ocular surface interacts with both outer environment and its own resident microbiota, clinical ocular samples are predicted to contain a diverse set of microorganisms. Microscopy of sample smears is an important step in the diagnostic process of infectious diseases to interpret the culture results. Traditional culture techniques have several limitations in the detection and/or identification of uncharacterized bacteria of environmental origin. Molecular biological techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction of pathogen-specific virulence genes, 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, and next-generation sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons, compensate for diagnostic culture techniques in diagnosing infectious diseases. These techniques are expected to provide novel insights into the ocular microbiota and pathology of ocular infections. In this article, we describe various ocular infections, including contact lens-related keratitis, silicone buckle infection, and dacryocystitis, which were analyzed using molecular biological techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of these highly sensitive and inclusive microbiological detection systems for ocular infections are discussed.

  5. Point-Counterpoint: Reflex Cultures Reduce Laboratory Workload and Improve Antimicrobial Stewardship in Patients Suspected of Having Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent and lead to a large number of clinical encounters. A common management strategy for patients suspected of having a urinary tract infection is to test for pyuria and bacteria by urine analysis (UA) of midstream urine, with initiation of antibiotic therapy and urine culture if one or both tests are positive. Although this practice was first used in an outpatient setting with midstream urine samples, some institutions allow its use in the management of catheterized patients. The ideas behind the reflex urine culture are to limit laboratory workload by not performing culture on negative specimens and to improve antimicrobial stewardship by not giving antimicrobials to patients with negative UA results. The questions are, first, whether reflex urine culture reduces workloads significantly and, second, whether it improves antimicrobial stewardship in the era of increasing numbers of urinary tract infections due to extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli. Romney Humphries from UCLA supports the idea that reflex urine cultures are of value and describes what reflex parameters are most useful, while Jennifer Dien Bard of Children's Hospital Los Angeles discusses their limitations. PMID:26659213

  6. Point-Counterpoint: Reflex Cultures Reduce Laboratory Workload and Improve Antimicrobial Stewardship in Patients Suspected of Having Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Romney M; Dien Bard, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent and lead to a large number of clinical encounters. A common management strategy for patients suspected of having a urinary tract infection is to test for pyuria and bacteria by urine analysis (UA) of midstream urine, with initiation of antibiotic therapy and urine culture if one or both tests are positive. Although this practice was first used in an outpatient setting with midstream urine samples, some institutions allow its use in the management of catheterized patients. The ideas behind the reflex urine culture are to limit laboratory workload by not performing culture on negative specimens and to improve antimicrobial stewardship by not giving antimicrobials to patients with negative UA results. The questions are, first, whether reflex urine culture reduces workloads significantly and, second, whether it improves antimicrobial stewardship in the era of increasing numbers of urinary tract infections due to extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli. Romney Humphries from UCLA supports the idea that reflex urine cultures are of value and describes what reflex parameters are most useful, while Jennifer Dien Bard of Children's Hospital Los Angeles discusses their limitations. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Effect of Linezolid on the 50% Lethal Dose and 50% Protective Dose in Treatment of Infections by Gram-Negative Pathogens in Naive and Immunosuppressed Mice and on the Efficacy of Ciprofloxacin in an Acute Murine Model of Septicemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Andrea; Lamb, Lucinda; Medina, Ivette; George, David; Gibson, Glenn; Hardink, Joel; Rugg, Jady; Van Deusen, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Murine models of infection were used to study the effect of linezolid on the virulence of Gram-negative bacteria and to assess potential pharmacodynamic interactions with ciprofloxacin in the treatment of these infections, prompted by observations from a recent clinical trial. Naive and immunosuppressed mice were challenged with Klebsiella pneumoniae 53A1109, K. pneumoniae GC6658, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa UC12120 in acute sepsis and pulmonary infection models, using different serial dilutions of these pathogens (groups of 8 animals each). Linezolid (100 mg/kg/dose) was administered orally at 0.5 and 4.0 h postchallenge in the sepsis model and at 4 h postchallenge followed by 2 days of twice-daily treatment in the pulmonary model. Further, ciprofloxacin alone and in combination with oral linezolid was investigated in the sepsis model. Survival was assessed for 4 and 10 days postchallenge in the systemic and respiratory models, respectively. The data were fitted to a nonlinear regression analysis to determine 50% lethal doses (LD50s) and 50% protective doses (PD50s). A clinically relevant, high-dose regimen of linezolid had no significant effect on LD50 in these models. This lack of effect was independent of immune status. A combination of oral ciprofloxacin with linezolid yielded lower PD50s than oral ciprofloxacin alone (ciprofloxacin in combination, 8.4 to 32.7 mg/kg; oral ciprofloxacin, 39.4 to 88.3 mg/kg). Linezolid did not improve the efficacy of subcutaneous ciprofloxacin (ciprofloxacin in combination, 2.0 to 2.4 mg/kg; subcutaneous ciprofloxacin, 2.0 to 2.8 mg/kg). In conclusion, linezolid does not seem to potentiate infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens or to interact antagonistically with ciprofloxacin. PMID:22710118

  8. Impact and cost-effectiveness of culture for diagnosis of tuberculosis in HIV-infected Brazilian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Dowdy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis currently represents the closest "gold standard" for diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB, but operational data are scant on the impact and cost-effectiveness of TB culture for human immunodeficiency (HIV- infected individuals in resource-limited settings. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded costs, laboratory results, and dates of initiating TB therapy in a centralized TB culture program for HIV-infected patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, constructing a decision-analysis model to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of TB culture from the perspective of a public-sector TB control program. Of 217 TB suspects presenting between January 2006 and March 2008, 33 (15% had culture-confirmed active tuberculosis; 23 (70% were smear-negative. Among smear-negative, culture-positive patients, 6 (26% began TB therapy before culture results were available, 11 (48% began TB therapy after culture result availability, and 6 (26% did not begin TB therapy within 180 days of presentation. The cost per negative culture was US$17.52 (solid media-$23.50 (liquid media. Per 1,000 TB suspects and compared with smear alone, TB culture with solid media would avert an estimated eight TB deaths (95% simulation interval [SI]: 4, 15 and 37 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs (95% SI: 13, 76, at a cost of $36 (95% SI: $25, $50 per TB suspect or $962 (95% SI: $469, $2642 per DALY averted. Replacing solid media with automated liquid culture would avert one further death (95% SI: -1, 4 and eight DALYs (95% SI: -4, 23 at $2751 per DALY (95% SI: $680, dominated. The cost-effectiveness of TB culture was more sensitive to characteristics of the existing TB diagnostic system than to the accuracy or cost of TB culture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: TB culture is potentially effective and cost-effective for HIV-positive patients in resource-constrained settings. Reliable transmission of culture results to patients and integration

  9. Culture confirmation of gonococcal infection by recall of subjects found to be positive by nucleic acid amplification tests in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate a routine notification of general practitioners to recall nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-positive subjects for culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to confirm gonococcal infection in the community.......To evaluate a routine notification of general practitioners to recall nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-positive subjects for culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to confirm gonococcal infection in the community....

  10. Immune modulating effects of NKT cells in a physiologically low dose Leishmania major infection model after αGalCer analog PBS57 stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G Griewank

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection affecting ∼12 million people worldwide, mostly in developing countries. Treatment options are limited and no effective vaccines exist to date. Natural Killer T (NKT cells are a conserved innate-like lymphocyte population with immunomodulating effects in various settings. A number of reports state a role of NKT cells in different models of Leishmania infection. Here, we investigated the effect of NKT cells in a physiologically relevant, intradermal low dose infection model. After inoculation of 103 infectious-stage L. major, comparable numbers of skin-immigrating NKT cells in both susceptible BALB/c mice and resistant C57BL/6 mice were noted. Compared to their wild type counterparts, NKT cell-deficient mice on a C57BL/6 background were better able to contain infection with L. major and showed decreased IL-4 production in cytokine analysis performed 5 and 8 weeks after infection. Low doses of the NKT cell stimulating αGalCer analog PBS57 applied at the time of infection led to disease exacerbation in C57BL/6 wild-type, but not NKT-deficient mice. The effect was dependent both on the timing and amount of PBS57 administered. The effect of NKT cell stimulation by PBS57 proved to be IL-4 dependent, as it was neutralized in IL-4-deficient C57BL/6 or anti-IL-4 antibody-treated wild-type mice. In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, administration of PBS57 in susceptible BALB/c mice resulted in an improved course of disease. Our results reveal a strain- and cytokine-dependent regulatory role of NKT cells in the development of immunity to low dose L. major infections. These effects, probably masked in previous studies using higher parasite inocula, should be considered in future therapy and immunization approaches.

  11. [Rabies Tissue Culture Infection Test as an Alternative for the Mouse Inoculation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, R.; Hörnlimann, B.; Wandeler, A. I.; Kappeler, A.; Kipfer, R.; Peterhans, E.

    1990-01-01

    Rabies has disappeared from large parts of Switzerland. Due to systematic oral fox-vaccination campaings that started in 1987, cases of rabies in wild and domestic animals have been confined to the western frontier with France in the last three years. Nevertheless, some cases of severe exposition of man by rabid or rabies-suspect animals still occur. Rabies can be diagnosed in brain smears of infected animals with high specificity and sensitivity by a direct immunofluorescence method. According to WHO recommendations, negative results are to be confirmed in cases of a human exposition by intracerebral inoculation of brain suspensions in three-weeks-old mice. This method has an excellent sensitivity and is able to detect false-negative results in immunofluorescence, which occur in a very small percentage (0.043%). The disadvantage of this confirmatory assay is the sacrification of relatively high numbers of mice (in the Swiss rabies center about 1,300 animals each year), and the long time required for a final diagnosis: 7-20 days in positive, 21 days in negative cases. The cultivation of virus from brain suspensions on a mouse neuroblastoma cell line is a tempting alternative to the mouse inoculation test. This method usually provides a conclusive diagnosis within a few days. However, in our hands it showed in preliminary experiments an unsatisfactory sensitivity (80.7%). The necessity to carry out strict reproducibility controls in this assay has to be emphasized. Further work must be invested in the improvement of the rabies tissue culture infection test and a careful long-term comparison with the mouse inoculation test will be necessary before the mouse inoculation test can be replaced.

  12. Interaction between Helicobacter pylori infection, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or low-dose aspirin use: old question new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostres, Carlos; Gargallo, Carla Jerusalen; Lanas, Angel

    2014-07-28

    Previous reports clearly demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) or low dose aspirin (ASA) use significantly and independently increased the risk for the development of peptic ulcer disease. Today, the presence of H. pylori infection associated with low dose ASA and/or NSAID use in the same patient is becoming more frequent and therefore the potential interaction between these factors and the consequences of it has important implications. Whether NSAID intake in the presence of H. pylori infection may further increase the risk of peptic ulcer carried by the presence of only one risk factor is still a matter of debate. Studies on the interaction between the two risk factors yielded conflicting data and no consensus has been reached in the last years. In addition, the interaction between H. pylori infection and low-dose ASA remains even more controversial. In real clinical practice, we can find different clinical scenarios involving these three factors associated with the presence of different gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risk factors. These huge variety of possible combinations greatly hinder the decision making process of physicians.

  13. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  14. First report on White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV infection in white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Crustacea, Penaeidae under semi intensive culture condition in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunalan Balakrishnan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Scientific shrimp culture began in India in the late eighties along the east coast particularly inAndrapradesh and Tamilnadu. Continuous success of shrimp culture was affected by mass mortalities ofcultured shrimp in 1994. Thereafter disease infection on survival and production of shrimps get itsimportance in culture. The present study is the first report on WSSV (white spot syndrome virusinfection in cultured Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 in India. WSSV infection was observed on 70thdays of culture due to cross contamination of white spot infected shrimp from the neighboring farmbecause of birds. Due to this infection within two days the mortality ratio has gone up to 25% in pond 1and 12% in pond 2. So this present study strongly recommends to every shrimp farmers to go for birdfencing & crab fencing to avoid horizontal contamination, before stocking the good quality seed, thenthey will have the risk free WSSV culture.

  15. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation is a requisite for modulation of skin-homing markers on regulatory T cells in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Ai-Leng; Koenen, Hans J P M; Michels, Meta; Ooms, Sharon; Bosch, Marjolein; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Irma; van der Ven, André J A M

    2013-02-01

    Vitamin D(3) is known to have an effect on the immune function. We investigated the immunomodulatory capability of vitamin D(3) in HIV-infected patients and studied the expression of chemokine receptors on regulatory T cells (Treg). Vitamin D(3)-deficient HIV-1-seropositive subjects were treated with cholecalciferol (vitamin D(3)) at a dose of 800 IU daily for 3 months (n=9) or 25,000 IU weekly for 2 months (n=7). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and analyzed for skin-homing (CCR4 and CCR10) and gut-homing (CCR9 and integrin α(4)β(7)) marker expression on Treg, by flow cytometry, before and after supplementation. Serum 25(OH)D(3) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were determined at baseline and after the treatment period. Weekly doses of 25,000 IU cholecalciferol effectively achieved the optimal target serum 25(OH)D(3) concentration of >75 nmol/liter (30 ng/ml) in HIV-infected patients. High-dose cholecalciferol supplementation differentially influenced skin-homing markers on Treg with an increased level of CCR10 expression and while a reduction in CCR4 expression level was observed together with a lower percentage of Treg expressing CCR4. For both dosing regimens, there were no significant differences in the expression of gut-homing markers, CCR9, and integrin α(4)β(7). High-dose vitamin D(3) supplementation is needed to reverse vitamin D(3) deficiency in HIV-infected individuals and this results in modulation of skin-homing markers but not gut-homing markers expression on Treg. At a standard dose of 800 IU/day, vitamin D(3) is not effective in achieving an optimal 25(OH)D(3) concentration in patients with an underlying T cell dysfunction and is unable to exert any immunomodulatory effects.

  16. [Infective endocarditis in intensive cardiac care unit - clinical and biochemical differences of blood-culture negative infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaziród-Wolski, Karol; Sielski, Janusz; Ciuraszkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-01-23

    Diagnosis and treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) is still a challenge for physicians. Group of patients with the worst prognosis is treated in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU). Etiologic agent can not be identified in a substantial number of patients.

  17. Association between Bartonella species infection and disease in pet cats as determined using serology and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Jane E; Westropp, Joellen L; Kasten, Rick W; Chomel, Bruno B

    2010-08-01

    This study's objective was to determine whether a relationship exists between infection or seropositivity to Bartonella species and clinical illness in cats. Blood samples were obtained for Bartonella species isolation and immunofluorescent antibody serology from 298 cats presenting to a tertiary referral hospital. Medical records were searched and the history, physical examination findings and the results of diagnostic testing relating to the visit at which Bartonella species testing was performed were recorded. Fifty-two (17%) samples were seropositive for Bartonella henselae, four (1%) for Bartonella clarridgeiae, and 57 (19%) for both organisms. Nineteen (6.4%) samples were culture positive, 17 for B henselae and two for B clarridgeiae. Gingivostomatitis was associated with Bartonella species isolation (P=0.001), but not seropositivity. There was no association with uveitis, neurologic signs, or chronic kidney disease, and a weak association between seropositivity and idiopathic lower urinary tract disease (feline interstitial cystitis) (P=0.05). Copyright 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exophiala xenobiotica infection in cultured striped jack, Pseudocaranx dentex (Bloch & Schneider), in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchan, C; Kurata, O; Wada, S; Hatai, K; Sano, A; Kamei, K; Nakaoka, N

    2009-10-01

    This report describes Exophiala infection in cultured striped jack, Pseudocaranx dentex, in Japan in 2005. One hundred out of 35,000 fish died per day and mortalities continued for 1 month. Diseased fish showed swelling of the abdomen and kidney distension. Numerous septate hyphae, pale brown in colour, were seen in kidney in squash preparations. Histology revealed abundant fungal hyphae and conidia in gill, heart and kidney. Fungal hyphae were accompanied by cell necrosis and influx of inflammatory, mainly mononuclear cells. The fungus isolated from the diseased fish had septate hyphae, pale brown in colour and 1.8-3.0 microm in diameter. Conidiogenous cells were conspicuous annellides, short or cylindrical or fusiform in shape. Conidia were one-celled, ellipsoidal with smooth walls, accumulated in balls at the apices of annellides that tended to slide down, 1.5-2.0 microm in width and 3.0-5.0 microm in length. The fungus was classified into the genus Exophiala based on its morphology and as Exophiala xenobiotica based on the sequences of the ITS 1-5.8S-ITS 2 regions of rDNA. This is the first record of this fungus in a marine fish.

  19. Endotracheal tube tip culture in post-operative respiratory infections in open heart surgery patients: a one year prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Mouli HC

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory tract infections are a common occurrence after open heart surgery, leading to prolonged hospital stay, morbidity and costing the hospital exchequer. This study was conducted to study the utility of postextubation endotracheal tube [ET] tip culture in providing an early-basis for starting evidence-based antibiotic therapy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the case records of 172 patients who had undergone heart surgery at our tertiary care teaching hospital for occurrence of post-operative infections from clinical and microbiological data. Results: Bacterial culture was positive in 67(39% patients. Endotracheal tube patients, grew organisms that were sensitive to empirical antibiotic therapy, in 39 (58% patients. In 28 (42% patients organisms resistant to empirical therapy were grown; only 14 of the 28 patients (50% were symptomatic. Staphylococcus was the most common organism isolated followed by Acinetobacter and Enterobacter. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested. Resistance was high among Acinetobacter sp. All the Gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to tigecycline. Resistance for beta-lactam antibiotics ranged from 35%-66% with imipenem being the most effective antibiotic. Conclusion: Our observations provide useful information regarding the microbiology of respiratory infection occurring in post-operative patients who had undergone open-heart surgery. Post-extubation endotracheal tip culture appears to be a useful tool for reliable and accurate diagnosis and treatment of these infections.

  20. Broad-range PCR as a supplement to culture for detection of bacterial pathogens in patients with a clinically diagnosed spinal infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuursted, K.; Arpi, M.; Lindblad, B.E.

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate broad-range PCR and subsequent sequencing compared to conventional culture in the diagnosis of spinal infection. The method was a prospective study of all patients admitted to Aarhus University Hospital for surgery during a 12-months period with a clinically diagnosed infection...... allowed for a microbiological diagnosis in 72% of patients (13/18). A positive culture was found only in patients treated compared to PCR. However, PCR and culture result were equally negatively affected by duration of treatment. The combination of culture and broad-range PCR...... (clinically diagnosed spinal infections=18; non-infectious diseases=20). The specificity was excellent for both culture and PCR (95% and 100%, respectively). A true culture positive result was obtained in 50% of patients (9/18) and 61% was positive (11/18) by broad-range PCR. When combined, culture and PCR...

  1. Patent infections of Ascaris suum in pigs: effect of previous exposure to multiple, high doses of eggs and various treatment regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz, M; Jonas, W; Froe, D L

    1992-08-01

    Fifty-four crossbred, 4-week-old pigs divided into nine equal groups were used to test whether multiple inoculations with high numbers of A. suum eggs with or without anthelmintic would result in patent infections. All pigs exposed to multiple prechallenge inoculations of 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10,000 and 20,000 and challenged orally 2 weeks later with 10,000 eggs harboured adult worms. When prechallenge infections were removed by pyrantel tartrate treatment the animals were more susceptible to challenge than controls not previously exposed to infections. The same drug used from 2 days before until 10 days after the last prechallenge infection eliminated that effect. Pigs subjected to the same multiple egg dosing regimen but given feed containing fenbendazole immediately before, during and for 10 days after multiple dosing developed significantly more adult intestinal worms after challenge than any other group. These worms were, however, significantly shorter than those that developed in any group of pigs. Adult worms from all these groups produced eggs that after embryonation were infective to mice.

  2. Evaluation of the suitability of six host genes as internal control in real-time RT-PCR assays in chicken embryo cell cultures infected with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Bang, Dang Duong; Handberg, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    -time RT-PCR is needed to a suitable internal control. We thus investigated the expression pattern of six chicken genes, including P-actin, 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, glyceral dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and beta-2-microglobulin, in chicken embryo (CE) cell cultures...... and GAPDH had a lower expression level in CE cell cultures. Also, beta-actin showed no significant variation in both normalized and non-normalized assays and virus dose-independent of inoculation, while other genes did. beta-Actin was further successfully used as an internal control to quantitate Bursine-2...... virus-specific RNA load in CE cell cultures. Thus, beta-actin was suggested as a suitable internal control in studying gene expression as well as virus-specific RNA load in CE cell after IBDV infection....

  3. Susceptibility of human lymphoid tissue cultured ex vivo to xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Curriu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was generated after a recombination event between two endogenous murine leukemia viruses during the production of a prostate cancer cell line. Although the associations of the XMRV infection with human diseases appear unlikely, the XMRV is a retrovirus of undefined pathogenic potential, able to replicate in human cells in vitro. Since recent studies using animal models for infection have yielded conflicting results, we set out an ex vivo model for XMRV infection of human tonsillar tissue to determine whether XMRV produced by 22Rv1 cells is able to replicate in human lymphoid organs. Tonsil blocks were infected and infection kinetics and its pathogenic effects were monitored RESULTS: XMRV, though restricted by APOBEC, enters and integrates into the tissue cells. The infection did not result in changes of T or B-cells, immune activation, nor inflammatory chemokines. Infectious viruses could be recovered from supernatants of infected tonsils by reinfecting DERSE XMRV indicator cell line, although these supernatants could not establish a new infection in fresh tonsil culture, indicating that in our model, the viral replication is controlled by innate antiviral restriction factors. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the replication-competent retrovirus XMRV, present in a high number of laboratories, is able to infect human lymphoid tissue and produce infectious viruses, even though they were unable to establish a new infection in fresh tonsillar tissue. Hereby, laboratories working with cell lines producing XMRV should have knowledge and understanding of the potential biological biohazardous risks of this virus.

  4. Randomized, placebo-controlled, single-ascending-dose study of BMS-791325, a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase inhibitor, in HCV genotype 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Karen D; Lemm, Julie; Eley, Timothy; Liu, Menping; Berglind, Anna; Sherman, Diane; Lawitz, Eric; Vutikullird, Apinya B; Tebas, Pablo; Gao, Min; Pasquinelli, Claudio; Grasela, Dennis M

    2014-06-01

    BMS-791325 is a nonnucleoside inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase with low-nanomolar potency against genotypes 1a (50% effective concentration [EC50], 3 nM) and 1b (EC50, 7 nM) in vitro. BMS-791325 safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral activity were evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-ascending-dose study in 24 patients (interferon naive and experienced) with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection, randomized (5:1) to receive a single dose of BMS-791325 (100, 300, 600, or 900 mg) or placebo. The prevalence and phenotype of HCV variants at baseline and specific posttreatment time points were assessed. Antiviral activity was observed in all cohorts, with a mean HCV RNA decline of ≈2.5 log10 copies/ml observed 24 h after a single 300-mg dose. Mean plasma half-life among cohorts was 7 to 9 h; individual 24-hour levels exceeded the protein-adjusted EC90 for genotype 1 at all doses. BMS-791325 was generally well tolerated, with no serious adverse events or discontinuations. Enrichment for resistance variants was not observed at 100 to 600 mg. At 900 mg, variants (P495L/S) associated with BMS-791325 resistance in vitro were transiently observed in one patient, concurrent with an observed HCV RNA decline of 3.4 log10 IU/ml, but were replaced with wild type by 48 h. Single doses of BMS-791325 were well tolerated; demonstrated rapid, substantial, and exposure-related antiviral activity; displayed dose-related increases in exposure; and showed viral kinetic and pharmacokinetic profiles supportive of once- or twice-daily dosing. These results support its further development in combination with other direct-acting antivirals for HCV genotype 1 infection. (This trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00664625.).

  5. Use of PCR and culture to detect Helicobacter pylori in naturally infected cats following triple antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, S E; Yan, L L; Shen, Z; Hayward, A; Murphy, J C; Fox, J G

    1996-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes gastritis and peptic ulcers and is linked to gastric cancer. Domestic cats from a commercial source were found to be naturally infected with H. pylori, and studies were undertaken to eradicate H. pylori from infected cats by using triple antimicrobial therapy. Eight cats infected with H. pylori were used in the study. Six cats received a 21-day course of oral amoxicillin, metronidazole, and omeprazole, and two cats served as controls. Two weeks and 4 weeks posttreatment (p.t.), all six treated cats were negative at several sites (saliva, gastric juice, and gastric mucosa) for H. pylori by culture. However, as determined by PCR with primers specific for the 26-kDa product, the majority of cats at 2 and 4 weeks p.t. had gastric fluid samples which were positive for H. pylori and three of three cats at 2 weeks p.t. had dental plaque which was positive for H. pylori. At 6 weeks p.t., all six cats had H. pylori-negative cultures for samples from several gastric sites taken at necropsy, and only one cat had H. pylori cultured from gastric juice. PCR analysis revealed that five of six cats had H. pylori DNA amplification products from plaque, saliva, and/or gastric fluid samples. Negative bacterial cultures for cats for which there was demonstrable PCR amplification of H. pylori DNA may reflect the inability of in vitro culture techniques to isolate small numbers of H. pylori organisms, focal colonization at sites not cultured, or a failure of the antibiotics to successfully eradicate H. pylori from extragastric sites which allowed subsequent recolonization of the stomach after cessation of therapy. Alternatively, the treatment strategy may have induced in vivo viable but nonculturable coccoid forms of H. pylori. The H. pylori cat model should allow further studies to test these hypotheses as well as the efficacies of other combined therapeutic regimens. Also, because 100% of these cats were naturally infected with H.pylori, this model should

  6. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals the Dose- and Time-Dependent Effect of Primary Human Airway Epithelium Tissue Culture After Exposure to Cigarette Smoke In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    To establish a relevant in vitro model for systems toxicology-based mechanistic assessment of environmental stressors such as cigarette smoke (CS), we exposed human organotypic bronchial epithelial tissue cultures at the air liquid interface (ALI) to various CS doses. Previously, we compared in vitro gene expression changes with published human airway epithelia in vivo data to assess their similarities. Here, we present a follow-up evaluation of these in vitro transcriptomics data, using comp...

  7. Comprehensive analysis of secondary dental root canal infections: a combination of culture and culture-independent approaches reveals new insights.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Carola Anderson

    Full Text Available Persistence of microorganisms or reinfections are the main reasons for failure of root canal therapy. Very few studies to date have included culture-independent methods to assess the microbiota, including non-cultivable microorganisms. The aim of this study was to combine culture methods with culture-independent cloning methods to analyze the microbial flora of root-filled teeth with periradicular lesions. Twenty-one samples from previously root-filled teeth were collected from patients with periradicular lesions. Microorganisms were cultivated, isolated and biochemically identified. In addition, ribosomal DNA of bacteria, fungi and archaea derived from the same samples was amplified and the PCR products were used to construct clone libraries. DNA of selected clones was sequenced and microbial species were identified, comparing the sequences with public databases. Microorganisms were found in 12 samples with culture-dependent and -independent methods combined. The number of bacterial species ranged from 1 to 12 in one sample. The majority of the 26 taxa belonged to the phylum Firmicutes (14 taxa, followed by Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. One sample was positive for fungi, and archaea could not be detected. The results obtained with both methods differed. The cloning technique detected several as-yet-uncultivated taxa. Using a combination of both methods 13 taxa were detected that had not been found in root-filled teeth so far. Enterococcus faecalis was only detected in two samples using culture methods. Combining the culture-dependent and -independent approaches revealed new candidate endodontic pathogens and a high diversity of the microbial flora in root-filled teeth with periradicular lesions. Both methods yielded differing results, emphasizing the benefit of combined methods for the detection of the actual microbial diversity in apical periodontitis.

  8. Editorial on low-dose acetylsalicylic acid treatment and impact on short-term mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: a propensity score-matched cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoergenhofer, Christian; Schwameis, Michael; Lagler, Heimo

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript “Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment and Impact on Short-Term Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) Bloodstream Infection: A propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study” published in Critical Care Medicine by Osthoff et al. reported an association of aspirin intake with a reduced short-term mortality. Direct anti-microbial effects of aspirin and its metabolite salicylate were suggested in preclinical studies. Especially intriguing is the inclusion of a control group with Escherichia coli (E. coli) blood stream infections in this study, in which aspirin was not associated with an improved outcome. However, as other observational studies also reported benefits of aspirin in critically ill patients, randomized trials are needed to confirm the effects of low-dose aspirin. PMID:27294095

  9. Evaluation of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infections by cell culture and the polymerase chain reaction using a closed system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars; Traulsen, J; Birkelund, Svend

    1993-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty-four specimens from males and females consulting a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases were analyzed for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Each clinical sample was tested by the cell culture technique and the polymerase chain reaction using a closed system. When...... the two test systems were compared, the overall sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction was 96% and the specificity 94% when compared to the cell culture technique. By use of a closed system for DNA extraction and sample transfer for the polymerase chain reaction, contamination of the samples...

  10. Evaluation of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infections by cell culture and the polymerase chain reaction using a closed system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars; Traulsen, J; Birkelund, Svend

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty-four specimens from males and females consulting a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases were analyzed for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Each clinical sample was tested by the cell culture technique and the polymerase chain reaction using a closed system. When...... the two test systems were compared, the overall sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction was 96% and the specificity 94% when compared to the cell culture technique. By use of a closed system for DNA extraction and sample transfer for the polymerase chain reaction, contamination of the samples...

  11. The behaviour of tomato golden mosaic virus DNA in cultured cells isolated from systemically infected tobacco leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, M J; Buck, K W; Coutts, R H

    1989-03-01

    When callus tissue was cultured from leaf pieces taken from a Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc. plant systemically infected with tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV), TGMV-specific DNA persisted for up to 6 months in culture. Analysis of TGMV-specific intracellular DNA forms indicated a decrease in double-stranded relative to single-stranded forms and an increase in sub-genomic relative to genomic single-stranded DNA species in the callus tissue compared to those in the original leaf explant. The implications of the results with regard to TGMV replication are discussed.

  12. Bimodal Influence of Vitamin D in Host Response to Systemic Candida Infection-Vitamin D Dose Matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, J.H.N.; Ravikumar, S.; Wang, Y.M.; Thamboo, T.P.; Ong, L.; Chen, J.; Goh, J.G.; Tay, S.H.; Chengchen, L.; Win, M.S.; Leong, W.; Lau, T.; Foo, R.; Mirza, H.; Tan, K.S.; Sethi, S.; Khoo, A.L.; Chng, W.J.; Osato, M.; Netea, M.G.; Wang, Y.; Chai, L.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D level is linked to susceptibility to infections, but its relevance in candidemia is unknown. We aimed to investigate the in vivo sequelae of vitamin D3 supplementation in systemic Candida infection. Implicating the role of vitamin D in Candida infections, we showed that candidemic patients

  13. Effect of low doses {gamma}-irradiation on oxidative stress and secondary metabolites production of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) callus culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Beltagi, Hossam S., E-mail: lbltg@yahoo.com [Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, P.O. Box 12613, Gamma st, Giza, Cairo (Egypt); Ahmed, Osama K. [Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, P.O. Box 12613, Gamma st, Giza, Cairo (Egypt); El-Desouky, Wael [Biochemistry Hot Laboratories Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-09-15

    Effect of various {gamma}-irradiation doses (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 G) on the enhancement of secondary metabolites production and antioxidant properties of rosemary callus culture was investigated. The obtained data showed a highly metabolic modification of chemical constituents and various antioxidant defense enzymes (APX, CAT, SOD and GR), which gradually increased in response to radiation doses, while reduced (GSH), ascorbic acid (AsA) contents, total soluble protein, total soluble amino acids, total soluble sugars and PAL activity positively correlated with the increased doses. On the other hands the high irradiation levels significantly increased the accumulation of various oxidative burst (MDA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup -}). Meanwhile, higher doses of gamma irradiation positively enhanced secondary products accumulation of total phenols and total flavonoids in rosemary callus culture. - Highlights: > We model effects of {gamma}-irradiation on rosemary callus. > Highly changes of chemical contents, oxidative burst and antioxidant enzymes. > Treatments positively enhanced secondary products.

  14. Growth of cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2) in cell culture and experimental infection of goldfish Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takafumi; Kurita, Jun; Ozaki, Akiyuki; Sano, Motohiko; Fukuda, Hideo; Ototake, Mitsuru

    2013-09-03

    Herpesviral haematopoietic necrosis has caused great economic damage to goldfish Carassius auratus aquaculture in Japan. The existence of cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2), the causative agent, has also been reported from several other countries. To prevent spread to other areas, basic virological information such as viral kinetics in infected fish is essential. Experimental infection trials using reliably prepared CyHV-2 for defining viral kinetics are difficult to carry out because successful and sustainable propagation of this virus in cell culture has previously been limited. Here we describe a method for sustainable propagation of CyHV-2 in cell culture, and the results of fish infection experiments using the propagated virus. We found that goldfish fin (GFF) cells and standard Ryukin Takafumi (SRTF) cells established from goldfish fin can be used for continuous propagation of CyHV-2. Experimental infections using 2 varieties of goldfish, Ryukin and Edonishiki, were performed with the virus passaged 7 times in GFF cells. In transmission experiments with water temperature at 20°C, cumulative mortality was 30% in Ryukin infected by immersion, and 90 and 100% in Edonishiki and Ryukin intraperitoneally injected with the virus, respectively. In an experiment carried out at 25°C, 90% of Edonishiki challenged by immersion died. PCR detection of viral DNA from the organs of infected fish showed that systemic infection occurs and also that the kidney is a main viral multiplication site. Moreover, CyHV-2 was successfully re-isolated in GFF cells from the dead fish.

  15. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  16. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  17. Comparative efficacy of one versus two doses of praziquantel on cure rate of Schistosoma mansoni infection and re-infection in Mayuge District, Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tukahebwa, Edridah M.; Vennervald, Birgitte J; Nuwaha, Fred;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current recommended control strategy for schistosomiasis is annual treatment using 40 mg/kg of praziquantel. However, praziquantel is only effective on adult worms and giving a second dose may increase its efficacy. We assessed the effect of one versus two doses of praziquantel on...

  18. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L.; Koenning, Stephen R.; Davis, Eric L.; Opperman, Charles H.; Lommel, Steven A.; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Sit, Tim L.

    2017-01-01

    Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines) from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC) and Missouri (MO). The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2), and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO). Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst) and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst), but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation. PMID:28141854

  19. Inhibition of Fusarium solani Infection in Murine Keratocytes by Lactobacillus salivarius ssp. salivarius JCM1231 Culture Filtrate In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianzhang; Chen, Fang; Kan, Tong; Zhuang, Hua; Zhang, Jingjin; Han, Xiaoli

    2017-06-21

    To explore the inhibitory activity of Lactobacillus salivarius ssp. salivarius JCM1231 (L. salivarius JCM1231) culture filtrate against Fusarium solani (F. solani) and its effects on murine keratocytes (MKs) infected with F. solani. L. salivarius JCM1231 was cultured in an anaerobic incubator for 24 h, and the L. salivarius culture filtrate (LSCF) was prepared .The antifungal activity of L. salivarius JCM1231 against F. solani was determined with a plate overlay assay, agar diffusion assay, and conidial germination inhibition test. The effects of temperature, pH, and proteolytic enzymes on the antifungal activity of LSCF were detected with microtiter plate-well assay and conidial germination inhibition assay. Furthermore, the effects of LSCF on MKs infected with F. solani were detected. Cell activity and apoptosis were measured using methylthiazoletetrazolium assays and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) cytokines were measured using real-time polymerase chain reactions and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and mycotoxin production was detected with high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Conidial germination and mycelia growth of F. solani were significantly inhibited by LSCF. The antifungal substances produced by L. salivarius JCM1231 were heat unstable, proteinaceous, and sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and were active within a narrow acidic pH range between 2.0 and 4.0. In the presence of 15 µg/ml of LSCF, cell activity was significantly increased, and cell apoptosis, the level of IL-6 and TNF-α expressions, and mycotoxin (zearalenone and fumonisin B1) productions were decreased significantly in MKs infected with F. solani. L. salivarius JCM1231 culture filtrate can effectively inhibit F. solani growth and protect MKs against F. solani infection.

  20. Mayaro virus infection alters glucose metabolism in cultured cells through activation of the enzyme 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Menezes, Maíra M T; Azevedo e Silva, Melissa C; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2004-11-01

    Although it is well established that cellular transformation with tumor virus leads to changes on glucose metabolism, the effects of cell infection by non-transforming virus are far to be completely elucidated. In this study, we report the first evidence that cultured Vero cells infected with the alphavirus Mayaro show several alterations on glucose metabolism. Infected cells presented a two fold increase on glucose consumption, accompanied by an increment in lactate production. This increase in glycolytic flux was also demonstrated by a significant increase on the activity of 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase, one of the regulatory enzymes of glycolysis. Analysis of the kinetic parameters revealed that the regulation of 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase is altered in infected cells, presenting an increase in Vmax along with a decrease in Km for fructose-6-phosphate. Another fact contributing to an increase in enzyme activity was the decrease in ATP levels observed in infected cells. Additionally, the levels of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, a potent activator of this enzyme, was significantly reduced in infected cells. These observations suggest that the increase in PFK activity may be a compensatory cellular response to the viral-induced metabolic alterations that could lead to an impairment of the glycolytic flux and energy production.

  1. Estimation of intracellular concentration of stavudine triphosphate in HIV-infected children given a reduced dose of 0.5 milligrams per kilogram twice daily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Sherwin K B; Innes, Steve; Derendorf, Hartmut; Cotton, Mark F; Rosenkranz, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The antiviral efficacy of stavudine depends on the trough concentration of its intracellular metabolite, stavudine-triphosphate (d4T-TP), while the degree of stavudine's mitochondrial toxicity depends on its peak concentration. Rates of mitochondrial toxicity are high when stavudine is used at the current standard pediatric dose (1 mg/kg twice daily [BID]). Evidence from adult work suggests that half of the original standard adult dose (i.e., 20 mg BID) may be equally effective, with markedly less mitochondrial toxicity. We present a population pharmacokinetic model to predict intracellular d4T-TP concentrations in pediatric HIV-infected patients administered a dose of 0.5 mg/kg BID. Our model predicted that the reduced pediatric dose would result in a trough intracellular d4T-TP concentration above that of the reduced 20-mg adult dose and a peak concentration below that of the 20-mg adult dose. The simulated pediatric intracellular d4T-TP at 0.5 mg/kg BID resulted in median peak and trough values of approximately 23.9 fmol/10(6) cells (95% prediction interval [PI], 14.2 to 41 fmol/10(6) cells) and 14.8 fmol/10(6) cells (95% PI, 7.2 to 31 fmol/10(6) cells), respectively. The peak and trough concentrations resulting from a 20-mg BID adult dose were 28.4 fmol/10(6) cells (95% PI, 17.3 to 45.5 fmol/10(6) cells) and 13 fmol/10(6) cells (95% PI, 6.8 to 28.6 fmol/10(6) cells), respectively. Halving the current standard pediatric dose should therefore not compromise antiviral efficacy, while markedly reducing mitochondrial toxicity.

  2. Discordances Between Serology and Culture for Strongyloides in an Ethiopian Adopted Child With Multiple Parasitic Infections: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Sulleiro, Elena; Zarzuela, Francesc; Ruiz, Edurne; Clavería, Isabel; Espasa, Mateu

    2016-03-01

    infectious diseases screening of international adoptees is complex because of the concurrence of different pathogens in a child at same time. We describe an international adopted child born at Ethiopia infected by 5 different pathogens (Hymenolepis nana, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Trichuris trichiura), 2 of them S. stercoralis and E. histolytica with a capacity to develop severe clinical complications if not detected promptly with appropriate diagnosis tests.Concerns of the patient: according to the screening protocol a stool sample is always processed for culture addressed to find out protozoan and helminthic pathogens but not specifically for S. stercoralis. Only, when eosinophilia is detected 3 serial stool samples are collected to rule out intestinal parasitic infection including S. stercoralis. in our case, S. stercoralis would not have been detected if we had followed the protocol because eosinophilia was absent and its specific serology was negative. Fortunately, the initial inclusion of the feces charcoal culture for S. stercoralis allowed us to detect this infection. discordances between direct methods such as culture and indirect as serology or antigen test forces us to be very cautious before ruling out S. stercoralis or E. histolytica infection, respectively. Also, if a child from tropical areas has persistent symptoms (such as diarrhea or fever) that have not been treated we have to rule out other infections that have not been detected yet.Main lessons: The introduction of different sequencing tests and the insistence to find out pathogens such as S. stercoralis or E. histolytica was determinant to be able to cure this symptomatic child and to prevent potential severe clinical forms in case of immunosuppression.

  3. Cultural care practices among mothers of nurslings with respiratory infection - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.s13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanne Rakelly de Oliveira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the cultural practices of care among mothers of infants with respiratory infection in a pediatric outpatient clinic, from the recognition of the importance of the use of traditional medicine in Brazil. Methods: We applied a descriptive and exploratory study, qualitative, with twenty-eight mothers of infants with respiratory infection seen at a referral center in the city of Barbalha - CE, Brazil. Data were collected between the months of November and December of 2010 through semi-structured interview with a tape recorder. The speeches were analyzed by thematic-categorical analysis, which allowed the creation of four themes: cultural practices of care among mothers, sources of information on medicinal plants, modes of preparation of medicinal herbs and plants used by mothers. To ensure anonymity of participants, they received enumeration following the order of interviews. Results: The study showed that mothers make use of folk medicine, through the preparation of home remedies in order to treat and cure respiratory infections of their children; the leaking tea and herbal medicine are worth mentioning. Mothers place great confidence and give real meaning to the use of homemade preparations. It was observed that this knowledge comes from their mothers, grandparents, relatives and neighbors. Conclusion: Mothers attach great importance to popular practice, the traditional knowledge of relevant cultural value, as it is transmitted from generation to generation and has been rebuilt over time.

  4. Bactericidal Activity of Ceragenin CSA-13 in Cell Culture and in an Animal Model of Peritoneal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucki, Robert; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wnorowska, Urszula; Byfield, Fitzroy J; Piktel, Ewelina; Wątek, Marzena; Janmey, Paul A; Savage, Paul B

    2015-10-01

    Ceragenins constitute a novel family of cationic antibiotics characterized by a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities, which have mostly been assessed in vitro. Using a polarized human lung epithelial cell culture system, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of the ceragenin CSA-13 against two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1 and Xen5). Additionally, the biodistribution and bactericidal activity of a CSA-13-IRDye 800CW derivate were assessed using an animal model of peritoneal infection after PAO1 challenge. In cell culture, CSA-13 bactericidal activities against PAO1 and Xen5 were higher than the activities of the human cathelicidin peptide LL-37. Increased CSA-13 activity was observed in polarized human lung epithelial cell cultures subjected to butyric acid treatment, which is known to increase endogenous LL-37 production. Eight hours after intravenous or intraperitoneal injection, the greatest CSA-13-IRDye 800CW accumulation was observed in mouse liver and kidneys. CSA-13-IRDye 800CW administration resulted in decreased bacterial outgrowth from abdominal fluid collected from animals subjected to intraperitoneal PAO1 infection. These observations indicate that CSA-13 may synergistically interact with antibacterial factors that are naturally present at mucosal surfaces and it maintains its antibacterial activity in the infected abdominal cavity. Cationic lipids such as CSA-13 represent excellent candidates for the development of new antibacterial compounds. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Blood culture-PCR to optimise typhoid fever diagnosis after controlled human infection identifies frequent asymptomatic cases and evidence of primary bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darton, Thomas C; Zhou, Liqing; Blohmke, Christoph J; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Baker, Stephen; Pollard, Andrew J

    2017-04-01

    Improved diagnostics for typhoid are needed; a typhoid controlled human infection model may accelerate their development and translation. Here, we evaluated a blood culture-PCR assay for detecting infection after controlled human infection with S. Typhi and compared test performance with optimally performed blood cultures. Culture-PCR amplification of blood samples was performed alongside daily blood culture in 41 participants undergoing typhoid challenge. Study endpoints for typhoid diagnosis (TD) were fever and/or bacteraemia. Overall, 24/41 (59%) participants reached TD, of whom 21/24 (86%) had ≥1 positive blood culture (53/674, 7.9% of all cultures) or 18/24 (75%) had ≥1 positive culture-PCR assay result (57/684, 8.3%). A further five non-bacteraemic participants produced culture-PCR amplicons indicating infection; overall sensitivity/specificity of the assay compared to the study endpoints were 70%/65%. We found no significant difference between blood culture and culture-PCR methods in ability to identify cases (12 mismatching pairs, p = 0.77, binomial test). Clinical and stool culture metadata demonstrated that additional culture-PCR amplification positive individuals likely represented true cases missed by blood culture, suggesting the overall attack rate may be 30/41 (73%) rather than 24/41 (59%). Several participants had positive culture-PCR results soon after ingesting challenge providing new evidence for occurrence of an early primary bacteraemia. Overall the culture-PCR assay performed well, identifying extra typhoid cases compared with routine blood culture alone. Despite limitations to widespread field-use, the benefits of increased diagnostic yield, reduced blood volume and faster turn-around-time, suggest that this assay could enhance laboratory typhoid diagnostics in research applications and high-incidence settings. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous population pharmacokinetic modelling of darunavir and ritonavir Once daily in HIV-infected patients: evaluation of lower ritonavir dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Dickinson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of study: Once-daily ritonavir-boosted darunavir (DRV/RTV is a preferred antiretroviral regimen for treatment-naïve patients. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of the interaction between DRV and RTV allows evaluation of alternative dosing strategies, particularly lower RTV doses (e.g. 800/50 mg once daily and assessment of factors that may influence DRV/RTV PK. Methods: Data were pooled from 3 DRV/RTV PK studies. Fifty-one HIV-infected patients (7 female stable on DRV/RTV (800/100 mg or 900/100 mg once daily; n=32 and 19, respectively were included. Median age, weight and baseline CD4 cell count were 39 yr (21–63, 74 kg (57–105 and 500 cells/mm3 (227–1129, respectively; 49 had undetectable viral load. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling (Monolix v.4.1.2 was applied simultaneously to DRV and RTV to determine PK parameters, interindividual variability and residual error. Covariates evaluated included: age, weight, sex and study. The model was validated by simulation and visual predictive check. DRV/RTV 800/50 mg once daily was simulated. Summary of results: RTV and DRV were described by a 1 and 2-compartment model, respectively with first-order absorption and lag-time. A maximum effect model, in which RTV inhibited DRV clearance (CL/F, best described the relationship between the two drugs. A RTV concentration of 0.33 mg/L was associated with 50% maximum inhibition of DRV CL/F with the maximum inhibitory effect fixed at 1. The population CL/F of DRV in the absence of RTV was 13.7L/h. Inclusion of weight on RTV CL/F and volume and age on DRV CL/F and study on DRV CL/F, volume and absorption improved the fit. Based on visual predictive check 93% and 91% of observed RTV and DRV concentrations were within the 95% prediction interval, indicative of an adequate model. Of 1000 simulated DRV troughs, 10% and 0% were below the MEC for treatment-experienced (<0.55 mg/L and naïve patients (<0.055 mg/L, respectively. For DRV/RTV 800/50 mg once

  7. Intraoperative subcutaneous wound closing culture sample: a predicting factor for periprosthetic infection after hip- and knee-replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Christian B; Adams, Martin; Kroeber, Markus; Wentzensen, Andreas; Heppert, Volkmar; Schulte-Bockholt, Dietrich; Guehring, Thorsten

    2011-10-01

    It is unknown whether intraoperative subcutaneous wound closing culture samples (WCCS) are useful to predict periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Here we prospectively followed 167 out of a total of 175 consecutive patients with primary total hip (THR) or knee replacement (TKR) between 01/2002 and 12/2002 for a mean follow-up period of 5 years; of those patients, n = 159 (96.8%) underwent WCCS. The results showed a positive WCCS in n = 9 cases (5.8%). Nine patients developed postoperative wound complication and required revision surgery. Two patients developed signs of a deep periprosthetic infection; however, only one out of nine patients had initial positive WCCS. Our results thus indicate that WCCS during primary joint replacement is not an appropriate predictive method to identify patients at risk for periprosthetic joint infections.

  8. Urine culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  9. Successful Treatment of Uncomplicated Gonococcal Urethritis in HIV-Infected Patients with Single-Dose Oral Cefpodoxime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Psevdos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones are no longer recommended for the treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States. Cephalosporins – ceftriaxone and cefixime – are the treatment of choice, as suggested by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (USA. There are limited data on the efficacy of cefpodoxime for the treatment of uncomplicated gonococcal infections. Two cases of HIV-infected homosexual men who were successfully treated with cefpodoxime for urethritis caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae are described in the present study.

  10. Dose-dependent effects of experimental infection with the virulent Neospora caninum Nc-Spain7 isolate in a pregnant mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz-Solís, David; Aguado-Martínez, Adriana; Müller, Joachim; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-07-30

    Pregnant BALB/c mice have been widely used as an in vivo model to study Neospora caninum infection biology and to provide proof-of-concept for assessments of drugs and vaccines against neosporosis. The fact that this model has been used with different isolates of variable virulence, varying infection routes and differing methods to prepare the parasites for infection, has rendered the comparison of results from different laboratories impossible. In most studies, mice were infected with similar number of parasites (2 × 10(6)) as employed in ruminant models (10(7) for cows and 10(6) for sheep), which seems inappropriate considering the enormous differences in the weight of these species. Thus, for achieving meaningful results in vaccination and drug efficacy experiments, a refinement and standardization of this experimental model is necessary. Thus, 2 × 10(6), 10(5), 10(4), 10(3) and 10(2) tachyzoites of the highly virulent and well-characterised Nc-Spain7 isolate were subcutaneously inoculated into mice at day 7 of pregnancy, and clinical outcome, vertical transmission, parasite burden and antibody responses were compared. Dams from all infected groups presented nervous signs and the percentage of surviving pups at day 30 postpartum was surprisingly low (24%) in mice infected with only 10(2) tachyzoites. Importantly, infection with 10(5) tachyzoites resulted in antibody levels, cerebral parasite burden in dams and 100% mortality rate in pups, which was identical to infection with 2 × 10(6) tachyzoites. Considering these results, it is reasonable to lower the challenge dose to 10(5) tachyzoites in further experiments when assessing drugs or vaccine candidates.

  11. Effects of a Low Dose of Fish Oil on Inflammatory Markers of Brazilian HIV-Infected Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy: A Randomized, Parallel, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julicristie M. Oliveira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The benefits of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected subjects have been limited by an increased risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of a low dose of marine omega-3 fatty acids on inflammatory marker concentrations in HIV-infected subjects under antiretroviral therapy (ART. Methods: This was a randomized, parallel, placebo-controlled trial that investigated the effects of 3 g fish oil/day (540 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid—EPA plus 360 mg of docosahexaenoic acid—DHA or 3 g soy oil/day (placebo for 24 weeks in 83 male and non-pregnant female HIV-infected adults on ART. Results: There were no differences between groups for the measures at baseline. Multilevel analyses revealed no statistically significant relationship between the longitudinal changes in high sensitivity-C reactive protein (hs-CRP (Wald Chi2 = 0.17, p = 0.918, fibrinogen (Wald Chi2 = 3.82, p = 0.148, and factor VIII (Wald Chi2 = 5.25, p = 0.073 with fish oil. No significant changes in interleukin-6 (IL6, interleukin-1 beta (IL1-beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha serum concentrations were observed with fish oil supplements for 12 weeks. Conclusions: Compared to placebo, a low dose of 900 mg omega-3 fatty acids (EPA plus DHA in fish oil capsules did not change hs-CRP, fibrinogen, factor VIII, IL6, IL1-beta and TNF-alpha serum concentrations in HIV-infected subjects on ART. Further investigations should consider the assessment of more sensitive inflammatory markers or higher doses to evaluate the effects of marine omega-3 fatty acids in this population. Registered at the Nederlands Trial Register, Identifier no. NTR1798.

  12. Phase I randomized dose-ascending placebo-controlled trials of ferroquine - a candidate anti-malarial drug - in adults with asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ospina Salazar Carmen L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and spread of drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains is a major concern and novel anti-malarial drugs are, therefore, needed. Ferroquine is a ferrocenic derivative of chloroquine with proven anti-malarial activity against chloroquine-resistant and -sensitive P. falciparum laboratory strains. Methods Adult young male aged 18 to 45 years, asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum, were included in two-dose escalation, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I trials, a single dose study and a multiple dose study aiming to evaluate oral doses of ferroquine from 400 to 1,600 mg. Results Overall, 54/66 patients (40 and 26 treated in the single and multiple dose studies, respectively experienced at least one adverse event, 15 were under placebo. Adverse events were mainly gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain (16, diarrhoea (5, nausea (13, and vomiting (9, but also headache (11, and dizziness (5. A few patients had slightly elevated liver parameters (10/66 including two patients under placebo. Moderate changes in QTc and morphological changes in T waves were observed in the course of the study. However, no adverse cardiac effects with clinical relevance were observed. Conclusions These phase I trials showed that clinically, ferroquine was generally well-tolerated up to 1,600 mg as single dose and up to 800 mg as repeated dose in asymptomatic young male with P. falciparum infection. Further clinical development of ferroquine, either alone or in combination with another anti-malarial, is highly warranted and currently underway.

  13. Methods and terminology used in cell-culture studies of low-dose effects of matrix constituents of polymer resin-based dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Bo W; Örtengren, Ulf; Simon-Santamaria, Jaione; Sørensen, Karen K; Michelsen, Vibeke B

    2016-12-01

    General comprehension of terms and confounding factors associated with in vitro experiments can maximize the potential of in vitro testing of substances. In this systematic review, we present an overview of the terms and methods used to determine low-dose effects of matrix constituents in polymer resin-based dental materials in cell-culture studies and discuss the findings in light of how they may influence the comprehension and interpretation of results. Articles published between 1996 and 2015 were identified by searches in the Scopus, Web of Science, MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase databases using keywords associated with low-dose effects, polymer resin-based materials, in vitro parameters, and dental materials. Twenty-nine articles were included. Subtoxic (n = 11), sublethal (n = 10), and nontoxic (n = 6) were the terms most commonly used to describe the low-dose effects of methacrylates. However, definition of terms varied. Most (82%) studies employed only one method to define the exposure scenario, and no agreement was seen between studies on the use of solvents. Prophylactic use of antibiotics was widespread, and mycoplasma screening was not reported. In conclusion, cell-culture conditions and tests used to define exposure scenarios have changed little in the last decades, despite development in recommendations. Nomenclature alignment is needed for a better understanding of possible biohazards of methacrylates. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  14. Culture proven Salmonella typhi co-infection in a child with Dengue fever: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasaraghavan, Rangan; Narayanan, Parameswaran; Kanimozhi, Thandapani

    2015-09-27

    Infectious diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Sometimes concurrent infections with multiple infectious agents may occur in one patient, which make the diagnosis and management a challenging task. The authors here present a case of co-infection of typhoid fever with dengue fever in a ten-year-old child and discuss the pertinent issues. The authors emphasize that the risk factors predicting the presence of such co-infections, if developed, will be immensely useful in areas where dengue outbreak occurs in the background of high transmission of endemic infections.

  15. The jejunal cellular responses in chickens infected with a single dose of Ascaridia galli eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luna Olivares, Luz Adilia; Kyvsgaard, Niels Christian; Ferdushy, Tania

    2015-01-01

    This histopathological study was carried out in order to investigate the cellular response in the jejunum to Ascaridia galli during the first 7 weeks of infection. Fourty-two ISA Brown chickens (7 weeks old) were infected orally with 500 embryonated A. galli eggs each while 28 chickens were left ...

  16. Infective Endocarditis: Identification of Catalase-Negative, Gram-Positive Cocci from Blood Cultures by Partial 16S rRNA Gene Analysis and by Vitek 2 Examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul-Redha, Rawaa Jalil; Kemp, Michael; Bangsborg, Jette M

    2010-01-01

    Streptococci, enterococci and Streptococcus-like bacteria are frequent etiologic agents of infective endocarditis and correct species identification can be a laboratory challenge. Viridans streptococci (VS) not seldomly cause contamination of blood cultures. Vitek 2 and partial sequencing of the ...

  17. Culture confirmation of gonococcal infection by recall of subjects found to be positive by nucleic acid amplification tests in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate a routine notification of general practitioners to recall nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-positive subjects for culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to confirm gonococcal infection in the community....

  18. Increased early local immune responses and altered worm development in high-dose infections of mice susceptible to the filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayan, Simon; Attout, Tarik; Specht, Sabine; Hoerauf, Achim; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Korenaga, Masataka; Bain, Odile; Martin, Coralie

    2005-05-01

    The relationship between the number of larvae inoculated and filarial infection outcome is an important fundamental and epidemiological issue. Our study was carried out with BALB/c mice infected with the filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis. For the first time, an immunological analysis of infection with various doses was studied in parallel with parasitological data. Mice were inoculated with 200, 60 or 25 infective larvae (third stage larvae, L3), and monitored over 80 days. At 60 h post-inoculation the immune response was stronger in the 200 L3 group than the 25 L3 group. Cells from lymph nodes draining the site of inoculation proliferated intensely and produced large amounts of IL-5 and IL-4. In the pleural cavity, leukocyte populations accumulated earlier and in larger quantities. IgG1, IL-4 and IL-10 serum concentrations were transiently higher. During the first 10 days the worm recovery rates were identical in all groups, but decreased thereafter in the 200 L3 group. In this group, the development of the worms was altered, with reduced lengths, diminished intra-uterine production of microfilariae and abnormalities of male copulatory organs. Whereas mice inoculated with 25 L3 became microfilaraemic, only one third reached patency in the 200 L3 group. However, detrimental effects of high numbers of worms are not seen in studies using different inoculation protocols. This suggests that the very early events determine subsequent immune response and infection outcome rather than competitive interactions between the worms.

  19. Randomized Trial Evaluating the Impact of Ribavirin Mono-Therapy and Double Dosing on Viral Kinetics, Ribavirin Pharmacokinetics and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldenström, Jesper; Westin, Johan; Nyström, Kristina;

    2016-01-01

    In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard-of-care (......In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard......, by day 14, double dosing entailed a greater hemoglobin decline as compared to SOC (2.2 vs. 1.4 g/dL; P = 0.03). Conclusion: Ribavirin down-regulates IP-10, and may have an anti-viral effect differently regulated across IL28B genotypes....

  20. The congruity between urine and cervical swab cultures in pregnant women with versus without amniotic fluid infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrova-Risteska, L; Hrgovic, Z; Curzik, D; Kissler, S; Kaufmann, M; Gaetje, R

    2005-12-01

    We observed the congruity of bacteria found in urine and cervix of pregnant women with amniotic fluid infection (AFI) compared to healthy controls. Over three years, we prospectively analysed urine and cervical swabs cultures in 120 pregnant women in gestational week 16-20. The patient population was divided in two groups: group I patients had clinical symptoms of AFI. The rest of the patients were designated as healthy controls (group II). Congruity between findings in both groups was observed. In patients with bacterial growth, antibiotic treatment was initiated as recommended and once ended - culture probes were repeated. The rates of nonsignificant and significant bacteriuria were doubled in group I. Fifty-five percent (n = 33) of patients in group I had identical bacteria cultured both from the urine sample and cervical swab, in contrast to only 13.3 % in group II. Congruity was most pronounced for Klebsiella species and E. coli, the later being single most dominant isolate in regards to both cultures. After antimicrobial treatment, microbial eradication occurred in 15 patients (45.5 %). The observed incidences of abortions and preterm deliveries were significantly lower in patients with microbial eradication versus patients with microbial persistence. Patients with clinical symptoms of AFI have high risk for bacteriuria identical to bacterial culture from cervical swab. Antimicrobial treatment was effective only partially where indicated. Screening for eradication is recommended and consensus on the most appropriate therapy is needed.

  1. Culture microtitration: a sensitive method for quantifying Leishmania infantum in tissues of infected mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Buffet, P. A.; Sulahian, A.; Garin, Y J; Nassar, N.; Derouin, F

    1995-01-01

    We developed a microtitration method to determine the parasite burdens in homogenized organs of mice infected with Leishmania infantum. This method proved more sensitive than direct enumeration of amastigotes in stained organs, was appropriate for describing the kinetics of infection, and can be considered for physiopathological or pharmaceutical experimental studies.

  2. Nevirapine resistance and breast-milk HIV transmission: effects of single and extended-dose nevirapine prophylaxis in subtype C HIV-infected infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Moorthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Daily nevirapine (NVP prophylaxis to HIV-exposed infants significantly reduces breast-milk HIV transmission. We assessed NVP-resistance in Indian infants enrolled in the "six-week extended-dose nevirapine" (SWEN trial who received single-dose NVP (SD-NVP or SWEN for prevention of breast-milk HIV transmission but who also acquired subtype C HIV infection during the first year of life. METHODS/FINDINGS: Standard population sequencing and cloning for viral subpopulations present at > or =5% frequency were used to determine HIV genotypes from 94% of the 79 infected Indian infants studied. Timing of infection was defined based on when an infant's blood sample first tested positive for HIV DNA. SWEN-exposed infants diagnosed with HIV by six weeks of age had a significantly higher prevalence of NVP-resistance than those who received SD-NVP, by both standard population sequencing (92% of 12 vs. 38% of 29; p = 0.002 and low frequency clonal analysis (92% of 12 vs. 59% of 29; p = 0.06. Likelihood of infection with NVP-resistant HIV through breast-milk among infants infected after age six weeks was substantial, but prevalence of NVP-resistance did not differ among SWEN or SD-NVP exposed infants by standard population sequencing (15% of 13 vs. 15% of 20; p = 1.00 and clonal analysis (31% of 13 vs. 40% of 20; p = 0.72. Types of NVP-resistance mutations and patterns of persistence at one year of age were similar between the two groups. NVP-resistance mutations did differ by timing of HIV infection; the Y181C variant was predominant among infants diagnosed in the first six weeks of life, compared to Y188C/H during late breast-milk transmission. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Use of SWEN to prevent breast-milk HIV transmission carries a high likelihood of resistance if infection occurs in the first six weeks of life. Moreover, there was a continued risk of transmission of NVP-resistant HIV through breastfeeding during the first year of life, but did not

  3. Ambulatory Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus-Infected Orthopedic Implants with High-Dose Oral Co-trimoxazole (Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Andreas; Bataille, Jean Francois; Drancourt, Michel; Curvale, Georges; Argenson, Jean Noel; Groulier, Pierre; Raoult, Didier

    1998-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness and safety of high-dose oral co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) for the treatment of orthopedic implants infected with multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus species. The prospective study was conducted between 1989 and 1997 in a university medical center with ambulatory-care services. Patients eligible for the study consisted of those from whom multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus spp. organisms susceptible only to glycopeptides and co-trimoxazole were isolated from their orthopedic implants and for whom there was no contraindication to the treatment. All patients were treated orally with high-dose co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim, 20 mg/kg of body weight/day; sulfamethoxazole, 100 mg/kg/day). Patients with prosthetic hip infections were treated for 6 months, with removal of any unstable prosthesis after 5 months of treatment; patients with prosthetic knee infections were treated for 9 months, with removal of any unstable prosthesis after 6 months of treatment; and patients with infected osteosynthetic devices were treated for 6 months, with removal of the device after 3 months of treatment, if necessary. Monthly clinical evaluations were conducted until the completion of the treatment, and follow-up examinations were conducted regularly for up to 6 years. The overall treatment success rate was 66.7% (26 of 39 patients), with success rates of 62.5% for patients with prosthetic knee infections, 50% for those with prosthetic hip infections, and 78.9% for those with other device infections. Seventeen of the 28 (60.7%) patients who did not have any orthopedic material removed were cured. Eight patients stopped the treatment because of side effects, and one patient was not compliant. In three patients treatment failed because of the appearance of a resistant bacterium. Long-term oral ambulatory treatment with co-trimoxazole appears to be an effective alternative to the conventional medicosurgical treatment of chronic multidrug

  4. Safety and Efficacy of High-Dose Daily Vitamin D3 Supplementation in Children and Young Adults Infected With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Kelly A.; Schall, Joan I.; Zemel, Babette S.; Tuluc, Florin; Hou, Xiaoling; Rutstein, Richard M.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Suboptimal vitamin D (vitD) status is common in children and young adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The vitD supplemental dose needed to normalize vitD status in this population is unknown. Methods In this double-blind trial, subjects infected with HIV ages 8.3 to 24.9 years were randomized to vitD3 supplementation of 4000 IU/day or 7000 IU/day and evaluated at 6 and 12 week for changes in vitD status and HIV indicators. A dose was considered unsafe if serum calcium was elevated (above age and sex-specific range) associated with elevated serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D); >160 ng/mL). Results At baseline, 95% of subjects (n = 44; 43% with perinatally acquired HIV, 57% with behaviorally acquired HIV) had a suboptimal serum 25(OH)D concentration of 80% of subjects. Change in serum 25(OH)D did not differ between HIV acquisition groups. Conclusions A 7000 IU/day D3 supplementation was safe and effective in children and young adults infected with HIV. PMID:26625449

  5. Conserved host response to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in human cell culture, mouse and macaque model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Jason E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding host response to influenza virus infection will facilitate development of better diagnoses and therapeutic interventions. Several different experimental models have been used as a proxy for human infection, including cell cultures derived from human cells, mice, and non-human primates. Each of these systems has been studied extensively in isolation, but little effort has been directed toward systematically characterizing the conservation of host response on a global level beyond known immune signaling cascades. Results In the present study, we employed a multivariate modeling approach to characterize and compare the transcriptional regulatory networks between these three model systems after infection with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype. Using this approach we identified functions and pathways that display similar behavior and/or regulation including the well-studied impact on the interferon response and the inflammasome. Our results also suggest a primary response role for airway epithelial cells in initiating hypercytokinemia, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of H5N1 viruses. We further demonstrate that we can use a transcriptional regulatory model from the human cell culture data to make highly accurate predictions about the behavior of important components of the innate immune system in tissues from whole organisms. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a global regulatory network modeling conserved host response between in vitro and in vivo models.

  6. Control of MRSA infection and colonisation in an intensive care unit by GeneOhm MRSA assay and culture methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the major nosocomial pathogens. Due to the diffusion of MRSA strains in both hospital and community settings, prevention and control strategies are receiving increased attention. Approximately 25% to 30% of the population is colonised with S. aureus and 0.2% to 7% with MRSA. The BD GeneOhm MRSA real-time PCR assay offers quicker identification of MRSA-colonised patients than do culture methods. Methods Ninety-five patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo of Pavia (Italy) for a period > 24 h were screened for MRSA colonisation with both the culture method and the GeneOhm assay. Results Of the 246 nasal swabs collected from 95 patients, 36 samples were found to be positive by both methods (true-positive). 30% of colonised patients had developed the MRSA infection. Conclusion Our results show that the GeneOhm MRSA assay is a valuable diagnostic tool for detecting MRSA quickly in nasal swabs. This study confirms that colonisation represents a high risk factor for MRSA infection, and that good MRSA surveillance in an Intensive Care Unit is therefore an excellent way to prevent MRSA infection. PMID:19703294

  7. Control of MRSA infection and colonisation in an intensive care unit by GeneOhm MRSA assay and culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Claudia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the major nosocomial pathogens. Due to the diffusion of MRSA strains in both hospital and community settings, prevention and control strategies are receiving increased attention. Approximately 25% to 30% of the population is colonised with S. aureus and 0.2% to 7% with MRSA. The BD GeneOhm MRSA real-time PCR assay offers quicker identification of MRSA-colonised patients than do culture methods. Methods Ninety-five patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo of Pavia (Italy for a period > 24 h were screened for MRSA colonisation with both the culture method and the GeneOhm assay. Results Of the 246 nasal swabs collected from 95 patients, 36 samples were found to be positive by both methods (true-positive. 30% of colonised patients had developed the MRSA infection. Conclusion Our results show that the GeneOhm MRSA assay is a valuable diagnostic tool for detecting MRSA quickly in nasal swabs. This study confirms that colonisation represents a high risk factor for MRSA infection, and that good MRSA surveillance in an Intensive Care Unit is therefore an excellent way to prevent MRSA infection.

  8. Low doses of nanodiamonds and silica nanoparticles have beneficial hormetic effects in normal human skin fibroblasts in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mytych, Jennifer; Wnuk, Maciej; Rattan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    oxygenease HO-1), sirtuin (SIRT1), and DNA methyltransferase II (DNMT2). These results imply that ND and SiO2-NP at low doses are potential hormetins, which exert mild stress-induced beneficial hormetic effects through improved survival, longevity, maintenance, repair and function of human cells...

  9. Transformation of Barley (Hordeum vulgar L.) by Agrobacterium tumefasciens Infection of In Vitro Cultured Ovules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Lange, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of in vitro cultured barley ovules is an attractive alternative to well-established barley transformation methods of immature embryos. The ovule culture system can be used for transformation with and without selection and has successfully been used to transform...

  10. Lysogenic infection in sub-tropical freshwater cyanobacteria cultures and natural blooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhauer, L.M.; Pollard, P.C.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Säwström, C.

    2014-01-01

    Lysogeny has been reported for a few freshwater cyanobacteria cultures, but it is unknown how prevalent it is in freshwater cyanobacteria in situ. Here we tested for lysogeny in (a) cultures of eight Australian species of subtropical freshwater cyanobacteria; (b) seven strains of one species: Cylind

  11. Lysogenic infection in sub-tropical freshwater cyanobacteria cultures and natural blooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhauer, L.M.; Pollard, P.C.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Säwström, C.

    2014-01-01

    Lysogeny has been reported for a few freshwater cyanobacteria cultures, but it is unknown how prevalent it is in freshwater cyanobacteria in situ. Here we tested for lysogeny in (a) cultures of eight Australian species of subtropical freshwater cyanobacteria; (b) seven strains of one species:

  12. Shortened strongyle-type egg reappearance periods in naturally infected horses treated with moxidectin and failure of a larvicidal dose of fenbendazole to reduce fecal egg counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, M G; Smith, A R; Lyons, E T

    2010-10-29

    Deworming horses with anthelmintics that have activity against encysted small strongyle larvae (L(3) and L(4)) is a common practice in parasite control programs. The two drugs currently available for this use are moxidectin (MOX) administered in a single dose of 0.4 mg/kg and fenbendazole (FBZ) given at the larvicidal dose (10mg/kg for 5 days). Here, we report the efficacy of MOX and the larvicidal dose of FBZ for reducing counts of strongyle-type eggs per gram of feces in naturally infected horses. Fecal egg counts (FECs) of 15 yearlings were observed following deworming. On day 0, 6 of the 15 yearlings were administered a larvicidal dose of FBZ; 14 days later, all 15 yearlings received MOX at a single dose of 0.4 mg/kg. Feces were collected on day 0 for pre-treatment egg counts. Feces were collected at weekly intervals thereafter during FEC observation periods. FECs of FBZ-treated horses were compared at day 0 and 14 days post-treatment. The difference in means pre- and post-treatment with FBZ was not statistically significant (p=0.65). On days 0 and 42 of the MOX treatment observation period the mean FEC of the yearlings that had not received the FBZ treatment did not differ significantly from that of the FBZ-treated yearlings. MOX was effective in reducing fecal egg counts to 0 EPG for 21 days. At day 35 all but 2 of the yearlings had some eggs present (range=4-361 EPG) and at day 42 all but 1 yearling had eggs present (range=3-432 EPG). At day 42 the group mean FEC reduction had fallen from 100% to 67%. Results of this study do not support the use of the larvicidal dose of FBZ for small strongyle control. Larger field studies will be needed to investigate whether egg reappearance periods are shortening for MOX-treated horses.

  13. Direct infection and replication of naturally occurring hepatitis C virus genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 in normal human hepatocyte cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Buck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection afflicts about 170 million individuals worldwide. However, the HCV life cycle is only partially understood because it has not been possible to infect normal human hepatocytes in culture. The current Huh-7 systems use cloned, synthetic HCV RNA expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells to produce virions, but these cells cannot be infected with naturally occurring HCV obtained from infected patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe a human hepatocyte culture permissible to the direct infection with naturally occurring HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 in the blood of HCV-infected patients. The culture system mimics the biology and kinetics of HCV infection in humans, and produces infectious virions that can infect naïve human hepatocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This culture system should complement the existing systems, and may facilitate the understanding of the HCV life cycle, its effects in the natural host cell, the hepatocyte, as well as the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines.

  14. Immune memory-boosting dose of rapamycin impairs macrophage vesicle acidification and curtails glycolysis in effector CD8 cells, impairing defense against acute infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Emily L; Smithey, Megan J; Lutes, Lydia K; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2014-07-15

    Direct mammalian target of rapamycin (Rapa) complex 1 inhibition by short-term low-dose Rapa treatment has recently been shown to improve CD8 T cell immunological memory. Whereas these studies focused on memory development, the impact of low-dose Rapa on the primary immune response, particularly as it relates to functional effector immunity, is far less clear. In this study, we investigated the impact of acute Rapa treatment on immune effector cell function during the primary immune response to several acute infections. We found that functional CD8 T cell and macrophage responses to both viral and intracellular bacterial pathogens were depressed in mice in vivo and in humans to phorbol ester and calcium ionophore stimulation in vitro in the face of low-dose Rapa treatment. Mechanistically, the CD8 defect was linked to impaired glycolytic switch in stimulated naive cells and the reduced formation of short-lived effector cells. Therefore, more than one cell type required for a protective effector immune response is impaired by Rapa in both mice and humans, at the dose shown to improve immune memory and extend lifespan. This urges caution with regard to the relative therapeutic costs and benefits of Rapa treatment as means to improve immune memory. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Randomized Trial Evaluating the Impact of Ribavirin Mono-Therapy and Double Dosing on Viral Kinetics, Ribavirin Pharmacokinetics and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Waldenström

    Full Text Available In this pilot study (RibaC, 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α, (ii 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii standard-of-care (SOC ribavirin dosing concurrent with pegIFN-α. Four weeks of ribavirin mono-therapy resulted in a mean 0.46 log(10 IU/mL HCV RNA reduction differentially regulated across IL28B genotypes (0.89 vs. 0.21 log(10 IU/mL for CC and CT/TT respectively; P = 0.006, increased likelihood of undetectable HCV RNA week 4 after initiating pegIFN-α and thus shortened treatment duration (P<0.05, and decreased median IP-10 concentration from 550 to 345 pg/mL (P<0.001. Both experimental strategies impacted on ribavirin concentrations, and high levels were achieved after one week of double dosing. However, by day 14, double dosing entailed a greater hemoglobin decline as compared to SOC (2.2 vs. 1.4 g/dL; P = 0.03. Conclusion: Ribavirin down-regulates IP-10, and may have an anti-viral effect differently regulated across IL28B genotypes.

  16. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures.

  17. [The preparation phosprenyl suppresses diarrhea and cattle infectious rhinotracheitis virus multiplication in sensitive cell cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozherelkov, S V; Belousova, R V; Danilov, L L; Deeva, A V; Mal'tsev, S D; Narovlianskiĭ, A N; Sanin, A V; Pronin, A V

    2001-01-01

    Fosprenil suppressed the multiplication of cattle diarrhea virus in calf coronary vessel cell culture. Added to the culture of infected cells in a dose of 200 mg, the drug decreased the virus titer 30-fold in comparison with infected control cultures. Antiviral activity of fosprenil towards infective rhinotracheitis virus multiplication was still higher: in a dose of 100 mg it decreased the virus titer in fetal calf lung culture 100-fold in comparison with the control. Moreover, the cytopathogenic effects of the viruses in infected cultures were 24-48 h delayed under the effect of fosprenil in comparison with infected control cultures. These results recommend fosprenil for the treatment of cattle viral diseases.

  18. Pharmacist-managed dose adjustment feedback using therapeutic drug monitoring of vancomycin was useful for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections: a single institution experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Ryuichi; Sakamoto, Yuichi; Kitazawa, Junichi; Yamamoto, Shoji; Tachibana, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background Vancomycin (VCM) requires dose adjustment based on therapeutic drug monitoring. At Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, physicians carried out VCM therapeutic drug monitoring based on their experience, because pharmacists did not participate in the dose adjustment. We evaluated the impact of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASP) on attaining target VCM trough concentrations and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) parameters in patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Materials and methods The ASP was introduced in April 2012. We implemented a prospective audit of prescribed VCM dosages and provided feedback based on measured VCM trough concentrations. In a retrospective pre- and postcomparison study from April 2007 to December 2011 (preimplementation) and from April 2012 to December 2014 (postimplementation), 79 patients were treated for MRSA infection with VCM, and trough concentrations were monitored (pre, n=28; post, n=51). In 65 patients (pre, n=15; post, n=50), 24-hour area under the concentration–time curve (AUC 0–24 h)/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratios were calculated. Results Pharmacist feedback, which included recommendations for changing dose or using alternative anti-MRSA antibiotics, was highly accepted during postimplementation (88%, 29/33). The number of patients with serum VCM concentrations within the therapeutic range (10–20 μg/mL) was significantly higher during postimplementation (84%, 43/51) than during preimplementation (39%, 11/28) (P400) was significantly higher during postimplementation (84%, 42/50) than during preimplementation (53%, 8/15; P=0.013). There were no significant differences in nephrotoxicity or mortality rate. Conclusion Our ASP increased the percentage of patients that attained optimal VCM trough concentrations and PK/PD parameters, which contributed to the appropriate use of VCM in patients with MRSA infections. PMID:27789965

  19. True microbiota involved in chronic lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients found by culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Thomsen, Trine R; Alhede, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) develop chronic lung infection. In this study, we investigated the microorganisms present in transplanted CF lungs (n = 5) by standard culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis. A correspondence between culturing and the molecular methods was observed. In c...

  20. Sonication for diagnosis of catheter-related infection is not better than traditional roll-plate culture: a prospective cohort study with 975 central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Stefan; Frei, Reno; Schregenberger, Katharina; Dangel, Marc; Nogarth, Danica; Widmer, Andreas F

    2014-08-15

    This prospective randomized controlled study with 975 nontunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) showed that the semiquantitative roll-plate culture technique (SQC) was as accurate as the sonication method for diagnosis of catheter-related infections. Sonication is difficult to standardize, whereas SQC is simpler, faster, and as reliable as the sonication method for culturing CVCs.

  1. Might real-time pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic optimisation of high-dose continuous-infusion meropenem improve clinical cure in infections caused by KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Federico; Della Siega, Paola; Cojutti, Piergiorgio; Sartor, Assunta; Crapis, Massimo; Scarparo, Claudio; Bassetti, Matteo

    2017-02-01

    The effect of real-time pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) optimisation of high-dose continuous-infusion meropenem on the clinical outcome of patients receiving combination antimicrobial therapy for treatment of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) infections was retrospectively assessed. Data for all patients with KPC-Kp-related infections who received antimicrobial combination therapy containing high-dose continuous-infusion meropenem optimised by means of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) were retrieved. Optimal PK/PD exposure was considered a steady-state concentration to minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (Css/MIC) of 1-4. Univariate binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of clinical outcome. Among the 30 eligible patients, 53.3% had infections caused by meropenem-resistant KPC-Kp (MIC ≥ 16 mg/L). Tigecycline and colistin were the two antimicrobials most frequently combined with meropenem. Mean doses of continuous-infusion meropenem ranged from 1.7 to 13.2 g/daily. The Css/MIC ratio was ≥1 in 73.3% of cases and ≥4 in 50.0%. Clinical outcome was successful in 73.3% of cases after a median treatment length of 14.0 days. In univariate analysis, a significant correlation with successful clinical outcome was found for a Css/MIC ratio ≥1 (OR = 10.556, 95% CI 1.612-69.122; P = 0.014), a Css/MIC ratio ≥4 (OR = 12.250, 95% CI 1.268-118.361; P = 0.030) and a Charlson co-morbidity index of ≥4 (OR = 0.158, 95% CI 0.025-0.999; P = 0.05). High-dose continuous-infusion meropenem optimised by means of real-time TDM may represent a valuable tool in improving clinical outcome when dealing with the treatment of infections caused by KPC-Kp with a meropenem MIC ≤ 64 mg/L.

  2. Clinical outcomes and virology of equine influenza in a naïve population and in horses infected soon after receiving one dose of vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannegieter, N J; Frogley, A; Crispe, E; Kirkland, P D

    2011-07-01

    As part of the control measures of the equine influenza (EI) outbreak, in addition to the strategic use of vaccination to provide buffer zones around infected populations, approval was obtained to vaccinate Thoroughbred racing horses. We review the clinical expression of the disease and virus excretion in a population of racehorses that were exposed to EI approximately 7 days after administration of a single dose of the canarypox-vectored recombinant compared with a similar unvaccinated population of horses at a nearby racetrack. Although this study was undertaken opportunistically and under the difficult field conditions that prevailed during the outbreak, our observations demonstrate that an appropriate vaccine can be effectively used as a disease control measure, even in the face of an outbreak, and therefore should be rapidly implemented as soon as there is evidence of infection in a naïve population.

  3. Infection Agents Detected with Wound Culture in Patients with Diabetic Foot who will Undergo Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkan Mert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: We aimed to obtain the knowledge of appropriate antibiotic therapy and to make a contribution to improving treatment efficacy by conducting a microbiological study of diabetic foot ulcers. METHOD: 30 patients (18 male and 12 female with diabetic foot ulcer applying to our center for hyperbaric oxygen (HBO treatment in 2010 were enrolled in this study. The wounds were graded according to Meggitt-Wagner classification system. Wound cultures were obtained before starting antibiotic therapy and HBO treatment. Phoenix system (Becton Dickinson, USA and Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion antibiotic sensitivity testing were used in order to detect the antimicrobial susceptibility of the infection agents. The number of HBO sessions, glycemic control and treatment results were assessed. RESULTS: Mean age of the patients was 61.3 years (range: 35-83. 24 patients had a good glycemic control and 6 patients had not. The patients were given 5 to 55 HBO sessions (mean: 20. Of the 30 patients 19 (63.33% recovered from the infection but 11 (36.67% have not responded to the treatment. 14 different infectious agents were detected in diabetic foot ulcers we examined. Gram-positive agents were isolated in 12 (40% out of 30 wound cultures and gram-negative agents were isolated in 18 (60% wound culture. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was predominantly isolated and the other agents isolated were enterococcus faecalis, klebsiella pneumoniae, staphylococcus aureus and escherichia coli. CONCLUSION: The outcomes can not represent the general population rates due to the restriction factors. They give only an idea about the probability of infectious agent spectrum in diabetic foot ulcers and their antibiotic susceptibility. We want to attract attention to the fact that although pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are mostly encountered in hospital, they can also be acquired from the community and it will be useful to develop appropriate antibiotic policies and treatment protocols. [TAF

  4. Was the increase in culture-confirmed Campylobacter infections in Denmark during the 1990s a surveillance artefact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Teunis, Peter; Simonsen, Jacob; Krogfelt, Karen A; Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Takkinen, Johanna; Mølbak, Kåre

    2015-01-01

    In 1991, 1999 and 2006, randomly selected individuals from the Danish Central Personal Register provided a serum sample. From individuals aged 30 years and above, 500 samples from each year were analysed for Campylobacter IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies using a direct ELISA method. We applied a seroincidence calculator available from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control to perform a mathematical back-calculation to estimate the annual Campylobacter seroincidence in the Danish population. The estimated Campylobacter seroincidence did not differ significantly between the 1991, 1999 and 2006 studies although the reported number of culture-confirmed cases of Campylobacter infection increased 2.5 fold from 1993 to 1999 among individuals aged 30 years and above. This suggests that Campylobacter was widely present in the Danish population before the increase in poultry-associated clinical Campylobacter infections observed from 1993 to 2001 among individuals of this age groups.

  5. Microscopy, culture, and sensitive management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in adults in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivathasan, Niroshan; Rakowski, Krzysztof R

    2011-06-01

    The high prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) places a significant burden on healthcare systems. Clinicians may over-manage the issue, and there is great variability in practice, with economic- and resource- implications. Up to 40% of patients with a suspected UTI do not have an infection. Using PubMed (Medline) to shortlist relevant papers in English from the last 30 years, and further sub-selection to include only uncomplicated UTIs in adults in primary care, we reviewed the literature pertaining to uncomplicated UTIs, and how it should be managed efficiently in the primary care setting. In general practice, there is no advantage to routinely request microscopy and culture of urine samples in the presence of an appropriate history and urinalysis reagent-strip testing. If antibiotics are required, then a 3-day course shall suffice. Larger epidemiological studies focusing on more susceptible sub-populations may provide better guidance for discriminatory factors to produce an algorithm for treatment.

  6. Hantavirus infection suppresses thrombospondin-1 expression in cultured endothelial cells in a strain-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana F Khaiboullina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus infection is associated with two frequently fatal diseases in humans: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS. The pathogenesis of hantavirus infection is complex and not fully understood; however, it is believed to involve virus-induced hyperinflammatory immune responses. Thrombospondin-1 (THBS1 is a large homotrimeric protein that plays a putative role in regulating blood homeostasis. Hyperresponsiveness to inflammatory stimuli has also been associated with defects in the THBS1 gene. Our data suggest that hantavirus infection of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVEC suppress the accumulation of THBS1 in the extracellular matrix. Additionally, this suppression is dependent on virus replication, implying a direct mechanism of action. Our data also imply that the pathogenic Andes and Hantaan strains inhibit THBS1 expression while the non-pathogenic Prospect Hill strain showed little inhibition. These observations suggest that a dysregulation of THBS1 may contribute to the pathogenesis of hantavirus infection.

  7. Behavior of sensitivity and resistance in urine cultures of adult patients with urinary infection Manizales, 2009.

    OpenAIRE

    Cardona Botero, Marcela; Coral Castro, Sayra Catalina; Castaño Castrillón, José Jaime; Profesor titular, facultad de ciencias de la salud, universidad de manizales.; Gallo Martínez, Ximena; Gañán Luque, Alejandra; García Fernández, Yandri Lorena; López Cardona, Viviana; Pineda Hernández, Paula Johana; Serna Osorio, Carlos Fernando; Villegas Arenas, Oscar Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background: In medical practice, Urinary Infection is among the most common community-acquired infections, mainly affecting the female population and occupies between the second and third leading cause of consultations in health centers. This study aims to describe and analyze the epidemiology of this disease in adult patients who consulted in two health centers Manizales(Caldas, Colombia) 2009.Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study which included clinical and laboratory findings of 1...

  8. Concentrations of tilmicosin in mammary gland secretions of dairy cows following subcutaneous administration of one or two doses of an experimental preparation of tilmicosin and its efficacy against intramammary infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Jesus; Martínez-Cortés, Ismael; López-Ordaz, Reyes; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Sumano, Hector

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the concentration of tilmicosin in mammary gland secretions of dairy cows following administration of an experimental preparation once or twice during the dry period (45-day period immediately prior to calving during which cows are not milked) and to evaluate its efficacy for the treatment of cows with intramammary infections (IMIs) caused by Staphylococcus aureus at dry off (cessation of milking; first day of dry period), compared with that of an intramammary infusion of ceftiofur. ANIMALS 172 cows. PROCEDURES Milk samples were collected for microbiological culture 5 days before dry off and at calving and 15 and 30 days after calving. Cows with Staphylococcus IMIs were randomly assigned to receive an experimental preparation of tilmicosin (20 mg/kg, SC) once at dry off (n = 58) or at dry off and again 20 days later (56) or receive a long-acting intramammary preparation of ceftiofur (500 mg/mammary gland; 56) at dry off. Mammary gland secretions were collected from 5 cows in the tilmicosin-treated groups every 5 days after dry off until calving for determination of tilmicosin concentration. RESULTS Mean maximum concentration of tilmicosin in mammary gland secretions ranged from 14.4 to 20.9 μg/mL after the first dose and was 17.1 μg/mL after the second dose. The bacteriologic cure rate was 100% for all 3 treatments. Tilmicosin was detectable for 0 and 18 days after calving in the milk of cows treated with 1 and 2 doses of tilmicosin, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of an experimental preparation of tilmicosin (20 mg/kg, SC) once to dairy cows at dry off might be useful for the treatment of S aureus IMIs.

  9. Inhibitory effect of chromogenic culture media on the growth of Rhodotorula: relevance to the diagnosis of Rhodotorula spp. infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Grenouillet, Frédéric; François, Nadine; Skana, Florence; Millon, Laurence

    2013-11-01

    With the increasing incidence and diverse etiologies of fungal infections, chromogenic yeast culture media are increasingly used for routine diagnosis. Rhodotorula species, which are characterized by the production of carotenoid pigments, are considered as emerging opportunistic pathogens. We recently diagnosed two fungemia due to Rhodotorula spp. and noticed that in both cases, the yeast failed to grow in subculture on the chromogenic yeast culture medium. This study was thus undertaken to investigate more thoroughly the ability (or inability) of Rhodotorula species to grow on different commercially available chromogenic media for yeast. Eighteen Rhodotorula spp. were checked for their ability to grow on four chromogenic yeast culture media: CHROMagar Candida (BD), Candi 4 Select (Biorad), Brilliance Candida (Oxoid), and Candida ID 2 (BioMerieux). All the Rhodotorula spp. strains grew on Brilliance and Candida ID 2, while only six isolates grew on Candi 4, and seven on CHROMagar. Two chromogenic yeast culture media showed a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of Rhodotorula species. As all Rhodotorula species are resistant to echinocandins and fluconazole, it is essential to isolate and identify these yeast quickly to initiate appropriate amphotericin B antifungal treatment as early as possible. The choice of media for routine use should take into account the ability of different media to allow all emerging fungal pathogens to grow. © 2013 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Elimination of toxicity and enhanced detection of lumpy skin disease virus on cell culture from experimentally infected bovine semen samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, V P; Osuagwuh, U I; Annandale, C H; Irons, P C; Venter, E H

    2006-12-01

    Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV), a poxvirus of the genus Capripoxvirus, is shed in the semen of infected bulls. The screening of semen for infectious virus requires a sensitive diagnostic method. The isolation of the virus on cell cultures and/or the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are sensitive diagnostic tests which may be used to screen semen for LSD viral DNA prior to artificial insemination. Although cell culture detects infectious virus and is a sensitive method, there are major difficulties in using this method due to the toxic effect of semen on the cells. The aim of this study was to find a method that decreases the toxic effect of semen and enhances the isolation of LSDV on cell culture. Semen samples from LSDV sero-negative bulls were collected and infected with a field isolate of LSDV, strain V248/93, with a titre of 6.5 log TCID50. The semen samples were treated with one of four different methods: centrifugation, serial dilution, filtration and chemical treatment with kaolin. The samples subjected to centrifugation, serial dilution and filtration were supplemented with gentamycin. Semen toxicity on cell cultures was eliminated when supernatants of semen samples centrifuged at 2000 rpm for 1, 3 and 5 min and serially diluted were used to inoculate confluent monolayer bovine dermis cells. The toxicity recorded when the pellet fractions of semen samples centrifuged for 5 min at 2000 rpm was comparable to results obtained from serially diluted samples supplemented with gentamycin. Filtration and kaolin treatment of semen samples did not remove the toxic effect.

  11. Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Does My Child Need? How to Safely Give Acetaminophen Is It a Cold or the Flu? Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family? Too Late for the Flu Vaccine? Common Childhood Infections Can Chronic Ear Infections Cause Long-Term Hearing Loss? Chickenpox Cold Sores Common Cold Diarrhea Fever and ...

  12. Rate of re-infection of tissue culture-derived Latin American and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-20

    Dec 20, 2010 ... The virus-free plants had been produced through meristem-tip culture and .... establish a field experiment in a randomized complete block design with four ..... monoclonal antibodies to African cassava mosaic virus and.

  13. Evaluation of PCR, culture, and serology for diagnosis of Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.A.J. Verkooyen (Roel); D. Willemse; S.C. Hiep-van Casteren; S.A. Joulandan; R.J. Snijder; H.P. van Helden; M.F. Peeters; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); J.M. van den Bosch (Jules)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWe prospectively studied 156 patients with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia requiring admission. Several respiratory specimens were obtained for the detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae by cell culture and PCR. Three serum samples were obtained from

  14. Culture change in infection control: applying psychological principles to improve hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbler, Ethan; Castillo, Leilani; Satorie, Laura; Ford, Deborah; Hagman, Jan; Hodge, Therese; Price, Lisa; Wald, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Hand hygiene occurs at the intersection of habit and culture. Psychological and social principles, including operant conditioning and peer pressure of conforming social norms, facilitate behavior change. Participatory leadership and level hierarchies are needed for sustainable patient safety culture. Application of these principles progressively and significantly improved hand hygiene compared with the hospital aggregate control. Changes to hand hygiene auditing and response processes demonstrate ability to improve and sustain adherence rates within a clinical microsystem.

  15. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Naoki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kubota, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kubota-cbu@umin.ac.jp [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kosaka, Kentarou; Akita, Shinsuke; Sasahara, Yoshitarou; Kira, Tomoe [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kuroda, Masayuki [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Bujo, Hideaki [Department of Clinical-Laboratory and Experimental-Research Medicine, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura-shi, Chiba, #285-8741 (Japan); Satoh, Kaneshige [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings.

  16. Study on persistent infection of Japanese encephalitis virus Beijing-1 strain in serum-free Sf9 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun; Lee, Su Jeen; Park, Jin Yong; Park, Yong Wook; Kim, Hyun Sung; Kang, Heui-Yun; Hur, Byung-Ki; Ryu, Yeon-Woo; Han, Sang In; Kim, Jong Su

    2004-03-01

    Sf9 cells have obvious advantages for the conventional production technology of vaccine. They are useful tools for high concentration and large-scale cultures. Sf9 cells were grown to maximal concentration, 8 x 10(6) cells/ml in a 500ml spinner flask, with a doubling time at the exponentially growing phase of 24.5 hours, using serum-free media. To explore the ability of Sf9 cells to be infected by the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus Beijing-1 strain, Sf9 cells were infected with the virus. By 4-5 days post-infection, 10-15% of the Sf9 cells showed cytopathic effect (CPE), from granularity to the formation of syncytia and multinucleated giant cells continuously observed over a period of 35 days. Positive fluorescent reactions were detected in 30-40% of cells infected with the JE virus Beijing-1 strain, and the uninfected Sf9 cells were completely negative. Virus particles, propagated in Sf9 and Vero cells, were concentrated by sedimentation on 40% trehalose cushions by ultracentrifugation, and showed identical patterns of viral morphogenesis. Complete virus particles, 40 to 50 nm in diameter, were observed, and JE virus envelope (E) proteins, at 53 kDa, were found in the western blot analysis to the anti-JE virus E protein monoclonal antibody and reacted as a magenta band in the same position to the glycoprotein staining. To evaluate whether the infectious virus was produced in Sf9 cells inoculated with the JE virus Beijing-1 stain, Sf9 cells were inoculated with the virus, and sample harvested every 5 days. The titers of the JE virus Beijing-1 strain rose from 1.0 x 10(5) to 1.5 x 10(6) pfu/ml. The infected Sf9 cells could be sub-cultured in serum-free medium, with no change in the plaque sizes formed by the JE virus Beijing-1 strain in the plaque assay. It is suggested that the ability of the JE virus Beijing-1 strain to infect Sf9 cells in serum-free media will provide a useful insect cell system, where the JE virus replication, cytopathogenicity and vaccine

  17. Dose-response met-RANTES treatment of experimental periodontitis: a narrow edge between the disease severity attenuation and infection control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Repeke

    Full Text Available Chemokines and chemokine receptors have been implicated in the selective migration of leukocyte subsets to periodontal tissues, which consequently influences the disease outcome. Among these chemoattractants, the chemokines CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 and its receptors, CCR1 and CCR5, have been associated with increased disease severity in mice and humans. Therefore, in this study we investigated the modulation of experimental periodontitis outcome by the treatment with a specific antagonist of CCR1 and 5 receptors, called met-RANTES. C57Bl/6 mice was orally infected with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and treated with 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.5 and 5 mg doses of met-RANTES on alternate days, and evaluated by morphometric, cellular, enzymatic and molecular methods. At 0.5 mg up to 5 mg doses, a strong reduction in the alveolar bone loss and inflammatory cell migration were observed. Interestingly, 5 mg dose treatment resulted in the maximum inhibition of inflammatory cell migration, but resulted in a similar inhibition of bone loss when compared with the lower doses, and also resulted in increased bacterial load and CRP response. When 0.5 and 5 mg therapy regimens were compared it was observed that both therapeutic protocols were able to downregulate the levels of pro-inflammatory, Th1-type and osteoclastogenic cytokines, and CD3+ and F4/80+ cells migration to periodontal tissues, but the high dose modulates host response in a more pronounced and unspecific and excessive way, interfering also with the production of antimicrobial mediators such as MPO, iNOS and IgG, and with GR1+ and CD19+ cells migration. Our results demonstrate a thin line between beneficial immunoregulation and impaired host defense during experimental periodontitis, and the determination of the exact equilibrium point is mandatory for the improvement of immune-targeted therapy of periodontitis.

  18. A Low Ethanol Dose Affects all Types of Cells in Mixed Long-Term Embryonic Cultures of the Cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickering, Chris; Wicher, Grzegorz; Rosendahl, Sofi

    2010-01-01

    The beneficial effect of the '1-drink-a-day' lifestyle is suggested by studies of cardiovascular health, and this recommendation is increasingly followed in many countries. The main objective of this study was to determine whether this pattern of ethanol use would be detrimental to a pregnant woman....... We exposed a primary culture of rat cerebellum from embryonic day 17 (corresponding to second trimester in humans) to ethanol at a concentration of 17.6 mM which is roughly equivalent to one glass of wine. Acutely, there was no change in cell viability after 5 or 8 days of exposure relative...... to control. By 11 days, a reduction in the number of viable cells was observed without an accompanying change in caspase-3 activity (marker of apoptotic cell death), suggesting changes in cell proliferation. As the proportion of nestin-positive cells was higher in the ethanol-treated cultures after 5 days...

  19. Effect of dose and frequency of exposure to infectious stages on trematode infection intensity and success in mussels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liddell, C.; Welsh, J.E.; van der Meer, J.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2017-01-01

    Marine parasites such as trematodes often compromise the fitness of their hosts. Sucheffects are generally considered to be density-dependent, i.e. the greater the infection intensity inthe host, the greater the detrimental impact on host fitness. However, the mechanisms determininginfection in

  20. Prevalence of intestinal protozoa infection among school-aged children on Pemba Island, Tanzania, and effect of single-dose albendazole, nitazoxanide and albendazole-nitazoxanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speich, Benjamin; Marti, Hanspeter; Ame, Shaali M; Ali, Said M; Bogoch, Isaac I; Utzinger, Jürg; Albonico, Marco; Keiser, Jennifer

    2013-01-04

    Pathogenic intestinal protozoa infections are common in school-aged children in the developing world and they are frequently associated with malabsorption syndromes and gastrointestinal morbidity. Since diagnosis of these parasites is difficult, prevalence data on intestinal protozoa is scarce. We collected two stool samples from school-aged children on Pemba Island, Tanzania, as part of a randomized controlled trial before and 3 weeks after treatment with (i) single-dose albendazole (400 mg); (ii) single-dose nitazoxanide (1,000 mg); (iii) nitazoxanide-albendazole combination (1,000 mg-400 mg), with each drug given separately on two consecutive days; and (iv) placebo. Formalin-fixed stool samples were examined for the presence of intestinal protozoa using an ether-concentration method to determine the prevalence and estimate cure rates (CRs). Almost half (48.7%) of the children were diagnosed with at least one of the (potentially) pathogenic protozoa Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar and Blastocystis hominis. Observed CRs were high for all treatment arms, including placebo. Nitazoxanide showed a significant effect compared to placebo against the non-pathogenic protozoon Entamoeba coli. Intestinal protozoa infections might be of substantial health relevance even in settings where they are not considered as a health problem. Examination of a single stool sample with the ether-concentration method lacks sensitivity for the diagnosis of intestinal protozoa, and hence, care is indicated when interpreting prevalence estimates and treatment effects.

  1. THE CELLS WITH MYCOBACTERIA IN GRANULOMATOUS AGGREGATES FROM MICE WITH LATENT TUBERCULOUS INFECTION IN EX VIVO CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Ufimtseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of this study was to obtain ex vivo monolayer culture cells migrated from individual granulomas isolated from the spleens of the Balb/c line mice through 1–2 months after BCG vaccine infection. The second goal was to evaluate influence of different types of cells in the development of granulomatic inflammation and analysis of BCG bacteria content in these cells in the latent stage of tuberculosis. Granulomas were presented by macrophages in general. The number of granulomas was varied as in one mouse as between mice. Granulomas contained also dendritic cells (in average 10% from macrophages of granulomas and lymphocytes. In some granulomas fibroblasts, neutrophils, eosiniphils, multinuclear cells of Pirogov–Langhans, megacariocytes and platelets were observed in all stages of infection. The number of these cells was also varied between granulomas. The acid staining BCG bacteria were only detected in macrophages, dendritic cells and Pirogov–Langhans cells of mice granulomas. Mice were different as by number of cells with BCG bacteria in granulomas as by number of granulomas with BCG-containing cells. The proposed model of granuloma cells of mice in ex vivo culture can be used to study interaction between host cells and mycobacteria to find new ways and methods of influence to intracellular pathogens in latent stage of tuberculosis. 

  2. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  3. Single strain isolation method for cell culture-adapted hepatitis C virus by end-point dilution and infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Sugiyama

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV culture system has enabled us to clarify the HCV life cycle and essential host factors for propagation. However, the virus production level of wild-type JFH-1 (JFH-1/wt is limited, and this leads to difficulties in performing experiments that require higher viral concentrations. As the cell culture-adapted JFH-1 has been reported to have robust virus production, some mutations in the viral genome may play a role in the efficiency of virus production. In this study, we obtained cell culture-adapted virus by passage of full-length JFH-1 RNA-transfected Huh-7.5.1 cells. The obtained virus produced 3 log-fold more progeny viruses as compared with JFH-1/wt. Several mutations were identified as being responsible for robust virus production, but, on reverse-genetics analysis, the production levels of JFH-1 with these mutations did not reach the level of cell culture-adapted virus. By using the single strain isolation method by end-point dilution and infection, we isolated two strains with additional mutations, and found that these strains have the ability to produce more progeny viruses. On reverse-genetics analysis, the strains with these additional mutations were able to produce robust progeny viruses at comparable levels as cell culture-adapted JFH-1 virus. The strategy used in this study will be useful for identifying strains with unique characteristics, such as robust virus production, from a diverse population, and for determining the responsible mutations for these characteristics.

  4. Culture Positivity of CVCs Used for TPN: Investigation of an Association with Catheter-Related Infection and Comparison of Causative Organisms between ICU and Non-ICU CVCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criona Walshe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between central venous catheter (CVC tip colonisation and catheter-related blood-stream infection (CRBSI has been suggested. We examined culture positivity of CVC tips (colonised and infected CVCs in a total parenteral nutrition (TPN population. Our aims were to define the relationship between culture positivity and CRBSI, and to compare causative organisms between culture positive and CRBSI CVCS, and between ward and ICU CVCs. All patients receiving TPN via non-tunnelled CVCs during the study (1997–2009 were included. All CVC tips were analysed. Data were collated contemporaneously. A TPN audit committee determined whether CVC tip culture positivity reflected colonisation/CRBSI using CDC criteria. 1,392 patients received TPN via 2,565 CVCs over 15,397 CVC days. 25.4% of CVCs tips were culture positive, of these 32% developed CRBSI. There was a nonsignificant trend of higher Gram negative Bacilli isolation in ICU CVCs (=0.1, ward CVCs were associated with higher rates of staphylococcal isolation (=0.01. A similar pattern of organisms were cultured from CRBSI and culture positive CVCs. The consistent relationship between CRBSI and culture positive CVCs, and similar pattern of causative organisms further supports an aetiological relationship between culture positive CVC tips and CRBSI, supporting the contention that CVC culture-positivity may be a useful surrogate marker for CRBSI rates.

  5. Prevalent and persistent viral infection in cultures of the coral algal endosymbiont Symbiodinium

    KAUST Repository

    Weynberg, Karen D.

    2017-03-17

    Reef corals are under threat from bleaching and disease outbreaks that target both the host animal and the algal symbionts within the coral holobiont. A viral origin for coral bleaching has been hypothesized, but direct evidence has remained elusive. Using a multifaceted approach incorporating flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, DNA and RNA virome sequencing, we show that type C1 Symbiodinium cultures host a nucleocytoplasmic large double-stranded DNA virus (NCLDV) related to Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae, a novel filamentous virus of unknown phylogenetic affiliation, and a single-stranded RNA virus related to retroviruses. We discuss implications of these findings for laboratory-based experiments using Symbiodinium cultures.

  6. Prevalent and persistent viral infection in cultures of the coral algal endosymbiont Symbiodinium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weynberg, Karen D.; Neave, Matthew; Clode, Peta L.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Brownlee, Christopher; Laffy, Patrick; Webster, Nicole S.; Levin, Rachel A.; Wood-Charlson, Elisha M.; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2017-09-01

    Reef corals are under threat from bleaching and disease outbreaks that target both the host animal and the algal symbionts within the coral holobiont. A viral origin for coral bleaching has been hypothesized, but direct evidence has remained elusive. Using a multifaceted approach incorporating flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, DNA and RNA virome sequencing, we show that type C1 Symbiodinium cultures host a nucleocytoplasmic large double-stranded DNA virus (NCLDV) related to Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae, a novel filamentous virus of unknown phylogenetic affiliation, and a single-stranded RNA virus related to retroviruses. We discuss implications of these findings for laboratory-based experiments using Symbiodinium cultures.

  7. Comparing culture and molecular methods for the identification of microorganisms involved in necrotizing soft tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Xu, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    made including infection by a) Acinetobacter baumannii, b) Streptococcus pneumoniae, and c) fungi, mycoplasma and Fusobacterium necrophorum. CONCLUSION: The study emphasizes that many pathogens can be involved in NSTIs, and that no specific "NSTI causing" combination of species exists. This means...

  8. Epstein-Barr virus infection in ex vivo tonsil epithelial cell cultures of asymptomatic carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pegtel, DM; Middeldorp, J.M.; Thorley-Lawson, DA

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is found frequently in certain epithelial pathologies, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and oral hairy leukoplakia, indicating that the virus can infect epithelial cells in vivo. Recent studies of cell lines imply that epithelial cells may also play a role in persistent EBV

  9. Use of microbial cultures and antibiotics in the prevention of infection-associated preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Laura L; Gibbs, Ronald S

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize recent evidence regarding infection-associated preterm birth and to make appropriate recommendations. Antepartum treatment of lower genital tract infection or bacterial colonization has been found to reduce the incidence of preterm birth in the case of asymptomatic bacteriuria and bacterial vaginosis in selected patients but has been proved to be ineffective for vaginal colonization with organisms such as Ureaplasma urealyticum and group B streptococcus. This is a clinical opinion based on a review of recent data related to 1) the association between lower genital tract infection and preterm birth and 2) antibiotic trials to prevent preterm birth. Antepartum treatment of lower genital tract infection or bacterial colonization has been found to reduce the incidence of preterm birth in the case of asymptomatic bacteriuria and bacterial vaginosis in selected patients, but has been proven to be ineffective for vaginal colonization with organisms such as Ureaplasma urealyticum and group B streptococcus. Large well-designed trials have shown that the routine administration of antibiotics to women with preterm labor and intact membranes is not beneficial; however, antibiotic regimens including macrolides are recommended for preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Large well-designed trials have shown that the routine administration of antibiotics to women with preterm labor and intact membranes is not beneficial; however, antibiotic regimens that include macrolides are recommended for preterm premature rupture of the membranes.

  10. Site of cleavage in infected cells and polypeptides of representative paramyxoviruses grown in cultured cells of the chorioallantoic membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, J.T.; Garten, W.; Rott, R. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1981-01-01

    Cultured cells of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) fulfilled the need of using the same cell system that was permissive for representative paramyxoviruses to carry out studies on the biosynthesis of their glycoproteins in infected cells. The polypeptide composition of the respective paramyxoviruses (Newcastle disease virus (NDV), paramyxovirus Yucaipa (PMY), and Sendai virus), grown in eggs and CAM-cells, was essentially identical. In egg-grown PMY a large glycoprotein (LGP) was present but only in some CAM-grown preparations of virus labeled with (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine and rarely in (/sup 35/S)-methionine or (/sup 3/H)-amino acids (valine, leucine, and tyrosine) labeled viruses. The site of cleavage of precursor F/sub 0/ to Fsub(1,2) was not the same. In contrast to the cleavage of Sendai virus glycoprotein, cleavage was intracellular in NDV and PMY infected cells. Homologous antisera against the glycoproteins failed to inhibit cleavage of HN/sub 0/ or F/sub 0/ in cells infected with the representative paramyxoviruses.

  11. Natural and cultured populations of the mangrove oyster Saccostrea palmula from Sinaloa, Mexico, infected by Perkinsus marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge; Ortega, Mauricio García; Vásquez-Yeomans, Rebeca; García, Teresa de Jesús Pineda; Stokes, Nancy A; Carnegie, Ryan B

    2012-07-01

    The mangrove oyster Saccostrea palmula coexists with the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in coastal lagoons of northwest Mexico. Recent discovery of Perkinsus marinus infecting the pleasure oyster in the region prompted evaluation of S. palmula as an alternative P. marinus host. An analysis to determine the possible presence of P. marinus in natural and cultured populations of S. palmula at four coastal lagoons in Sinaloa, Mexico was carried out during October-November 2010. Tissues from apparently healthy S. palmula were evaluated using Ray's fluid thioglycollate method (RFTM), which revealed a Perkinsus sp. to be present in all four locations at 6.7-20.0% prevalence. Histopathological analysis of these specimens showed tissue alterations and parasite forms consistent with moderate P. marinus infection, which was confirmed by ribosomal non-transcribed spacer (NTS)-based PCR assays on DNA samples from oysters positive by RFTM and histology. DNA sequencing of amplified NTS fragments (307 bp) produced a sequence 98-100% similar to GenBank-deposited sequences of the NTS from P. marinus. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for Perkinsus spp. and P. marinus corroborated the PCR results, showing clear hybridization of P. marinus in host tissues. This is the first record of P. marinus infecting a species from genus Saccostrea and the first record of the parasite from coastal lagoons in Sinaloa, Mexico. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Cervical Mucosa in Transmission Bottleneck during Acute HIV-1 Infection Using a Cervical Tissue-Based Organ Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengli; Ding, Ming; Ratner, Deena; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Chen, Yue; Gupta, Phalguni

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there are different strains of HIV-1 in a chronically infected individual, only one or limited virus strains are successfully transmitted to a new individual. The reason for this “transmission bottleneck” is as yet unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings A human cervical explant model was used to measure HIV-1 transmission efficiency of viral strains from chronic infections, and transmitter/founder variants. We also evaluated the genetic characteristics of HIV-1 variants in the inoculums compared to those transmitted across the cervical mucosa. Eight different HIV-1 isolates were used in this study, six chronic isolates and two transmitter/founder viruses. The transmission efficiency of the chronic and transmitter/founder virus isolates and the viral diversity of chronic isolates before and after viral transmission were assessed. The results indicate that transmitter/founder viruses did not display higher transmission efficiency than chronic HIV-1 isolates. Furthermore, no evidence for a difference in diversity was found between the inoculums and transmitted virus strains. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the sequences of variants in the inoculums and those present in transmitted virus intermingled irrespective of co-receptor usage. In addition, the inoculum and transmitted variants had a similar pairwise distance distribution. Conclusion There was no selection of a single or limited number of viral variants during HIV-1 transmission across the cervical mucosa in the organ culture model, indicating that the cervical mucosa alone may not produce the transmission bottleneck of HIV-1 infection observed in vivo. PMID:22412886

  13. Host and environmental risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium scophthalmi (Apicomplexa) infection in cultured turbot, Psetta maxima (L.) (Pisces, Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Pellitero, Pilar; Perez, Andrés; Quiroga, M Isabel; Redondo, M José; Vázquez, Sonia; Riaza, Ana; Palenzuela, Oswaldo; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Nieto, José M

    2009-11-12

    An epidemiological cohort study of Cryptosporidium scophthalmi in cultured turbot Psetta maxima L. of Northwestern Spain was conducted along a four-year period. Four different ongrowing cohorts were monitored monthly from introduction into the ongrowing tanks (10-50 g) until reaching market size (400-1400 g). The association of host and environmental factors with five categories of parasite abundance was assessed using a multivariable regression framework. Epidemiological factors assessed here were water temperature, weight, length, month of collection, season, age, origin, condition factor, water filtration, and status to the myxozoan Enteromyxum scophthalmi infection. E. scophthalmi was included into the analysis because it targets the same organ than C. scophthalmi and it was prevalent in the studied population. The multivariable analysis demonstrated the statistically significant association between several factors and parasite abundance. C. scophthalmi abundance was associated (P<0.05) with age, condition factor, season, and status to E. scophthalmi infection. Young animals, with poor condition factor, during spring or summer, and not infected with the myxozoan were most likely to be highly infected by C. scophthalmi. Inclusion of these four variables significantly (P<0.05) improved the model, compared to the model that did not include any of these epidemiological factors. Increasing levels of C. scophthalmi abundance were associated (P<0.01) with higher severity of C. scophthalmi-compatible lesions. The frequency of distribution of C. scophthalmi abundance was clearly right-skewed and fitted a negative binomial distribution, whereas the intensity of infection fitted a Poisson distribution. The quantification of the variance-to-mean ratio stratified by age demonstrated overdispersion for 8-16 months old fish, although this bivariate association is likely affected by several other factors, as suggested by the results of the multivariable analysis. The negative

  14. Response of cupuassu embryonic axes (Theobroma grandiflorum Schum.) to salts concentration, sucrose doses and culture medium renewal

    OpenAIRE

    FERREIRA MARIA DAS GRAÇAS RODRIGUES; NINAMANGO CÁRDENAS FERNANDO ENRIQUE; CARVALHO CARLOS HENRIQUE SIQUEIRA DE; CARNEIRO ANDRÉA ALMEIDA; DAMIÃO FILHO CARLOS FERREIRA

    2002-01-01

    Foram estudados os efeitos da concentração de sais, doses de sacarose e freqüência de renovação do meio de cultura para o desenvolvimento de eixos embrionários de cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum Schum.). Testaram-se 2 concentrações de sais MS (100 e 50%), 2 níveis de sacarose (1,5 e 3%) e 3 freqüências de renovação dos meios (sem renovação, renovação aos 30 e aos 60 dias), com os meios acrescidos de ANA (0,5 mg/L) e BAP (0,3 mg/L.), semi-solidificados com ágar 0,7% e pH 5,7. Observou-se que a...

  15. Diagnosing herpesvirus infections by real-time amplification and rapid culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Guldemeester; H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractProcedures using real-time technique were developed to demonstrate the presence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2, varicella zoster virus (VZV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in miscellaneous clinical specimens. The assays were compared to rapid culture using centrifugation fo

  16. Preoperative screening cultures in the identification of staphylococci causing wound and valvular infections in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. J. Ridgway; A.P.R. Wilson; M. C. Kelsey

    1990-01-01

    textabstractCultures of nasal or presternal swabs form part of the routine preoperative screening of patients on the cardiac surgical ward. During a trial of antibiotic prophylaxis in 314 patients, preoperative isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci were compared with

  17. Alternative methods to determine infectivity of Tulane virus: a surrogate for human norovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culturable animal caliciviruses are widely-used as surrogates for human norovirus (HuNoV), which can not replicate in cells. The infectivity of a culturable virus was traditionally determined by plaque assay and/or 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay, both of which are time-consuming ...

  18. Low-dose gamma irradiation following hot water immersion of papaya (Carica papaya linn.) fruits provides additional control of postharvest fungal infection to extend shelf life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, M. H. A.; Grout, B. W. W.; Continella, A.; Mahmud, T. M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Low-dose gamma irradiation (0.08 kGy over 10 min), a level significantly below that required to satisfy the majority of international quarantine regulations, has been employed to provide a significant reduction in visible fungal infection on papaya fruit surfaces. This is appropriate for local and national markets in producer countries where levels of commercial acceptability can be retained despite surface lesions due to fungal infection. Irradiation alone and in combination with hot-water immersion (50 °C for 10 min) has been applied to papaya (Carica papaya L.) fruits at both the mature green and 1/3 yellow stages of maturity. The incidence and severity of surface fungal infections, including anthracnose, were significantly reduced by the combined treatment compared to irradiation or hot water treatment alone, extending storage at 11 °C by 13 days and retaining commercial acceptability. The combined treatment had no significant, negative impact on ripening, with quality characteristics such as surface and internal colour change, firmness, soluble solids, acidity and vitamin C maintained at acceptable levels.

  19. Evaluation of medicinal plants and colloidal silver efficiency against Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection in Litopenaeus vannamei cultured at low salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Covarrubias, María Soledad; García-Aguilar, Noemí; Bolan-Mejía, María Del; Puello-Cruz, Ana Carmela

    2016-11-22

    In shrimp aquaculture, reduction in the use of synthetic antibiotics is a priority due to the high incidence of resistant bacteria (Vibrio) in the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. An increasing number of studies show bactericidal activity of natural treatments in aquaculture. The effectiveness of neem (Azadirachta indica) and oregano (Lippia berlandieri) aqueous extracts and colloidal silver against V. parahaemolyticus were evaluated in low salinity shrimp culture. Results show that aqueous extracts of oregano and neem each present a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 62.50 mg ml-1 and inhibitory halos of 12.0 to 19.0 mm. Colloidal silver gave a MIC of 2 mg ml-1, and the inhibitory halos were found to be between 11.8 and 18.8 mm, depending on treatment concentrations. An in vivo challenge test was conducted on white shrimp postlarvae cultured at low salinity (5 practical salinity units, PSU), and a significant increase (p colloidal silver 90%), when compared to the control (0%) in the challenge test. However, no significant differences were observed between treatments, suggesting that they all act as alternative bactericidal source agents against V. parahaemolyticus infections for L. vannamei postlarvae when cultured at 5 PSU.

  20. Dose-dependent differential effect of hemin on protein synthesis and cell proliferation in Leishmania donovani promastigotes cultured in vitro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayanta K Pal; Manisha Joshi-Purandare

    2001-06-01

    Leishmania donovani requires an exogenous source of heme for growth and transformation. In in vitro culture of the free-living promastigotes, exogenously added hemin enhances cell proliferation. In this investigation, the question of the function of heme with particular reference to protein synthesis and cell proliferation has been addressed. The results of in vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated that hemin (10 M) alone is suitable for supporting optimum level of protein synthesis, and thereby cell proliferation of promastigotes to an extent that it can replace fetal bovine serum. However, in situ labelling experiments along with Western blots revealed that high concentration of hemin (50 M) reduced the level of protein synthesis in general and of -tubulin in particular with a concomitant induction of hsp90, and induced consequent morphological changes that are observed during in situ transformation of promastigotes in mammalian macrophages. These results therefore suggest that sudden exposure to high concentration of heme in mammalian macrophages may be one of the key factors that trigger promastigote to amastigote transformation in L. donovani. Furthermore, hemin with its dual characteristic could be used as a tool to understand molecular mechanism of cell proliferation and transformation in these parasites.

  1. Dose findings of antofloxacin hydrochloride for treating bacterial infections in an early clinical trial using PK-PD parameters in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-fei LI; Kun WANG; Fang YIN; Ying-chun HE; Ji-han HUANG; Qing-shan ZHENG

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To find an appropriate dose regimen of the novel antibacterial agent antofloxacin for a phase Ⅱ clinical trial using a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) study in healthy volunteers and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) as pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters.Methods:Twenty-four healthy volunteers were enrolled in a double-blind crossover study and received antofloxacin (200 or 400 mg/d,po) for consecutive 5 d with 10 d washout between two separate periods.Blood concentrations were analyzed using HPLC with a UV-Vis detector.The values of area under the curve (AUC) with covariates were obtained from a PPK model,and the MlCs came from the previous in vitro studies.The dose regimen was determined for the phase Ⅱ clinical trial according to the ratio (>20) of AUC/MIC,and the efficacy of the dose was evaluated by the trial.Results:A two-compartment model best described the time-concentration data with first-order absorption.The PPK parameter estimates for CL,Vc,Q,Vp and KA are 8.34 L/h,142 L,15.9 L/h,52.2 L and 4.64 1/h,respectively.The covariates sex for KA,weight for CL,weight for Vc and interoccasion variability were included in the final model.The AUC/MIC was calculated based on the PPK model and the MIC of antofloxacin for Escherichia coli,Klebsiella pneumonia,Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were determined in previous researches.The 400 mg loading dose with 200 mg/d maintenance dose was recommended and confirmed by the phase Ⅱ trial.Conclusion:The ratio of AUC from the PPK model vs MIC as the PD parameter can be applied in a dose-finding trial of antofloxacin in treatment of bacterial infections.The PPK model suggests that sex and body weight may be considerations in regards to individual therapy,which should be investigated in larger clinical trials and serve as a potential reference for clinical therapies.

  2. Detection and identification of microbes in prosthetic joint infections by culture and molecular methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Ehrlich, Garth;

    uncovered many more species including known pathogens and species not previously reported in orthopedic infections, and polymicrobial communities were commonly observed. Additionally the molecular findings suggested the bacterial composition and yield varied depending on the position and type of samples...... used for analysis, particularly prosthetic implants yielded more positive results. Furthermore, the presence of bacteria as both single cells and microcolonies were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes and confocal scanning laser microscopy...

  3. Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Vanzzini Zago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective, and descriptive study about the support that the laboratory of microbiology aids can provide in the diagnosis of ocular infections in patients whom were attended a tertiary-care hospital in México City in a 10-year-time period. We describe the microbiological diagnosis in palpebral mycose; in keratitis caused by Fusarium, Aspergillus, Candida, and melanized fungi; endophthalmitis; one Histoplasma scleritis and one mucormycosis. Nowadays, ocular fungal infections are more often diagnosed, because there is more clinical suspicion and there are easy laboratory confirmations. Correct diagnosis is important because an early medical treatment gives a better prognosis for visual acuity. In some cases, fungal infections are misdiagnosed and the antifungal treatment is delayed.

  4. Effect of ultrasound on herpes simplex virus infection in cell culture

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    Iwai Soichi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound has been shown to increase the efficiency of gene expression from retroviruses, adenoviruses and adeno-associated viruses. The effect of ultrasound to stimulate cell membrane permeabilization on infection with an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was examined. Results Vero monkey kidney cells were infected with HSV-1 and exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound after an adsorption period. The number of plaques was significantly greater than that of the untreated control. A combination of ultrasound and microbubbles further increased the plaque number. Similar results were obtained using a different type of HSV-1 and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells. The appropriate intensity, duty cycle and time of ultrasound to increase the plaque number were 0.5 W/cm2, 20% duty cycle and 10 sec, respectively. Ultrasound with microbubbles at an intensity of 2.0 W/cm2, at 50% duty cycle, or for 40 sec reduced cell viability. Conclusion These results indicate that ultrasound promotes the entry of oncolytic HSV-1 into cells. It may be useful to enhance the efficiency of HSV-1 infection in oncolytic virotherapy.

  5. Pharmacist-managed dose adjustment feedback using therapeutic drug monitoring of vancomycin was useful for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections: a single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirano R

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ryuichi Hirano,1 Yuichi Sakamoto,2 Junichi Kitazawa,2 Shoji Yamamoto,1 Naoki Tachibana2 1Department of Pharmacy, 2Laboratory Medicine and Blood Transfusion, Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Aomori-shi, Japan Background: Vancomycin (VCM requires dose adjustment based on therapeutic drug monitoring. At Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, physicians carried out VCM therapeutic drug monitoring based on their experience, because pharmacists did not participate in the dose adjustment. We evaluated the impact of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASP on attaining target VCM trough concentrations and pharmacokinetics (PK/pharmacodynamics (PD parameters in patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections. Materials and methods: The ASP was introduced in April 2012. We implemented a prospective audit of prescribed VCM dosages and provided feedback based on measured VCM trough concentrations. In a retrospective pre- and postcomparison study from April 2007 to December 2011 (preimplementation and from April 2012 to December 2014 (postimplementation, 79 patients were treated for MRSA infection with VCM, and trough concentrations were monitored (pre, n=28; post, n=51. In 65 patients (pre, n=15; post, n=50, 24-hour area under the ­concentration–time curve (AUC 0–24 h/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC ratios were calculated. Results: Pharmacist feedback, which included recommendations for changing dose or using alternative anti-MRSA antibiotics, was highly accepted during postimplementation (88%, 29/33. The number of patients with serum VCM concentrations within the therapeutic range (10–20 μg/mL was significantly higher during postimplementation (84%, 43/51 than during preimplementation (39%, 11/28 (P<0.01. The percentage of patients who attained target PK/PD parameters (AUC 0–24 h/MIC >400 was significantly higher during postimplementation (84%, 42/50 than during preimplementation (53%, 8/15; P=0.013. There were

  6. Simvastatin Results in a Dose-Dependent Toxic Effect on Spiral Ganglion Neurons in an In Vitro Organotypic Culture Assay

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    Katharina Leitmeyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, an enzyme necessary for the production of mevalonate. They are widely used as cholesterol-lowering drugs. However, conflicting data about the effect of statins on neuronal cells has been published. To explore the effect of simvastatin on spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs, SG explants of 5-day-old rats were treated with increasing concentrations of simvastatin. In addition, SG explants were treated with mevalonate and with the combination of simvastatin and mevalonate. SGN number, length of the neurites, area of nonneuronal supporting cells, and neuronal survival were analyzed. Simvastatin treatment results in a significant dose-dependent decrease of SG neurite number, length of neurites, area of supporting cells, and SG neuronal survival compared to control. Interestingly, treatment with mevalonate in addition to simvastatin increased SG neuronal survival compared to simvastatin treatment only. However, treatment with mevalonate in addition to simvastatin did not influence SG neurite number, length of neurites, and area of supporting cells compared to simvastatin treatment only. Our results suggest a neurotoxic effect of simvastatin on SGNs in vitro. Neurotoxicity seems to be at least partially mediated by the mevalonate pathway. Therefore, caution is warranted to use simvastatin as a potential otoprotective drug.

  7. A quantitative measurement of antiviral activity of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drugs against simian immunodeficiency virus infection: dose-response curve slope strongly influences class-specific inhibitory potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kai; Zink, M Christine; Clements, Janice E; Siliciano, Robert F

    2012-10-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in macaques is so far the best animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) studies, but suppressing viral replication in infected animals remains challenging. Using a novel single-round infectivity assay, we quantitated the antiviral activities of antiretroviral drugs against SIV. Our results emphasize the importance of the dose-response curve slope in determining the inhibitory potential of antiretroviral drugs and provide useful information for regimen selection in treating SIV-infected animals in models of therapy and virus eradication.

  8. Evaluating the role of atazanavir/cobicistat and darunavir/cobicistat fixed-dose combinations for the treatment of HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crutchley RD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rustin D Crutchley,1 Rakesh C Guduru,2 Amy M Cheng1 1Department of Pharmacy Practice and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, 2CompanionDX, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Atazanavir/cobicistat (ATV/c and darunavir/cobicistat (DRV/c are newly approved once daily fixed-dose protease inhibitor combinations for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Studies in healthy volunteers have established bioequivalence between cobicistat and ritonavir as pharmacoenhancers of both atazanavir (ATV and darunavir (DRV. In addition, two randomized clinical trials (one Phase II and one Phase III noninferiority trial with a 144-week follow-up period demonstrated that cobicistat had sustainable and comparable efficacy and safety to ritonavir as a pharmacoenhancer of ATV through 144 weeks of treatment in HIV-1-infected patients. Furthermore, one Phase III, open-label, single-arm, clinical trial reflected virologic and immunologic responses and safety outcomes consistent with prior published data for DRV/ritonavir 800/100 mg once daily, supporting the use of DRV/c 800/150 mg once daily for future treatment of treatment-naïve and -experienced HIV-1-infected patients with no DRV resistance-associated mutations. Low rates of virologic failure secondary to resistance to antiretroviral regimens were present in these clinical studies. Most notable adverse events in the ATV studies were hyperbilirubinemia and in the DRV study rash. Small increases in serum creatinine and minimally reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate Cockcroft–Gault calculation (eGFRCG were observed in ATV/c and DRV/c clinical studies consistent with other studies evaluating elvitegravir/cobicistat/tenofovir/emtricitabine for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. These renal parameter changes occurred acutely in the first few weeks and plateaued off for the remaining study periods and are not necessarily clinically relevant. Cobicistat has numerous advantages compared to

  9. Randomised community-based trial of annual single-dose diethylcarbamazine with or without ivermectin against Wuchereria bancrofti infection in human beings and mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockarie, M J; Alexander, N D; Hyun, P; Dimber, Z; Bockarie, F; Ibam, E; Alpers, M P; Kazura, J W

    1998-01-17

    WHO has targeted lymphatic filariasis for elimination. Studies of vector-parasite relations of Wuchereria bancrofti suggest that a reduction in the microfilarial reservoir by mass chemotherapy may interrupt transmission and thereby eliminate infection. However, no field data exist on the impact of chemotherapy alone on vector efficiency and transmission intensity of W bancrofti. We compared the impact of an annual community-wide single-dose treatment with diethylcarbamazine alone or with ivermectin on rate and intensity of microfilaraemia, and transmission intensity in an area of Papua New Guinea endemic for intense W bancrofti transmission. We carried out clinical and parasitological surveys in 14 communities in matched pairs. People aged 5 years or older in seven communities received randomly assigned diethylcarbamazine 6 mg/kg and people in the other seven communities received diethylcarbamazine 6 mg/kg plus ivermectin 400 micrograms/kg. We made physical examinations for hydroceles and leg oedema and investigated microfilarial densities by membrane filtration before and after treatment. We selected five communities for monthly entomological surveys between September, 1993, and September, 1995. Mosquitoes were collected in these communities by the all-night landing catch method and were individually dissected to identify rates of infection and infectiveness. 2219 (87.6%) of 2534 eligible people received treatment. Microfilarial rate and density had decreased 1 year after treatment in all 14 communities; this decrease was significantly higher in communities given combined therapy than in those given diethylcarbamazine alone (mean decreases 57.5% and 30.6%, respectively; p = 0.0013). Greater decreases were also seen in community-specific microfilarial intensity with combined therapy (mean reductions 91.1% and 69.8%, respectively; p = 0.0047). The rate of leg oedema was not altered, but the frequency of advanced hydroceles decreased by 47% with combined therapy and

  10. Role of culture of postoperative drainage fluid in the prediction of infection of the surgical site after major oncological operations of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candau-Alvarez, A; Linares-Sicilia, M J; Dean-Ferrer, A; Pérez-Navero, J L

    2015-02-01

    Infection of the surgical site after major oncological operations of the head and neck increases mortality and morbidity. The aim of this prospective pilot study was to assess the efficacy of culturing the exudate from the drain after cervical neck dissection to see if it predicted such infection. We studied 40/112 patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck who were treated during the last two years and met our inclusion criteria. Six patients developed infections (15%). Reconstruction with pedicled rather than local or microvascular flaps, duration of operation of over 7 hours, the presence of a tracheostomy, and bilateral neck dissection were considered risk factors (p=0.01). Culture of drainage fluid on postoperative day 3 that grew no pathogens predicted that the site would not become infected, with a negative predictive value of 96%. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuous improvement of construction of infection control culture%医院感染控制文化建设的持续改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张越巍; 李静; 胡爱香; 石月欣

    2016-01-01

    目的:通过对医院感染控制工作的回顾,评价医院感染管理的文化建设在医院感染管理中的作用。方法通过对感染控制历史传承的回顾,逐步确立“全院协作,共控院感”的工作愿景,设置医院感染徽志,树立工作目标和方针,创办《天坛医院感染通讯》和《简报》,创建了天坛感控的品牌;在医院感染工作中大力提倡引领的文化、激励的文化、服务的文化。结果通过“天坛感染控制宣传周”,评选“院感之星”等活动,树立天坛医院感染控制的文化内涵;用甘特图进行工作管理,通过网络培训普及知识;在工作方法上引入多元文化,以院感历史、专题集邮和摄影等多种形式进行宣传,通过专题网页、公邮、二维码等多种途径和科室沟通;探索医院感染管理的专科化之路,让医院感染问题来自于临床,服务于临床。结论经过医院感染文化建设,提高了医院感染控制的影响力和执行力,通过丰富的文化活动提高全院职工对医院感染重要性的认识。%OBJECTIVE To evaluate the role of culture construction of nosocomial infection management in control of nosocomial infections through review of cultural construction of infection control .METHODS The working vision of′hospital‐wide collaboration ,joint efforts for control of infection′was gradually established through the review of historical inheritance of infection control ,the signature sign of nosocomial infection was designed ,the work tar‐gets and policies were set up ,Tiantan Newsletter and Bulletin of Infection Control were launched to create a brand of "Tiantan infection control",and the culture of lead ,incentive and service was energetically advocated during the work of infection control .RESULTS A brand of infection control and cultural connotations was established through the activities such as′Tiantan Infection Control Week

  12. A secretome analysis reveals that PPARα is upregulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation in three-dimensional keratinocyte cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jee Yong; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yi, Jae Youn [Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) environment composed of properly interconnected and differentiated cells that allows communication and cooperation among cells via secreted molecules would be expected to more accurately reflect cellular responses. Here, we investigated γ-irradiation-induced changes in the secretome of 3D-cultured keratinocytes. An analysis of keratinocyte secretome profiles following fractionated-dose γ-irradiation revealed changes in genes involved in cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and the immune system. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-(PPARα) was upregulated in response to fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. This upregulation was associated with an increase in the transcription of known PPARα target genes, including angiopoietin-like protein 4, dermokine and kallikrein-related peptide 12, which were differentially regulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. Collectively, our data imply a mechanism linking γ-irradiation and secretome changes, and suggest that these changes could play a significant role in the coordinated cellular responses to harmful ionizing radiation, such as those associated with radiation therapy. This extension of our understanding of γ-irradiation-induced secretome changes has the potential to improve radiation therapy strategies. Control of inflammatory waves, improved wound healing, and stabilization of the skin barrier are imperative for minimizing such injuries. Therefore, PPARα agonists and antagonists have the potential to become important therapeutic agents for the treatment of γ-irradiation induced skin damage. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the undesirable consequences of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation could be alleviated by PPARα agonists.

  13. Dose-Dependent Effects on Sphingoid Bases and Cytokines in Chickens Fed Diets Prepared with Fusarium Verticillioides Culture Material Containing Fumonisins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Grenier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In chickens, the effect of mycotoxins, especially fumonisins (FB, in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT is not well documented. Thus, this study in broiler chicks determined the effects of consuming diets prepared with Fusarium verticillioides culture material containing FB on intestinal gene expression and on the sphinganine (Sa/sphingosine (So ratio (Sa/So; a biomarker of FB effect due to disruption of sphingolipid metabolism. Male broilers were assigned to 6 diets (6 cages/diet; 6 birds/cage from hatch to 20 days containing 0.4, 5.6, 11.3, 17.5, 47.8, or 104.8 mg FB/kg diet. Exposure to FB altered the Sa/So ratio in all tissues analyzed, albeit to varying extents. Linear dose-responses were observed in the kidney, jejunum and cecum. The liver and the ileum were very sensitive and data fit a cubic and quadratic polynomial model, respectively. Gene expression in the small intestine revealed low but significant upregulations of cytokines involved in the pro-inflammatory, Th1/Th17 and Treg responses, especially at 10 days of age. Interestingly, the cecal tonsils exhibited a biphasic response. Unlike the sphingolipid analysis, the effects seen on gene expression were not dose dependent, even showing more effects when birds were exposed to 11.3 mg FB/kg. In conclusion, this is the first report on the disruption of the sphingolipid metabolism by FB in the GIT of poultry. Further studies are needed to reach conclusions on the biological meaning of the immunomodulation observed in the GIT, but the susceptibility of chickens to intestinal pathogens when exposed to FB, at doses lower than those that would cause overt clinical symptoms, should be addressed.

  14. ECONOMIC STUDIES ON IMMUNOSTIMULENTS IN RELATION TO MYCOTOXIN INFECTION IN CULTURED FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.T. SAAD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies in the past decade confirm that the growth of both gram-positive and gram-negative foodborne bacteria, yeast and mold can be inhibited by garlic, onion, cinnamon, cloves, thyme, sage, and other spices. Consumption of mycotoxin contaminated foods has been associated with several cases of human poisoning, or mycotoxicosis, sometimes resulting in death. This study concluded that: When the ration or the fish suffered from fungal infection the addition of black seed, garlic and onion will reduce the infection and improve fish health. In Post mortem lesions the fish suffered from mycotic infection showed severe degenerative changes in internal organs especially in the liver, heart and kidneys. The result cleared that, the blackseed is the best herbs that prevented and improve the aflatoxin effect followed by garlic and onion, respectively. The result also showed that level of RBCs and WBCs, differential leucocytic counts, phagocytosis process, serum protein, biochemical analysis of fish body, body weight and body weight gain improved with addition of blackseed, garlic and onion. The residue of aflatoxin in fish flesh decreased in the groups treated with blackseed, garlic and onion than the control or fish fed on the aflatoxin. The results also showed that, frequent supplementation of fish ration with black seed, garlic and onion can reduce the aflatoxin hazards in the fish. The results also concluded that, the higher economic efficiency measures (total return, total costs, net profit, total returns/total costs and net return to total costs improved in the groups fed with blackseed, garlic, onion and all of them improved economic efficiency measures than the control groups and when all of them added to the fish treated with aflatoxin diet improved economic efficiency results than the group treated with aflatoxin only.

  15. Identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infection in honey bees: establishment of a medium throughput screening assay based on N. ceranae infected cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae.

  16. Genetic mutations in live infectious bronchitis vaccine viruses following single or dual in vitro infection of tracheal organ cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Christopher; Bennett, Sarah; Forrester, Anne; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2016-12-01

    Despite regular co-vaccination of two different strains of live infectious bronchitis vaccine viruses, little is known about possible mutations in these viruses following vaccination. As an alternative to chicks, this study used an in vitro infection model to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the part-S1 gene of two live infectious bronchitis virus vaccine strains (793B and Massachusetts) following single or dual inoculation onto tracheal organ cultures. Results indicate that viral titres reduced over the duration of the study; conversely, the amount of detected infectious bronchitis virus genome increased. Results demonstrate a greater number of non-synonymous SNPs in both vaccine strains when they are co-inoculated, compared with the single inoculations. The influence of the increased SNP and hydrophobic properties of the translated proteins on the vaccine viruses' virulence is unknown.

  17. Effects of different dose endothelin-1 on expession of peroxisome proliferator-γ in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells of adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengli Di; Xiaolin Niu; Jin Wei; Nanping Wang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of endothlin- 1 (ET- 1 ) on vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs ) proliferation and the expression of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγ (PPAR-γ) in VSMCs. Methods: VSMCs of 16-week-old wistar rats thoracic aorta were cultured. VSMCs were treated by ET-1 for 48 h and observed of the proliferation by MTT. The expression of PPAR-γmRNA and protein in cultured VSMCs treated by different concentration of ET-1 for 48 h was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot.Results: Compared with control group, VSMCs treated by ET-1 proliferated with the increase concentration of ET-1. There was significant differences among different groups ( P < 0.01). Meanwhile, the expression of PPAR-γ both in mRNA and in protein levels deceased. The expression of PPAR-γ in VSMCs was gradually decreased along with the increase concentration of ET-1. There was significant differences among different groups ( P <0.01). Compared with control group, the expression of both PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ in ET-1 treated groups were lower( P < 0.01). Conclusion: ET-1 could induce VSMCs proliferation and the expression of PPAR-γ in VSMCs, which demonstrates that high dose ET-1 obviously weakens the function of PPAR-γ to increase VSMCs proliferation.

  18. Cultivated vaginal microbiomes alter HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral efficacy in colonized epithelial multilayer cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B Pyles

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for modeling of the symbiotic and at times dysbiotic relationship established between bacterial microbiomes and human mucosal surfaces. In particular clinical studies have indicated that the complex vaginal microbiome (VMB contributes to the protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens including the life-threatening human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1. The human microbiome project has substantially increased our understanding of the complex bacterial communities in the vagina however, as is the case for most microbiomes, very few of the community member species have been successfully cultivated in the laboratory limiting the types of studies that can be completed. A genetically controlled ex vivo model system is critically needed to study the complex interactions and associated molecular dialog. We present the first vaginal mucosal culture model that supports colonization by both healthy and dysbiotic VMB from vaginal swabs collected from routine gynecological patients. The immortalized vaginal epithelial cells used in the model and VMB cryopreservation methods provide the opportunity to reproducibly create replicates for lab-based evaluations of this important mucosal/bacterial community interface. The culture system also contains HIV-1 susceptible cells allowing us to study the impact of representative microbiomes on replication. Our results show that our culture system supports stable and reproducible colonization by VMB representing distinct community state types and that the selected representatives have significantly different effects on the replication of HIV-1. Further, we show the utility of the system to predict unwanted alterations in efficacy or bacterial community profiles following topical application of a front line antiretroviral.

  19. Classification of positive blood cultures: computer algorithms versus physicians' assessment - development of tools for surveillance of bloodstream infection prognosis using population-based laboratory databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradel Kim O

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information from blood cultures is utilized for infection control, public health surveillance, and clinical outcome research. This information can be enriched by physicians’ assessments of positive blood cultures, which are, however, often available from selected patient groups or pathogens only. The aim of this work was to determine whether patients with positive blood cultures can be classified effectively for outcome research in epidemiological studies by the use of administrative data and computer algorithms, taking physicians’ assessments as reference. Methods Physicians’ assessments of positive blood cultures were routinely recorded at two Danish hospitals from 2006 through 2008. The physicians’ assessments classified positive blood cultures as: a contamination or bloodstream infection; b bloodstream infection as mono- or polymicrobial; c bloodstream infection as community- or hospital-onset; d community-onset bloodstream infection as healthcare-associated or not. We applied the computer algorithms to data from laboratory databases and the Danish National Patient Registry to classify the same groups and compared these with the physicians’ assessments as reference episodes. For each classification, we tabulated episodes derived by the physicians’ assessment and the computer algorithm and compared 30-day mortality between concordant and discrepant groups with adjustment for age, gender, and comorbidity. Results Physicians derived 9,482 reference episodes from 21,705 positive blood cultures. The agreement between computer algorithms and physicians’ assessments was high for contamination vs. bloodstream infection (8,966/9,482 reference episodes [96.6%], Kappa = 0.83 and mono- vs. polymicrobial bloodstream infection (6,932/7,288 reference episodes [95.2%], Kappa = 0.76, but lower for community- vs. hospital-onset bloodstream infection (6,056/7,288 reference episodes [83.1%], Kappa = 0.57 and

  20. Should the presence of a culture positive urinary tract infection exclude patients from rapid evaluation hematuria protocols?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdev, Nikhil; Thorpe, Andrew C

    2013-08-01

    Current rapid evaluation protocols for patients with hematuria tend to exclude those with urinary tract infection since this is assumed to be evidence of a benign treatable cause. The likelihood of a urinary tract cancer in such patients is, however, uncertain, and we have therefore analyzed a prospective hematuria clinic database to determine risk. A total of 1,740 patients were enrolled prospectively in this study at our unit's one stop fast track hematuria clinic between April 2003 and March 2006. Evaluation of patients consisted of basic demographics, history and examination, urinalysis, urine culture, urine cytology, and serum creatinine. All patients then underwent a renal ultrasound, intravenous urogram, and cystoscopy. A total of 1,067 males and 673 females with a mean (range) age of 60.8 (16-96) years were included in the study. One hundred sixty-one patients had a positive mid-stream urine (MSU) on a specimen collected at the hematuria clinic. Amongst this group 20% (32) patients had a urologic malignancy diagnosed, of whom 12% (4) had metastatic disease at presentation. Only 1% (3) of patients had a urologic malignancy with a previous history of a treated urinary tract infection (UTI) and negative MSU at the clinic. The risk of urologic malignancy was 24% (303) in the remaining 1,249 patients with no history of a UTI prior to presentation and a negative MSU on a specimen collected at the one stop fast track hematuria clinic. Despite selection bias inherent in this analysis, it appears that the presence of UTI does not decrease the likelihood of having a urologic malignancy diagnosed. Hence, there is no indication to delay prompt evaluation in patients with hematuria and a positive urine culture collected at the hematuria clinic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry5B protein is highly efficacious as a single-dose therapy against an intestinal roundworm infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Hu

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasitic nematode diseases are one of the great diseases of our time. Intestinal roundworm parasites, including hookworms, whipworms, and Ascaris, infect well over 1 billion people and cause significant morbidity, especially in children and pregnant women. To date, there is only one drug, albendazole, with adequate efficacy against these parasites to be used in mass drug administration, although tribendimidine may emerge as a second. Given the hundreds of millions of people to be treated, the threat of parasite resistance, and the inadequacy of current treatments, new anthelmintics are urgently needed. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt crystal (Cry proteins are the most common used biologically produced insecticides in the world and are considered non-toxic to vertebrates.Here we study the ability of a nematicidal Cry protein, Cry5B, to effect a cure in mice of a chronic roundworm infection caused by the natural intestinal parasite, Heligmosomoides bakeri (formerly polygyrus. We show that Cry5B produced from either of two Bt strains can act as an anthelmintic in vivo when administered as a single dose, achieving a approximately 98% reduction in parasite egg production and approximately 70% reduction in worm burdens when delivered per os at approximately 700 nmoles/kg (90-100 mg/kg. Furthermore, our data, combined with the findings of others, suggest that the relative efficacy of Cry5B is either comparable or superior to current anthelmintics. We also demonstrate that Cry5B is likely to be degraded quite rapidly in the stomach, suggesting that the actual dose reaching the parasites is very small.This study indicates that Bt Cry proteins such as Cry5B have excellent anthelmintic properties in vivo and that proper formulation of the protein is likely to reveal a superior anthelmintic.

  2. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiretroviral activity of multiple doses of ibalizumab (formerly TNX-355), an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody, in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Godofsky, Eliot; DeJesus, Edwin; Larson, Jeffrey A; Weinheimer, Steven P; Lewis, Stanley T

    2009-02-01

    Ibalizumab (formerly TNX-355) is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and inhibits the viral entry process. A phase lb multidose study of the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral activity of ibalizumab was conducted with 22 HIV-1-infected patients. Nineteen patients were randomized to receive either 10 mg/kg of body weight weekly (arm A) or a 10-mg/kg loading dose followed by 6 mg/kg every 2 weeks (arm B) intravenously for 9 weeks. Three patients were assigned to receive 25 mg/kg every 2 weeks for five doses (arm C). During the study, the patients remained off other antiretrovirals or continued a stable failing regimen. Treatment with ibalizumab resulted in substantial reductions in HIV-1 RNA levels (0.5 to 1.7 log(10)) in 20 of 22 subjects. In most patients, HIV-1 RNA fell to nadir levels after 1 to 2 weeks of treatment and then returned to baseline despite continued treatment. Baseline viral isolates were susceptible to ibalizumab in vitro, regardless of coreceptor tropism. Emerging resistance to ibalizumab was manifested by reduced maximal percent inhibition in a single-cycle HIV infectivity assay. Resistant isolates remained CD4 dependent and were susceptible to enfuvirtide in vitro. Complete coating of CD4(+) T-cell receptors was correlated with serum ibalizumab concentrations. There was no evidence of CD4(+) T-cell depletion in ibalizumab-treated patients. Ibalizumab was not immunogenic, and no serious drug-related adverse effects occurred. In conclusion, ibalizumab administered either weekly or biweekly was safe and well tolerated and demonstrated antiviral activity. Further studies with ibalizumab in combination with standard antiretroviral treatments are warranted.

  3. Influenza Virus Specific CD8+ T Cells Exacerbate Infection Following High Dose Influenza Challenge of Aged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Parzych

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses cause severe illnesses and death, mainly in the aged population. Protection afforded by licensed vaccines through subtype-specific neutralizing antibodies is incomplete, especially when the vaccine antigens fail to closely match those of the circulating viral strains. Efforts are underway to generate a so-called universal influenza vaccine expressing conserved viral sequences that induce broad protection to multiple strains of influenza virus through the induction of CD8+ T cells. Here we assess the effect of a potent antiviral CD8+ T cell response on influenza virus infection of young and aged mice. Our results show that CD8+ T cell-inducing vaccines can provide some protection to young mice, but they exacerbate influenza virus-associated disease in aged mice, causing extensive lung pathology and death.

  4. Sustained low-dose growth hormone therapy optimizes bioactive insulin-like growth factor-I level and may enhance CD4 T-cell number in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Troensegaard, William;

    2010-01-01

    High-dose recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) (2-6 mg/day) regimes may facilitate T-cell restoration in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). However, high-dose rhGH regimens increase insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF......-I) to supra-physiological levels associated with severe side effects. The present study investigated whether lower doses of rhGH may improve T-cell restoration in patients infected with HIV following an expedient response of total and bioactive (i.e., free) IGF-I. A previous 16-week pilot-study included six...... HIV-infected patients on stable HAART to receive rhGH 0.7 mg/day, which increased total (+117%, P

  5. Staph Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Culture Household Safety: Preventing Cuts Dealing With Cuts Osteomyelitis Tetanus First Aid: Skin Infections Toxic Shock Syndrome ... Abscess Paronychia Dealing With Cuts and Wounds Cellulitis Osteomyelitis Impetigo Staph Infections MRSA Cuts, Scratches, and Scrapes ...

  6. Severe Bone Marrow Suppression Accompanying Pulmonary Infection and Hemorrhage of the Digestive Tract Associated with Leflunomide and Low-dose Methotrexate Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Caihong; Lu, Ying; Liu, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    A 60-year-old male patient developed hyperpyrexia, cough, expectoration with blood-stained sputum, mouth ulcers, and suppurative tonsillitis after receiving 35 days of combination treatment with leflunomide (LEF) and low-dose methotrexate (MTX) for active rheumatoid arthritis. On admission, routine blood tests showed severe thrombocytopenia, agranulocytosis, and decreased hemoglobin concentration compared with the relatively normal results of 1 month previously during the first hospitalization. Chest radiography revealed inflammation in both lungs, and a fecal occult blood test was positive. Given this presentation, severe bone marrow suppression accompanying pulmonary infection and hemorrhage of the digestive tract associated with LEF and MTX combination therapy was diagnosed. After 28 days of symptomatic treatment, the patient's complications subsided gradually. This case highlighted that bone marrow suppression associated with MTX and LEF combination therapy could be very serious, even at a normal dose or especially at the beginning of treatment. MTX and LEF combination therapy should be used with caution or be limited in those with a history of pulmonary disease, hemorrhage of the digestive tract, or other relevant diseases.

  7. Characterization of a unique OpMNPV-specific early gene not required for viral infection in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippam, C; Wu, X; Stewart, S; Theilmann, D A

    1997-01-20

    opep-2 is an Orgyia pseudotsugata multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (OpMNPV) early gene in the ie1-ie2 gene region for which there is no homolog in either the archetype virus, Autographa californica MNPV, or Bombyx mori NPV. opep-2 is transcribed immediately upon infection as three mRNAs which initiate from a early gene motif (TATA-N27-CAGT). The expression of multiple transcripts at very early times postinfection has only been previously described for the baculovirus early gene ie1, which produces spliced mRNAs. However, distinct from ie1, the multiple mRNAs of opep-2 are due to multiple termination sites and not splicing. Western blot analysis of steady-state levels of OPEP-2 showed that in OpMNPV-infected Ld652Y cells maximum levels are obtained at 8-12 hr postinfection (p.i.) prior to DNA replication. By 48 hr p.i. OPEP-2 is shut off and is undetectable. To aid in elucidating the function of this OpMNPV-specific gene an opep-2 deletion mutant was generated and was compared to wild-type virus to determine if its absence affects viral growth in Ld652Y tissue culture cells.

  8. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Interactions between biofilms and the environment. FEMS Microbiol Rev. 1997;20:291–303. 4. Webb LX, Wagner W, Carroll D, et al. Osteomyelitis and...treatment of osteomyelitis . Biomed Mater. 2008;3: 034114. 6. Gristina AG. Biomaterial-centered infection: microbial adhesion versus tissue integration...vertebral osteomyelitis . Spine. 2007;32: 2996–3006. 15. Beckham JD, Tuttle K, Tyler KL. Reovirus activates transforming growth factor ß and bone

  9. Culture-independent genome sequencing of clinical samples reveals an unexpected heterogeneity of infections by Chlamydia pecorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Sullivan, Mitchell J; Jelocnik, Martina; Myers, Garry S A; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is an important global pathogen of livestock, and it is also a significant threat to the long-term survival of Australia's koala populations. This study employed a culture-independent DNA capture approach to sequence C. pecorum genomes directly from clinical swab samples collected from koalas with chlamydial disease as well as from sheep with arthritis and conjunctivitis. Investigations into single-nucleotide polymorphisms within each of the swab samples revealed that a portion of the reads in each sample belonged to separate C. pecorum strains, suggesting that all of the clinical samples analyzed contained mixed populations of genetically distinct C. pecorum isolates. This observation was independent of the anatomical site sampled and the host species. Using the genomes of strains identified in each of these samples, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis revealed that a clade containing a bovine and a koala isolate is distinct from other clades comprised of livestock or koala C. pecorum strains. Providing additional evidence to support exposure of koalas to Australian livestock strains, two minor strains assembled from the koala swab samples clustered with livestock strains rather than koala strains. Culture-independent probe-based genome capture and sequencing of clinical samples provides the strongest evidence yet to suggest that naturally occurring chlamydial infections are comprised of multiple genetically distinct strains.

  10. Effect of antimicrobial therapy on the gastrointestinal bacterial flora, infection and mortality in mice exposed to different doses of irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, I.; Ledney, G.D. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The effect of antimicrobial therapy on gut flora, sepsis, and mortality was investigated in C[sub 3]H/HeN female mice irradiated with 7.0, 8.0 or 8.5 Gy or [sup 60]Co. The antimicrobial agents tested were metronidazole, penicillin, imipenem, gentamicin and ofloxacin. In control mice, the greatest reduction of lactose fermenting organisms (1.7-2.8 logs) occurred on day 8 after irradiation and were related directly to radiation doses. After day 8 lactose fermenting organism levels increased and the increases were associated with mortality due to Enterobacteriaceae sepsis. Irradiation reduced the populations of strict anaerobic bacteria in control mice by 2-8 logs, and these remained at low levels. Treatment with either metronidazole or penicillin resulted in greater reductions of strict anaerobic bacteria than occurred in the controls and induced earlier and greater increases in lactose fermenting organisms and associated mortality. Therapies with either gentamicin or ofloxacin resulted in lesser reductions of strict anaerobic bacteria (1.1-2.2 logs) than occurred in controls, and caused greater decreases in lactose fermenting organisms and mortality. The changes in the bacterial flora and mortality following imipenem treatment were similar to controls. These data demonstrate that in animals exposed to irradiation, antimicrobial agents effective against strict anaerobic bacteria can be deleterious, but antimicrobial agents effective against lactose fermenting organsims may be beneficial. (Author).

  11. Correlation between urine analysis and urine culture in the diagnosis of urinary tract infection in Yazd central laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalili M B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The misdiagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI may lead to kidney deficiency and even pyelonephritis. Since different species may cause this disease, urine culture (UC and antibiogram of the isolated species should be performed and results compared to urine analysis (UA parameters to obtain the best diagnosis."nMethods: The urine specimens from 1509 patients (1195 women and 314 men were processed for UA, UC and antibiogram. First of all, the sterile urine samples were cultured using differential media, including EMB and blood agar. After 24 hr incubation, the colonies were identified and differentiated by biochemical tests. Antibiograms for all isolated species were determined using Muller Hinton agar. All results obtained from this survey were analyzed using SPSS software."nResults: Of the 1509 samples, 986 (65.3% were positive for pathogenic bacteria, 170 (17.2% of which were from men and 816 (82.8% from women. E. coli was the most prevalent with 591 cases (58.7%, followed by Enterobacter 115 (11.4% and Klebsiella 88 (8.8%. Data analysis revealed that the correlations between the WBC, RBC, nitrite, crystal, and protein were significantly higher in culture-positive samples. Of the antibiotics tested, isolated species were most sensitive to amikacin and most resistant to ampicillin."nConclusion: The present study revealed a correlation between pyuria and bacteruria; however, it should be noted that the clinical signs and the presence of WBC in urine could not be used to confirm the UTI. In addition, since different bacterial species are able to cause UTI, in order to administer proper treatment while controlling improper use of antibiotics, thorough testing, including UA and UC together with antibiogram, is strongly recommended.

  12. Evaluation of routinely reported surgical site infections against microbiological culture results: a tool to identify patient groups where diagnosis and treatment may be improved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kievit Job

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons may improve their decision making by assessing the extent to which their initial clinical diagnosis of a surgical site infection (SSI was supported by culture results. Aim of the present study was to evaluate routinely reported SSI by surgeons against microbiological culture results, to identify patient groups with lower agreement where decision making may be improved. Methods 701 admissions with SSI were reported by surgeons in a university medical centre in the period 1997-2005, which were retrospectively checked for microbiological culture results. Reporting a SSI was conditional on treatment being given (e.g. antibiotics and was classified by severity. To identify specific patient groups, patients were classified according to the surgery group of the first operation during admission (e.g. trauma. Results Of all reported SSI, 523 (74.6% had a positive culture result, 102 (14.6% a negative culture result and 76 (10.8% were classified as unknown culture result (due to no culture taken. Given a known culture result, reported SSI with positive culture results less often concerned trauma patients (16% versus 26%, X2 = 4.99 p = 0.03 and less severe SSI (49% versus 85%, X2 = 10.11 p Conclusion Routine reporting of SSI was mostly supported by culture results. However, this support was less often found in trauma patients and less severe SSI, thereby giving surgeons feedback that diagnosis and treatment may be improved in these cases.

  13. Simulation of the impact of rifampicin on darunavir/ritonavir PK and dose adjustment strategies in HIV-infected patients: a population PK approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Dickinson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of HIV/TB co-infection is challenging due to high drug–drug interaction potential between antiretrovirals and rifamycins, such as rifampicin (RIF. The PK interaction between darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/RTV and RIF has not been studied. Utilizing other protease inhibitor data, population PK modelling and simulation was applied to assess the impact of RIF on DRV/RTV PK and generate alternative dosing strategies to aid future clinical trial design. Materials and Methods: A previously developed model describing DRV/RTV PK including data from three studies in HIV patients was used [n=51, 7 female, DRV/RTV 800/100 mg (n=32 or 900/100 mg once daily (qd; n=19 (1. The PK interaction between DRV/RTV and RIF was assumed to mimic that observed in HIV-infected, TB negative patients receiving lopinavir (LPV/RTV (n=21 (2. Simulations of DRV/RTV 800/100 mg qd (n=1000 were performed (-RIF. The model was adapted to increase the typical value of apparent oral clearance (CL/F by 71% and 36% and decrease relative bioavailability (F by 20% and 45% for DRV and RTV, respectively (2; 1000 simulations were generated (+RIF. Dose adjustments of DRV/RTV 1200/200 mg qd, 800/100 mg and 1200/150 mg twice daily (bid were simulated to overcome the interaction. DRV trough (Ctrough for each dosing scenario was compared to the reference (-RIF by GMR (90% CI. Results: DRV and RTV were described by a 1 and 2-compartment model, respectively. A maximum effect model, with RTV inhibiting DRV CL/F, best described the relationship between the drugs. Compared to the reference (-RIF, simulated DRV Ctrough was 70%, 46% and 20% lower for 800/100 mg qd, 1200/200 mg qd and 800/100 mg bid all +RIF, respectively. Ctrough was 38% higher with 1200/150 mg bid +RIF (Table 1. Conclusions: Modelling and simulation was used to investigate the theoretical impact of RIF on DRV/RTV PK. Based on simulations, 800/100 mg and 1200/150 mg both bid could largely overcome the impact of the

  14. Euclinostomum heterostomum infection in guppies Poecilia reticulata cultured in Southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suanyuk, Naraid; Mankhakhet, Suchanya; Soliman, Hatem; Saleh, Mona; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2013-05-27

    During April to June 2009 and February 2010 to February 2011, numerous digenetic trematode metacercariae were observed embedded in the muscles of guppies Poecilia reticulata cultured at Kidchakan Supamattaya Aquatic Animal Health Research Center, Songkhla, southern Thailand. A total of 424 guppies were examined to identify the parasite and to study its pathogenicity. Based on conventional parasitological techniques, the parasitic digenean found in the guppies was identified as Euclinostomum heterostomum Rudolphi, 1809. Histological analysis revealed numerous metacercariae embedded in the fish muscle. A life cycle study indicated that the snail Indoplanorbis exustus was the first intermediate host, with the guppies serving as the second intermediate host. No E. heterostomum metacercariae were found in cohabited fish species, giant sailfin molly Poecilia velifera or platy Xiphophorus maculatus, which indicated that the guppy was the only suitable fish host present.

  15. The prevalence and distribution of Mycobacterium bovis infection in European badgers (Meles meles) as determined by enhanced post mortem examination and bacteriological culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D; Gormley, E; Costello, E; O'Meara, D; Corner, L A L

    2010-02-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection in badgers is key to understanding the epidemiology of tuberculosis in this species and has significant implications for devising strategies to limit spread of the disease. In this study, badgers (n=215) in the Republic of Ireland were examined at post mortem and tissues were collected from a range of anatomical locations and pooled into groups for bacterial culture of M. bovis. By assessing confirmed gross visible lesions (VL) alone, infection was detected in 12.1% of badgers. However, by including the results of all culture positive pooled samples, the overall infection prevalence increased significantly to 36.3%. Two-thirds (66.7%) of infected animals had no visible lesions (NVL). While the thoracic cavity (lungs and pulmonary lymph nodes) was found to be the most common site of infection, in a proportion of animals infection was absent from the lungs and draining lymph nodes and was confined to the lymph nodes of the carcase or the head. This may indicate an early extrapulmonary dissemination of infection or alternatively, in the case of the head lymph nodes, a secondary pathogenic pathway involving the lymphoid tissues of the upper respiratory tract (URT).

  16. Co-infection of SENV-D among chronic hepatitis C patients treated with combination therapy with high-dose interferon-alfa and ribavirin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chia-Yen Dai; Liang-Yen Wang; Ming-Lung Yu; Wan-Long Chuang; Wen-Yu Chang; Shinn-Cherng Chen; Li-Po Lee; Ming-Yen Hsieh; Nei-Jen Hou; Zu-Yau Lin; Ming-Yuh Hsieh

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The clinical significance of co-infection of SENV-D among patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and response of both viruses to combination therapy with high-dose interferon-alfa (IFN) plus ribavirin remain uncertain and are being investigated.METHODS: Total 164 (97 males and 67 females, the mean age 48.1±11.4 years, range: 20-73 years, 128histologically proved) naive CHC patients were enrolled in this study. SENV-D DNA was tested by PCR method.Detection of serum HCV RNA was performed using a standardized automated qualitative RT-PCR assay (COBAS AMPLICOR HCV Test, version 2.0). HCV genotypes 1a,1b, 2a, 2b, and 3a were determined by using genotypespecific primers. Pretreatment HCV RNA levels were determined by using the branched DNA assay (Quantiplex HCV RNA 3.0). There are 156 patients receiving combination therapy with IFN 6 MU plus ribavirin for 24 wk and the response to therapy is determined.RESULTS: Sixty-one (37.2%) patients were positive for SENV-D DNA and had higher mean age than those who were negative (50.7±10.6 years vs46.6±11.6 years,P = 0.026). The rate of sustained viral response (SVR)for HCV and SENV-D were 67.3% (105/156) and 56.3%(27/48), respectively. By univariate analysis, the higher rate of SVR was significantly related to HCV genotype non-1b (P<0.001), younger ages (P = 0.014), lower pretreatment levels of HCV RNA (P = 0.019) and higher histological activity index (HAI) score for intralobular regeneration and focal necrosis (P = 0.037). By multivariate analyses, HCV genotype non-1b, younger age and lower pretreatment HCV RNA levels were significantly associated with HCV SVR (odds ratio (OR)/95% confidence interval (CI): 12.098/0.02-0.19, 0.936/0.890-0.998, and 3.131/1.080-9.077, respectively). The SVR of SENV-D was higher among patients clearing SENV-D than those who had viremia at the end of therapy (P = 0.04).CONCLUSION: Coexistent SENV-D infection, apparently associated with higher ages, is found in more than onethird Taiwanese

  17. CHLAMYDIA-TRACHOMATIS INFECTION IN A HIGH-RISK POPULATION - COMPARISON OF POLYMERASE CHAIN-REACTION AND CELL-CULTURE FOR DIAGNOSIS AND FOLLOW-UP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VOGELS, WHM; VADER, PCV; SCHRODER, FP

    1993-01-01

    A study to compare the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test with the cell culture method in diagnosing urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infections was performed. From 497 patients (212 women, 285 men) attending an outpatient clinic for sexually transmitted diseases, a total of 814 samples (female pa

  18. Impact of positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures on adverse outcomes following hospitalized pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Marlene; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Benfield, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical presentation and outcome of pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) without positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures. We investigated the prognostic impact of a pulmonary infiltrate and bacteraemia on the clinical course of hospitalized...

  19. Parasitic infections of Piaractus mesopotamicus and hybrid (P. mesopotamicus xPiaractus brachypomus cultured in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Franceschini

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the occurrence of parasitic infections in the “pacu” fish Piaractus mesopotamicus and the “patinga” hybrid (P. mesopotamicus x Piaractus brachypomus in the northwest of São Paulo State, Brazil. Fish from the following three fish farms were evaluated every two months: A, a hatchery and larviculture farm (n = 16 pacu / n = 19 patinga, B, a growout farm (n = 35 patinga and C, a fee-fishing property (n = 28 pacu / n = 7 patinga. Thirty-five fish from each property were collected from February 2010 to February 2011 and subjected to parasitological analysis. The parasites found were the following:Mymarothecium viatorum, Anacanthorus penilabiatus, Notozothecium janauachensis (Dactylogyridae, Monogenea,Trichodina spp., Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, Chilodonella sp. (Protozoa, Myxobolus spp.,Henneguya spp. (Myxozoa, Rondonia rondoni, Contracaecum sp. (Nematoda, and Dolops carvalhoi(Crustacea. Of the fish examined, 62.9% from “A” and 100% from “B” and “C” were infested with at least one parasite species. Pacu fish (n = 44 showed a higher susceptibility to Anacanthorus penilabiatus infestations, whereas patinga (n = 61 were more susceptible to Mymarothecium viatorum (p < 0.05. Appropriate fish handling (nutrition, transport and storage, in conjunction with monitoring of water quality, can reduce the stress to which the farmed fish are exposed and is essential for pathogen control.

  20. Expression of Heat Shock and Other Stress Response Proteins in Ticks and Cultured Tick Cells in Response to Anaplasma spp. Infection and Heat Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Villar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are ectoparasites of animals and humans that serve as vectors of Anaplasma and other pathogens that affect humans and animals worldwide. Ticks and the pathogens that they transmit have coevolved molecular interactions involving genetic traits of both the tick and the pathogen that mediate their development and survival. In this paper, the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs and other stress response proteins (SRPs was characterized in ticks and cultured tick cells by proteomics and transcriptomics analyses in response to Anaplasma spp. infection and heat shock. The results of these studies demonstrated that the stress response was activated in ticks and cultured tick cells after Anaplasma spp. infection and heat shock. However, in the natural vector-pathogen relationship, HSPs and other SRPs were not strongly activated, which likely resulted from tick-pathogen coevolution. These results also demonstrated pathogen- and tick-specific differences in the expression of HSPs and other SRPs in ticks and cultured tick cells infected with Anaplasma spp. and suggested the existence of post-transcriptional mechanisms induced by Anaplasma spp. to control tick response to infection. These results illustrated the complexity of the stress response in ticks and suggested a function for the HSPs and other SRPs during Anaplasma spp. infection.

  1. [Pediatric osteo-articular infections with negative culture results: what about Kingella kingae?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkaoui, A; Ceroni, D; Ferey, S; Emonet, S; Schrenzel, J

    2009-11-04

    Kingella kingae is an emerging pathogen that is recognized as a causative agent of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, primarily in infants and children. The bacterium is best detected by rapid inoculation in blood culture systems or by real-time PCR assays. Pathogenesis of the agent was linked recently to the production of a potent cytotoxin, known as RTX, which is toxic to a variety of human cell types. The locus encoding the RTX toxin is thought to be a putative virulence factor, and is, apparently, essential for inducing cytotoxic effects on respiratory epithelial, synovial and macrophage-like cells. Herein, we describe a novel real-time PCR assay that targets the RTX toxin gene. The assay exhibited a sensitivity of 30 c.f.u., which is 10-fold more sensitive than a previously published semi-nested broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR, and showed no crossreactivity with several related species and common osteoarticular pathogens. Its clinical impact is illustrated by three pediatric cases.

  2. Developmental disorders of the brain can be caused by PCBs; low doses of hydroxy-PCBs disrupt thyroid hormone-dependent dendrite formation from Purkinje neurons in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Y.; Kimura-Kuroda, J. [Tokyo Metropol. Inst. for Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, I. [CREST/ JST, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Exposure to some environmental chemicals during the perinatal period causes developmental disorders of the brain. Cognitive impairment and hyperactivity in infants were reported in Taiwan, known as Yu-cheng incidents caused by the accidental contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Together with recent experimental data, Kuroda proposes a hypothesis that spatio-temporal disruptions of developing neuronal circuits by PCB exposure can cause the comobidity of learning disorders (LD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autsm with the co-exposure to other environmental chemicals. PCBs and hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) have similar chemical structures to thyroid hormones (TH), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). TH deficiency in the perinatal period causes cretinism children with severe cognitive and mental retardation. In primate model, Rice demonstrates that postnatal exposure to PCBs can dramatically influence later behavioral function. Epidemiological studies also indicate the possible developmental neurotoxicity of PCBs accumulated in human bodies. However, the precise underlying mechanisms and which types of PCB or OH-PCB with such effects have yet to be elucidated. It is important to establish a simple, reproducible, and sensitive in vitro assay for determining the effects of PCBs and OH-PCBs on the development of the central nervous system. Recently Iwasaki et al. established a reporter assay system and disclosed that low doses of PCBs potentially interfere TH-dependent gene expressions. This is the first demonstration that PCBs and OH-PCBs directly affect TH-receptor (TR)-mediated gene expressions crucial to the brain development, through unique mechanism. We also have demonstrated TH-dependent development of Purkinje neurons in vitro using a serum-free chemically defined medium. The degree of dendritic development of Purkinje cells is TH dose-dependent and exhibits high sensitivity in the pM order. Therefore, in the present study

  3. Alisporivir inhibits MERS- and SARS-coronavirus replication in cell culture, but not SARS-coronavirus infection in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wilde, Adriaan H; Falzarano, Darryl; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Beugeling, Corrine; Fett, Craig; Martellaro, Cynthia; Posthuma, Clara C; Feldmann, Heinz; Perlman, Stanley; Snijder, Eric J

    2017-01-15

    Currently, there is no registered treatment for infections with emerging zoonotic coronaviruses like SARS- and MERS-coronavirus. We here report that in cultured cells low-micromolar concentrations of alisporivir, a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A-analog, inhibit the replication of four different coronaviruses, including MERS- and SARS-coronavirus. Ribavirin was found to further potentiate the antiviral effect of alisporivir in these cell culture-based infection models, but this combination treatment was unable to improve the outcome of SARS-CoV infection in a mouse model. Nevertheless, our data provide a basis to further explore the potential of Cyp inhibitors as host-directed, broad-spectrum inhibitors of coronavirus replication.

  4. Proteome and transcript analysis of Vitis vinifera cell cultures subjected to Botrytis cinerea infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadakova, K; Havelkova, M; Kurkova, B; Tlolkova, I; Kasparovsky, T; Zdrahal, Z; Lochman, J

    2015-04-24

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important diseases of grapevine resulting in significant reductions in yield and fruit quality. In order to examine the molecular mechanisms that characterize the interaction between B. cinerea and the host plant, the grapevine cytoplasmic proteome was analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The interaction between Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay cells and B. cinerea was characterized by the increase in spot abundance of 30 proteins, of which 21 were successfully identified. The majority of these proteins were related to defence and stress responses and to cell wall modifications. Some of the modulated proteins have been previously found to be affected by other pathogens when they infect V. vinifera but interestingly, the proteins related to cell wall modification that were influenced by B. cinerea have not been shown to be modulated by any other pathogen studied to date. Transcript analysis using the quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction additionally revealed the up-regulation of several acidic, probably extracellular, chitinases. The results indicate that cell wall strengthening, accumulation of PR proteins and excretion of lytic enzymes are likely to be important mechanisms in the defence of grapevine against B. cinerea. Although gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important diseases of grapevine, little information is available about proteomic changes in this pathosystem. These results suggest that cell wall strengthening, accumulation of PR proteins and excretion of lytic enzymes are important molecular mechanisms in the defence of grapevine against B. cinerea. Surprisingly, the proteins related to cell wall modification that were modulated by B. cinerea have not been shown to be affected by any other pathogen studied to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical utility of a nested nucleic acid amplification format in comparison to viral culture for the diagnosis of mucosal herpes simplex infection in a genitourinary medicine setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Dorothy E

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nested nucleic acid amplification tests are often thought too sensitive or prone to generatingfalse positive results for routine use. The current study investigated the specificity and clinicalutility of a routine multiplex nested assay for mucosal herpetic infections. Methods Ninety patients, categorised into those clinically diagnosed to (a have and (b not haveherpetic infection, were enrolled. Swabs from oral and ano-genital sites were assayed by thenested assay and culture and the results assessed against clinical evaluation for diagnosingherpetic infections; cell content was also recorded. Results Twenty-six and 64 patients were thought to (a have and (b not have mucosal herpeticinfection. Taking the clinical evaluation as indicating the presence of herpetic infection, thenested polymerase chain reaction and culture had respective sensitivities of 19/26 (73% and12/26 (46% (Χ2 p = 0.02. There was no significant difference in specificities between nPCR62/64 (97% and culture 63/64 (98% (Χ2 p = 1.0. Cell content was important for viraldetection by nPCR (Χ2 p = 0.07 but not culture. Nesting was found necessary for sensitivity anddid not reduce specificity. Assay under-performance appeared related to sub-optimal cellcontent (20% but may have reflected clinical over-diagnosis. The results suggest the need forvalidating specimen cell quality. Conclusions This study questions the value of routine laboratory confirmation of mucosal herpetic infection. The adoption of a more discriminatory usage of laboratory diagnostic facilities for genital herpetic infection, taking account of cell content, and restricting it to those cases where it actually affects patient management, may be warranted.

  6. Immune reactivity in early life stages of sea-cage cultured Pacific bluefin tuna naturally infected with blood flukes from genus Cardicola (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchi, Ylenia; Shirakashi, Sho; Nowak, Barbara F; Bridle, Andrew R

    2016-11-01

    Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT), Thunnus orientalis, due to its high average price on the market is an economically valuable fish species. Infections by blood flukes from the genus Cardicola (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) represent a growing concern for the cage culture of bluefin tuna in Japan, Australia and Southern Europe. The accumulation of numerous Cardicola eggs in the fish gills causes severe pathology that has been linked to mortality in PBT juveniles up to one year old. The only effective treatment used to mitigate the infection is the oral administration of the antihelminthic drug praziquantel (PZQ) to the affected fish. However, with the need to minimise therapeutic drug use in aquaculture it is hoped that immunoprophylaxis can provide a future alternative to protect the PBT juveniles against Cardicola infection. Currently, little is known of the host immune response to these parasites and of their infection dynamics. In this study, using real-time qPCR we aimed to quantitatively detect C. orientalis and C. opisthorchis DNA within the gills and heart of cultured PBT juveniles and to investigate the host immune response at the transcriptional level in the gills. The research focused mainly during early stages of infection soon after young PBT were transferred to culture cages (from 14 to 77 days post-transfer). An increase (up to 11-fold) of immune-related genes, namely IgM, MHC-I, TCR-β and IL-1β was observed in the PBT gills infected with Cardicola spp. (28-77 days post-transfer). Furthermore, IgM (19-fold increase) and MHC-I (11.5-fold increase) transcription was strongly up-regulated in gill samples of PBT infected with C. orientalis relative to uninfected fish but not in fish infected with C. opisthorchis. Cardicola-specific DNA was first detected in the host 14 days post-transfer (DPT) to sea-cages which was 55 days earlier than the first detection of parasite eggs and adults by microscopy. Oral administration of PZQ did not have an immediate effect

  7. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Strains Elicit a Greater Innate Immune Response than Antigenically-Matched Seasonal Influenza Viruses during Infection of Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A.; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10–20% of the world’s population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the

  8. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  9. Evaluation of the association between Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) measures and catheter-associated infections: results of two national collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Reichert, Heidi; Greene, M Todd; Safdar, Nasia; Krein, Sarah L; Olmsted, Russell N; Watson, Sam R; Edson, Barbara; Albert Lesher, Mariana; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Background The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has funded national collaboratives using the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program to reduce rates of two catheter-associated infections—central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), using evidence-based intervention bundles to improve technical aspects of care and socioadaptive approaches to foster a culture of safety. Objective Examine the association between hospital units' results for the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) and catheter-associated infection rates. Methods We analysed data from two prospective cohort studies from acute-care intensive care units (ICUs) and non-ICUs participating in the AHRQ CLABSI and CAUTI collaboratives. National Healthcare Safety Network catheter-associated infections per 1000 catheter-days were collected at baseline and quarterly postimplementation. The HSOPS was collected at baseline and again 1 year later. Infection rates were modelled using multilevel negative binomial models as a function of HSOPS components over time, adjusted for hospital-level characteristics. Results 1821 units from 1079 hospitals (CLABSI) and 1576 units from 949 hospitals (CAUTI) were included. Among responding units, infection rates declined over the project periods (by 47% for CLABSI, by 23% for CAUTI, unadjusted). No significant associations were found between CLABSI or CAUTI rates and HSOPS measures at baseline or over time. Conclusions We found no association between results of the HSOPS and catheter-associated infection rates when measured at baseline and postintervention in two successful large national collaboratives focused on prevention of CLABSI and CAUTI. These results suggest that it may be possible to improve CLABSI and CAUTI rates without making significant changes in safety culture, particularly as measured by instruments like HSOPS. PMID:27222593

  10. Initial dosing regimen of vancomycin to achieve early therapeutic plasma concentration in critically ill patients with MRSA infection based on APACHE II score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaura, Masaharu; Yokoyama, Haruko; Kohata, Yuji; Kanai, Riichiro; Kohyama, Tomoki; Idemitsu, Wataru; Maki, Yuichi; Igarashi, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2016-06-01

    It is essential to assure the efficacy of antimicrobials at the initial phase of therapy. However, increasing the volume of distribution (Vd) of hydrophilic antimicrobials in critically ill patients leads to reduced antimicrobial concentration in plasma and tissue, which may adversely affect the efficacy of that therapy. The aim of the present study was to establish a theoretical methodology for setting an appropriate level for initial vancomycin therapy in individual patients based on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score. We obtained data from patients who received intravenous vancomycin for a suspected or definitively diagnosed Gram-positive bacterial infection within 72 h after admission to the intensive care unit. The Vd and elimination half-life (t 1/2) of vancomycin values were calculated using the Bayesian method, and we investigated the relationship between them and APACHE II score. There were significant correlations between APACHE II scores and Vd/actual body weight (ABW), as well as t 1/2 (r = 0.58, p < 0.05 and r = 0.74, p < 0.01, respectively). Our results suggested that the Vd and t 1/2 of vancomycin could be estimated using the following regression equations using APACHE II score.[Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]We found that APACHE II score was a useful index for predicting the Vd and t 1/2 of vancomycin, and used that to establish an initial vancomycin dosing regimen comprised of initial dose and administration interval for individual patients.

  11. Zoonotic disease risk perceptions and infection control practices of Australian veterinarians: call for change in work culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Karen; Taylor, Melanie; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L; Hooker, Claire; Dhand, Navneet K

    2013-08-01

    , those working in private practices, those who tended to 'just hope for the best' when trying to avoid zoonotic diseases, and those who were not aware of industry guidelines were less likely to use PPE. The results suggest that veterinarians' perceptions and workplace policies and culture substantially influence their use of PPE. Efforts should be made to encourage veterinarians and their workplaces to use infection control practices to protect themselves and their staff from zoonotic diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. For reliable urine cultures in the detection of complicated urinary tract infection, do we use urine specimens obtained with urethral catheter or a nephrostomy tube?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Gülay; Deveci, Özcan; Dede, Onur; Utanğac, Mazhar; Dağgulli, Mansur; Penbegül, Necmettin; Hatipoğlu, Namık Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the results of urine cultures obtained either from urethral, and percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) catheters. Materials and methods This study included 328 consecutive patients that underwent PCN at our institution with complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) between July 2010 and April 2015. Results of urine cultures obtained from the urethral and nephrostomy catheters were compared. Results This study included 152 male and 176 female patients. Mean age of the patients was 46.2±24.3 years. The main indications were obstructive uropathy due to urolithiasis complicated with pyonephrosis 145 (44%), malignant disease (n=87; 26%), pregnancy (n=26; 8%), and anatomical abnormality (n=23; 7%). One hundred and twenty three patients had diabetes mellitus. The most common causative organisms were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Blood cultures showed the same results for the PCN and bladder urine cultures. The bladder urine culture was positive in 304 patients, while the PCN urine culture in 314 patients. Conclusion PCN is an important treatment for the management of pyonephrosis. Cultures from the PCN yield valuable information that is not available from urethral urine cultures, and is a guiding tool for antibiotic therapy selection. PMID:27909624

  13. First case of Aeromonas schubertii infection in the freshwater cultured snakehead fish, Ophiocephalus argus (Cantor), in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J Y; Li, A H

    2012-05-01

    An epizootic in snakehead fish, Ophiocephalus argus, in earthen ponds in Xianning, Hubei Province, central China, from June to August 2009 was found to be caused by Aeromonas schubertii. The cumulative mortality within 40 days was 45%, and the diseased fish were 18 months old and 35-45 cm in length. Multiple, ivory-white, firm nodules, 0.5-1 mm in diameter, were scattered throughout the kidney. Blood clots, 3-5 mm in diameter, were found in the liver. This is a disease frequently found in cultured snakehead throughout China. Isolated bacteria were Gram negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile, short rod-shaped, with a length of 0.3-1.0 μm. Morphological and biochemical tests, as well as phylogenetic analysis derived from 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoD and dnaJ gene sequencing all strongly indicated that these snakehead isolates are identical to A. schubertii. In addition, the isolates possessed two plasmids: 5.0 kb and 10.0 kb. Antibiotic sensitivity testing of the isolates was carried out by the standard Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Experimental infection assays were conducted, and pathogenicity (by intraperitoneal injection) was demonstrated in snakehead fingerlings and zebrafish, Brachydanio rerio (Hamilton).

  14. Culturally Responsive Adolescent Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infection Prevention Program for Middle School Students in Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Linda Toms; Chan, Vincent; Eucogco, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of Pono Choices, a culturally responsive adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention program targeting middle school youths in Hawai‘i. Methods. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial with the school as the unit of random assignment over 3 semesters between 2012 and 2013. The sample consisted of 36 middle schools and 2203 students. We administered student surveys to collect baseline outcomes, student demographic data, and outcomes at 12 months after baseline. Results. We found statistically significant effects for the knowledge assessment, which focused on basic understanding of adolescent pregnancy and STI prevention. The average percentage of correct responses was 73.6 for the treatment group and 60.4 for the control group (P < .001). We did not find statistically significant effects on behavioral outcomes (initiation of sexual activity or engagement in high-risk sexual behavior) or on other nonbehavioral outcomes (attitudes, skills, intentions). Conclusions. Pono Choices had a statistically significant impact on knowledge of adolescent pregnancy and STI prevention among middle school students at 12 months after baseline, though it did not lead to detectable changes in behavioral outcomes within the 1-year observation period. These results call for an exploration of longer-term outcomes to assess effects on knowledge retention and behavioral changes. PMID:27689477

  15. Two Perkinsus spp. infect Crassostrea gasar oysters from cultured and wild populations of the Rio São Francisco estuary, Sergipe, northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Scardua, Marcos Paiva; Vianna, Rogério Tubino; Mendonça, Raoani Cruz; Vieira, Cairé Barreto; Dungan, Christopher F; Scott, Gail P; Reece, Kimberly S

    2014-06-01

    Brazilian production of bivalve molluscs is small but expanding, especially in the northeastern region where the native oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae and C. gasar are abundant, and tropical weather promotes their rapid growth. Studies on bivalve pathology are scarce in Brazil, with only a few employing techniques for detecting protozoan pathogens listed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). In 2008, a Perkinsus sp. was reported for the first time in Brazil, infecting C. rhizophorae oysters from a wild population in Ceará state, NE Brazil. Recently P. marinus was detected in the same oyster species in nearby Paraíba state. These findings highlighted the need to expand knowledge on the presence and impacts of Perkinsus spp. on Brazilian oyster populations. The current investigation evaluated Perkinsus sp. infections among wild and cultured C. gasar mangrove oysters from the estuary of the Rio São Francisco, Sergipe state, NE Brazil. Our results show that Perkinsus sp. infections occurred commonly in oysters of both groups, at prevalences that were frequently higher among cultured oysters. Prevalences varied seasonally, with maximum values during summer (January) of 57% and 80% for wild and cultured oysters respectively, and minimum values during winter (July). Results of DNA sequencing, in situ hybridization assays, and phylogenetic analyses showed dual- and single-pathogen infections by P. marinus and/or P. olseni in the tested oysters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of gamma-ray dose-rate effects by D/sup 2/O and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase in cultured mammalian L5178Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, A.M.; Tanaka, O.; Matsudaira, H.

    1984-06-01

    Effects of deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) and 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, on cell proliferation and survival were studied in cultured mammalian L5178Y cells under growing conditions and after acute and low-dose-rate irradiation at about 0.1 to 0.4 Gy/hr of ..gamma.. rays. Growth of irradiated and unirradiated cells was inhibited by 45% D/sub 2/O but not by 3-aminobenzamide at 10mM, except for treatments longer than 30 hr. The presence of these agents either alone or in combination during irradiation at low dose rates suppressed almost totally the decrease in cell killing due to the decrease in dose rate. Among other inhibitors tested, theobromine and theophylline were found to be effective in eliminating the dose-rate effects of ..gamma.. rays. Possible mechanisms underlying the inhibition are discussed.

  17. Identifying the major bacteria causing intramammary infections in individual milk samples of sheep and goats using traditional bacteria culturing and real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovai, M; Caja, G; Salama, A A K; Jubert, A; Lázaro, B; Lázaro, M; Leitner, G

    2014-09-01

    Use of DNA-based methods, such as real-time PCR, has increased the sensitivity and shortened the time for bacterial identification, compared with traditional bacteriology; however, results should be interpreted carefully because a positive PCR result does not necessarily mean that an infection exists. One hundred eight lactating dairy ewes (56 Manchega and 52 Lacaune) and 24 Murciano-Granadina dairy goats were used for identifying the main bacteria causing intramammary infections (IMI) using traditional bacterial culturing and real-time PCR and their effects on milk performance. Udder-half milk samples were taken for bacterial culturing and somatic cell count (SCC) 3 times throughout lactation. Intramammary infections were assessed based on bacteria isolated in ≥2 samplings accompanied by increased SCC. Prevalence of subclinical IMI was 42.9% in Manchega and 50.0% in Lacaune ewes and 41.7% in goats, with the estimated milk yield loss being 13.1, 17.9, and 18.0%, respectively. According to bacteriology results, 87% of the identified single bacteria species (with more than 3 colonies/plate) or culture-negative growth were identical throughout samplings, which agreed 98.9% with the PCR results. Nevertheless, the study emphasized that 1 sampling may not be sufficient to determine IMI and, therefore, other inflammatory responses such as increased SCC should be monitored to identify true infections. Moreover, when PCR methodology is used, aseptic and precise milk sampling procedures are key for avoiding false-positive amplifications. In conclusion, both PCR and bacterial culture methods proved to have similar accuracy for identifying infective bacteria in sheep and goats. The final choice will depend on their response time and cost analysis, according to the requirements and farm management strategy.

  18. Precision-cut intestinal slices as a culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Winter, Christine; Mork, Ann-Kathrin; Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y; Rautenschlein, Silke; Herrler, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses infect and replicate in their host via the intestinal tract, e.g. many picornaviruses, several coronaviruses and avian influenza viruses of waterfowl. To analyze infection of enterocytes is a challenging task as culture systems for differentiated intestinal epithelial cells are not readily available and often have a life span that is too short for infection studies. Precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) from chicken embryos were prepared and shown that the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the intestine are viable for up to 4 days. Using lectin staining, it was demonstrated that α2,3-linked sialic acids, the preferred receptor determinants of avian influenza viruses, are present on the apical side of the epithelial cells. Furthermore, the epithelial cells (at the tips) of the villi were shown to be susceptible to infection by an avian influenza virus of the H9N2 subtype. This culture system will be useful to analyze virus infection of intestinal epithelial cells and it should be applicable also to the intestine of other species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of Zymomonas mobilis culture on experimental Schistosoma mansoni infection O efeito da cultura de Zymomonas mobilis na infecção experimental por Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Fátima Macedo Santos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available C57Bl/10 male mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni were distributed into mixed, prophylactic and curative groups. A culture of Zymomonas mobilis was orally administered to mice. A 61% protection from the infection was observed in the curative group (p Camundongos C57Bl/10 do sexo masculino, infectados com Schistosoma mansoni foram distribuídos nos grupos misto, profilático e curativo. Cultura de Zymomonas mobilis foi administrada oralmente aos camundongos. Uma proteção de 61% foi observada no grupo curativo (p<0,05. Os estudos histopatológicos dos fígados e intestinos mostraram resultados similares.

  20. High Incidence of Afebrile Bloodstream Infection Detected by Surveillance Blood Culture in Patients on Corticosteroid Therapy after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Kazuaki; Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Akahoshi, Yu; Nakano, Hirofumi; Harada, Naonori; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yuko; Kawamura, Koji; Sakamoto, Kana; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Nakasone, Hideki; Kikuchi, Misato; Yamazaki, Rie; Kanda, Junya; Kako, Shinichi; Tanihara, Aki; Nishida, Junji; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-02-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSI) are still important complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Patients who are receiving corticosteroid therapy can develop BSI without fever. The utility of surveillance blood cultures in these situations is controversial. We retrospectively analyzed 74 patients who received a corticosteroid consisting of ≥.5 mg/kg prednisolone or equivalent after allo-SCT. In principle, we performed surveillance blood culture weekly for these patients. Sixteen patients (21.6%) developed definite BSI. In a multivariate analysis, a myeloablative conditioning regimen, high-risk disease status at allo-SCT, and the presence of a central venous catheter at the initiation of corticosteroid therapy were identified as independent significant risk factors for the development of definite BSI. At the first definite BSI episode, 7 patients (46.7%) were afebrile and diagnosed by surveillance blood culture. However, 6 of these 7 afebrile patients showed various signs that could be attributed to infection at the time of positive blood culture. In conclusion, patients receiving corticosteroid therapy after allo-SCT frequently develop afebrile BSI. Although surveillance blood culture might be beneficial in these situations, it also seems important to not miss the signs of BSI, even when patients are afebrile.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of semi-quantitative and quantitative culture techniques for the diagnosis of catheter-related infections in newborns and molecular typing of isolated microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboli, Danilo Flávio Moraes; Lyra, João César; Silva, Eliane Pessoa; Valadão, Luisa Leite; Bentlin, Maria Regina; Corrente, José Eduardo; Rugolo, Ligia Maria Suppo de Souza; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2014-05-22

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) have become the most common cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections in neonatal intensive care units (ICUs). Microbiological evidence implicating catheters as the source of bloodstream infection is necessary to establish the diagnosis of CR-BSIs. Semi-quantitative culture is used to determine the presence of microorganisms on the external catheter surface, whereas quantitative culture also isolates microorganisms present inside the catheter. The main objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of these two techniques for the diagnosis of CR-BSIs in newborns from a neonatal ICU. In addition, PFGE was used for similarity analysis of the microorganisms isolated from catheters and blood cultures. Semi-quantitative and quantitative methods were used for the culture of catheter tips obtained from newborns. Strains isolated from catheter tips and blood cultures which exhibited the same antimicrobial susceptibility profile were included in the study as positive cases of CR-BSI. PFGE of the microorganisms isolated from catheters and blood cultures was performed for similarity analysis and detection of clones in the ICU. A total of 584 catheter tips from 399 patients seen between November 2005 and June 2012 were analyzed. Twenty-nine cases of CR-BSI were confirmed. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were the most frequently isolated microorganisms, including S. epidermidis as the most prevalent species (65.5%), followed by S. haemolyticus (10.3%), yeasts (10.3%), K. pneumoniae (6.9%), S. aureus (3.4%), and E. coli (3.4%). The sensitivity of the semi-quantitative and quantitative techniques was 72.7% and 59.3%, respectively, and specificity was 95.7% and 94.4%. The diagnosis of CR-BSIs based on PFGE analysis of similarity between strains isolated from catheter tips and blood cultures showed 82.6% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The semi-quantitative culture method showed higher

  2. Use of a feline respiratory epithelial cell culture system grown at the air-liquid interface to characterize the innate immune response following feline herpesvirus 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelli, Rahul K; Maes, Roger; Kiupel, Matti; Hussey, Gisela Soboll

    2016-03-02

    Infection with feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) accounts for 50% of viral upper respiratory diseases in domestic cats and is a significant cause of ocular diseases. Despite the clinical significance and high prevalence of FHV-1 infection, currently available vaccines cannot completely protect cats from infection and lifelong latency. FHV-1 infects via the mucous membranes and replicates in respiratory epithelial cells, but very little is known about the early innate immunity at this site. To address questions about immunity to FHV-1, feline respiratory epithelial cells cultured at air-liquid interface (ALI-FRECs) were established by collecting respiratory tracts from 6 healthy cats after euthanasia. Cells were isolated, cultured and characterized histologically and immunologically before infection with FHV-1. The expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokine and chemokine responses were measured by real time PCR. ALI-FRECs morphologically resembled the natural airways of cats with multilayered columnar epithelial cells and cilia. Immunological properties of the natural airways were maintained in ALI-FRECs, as evidenced by the expression of TLRs, cytokines, chemokines, interferons, beta-defensins, and other regulatory genes. Furthermore, ALI-FRECs were able to support infection and replication of FHV-1, as well as modulate transcriptional regulation of various immune genes in response to infection. IL-1β and TNFα were increased in ALI-FRECs by 24hpi, whereas expression levels of IFN-α and TLR9 were not increased until 36hpi. In contrast, TLR3, GM-CSF and TGF-1β expression was down-regulated at 36hpi. The data presented show the development of a system ideal for investigating the molecular pathogenesis and immunity of FHV-1 or other respiratory pathogens.

  3. GSM-900MHz at low dose temperature-dependently downregulates α-synuclein in cultured cerebral cells independently of chaperone-mediated-autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terro, Faraj; Magnaudeix, Amandine; Crochetet, Marion; Martin, Ludovic; Bourthoumieu, Sylvie; Wilson, Cornelia-M; Yardin, Catherine; Leveque, Philippe

    2012-02-26

    The expanding use of GSM devices has resulted in public concern. Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a way for protein degradation in the lysosomes and increases under stress conditions as a cell defense response. α-synuclein, a CMA substrate, is a component of Parkinson disease. Since GSM might constitute a stress signal, we raised the possibility that GSM could alter the CMA process. Here, we analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to a low GSM-900MHz dose on apoptosis and CMA. Cultured cerebral cortical cells were sham-exposed or exposed to GSM-900MHz at specific absorption rate (SAR): 0.25W/kg for 24 h using a wire-patch cell. Apoptosis was analyzed by DAPI stain of the nuclei and western blot of cleaved caspase-3. The expression of proteins involved in CMA (HSC70, HSP40, HSP90 and LAMP-2A) and α-synuclein were analyzed by western blot. CMA was also quantified in situ by analyzing the cell localization of active lysosomes. 24 h exposure to GSM-900MHz resulted in ∼0.5°C temperature rise. It did not induce apoptosis but increased HSC70 by 26% and slightly decreased HSP90 (GSM-generated temperature rise. The GSM-induced changes in HSC70, HSP90 and α-synuclein are most likely linked to temperature rise. We did not observe any immediate effect on cell viability. However, the delayed and long term consequences (protective or deleterious) of these changes on cell fate should be examined.

  4. A new, practical, low-dose {sup 14}C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: clinical validation and comparison with the standard method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztuerk, Emel; Ilgan, Seyfettin; Arslan, Nuri; Oezgueven, Mehmet [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guelhane Military Medical Academy and Medical School, 06018, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Yesilova, Zeki; Erdil, Ahmet; Dagalp, Kemal [Department of Gastroenterology, Guelhane Military Medical Academy and Medical School, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Celasun, Buelent [Department of Pathology, Guelhane Military Medical Academy and Medical School, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Ovali, Oender [Department of Internal Medicine, Guelhane Military Medical Academy and Medical School, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Bayhan, Hikmet [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Acbadem Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2003-11-01

    The carbon-14 urea breath test (UBT) is a reliable and non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic performance of a new, practical and low-dose {sup 14}C-UBT system for the diagnosis of HP and compared the results with those obtained using the standard method. Seventy-five patients (56 female, 19 male) with dyspepsia underwent {sup 14}C-UBT and endoscopy with antral biopsies for histological analysis. The rapid urease test (CLO test) was applied to 50 of these patients. After a 6-h fasting period, a 37-kBq {sup 14}C-urea capsule was swallowed for UBT. Breath samples were collected and counted using two different methods, the Heliprobe method and the standard method. In the Heliprobe method, patients exhaled into a special dry cartridge system (Heliprobe BreathCard) at 10 min. The activities of the cartridges were counted using a designated small GM counter system (Heliprobe analyser). Results were expressed both as counts per minute (HCPM) and as grade (0, not infected; 1, equivocal; 2, infected) according to the counts. In the standard method, breath samples were collected by trapping in a liquid CO{sub 2} absorber. Radioactivity was counted as disintegrations per minute (SDPM) using a liquid scintillation counter after addition of a liquid scintillation cocktail. Histological examination was used as a gold standard. Two patients were excluded from the study because of inadequate biopsy sampling. Forty-eight patients (65%) were found to be HP positive on histology. The Heliprobe method correctly classified 48 of 48 HP-positive patients and 19 of 25 HP-negative patients (sensitivity 100%, specificity 76%, PPV 88%, NPV 100%, accuracy 91%). The standard method correctly classified 48 of 48 HP-positive patients and 20 of 25 HP-negative patients (sensitivity 100%, specificity 80%, PPV 90%, NPV 100%, accuracy 93%). On the other hand, the CLO test identified 26 of 32 HP-positive and 12 of 16 HP

  5. Epidemiology of coagulase-negative staphylococci intramammary infection in dairy cattle and the effect of bacteriological culture misclassification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, S; Dohoo, I R; Barkema, H W; Descôteaux, L; Devries, T J; Reyher, K K; Roy, J-P; Scholl, D T

    2012-06-01

    Objectives of this study were to identify the manageable risk factors associated with the lactational incidence, elimination, and prevalence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) intramammary infections (IMI) while taking into account the difficulties inherent to their diagnosis. A second objective was to evaluate the effect of CNS IMI misclassification in mastitis research. A cohort of 90 Canadian dairy herds was followed throughout 2007 to 2008. In each herd, series of quarter milk samples were collected from a subsample of cows and bacteriological culture was performed to identify prevalent, incident, and eliminated CNS IMI. Practices used on farms were captured using direct observations and a validated questionnaire. The relationships between herd CNS IMI prevalence and herd incidence and elimination rates were explored using linear regression. Manageable risk factors associated with the prevalence, incidence, or elimination of CNS IMI were identified via Bayesian analyses using a latent class model approach, allowing adjustment of the estimates for the imperfect sensitivity and specificity of bacteriological culture. After adjustment for the diagnostic test limitations, a mean CNS IMI quarter prevalence of 42.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 34.7, 50.1] and incidence and elimination rates of 0.29 new IMI/quarter-month (95% CI: 0.21, 0.37) and 0.79 eliminated IMI/quarter-month (95% CI: 0.66, 0.91), respectively, were observed. Considerable biases of the estimates were observed when CNS IMI misclassification was ignored. These biases were important for measures of association with risk factors, were almost always toward the null value, and led to both type I and type II errors. Coagulase-negative staphylococci IMI incidence appeared to be a stronger determinant of herd IMI prevalence than IMI elimination rate. The majority of herds followed were already using blanket dry cow treatment and postmilking teat disinfection. A holistic approach considering

  6. Effect of a single 1200 Mg dose of Mucinex® on mucociliary and cough clearance during an acute respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, W D; Kala, A; Duckworth, H; Zeman, K L; Wu, J; Henderson, A; Yopp, M; Rubin, B K

    2015-11-01

    Observational studies suggest that orally administered guaifenesin (GGE) may thin lower respiratory tract secretions but none have examined its effects on mucociliary and cough clearance (MCC/CC) during a respiratory tract infection (RTI). The current study was a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in non-smoking adults who suffered from an acute upper RTI. We assessed the effects of a single dose of Mucinex(®) 1200 mg (2 × 600 mg extended release tablets) (ER GGE) on 1) MCC/CC by assessing the rate of removal from the lung of inhaled radioactive tracer particles (Tc99m-sulfur colloid), 2) sputum dynamic rheology by stress/strain creep transformation over the linear part of the curve, 3) sessile drop interfacial tension by the deNouy ring technique, and 4) subjective symptom measures. MCC was measured during the morning (period 1) and compared to that in the afternoon 4 h later (period 2) immediately following either drug (n = 19) or placebo (n = 19). For both period 1 and 2 subjects performed 60 voluntary coughs from 60 to 90 min after inhalation of radio-labeled aerosol for a measure of CC. Sputum properties were measured from subjects who expectorated sputum during the cough period post treatment (n = 8-12 for each cohort). We found no effect of ER GGE on MCC or CC compared to placebo. MCC through 60 min for period 1 vs. 2 = 8.3 vs. 11.8% (placebo) and = 9.7 vs. 11.1% (drug) (NS) and CC for period 1 vs. 2 was 9.9 vs. 9.1% (placebo) and 10.8 vs. 5.6% (drug) (NS). There was no significant difference in sputum biophysical properties after administration of drug or placebo. There was no significant effect of a single dose of ER GGE on MCC/CC or on sputum biophysical properties compared to placebo in this population of adult patients with an acute RTI. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01114581. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Co-Culture of S. epidermidis and Human Osteoblasts on Implant Surfaces: An Advanced In Vitro Model for Implant-Associated Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zaatreh

    Full Text Available Total joint arthroplasty is one of the most frequent and effective surgeries today. However, despite improved surgical techniques, a significant number of implant-associated infections still occur. Suitable in vitro models are needed to test potential approaches to prevent infection. In the present study, we aimed to establish an in vitro co-culture setup of human primary osteoblasts and S. epidermidis to model the onset of implant-associated infections, and to analyze antimicrobial implant surfaces and coatings.For initial surface adhesion, human primary osteoblasts (hOB were grown for 24 hours on test sample discs made of polystyrene, titanium alloy Ti6Al4V, bone cement PALACOS R®, and PALACOS R® loaded with antibiotics. Co-cultures were performed as a single-species infection on the osteoblasts with S. epidermidis (multiplicity of infection of 0.04, and were incubated for 2 and 7 days under aerobic conditions. Planktonic S. epidermidis was quantified by centrifugation and determination of colony-forming units (CFU. The quantification of biofilm-bound S. epidermidis on the test samples was performed by sonication and CFU counting. Quantification of adherent and vital primary osteoblasts on the test samples was performed by trypan-blue staining and counting. Scanning electron microscopy was used for evaluation of topography and composition of the species on the sample surfaces.After 2 days, we observed approximately 104 CFU/ml biofilm-bound S. epidermidis (103 CFU/ml initial population on the antibiotics-loaded bone cement samples in the presence of hOB, while no bacteria were detected without hOB. No biofilm-bound bacteria were detectable after 7 days in either case. Similar levels of planktonic bacteria were observed on day 2 with and without hOB. After 7 days, about 105 CFU/ml planktonic bacteria were present, but only in the absence of hOB. Further, no bacteria were observed within the biofilm, while the number of hOB was decreased to 10

  8. A Multifaceted Approach to Reduction of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in the Intensive Care Unit With an Emphasis on "Stewardship of Culturing".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Katherine M; Kovacs, Christopher S; Fatica, Cynthia; Einloth, Colette; Neuner, Elizabeth A; Guzman, Jorge A; Kaiser, Eric; Menon, Venu; Castillo, Leticia; Popovich, Marc J; Manno, Edward M; Gordon, Steven M; Fraser, Thomas G

    2017-02-01

    BACKGROUND Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are among the most common hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). Reducing CAUTI rates has become a major focus of attention due to increasing public health concerns and reimbursement implications. OBJECTIVE To implement and describe a multifaceted intervention to decrease CAUTIs in our ICUs with an emphasis on indications for obtaining a urine culture. METHODS A project team composed of all critical care disciplines was assembled to address an institutional goal of decreasing CAUTIs. Interventions implemented between year 1 and year 2 included protocols recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for placement, maintenance, and removal of catheters. Leaders from all critical care disciplines agreed to align routine culturing practice with American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCCM) and Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for evaluating a fever in a critically ill patient. Surveillance data for CAUTI and hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (HABSI) were recorded prospectively according to National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) protocols. Device utilization ratios (DURs), rates of CAUTI, HABSI, and urine cultures were calculated and compared. RESULTS The CAUTI rate decreased from 3.0 per 1,000 catheter days in 2013 to 1.9 in 2014. The DUR was 0.7 in 2013 and 0.68 in 2014. The HABSI rates per 1,000 patient days decreased from 2.8 in 2013 to 2.4 in 2014. CONCLUSIONS Effectively reducing ICU CAUTI rates requires a multifaceted and collaborative approach; stewardship of culturing was a key and safe component of our successful reduction efforts. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:186-188.

  9. Using qualitative insights to change practice: exploring the culture of antibiotic prescribing and consumption for urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, Sinead; Domegan, Christine; Callan, Aoife; Galvin, Sandra; Cormican, Martin; Bennett, Kathleen; Murphy, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper is to explore the culture of antibiotic prescribing and consumption in the community for urinary tract infections (UTI) from the perspective of the general practitioners (GPs) and community member. Design Indepth interviews were conducted with GPs, and focus groups were held with community members. Setting General practice and community setting. Participants 15 GPs practising in rural and urban locations in Ireland participated in the indepth interviews. 6 focus groups (n=42) with participants who had direct or indirect experiences with UTI were also undertaken. Results The decision to prescribe or consume an antibiotic for a UTI is a set of complex processes including need recognition, information search and evaluation processes governed by the relationship and interactions between the GP and the patient. Different GP and patient decision-making profiles emerged emphasising the diversity and variety of general practice in real-life settings. The GP findings showed a requirement for more microbiological information on antibiotic resistance patterns to inform prescribing decisions. Focus group participants wanted a conversation with the GP about their illness and the treatment options available. Conclusions Collectively, this research identified the consultation as a priority intervention environment for stimulating change in relation to antibiotics. This paper demonstrates how qualitative research can identify the interacting processes which are instrumental to the decision to prescribe or consume an antibiotic for a suspected UTI. Qualitative research empowers researchers to investigate the what, how and why of interventions in real-life setting. Qualitative research can play a critical and instrumental role in designing behavioural change strategies with high impact on practice. The results of this research were used to design a complex intervention informed by social marketing. Trial registration number NCT01913860; Pre

  10. Impact of Safety-Related Dose Reductions or Discontinuations on Sustained Virologic Response in HCV-Infected Patients: Results from the GUARD-C Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham R Foster

    Full Text Available Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, peginterferon alfa/ribavirin remains relevant in many resource-constrained settings. The non-randomized GUARD-C cohort investigated baseline predictors of safety-related dose reductions or discontinuations (sr-RD and their impact on sustained virologic response (SVR in patients receiving peginterferon alfa/ribavirin in routine practice.A total of 3181 HCV-mono-infected treatment-naive patients were assigned to 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon alfa/ribavirin by their physician. Patients were categorized by time-to-first sr-RD (Week 4/12. Detailed analyses of the impact of sr-RD on SVR24 (HCV RNA <50 IU/mL were conducted in 951 Caucasian, noncirrhotic genotype (G1 patients assigned to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 48 weeks. The probability of SVR24 was identified by a baseline scoring system (range: 0-9 points on which scores of 5 to 9 and <5 represent high and low probability of SVR24, respectively.SVR24 rates were 46.1% (754/1634, 77.1% (279/362, 68.0% (514/756, and 51.3% (203/396, respectively, in G1, 2, 3, and 4 patients. Overall, 16.9% and 21.8% patients experienced ≥1 sr-RD for peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, respectively. Among Caucasian noncirrhotic G1 patients: female sex, lower body mass index, pre-existing cardiovascular/pulmonary disease, and low hematological indices were prognostic factors of sr-RD; SVR24 was lower in patients with ≥1 vs. no sr-RD by Week 4 (37.9% vs. 54.4%; P = 0.0046 and Week 12 (41.7% vs. 55.3%; P = 0.0016; sr-RD by Week 4/12 significantly reduced SVR24 in patients with scores <5 but not ≥5.In conclusion, sr-RD to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin significantly impacts on SVR24 rates in treatment-naive G1 noncirrhotic Caucasian patients. Baseline characteristics can help select patients with a high probability of SVR24 and a low probability of sr-RD with peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin.

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of adding low dose ribavirin to peginterferon alfa-2a for treatment of chronic hepatitis C infected thalassemia major patients in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrazmay, Alireza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Mokhtari Payam, Mahdi; Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Behnava, Bita; Miri, Seyyed Mohammad; Karimi Elizee, Pegah; Tabatabaee, Seyed Vahid; Keshvari, Maryam; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis C in Iran is 1% and 18% in general population and thalassemia patients respectively. The cost effectiveness analysis of adding Ribavirin to Peginterferon alfa-2a (PEG IFN alfa-2a) as a combination treatment strategy of chronic hepatitis C in thalassemia patients in comparison with monotherapy could help clinicians and policy makers to provide the best treatment for the patients. In this study we aimed to assess whether adding Ribavirin to PEG IFN alfa-2a is a cost effective strategy in different genotypes and different subgroups of 280 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection from the perspective of society in Iranian setting. A cost effectiveness analysis including all costs and outcomes of treatments for chronic hepatitis C infected thalassemia major patients was conducted. We constructed a decision tree of treatment course in which a hypothetical cohort of 100 patients received "PEG IFN alfa-2a" or "Peg IFN alfa-2a plus Ribavirin." The cost analysis was based on cost data for 2008 and we used 9300 Iranian Rials (IR Rial) as exchange rate declared by the Iranian Central Bank on that time to calculating costs by US Dollar (USD). To evaluate whether a strategy is cost effective, one time and three times of GDP per capita were used as threshold based on recommendation of the World Health Organization. The Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) for combination therapy in genotype-1 and genotypes non-1 subgroups was 2,673 and 19,211 US dollars (USD) per one Sustain Virological Response (SVR), respectively. In low viral load and high viral load subgroups, the ICER was 5,233 and 14,976 USD per SVR, respectively. The calculated ICER for combination therapy in subgroup of patients with previously resistant to monotherapy was 13,006 USD per SVR. Combination therapy in previously resistant patients to combination therapy was a dominant strategy. Adding low dose of Ribavirin to PEG IFN alfa-2a for treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients

  12. Impact of Safety-Related Dose Reductions or Discontinuations on Sustained Virologic Response in HCV-Infected Patients: Results from the GUARD-C Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Graham R.; Coppola, Carmine; Derbala, Moutaz; Ferenci, Peter; Orlandini, Alessandra; Reddy, K. Rajender; Tallarico, Ludovico; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Ahlers, Silke; Bakalos, Georgios; Hassanein, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, peginterferon alfa/ribavirin remains relevant in many resource-constrained settings. The non-randomized GUARD-C cohort investigated baseline predictors of safety-related dose reductions or discontinuations (sr-RD) and their impact on sustained virologic response (SVR) in patients receiving peginterferon alfa/ribavirin in routine practice. Methods A total of 3181 HCV-mono-infected treatment-naive patients were assigned to 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon alfa/ribavirin by their physician. Patients were categorized by time-to-first sr-RD (Week 4/12). Detailed analyses of the impact of sr-RD on SVR24 (HCV RNA <50 IU/mL) were conducted in 951 Caucasian, noncirrhotic genotype (G)1 patients assigned to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 48 weeks. The probability of SVR24 was identified by a baseline scoring system (range: 0–9 points) on which scores of 5 to 9 and <5 represent high and low probability of SVR24, respectively. Results SVR24 rates were 46.1% (754/1634), 77.1% (279/362), 68.0% (514/756), and 51.3% (203/396), respectively, in G1, 2, 3, and 4 patients. Overall, 16.9% and 21.8% patients experienced ≥1 sr-RD for peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, respectively. Among Caucasian noncirrhotic G1 patients: female sex, lower body mass index, pre-existing cardiovascular/pulmonary disease, and low hematological indices were prognostic factors of sr-RD; SVR24 was lower in patients with ≥1 vs. no sr-RD by Week 4 (37.9% vs. 54.4%; P = 0.0046) and Week 12 (41.7% vs. 55.3%; P = 0.0016); sr-RD by Week 4/12 significantly reduced SVR24 in patients with scores <5 but not ≥5. Conclusions In conclusion, sr-RD to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin significantly impacts on SVR24 rates in treatment-naive G1 noncirrhotic Caucasian patients. Baseline characteristics can help select patients with a high probability of SVR24 and a low probability of sr-RD with

  13. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  14. Evaluation of different sampling methods and criteria for diagnosing canine urinary tract infection by quantitative bacterial culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Møller; Jensen, A.B.; Damborg, Peter Panduro

    2016-01-01

    The use of voided urine specimens for bacteriological culture in dogs is discouraged because contamination from external genitalia could lead to misinterpretation of laboratory results. Quantitative culturing and defining significant bacteriuria could increase the usefulness of voided specimens. ...

  15. Impact of mycobacterial culture among HIV-infected adults with presumed TB in Uganda: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semitala, F C; Chaisson, L H; den Boon, S; Walter, N; Cattamanchi, A; Awor, M; Katende, J; Huang, L; Joloba, M; Albert, H; Kamya, M R; Davis, J L

    2015-06-21

    Implementation of new tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic strategies in resource-constrained settings is challenging. We measured the impact of solid and liquid mycobacterial cultures on treatment practices for patients undergoing TB evaluation in Kampala, Uganda. We enrolled consecutive smear-negative, human immunodeficiency virus positive adults with cough of ⩾2 weeks from September 2009 to April 2010. Laboratory technicians performed mycobacterial cultures on solid and liquid media. We compared empiric treatment decisions with solid and liquid culture in terms of diagnostic yield and time to results, and assessed impact on patient management. Of 200 patients enrolled, 26 (13%) had culture-confirmed TB: 22 (85%) on solid culture alone, 2 (8%) on liquid culture alone, and 2 (8%) on both solid and liquid culture. Thirty-four patients received empiric anti-tuberculosis treatment, but only 10 (29%) were culture-positive. Median time to a positive result on solid culture was 92 days (interquartile range [IQR] 69-148) compared to 106 days (IQR 66-157) for liquid culture. No patients initiated treatment following a positive result on liquid culture. The introduction of mycobacterial culture did not influence care for patients undergoing evaluation for TB in Kampala, Uganda. Attention to contextual factors surrounding implementation is needed to ensure the effective introduction of new testing strategies in low-income countries.

  16. Time-lapse ultrashort pulse microscopy of infection in three-dimensional versus two-dimensional culture environments reveals enhanced extra-chromosomal virus replication compartment formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Holly C.; Sing, Garwin; Armas, Juan Carlos González; Campbell, Colin J.; Ghazal, Peter; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2013-03-01

    The mechanisms that enable viruses to harness cellular machinery for their own survival are primarily studied in cell lines cultured in two-dimensional (2-D) environments. However, there are increasing reports of biological differences between cells cultured in 2-D versus three-dimensional (3-D) environments. Here we report differences in host-virus interactions based on differences in culture environment. Using ultrashort pulse microscopy (UPM), a form of two-photon microscopy that utilizes sub-10-fs pulses to efficiently excite fluorophores, we have shown that de novo development of extra-chromosomal virus replication compartments (VRCs) upon murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) infection is markedly enhanced when host cells are cultured in 3-D collagen gels versus 2-D monolayers. In addition, time-lapse imaging revealed that mCMV-induced VRCs have the capacity to grow by coalescence. This work supports the future potential of 3-D culture as a useful bridge between traditional monolayer cultures and animal models to study host-virus interactions in a more physiologically relevant environment for the development of effective anti-viral therapeutics. These advances will require broader adoption of modalities, such as UPM, to image deep within scattering tissues.

  17. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Blood Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Culture Print A A ... adjust the treatment choice. Why Do a Blood Culture? During some illnesses, certain infection-causing bacteria and ...

  18. Tropism and Infectivity of Influenza Virus, Including Highly Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Virus, in Ferret Tracheal Differentiated Primary Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hui; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Maines, Taronna R.; Belser, Jessica A.; Gustin, Kortney M.; Pekosz, Andrew; Zaki, Sherif R.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Tropism and adaptation of influenza viruses to new hosts is partly dependent on the distribution of the sialic acid (SA) receptors to which the viral hemagglutinin (HA) binds. Ferrets have been established as a valuable in vivo model of influenza virus pathogenesis and transmission because of similarities to humans in the distribution of HA receptors and in clinical signs of infection. In this study, we developed a ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture model that consisted of a layered epithelium structure with ciliated and nonciliated cells on its apical surface. We found that human-like (α2,6-linked) receptors predominated on ciliated cells, whereas avian-like (α2,3-linked) receptors, which were less abundant, were presented on nonciliated cells. When we compared the tropism and infectivity of three human (H1 and H3) and two avian (H1 and H5) influenza viruses, we observed that the human influenza viruses primarily infected ciliated cells and replicated efficiently, whereas a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) replicated efficiently within nonciliated cells despite a low initial infection rate. Furthermore, compared to other influenza viruses tested, VN/1203 virus replicated more efficiently in cells isolated from the lower trachea and at a higher temperature (37°C) compared to a lower temperature (33°C). VN/1203 virus infection also induced higher levels of immune mediator genes and cell death, and virus was recovered from the basolateral side of the cell monolayer. This ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture system provides a valuable in vitro model for studying cellular tropism, infectivity, and the pathogenesis of influenza viruses. PMID:23255802

  19. A randomised phase 1 study to investigate safety, pharmacokinetics and impact on gut microbiota following single and multiple oral doses in healthy male subjects of SMT19969, a novel agent for Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Richard; Robinson, Neil; Best, Emma; Echols, Roger; Tillotson, Glenn; Wilcox, Mark

    2015-02-25

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading cause of diarrhoea in health care settings with symptoms ranging from mild and self-limiting to life threatening. SMT19969 is a novel, non-absorbable antibiotic currently under development for the treatment of CDI. Here we report the results from a Phase I study. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study assessing safety and tolerability of single and multiple oral doses of SMT19969 in healthy volunteers. Pharmacokinetic assessments included blood and faecal sampling. The effect of food on systemic exposure and analysis of the gut microbiota were also included. Fifty-six healthy male subjects were enrolled. Following single oral doses of up to 2,000 mg in the fasted state, plasma concentrations of SMT19969 were generally below the lower limit of quantification. In the fed state levels ranged from 0.102 to 0.296 ng/mL after single dosing and after repeat dosing at Day 10 from 0.105 to 0.305 ng/mL. Following single and multiple oral doses of SMT19969, mean daily faecal concentrations increased with increasing dose level and were significantly above the typical MIC range for C. difficile (0.06-0.5 μg/mL). At 200 mg BID, mean (± SD) faecal concentrations of 1,466 (±547) μg/g and 1,364 (±446) μg/g were determined on days 5 and 10 of dosing respectively. No notable metabolites were detected in faeces. Overall, all doses of SMT19969 were well tolerated both as single oral doses or BID oral doses for 10 days. The majority (88%) of adverse events (AEs) were classified as gastrointestinal disorders and were mild in severity, resolving without treatment. The gut microbiota was analysed in the multiple dose groups with minimal changes observed in the bacterial groups analysed except for total clostridia which were reduced to below the limit of detection by day 4 of dosing. Oral administration of SMT19969 was considered safe and well tolerated and was associated with negligible plasma concentrations after

  20. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccine potency testing: the influence of serotype, type of adjuvant, valency, fractionation method, and virus culture on the dose-response curve in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Syed M; Bouma, Annemarie; van den Broek, Jan; Stegeman, Arjan; Chénard, Gilles; Dekker, Aldo

    2008-11-25

    The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between vaccine potency (amount of PD50 per dose) and fraction of clinically protected cattle following homologous challenge with infectious foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus, and to determine the effect of method of fractionation, serotype, type of adjuvant, valency and type of virus culture on the dose-response curve. Data from 297 potency tests of FMD vaccines, comprising 4004 vaccinated cattle, performed at the FMD vaccine production facility in the Netherlands, were used for the present study. A generalised linear mixed effect model was used to analyse the results. Our study showed that the relation between FMD vaccine potency and fraction protected was also affected by the serotype and type of adjuvant. No common level of protection could be assigned to all FMD vaccines with the same amount of PD50 per dose, this information is essential when designing a new standard FMD vaccines control.

  1. Detection and Quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Sputum of Culture-Negative HIV-infected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madico, Guillermo; Mpeirwe, Moses; White, Laura; Vinhas, Solange; Orr, Beverley; Orikiriza, Patrick; Miller, Nancy S.; Gaeddert, Mary; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Palaci, Moises; Kreiswirth, Barry; Straight, Joe; Dietze, Reynaldo; Boum, Yap; Jones-López, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is critical for timely initiation of treatment and interruption of transmission. Yet, despite recent advances, many patients remain undiagnosed. Culture, usually considered the most sensitive diagnostic method, is sub-optimal for paucibacillary disease. Methods We evaluated the Totally Optimized PCR (TOP) TB assay, a new molecular test that we hypothesize is more sensitive than culture. After pre-clinical studies, we estimated TOP’s per-patient sensitivity and specificity in a convenience sample of 261 HIV-infected pulmonary TB suspects enrolled into a TB diagnostic study in Mbarara, Uganda against MGIT culture, Xpert MTB/RIF and a composite reference standard. We validated results with a confirmatory PCR used for sequencing M. tuberculosis. Measurements and Results Using culture as reference, TOP had 100% sensitivity but 35% specificity. Against a composite reference standard, the sensitivity of culture (27%) and Xpert MTB/RIF (27%) was lower than TOP (99%), with similar specificity (100%, 98% and 87%, respectively). In unadjusted analyses, culture-negative/TOP-positive patients were more likely to be older (P<0·001), female (P<0·001), have salivary sputum (P = 0·05), sputum smear-negative (P<0.001) and less advanced disease on chest radiograph (P = 0.05). M. tuberculosis genotypes identified in sputum by DNA sequencing exhibit differential growth in culture. Conclusions These findings suggest that the TOP TB assay is accurately detecting M. tuberculosis DNA in the sputum of culture-negative tuberculosis suspects. Our results require prospective validation with clinical outcomes. If the operating characteristics of the TOP assay are confirmed in future studies, it will be justified as a “TB rule out” test. PMID:27391604

  2. Response to rhinovirus infection by human airway epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in an in vitro two-chamber tissue culture system.

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