WorldWideScience

Sample records for culture communication commitment

  1. The Influence of Cultural Congruency, Communication, and Work Alienation on Employee Satisfaction and Commitment in Mexican Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlock, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of cultural congruency between societal and organizational cultures on Mexican supervisors' and employees' communication behaviors and employees' work alienation, satisfaction, and commitment. The participants were full time nonmanagement adults working for Mexican owned organizations located in Mexico. This study…

  2. The Influence of Cultural Congruency, Communication, and Work Alienation on Employee Satisfaction and Commitment in Mexican Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlock, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of cultural congruency between societal and organizational cultures on Mexican supervisors' and employees' communication behaviors and employees' work alienation, satisfaction, and commitment. The participants were full time nonmanagement adults working for Mexican owned organizations located in Mexico. This study…

  3. Change in police organizations : A study of commitment, communication, culture, leadership and participiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogiest, S.E.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Three studies empirically test the impact of change context, process and individual characteristics on employee commitment. The first study highlights the significance of an involvement-oriented climate when changing an organization. The results show that such a climate increases quality change comm

  4. Change in police organizations : A study of commitment, communication, culture, leadership and participiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogiest, S.E.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Three studies empirically test the impact of change context, process and individual characteristics on employee commitment. The first study highlights the significance of an involvement-oriented climate when changing an organization. The results show that such a climate increases quality change

  5. Cultural Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  6. The Influence of Culture on Teacher Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Razak, Nordin; Darmawan, I. Gusti Ngurah; Keeves, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Culture is believed to be an important factor that influences various aspects of human life, such as behaviour, thinking, perceptions and attitudes. This article examines the similarities and differences in the influence of culture on teacher commitment in three types of Malaysian primary schools. Since commitment to teaching has rarely been…

  7. The importance of commitment, communication, culture and learning for the implementation of the Zero Accident Vision in 27 companies in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Kines, P.; Ruotsala, R.; Drupsteen, L.; Merivirta, M.L.; Bezemer, R.A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the findings are presented of a multinational study involving 27 companies that have adopted a ‘Zero Accident Vision’ (ZAV). ZAV is the ambition that all accidents are preventable, and this paper focuses on how companies implement ZAV through ZAV commitment, safety communication,

  8. Planning and commitment in cultural heritage projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarveld, Marlijn; Smit, Marnix; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of the study is to generate insights into the planning process for reusing cultural heritage within urban redevelopment projects and identifies barriers to and drivers for stakeholder commitment. Design/methodology/approach – Characteristics of five Dutch urban redevelopment

  9. Planning and commitment in cultural heritage projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarveld, Marlijn; Smit, Marnix; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of the study is to generate insights into the planning process for reusing cultural heritage within urban redevelopment projects and identifies barriers to and drivers for stakeholder commitment. Design/methodology/approach – Characteristics of five Dutch urban redevelopment pr

  10. Planning and commitment in cultural heritage projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarveld, M.Y.; Smit, M.; Dewulf, G.P.M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of the study is to generate insights into the planning process for reusing cultural heritage within urban redevelopment projects and identifies barriers to and drivers for stakeholder commitment. Design/methodology/approach – Characteristics of five Dutch urban redevelopment

  11. Predicting Organizational Commitment from Organizational Culture in Turkish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Cemalettin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe organizational culture and commitment and to predict organizational commitment from organizational culture in Turkish primary schools. Organizational Culture Scale (Ipek "1999") and Organizational Commitment Scale (Balay "2000") were used in the data gathering process. The data were collected from…

  12. Predicting Organizational Commitment from Organizational Culture in Turkish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Cemalettin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe organizational culture and commitment and to predict organizational commitment from organizational culture in Turkish primary schools. Organizational Culture Scale (Ipek "1999") and Organizational Commitment Scale (Balay "2000") were used in the data gathering process. The data were collected from 415 primary teachers…

  13. Language, Perception, Culture & Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Man-li

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the prospect of introducing language, perception, culture and communication. Starting with some definitions of language, perception, culture and communication, the paper argues for the internal connection among them. It pro⁃vides better understanding of these factors in foreign language learning and encourages learners to achieve the better learning re⁃sult to communicate effectively through language, culture etc.

  14. Experimental bit commitment based on quantum communication and special relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunghi, T; Kaniewski, J; Bussières, F; Houlmann, R; Tomamichel, M; Kent, A; Gisin, N; Wehner, S; Zbinden, H

    2013-11-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which Bob wishes to commit a secret bit to Alice. Perfectly secure bit commitment between two mistrustful parties is impossible through asynchronous exchange of quantum information. Perfect security is however possible when Alice and Bob split into several agents exchanging classical and quantum information at times and locations suitably chosen to satisfy specific relativistic constraints. Here we report on an implementation of a bit commitment protocol using quantum communication and special relativity. Our protocol is based on [A. Kent, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 130501 (2012)] and has the advantage that it is practically feasible with arbitrary large separations between the agents in order to maximize the commitment time. By positioning agents in Geneva and Singapore, we obtain a commitment time of 15 ms. A security analysis considering experimental imperfections and finite statistics is presented.

  15. Using internal communication as a marketing strategy: gaining physician commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, R P

    1990-01-01

    In the ambulatory care industry, increased competition and promotional costs are pressuring managers to design more creative and effective marketing strategies. One largely overlooked strategy is careful monitoring of the daily communication between physicians and ambulatory care staff providing physician services. Satisfying physician communication needs is the key to increasing physician commitment and referrals. This article outlines the steps necessary to first monitor, then improve the quality of all communication provided to physicians by ambulatory care personnel.

  16. Asymmetries in commitment in an avian communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randler, Christoph; Vollmer, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Mobbing of predators occurs within a conspecific and heterospecific context but has not been quantified within the framework of a communication network and analysed with respect to heterospecific reciprocity. Here, we used playbacks of mobbing calls to show that mobbing is unequally distributed within a community of deciduous forest birds. Five species (great tit Parus major, blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus, marsh tit Poecile palustris, nuthatch Sitta europaea and chaffinch Fringilla coelebs) responded to each other's playbacks of mobbing calls. Commitment to mob was measured by minimum distance, response latency and uttering of calls. Commitment was higher when conspecific calls were broadcast. Yet, responses to heterospecific calls were significantly different between the five species. Chaffinches had the lowest commitment, and blue tits tended to have the highest. The communication network is asymmetric. Some species invest more than they receive from other species. As mobbing might incur costs, these are unequally distributed across the community.

  17. A study on relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khalili

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between organizational culture and organization commitment. The study uses two questionnaires, one for measuring organizational commitment originally developed by Meyer and Allen (1991 [Meyer, J. P., & Allen, N. J. (1991. A three-component conceptualization of organizational commitment. Human resource management review, 1(1, 61-89.] and the other one for organizational culture developed by Denison and Spreitzer (1991 [Denison, D. R., & Spreitzer, G. M. (1991. Organizational culture and organizational development: A competing values approach. Research in organizational change and development, 5(1, 1-21.]. The study is accomplished among selected full time employees who work for an Iranian bank named Bank Saderat Iran. Using Pearson correlation test as well as linear regression methods, the study has determined that there were some positive and meaningful relationship between all components of organizational commitment and organizational culture.

  18. [Culture and cultural gaps in work teams: implications for organisational commitment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, José C; Lanero, Ana; Yurrebaso, Amaia; Tejero, Blanca

    2007-05-01

    Some theoreticians of organisational commitment have proposed that culture is an important determinant of organisational commitment. Nevertheless, very few studies have examined the role that work teams culture (subculture) and their cultural gaps play in commitment. This study is an attempt to overcome this lack. Using a sample of 375 work teams from various public and private organisations, it was found that the results confirmed our proposals. Cultural gaps were negatively related to commitment; the teams subculture was positively related to commitment, and more highly to commitment to values than to commitment to continuing. Contrary to the results of other studies, the demographic variables (age, time on the team, time in the company) were not significant, except that educational level was related to the commitment to continue. The implications of these results are analysed.

  19. Culture, technology, communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ess, Charles; Sudweeks, Fay

    The first book-length anthology to collect some of the most significant culturally-oriented research and scholarship on CMC from the biennial conference series "Cultural Attitudes towards Technology and Communication" (CATaC). The collection is significant for its contribution towards calling...... attention to the role of culturally-variable dimensions, including communication preferences, in the design, implementation, and use of ICTs - and thereby helping to bring into the mainstream of related scholarship and research (e.g., HCI, etc.) what was then a novel perspective and series of questions...... and concerns, beginning with the possibility of "computer-mediated colonization," i.e., of imposing culturally-specific preferences and values through the design and implementation of ICTs as then distributed globally....

  20. Quantum communication based on orthogonal states enables quantum bit commitment

    CERN Document Server

    He, Guang Ping

    2011-01-01

    For more than a decade, it was believed that unconditionally secure quantum bit commitment (QBC) is impossible. But basing on a formerly proposed quantum communication scheme using orthogonal states, here we build a QBC protocol in which the density matrices of the quantum states encoding the commitment do not satisfy a crucial condition on which the impossibility proofs of QBC are based. Thus unconditional security can be achieved. Our protocol is very feasible with currently available technology. It re-opens the venue for other "post-cold-war" multi-party cryptographic protocols, e.g., unconditionally secure quantum bit string commitment and quantum strong coin tossing with an arbitrarily small bias. This result also has a strong influence on the Clifton-Bub-Halvorson theorem which suggests that quantum theory could be characterized in terms of information-theoretic constraints.

  1. Culturally Aware Agent Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Nakano, Yukiko; Koda, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Agent based interaction in the form of Embodied Conversational Agents (ECAs) has matured over the last decade and agents have become more and more sophisticated in terms of their verbal and nonverbal behavior like facial expressions or gestures. Having such “natural” communication channels...... available for expressing not only task-relevant but also socially and psychologically relevant information makes it necessary to take influences into account that are not readily implemented like emotions or cultural heuristics. These influences have a huge impact on the success of an interaction...... the expression of multimodal behavior in agents....

  2. Cultural Heritage communication technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ippoliti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This magazine issue is about the relationship between digital techniques and the communication of cultural heritage and specifically aims at portraying how the interest and implications of these two things are widespread. Without trying to go too in depth, various points of view have been compared, each taken from different articles presenting a wide range of possible approaches on the subject of creating a wealth of information on cultural heritage and how it can be made available to the public without difficulty. Therefore, this issue wants to create a forum for a many-sided comparison built on a wealth of experience and opinions of different authors. In this way the abundance and versatility of the contributing professions (architects, archaeologists, engineers, mathematicians, graphic designers, artists, video producers, digital experts, 3D graphic designers, critics, directors, etc. has given life to a precious blend of know-how, which is without doubt enhanced by present-day digital technology.

  3. Bilingual Cultural Differences and Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fu-sheng; HUA Qing-liang

    2001-01-01

    For historical, regional or other reasons, there are some great differences between the Chinese and the English culture. Generally, the keynote of the western culture is the superiority of lust, while the Chinese culture stresses on reservation and compromise. The westerners emphasize individualism, while the Chinese lay stress on context. Different cultures contribute to different habits, characters and behaviors as well as different registers.Cultural differences can directly lead to information loss, information misleading, thus result in obstacles in communication. This essay will have a detailed analysis on the cultural differences and their influence on communication.

  4. The Relationship between Multiple Commitments and Organizational Citizenship Behavior in Arab and Jewish Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relation between multiple commitments (organizational commitment, occupational commitment, job involvement, and group commitment), ethnicity, and cultural values (individualism/collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and masculinity/femininity) with organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) and in-role…

  5. To what extent are airlines communicating their commitment to sustainability issues?

    OpenAIRE

    Tornes, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the aviation industry. The aim of the research is to analyse the extent to which these airlines are communicating their commitment to sustainability issues. The central question is essentially whether they are committed to the triple bottom line or to Milton Friedman's view that businesses need only follow the law? It is hard to measure commitment, but the first step in measuring commitment is to look at what these ...

  6. Cultural Communication and Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschumi, R.

    1973-01-01

    Part of a larger work, of which the French version, Theorie de la Culture'' (Theory of Culture), is to be published first; shorter version read at the International Federation for Modern Languages and Literatures Congress, Cambridge, England, 1972. (RS)

  7. Cross-Cultural Communication Patterns in Computer Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panina, Daria; Kroumova, Maya

    2015-01-01

    There are important cultural differences in attitudes towards and use of electronic text communication. Consistent with Hall's high-context/low-context conceptualization of culture, electronic inter-cultural communication, just as verbal inter-cultural communication, is affected by the culturally-specific assumptions and preferences of message…

  8. Communication, "Class," and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffres, Leo W.

    A study was conducted to examine the relationships among communication, social class, and ethnic heritage. Eleven of thirteen ethnic groups in a Midwestern metropolitan area who had been studied in 1976 were surveyed again in late 1980 and early 1981. Groups surveyed were Irish, Greek, Czech, Italian, Lebanese, Hungarian, Lithuanian, Polish,…

  9. Culturally Aware Agent Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Nakano, Yukiko; Koda, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Agent based interaction in the form of Embodied Conversational Agents (ECAs) has matured over the last decade and agents have become more and more sophisticated in terms of their verbal and nonverbal behavior like facial expressions or gestures. Having such “natural” communication channels...

  10. Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕游

    2012-01-01

    In Longman Modern English Dictionary, “culture” is defined as: “the social and religious structures and intellectual and artistic manifestations etc. that characterize a society.” Kluckhohn’s definition is: “culture is way of thinking, feeling, believing. It is the group’s knowledge stored up for future use.”

  11. STUDENTS: COMMUNICATION AND PEACE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Arapé Copello

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a research about Communication and Peace Culture developed with Venezuelan students. We did a theoretical review and field-work with students. We are looking for visions and perceptions about communication to peace from students. The research is focused on three student groups who live near of Venezuela frontier. We work with three test: (COMPAZ-1, Peace Builder and Learning to Dialoguing. The students show changes in their initials perceptions after the workshop. The experience developed that short training could be useful to be better the communication behavior as support of peace project.

  12. [Motivational climate and coaches' communication style predict young soccer players' commitment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Miquel; Sousa, Catarina; Viladrich, Carme; Villamarín, Francisco; Cruz, Jaume

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the role of coaches' communication style and coach-created motivational climate in young soccer players' enjoyment and commitment. Four hundred and fifteen young soccer players of high competitive level in the age range from 14 to 16 completed the following questionnaires: a) coach-induced perceived motivational climate (PMCSQ-2), b) coaches' behaviour perception (CBAS-PBS), and c) sport commitment (SCQ). Results showed that coach-created motivational climate correlated highly with the perception of coaches' communication style. Moreover, coach-created motivational climate and communication style significantly determines players' sport commitment and enjoyment. Discussion focuses on the importance of seeking and training credible coaches that favours athletes' commitment.

  13. Climate , communication and participation impacting commitment to change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogiest, S.E.A.M.; Segers, J.; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Through the combination of change process, context and content this paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of failure or success of organizational change. This study considers the effect of organizational climate on affective commitment to change simultaneously with quality change comm

  14. Climate , communication and participation impacting commitment to change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogiest, S.E.A.M.; Segers, J.; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Through the combination of change process, context and content this paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of failure or success of organizational change. This study considers the effect of organizational climate on affective commitment to change simultaneously with quality change

  15. Secure Classical Bit Commitment using Fixed Capacity Communication Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Kent, Adrian

    1999-01-01

    If mutually mistrustful parties A and B control two or more appropriately located sites, special relativity can be used to guarantee that a pair of messages exchanged by A and B are independent. In earlier work, we used this fact to define a relativistic bit commitment protocol, RBC1, in which security is maintained by exchanging a sequence of messages whose transmission rate increases exponentially in time. We define here a new relativistic protocol, RBC2, which requires only a constant tran...

  16. Cross- cultural Communication in Business English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗雪

    2014-01-01

    The factors in cross - cultural communication affects business activities should be paid attention through the process of learning Business English. The successful communication can be realized through the identity with inter- culture.

  17. Perception of Nonverbal Communication Influenced by Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蒙蒙

    2013-01-01

    The concept of perception influenced by culture is pretty important in the study of intercultural communication. The perceptions of language and nonverbal language formed under various cultures intimate with each other during communication. This paper aims to explore the relationship between perception and culture in nonverbal communication through the study of eye language and body odor, and promote the communication among people of different culture as well.

  18. Cultural Communication Learning Environment in Science Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Harkirat S.; Abdul-Latif, Salwana

    2012-01-01

    Classroom communication often involves interactions between students and teachers from dissimilar cultures, which influence classroom learning because of their dissimilar communication styles influenced by their cultures. It is therefore important to study the influence of culture on classroom communication that influences the classroom verbal and…

  19. Informatics, Culture and Communication in three aspects-communication styles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; WANG Yun

    2013-01-01

    With the development of business among China, Indian and Australia, people pay more attention to communication chan⁃nels and cross-cultural business ethics and methods as well as cultural, religious and dietary issues that may impact on successful communication. This article talks about cross communication awareness and methods for improving cross cultural communication based on author’s working experience in a firm in Sydney (Australia) that exports foodstuffs to a number of countries in Asia.

  20. Affective, Normative, and Continuance Commitment Levels across Cultures: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, David J.; Jackson, Timothy A.; McInnis, Kate J.; Maltin, Elyse R.; Sheppard, Leah

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization of business and diversity within the workplace, there has been growing interest in cultural differences in employee commitment. We used meta-analysis to compute mean levels of affective (AC; K=966, N=433,129), continuance (CC; K=428, N=199,831), and normative (NC; K=336, N=133,277) organizational commitment for as…

  1. Affective, Normative, and Continuance Commitment Levels across Cultures: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, David J.; Jackson, Timothy A.; McInnis, Kate J.; Maltin, Elyse R.; Sheppard, Leah

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization of business and diversity within the workplace, there has been growing interest in cultural differences in employee commitment. We used meta-analysis to compute mean levels of affective (AC; K=966, N=433,129), continuance (CC; K=428, N=199,831), and normative (NC; K=336, N=133,277) organizational commitment for as…

  2. Reflections on Intercultural Communication:Culture and Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯丽琼

    2014-01-01

    We live in the changeable and dynamic change. The study of intercultural communication is about the world ’s change of social relationships and how we must adapt to them. This paper mainly deals with the relationship between culture and com-munication. And what the influences of culture and communication have on studying ICC.

  3. Study of Cultural Negative Transfer in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国玲

    2015-01-01

    Different nations in the world have their own cultures, and these cultures are characterized by both universality and particularity. The former provides a foundation and guarantee for intercultural communication, while the latter often leads to neg⁃ative cultural transfer in communication if the speakers are unconscious of cultural differences. This paper makes a general analysis of the negative transfer of surface-structure culture in language forms and that of deep-structure culture in values, thought pat⁃terns, religious beliefs and ethics. It holds that failure in intercultural communication will occur if inadequate attention is paid to cultural differences in the process of language and culture learning.

  4. The effects of organizational commitment and structural empowerment on patient safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Sujin K; Horwitz, Irwin B

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between patient safety culture and two attitudinal constructs: affective organizational commitment and structural empowerment. In doing so, the main and interaction effects of the two constructs on the perception of patient safety culture were assessed using a cohort of physicians. Design/methodology/approach Affective commitment was measured with the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire, whereas structural empowerment was assessed with the Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II. The abbreviated versions of these surveys were administered to a cohort of 71 post-doctoral medical residents. For the data analysis, hierarchical regression analyses were performed for the main and interaction effects of affective commitment and structural empowerment on the perception of patient safety culture. Findings A total of 63 surveys were analyzed. The results revealed that both affective commitment and structural empowerment were positively related to patient safety culture. A potential interaction effect of the two attitudinal constructs on patient safety culture was tested but no such effect was detected. Research limitations/implications This study suggests that there are potential benefits of promoting affective commitment and structural empowerment for patient safety culture in health care organizations. By identifying the positive associations between the two constructs and patient safety culture, this study provides additional empirical support for Kanter's theoretical tenet that structural and organizational support together helps to shape the perceptions of patient safety culture. Originality/value Despite the wide recognition of employee empowerment and commitment in organizational research, there has still been a paucity of empirical studies specifically assessing their effects on patient safety culture in health care organizations. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first

  5. Transparency: can central banks commit to truthful communication?

    OpenAIRE

    Julian A. Parra POlanía

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether transparency is beneficial, it is usual to assume that the central bank may choose one of two options, opacity versus truthful communication. However, the monetary policymaker may have incentives to misrepresent private information so as to reduce economic volatility by manipulating inflation expectations. Using a standard model, this paper points out the fact that if misrepresentation is included as a possible action there is no rational expectations equilibrium with infl...

  6. Eye contact and Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘西娟

    2009-01-01

    It is commonly agreed by contemporary schohrs that it is important to understand the role of culture and its characteristics and potential impact on individuals engaged in cross-cultural communication.Nonverbal Communication often reveals basic culture traits.Eye contact,as a mediunq to convey emodon.attitudes and intention.phys an undeniably vital role in communication.The concentration of this paper is to discuss the functions of eye contact in communication,different information conveyed by eve contact on the basis of different cultures and the importance of understanding and respecting the rituals of eye contact in cross-culmral communication.

  7. Country actions to meet UN commitments on non-communicable diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonita, Ruth; Magnusson, Roger; Bovet, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Strong leadership from heads of state is needed to meet national commitments to the UN political declaration on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and to achieve the goal of a 25% reduction in premature NCD mortality by 2025 (the 25 by 25 goal). A simple, phased, national response to the political ...

  8. COMUNICA Project: a commitment for strategic communication on Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Picas, Jordi; Diaz, Jordi; Fernandez-Turiel, Jose-Luis

    2016-04-01

    The Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera (ICTJA-CSIC) has just celebrated its 50-year anniversary last year. It is a reference research center on Earth Sciences both national and international level. The Institute includes 4 research groups which focus their scientific activity on the structure and dynamics of the Earth, the environmental changes in the geological record, geophysical and geochemical modelling and crystallography and optical properties. Only when large geological disasters happens, mainly earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, some interaction between ICTJA-CSIC researchers and traditional media occurs, which is limited by the fact that the aim of the Institute is the scientific research and it has no responsibilities in the area of civil protection. This relationship reduces the knowledge of our activity to the general public. To overcome this situation, the ICTJA-CSIC has decided to take an active role in the social dissemination of geological and geophysical knowledge. Thus, the ICTJA-CSIC has launched the COMUNICA Project. The project is aimed to increase the social visibility of the ICTJA-CSIC and to promote the outreach of researchers. Therefore ICTJA-CSIC has created the Communication Unit, which is in charge of designing communication strategies to give to different audiences (media, students of secondary and higher education, general public) an overview of the scientific and institutional activity of the ICTJA-CSIC. A global communication plan is being designed to define the strategic actions, both internal and external. An important role has been reserved for digital channels, to promote ICTJA-CSIC activity on social networks such as Twitter, Facebook or Youtube, besides making a major effort in the renovation and maintenance of the corporate website. A strong effort will be done to collect and spread through press releases the major scientific milestones achieved by the researchers, to promote the interest of mass media. Communication

  9. Study of Politeness in Cross Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂仁娜; 姜艳

    2012-01-01

      Politeness is a universal linguistic phenomenon but also relative by nature and subject to culture. The politeness in pragmatic study and its cultural specificity in cross cultural communication are explained. Some tactics in cross communication are also suggested.

  10. Emotional contagion, empathic concern and communicative responsiveness as variables affecting nurses' stress and occupational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omdahl, B L; O'Donnell, C

    1999-06-01

    Based on data gathered from registered nurses at two hospitals, this research examined the extent to which empathy variables contributed to nursing stress and occupational commitment. The empathy variables examined were emotional contagion (i.e. sharing the emotions of patients), empathic concern (i.e. being concerned for patients) and communicative effectiveness (i.e. effectively communicating with patients and their families). Nursing stress was explored through the variables of depersonalization, reduced personal accomplishment and emotional exhaustion. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the combination of the three emotional communication variables explained significant proportions of the variance in all three of the stress variables, as well as occupational commitment. The analyses further revealed that a lack of empathic concern and poor communicative responsiveness accounted for significant proportions of the variance in depersonalization. Lack of empathic concern, poor communicative responsiveness and high emotional contagion significantly contributed to reduced personal accomplishment. Emotional contagion explained a significant proportion of the variance in emotional exhaustion. Emotional contagion also significantly reduced occupational commitment. The findings are discussed in terms of nursing education and administration.

  11. Cultural determinants of email communication styles

    OpenAIRE

    Holtbrügge, Dirk; Weldon, Abigail; Rogers, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Based on a sample of 234 IT consulting and services professionals from various cultural backgrounds, this study investigates whether Edward T. Hall’s concept of culture can explain cultural differences in email communication. Although a vast array of intercultural research employs Hall’s concept in various communication settings, few take into account the computer-mediated communication technologies that now play an integral role in the operations of international companies. Our results show ...

  12. The Obstacles in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-hua

    2009-01-01

    In Cross-cultural communication,the ability of the languages and the ability of the cultures ale the crucial factors in the communicating activities.People with the sanle cultural background communicate with each other easily and smoothly,and understand each other better,and there are fewer or no obstacles in their communication at all.The different cultural backgrounds and traditions,the different social customs and everyday living habits,and the different values all will affect the communication quality and will surely result in obstacles in cross-cultural communication.The obstacles which frequently occur in the cross-cultural communication are:ethnocentrism,stereotyping,prejudice,and the different cultural backgrounds.In order to do away with the obstacles and to make the communication smoothly and successfully,the communicating parties both should observe the cooperative principles and politeness principles.And what's more,they must discard their own prejudices,and respect others,together to fulfill the cross-cultural communicating activities.

  13. The role of Public Service Motivation and Organizational Culture for Organizational Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austen Agata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the our paper is to discuss the relationships between organizational culture, Public Service Motivation (PSM and organizational commitment (OC. On the basis of literature review we formulated hypotheses presenting potential relationships between mentioned constructs. We propose that there is a mutual influence between PSM and organizational culture and that organizational culture moderates the influence of Public Service Motivation on organizational commitment. Due to the presence of variables on different levels of analysis, we also discuss some issues of multilevel approach.

  14. Inter-Cultural Communication: A Foundation of Communicative Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a model of inter-cultural communication that enumerates and structures latent factors affecting such communication and elaborates on the process of self-reflection as a guiding mechanism of successful communication. Design/methodology/approach: The five factors and various moderators that are…

  15. Relationship between organizational culture and commitment of employees in health care centers in west of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Yadollah; Mohammadibakhsh, Roghayeh; Soltanian, Alireza; Behzadifar, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Presence of committed personnel in each organization not only reduces their absenteeism, delays, and displacements but also leads to a dramatic increase in performance and efficiency of an organization, mental freshness of employees, better manifestation of noble objectives, and organizational mission as well as fulfillment of personal goals. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment of employees in administrative units of health care centers in the cities of Hamedan Province based on the Denison model in 2015. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 177 employees in administrative units of health care centers in the cities of Hamedan Province were selected by a multistage stratified sampling method. The data collection instruments included the standardized Denison organizational culture survey and organizational commitment questionnaire by Meyer and Allen. Data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS version 21 using descriptive statistics and Pearson product-moment coefficient. Results Among the 12 indicators of organizational culture, the highest mean scores were assigned to empowerment (16.74), organizational learning (16.41), vision (16.4), and strategic direction (16.35); respectively. Furthermore, the indicators of capability development (14.2), core values (15.31), team orientation (15.45), and goals (15.46) received the lowest mean scores in this respect. Among the four dimensions of organizational culture, the highest mean score was related to “mission” in organizational culture and the lowest score was associated with “involvement.” Meyer and Allen’s organizational commitment model also had three components in which affective commitment in this study obtained the highest score (26.63) and continuance commitment received the lowest score (24.73). In this study, there was a significant correlation between all the components of organizational culture and

  16. Relationships among Organizational Commitment, Job Satisfaction, and Learning Organization Culture in One Korean Private Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Taejo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify dynamic relationships among organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and learning organization culture in a Korean private company. Using a sample of 669 employees from five subsidiaries of a Korean conglomerate, this research found that learning organization culture is moderately and positively related…

  17. Relationships among Organizational Commitment, Job Satisfaction, and Learning Organization Culture in One Korean Private Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Taejo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify dynamic relationships among organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and learning organization culture in a Korean private company. Using a sample of 669 employees from five subsidiaries of a Korean conglomerate, this research found that learning organization culture is moderately and positively related…

  18. Metaphor and Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晶

    2009-01-01

    The nature of metaphor is not only a matter of language, but also a matter of mind. Metaphor, as a kind of common language phenomenon, reflects different cultural models used in different languages, that is called cognitive models. The application of metaphorical concept shows that the metaphor cognition is universal across cultures, but at the same time, it has some differences in their application because of their different social and cultural backgrounds. We should consider the factor of context when perform cross-cultural communication in order to avoid the misunderstanding between different cultures.[Key Words]Metaphor;Culture;Cross-cultural Communication

  19. Does organizational culture mediate the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Hazana Abdullah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To date, the relationships among organizational culture, transformational leadership and organizational commitment have been empirically investigated. However, majority of these studies have been focusing on direct effects of either transformational leadership or organizational culture on organizational commitment in large organizations. This approach might not only hinder our understanding on real predictors of organizational commitment but also obscure the presence of spurious relationships. Therefore, this study aims to determine the mediating effect of organizational culture on the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational commitment among small business employees. An explanatory research design was used with cross-sectional survey as data collection technique. Once the composite reliability, construct, and convergent and discriminant validity of the measurement constructs were established, a Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM was run to analyze the structural model and the mediating effect of organizational culture. The results showed that organizational culture mediates the effect of transformational leadership on organizational commitment among small business. This study cautions the generalization of findings obtained from large organizations to be extended to small organizations.

  20. Culture and demography: from reluctant bedfellows to committed partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, Christine A

    2014-02-01

    Demography and culture have had a long but ambivalent relationship. Cultural influences are widely recognized as important for demographic outcomes but are often "backgrounded" in demographic research. I argue that progress toward a more successful integration is feasible and suggest a network model of culture as a potential tool. The network model bridges both traditional (holistic and institutional) and contemporary (tool kit) models of culture used in the social sciences and offers a simple vocabulary for a diverse set of cultural concepts, such as attitudes, beliefs, and norms, as well as quantitative measures of how culture is organized. The proposed model conceptualizes culture as a nested network of meanings represented by schemas that range in complexity from simple concepts to multifaceted cultural models. I illustrate the potential value of a model using accounts of the cultural changes underpinning the transformation of marriage in the United States and point to developments in the social, cognitive, and computational sciences that could facilitate the application of the model in empirical demographic research.

  1. Cultural Norms and Nonverbal Communication: An Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yanrong

    2015-01-01

    Nonverbal communication takes place in specific cultural contexts and is influenced by cultural norms. Cultural norms are "social rules for what certain types of people should and should not do" (Hall, 2005). Different cultures might have different norms for nonverbal behaviors in specific social, relational, and geographical contexts.…

  2. Cultural Norms and Nonverbal Communication: An Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yanrong

    2015-01-01

    Nonverbal communication takes place in specific cultural contexts and is influenced by cultural norms. Cultural norms are "social rules for what certain types of people should and should not do" (Hall, 2005). Different cultures might have different norms for nonverbal behaviors in specific social, relational, and geographical contexts.…

  3. Cultural Effects and Uses of Communication Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Wilbur

    The communication satellite already has developed a mature technology. It carries a substantial part of the world's long range communication, and is now useable for special cultural and educational purposes. Major cultural effects come from its contribution to increasing enormously the flow of information in the world. It will increase human…

  4. China English in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢红艳; 张妮

    2013-01-01

      China English,as an international variant of English, is gradually known and recognized by scholars around the world. Its emergence has its own objectivity and rationality. China English plays a very important role in cross-cultural communication and its functions can not be ignored in cross-cultural communication.

  5. Communication as a mechanism for cultural integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrom, Tomas; Hagstrom, Tom; Goransson, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Providing autonomy for employees ensures innovation competence if balanced by integration into the organization. The aim of this article is to study processes leading to the integration of employees into the company culture. The two research questions are: What makes the culture of a work group similar to the company culture? How is a work group culture constructed? Theories that are employed concern culture as an organizing structure emerging in the interaction, company culture as a way to exert control, and social networks as a way to describe the interaction. Empirical data come from a merchant bank from which 105 respondents from ten work groups answered questions about their communication and their integration into the company culture. The results show that the sub-culture of the group emerges in communication between members of the group. There seems to be a self-reinforcing spiral between collegial talk, especially about goals, plans and changes at the work place, and cultural integration. All members of a group should be included in this communication to create a strong culture. The value system of the supervisor strongly influences the sub-culture of the work group. Appointing supervisors with values that correspond to the company culture and provide for employee communications is thus central for organizations using culture as a tool for control.

  6. Cultural Differences of Etiquette in Nonverbal Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝钰; 朱凡

    2007-01-01

    Cultural difference is one of the greatest hinders in the intercultural communication. This thesis focuses on displaying cultural differences of etiquette in nonverbal communication. It lays emphasis on the comparisons in China (mainly Han Nationality) and Western (mainly Britain and American) as well as the different culture backgrounds that bring about the etiquette variations. These comparative analyses help people smooth the paths of social intercourse and establish pleasant, comfortable, and cooperative relationships.

  7. Cultural Differences of Etiquette in Nonverbal Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝钰; 朱凡

    2007-01-01

    Cultural difference is one of the greatest hinders in the intercultural communication. This thesis focuses on displaying cultural differences of etiquette in nonverbal communication. It lays emphasis on the comparisons in China (mainly Han Nationality)and Western (mainly Britain and American) as well as the different culture backgrounds that bring about the etiquette variations. These comparative analyses help people smooth the paths of social intercourse and establish pleasant, comfortable, and cooperative relationships.

  8. The Mediator Effect of Career Development between Personality Traits and Organizational Commitment: The Example of Sport Communication Technology Talents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hung-Jen; Lin, Chun-Hung; Tung-Hsing, Lin; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-01-01

    This paper explored the relationships among career development, personality trait, and organizational commitment and examines whether career development mediates the relationship between personality trait and organizational commitment. The sample was 275 sport communication technology talents in Taiwan. The instrument included the Personality…

  9. Cultural Isolation and Cultural Integration: A Communicative Language Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, John

    2002-01-01

    Provides a theoretical grounding to an activity that follows a communicative language teaching approach to teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language. The activity, cultural isolation and cultural integration, motivates learners to relate their experiences and feelings in regard to diverse cultures. (Author/VWL)

  10. Euphemisms in Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙萌珏

    2009-01-01

    As an important language phenomenon,euphemism surely has an influence on cross-cultural communication. Using euphemism can make the language communication go smoothly and successfully. The paper first gives the source of euphemism and the significance of the study of euphemism. It then discusses the features of euphemism:its definition and classification and the principles. By using a large number of examples,it finally focuses on comparison and analysis of cultural differences and similarity between English and Chinese euphemisms. Through this paper,we can cultivate the consciousness of cross-cultural communication and avoid pragmatic errors of euphemisms.

  11. The Effect of Learning Organization Culture on the Relationship between Interpersonal Trust and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hong Min; Kolb, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to assess the effect of learning organization culture on the linkage between interpersonal trust and organizational commitment. The study sample was obtained from employees of two major Korean conglomerates. Online questionnaires were completed by 321 respondents. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used…

  12. Commitment to the Study of International Business and Cultural Intelligence: A Multilevel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jase R.; Barakat, Livia L.; Aad, Amine Abi

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a multilevel theoretical framework, we examined how metacognitive and motivational cultural intelligence influence an individual's commitment to the study of international business (IB). Data from 292 undergraduate and graduate business students nested in 12 U.S. business school classes demonstrated that individuals' metacognitive and…

  13. Commitment to the Study of International Business and Cultural Intelligence: A Multilevel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jase R.; Barakat, Livia L.; Aad, Amine Abi

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a multilevel theoretical framework, we examined how metacognitive and motivational cultural intelligence influence an individual's commitment to the study of international business (IB). Data from 292 undergraduate and graduate business students nested in 12 U.S. business school classes demonstrated that individuals'…

  14. Person-Organization (Culture) Fit and Employee Commitment under Conditions of Organizational Change: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Hecht, Tracy D.; Gill, Harjinder; Toplonytsky, Laryssa

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how person-organization fit, operationalized as congruence between perceived and preferred organizational culture, relates to employees' affective commitment and intention to stay with an organization during the early stages of a strategic organizational change. Employees in a large energy company completed surveys…

  15. Commitment to the Study of International Business and Cultural Intelligence: A Multilevel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jase R.; Barakat, Livia L.; Aad, Amine Abi

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a multilevel theoretical framework, we examined how metacognitive and motivational cultural intelligence influence an individual's commitment to the study of international business (IB). Data from 292 undergraduate and graduate business students nested in 12 U.S. business school classes demonstrated that individuals' metacognitive and…

  16. A Path Analysis Study of School Culture and Teachers' Organisational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Engin; Baloglu, Nuri; Cakir, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the direct and indirect relations between school culture and the organisational commitment of primary school teachers were analyzed. The subjects of the research consisted of primary school teachers who worked at a district in Istanbul in the academic year 2007-2008. The sampling group was defined by the cluster sampling method. In…

  17. Person-Organization (Culture) Fit and Employee Commitment under Conditions of Organizational Change: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Hecht, Tracy D.; Gill, Harjinder; Toplonytsky, Laryssa

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how person-organization fit, operationalized as congruence between perceived and preferred organizational culture, relates to employees' affective commitment and intention to stay with an organization during the early stages of a strategic organizational change. Employees in a large energy company completed surveys…

  18. A Path Analysis Study of School Culture and Teachers' Organisational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Engin; Baloglu, Nuri; Cakir, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the direct and indirect relations between school culture and the organisational commitment of primary school teachers were analyzed. The subjects of the research consisted of primary school teachers who worked at a district in Istanbul in the academic year 2007-2008. The sampling group was defined by the cluster sampling method. In…

  19. The effects of corporate social responsibility on employees' affective commitment: a cross-cultural investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Hattrup, Kate; Spiess, Sven-Oliver; Lin-Hi, Nick

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the moderating effects of several Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) cultural value dimensions on the relationship between employees' perceptions of their organization's social responsibility and their affective organizational commitment. Based on data from a sample of 1,084 employees from 17 countries, results showed that perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) was positively related to employees' affective commitment (AC), after controlling for individual job satisfaction and gender as well as for nation-level differences in unemployment rates. In addition, several GLOBE value dimensions moderated the effects of CSR on AC. In particular, perceptions of CSR were more positively related to AC in cultures higher in humane orientation, institutional collectivism, ingroup collectivism, and future orientation and in cultures lower in power distance. Implications for future CSR research and cross-cultural human resources management are discussed. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Linguistic Relativity and Cultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhifang, Zhu

    2002-01-01

    A culture is usually with the bias of universalization. Each culture has its ultimate concern, and its answers to the concern make up a worldview. And each culture is inclined to see its worldview as universal. The Christian thinks that Jehovah God is the creator and law-maker of the whole universe; Chinese think that the sage's teaching sheds…

  1. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbone, Antonella

    2008-03-01

    Cultural competence in oncology requires the acquisition of specific knowledge, clinical skills, and attitudes that facilitate effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting, thus, leading to improved therapeutic outcomes and decreased disparities in cancer care. Cultural competence in oncology entails a basic knowledge of different cultural attitudes and practices of communication of the truth and of decision-making styles throughout the world. Cultural competence always presupposes oncology professionals' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and values. To be able to communicate with cancer patients in culturally sensitive ways, oncologists should have knowledge of the concept of culture in its complexity and of the risks of racism, classism, sexism, ageism, and stereotyping that must be avoided in clinical practice. Oncologists should develop a sense of appreciation for differences in health care values, based on the recognition that no culture can claim hegemony over others and that cultures are evolving under their reciprocal influence on each other. Medical schools and oncology training can teach communication skills and cultural competence, while fostering in all students and young doctors those attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity, and awareness that are needed to deliver effective and culturally sensitive cancer care.

  2. Organizational Commitment for Knowledge Workers: The Roles of Perceived Organizational Learning Culture, Leader-Member Exchange Quality, and Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Baek-Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of perceived organizational learning culture and leader-member exchange (LMX) quality on organizational commitment and eventually on employee turnover intention. Employees exhibited the highest organizational commitment when they perceived a higher learning culture and when they were supervised in a supportive…

  3. Organizational Commitment for Knowledge Workers: The Roles of Perceived Organizational Learning Culture, Leader-Member Exchange Quality, and Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Baek-Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of perceived organizational learning culture and leader-member exchange (LMX) quality on organizational commitment and eventually on employee turnover intention. Employees exhibited the highest organizational commitment when they perceived a higher learning culture and when they were supervised in a supportive…

  4. Mexican American Adolescent Couples Communicating about Conflict: An Integrated Developmental and Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Heidi Adams; Williams, Lela Rankin

    2016-01-01

    Using observational methods on a small sample of committed Mexican American couples (N = 10, ages 15-17, M length of relationship = 26.5 months), we describe and categorize developmental and cultural communication patterns concerning the negotiation of conflict issues. Videotaped dyadic interactions were transcribed and qualitatively coded using…

  5. The effects of job satisfaction, employee commitment, workplace friendship and team culture on service recovery performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abednego Feehi Okoe

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The existing literature has called for more studies to be conducted on how human resource activities affect service recovery performance. This study therefore ascertains the effects of Job Satisfaction, employee Commitment, Workplace Friendship and Team Culture on Service Recovery Performance. The survey research design was used in this study. The participants were frontline employees from the various service sectors in Ghana. The convenience sampling was used as the sampling technique. A total of 372 responses were used in the final analysis. The scale items were adapted from the existing literature. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the fit of the model. Multiple linear regression was used to test the hypotheses. The findings indicate that Job Satisfaction, Employee Commitment, Workplace Friendship and Team Culture significantly exerts positive influence on Service Recovery Performance of frontline employees. The findings from the study imply that there are several antecedents to Service Recovery Performance. Team Culture, Workplace Commitment, and Employee Commitment can influence Job Satisfaction which in turn will affect Service Recovery Performance resulting in customer satisfaction and retention.

  6. On Cross-cultural Communication from the Perspective of Semiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勇; 缑英俊

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural communication refers to the activities that people with different cultural backgrounds communicate with each other and have information disseminated and exchanged. Ways of cross-cultural communication can be verbal communica-tion and nonverbal communication. Language is a symbolic system used to record the culture, and culture is transmitted by sym-bols as the medium, thus, the meaning of signs is divergent from culture to culture. In cross-cultural communication, to learn the meaning theory of semiotics consciously helps improve the ability of cross-cultural communication by contrasting the differenc-es from the verbal symbols and nonverbal symbols.

  7. Cultural Fields, Communication and Ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    This article is a cultural analysis conducted in a neighbourhood of Copenhagen, Indre Nørrebro, where approximately 20 percent of the population is of other than Danish ethnic origin. It sheds light on the structural characteristics of two strategic sites, or cultural fields, within which everyday...... life and identity formation of ethnic minorities take place. We deliberately explore how ethnicity works or does not work as a marker in the configuration of the two chosen cultural fields: public libraries and ethnic media. We analyse the role of these two cultural fields in the social formation...... of Indre Nørrebro as a neighbourhood and in the local citizens' process of producing locality and a sense of belonging. How are these cultural fields structurally configured and organized, and what role do they historically and contemporarily have in the neighbourhood? The implicit assumption is that both...

  8. The Internet, Intercultural Communication and Cultural Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoccia, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The internet affords its users an unprecedented level of contact with people from other cultural and social groups. It is often assumed that because of this it can facilitate intercultural communication and reduce the perceived distance between cultures. This article will examine this assumption by exploring two questions. Firstly, do the…

  9. The cultural side of science communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L; Bang, Megan

    2014-09-16

    The main proposition of this paper is that science communication necessarily involves and includes cultural orientations. There is a substantial body of work showing that cultural differences in values and epistemological frameworks are paralleled with cultural differences reflected in artifacts and public representations. One dimension of cultural difference is the psychological distance between humans and the rest of nature. Another is perspective taking and attention to context and relationships. As an example of distance, most (Western) images of ecosystems do not include human beings, and European American discourse tends to position human beings as being apart from nature. Native American discourse, in contrast, tends to describe humans beings as a part of nature. We trace the correspondences between cultural properties of media, focusing on children's books, and cultural differences in biological cognition. Finally, implications for both science communication and science education are outlined.

  10. Culture, Self, and Collectivist Communication: Linking Culture to Individual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singelis, Theodore M.; Brown, William J.

    1995-01-01

    Develops and demonstrates a theoretical framework and corresponding methodology to link variables at the culture level to the individual level and, then, to specific outcome variables. Tests a path-analytic model linking cultural collectivism with interdependent self-construals and high-context communication. Discusses implications for theory…

  11. PARTICULARITIES OF ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT IN THE SPECIFIC CULTURE OF THE ROMANIAN COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea-Valentin BUȘU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture and organizational commitment represent two of the most important concepts to be considered în an well-functioning organization, having a direct influence over employees` lives in that company. Organizational culture, a scientific concept appeared in the field literature at the end of 1980`, in an increasingly unstable business environment, could be defined as a defined series of collective attitudes, ideas, beliefs, symbols and meanings, values and ideologies, rules and norms, feelings or behaviors, as a model and structure of stable practices shared by all the members of that organization and which, by being implemented, come to merge with the structure of organization and its control systems, with the purpose of producing behavioral norms, this way keeping  the unit of organization. In the same time, organizational commitment represents the feeling of membership, of belonging felt by the employee toward the company he/she works in, reflecting the degree to which those characteristics and organizational perspectives are internalized and adopted in his behavior by the subject. Commitment could be also seen as a model of thinking of an employee taking into consideration the level to which personal values and goals are congruent with those of the company. On the other hand, behavioral commitment refers to the process of one employee becoming committed or even stacked into the organization and the way he manage the situation. Our motivation for choosing the theme of this research lays on one hand in the desire to understand the construct of organizational culture and the organizational development, field which I`m interested in,  and on the other hand because the lack of similar research regarding the Romanian companies. The research We have made revealed that there are many studies linking the two concepts with the organizational development in companies from other countries, but only two studies realized in our country

  12. Communication in Corporate Culture Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Perbawasari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available PT Dahana (Persero which was originally a monopoly company has been changed into a company that has competitors not only from within the country but also from foreign companies, therefore it takes effort to transform corporate culture so that employee can adjust their behavior with the company's vision to be a global player. The objective of this study is to investigate the comprehension of PT. Dahana’s employees about the recent and the previous corporate cultures within the organization. This study used qualitative research approach with constructivist paradigm, and the type chosen was case studies. According to the study, it was revealed that the old values in the previous corporate culture were understood by the employees as culture with kinship, strict leadership, relaxed work ethos, bureaucratic, less-competitiveness, less client-orientation, and not based on competencies. Meanwhile, the new values in the recent culture were comprehend as culture with high discipline value, system of rewards and punishments, efficiency, based on competency, prioritizing educational levels, but without adequate role models.

  13. Communication Dialectics, Islam, and Sundanese Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujang Saefullah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Customary societies of Kampung Dukuh is community tightly maintaining their tradition up to the present. It appeared on their life routine beginning from the way of having intercourse, the custom of consuming, the kind of living, the system of leadership until the construction model of stage house constructed from bamboo with palm fiber for the roof. This study aimed to analyze: 1 language dialectic, communication and Sundanese culture at customary society of Kampung Dukuh 2 communication dialectic and tradition of Islam at customary society of Kampung Dukuh 3 Dialectic of Islam tradition and Sundanese culture at customary society of Kampung Dukuh. The method of this research is Ethnography of Communication with qualitative approach. The techniques of data collection are profound interview, participatory observation and documentation research. The results are 1 communication dialectic Sundanese culture lasted in total dialectic manner and indicated relation of dependence each other 2 communication dialectic and tradition of Islam prevailed in total dialectic way, and possessed dependence, affirmed as well as strengthen each other 3 tradition dialectic of Islam and Sundanese culture were divided into two categories namely 1 dialectic of Islam value and culture norm run in total dialectic manner and owned dependence each other 2 dialectic of Islam faith and myths lasted in contradictory way or be in conflict among two different extremes.

  14. An analysis of the relationship between high school teachers’ organizational commitment levels and perceptions of school culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ayık

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is aimed at investigating the relationship between high school teachers’ organizational commitment levels and their perceptions of school culture. Therefore, relational (correlational model has been used in the study. The sampling group of the study consists of 265 teachers who work at high schools in Palandöken district of Erzurum. Organizational Commitment Scale and School Culture Scale have been used as data collection instruments. Data has been analysed through arithmetic mean, standard deviation, Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. At the end of the study, positive and significant correlation has been found between organizational commitment levels of high school teachers and their school culture. Teachers’ perception levels on emotional commitment has been found to be higher than normative and continuance commitment levels. Besides, it has been determined that high school teachers’ perceptions on school culture are at the highest levels in unity of purpose dimension while they are at low levels in learning partnership dimension. It has been concluded that collaborative leadership and collegial support dimensions of school culture predict teachers’ perceptions of emotional commitment; learning partnership dimension predicts their perceptions of continuance commitment; collaborative leadership dimension predicts their perceptions of normative commitment in positive direction and at meaningful levels. In this context, educational administrators in educational organizations should lead teachers and support them about learning partnership which is one of the factors of setting school culture. Moreover, educational administrators should produce works for setting organizational commitment which helps achieving the objectives of the institution. Regarding the fact that organizational commitment and school culture affect each other, these two variables should be compromised in school setting.

  15. Cultural Deterritorialisation: Communications Technology, Provenance and Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Bida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The deterritorialisation, or uprooting from time and place, of culture through communication technologies can be explored through John Tomlinson's idea of globalisation as "complex connectivity". This paper aims to cover various areas of research to highlight the ways in which cultural deterritorialisation continually permeates cultural experience. The analysis is grounded in an understanding of globalisation as both a homogenising and differentiating force. Three aspects of communication's "complex connectivity" are looked at in greater detail: control, speed/ease, and the idea of a global village. These are discussed in terms of ownership and market concentration, and notions of "direct connectivity" and "indirect connectivity". Adapted from Tomlinson's "complex connectivity", "direct connectivity" focuses on interpersonal relations and deterritorialisation on individual scales through personal global contact, while "indirect connectivity" enlarges the scale with a focus on mass cultural production and global consumption. Finally, a discussion of possible kinds of reterritorialisation will consider the impact of these aspects of communication's "complex connectivity" on cultural flows. Rather than concepts such as transterritoriality which are not rooted and remain deterritorialised, reterritorialisation is explored as a means of balancing global trends in the cultural and communications sectors of global and local villages alike.

  16. Communication and Culture: Interpersonal Attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lydia Ledesma; Emry, Robert A.

    Cultural differences in interpersonal attraction were studied using 93 black, 112 Chicano, and 112 white college students who completed 40 Likert-type rating scales for each of four concepts of attraction (intimate, friendship, acquaintance, and stranger attraction). When a factor solution was generated, differences were noted in the amount of…

  17. Communication and Culture: Interpersonal Attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lydia Ledesma; Emry, Robert A.

    Cultural differences in interpersonal attraction were studied using 93 black, 112 Chicano, and 112 white college students who completed 40 Likert-type rating scales for each of four concepts of attraction (intimate, friendship, acquaintance, and stranger attraction). When a factor solution was generated, differences were noted in the amount of…

  18. The Impact of Culture: Communicating with Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    RESEARCH PROJECT THE IMPACT OF CULTURE: COMMUNICATING WITH IRAN by Colonel Eric J. Winkie United States Army Dr. Richard Meinhart Project Adviser This...St ra te gy Re se ar ch Pr oj ec t THE IMPACT OF CULTURE: COMMUNICATING WITH IRAN BY COLONEL ERIC J. WINKIE United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT...position of the Department of the Army , Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. U.S. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA 17013-5050 USAWC CLASS

  19. Inter-Cultural Communication in Student Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda

    This article describes a project undertaken at the University of Southern Denmark designed to support active group work and inter-cultural communication between international students. The project is based on using group work and cooperative learning principles to do student research, therefore...... challenging the students to solve problems as a group. The main aim of the research is to investigate the possible effects of using integrated student research and group work using cooperative learning methods to develop international communication skills of students in multi-cultural higher education courses....

  20. Immunocytochemical and structural comparative study of committed versus multipotent stem cells cultured with different biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Carla; Baldini, Andrea; Cavani, Francesco; Sena, Paola; Benincasa, Marta; Ferretti, Marzia; Zaffe, Davide

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was the comparison of the behavior of committed (human osteoblast cells - hOB - from bone biopsies) versus multipotent (human dental pulp stem cells - hDPSC - from extracted teeth) cells, cultured on shot-peened titanium surfaces, since the kind of cell model considered has been shown to be relevant in techniques widely used in studies on composition/morphology of biomaterial surfaces. The titanium surface morphology, with different roughness, and the behavior of cells were analyzed by confocal microscope (CM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis. The best results, in terms of hOB adhesion/distribution, were highlighted by both CM and SEM in cultured plates having 20-μm-depth cavities. On the contrary, CM and SEM results highlighted the hDPSC growth regardless the different surface morphology, arranged in overlapped layers due to their high proliferation rate, showing their unfitness in biomaterial surface test. Nevertheless, hDPSC cultured inside 3D-matrices reproduced an osteocyte-like three-dimensional network, potentially useful in the repair of critical size bone defects. The behavior of the two cell models suggests a different use in biomaterial cell cultures: committed osteoblast cells could be appropriate in selecting the best surfaces to improve osseointegration, while multipotent cells could be suitable to obtain in vitro osteocyte-like network for regenerative medicine. The originality of the present work consists in studying for the first time two different cell models (committed versus multipotent) compared in parallel different biomaterial cultures, thus suggesting distinct targets for each cellular model.

  1. Silence in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常利娜; 郭芳芳; 郝继亭; 顾庆媛; 孙胜强

    2008-01-01

    In academic field, silence is classified as part of the nonverbal communication. Edward T. Hall regarded silence as a key standard of dividing high-context cultures and low-context cultures (毕 46). In high-context cultures, information is provided through gestures, the use of space, and even silence. Little information is explicitly explained by words. Chinese, Japanese, Native American cultures are high-context ones. However, "in low-context cultures, the verbal message contains most of the information and very little is embedded in the context." (Samovar, A. Larry, Richard E. Porter and Lisa A. Stefani 79). How do people from different cultures respond to silence? How their values affect their attitudes? What causes silence?

  2. Cultural cognition and public policy: the case of outpatient commitment laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Dan M; Braman, Donald; Monahan, John; Callahan, Lisa; Peters, Ellen

    2010-04-01

    What explains controversy over outpatient commitment laws (OCLs), which authorize courts to order persons with mental illness to accept outpatient treatment? We hypothesized that attitudes toward OCLs reflect "cultural cognition" (DiMaggio, P. Annl Rev Sociol 23:263-287, 1997), which motivates individuals to conform their beliefs about policy-relevant facts to their cultural values. In a study involving a diverse sample of Americans (N = 1,496), we found that individuals who are hierarchical and communitarian tend to support OCLs, while those who are egalitarian and individualistic tend to oppose them. These relationships, moreover, fit the cultural cognition hypothesis: that is, rather than directly influencing OCL support, cultural values, mediated by affect, shaped individuals' perceptions of how effectively OCLs promote public health and safety. We discuss the implications for informed public deliberation over OCLs.

  3. Cultural Diversity and Information and Communication Impacts on Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Hung; Chu, Ying-Chien

    2011-01-01

    Cultural diversity doesn't just entail differences in dress and language. It also encompasses different ways of thinking, managing, and communicating. The relationship between communication and culture is a very complex and intimate one. Cultures are created through communication; that is, communication is the means of human interaction through…

  4. Adoption of communication technologies and national culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper investigates the question what attributes of countries influence the differential speed at which they adopt new communication technologies. On the basis of empirical data, it concludes that besides GNP per capita, cultural variables predict the speed of technology adoption. In particular,

  5. Hybrid Experience Space for Cultural Heritage Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Niels Einar; Christensen, Mogens Fiil; Mayerhofer, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    by daily use of experience products like computer-games, IMAX cinemas and theme parks featuring virtual reality installations. “It’s a question of stone-axe displays versus Disney-power installations” as one of the involved museum professionals point it, “but we don’t want any of these possibilities......”. The paper presents an actual experience design case in Zea Harbour, Greece dealing with these challenges using hybrid experience space communicating cultural heritage material. Ar-chaeological findings, physical reconstructions and digital models are mixed to effec-tively stage the interactive experience...... space. The Zea Case is a design scenario for the Museum of the Future showing how Cultural Heritage institutions can reinvent the rela-tion to the visitor and the neighbourhood. While Hybrid Experience Space can be used for Cultural Heritage Communication in traditional exhibitions we have reached...

  6. Communicating in Collectivistic Culture: Relationship between Interdependent Self-Construal and Cooperative Communication in Cross-Cultural Communication Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hoo Pin Lick Soo

    2017-01-01

    This concept paper proposes that when companies have expanded their business and operation throughout the Asian countries, the success or failure of a company abroad depends on how effectively its business negotiators can apply their cross-cultural communication skills in a new cultural environment. At the forefront of this change is interdependent self-construal, which stands as communication medium on interaction goals (international business negotiation outcome) in collectivistic culture. ...

  7. The Path from Ethical Organisational Culture to Employee Commitment: Mediating Roles of Value Congruence and Work Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Huhtala

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Following the Job Demands-Resources model’s motivational process, this study investigates the role of person-organisation fit and work engagement as mediating processes between ethical culture and employee commitment, where ethical culture is seen as an organisational resource. It was expected that the stronger the ethical values and practices are experienced to be, the more compatible employees feel with the organisation. A good person-organisation fit was further hypothesised to act as a personal job resource for the employees, who would consequently experience higher work engagement leading to stronger affective commitment and less turnover intentions. The study used questionnaire data gathered from 270 Finnish school psychologists. The analyses were performed by using SEM and mediation modelling with the bootstrapping method. Ethical organisational culture had a significant positive association with experienced person-organisation fit, which in turn was related to higher work engagement. Both person-organisation fit and work engagement were associated with higher affective commitment and with lower turnover intentions. This study contributes to understanding the mechanisms through which ethical culture affects employee commitment by integrating the concept of person-organisation fit with the Job Demands-Resources model. Organisations can retain committed and motivated workforce through fostering a strong ethical culture, which can support employees’ affective commitment to the organisation.

  8. The Path from Ethical Organisational Culture to Employee Commitment: Mediating Roles of Value Congruence and Work Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Huhtala

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Following the Job Demands-Resources model’s motivational process, this study investigates the role of person-organisation fit and work engagement as mediating processes between ethical culture and employee commitment, where ethical culture is seen as an organisational resource. It was expected that the stronger the ethical values and practices are experienced to be, the more compatible employees feel with the organisation. A good person-organisation fit was further hypothesised to act as a personal job resource for the employees, who would consequently experience higher work engagement leading to stronger affective commitment and less turnover intentions. The study used questionnaire data gathered from 270 Finnish school psychologists. The analyses were performed by using SEM and mediation modelling with the bootstrapping method. Ethical organisational culture had a significant positive association with experienced person-organisation fit, which in turn was related to higher work engagement. Both person-organisation fit and work engagement were associated with higher affective commitment and with lower turnover intentions. This study contributes to understanding the mechanisms through which ethical culture affects employee commitment by integrating the concept of person-organisation fit with the Job Demands-Resources model. Organisations can retain committed and motivated workforce through fostering a strong ethical culture, which can support employees’ affective commitment to the organisation.

  9. Language and Culture in International Legal Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Kocbek

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary business world, partners belonging to different nations, and hence different cultures, conduct business operations in either the language of one of the parties involved or in a third, neutral language, serving as lingua franca. Thus, language skills, as an essential component of the communicative competence, imply a certain extent of implicit or explicit translating and interpreting. The functionalist approaches in translation science, and most of all the Skopos theory by J. H. Vermeer, view translation as an intercultural transfer, which inevitably entails taking into account intercultural differences. As intercultural business communication is directly affected by the legal systems of the cultures involved, the communicating parties need to be acquainted with both the source and target legal systems. This is especially the case with English, as the Anglo-American legal system, based essentially on common law, differs substantially from continental law, to which most of the European countries belong. English as the world’s most commonly used lingua franca will have to be adapted to its new function by adopting terms and concepts from other cultures and, within the EU, take into consideration the existing discrepancies between the continental and the Anglo-American legal systems. In this paper, cases of non-equivalence regarding legal terms are illustrated with examples from company law. In conclusion, some linguistic and cultural implications of the use of English as lingua franca, as well as their impact on teaching and learning practices are presented.

  10. Organisational Communication and Its Relationships with Job Satisfaction and Organisational Commitment of Primary School Staff in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nobile, John

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between aspects of organisational communication and dimensions of job satisfaction and general organisational commitment. Participants were 358 staff members from 35 government primary schools in the state of Western Australia, who completed a survey comprising the Organisational…

  11. New insights in cross-cultural communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Lidia

    2012-01-01

    Improving clinician-patient communication, improving clinical decision making, and eliminating mistrust have been identified as three key areas for reducing disparities in care. An important step is the training of cancer professionals to deliver culturally competent care in clinical settings as well as increasing the proportion of underrepresented minorities in the health care workforce. Providing care that is attuned to the patient's cultural preferences begins by talking to the patient about his or her cultural history and identifying the locus of decision making, preferences for disclosure of vital health information, and goals of care. Patients with low literacy and those with poor fluency of the dominant language require additional services. Language interpretation by trained professionals is fundamental to ensure that patients are able to provide informed consent for treatment. A working definition of culture involves multiple dimensions and levels and must be viewed as both dynamic and adaptive, rather than simply as a collection of beliefs and values. Effective cross-cultural education avoids stereotyping and promotes communication and negotiation to solve problems and minimize tension and conflict. Recent research has identified that unconscious biases held by clinicians affect their behavior and recommendations for treatment.

  12. Communicating in Collectivistic Culture: Relationship between Interdependent Self-Construal and Cooperative Communication in Cross-Cultural Communication Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoo Pin Lick Soo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This concept paper proposes that when companies have expanded their business and operation throughout the Asian countries, the success or failure of a company abroad depends on how effectively its business negotiators can apply their cross-cultural communication skills in a new cultural environment. At the forefront of this change is interdependent self-construal, which stands as communication medium on interaction goals (international business negotiation outcome in collectivistic culture. The international trade may bring about a lot in terms of cross-cultural communication and international business negotiation, but adopting cooperative communication in the international business negotiations will create more integrative agreements between the international business negotiators. Many scholars believe that if both parties have similarities in communication styles, it will lead to positive interaction (cooperative communication that contributes to cooperation and influences the interaction goals (negotiation outcome. This paper offers critical insight into the theoretical link between interdependent selfconstrual and interaction goals. The proposed cross-cultural communication model uses interdependent self-construal and cooperative communication to understand when collectivistic business negotiators develop relationships that promotes positive interaction goals (negotiation outcome.

  13. The negative transfer of native culture in intercultural communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Jing

    2016-01-01

    In intercultural communication, the negative transfer of native culture is a universal phenomenon that may induce communicative barriers, misunderstandings and even conflicts. This paper touches upon the nature and causes of the negative transfer of native culture, and elucidates cultural empathy as one way to diminish such negative transfer with the purpose of improving intercultural communication quality.

  14. A Study on Pragmatic Failure in Cross-Cultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Through analyzing and comparing the anecdotes of pragmatic failure in cross-cultural communication from the aspects of lexicon, syntax and discourse, some pragmatic strategies are suggested in intercultural communication. To improve learners' cultural awareness and communicative competence, a cultural-linguistic approach in foreign language…

  15. Relationship between staff-reported culture change and occupancy rate and organizational commitment among nursing homes in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method from four regions nationwide. Culture change in nursing homes was operationalized by five person-directed care (PDC) constructs and three organizational environment constructs, and outcome quality was indicated by changes to occupancy rate and organizational commitment. After controlling for facility characteristics, the effect of staff-reported culture change on occupancy rate and organizational commitment was analyzed through the multiple-regression method. Consistent with previous research, this study revealed positive effects of culture change for nursing homes in South Korea. The study found that staff-reported culture change correlated with occupancy rate and organizational commitment. Given that culture change variables were significantly related to occupancy rate and organizational commitment, the findings of the study provide a persuasive argument that policies and/or programs to support culture change in nursing homes should be enhanced. Management-level workers in these facilities should have the skills and knowledge to foster more PDC and a more person-directed environment.

  16. Teacher Perceptions of School Culture and Their Organizational Commitment and Well-Being in a Chinese School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Devos, Geert; Li, Yifei

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to analyze and validate the dimensions and specific features of a school culture in a Chinese context. A sample of 181 teachers from a Chinese primary and secondary school in Beijing participated in a survey that measures school organizational cultural characteristics and teacher organizational commitment and well-being as outcomes…

  17. Teacher Perceptions of School Culture and Their Organizational Commitment and Well-Being in a Chinese School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Devos, Geert; Li, Yifei

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to analyze and validate the dimensions and specific features of a school culture in a Chinese context. A sample of 181 teachers from a Chinese primary and secondary school in Beijing participated in a survey that measures school organizational cultural characteristics and teacher organizational commitment and well-being as outcomes…

  18. Cross Cultural Scientific Communication in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2006-12-01

    An example of cross-cultural education is provided by the Aurora Alive curriculum. Aurora Alive communicates science to Alaska Native students through cross-cultural educational products used in Alaska schools for more than a decade, including (1) a CDROM that provides digital graphics, bilingual (English and Athabascan language) narration-over-text and interactive elements that help students visualize scientific concepts, and (2) Teacher's Manuals containing more than 150 hands-on activities aligned to national science standards, and to Alaska Standards for Culturally Responsive Schools. Created by Native Elders and teachers working together with University Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute scientists, Aurora Alive blends Native "ways of knowing" with current "western" research to teach the physics and math of the aurora.

  19. Communicating with culturally and linguistically diverse patients in an acute care setting: nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, R N Jane

    2003-03-01

    Communication with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) patients has been shown to be difficult. This study describes nurses' experiences of communicating with CLD patients in an acute care setting. A purposive sample of registered nurses and certified midwives (n=23) were interviewed. Main findings were: interpreters, bilingual health workers and combinations of different strategies were used to communicate with CLD patients; some nurses showed empathy, respect and a willingness to make an effort in the communication process with others showing an ethnocentric orientation. Main recommendations were: prioritising access to appropriate linguistic services, providing nurses with support from health care workers, e.g., bilingual health care workers who are able to provide more in-depth information, increasing nurses' understanding of legal issues within patient encounters, supporting nurses to translate their awareness of cultural diversity into acceptance of, appreciation for and commitment to CLD patients and their families.

  20. A multilevel cross-cultural examination of role overload and organizational commitment: investigating the interactive effects of context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, David M

    2014-07-01

    Considering the influential nature of context, the current investigation examined whether the relationship between role overload and organizational commitment was affected by various contextual factors. Drawing on the occupational stress literature, structural empowerment and cooperative climate were examined as factors that would mitigate the negative effects of role overload on organizational commitment. In addition, national culture was examined to determine whether empowerment and cooperative climate had consistent moderating effects across cultures. The relationships among these variables were examined using hierarchical linear modeling in a sample of 6,264 employees working at a multinational organization in 337 different work locations across 18 countries. Results suggested that the negative effect of role overload on organizational commitment did not vary as a function of culture in the current sample, but empowerment and cooperative climate had a moderating influence on this relationship. Furthermore, a 3-way interaction was observed between the cultural variable of power distance, empowerment, and role overload in predicting organizational commitment, suggesting that factors that serve to mitigate the negative effects of role overload in one culture may be ineffectual in another. This 3-way interaction was observed regardless of whether Hofstede's (2001) cultural value indices were used or the cultural practice scores from the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) project (R. J. House, Hanges, Javidan, Dorfman, & Gupta, 2004).

  1. On Affective Communication-From Perspective of Cultural Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨佩佩

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, cross-cultural study is turning to pragmatic fields concerning communication, such as business negotiation, overseas life and language teaching, etc. This paper reviews previous studies of culture and communication, attempting to reveal how to have affective communication from perspective of cultural context by case studies. As a result, theoretical foundation and case studies prove that although we have cooperative principles as general guidelines for communication, cultural awareness, espe⁃cially awareness of High Context (HC) and Low Context (LC), still plays a key role in cross-cultural communication by making up for the lost of meaning while transmission.

  2. Pragmatic Failures in Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴西

    2015-01-01

    Pragmatics was only invented in 1973 and its first major theory,Speech Act Theory,did not take shape until the 50s. G.Leech argues that“we cannot really understand the nature of language itself unless we understand pragmatics:how language is used in communication.” Therefore,the most important element in pragmatics is the context.According to Thomas,pragmatic failure can be divided into two levels:pragmalinguistic failure and socio-pragmatic failure.Therefore,communicative competence must include pragmalinguistic competence and sociopragmatic competence,if inter-cultural pragmatic problems are to be avoided.The paper aims to analyze the causes of pragmatic failures and solutions to this problem will be presented.

  3. Pragmatic Failures in Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴西

    2015-01-01

    Pragmatics was only invented in 1973 and its first major theory,Speech Act Theory,did not take shape until the 50s.G.Leech argues that"we cannot really understand the nature of language itself unless we understand pragmatics:how language is used in communication."Therefore,the most important element in pragmatics is the context.According to Thomas,pragmatic failure can be divided into two levels:pragmalinguistic failure and socio-pragmatic failure.Therefore,communicative competence must include pragmalinguistic competence and sociopragmatic competence,if inter-cultural pragmatic problems are to be avoided.The paper aims to analyze the causes of pragmatic failures and solutions to this problem will be presented.

  4. Communicating Investment: Cultural Studies, Affect and the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, publishers' catalogues have showcased a continuing supply of introductory readers, taxonomies and evaluations of cultural studies, largely for teaching purposes. In this article, the author suggests that the current climate of academic publishing has allowed cultural studies' particular investment and commitment to scholarly…

  5. Olympic Education and Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Hai

    2009-01-01

    @@ In recent years, Olympic education has received increasingly greater attention. It is not just Olympic host cities that have established specialized Olympic education prograrnmes across the board, but also non-host cities are developing Olympic education activities to different degrees. Olympic education has also become an important project in the Olympic preparatory work, and has been an important project in the preparations for the Beijing Olympics. How to understand Olympic education? There are many different ways of looking at it. This essay attempts to take the unique characteristics of Olympic education as a starting point to explore the important role played by issues of cross-cultural communication in Olympic education.

  6. The significance of ABSA's Group chief executive's internal corporate communication programme for the commitment levels of selected Absa employees.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Grunig (1992:114) states that internal communication is so entwined with the process of organising and with organisational structure, environment, power and culture that many theorists of organisational communication argue that organisations would not exist without communication. Grunig (1992) goes further by saying that internal communication is the catalyst if not the key to organisational excellence and effectiveness. In this study an attempt was made to illustrate the link between the int...

  7. Understanding organizational commitment: A meta-analytic examination of the roles of the five-factor model of personality and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Daejeong; Oh, In-Sue; Colbert, Amy E

    2015-09-01

    We examined the relationships between the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality traits and three forms of organizational commitment (affective, normative, and continuance commitment) and their variability across individualistic and collectivistic cultures. Meta-analytic results based on 55 independent samples from 50 studies (N = 18,262) revealed that (a) all FFM traits had positive relationships with affective commitment; (b) all FFM traits had positive relationships with normative commitment; and (c) Emotional Stability, Extraversion, and Openness to Experience had negative relationships with continuance commitment. In particular, Agreeableness was found to be the trait most strongly related to both affective and normative commitment. The results also showed that Agreeableness had stronger relationships with affective and normative commitment in collectivistic cultures than in individualistic cultures. We provide theoretical and practical implications of these findings for personality, job attitudes, and employee selection and retention.

  8. Education for Committed Leadership: The Correlation between Bible College Institutional Culture and Student Commitment to the Religious Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to confirm the belief that differences in the institutional culture of United Pentecostal Church International (UPCI)-endorsed Bible colleges correlate with changes in the level of identification with the UPCI experienced by students who complete a program of study at these institutions. Because adherents of the UPCI…

  9. COMMUNICATIVE CULTURE AND THE ROLE OF PHATIC FUNCTION IN INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosova Kristina Igorevna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses a language function which helps to personalize and control communication arranging it in accordance with communicative norms and rituals. The choice of forms of interpersonal communication is regulated by norms and motivated by conditions of communicative behavior. Interpersonal communication peculiarities are connected in particular with the forms of indirect communication implementing the phatic language function. Phatic communication is viewed as a special form of interpersonal communication which is not connected with the quality of information transfer and which is targeted at regulating interpersonal relations. With the help of special verbal means the specific cause of communication, which is the control of communication arrangement, is implemented. Phatic utterances provide the success of informative function implementation in the future. The article also describes the notion of communicative culture. Standards of communicative culture are connected with the systematization of communication forms and rules in their relation to various communicative functions of the language, phatic function in particular, and national and cultural characteristics of their implementation in speech. Typical cases of contact making and contact maintaining are part of communicative culture's sphere. They are the most important means of regulating interpersonal relations. Representatives of a certain communicative culture know common rules which normalize their verbal behavior and dictate the necessity or lack of necessity to start the interaction. Interpersonal behavior is based on norms of communicative culture which can be defined as loose norms of communication building correlated with speech forms and targeted at people's behavior. It happens in a familiar ethnocultural environment and requires knowledge of phatic communication norms. Phatic communication requires specific consideration since success and efficiency of interpersonal

  10. CULTURAL “FACES” OF INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    different patterns of interpersonal communication in the two cultures. .... emotional communication, self disclosure, verbal and nonverbal expressions in general .... are any differences between fathers and their adolescent sons in terms of self ...

  11. Health communication: a media and cultural studies approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Belinda; Lewis, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    "This book is about communicating for health and social change. With a clear focus on public health and health promotion practice, it provides a unique introduction to media and cultural studies perspectives on health communication...

  12. Exploring the Relationship between Self-Awareness and Student Commitment and Understanding of Culturally Responsive Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kimberly; Negi, Nalini; Fowler, Dawnovise N.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between self-awareness and social work students' commitment and understanding of culturally responsive social work practice. Data consisted of assigned papers (N = 23), submitted by graduate social work students, which asked them to describe their ethnic/racial background and ancestors' process of assimilation,…

  13. THE CONCEPT OF FRAMING IN CROSS-CULTURAL BUSINESS COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELA DUMBRAVĂ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the concept of cultural frames and their role in signifying human experience, the paper aims at pointing out that business communication, like any social interaction, is underrun by a process of framing, according to which individuals perceive, comprehend and appropriate otherness. Expanded to cross - cultural business communication, framing provides a clearer perspective on cultural divergence and ensures the acquiring of cultural sensitivity, which, in a global business environment, is of crucial importance for effective interactions.

  14. How Does Satisfaction Translate into Performance? An Examination of Commitment and Cultural Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to add new insights into the mechanism through which job satisfaction relates to job performance. Affective commitment was tested as a potential mediator between job satisfaction and job performance, and traditionality was used as a potential moderator between job satisfaction and affective commitment. A survey study…

  15. Effects of Management Communication, Opportunity for Learning, and Work Schedule Flexibility on Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Butts, Marcus M.; Vandenberg, Robert J.; DeJoy, David M.; Wilson, Mark G.

    2006-01-01

    In the current career climate characterized by change and turbulence, employees may demonstrate limited organizational commitment to their employers. Rousseau (1998) suggests that two key ways to elicit loyalty from employees today are to reinforce perceptions of organizational membership and demonstrate organizational care and support for…

  16. The Correlation between School Managers' Communication Skills and School Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanci, Ali; Sahin, Ahmet; Sönmez, Melek Alev; Yilmaz, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the correlation between school administrators' communication skills and school culture. This research was conducted as a survey using a descriptive method in order to ascertain the views of school managers and teachers about the correlation between school managers' communication skills and school culture in…

  17. Cultural differences in medical communication: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Barbara C; Meeuwesen, Ludwien

    2006-12-01

    Culture and ethnicity have often been cited as barriers in establishing an effective and satisfying doctor-patient relationship. The aim of this paper is to gain more insight in intercultural medical communication difficulties by reviewing observational studies on intercultural doctor-patient communication. In addition, a research model for studying this topic in future research is proposed. A literature review using online databases (Pubmed, Psychlit) was performed. Findings reveal major differences in doctor-patient communication as a consequence of patients' ethnic backgrounds. Doctors behave less affectively when interacting with ethnic minority patients compared to White patients. Ethnic minority patients themselves are also less verbally expressive; they seem to be less assertive and affective during the medical encounter than White patients. Most reviewed studies did not relate communication behaviour to possible antecedent culture-related variables, nor did they assess the effect of cultural variations in doctor-patient communication on outcomes, leaving us in the dark about reasons for and consequences of differences in intercultural medical communication. Five key predictors of culture-related communication problems are identified in the literature: (1) cultural differences in explanatory models of health and illness; (2) differences in cultural values; (3) cultural differences in patients' preferences for doctor-patient relationships; (4) racism/perceptual biases; (5) linguistic barriers. It is concluded that by incorporating these variables into a research model future research on this topic can be enhanced, both from a theoretical and a methodological perspective. Using a cultural sensitive approach in medical communication is recommended.

  18. The Correlation between School Managers' Communication Skills and School Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanci, Ali; Sahin, Ahmet; Sönmez, Melek Alev; Yilmaz, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the correlation between school administrators' communication skills and school culture. This research was conducted as a survey using a descriptive method in order to ascertain the views of school managers and teachers about the correlation between school managers' communication skills and school culture in…

  19. Teaching about Culture and Communicative Life in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nemi C.

    Basic patterns of culture and communication in India such as world view, reincarnation, concepts of Karma and Dharma, stages of life, the caste system, time orientation, collectivism, hierarchical orientation, language situation, and nonverbal communication norms are an integral part of Hinduism and Indian culture, and have a significant influence…

  20. Why Are Cultural Policy Decisions Communicated in Cool Cash?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Grønholm, Adam; Møgelgaard, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the role of the economic rationale in modern cultural policy decision communication and ask why it remains such an important factor, even though research has argued against it. Based on Luhmann’s system theory, we show how the economic rationale manifests itself...... in the cultural political communication as parasitic and complementary couplings, and how different communication forms are in play: the indirect, direct, and the both-and form. The point is to construct communicative positions in cultural policy. The positions involve the economic rationale in their own...... particular way and each of them offers themselves as a communicative platform which the culture politician can optionally step into and out of. The arts system stands out from other systems by not distinguishing itself in one single distinction and coding. In exactly this issue lies the communicative...

  1. Cultural Influences on the Business Context in Intercultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范松嵩

    2014-01-01

    More and more organizations and business people involve in communication across cultures, because they are doing business in foreign countries or have an increasingly multicultural workforce. As a result of their migrations, they, with diverse backgrounds and different languages, are working side by side in many countries. So business communication has been intercultur-al communication.

  2. Culture: A Filtration Process during Communication in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Rudi

    This paper focuses on the filtration process of culture during communication in education with reference to visual elements. An introduction provides a review of some communication models--graphic representations of theories that attempt to predict and explain the process of communication. These simple models are discussed: Aristotle's model of…

  3. Cross-Cultural Communication and the Continuity of Cultures: The Role of Intercultural Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    cultural contexts influence interpersonal communication. We need to know how intercultural communication affects the mobility and permanency of cultures. We need to know what sustains our core values and what might be harmful to them. We need a clear definition of what intercultural communication is about...

  4. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-07

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  5. A Comparative Study between Chinese and Western Food Culture in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦体霞

    2014-01-01

    The differences of food culture play an important role in cross-cultural communication. Learn the cultural rooted causes of food culture between Chinese and Western countries, will promote mutual understanding between people and enjoy different feelings different foods brings, enhance cultural exchange, complement and integration.

  6. Cultural Differences and Cultivation of Cross-Cultural Communicative Competence in Chinese FLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaobo

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve their abilities in cross-cultural communication, language learners should develop not only their language competence, but also communicative competence. This paper presents an understanding on the general cultural differences between the west and China by applying the cultural dimensions of Hofstede and Bond, and points out…

  7. An Important Role Culture Plays in Communicative Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓霞

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the effects of cultural background on the communicative approach exemplified by the teaching of Integrated Skills of English (ISE).It proceeds from the interpretation of culture in light of linguis tic and pedagogic perspectives,then target on how cultural knowledge affects the communicative approach with the actual examples from ISE,and concludes that greater importance should be attached to EFL teaching

  8. RELIGIOUS COMMUNICATION IN THE CONTEXT OF CULTURE MEDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Petrushkevych, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the work is to determine the features of media culture that bind it with mass culture and mass communications and have the most significant effect on the general principles of the religious mass communication. In addition, the objective is to identify the skills system and traits of mass human that are necessary for using media culture. Methodology. The methodological basis is related to structuring, analytical analysis and synthesis of media features; highlighting phenome...

  9. The most important culture differences and elements of intercultural communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张乐

    2012-01-01

    This paper wrote about the cultural differences. There are four dimensions: power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism and masculinity. After that, paper talked about the intercultural communication, which contains language, non-verbal communication, time and space concept. Then talked different cultures do cause problems in business. To avoid misunderstanding and clashes, the international managers should realize and understand the different cultures, adapt themselves to fit into the business environment in order to get the best achievement in business.

  10. Distributed communication: Implications of cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) for communication disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengst, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes distributed communication as a promising theoretical framework for building supportive environments for child language development. Distributed communication is grounded in an emerging intersection of cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) and theories of communicative practices that argue for integrating accounts of language, cognition and culture. The article first defines and illustrates through selected research articles, three key principles of distributed communication: (a) language and all communicative resources are inextricably embedded in activity; (b) successful communication depends on common ground built up through short- and long-term histories of participation in activities; and (c) language cannot act alone, but is always orchestrated with other communicative resources. It then illustrates how these principles are fully integrated in everyday interactions by drawing from my research on Cindy Magic, a verbal make-believe game played by a father and his two daughters. Overall, the research presented here points to the remarkably complex communicative environments and sophisticated forms of distributed communication children routinely engage in as they interact with peer and adult communication partners in everyday settings. The article concludes by considering implications of these theories for, and examples of, distributed communication relevant to clinical intervention. Readers will learn about (1) distributed communication as a conceptual tool grounded in an emerging intersection of cultural-historical activity theory and theories of communicative practices and (2) how to apply distributed communication to the study of child language development and to interventions for children with communication disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Relationships among Different Organizational Culture and Leadership Types with Organizational Commitment: A Field Study on Logistics Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zafer ACAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Logistics industry contributes to the adaptation of the firms to the requirements of global competitiveness by ensuring the movement of goods. Despite the changes and developments in context of telecommunication and transportation technologies logistics industry is still having a labor-intensive structure. Thus, to sustain organizational capabilities that created through employees is an important factor to achieve competitive advantage. According to the literature, desirable work outcomes of employees are related with their organizational commitment behavior to their organizations. Moreover in logistics firms, to adapt competitive environment and to create organizational capabilities through employees, leaders have to demonstrate leadership behaviors as forming and supporting a capability creating organizational culture. Thus the aim of this study is to explore the effects of organizational culture and leadership styles on employees’ commitment. To reach this aim a questionnaire survey is performed and data collected from 448 employees of 39 logistics firms analyzed by using SPSS v.15 statistical program. Findings of this research are supported the positive effects of leadership and organizational culture on the organizational commitment in context of logistics industry.

  12. Cross-cultural Communication and ELT in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChengTongchun

    2004-01-01

    Culture plays a significant role in teaching and learning a language. The acquisition of cultural knowledge is an indispensable part of language learning. This paper discusses the importance and necessity of cross-cultural communication in the language teaching, and focuses on three parts:

  13. The Influence of Socio-cultural Domains on Communication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    Specialized languages develop within groups that share a common element. In similar ways, people ..... roles for women and men. In these cultures, male ... different verbal and non verbal communication systems. Verbal Codes .... mindedness are culture-general, knowledge and skill are usually culture – specific, requiring ...

  14. On English Teaching and Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琪

    2016-01-01

    Since last century, because of reforming and opening policy, many people, especially young people go abroad to get a better job or get further education and so on. Besides, many foreigners are curious about our country. Consequently, people come to realize that if we known little about cross-cultural communication, there will be many conflicts. Some experts suggest that today's English teaching should emphasize intercultural communication. Learners ought to know not only grammar or words, but should learn cultural knowledge. If not, they will meet many difficulties while they communicate with foreigners. Therefore, it is important to introduce this kind of knowledge while teaching. This paper mainly talks about cross-cultural communication in foreign language teaching in China. In the first part, we talk about the importance of learn cross-culture and discuss the relationship between language teaching and cultural teaching. Next part is talk about the problems of culture teaching nowadays. According to these problems, we explore some culture teaching methods to improve culture teaching. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the importance of culture teaching during foreign language teaching. Culture teaching is necessary for all of us, it can make it possible for learners to prevent miscommunication from occurring in intercultural communications.

  15. Cross-cultural Communication and English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘爽

    2014-01-01

    Language is the carrier of culture .Culture is the essence of language .However , most Chinese English teaching seriously lacksthe diverse English culture acquisition .The main topic of this essay is to point out the lexicon differences between English and Chinese languagesand then is about the application of cross -cultural knowledge in English teaching .

  16. Cultural Consumption of the Overseas Chinese Garden in the Process of Cross-cultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, L.

    2015-08-01

    When referring to the tangible cultural heritage, people tend to concern more about the conservation and research of the entity of the tangible heritage than the cross-cultural communication of the cultural heritage which is also one of the most important components of the preservation of the cultural heritage. As an exotic new born of the cultural heritage, the entity born from the cross-cultural communication inherits the properties of the cultural heritage on the one hand, and on the other hand generates diversities as a result of the differences based on social, cultural and environment. And the business model is one of the most important reasons for the production of diversities. There's no doubt that a good form of business model makes great significance to the cross-cultural communication. Therefore, the study of the business model of cultural heritage in the process of cross-cultural communication will not only contributes to the deeper understanding towards the phenomenon of the cultural heritage's cross-cultural communication, but also leads to the introspection to the tangible cultural heritage itself. In this way, a new kind of conservative notion could take form, and the goal of protecting cultural heritage could be achieved. Thus the Chinese Garden is a typical representation of the cultural heritage which makes great sense in the cross-cultural communication. As a kind of tangible cultural heritage, the Chinese gardens are well preserved in different regions in China. While the spirits of the Chinese garden carry forward through the construction of the Chinese gardens abroad during the cross-cultural communication. As a new kind of form of the cross-cultural communication of the cultural heritage, on the one hand, the Chinese gardens overseas built ever since China's Reform and Opening express creatively of the materialist and the spirituality of the traditional Chinese Garden, and on the other hand, those Chinese gardens overseas face all kinds of

  17. Culture and Communication in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael G.

    Robert L. Stevenson recently described the problems facing international communications researchers: the field has no common focal variable, no common method, and no common literature--despite this, he professed pleasure at the state of the field. This paper takes Stevenson as a starting point to analyze international communications through a case…

  18. Influences by Sino - American Cultures on Oral Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭煜颖

    2013-01-01

    Oral communication is the universal phenomenon in the daily life,whose success plays an important role in the daily life and the work.When communicating with people from another country orally,we should pay great attention to cultural differences.This paper,on the basis of analyzing the cultural differences between China and America,mainly explores their influences on the oral communication between two countries.And meanwhile the author proposes some suggestions on how to succeed in oral communication between China and America.Through analysis,the author intends to advocate improving cultural awareness and cultivating oral communicative competence for better adjustment to the development of the ages.

  19. Linguistic and Cultural Barriers to Intercultural Communication in Foreign Subsidiaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltokorpi, Vesa; Clausen, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the causes and consequences of linguistic and cultural barriers to inter-cultural communication in Nordic subsidiaries in Japan. Interviews with 30 Nordic (Finland, Denmark, Norway and Sweden) expatriates and 29 Japanese employees show that the main linguistic barriers...... to intercultural communication were lack of a shared language and low motivation to improve foreign-language proficiency. The main cultural barriers were collectivism, and status and power differences. Combined, the consequences of these barriers were extensive reliance on language intermediaries, information...... filtering, in-group/out-group categorization, receiver-centred communication and incongruent supervisor-subordinate expectations. The interviews suggest that linguistic and cultural barriers have a differentiated impact on intercultural communication....

  20. The Importance of Informal Communication under Chinese Culture Background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阚昱雯

    2014-01-01

    Over the last three decades of open market policy, China undoubtedly has risen to be the magnet of global investors of all walks, which attracts many foreign investors and enterprises to venture into China market for their profit. However, many foreigners just use formal communication methods to manage the company or cope with business matters. Actually, from the aspect of culture study, informal communication is of great significance and should not be ignored under Chinese cultural background.

  1. Cross-cultural communication in medicine: questions for educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, J R; Kai, J; Loudon, R F

    2001-03-01

    Most research into medical communication has had a western setting. It has been undertaken by western researchers and been influential in shaping communication skills curricula. However we know much less about what communication is effective under other circumstances. This article highlights gaps in our knowledge from research in this field, and poses attendant questions for debate by medical educators. We consider the following key aspects of debate on cross-cultural work. (i) To what extent can our understanding of general principles in other cultures be summarized and presented for teaching in a way which does not descend into caricature? Alternatively, can features of other cultures be presented in ways which do not descend into particularity? (ii) Can such paradigms as "patient-centredness" be transferred from culture to culture? Should they be presented across cultures as features of "good" consultations? (iii) What use can be made of the role of interpreters for teaching purposes? What importance does it have to the educator that a doctor may not be a native speaker of the majority language of the culture in which s/he is operating? (iv) Although the language of illness, and particularly metaphors associated with illness, are studied in other cultures, the way in which illness is metaphorized in British English is seldom discussed. What can educators learn and teach from a study of such matters? (v) What are the implications for communication skills teachers of the need to present materials within a culturally diverse environment?

  2. Cultural preferences for visual and verbal communication styles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cultural preferences for visual and verbal communication styles in sport ... prefer more symbolic communication like complex visuals and high-context verbal ... the effects of context on attitude-to-the-advertisement and attitude-to-the-brand. ... Americans did not exhibit a strong preference for any specific advertisement type.

  3. Non-verbal Means in Cross-cultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shara Mazhitaeva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the non-verbal means of communication which are significant factors of cross-cultural communication. Authors dwell on the features of kinetic components of speech and confirm the idea that language is universal in its basis and national according to different ways of expression.

  4. ICT-Based, Cross-Cultural Communication: A Methodological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Niels; Bruselius-Jensen, Maria; Danielsen, Dina; Nyamai, Rachael; Otiende, James; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses how cross-cultural communication based on information and communication technologies (ICT) may be used in participatory health promotion as well as in education in general. The analysis draws on experiences from a health education research project with grade 6 (approx. 12 years) pupils in Nairobi (Kenya) and Copenhagen…

  5. Cultural context in marketing communication on international market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Hirsch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to show in what way cultural factors can determine decisions in international marketing. Particular attention is devoted to the decisions associated with marketing communication, that is, the way in which cultural factors influence our preferences concerning the style of communication and what two basic styles are distinguished within intercultural communication. On the basis of particular examples it will be shown on the one hand in what ways these styles are visible in various forms of marketing messages coming from various countries. On the other hand it will also be shown in what way these messages reflect (very often unwittingly the culture and the system of values of an organization of the place were the messages originated. Before we start discussing the above-mentioned issues, the basic assumptions of the cultural marketing, as well as the term of culture, its models and dimensions will be presented.

  6. Shifting our focus: Communicating science to a new, nontechnical culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnett, A.; Hollen, G.; Longshore, A.; Mauzy, A.; Reeves, A.

    1994-07-01

    Congress` decision to close down the $11 billion Superconducting Supercollider is spreading anxiety throughout the scientific community. As funding for the nation`s research laboratories becomes increasingly scarce, technical communicators in these organizations must focus much of their communications efforts on a new culture: Congress and the public. We discuss how to characterize this new audience and the importance of evaluating communication products, and we highlight some strategies for interpreting science to nonscientists more effectively.

  7. RELIGIOUS COMMUNICATION IN THE CONTEXT OF CULTURE MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Petrushkevych

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the work is to determine the features of media culture that bind it with mass culture and mass communications and have the most significant effect on the general principles of the religious mass communication. In addition, the objective is to identify the skills system and traits of mass human that are necessary for using media culture. Methodology. The methodological basis is related to structuring, analytical analysis and synthesis of media features; highlighting phenomena that illustrate modern communicative situation; characteristics of media trends influence for the specific functioning of religious communication. Scientific novelty. Main part of the work is devoted to the analysis of the progressive media culture, mass-media and their main features, design of religious communication in this culture. Media gradually form the appearance of religious communication quietly, especially the mass one, they adapt the modern religious discourse to rates of transfer and perception of information. Modern believer gets a lot of different kinds of religious information, on any subject, any explanation of the religious question, with respect to any religion. Such volume of religious information and the speed with which a person receives it, does not usually make it religious or spiritually advanced, but only informed. Spiritual perfection and religious development, religious communication is possible only when the customer is aware of media culture and way of seeing the ultimate goal of such communications using the Mass Media. So far these mechanisms are perfectly designed in traditional religious communication. Phenomena, that reflects the dramatic changes in the communicative environment are: mediatization of body and mind, the new practice of processing / reading information, the phenomenon of simultaneous perception of a large number of information channels – similar or different. Features of media culture that connect it with

  8. MEDIA COMMUNICATION: UNIFORMITY OR CULTURAL DIVERSITY?

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Wist

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to the extent acquired in the recent decades, especially after the development of new communication technologies and the explosion of mass media such as press, radio, Internet and television, media communication is attaining the status of supreme power in the social hierarchy in Europe and worldwide, and its effects are felt widely by individuals.Of all mass media, television is one that is individualized by its symbolic power, having a noticeable influence, direct and undisputed upon ...

  9. Teaching Culture. Strategies for Intercultural Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelye, H. Ned

    Based on the assertion that language and culture study are best brought together when the teacher is effective in the affective as well as cognitive and skills domains, teaching strategies and activities are presented that combine specific teaching techniques and ideas with other human and cultural resources in and out of the classroom. Chapters…

  10. Cockpit-cabin communication: I. A tale of two cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chute, R D; Wiener, E L

    1995-01-01

    Several dramatic accidents have emphasized certain deficiencies in cockpit-cabin coordination and communication. There are historical, organizational, environmental, psychosocial, and regulatory factors that have led to misunderstandings, problematic attitudes, and suboptimal interactions between the cockpit and cabin crews. Our research indicates the basic problem is that these two crews represent two distinct and separate cultures and that this separation serves to inhibit satisfactory teamwork. A survey was conducted at two airlines to measure attitudes of cockpit and cabin crews concerning the effectiveness of their communications. This article includes recommendations for the improvement of communications across the two cultures.

  11. of Legends, Denmark. Communicating Culture. Workshop Info 2, 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karg, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Karg S. (ed.) Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) - a natural resource for food and textiles for 8000 years. Cross-disciplinary investigations on the evolution and cultural history of flax and linen. Programme and abstracts of the second workshop 28-30 June 2010 at Sonnerupgaard and in the Land of Lege...... of Legends, Denmark. Communicating Culture. Workshop Info 2, 2010...

  12. Negative Cultural Transfer in Cross-Cultural Communication for Inter-national Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏秋颖

    2015-01-01

    With the depth development of economic globalization,the multi-culture conflict,communication and integration are strengthened.Meanwhile,series of problems about cross-cultural communication for international business have happened.One of the core problem is negative cultural transfer.This paper gives the analysis about its causes and effects.At last,the way to solve it have been found.

  13. CULTURAL GLOBALISATION AND CHALLENGES TO TRADITIONAL COMMUNICATION THEORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Movius

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews existing traditional media theories, and analyses the challenges that the current developments of globalisation present to them. The article provides a short history of the concept of globalisation, and reviews the primary theoretical approaches to globalisation that are critical to communication scholars. The article also examines how globalisation challenges the ways in which media and communication have traditionally been theorised. Specifically, the cultural imperialism theory is discussed, as well as the main challenges to the theory. Audience reception studies, which focus on how audiences negotiate meaning differently in specific cultural contexts, are highlighted as the key critique of cultural imperialism

  14. Mixed Reality Cultural Heritage Communication - The Zea Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Niels Einar; Christensen, Mogens Fiil; Mayerhofer, Mikkel

    ”. The poster presents an actual experience design case in Zea Harbour, Greece dealing with these challenges using mixed reality communicating cultural heritage material. Archaeological findings, physical reconstructions and digital models are mixed to effectively stage the interactive experience space. The Zea...... Case is a design scenario for the Museum of the Future showing how Cultural Heritage institutions can use a Glocal Approach to technology and architecture to reinvent the relation to the visitor and the neighbourhood. While Mixed Reality can be used for Cultural Heritage Communication in traditional...

  15. Cross-culture Communications in Tourism under Conditions of Globalisation

    OpenAIRE

    Aldoshyna Mariia V.; Brusilseva Anna N.

    2014-01-01

    The article is devoted to the study of cross-cultural specific features of interaction within social and business communication in the international tourism. The goal of the article is analysis of the cross-cultural environment of Ukraine in the context of the world globalisation for efficient interaction in the sphere of international management and marketing. The article shows a necessity of a study of influence of national cultural features upon business activity of tourist enterprises wit...

  16. Musics, Cultures and Meanings: Music as Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Cross

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary explores interpretations of concepts that lie at the focus of Richard Widdess's paper—"music", and "culture"—with the aim of specifying frameworks within which issues of musical meaning can fruitfully be addressed.

  17. Communication to Self in Organizations and Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broms, Henri; Gahmberg, Henrik

    1983-01-01

    Lotman's concept of autocommunication--self-communication that functions as a mantra to enhance the ego--is applied to examples of strategic plans that were not implemented. Such autocommunicational planning is seen, not as failure, but as offering mythical insight and serving to focus mind and foster enthusiasm and goal seeking. (MJL)

  18. The Digital Culture and Communication: More than just Classroom Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Snyder

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a conceptual model of the digital culture that reflects the multi-dimensionality of ICT in education: pedagogy, communication, technology and organizational systems. The model grew out of a three-year study of an online professional development program for educators in seven countries. The focus of the paper is to explore the relationship between human dynamics and technological systems for advancing the school as an organization. Considering the digital culture of schools from an organizational communication culture perspective awakens us to the importance of looking at the subculture that emerges through human exchange reflecting core values and beliefs. When we consider the digital world in which students already live, and match it against the challenge of schools for human citizen development, we begin to see that a digital culture is more than technological. It is organizational, it is communicative, and it is cultural. Through the creation of cultural webs, motivated by humans, and assisted by technology, online communication has the possibility to shape a collective space for cross cultural connections that support a shared democracy.

  19. Cultural Context and Associative Meaning of Words in Cross-culture Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴玉侠; 董艇舰

    2014-01-01

    Language is the vehicle of culture, vocabulary is the most active part of a language. This article compares and analyses the relationship of cultural context and the associative meaning of words in three aspects—associative meaning overlap, associative meaning mismatch and associative meaning gap, revealing its importance in the cross-cultural communication.

  20. Building a Science Communication Culture: One Agency's Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, S.; Tenenbaum, L. F.; Betz, L.

    2014-12-01

    Science communication does not have to be a solitary practice. And yet, many scientists go about it alone and with little support from their peers and organizations. To strengthen community and build support for science communicators, NASA designed a training course aimed at two goals: 1) to develop individual scientists' communication skills, and 2) to begin to build a science communication culture at the agency. NASA offered a pilot version of this training course in 2014: the agency's first multidisciplinary face-to-face learning experience for science communicators. Twenty-six Earth, space and life scientists from ten field centers came together for three days of learning. They took part in fundamental skill-building exercises, individual development planning, and high-impact team projects. This presentation will describe the course design and learning objectives, the experience of the participants, and the evaluation results that will inform future offerings of communication training for NASA scientists and others.

  1. COMMUNICATION SATELLITES FOR EDUCATION, SCIENCE AND CULTURE. REPORTS AND PAPERS ON MASS COMMUNICATION, NO. 53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHRAMM, WILBUR

    THE TECHNOLOGY OF COMMUNICATION SATELLITES IS SUFFICIENTLY ADVANCED THAT CONCERNED AGENCIES, SUCH AS UNESCO, SHOULD BEGIN TO PLAN FOR THEIR USE IN EXCHANGE OF DATA, NEWS TRANSMISSION, CULTURAL EXCHANGE, AND EDUCATION. GROUNDWORK IN TECHNOLOGY, IN THE DESIGN OF A SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM, IN VALUE JUDGMENTS, IN AGREEMENTS OF COOPERATION AND…

  2. Spaces of intercultural communication. An interdisciplinary introduction to communication, culture, and globalizing/localizing identities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie, R.

    2003-01-01

    This volume explores spaces where cultures meet and mix in entangled flows and levels of globality and locality. It makes a contribution to our understanding of the complex processes of communications across and beyond borders. It provides an introduction to intercultural/international communication

  3. A study on relationship between organizational culture and communication apprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Farhangi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and communication apprehension among some employees who worked for Iran broadcasting channel. The study has adopted two well-known questionnaires developed by Hofstede (1984 [Hofstede, G. (1984. Culture's Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values (2nd ed.. Beverly Hills CA: SAGE Publications. ISBN 0-8039-1444-X] for organizational culture and McCroskey et al. (1985 [McCroskey, J. C., Beatty, M. J., Kearney, P., & Plax, T. G. (1985. The content validity of the PRCA‐24 as a measure of communication apprehension across communication contexts. Communication Quarterly, 33(3, 165-173.] for communication apprehension (CA. We have used Chi-Square test to verify different hypotheses of the survey and the results of the survey have indicated that while there was no relationship between CA and three components including cultures of masculinity, individualistic culture and ambiguity aversion, there was a significance relationship between CA and power distance. The results of our survey indicate that as the power distance increases we may expect a higher level on CA.

  4. Intercultural and Cross-Cultural Communication Research: Some Reflections about Culture and Qualitative Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Assumpta Aneas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to offer a response, from a general perspective, to the question of how culture reveals itself in the application of qualitative research methods in intercultural communication. When we use the term "culture" it is important to bear in mind that culturally attributed social interaction processes are themselves the result of socially constructed processes. They are part of an individual-collective dialectic with multiple potential meanings, which are emergent and in constant reformulation from a wide variety of social and cultural perspectives. Much of the recent research in intercultural communication has been directed towards the study of these systems of culturally related meanings. The literature we review offers perspectives from a variety of disciplines and insights into the role of culture in communication processes. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0901519

  5. A Study on Turnover Intention in Fast Food Industry: Employees’ Fit to the Organizational Culture and the Important of their Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of employee turnover intention has become one of the most important topics in organization. Some of the scholars come up with a lot of factors that could give impact on turnover intention; however there are other factors such as organizational culture and organizational commitment, organizational person fit also could give impact towards turnover intention. However studies on organizational culture towards turnover intention specifically in fast food industry of Malaysia are very limited. The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of organizational culture, organizational commitment and person organization fit towards turnover intention in Fast food industry. The total size of the sample is 278 respondents from top level until low level employees in Fast Food Industry, by using a multiple regression; it is found that organizational culture and organizational commitment, organization person fit give an impact on turnover intention in fast food Industry.

  6. What would Mary Douglas do? A commentary on Kahan et al., "Cultural cognition and public policy: the case of outpatient commitment laws".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    Involuntary outpatient commitment is a highly controversial issue in mental health law. Strong supporters of outpatient commitment see it as a form of access to community-based mental health care and a less restrictive alternative to hospitalization for people with severe mental illness; vocal opponents see it as an instrument of social control and an unwarranted deprivation of individual liberty. Kahan and colleagues apply the theory of "cultural cognition" in an empirical study of how cultural worldviews influence support for outpatient commitment laws among the general public and shape perceptions of evidence for these laws' effectiveness. This article critiques Kahan et al. and offers an alternative perspective on the controversy, emphasizing particular social facts underlying stakeholders' positions on outpatient commitment laws.

  7. Cross-Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orasanu, Judith; Davison, Jeannie; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Recent research on communication and performance in airline flight crews has led to a concept of shared mental models that is associated with effective, efficient team coordination in problem solving and decision making situations. Elements that characterize efficient communication have been identified. This research, however, was based strictly on US crews. More recent studies supported by NASA have identified cultural factors that influence communication among team members who vary in their status and roles. Research is just beginning to identify commonalities and culturally distinct strategies for accomplishing joint tasks. ASRS incident reports have been analyzed to identify language barriers in flight that have safety consequences. Implications of these concepts and findings for multi-cultural command and control will be explored.

  8. Science in public communication, culture, and credibility

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Jane

    1998-01-01

    Does the general public need to understand science? And if so, is it scientists' responsibility to communicate? Critics have argued that, despite the huge strides made in technology, we live in a "scientifically illiterate" society--one that thinks about the world and makes important decisions without taking scientific knowledge into account. But is the solution to this "illiteracy" to deluge the layman with scientific information? Or does science news need to be focused around specific issues and organized into stories that are meaningful and relevant to people's lives? In this unprecedented, comprehensive look at a new field, Jane Gregory and Steve Miller point the way to a more effective public understanding of science in the years ahead.

  9. Cross-culture Communications in Tourism under Conditions of Globalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldoshyna Mariia V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of cross-cultural specific features of interaction within social and business communication in the international tourism. The goal of the article is analysis of the cross-cultural environment of Ukraine in the context of the world globalisation for efficient interaction in the sphere of international management and marketing. The article shows a necessity of a study of influence of national cultural features upon business activity of tourist enterprises with consideration of their international and cross-cultural nature of activity. The article identifies functions of culture and presents basic classifications of the world cultures by Geert Hofstede, Fons Trompenaars and Edward Twitchell Hall Jr. It considers specific features of activity of tourist enterprises in the spheres of cross-cultural management and marketing, formulates problems of manifestation of cultural differences in these spheres. It offers main advertising strategies in the international communication policy, which help enterprises to promote their tourist products to international markets more efficiently.

  10. The Effect of Organizational Culture, Leadership Style, and Functional Position on Organizational Commitment and Their Impact on the Performance of Internal Auditors in Aceh, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shabri Abd. Majid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at empirically examining the influence of the organizational culture, leadership style, and functional position of an auditor on organizational commitment and their impact on the performance of government internal auditors in Aceh, Indonesia. All 183 of the governmental internal auditors at the district level within the Province of Aceh, Indonesia, were investigated. Data, which are gathered by distributing questionnaires to the entire population, are then analysed by the Structural Equation Modelling (SEM technique.The study found that organizational culture, leadership style, and functional auditor have affected the performance of the governmental internal auditor either directly or indirectly through organizational commitment.Keywords: Organizational Culture, Leadership Style, Functional Auditor, Organizational Commitment, Internal Auditor Performance.

  11. Celebrating ONS's 40th anniversary and its commitment 
to cultural competency, diversity, and inclusiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palos, Guadalupe R

    2015-04-01

    Today, we all have been taught that cultural competence is a valuable tool in providing patient-centered care. However, this concept was not considered a standard of oncology nursing practice when the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) began. It was not regarded as a critical component of patient safety, satisfaction, or quality care. In fact, in the 1970s, the importance of providing culturally competent care was virtually nonexistent in our nation's government policies, regulatory standards, academic curriculum, or professional practice. 
.

  12. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  13. Avengers Assemble! Using Pop-Culture Icons to Communicate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehr, E. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Engaging communication of complex scientific concepts with the general public requires more than simplification. Compelling, relevant, and timely points of linkage between scientific concepts and the experiences and interests of the general public are needed. Pop-culture icons such as superheroes can represent excellent opportunities for exploring…

  14. Awareness of Cultural Differences and Cultivation of Intercultural Communicative Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖攀

    2014-01-01

    <正>Ⅰ.Introduction The aim of foreign language teaching is not only to make students get familiar with the knowledge of Western countries,but also to cultivate the students’competence in intercultural communication,this paper will list some cultural differences between China and Western counrties,then present some personal opinions on how to cultivate students’competence in

  15. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  16. The Study of Language and Communication in Cross Cultural Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁爽

    2016-01-01

    Language plays an important role in the contemporary business communication. Regarding to the businesspersons' choices of language, jargon, jokes and their applications in cross cultural business, suggests that language is in fact a part of a strategic discourse between diverse groups within the organization and the business scope.

  17. Avengers Assemble! Using Pop-Culture Icons to Communicate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehr, E. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Engaging communication of complex scientific concepts with the general public requires more than simplification. Compelling, relevant, and timely points of linkage between scientific concepts and the experiences and interests of the general public are needed. Pop-culture icons such as superheroes can represent excellent opportunities for exploring…

  18. Cultural Norms Affect Oral Communication in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ellen

    1997-01-01

    Students from different cultures follow differing norms for communication, affecting the classroom and students' grades. Such patterns are found in class discussions, question-and-answer sessions, small-group interactions (issues include cooperation, structure, competition, and gender), and formal class presentations. While no single teaching…

  19. On the possibilities and impossibilities of cross-cultural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ožbot

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available As is well known, the second half of the last century has witnessed an un­ precedented increase in cross-cultural communication at a practical level as well as a remarkable development of research on various aspects of translation as cross-cultural communication par excellence. Such an interest in the study of translation appears to be directly linked with the expansion of translational activities and reflects the impor­ tance attributed to them in the society at large. At the same time, the burgeoning growth of translation studies is to be explained within the context of the expansion of the discipline of linguistics over the past half-century , an important part of which is the development of various text-oriented branches in which attention has been given to previously largely unstudied phenomena of the functioning of language in real communicative situations.

  20. Cross-Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, U.; Orasanu, J.; Davison, J.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Communication is essential to safe flight, as evidenced by several accidents in which crew communicates was found to have contributed to the accidents. This chapter documents the essential role of explicit efficient communication to flight safety with a global context. It addresses communication between flight crews and air traffic controllers in regions a the world where pilots and controllers speak different native languages, as well as cases in which crew members within the flight deck represent different native languages and cultures. It also addresses problems associated with "exporting" crew resource management training programs to parts of the world which values and norms differ from those of the United States, where these programs were initially developed. This chapter is organized around several central questions: (1) What are various kinds of communication failures and what are their consequences; (2) What are the causes of communication failure; (3) What are features of effective crew communication; (4) What can be done to enhance communication success? To explore a wider range of communication failures than available from accident reports, we examined a set of incident reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System. These could be classified into three major categories: those in which language actually interfered with transmission of a message; those in which transmission was adequate but the context was not expressed unambiguously and thus the message received was not the same as the message intended; and those in which the message was received as intended, but was not adequately understood or acted upon, mainly because of cultural factors. The consequences of failed communication can be flight errors (such as when a clearance is not received correctly), loss of situation awareness, or failure of crew members (or ATC and pilots) to build a shared understanding of a situation. Causes of misunderstanding can be traced to a number of sources, often

  1. Cross-Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, U.; Orasanu, J.; Davison, J.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Communication is essential to safe flight, as evidenced by several accidents in which crew communicates was found to have contributed to the accidents. This chapter documents the essential role of explicit efficient communication to flight safety with a global context. It addresses communication between flight crews and air traffic controllers in regions a the world where pilots and controllers speak different native languages, as well as cases in which crew members within the flight deck represent different native languages and cultures. It also addresses problems associated with "exporting" crew resource management training programs to parts of the world which values and norms differ from those of the United States, where these programs were initially developed. This chapter is organized around several central questions: (1) What are various kinds of communication failures and what are their consequences; (2) What are the causes of communication failure; (3) What are features of effective crew communication; (4) What can be done to enhance communication success? To explore a wider range of communication failures than available from accident reports, we examined a set of incident reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System. These could be classified into three major categories: those in which language actually interfered with transmission of a message; those in which transmission was adequate but the context was not expressed unambiguously and thus the message received was not the same as the message intended; and those in which the message was received as intended, but was not adequately understood or acted upon, mainly because of cultural factors. The consequences of failed communication can be flight errors (such as when a clearance is not received correctly), loss of situation awareness, or failure of crew members (or ATC and pilots) to build a shared understanding of a situation. Causes of misunderstanding can be traced to a number of sources, often

  2. IMPACT OF SUPPORTIVE LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING CULTURE AS A MODERATOR ON THE RELATIONSHIP OF PSYCHOLOGICAL EMPOWERMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Abir Hassan Naqvi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to forces of globalization organization are going to multinational. Severity of competition is forcing organizations to psychological empower their employees for maximum performance. In the presence of organizational learning culture and supportive leadership psychological empowerment of employee will lead to organizational commitment. This paper attempt to analyze the relationship among these variables in the context of existing literature. Present days managers face the challenges of motivating employees. Psychological empowerment is the one of the best tool to provide them felling of autonomy and self drive this conceptual development is presented here with the hope that future researchers will analysis these relationships more deeply for the performance optimization of the organization.

  3. Importance of Hofstede's study of cultural dimensions to the field of cross-cultural communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周斌

    2008-01-01

    In 1980, Culture's Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values showed Geert Hofstede' s study of five cuhural dimensions: individualism versus collectivism, masculinity versus femininity, power distance, uncertainty avoidance and long-term versus short-term orientation to life. This essay discusses this theory' s weakness and usefulness as well as its importance to the cross-cultural communication that will give readers a better understanding about this cultural dimension. It concludes that Geert Hofstede's study of these five cultural dimensions is a starting point to the beginners to know about this field and the government offices even can establish economic policies according to the specific culture. It is really a useful research to the field of cross-cultural communication.

  4. CORPORATE POLICY AND STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION ON CORPORATE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRIVEANU Maria Magdalena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current context, organizations should reinforce their culture so that they may be classified as strong organizations, able to face the disturbances of the external environment and meet the customers' needs. The maintenance or change of corporate culture starts from the socializing skills of actors involved in business activities. Socializing skills ensure the transmission of attitudes, values, guidelines, behavioral trends, as well as aspirations and needs, since socialization is a communication process. With this opportunity, communication claims its status as a major component of the management process, as an answer to issues in the knowledge-based era. Studies show that any form of interaction is a cultural phenomenon and a company's efficiency and performance is correlated to these issues.

  5. PROBLEMS OF MODERN DOCUMENTAL COMMUNICATION (cultural-and-social aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Petrovich Kushneruk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Some results of the official-and-business texts’ qualities revealed on communication level are presented in this article. The system of axes used for national-and-social evaluations of the business communicative instruments is under analysis. The influences of unstable social-and-cultural conditions on technological and organizational circumstances of document-oriented communication are analyzed. Some results of the out-of-officinal factors origin’ and level’s evaluation in their influence on unified forms and textual peculiarities of communicative acts in the forms of “business papers” are presented.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-44

  6. Finding Cultural Holes: How Structure and Culture Diverge in Networks of Scholarly Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daril A. Vilhena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Divergent interests, expertise, and language form cultural barriers to communication. No formalism has been available to characterize these “cultural holes.” Here we use information theory to measure cultural holes and demonstrate our formalism in the context of scientific communication using papers from JSTOR. We extract scientific fields from the structure of citation flows and infer field-specific cultures by cataloging phrase frequencies in full text and measuring the relative efficiency of between-field communication. We then combine citation and cultural information in a novel topographic map of science, mapping citations to geographic distance and cultural holes to topography. By analyzing the full citation network, we find that communicative efficiency decays with citation distance in a field-specific way. These decay rates reveal hidden patterns of cohesion and fragmentation. For example, the ecological sciences are balkanized by jargon, whereas the social sciences are relatively integrated. Our results highlight the importance of enriching structural analyses with cultural data.

  7. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE IN CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Zlomislić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the influence of education and additional factors influencing students’ awareness of intercultural differences. For the purposes of this research assessment was carried out with regard to their role in promoting cultural awareness and facing cross-cultural challenges posed by unfamiliar cross-cultural contexts. Cultural education is presumed to be a key factor for achieving a significant increase of cultural sensitivity and cultural awareness in order to ensure successful cross-cultural communication and increase mobility of students/working professionals. For this study, it was assumed that the cultural awareness of students increases due to the courses they take and their overall study experience. A special questionnaire was developed for the purposes of this research, and the obtained results were statistically analyzed with the help of descriptive statistics, the non-parametric chi-square test, and the Mann-Whitney test. The research has shown that intercultural competence has a statistically significant positive effect on the readiness of students to participate in study and work programs abroad. Thus, it is mandatory that foreign language competence as well as intercultural competence be a priority of the curriculum if we are to increase the number of highly educated experts who will be capable to compete successfully as students or professionals in all fields and all cultural areas. If we recognize that globalization has made the world a global village, we all need the intercultural competence to successfully live in it.

  8. The National Commitment Towards Conserving the Heritage (documentation of Historical and Cultural Sites in Gcc Countries)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSulaiti, F.

    2013-07-01

    The five Arab Gulf countries of Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman possess many shared characteristics and historical ties across their common peninsula. The prime factor uniting them is the historical nature of their entwined involvement with peoples and nations beyond the region. That the Gulf has been an important water passageway since ancient times suggests that the inhabitants of its shores met early on with other civilizations. The knowledge of one's roots, history, and traditional arts supports awareness of inherited culture and can help contextualize and illuminate community reflection and identification. The intricacy of the recording and understanding processes of documentation requires skilled professionals, with knowledge and awareness for the associated tasks. Responsible of cultural heritage should provide the adequate documentations, recording and updating of the records. Collaboration of different individuals such as specialist heritage, archaeologists, surveyors, conservators, researchers, architectural historians, and many other expert personnel is the golden key of successful documentation. The purpose of this document is to show the authorities of Gulf Arab countries and their planning measures, management and sharing effect of recording the cultural heritage. This essay identifies key points in the approach to contextualizing and developing cultural identity in a way that respects organic qualities. Through highlighting a number of archeological ruins and outlining management plans, the essay explores frameworks that can be applied to promote and preserve integral identity of important sites and their greater surrounding communities.

  9. An Analysis of Body Language between China and Western Countries in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雁

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of the global economy,cross-cultural communication has become increasingly frequent.In human communication,people use nonverbal language to communicate as well as verbal language.Body language,like verbal language,is also part of culture which exerts significant influence on cross-culture communication.However,body language varies due to different regions,race and culture customs and it is restricted by different cultural connotations.Therefore,in order to e nsure the cross-cultural communication goes smoothly,understanding body language connotation in different culture backgrounds is desperately necessary.

  10. An Analysis of Body Language between China and Western Countries in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雁

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of the global economy,cross-cultural communication has become increasingly frequent.In human communication,people use nonverbal language to communicate as well as verbal language.Body language,like verbal language,is also part of culture which exerts significant influence on cross-culture communication.However,body language varies due to different regions,race and culture customs and it is restricted by different cultural connotations.Therefore,in order to ensure the cross-cultural communication goes smoothly,understanding body language connotation in different culture backgrounds is desperately necessary.

  11. Intercultural marketing: Culture and its influence on the efficiency of Facebook marketing communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lukáš Copuš; Karol Čarnogurský

    2017-01-01

    .... Subsequently, the aim is to analyse marketing communication of the selected automotive companies and determine its efficiency on social media within the context of cultural differences and cultural...

  12. A Study on Turnover Intention in Fast Food Industry: Employees’ Fit to the Organizational Culture and the Important of their Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The concept of employee turnover intention has become one of the most important topics in organization. Some of the scholars come up with a lot of factors that could give impact on turnover intention; however there are other factors such as organizational culture and organizational commitment, organizational person fit also could give impact towards turnover intention. However studies on organizational culture towards turnover intention specifically in fast food industry of Malaysia are very ...

  13. The Significance of Achieving Effective Cross-culture Communication in Foreign Trade Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董秋萍

    2016-01-01

    The commercial activities of foreign enterprises are a kind of cross-cultural communication activity. There are many contradictions and conflicts existing in the foreign trade business communication. The thesis aims to discuss the misunderstandings generated in the course of cross-cultural communication and illustrate the importance to improve cross-cultural awareness, as well as providing measures to improve the cross-cultural communication competence in foreign trade business.

  14. Tom Tabor, the owner of Tabor Communications, presents Wolfgang von Rüden with the Editors Choice Award of HPCwire, which was awarded to CERN for its commitment to educating the public about high-performance computing.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Tom Tabor, the owner of Tabor Communications, presents Wolfgang von Rüden with the Editors Choice Award of HPCwire, which was awarded to CERN for its commitment to educating the public about high-performance computing.

  15. Cultural Identity Forum: Enacting the Self-Awareness Imperative in Intercultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Lain, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Intercultural Communication; any course with an intercultural communication unit. Objectives: Students will demonstrate the self-awareness imperative in intercultural communication, explore their own cultural identities, and reflect on others cultural identities in order to build their intercultural communication competence.

  16. Cultivation of College Students’Ability in Cross-cultural Non-verbal Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琳琳

    2015-01-01

    For a long time, students’non-verbal communicative competence is neglected by themselves as well as the teachers. In this paper a research is done to analyze the causes of students’non-verbal communicative failure. And some suggestions are given to cultivate students’ability in cross-cultural non-verbal Communication The students’enhanced communicative competence will help them avoid non-verbal communicative failure and communicate effectively and appropriately in cross-cultural communi⁃cation.

  17. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members' organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet networks, in order to promote university netiquette and

  18. Conceptions of ‘culture' in international communication - Limits to cultural explanations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froholdt, Lisa Loloma; Knudsen, Fabienne

    2008-01-01

    outcomes. E.g. it may lead to a deterministic view of other cultures, thereby reinforcing prejudices and underestimating other forms for identity; it may tend to hide the universality and the individuality which every man also acts up to, and which makes empathy possible across cultural differences....... Above all, it risks ‘blinding' the participants for the specific context of a given communicative situation....

  19. Movie-An Important Media in Cultural Communication between China and America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    信丹丹

    2014-01-01

    Culture is the accumulation of life style and idea. As the container of culture, movies become the most important me⁃dia of cross-cultural communication. This paper explains movie’s significance for cross-cultural communication, it tells of the in⁃ter-effects on life and spirit between Chinese and American, it provides the strategy for cross-cultural communication for movies.

  20. Clinical-scale cultures of cord blood CD34(+) cells to amplify committed progenitors and maintain stem cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Zoran; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski, Marija; Lafarge, Xavier; Dazey, Bernard; Robert-Richard, Elodie; Mazurier, Frédéric; Boiron, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We developed a clinical-scale cord blood (CB) cell ex vivo procedure to enable an extensive expansion of committed progenitors--colony-forming cells (CFCs) without impairing very primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). CD34(++) cells, selected from previously cryopreserved and thawed CB units, were cultured in two steps (diluted 1:4 after 6 days) in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF) (100 ng/ml each), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (10 ng/ml) in HP01 serum-free medium. HSC activity was evaluated in a serial transplantation assay, by detection of human cells (CD45, CD33, CD19 and CFC of human origin) in bone marrow (BM) of primary and secondary recipient NOD/SCID mice 6-8 weeks after transplantation. A wide amplification of total cells (∼350-fold), CD34(+) cells (∼100-fold), and CFC (∼130-fold) without impairing the HSC activity was obtained. The activity of a particular HSC subpopulation (SRC(CFC)) was even enhanced.Thus, an extensive ex vivo expansion of CFCs is feasible without impairing the activity of HSCs. This result was enabled by associating antioxidant power of medium with an appropriate cytokine cocktail (i.e., mimicking physiologic effects of a weak oxygenation in hematopoietic environment).

  1. Research on College English Listening Teaching Based on Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娇; 常世财

    2015-01-01

    This paper clarified the importance of improving cross-cultural communicative competence in listening teaching from the perspective of the relationship between cross-cultural communicative competence and listening teaching.For the hearing ob-stacles caused by cultural differences,the author presented that cross-cultural awareness should be permeated in the classroom to improve students'English listening skills.

  2. On Vocabulary Teaching from the Perspective of Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘航

    2013-01-01

    Language is the carrier of culture, and culture determines language application. Vocabulary is the essential element of a language, thus the cultivation of cross-culture communication ability should start from vocabulary.

  3. Dubbing: adapting cultures in the global communication era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Canu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Adapting translation for dubbing is not a mere linguistic fact: it is mainly the adaptation of cultures. In fact, audiovisual translation and adaptation implicitly takes into account the importance of the historical background behind the multiplicity of languages and cultures, and by doing so, it becomes a means of cultural diffusion. That peculiarity enables what we can describe as the “socio-anthropological function” of the adaptation of translation for dubbing, which is the object of the following paper. Through an analysis of some important landmarks that intersected the history of some Western countries in the last two centuries, it was possible to trace a lack of reciprocity in the usage of dubbing in the two biggest film markets: North America and Europe. Clearly, that helps cultural supremacy to penetrate into our lives in a very subtle way. As a result, the paper attempts to demonstrate how dubbing spreads all cultures in order to have an effectively global communication

  4. Intercultural communication between patients and health care providers: an exploration of intercultural communication effectiveness, cultural sensitivity, stress, and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrey, K L; Amason, P

    2001-01-01

    Cultural diversity is becoming increasingly more important in the workplace. This is particularly true in health care organizations facing demographic shifts in the patients served and their families. This study serves to aid the development of intercultural communication training programs for health care providers by examining how cultural sensitivity and effective intercultural communication, besides helping patients, personally benefit health care providers by reducing their stress. Effective intercultural communication and cultural sensitivity were found to be related. Health care providers' levels of intercultural anxiety also were found to correlate with effective intercultural communication.

  5. Experimental unconditionally secure bit commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Yuan; Curty, Marcos; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Li, Yu-Huai; Lin, Ze-Hong; Sun, Qi-Chao; Li, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Teng-Yun; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Cabello, Adan; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-03-01

    Quantum physics allows unconditionally secure communication between parties that trust each other. However, when they do not trust each other such as in the bit commitment, quantum physics is not enough to guarantee security. Only when relativistic causality constraints combined, the unconditional secure bit commitment becomes feasible. Here we experimentally implement a quantum bit commitment with relativistic constraints that offers unconditional security. The commitment is made through quantum measurements in two quantum key distribution systems in which the results are transmitted via free-space optical communication to two agents separated with more than 20 km. Bits are successfully committed with less than 5 . 68 ×10-2 cheating probability. This provides an experimental proof of unconditional secure bit commitment and demonstrates the feasibility of relativistic quantum communication.

  6. Communication and cognition: the social beyond language, interaction and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascareño, Aldo

    2008-06-01

    Cognition theories describe the social with terms like language, interaction or culture, whose theoretical status has also been discussed in modern sociology. These concepts are not well-positioned to understand the emergence and autonomy of social orders. Sociological theory of self-referential systems can be useful to reconstruct the bottom-up process which contributes to the emergence of the social as communication as well as to describe the way in which society exerts downward causation upon cognitive phenomena. The core of this theory is the systemic category of meaning as a shared horizon for psychic and social systems.

  7. The cultural divide: exploring communication barriers between scientists and clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L. Restifo

    2011-07-01

    Despite remarkable advances in basic biomedical science that have led to improved patient care, there is a wide and persistent gap in the abilities of researchers and clinicians to understand and appreciate each other. In this Editorial, the authors, a scientist and a clinician, discuss the rift between practitioners of laboratory research and clinical medicine. Using their first-hand experience and numerous interviews throughout the United States, they explore the causes of this ‘cultural divide’. Members of both professions use advanced problem-solving skills and typically embark on their career paths with a deeply felt sense of purpose. Nonetheless, differences in classroom education, professional training environments, reward mechanisms and sources of drive contribute to obstacles that inhibit communication, mutual respect and productive collaboration. More than a sociological curiosity, the cultural divide is a significant barrier to the bench-to-bedside goals of translational medicine. Understanding its roots is the first step towards bridging the gap.

  8. Transformative communication as a cultural tool for guiding inquiry science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Joseph L.; Pea, Roy D.

    2001-05-01

    Inquiry-based science instruction offers great promise as a means of actively engaging students in authentic scientific problem solving, including consideration of research design issues. At the same time, inquiry introduces some difficulties. In particular, familiar cultural tools for classroom discourse, such as Initiation-Reply-Evaluation sequences, are no longer appropriate because they are premised on known answers and teacher-driven activity. To help support productive open-ended science inquiry, coaching strategies that allow for strong student voice and teacher influence are necessary. We describe the sociocultural theory motivating one such strategy, transformative communication, as well as a specific dialogue sequence that can be used as a cultural tool for accomplishing such interaction. We then illustrate the utility of the dialogue sequence in four key episodes within an inquiry-based high school Earth Science class.

  9. English Communication on Migration and Measures to Overcome the Negative Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈婉媛

    2016-01-01

    Since the reform and opening up, China has more opportunities and European countries, exchanges and cooperation. However, in the process of communication, we may inadvertently ignore each other's culture and customs, the lack of cross-cul-tural communication awareness in local culture to measure the culture of other countries, such behavior is called negative trans-fer culture. Negative Transfer of Culture will have cultural misunderstandings and conflicts between nations and hinder the smooth progress of cross-cultural communication. In order to avoid unnecessary misunderstanding, strengthen the friendship be-tween different countries, we should understand, learn and overcome cultural negative transfer. This will combine theoretical knowledge and examples to explain the culture, language and culture negative relationship between migration and elaborate cul-tural negative transfer of two levels:Negative Transfer negative transfer surface culture and deep culture (including values mi-gration and ethnic psychological aspects), and its negative impact on the English cross-cultural communication. In addition, this paper will propose some strategies and corresponding to the principle of helping people overcome the negative transfer in cross-cultural communication, enhance cross-cultural communication ability, up from psychological acceptance, adaptation, and toler-ance of different cultures.

  10. The Cultural Differences of Non-verbal Communication between Western Countries and China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周月

    2013-01-01

      Communication behavior consists of verbal and nonverbal communication. Nonverbal communication between human beings has drawn great attention to its study and research nowadays. The paper tries to show the culture differences in non-verbal communication through body language, paralanguage, object language, and environmental language. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve such kinds of awareness and get a better understanding of cultural differences among different countries in the aspect of nonverbal communication so as to help smooth our communication barriers with people of different culture background.

  11. Culture, Communication, and Competence: A Commentary on Variables Affecting Social and Academic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Rob

    2011-01-01

    The editors of this special issue have recruited six papers focused on the ways that language and communication interact with culture to influence student behavior. Two themes that emerge from these papers are the fundamental role of communication in learning and living, and the impact of culture on the functions of communication. The present…

  12. Culture, Communication, and Competence: A Commentary on Variables Affecting Social and Academic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Rob

    2011-01-01

    The editors of this special issue have recruited six papers focused on the ways that language and communication interact with culture to influence student behavior. Two themes that emerge from these papers are the fundamental role of communication in learning and living, and the impact of culture on the functions of communication. The present…

  13. Communication and Cultural Memory in Contemporary Tourism Media Products: Culture-specific and Cross-cultural Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Salamurović

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Communication practices which are a part of the contemporary media-culture are intrinsically tied to the processes of (recreating collective identities. One of the possible strategies in the frame of the mediated communication practice is to connect traditional ele-ments of cultural memory with new ones, which are declared as preferable and acceptable. In that way the collective identity remains, on the one hand, “homoge-neous”, offering stability to the members of communica-tion community, on the other hand, it is subject to change and dynamics, always “ready” to be reshaped in order to achieve wider acceptance. The tourism media products, especially tourism promotion videos, are the best examples for this mediated communication prac-tice. The visual images, combined with text messages, i.e. slogans, are not only some of the most important narrative mechanisms in the presentation of certain tourist destination, they are also the key elements of the mediated collective cultural memory and identity of the respective country presented in the tourism promotion videos. The main goal of this article is to examine the represen-tation and composition forms of some of the tourism promotion videos both from the Balkan countries as well as from other regions worldwide related especially to the elements of the cultural memory in order to de-fine culture-specific and cross-cultural strategies rele-vant to the creation of the collective identity. The analy-sis is based on the Critical Discourse Analysis, respec-tively the analytical framework of the “Grammar of Vis-ual Design” by Kress/van Leeuwen.

  14. Developing culturally sensitive cancer genetics communication aids for African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Bonnie Jeanne; Kinney, Anita Yeomans; Ellis, Sara Marie

    2003-04-15

    The goal of this project was to develop educational materials to communicate genetic health information in a culturally sensitive manner. These materials were designed to communicate information about cancer risk, genetic testing options, and health management options in an African American kindred with a known BRCA1 mutation. Educational materials were pilot-tested in four African American focus groups varying in socioeconomic status and gender. The audiotaped focus groups consisted of presentation of the educational materials, followed by a feedback session led by an African American facilitator. Qualitative analysis of the focus group transcripts identified important themes and the educational materials were revised in response to the participants' suggestions. The products included a booklet and a flip chart for use in educational sessions. Focus group participants recommended a substantial reduction in technical detail, and recommended that information be personalized and made relevant to the lives of the target population. Other critical themes included the importance of building trust in the medical system and avoiding words and images that have strong negative associations in the African American community. Strategies that were successful included nontechnical images to explain genetic concepts, clip art images to energize and personalize word slides, vibrant color, identifiably African American figures, and the development of themes relevant to many African Americans. The use of these materials in an ongoing study offering BRCA1 counseling and testing to a large, rural Louisiana-based kindred will provide additional feedback about the effectiveness of the culturally tailored genetic education and counseling materials.

  15. Research on cognitive, social and cultural processes of written communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo González, Rosario; Salvador Mata, Francisco

    2009-08-01

    This article compiles the investigations carried out by a Research Group of the University of Granada, Spain. Its different projects on writing's cognitive social and cultural processes have been supported by the Spanish Government. This line of research joined together linguistic, psychological, social and cultural contributions to the development of writing from the 1970s. Currently, this line of research develops in collaboration with other European Universities: (a) Interuniversity Centre for Research On Cognitive Processing in Natural and Artificial Systems (ECONA), "La Sapienza" University of Rome (Italy); (b) Anadolu University, (Eskisehir, Turkey); (c) Coimbra University (Portugal); (d) University of Zaragoza (Spain); (e) the Institute of Education of the University of London (United Kingdom). The aforementioned collaboration is materializing into projects like the International Master on Multilingual Writing: Cognitive, Intercultural and Technological Processes of Written Communication ( http://www.multilingualwriting.com ) and the International Congress: Writing in the twenty-first Century: Cognition, Multilinguisim and Technologies, held in Granada ( http://www.asprogrades.org ). This research line is focussed on the development of strategies in writing development, basic to train twenty-first century societies' citizens. In these societies, participation in production media, social exchange and the development of multilingual written communication skills through new computer technologies spread multicultural values. In order to fulfil the social exigencies, it is needed to have the collaboration of research groups for designing and applying international research projects.

  16. Cultural Memory and the Communicational Criticism of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D. SELL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Communicational criticism focuses on the ethics of literary address. It tends to show that writers who try to send some particular message may thereby allow their addressees relatively little scope for their own perceptions and evaluations. Other writers, by contrast, offer their audiences an opportunity to compare notes about life from within more than one life-world, so agreeing, as it were, to dis-agree when necessary. By engaging in this more “genuine” kind of literary communication, such writers can promote the post-postmodern goal of a globalization that is non-hegemonic, and not least through their handling of cultural memory. When they loosen up one-to-one correlations between particular ranges of memory and particular communities, cultural memory becomes a polyvalent resource for both personal hybridities and rainbow coalitions. In the present article, I illustrate this process from Anglophone literature, paying special attention to a number of postmodern novelists and an early modern poet.

  17. Pragmatic Failure in inter-cultural Non-verbal Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兑艳霞; 刘凯歌

    2006-01-01

    近年来.随着跨文化交际的日趋频繁,语用失误引起了国内外语语言学家的重视.国内外很多学者对语用失误进行了一系列的研究.其中以Jenny Thomas的研究成果为代表.然而,这些语用失误的定义及分类一般都因忽略了非语言交际而存在局限.本文章阐释了跨文化中的非语言交际语用失误,并分析其理论根源,在此基础上提出克服跨文化非语言交际语用失误的对策.%With the increasing development of intercultural communication between cultures,pragmatic failure has recent caught the attention of linguists and language teachers both at home and abroad. But the usual definition and classification of pragmatic failure has its limitations because of its neglect of nonverbal communication. The present thesis is intended to explore pragmatic failure in intercultural non-verbal communication,analyzing the root causes of intercultural non-verbal pragmatic failure, offering the strategic approaches to avoid intercultural non-verbal pragmatic failure.

  18. Negotiating Organizational Communication Cultures in American Subsidiaries Doing Business in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Christina W.

    1999-01-01

    Studies organizational communication cultures in United States-Thai parent-subsidiary organizations doing business in Thailand and ascertains to what degree employees at the subsidiary locations participated in the creation of their organizational communication cultures. Develops the idea of negotiated cultures to understand the extent to which…

  19. The Significance of Cross-culture Communication in Global Modern Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Lu-lu

    2015-01-01

    This essay is talk about The significance of cross-culture communication in global modern society. It will expound the necessity of cross-cultural communication for the global modern society, which includes explain how the cross-culture commu⁃nication works in the global modern society.

  20. The Acceptance of Critical-Cultural Scholarship in Mass Communication Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Les; Ryan, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Notes that critical-cultural studies have had little impact on journalism and mass communication education for a number of reasons. Surveys 100 journalism and mass communication programs. Examines how critical-cultural faculty interact with the university community. Finds that scholars, as a whole, were open to critical-cultural perspectives.…

  1. The Relationships Among Personality, Intercultural Communication, and Cultural Self-Efficacy in Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Joanne Chung-Yan; Sy, Po Yi

    2016-12-01

    The demand for nurses to provide transcultural nursing care is rising. However, little is known about the relationships among the dimensions of nurse personality, intercultural communication, and cultural self-efficacy in the provision of this care. The aims of this study were to examine the associations among personality, intercultural communication, and cultural self-efficacy in nursing students and to compare intercultural communication and cultural self-efficacy between first-year and third-year nursing students. One hundred twenty-six Chinese students completed a questionnaire that consisted of three scales that were designed to measure intercultural communication, cultural self-efficacy (cultural concepts, transcultural nursing functions, and cultural knowledge related to South Asians), and personality, respectively. Intercultural communication correlated positively with the three subscales of personality, agreeableness (r = .22, p intercultural communication (r = .49, p intercultural communication (r = .36, p intercultural communication (r = .27, p intercultural communication, self-efficacy in knowledge of cultural concepts, self-efficacy in the skills needed to perform key transcultural nursing functions, or self-efficacy in the cultural knowledge related to South Asians. Personality assessments should be included in the nursing student recruitment process. Furthermore, nurse educators should focus greater attention on enhancing the cultural self-efficacy and intercultural communication skills of their students.

  2. Organisational Culture and Its Role in Developing a Sustainable Science Communication Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Bev; Cridge, Belinda; Fogg-Rogers, Laura

    2017-01-01

    There is an ongoing tension for scientists when deciding to engage with the public about their research as many scientists view direct participation as peripheral to their role. Pressures of time, lack of support by management and a lack of communicative skills are identified by scientists as reasons for not committing to communicative…

  3. Cultural and communicative competence in the caring relationship with patients from another culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberg, Jessica Anne Viveka; Vilander, Susann

    2017-02-24

    The global and multicultural society of today creates challenges that require multicultural competence among individuals, especially within caring contexts. This study assumes an intercultural perspective, and the aim is to uncover a new understanding of the caring community between nurses and patients when these do not speak the same language. The research question is: What is the significance of communication in a caring community when nurses and patients do not speak the same language? This qualitative study uses a hermeneutical approach. The material was collected through questionnaires with eight nurses and two adults from another culture. The texts were analysed through latent content analysis. Study participation, data storage and handling for research purposes were approved by the participants when they provided their informed consent. Permission to conduct the study was granted by an ethical committee of a hospital organisation. Human love is the basis for a caring relationship since it reaches beyond the limits of cultural differences. Integrity is vital for cultural respect and especially for the consideration of spiritual needs in the caring relationship. An affirming presence is essential for communion. Creative courage is fundamental for communication, and continuous information is vital for establishing trust within the caring relationship. One limitation to this study might be the limited number of participants (ten). Caring for a patient from another culture requires that nurses are open-minded and have the courage to encounter new challenges. It is essential for nurses to respect the patient's integrity but also to acquire knowledge in order to improve their cultural competence. Further research within this area should focus on the role of next of kin in intercultural caring and on how leadership may contribute to improving cultural competence within health organisations. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  4. Cultural and Rhetorical Bases for communicating knowledge in web based communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance; Kommers, Piet

    2008-01-01

    Cultural and Rhetorical Bases for communicating knowledge in web based communities How can we extend learner-centred theories for educational technology to include, for instance, the cultural and rhetorical backgrounds which influence participants in online communities as they engage in knowledge...... via web-based communities the intersection of culture and rhetoric in web-based communication rhetoric and discourse in the process of communicating knowledge via technology heuristics for knowledge communication from teaching in online forums connections between identity and knowledge communication...

  5. MODERN BUSINESS COMMUNICATION, SPEECH CULTURAL TRADITIONS AND INTERNATIONAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Butorina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal to simplify the Russian language for its practical use and the extension of Russian cultural influence was set in Peter the Great’s period. In his language policy Peter the Great preferred a functional criterion, insisting on the use of the Russian language variety, which would be understandable not by the elite only, so the Russian language regulation for business purposes has had a long-standing tradition. The article discusses the European practice of various languages standardization in modern business communication. To compare Russian business texts in Russia and abroad urban sites of Moscow, New York and Tallinn are analyzed. The data obtained suggest some hypotheses about peculiarities of business texts in modern Russian language space.

  6. Preparedness of Chinese Students for American Culture and Communicating in English

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Melody Rawlings; Edna Sue

    2013-01-01

      What Chinese students learn about American culture and the English language in the classrooms of China does not adequately prepare them for the reality of American culture and communication in English...

  7. A Study of Pragmatic Failure of Address Forms in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙美玮

    2012-01-01

      As the process of globalization moves on, cross-cultural communication has been a part of people’ s daily lives. It is quite important for people to know how to behave properly in many situations.The present study analyses the phenomena of pragmatic failure of address forms. The study may help enhance peoples’ awareness on polite address in cross-cultural communi⁃cation and improve their communicative competence. Foreign language teachers can get implications for their teaching methods, paying more attention on cultural teaching. In addition, the author hopes that equal cultural communication and multi-cultural concept can be achieved.

  8. A critical analysis of intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke; Lauring, Jakob; Klitmøller, Anders

    2009-01-01

    for understanding intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management (CCM). Design/methodology/approach - The paper analyzes the established approaches to the cultural underpinnings of intercultural communication in CCM and examines how newer developments in anthropology may contribute...... of anthropology from which it originated. This theory gap between intercultural communication research in CCM and anthropology tends to exclude from CCM an understanding of how the context of social, organizational and power relationships shapes the role of culture in communication. Practical implications...... - The paper proposes to substitute the view of culture as comprising of abstract values and codes as determinants of communication with concepts of culture as dynamically enfolded in practice and socially situated in specific contexts, in order to give new directions to theories on intercultural communication...

  9. Information and Communication Technologies – and Culturally Sensitive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Michail

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the perceptions of Egyptian minority groups in relation to internet information technology with which they feel empowered to protect, affirm and communicate their oppressed existence, on local and global dimensions. The research employs qualitative methods and interpretive analysis, to focus on the use of Internet information technology tools by Egyptian minority groups, in particular, their online platforms and chat rooms, and the related issues associated with these practices and usages. The paper argues that cyberspace is used by specific minority groups in Egypt as a "gateway to freedom" in which it constitutes an ally to establish newly founded cyber identities that aide them to exercise their basic human rights of freedom of thought, speech and expression. The paper thus examines cyberspace a medium or tool for the carrying out of information exchange without the traditional fear of politics and power that is deeply engraved in the roots of the Egyptian culture. In this way, these minority groups are analysed as the newly conceived human information systems (HIS residing on Internet information technology and infrastructure. The paper proposes an adaptive and culturally sensitive model of human information systems as well as human information systems development life cycle (HISDLC to aid in establishing effective processes of information exchange and creation, hence assisting in the emancipation of conflicting parties residing in Egypt, elsewhere in the Middle East and globally.

  10. The Role of Nonverbal Behavior in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓文

    2014-01-01

    Nonverbal behaviors, such as hand gestures, eye contact and facial expressions etc., play a vital role in communication. Therefore, only by observing and perceiving the nonverbal cues of the communicators, can the effectiveness of communication be enhanced.

  11. Understanding the repercussions of intercultural communicative competence: a study on the degree of students’ cultural awareness, social and communication skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malissa Maria Mahmud

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Demographic change is transforming the way we communicate. In many parts of the world, the society has become increasingly multicultural and multi-ethnic. In this context, intercultural cognizance is one of the pivotal facets for intercultural communication. The recent years has seen the emergence of the intercultural communicative competence (ICC concept permeating the education field thereby a large and growing body of literature has commenced to investigate the concept of intercultural communicative competence (ICC and its repercussion in the context of teaching and learning. The notion of ICC is incepted on the acquisition of several “savoirs” associated with attitudes and values, knowledge, skills of interpreting and relating, skills of discovery and interaction and critical cultural awareness. However, the process of acquiring and negotiating meaning in the context of intercultural communication lies a tremendous challenge and demands a continuous effort. Thus, the objective of this study is to probe on how students’ attitudes towards another culture affect their degree of cultural awareness and to deliberate how social and communication skills can foster intercultural competence that is influenced by the level of ICC acquisition. The findings indicate that the students possess intercultural competence in which they demonstrate positive attitudes towards individuals from other cultures; henceforth is reflected in the high cultural awareness amongst the students. Apart from this, the findings yielded also show that the students are able to exhibit and display significant competencies in both social and communication skills which are allied to the high level of ICC acquisition.

  12. Comparison of communication skills between trained and untrained students using a culturally sensitive nurse-client communication guideline in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claramita, M.; Tuah, R.; Riskione, P.; Prabandari, Y.S.; Effendy, C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A communication guideline that is sensitive to the local culture is influential in the process of nursing care. The Gadjah Mada nurse-client communication guideline, the "Ready-Greet-Invite-Discuss," was meant (1) to strengthen the relationship between the nurse and the client despite of

  13. Comparison of communication skills between trained and untrained students using a culturally sensitive nurse-client communication guideline in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Tuah, Rodianson; Riskione, Patricia; Prabandari, Yayi Suryo; Effendy, Christantie

    2016-01-01

    A communication guideline that is sensitive to the local culture is influential in the process of nursing care. The Gadjah Mada nurse-client communication guideline, the "Ready-Greet-Invite-Discuss," was meant (1) to strengthen the relationship between the nurse and the client despite of socio-culturally hierarchical gap between health providers and clients in Indonesian context, (2) to provide attention to the unspoken concerns especially in the context of indirect communication which mostly using non-verbal signs and politeness etiquettes, and (3) to initiate dialog in the society which hold a more community-oriented decision making. Our aim is to compare the communication skills of nursing students who had and had not received a training using a culture-sensitive Gadjah Mada nurse-client communication guideline. This was a quasi experimental randomized control study to the fifth semester students of a nursing school at Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The intervention group was trained by the Gadjah Mada nurse-client communication guideline. Both intervention and the control group had learned general nurse-client communication guidelines. The training was 4h with role-plays, supportive information and feedback sessions. An objective-structured clinical examination (OSCE) was conducted 1week after the training, in seven stations, with seven simulated clients. Observers judged the communication skills of the students using a checklist of 5-point Likert scale, whereas simulated clients judged their satisfaction using 4-point Likert scale represented in colorful ribbons. There were significant mean differences in each domain of communication guideline observed between the trained and the control groups as judged by the teachers (p≤0.05) and simulated clients. Training using a culture-sensitive communication skills guideline could improve the communication skills of the nursing students and may increase satisfaction of the clients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  14. Essays in Comparative Popular Culture: Coffee, Comics, and Communication. Paper No. 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hidetoshi

    Based on papers presented at the East-West Communication Institute conferences and seminars in Hawaii between 1973 and 1975, these five essays focus on intercultural communication, emphasizing that popular culture existed with great diversity for centuries before modern media and that popular cultures have importance and impact on the everyday…

  15. Virtual Communication Processes of Open and Distance Education: Some Contributions from the Cultural Studies Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainholc, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The pressures of the information and digital culture exhibit innovation, but also a hegemonic power, and act in reciprocity with the global economy. Theoretical concepts and practical actions need to be revisited, to build equity in virtual communication. A sociological-cultural focus of communication mediated by technology, cannot occur without…

  16. Sex Workers and HIV/AIDS: Analyzing Participatory Culture-Centered Health Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ambar; Dutta, Mohan J.

    2009-01-01

    An emerging trend in health communication research advocates the need to foreground articulations of health by participants who are at the core of any health campaign. Scholarly work suggests that the culture-centered approach to health communication can provide a theoretical and practical framework to achieve this objective. The culture-centered…

  17. The Cultivation of Cross-Cultural Communication Competence in Oral English Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the main problems and difficulties in current college English oral English teaching practice, illustrates the relationship between oral English teaching and cross-cultural communication competence. On the one hand, cross-cultural communication plays an essential role in oral English teaching; besides, oral English teaching…

  18. Virtual Communication Processes of Open and Distance Education: Some Contributions from the Cultural Studies Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainholc, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The pressures of the information and digital culture exhibit innovation, but also a hegemonic power, and act in reciprocity with the global economy. Theoretical concepts and practical actions need to be revisited, to build equity in virtual communication. A sociological-cultural focus of communication mediated by technology, cannot occur without…

  19. Sex Workers and HIV/AIDS: Analyzing Participatory Culture-Centered Health Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ambar; Dutta, Mohan J.

    2009-01-01

    An emerging trend in health communication research advocates the need to foreground articulations of health by participants who are at the core of any health campaign. Scholarly work suggests that the culture-centered approach to health communication can provide a theoretical and practical framework to achieve this objective. The culture-centered…

  20. Negotiating cultural encounters narrating intercultural engineering and technical communication

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Han

    2013-01-01

    Discusses the challenges of intercultural communication in engineering, technical, and related professional fields Given today's globalized technical and engineering environment, intercultural communication is an essential topic for engineers, other technical professionals, and technical communicators to learn. Engineering programs, in particular, need to think about how to address the ABET requirement for students to develop global competence and communication skills. This book will help readers learn what intercultural communication is like in the workplace-which is an import

  1. Cultural and Rhetorical Bases for communicating knowledge in web based communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance; Kommers, Piet

    2008-01-01

    This call for papers invites papers focused on theoretical frameworks or empirical research which highlights the cultural and/or rhetorical aspects of communicating knowledge in web based communities. We are looking for work that brings together methods and perspectives across disciplines......Cultural and Rhetorical Bases for communicating knowledge in web based communities How can we extend learner-centred theories for educational technology to include, for instance, the cultural and rhetorical backgrounds which influence participants in online communities as they engage in knowledge...... communication processes? To begin to answer this question, we are looking for papers which engage concepts such as: communities of practice (Wenger 1998) the emerging field of knowledge communication the connections between communicating knowledge and discourse structures cultural situatedness of communication...

  2. PEACE CULTURE IN PROGRAMS OF SOCIAL COMMUNICATION SCHOOLS OF ZULIA STATE

    OpenAIRE

    Luisa Julieta Barboza; Rocío Belandria

    2012-01-01

    This paper to search the principles for the culture of peace present in the Curriculum of the Schools of Social Communication of Zulia state. We studied the curriculum of two schools of social communication more Zulia state tuition. The study was descriptive, not experimental and transversal. A checklist was used to support a content analysis. The results showed a favorable trend for the consideration of the principles of culture of peace in the curriculum of schools of social communication i...

  3. Research on the Influence Mechanism of Organizational Culture Identity on Organizational Commitment%组织文化认同对组织承诺的影响路径研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩丹; 王磊

    2015-01-01

    在构建组织文化认同对组织承诺结构模型的基础上,通过问卷调查对其作用机制进行实证分析。结果发现:组织文化认同包含组织认知和组织情感两个层面,组织承诺则包含持续承诺、理想承诺和情感承诺三种不同的类型。其中,组织文化认同对情感承诺、理想承诺具有显著的正向影响,而对持续承诺作用不显著。因此,组织可以通过提高文化认同度来提高员工组织承诺,以保持内部员工的稳定。%Based on the construction of structure model about the influence of organizational culture iden-tity on the organizational commitment,the empirical analysis of its influencing mechanism was carried out through the questionnaire. It is found out that organizational culture identity includes two levels of organization cognition and organization emotion,while organizational commitment consists of three different types:sustain-able commitment,ideal commitment,and affective commitment. Among them,organizational cultural identity has a remarkably positive effect on the affective commitment and ideal commitment,but has no significant effect on sustainable commitment. Thus organizations can improve organizational commitment by improving cultural i-dentity in order to keep the internal staff stability.

  4. Improving socially constructed cross-cultural communication in aged care homes: A critical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Willis, Eileen; Harrington, Ann; Gillham, David; De Bellis, Anita; Morey, Wendy; Jeffers, Lesley

    2017-06-14

    Cultural diversity between residents and staff is significant in aged care homes in many developed nations in the context of international migration. This diversity can be a challenge to achieving effective cross-cultural communication. The aim of this study was to critically examine how staff and residents initiated effective cross-cultural communication and social cohesion that enabled positive changes to occur. A critical hermeneutic analysis underpinned by Giddens' Structuration Theory was applied to the study. Data were collected by interviews with residents or their family and by focus groups with staff in four aged care homes in Australia. Findings reveal that residents and staff are capable of restructuring communication via a partnership approach. They can also work in collaboration to develop communication resources. When staff demonstrate cultural humility, they empower residents from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds to engage in effective communication. Findings also suggest that workforce interventions are required to improve residents' experiences in cross-cultural care. This study challenges aged care homes to establish policies, criteria and procedures in cross-cultural communication. There is also the challenge to provide ongoing education and training for staff to improve their cross-cultural communication capabilities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Communication works across cultures: hard data on ORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A; Foote, D; Smith, W

    1985-01-01

    From 1980 through 1984 the same communication and social marketing strategy was applied to teaching oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and related child survival practices in both the Gambia and Honduras. Within that strategy, each country developed campaigns that had their own character, peculiarities, and challenges. Data bridging 3 years and the 2 cultures show almost identical results, including sustained adoption of ORT and significant improvement in nutritional practices. This discussion reports on the most interesting similarities, differences, and data from the 2 countries, based on recently published longitudinal studies conducted by Stanford University and Applied Communication Technology. Highly specific objectives were pursued and multiple channels -- radio, print materials, and direct contact -- were coordinated to support these objectives in the campaigns of Honduras and Gambia to teach ORT and related practices. Although emphasis shifted among topics for limited periods of time during the interventions, the key communication methods and procedures for conducting the interventions would not end abruptly but become an ongoing part of the public health education process and the health care delivery system. The interventions in Honduras and Gambia adapted lessons learned from past experiences. The methodological sequence is outlined. Stratified, random panels of approximately 750-1000 households with posttest controls were surveyed in each country in repeated waves over a 3 year period. The overall evaluation plan examined a sequential model of changes, recognizing that changes in any individual do not necessarily follow the same pattern. 1 technique used with strong impact in Gambia was the "Happy Baby Lottery." This was a contest of skill rather than chance and proved successful in overcoming the difficulty many Gambian women expeience in interpreting 2-dimensional graphs. The "lottery" in Gambia marked the beginning of a 2-year effort to teach a water

  6. Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with clinical pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Romo, Dawn N; Barner, Jamie C; Brown, Carolyn M; Rivera, José O; Garza, Aida A; Klein-Bradham, Kristina; Jokerst, Jason R; Janiga, Xan; Brown, Bob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with their clinical pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity, while controlling for patients' sociodemographic, clinical, and communication factors, as well as pharmacist factors, and to identify clinical pharmacists' cultural factors that are important to Spanish-speaking patients. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Central Texas during August 2011 to May 2012. PARTICIPANTS Spanish-speaking patients of federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) A Spanish-translated survey assessed Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with their clinical pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity. RESULTS Spanish-speaking patients (N = 101) reported overall satisfaction with their clinical pharmacists' communication skills and cultural sensitivity. Patients also indicated that pharmacists' cultural rapport (e.g., ability to speak Spanish, respectfulness) was generally important to Spanish speakers. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that cultural rapport was significantly related to satisfaction with pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity. CONCLUSION Overall, patients were satisfied with pharmacists' communication skills and cultural sensitivity. Patient satisfaction initiatives that include cultural rapport should be developed for pharmacists who provide care to Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.

  7. Statistical estimation of cell-cycle progression and lineage commitment in Plasmodium falciparum reveals a homogeneous pattern of transcription in ex vivo culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Jacob E; Gomez-Escobar, Natalia; Feller, Avi; Carret, Celine; Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; Pinches, Robert; Day, Felix; Kyes, Sue A; Conway, David J; Holmes, Chris C; Newbold, Chris I

    2009-05-05

    We have cultured Plasmodium falciparum directly from the blood of infected individuals to examine patterns of mature-stage gene expression in patient isolates. Analysis of the transcriptome of P. falciparum is complicated by the highly periodic nature of gene expression because small variations in the stage of parasite development between samples can lead to an apparent difference in gene expression values. To address this issue, we have developed statistical likelihood-based methods to estimate cell cycle progression and commitment to asexual or sexual development lineages in our samples based on microscopy and gene expression patterns. In cases subsequently matched for temporal development, we find that transcriptional patterns in ex vivo culture display little variation across patients with diverse clinical profiles and closely resemble transcriptional profiles that occur in vitro. These statistical methods, available to the research community, assist in the design and interpretation of P. falciparum expression profiling experiments where it is difficult to separate true differential expression from cell-cycle dependent expression. We reanalyze an existing dataset of in vivo patient expression profiles and conclude that previously observed discrete variation is consistent with the commitment of a varying proportion of the parasite population to the sexual development lineage.

  8. Exploring the influence of cultural orientations on assessment of communication behaviours during patient-practitioner interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Kyle J; Govaerts, Marjan J B; Austin, Zubin; Dolmans, Diana H J M

    2017-03-21

    Research has shown that patients' and practitioners' cultural orientations affect communication behaviors and interpretations in cross-cultural patient-practitioner interactions. Little is known about the effect of cultural orientations on assessment of communication behaviors in cross-cultural educational settings. The purpose of this study is to explore cultural orientation as a potential source of assessor idiosyncrasy or between-assessor variability in assessment of communication skills. More specifically, we explored if and how (expert) assessors' valuing of communication behaviours aligned with their cultural orientations (power-distance, masculinity-femininity, uncertainty avoidance, and individualism-collectivism). Twenty-five pharmacist-assessors watched 3 videotaped scenarios (patient-pharmacist interactions) and ranked each on a 5-point global rating scale. Videotaped scenarios demonstrated combinations of well-portrayed and borderline examples of instrumental and affective communication behaviours. We used stimulated recall and verbal protocol analysis to investigate assessors' interpretations and evaluations of communication behaviours. Uttered assessments of communication behaviours were coded as instrumental (task-oriented) or affective (socioemotional) and either positive or negative. Cultural orientations were measured using the Individual Cultural Values Scale. Correlations between cultural orientations and global scores, and frequencies of positive, negative, and total utterances of instrumental and affective behaviours were determined. Correlations were found to be scenario specific. In videos with poor or good performance, no differences were found across cultural orientations. When borderline performance was demonstrated, high power-distance and masculinity were significantly associated with higher global ratings (r = .445, and .537 respectively, p communication behaviours. Interestingly, expert assessors generally agreed on scenarios of

  9. Innovation, Corporate Strategy, and Cultural Context: What Is the Mission for International Business Communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulijn, Jan; O'Hair, Dan; Weggeman, Mathieu; Ledlow, Gerald; Hall, H. Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Reviews relevant literature in the areas of communication and innovation and explores how efforts toward innovative practices are directly related to globalism and business strategy. Focuses on issues associated with national culture, corporate culture, and professional culture that are relevant to strategies for researching business communication…

  10. Preparedness of Chinese Students for American Culture and Communicating in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Melody; Sue, Edna

    2013-01-01

    What Chinese students learn about American culture and the English language in the classrooms of China does not adequately prepare them for the reality of American culture and communication in English. In this study, the constructs of American culture and models of English language taught in Chinese classrooms are compared with the reality of…

  11. Expressive Practices: The Local Enactment of Culture in the Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Karen; Milburn, Trudy; Wilkins, Richard

    2008-01-01

    As students participate in corporate communication classes, they may, on occasion, use the term culture to make sense of their experiences. The authors use Mino's idea of a learning paradigm to shift the emphasis away from teaching traditional theories of culture and use student-centered experiences to teach culture as an expressive practice.…

  12. Monitoring compliance with high-level commitments in health: the case of the CARICOM Summit on Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, T Alafia; Kirton, John; Guebert, Jenilee

    2014-04-01

    The CARICOM Summit on Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases - the first government summit ever devoted to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) - was convened by the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) in Trinidad and Tobago in September 2007. Leaders in attendance issued the declaration of Port of Spain, a call for the prevention and control of four major NCDs and their risk factors. An accountability instrument for monitoring compliance with summit commitments was developed for CARICOM by the University of the West Indies in 2008 and revised in 2010. The instrument - a one-page colour-coded grid with 26 progress indicators - is updated annually by focal points in Caribbean health ministries, verified by each country's chief medical officer and presented to the annual Caucus of Caribbean Community Ministers of Health. In this study, the G8 Research Group's methods for assessing compliance were applied to the 2009 reporting grid to assess each country's performance. Given the success of the CARICOM Summit, a United Nations high-level meeting of the General Assembly on the prevention and control of NCDs was held in September 2011. In May 2013 the World Health Assembly adopted nine global targets and 25 indicators to measure progress in NCD control. This study shows that the CARICOM monitoring grid can be used to document progress on such indicators quickly and comprehensibly. An annual reporting mechanism is essential to encourage steady progress and highlight areas needing correction. This paper underscores the importance of accountability mechanisms for encouraging and monitoring compliance with the collective political commitments acquired at the highest level.

  13. The Investigation of the Relationship between Cultural Values and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR, Organizational Commitment (OC and Personal Benefit (PB in Accounting System of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Jabbarzadeh Kangarlouei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the relationships between cultural values and ethical dimensions of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR, Organizational Commitment (OC and Personal Benefit (PB in accounting system of Iran. The cultural values criteria in this study include Power Distance Index (PDI, Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI, Individualism (IDV and Masculinity (MAS. For measuring the cultural values, Hofstede questionnaire (1991 and in order to collect data for CSR, OC, and PB, Singhapakdi et al. (1996, Hunt et al. (1989, and Clikeman and Henning standard questionnaire (2000 were used, respectively, because of their high validity and reliability. Research sample consists of 115 accepted companies in Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE during the period of 2004-2010. The regression models and econometric software EViews 6 are used to test the hypotheses. Research findings indicate that there is a weak correlation between cultural values and ethical dimensions of CRS, OC, and PB that results in the rejection of research hypotheses. In addition, among the variables of cultural values, UAI has the most and MAS index has the least impact on CSR.

  14. Building Trans-Cultural Standards. On Demolishing the Barriers to Intercultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru Bortun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the individual and intercultural communication becomes clear when weunderstand culture within the cultural anthropology paradigm. From this point of view, any individual is thebarer of a certain culture (subculture, sub-subculture etc., and interindividual communication is anintercultural one. That is why the issue of tolerance between individuals and groups becomes an issue of theefficient communication and mutual understanding between cultures. My research on demolishing thebarriers to intercultural communication aims not only to institutionalized communication (betweengovernments or national organizations, but also to communication between well established culturalcommunities, with a strong identity (linguistic, ethnic or religious communities: they regard any act ofcommunication, including here the international professional one (where the main barriers dwell in thecommunication between national cultures. I think that in its current shape, based on economic criteria (whichsplit rather than unify, the European Union does not offer enough “common tasks” in order to give birth to anew Pan-European civic culture, as a variety of the third culture. But, a European Federation could offer thepolitical, economical, social and cultural framework necessary for the achievement of what Casmir called“the third culture”.

  15. Teaching and training for global engineering perspectives on culture and professional communication practices

    CERN Document Server

    Flammia, Madelyn

    2016-01-01

    Provides a foundation for understanding a range of linguistic, cultural, and technological factors to effectively practice international communication in a variety of professional communication arenas This book presents a range of perspectives, examples, and concepts for teaching international professional communication in different settings. Industry professionals and academic researchers alike have written entries for Teaching and Training for Global Engineering: Perspectives on Culture and Professional Communication Practices, which have been organized into four cohesive, context-based sections that examine central issues associated with offering effective instruction on communication in global settings. The first section presents approaches for teaching issues of language and visual design related to international communication. The second section reviews aspects of software use and ethical practices associated with communicating globally. The third ection discusses how educators can use information a...

  16. English language status and English communication in culturally diverse academic departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Communicating in a common language can function as a general frame of reference in culturally diverse organizations, providing that the status of the language permits its use. Based on a large-scale survey of 489 academic members of sixteen culturally diverse science departments at three...... universities, results showed that English fluency had a positive association with inter-individual communication and management communication, both in English, while linguistic distance only had a positive relationship with inter-individual communication in English. Implications of these findings are discussed...

  17. On Significance of Cross-cultural Communication in International Business-Specified on Accounting Internationalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洁

    2011-01-01

    There is limited information about intercultural communication during the process of accounting internationalization,and Chinese accounting still has a long way to go because of the disparity in accounting principles,business culture and so on.This paper talks about the necessity of accounting internationalization and the importance of intercultural communication skill,aiming at reminding people that a good command of intercultural communication skill is a must.Some suggestions are given in hope of contributing to cross-cultural communication during the process of Chinese accounting internationalization.

  18. Forming of communicative competence as condition of professional preparation of future teachers of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsutina NM.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The modern state and necessity of realization of forming communicative competence of future teachers of physical culture is found out in the process of professional preparation. 294 students took part in an experiment. Rotined expedience of realization of forming of communicative competence of future teachers of physical culture. The questionnaire of students of higher educational establishments is conducted. The level of formed of communicative competence for students remains at low level. It needs strengthening of attention to perfection of process of professional preparation of future teachers of physical culture.

  19. Culturally Responsive: Exploring the Attributes of Islamic Health Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohd Khairie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the attributes (basis and values of faith-based communication strategy on health communication. Eight series of focus group studies on Muslim community were conducted to gather the data. The finding makes abundantly clear that the tawhidic (the belief in Oneness of God conception significantly determine the effectiveness of Islamic communication message. In addition, there were another six themes that contributes to Islamic health communication attributes which may influence the receiver’s attitudes and behaviours. The insights of this paper may contribute to the further development of health promotion strategies for Muslims community.

  20. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  1. Understanding Organizational Culture and Communication through a Gyroscope Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisel, Ryan S.; Messersmith, Amber S.; Keyton, Joann

    2010-01-01

    To fill a critical void in organizational culture pedagogy, the authors present an instructional system that employs the metaphor of a gyroscope to help students understand implicit assumptions in culture research. Working from Martin's nexus approach to organizational culture and Fairhurst and Putnam's tripartite theory of organizational…

  2. Understanding Organizational Culture and Communication through a Gyroscope Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisel, Ryan S.; Messersmith, Amber S.; Keyton, Joann

    2010-01-01

    To fill a critical void in organizational culture pedagogy, the authors present an instructional system that employs the metaphor of a gyroscope to help students understand implicit assumptions in culture research. Working from Martin's nexus approach to organizational culture and Fairhurst and Putnam's tripartite theory of organizational…

  3. Doctor-Patient Communication in Southeast Asia: A Different Culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D. F.; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative…

  4. Doctor-Patient Communication in Southeast Asia: A Different Culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D. F.; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative…

  5. Doctor-patient communication in Southeast Asia: a different culture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claramita, M.; Nugraheni, M.D.; Dalen, J. Van; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southea

  6. Doctor-patient communication in Southeast Asia: a different culture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claramita, M.; Nugraheni, M.D.; Dalen, J. Van; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southea

  7. Spontaneous Emotional Communication and Social Biofeedback: A Cross-Cultural Study of Emotional Expression and Communication in Chinese and Taiwanese Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ross; Teng, Wan-Cheng

    Different cultures develop different rules of emotional expression and communication which may have important consequences within the culture and which may impose barriers to communication between cultures. A study was conducted to examine this issue. Emotionally-loaded color slides were shown to 44 college students from Taiwan and the People's…

  8. Codes of Commitment to Crime and Resistance: Determining Social and Cultural Factors over the Behaviors of Italian Mafia Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayli, Baris

    2016-01-02

    This article categorizes thirty-three women in four main Italian Mafia groups and explores social and cultural behaviors of these women. This study introduces the feminist theory of belief and action. The theoretical inquiry investigates the sometimes conflicting behaviors of women when they are subject to systematic oppression. I argue that there is a cultural polarization among the categorized sub-groups. Conservative radicals give their support to the Mafia while defectors and rebels resist the Mafia. After testing the theory, I assert that emancipation of women depends on the strength of their beliefs to perform actions against the Mafiosi culture.

  9. THE NEW NATURE OF CULTURAL DIPLOMACY IN THE AGE OF ONLINE COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Saliu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Countries undertake different actions to improve international image in order to benefit politically, economically, culturally, etc. This is made through actions of public diplomacy, where cultural diplomacy is an important dimension. It doesn’t use media as mediating channel, but communication with foreign public is carried through different exchanges, visits, tourism, diaspora, etc. This makes communication more reliable than information and influencing foreign public through media. However, lately, online communication through different platforms, where people from different cultures and countries exchange messages, has also changed the nature of traditional cultural diplomacy. This enables creating an image for their country or receiving an image for another country, whereas on the other hand and simultaneously this makes communication with the foreign public more complex and unmanageable.

  10. The Hierarchical Role Relationship Exercises Negative Influences On Communication in Collective Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨秋仙

    2015-01-01

    Based on the previous studies,the present paper intends to further discuss why and how the hierarchical nature of role relationship influences communication in a negative way in collectivistic culture where high power distance dominates.

  11. The Voice of Silence in Communication-from cross-culture perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹琪雯

    2014-01-01

    This paper makes a study of silence from cross-culture perspective and holds that silence is an indispensable compo-nent of human communication without which the proper decoding of the information would be impossible.

  12. A critical analysis of intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke; Lauring, Jakob; Klitmøller, Anders

    2009-01-01

    of anthropology from which it originated. This theory gap between intercultural communication research in CCM and anthropology tends to exclude from CCM an understanding of how the context of social, organizational and power relationships shapes the role of culture in communication. Practical implications......Purpose - Functionalist models of intercultural interaction have serious limitations relying on static and decontextualized culture views. This paper sets out to outline newer developments in anthropological theory in order to provide inspirations to a more dynamic and contextual approach...... for understanding intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management (CCM). Design/methodology/approach - The paper analyzes the established approaches to the cultural underpinnings of intercultural communication in CCM and examines how newer developments in anthropology may contribute...

  13. Acupuncture: A Paradigm of Worldwide Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hao; CHEN Ke-ji

    2011-01-01

    @@ On 16 November 2010, an exciting news inspired all traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practitioners,especially acupuncturists in China.Acupuncture and moxibustion of TCM along with Peking Opera were both inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity during the 5th session of the United Nations Educational,Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Inter-governmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage meeting in Nairobi.The Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity aims at ensuring better visibility of the intangible cultural heritage and raising awareness of its importance while encouraging dialogue that respects cultural diversity.The Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity now comprises 213 elements.

  14. Cross-cultural Communication and Translation of Culture-loaded Words%跨文化交际与词语的文化涵义翻译

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章国健

    2003-01-01

    Language and culture are closely related to each other. This paper studies the principles and approaches of translating culture -loaded words in the context of cross-cultural communication by exploring the relation between culture and translation. Culture-loaded words are considered difficult to translate because these words contain cultural connotations and obviously mirror cultural characteristics. In light of cross-cultural communication research, the paper proposes that in translation of culture-loaded words semantic and pragmatic equivalence should be achieved by adopting proper translating methods.

  15. Religion, Belief and Medial Layering of Communication. Perspectives from Studies in Visual Culture and Artistic Productions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Schade

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the relationship between religious practices, belief and the media based on the medial layering of communication. The arguments are situated within the fields of studies in visual culture and cultural studies, reflecting on the role of art as a specific medium in the Western religious tradition. Vera Frenkel’s video This Is Your Messiah Speaking (1990 is reviewed as a critical inquiry into religious practices and the media structures of communication.

  16. The impact of information and communication technology on decentralization: The role of organizational culture

    OpenAIRE

    Janićijević, Nebojša; Milovanović, Miloš

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the impact of organizational culture on the effects that the implementation of information and communication technology has on decentralization of organization. The starting assumption is that the implementation of information and communication technology does not have a predetermined and unique impact on centralization or decentralization of organization, but this impact rather depends on the context in which the implementation is performed. Organizational culture has a co...

  17. Effective Communication in a Culture of Learning: K-2 and Specialized Educators Communicating Effectively Regarding Students' Academic Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Castellano, Latesha D.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation describes an action research study that was designed to improve the communication channels among K-2 and specialized educators in a specific learning culture regarding the learning needs of students. The action research intervention plan included professional online workshops, telecommunication conferences, and recorded…

  18. Celebrating the "Intellectual Heart": Emergent Meanings from a Post-Earthquake Organizational Communication Culture Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Catherine V.; And Others

    The Organizational Communication Culture (OCC) method, designed by Charles A. Bantz (1993) was utilized as the primary method for analyzing messages coming from the administration of California State University, Northridge, after the earthquake. Bantz feels that communication interactions in an organization bring meanings and expectations to that…

  19. Preparing TESOL Students for the ESOL Classroom: A Cross-Cultural Project in Intercultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-López-Portillo, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Intercultural communication classes for TESOL students give them a solid foundation for their work with their own ESOL students. This article presents the cross-cultural project that TESOL students have to complete in a required intercultural communication class at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and the case study that was used to…

  20. Problems and Recommendations: Enhancing Communication with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Shereen Abdel; Yawkey, Thomas D.

    2002-01-01

    Notes that communication between teachers and culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students need serious consideration especially in recognizing potential sources of miscommunication and misinterpretation. Considers sources of miscommunication within verbal and nonverbal communication. Discusses each element and offers examples in CLD…

  1. "How should I say this?" Agents with culturally-appropriate verbal communication styles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascarenhas, S.; Paiva, A.; Degens, D.M.; McBreen, J.; Hofstede, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    There are several cultural differences in the way humans communicate, both in verbal and non-verbal communication. Research on creating agents that are able to simulate such differences is currently growing, in part for their potential use in designing Virtual Learning Environments for intercultural

  2. Enhancing Cross Cultural Communication in the Marketing Classroom: A Case Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budden, Michael C.; Budden, Connie B.; Lopez, Tará Burnthorne

    2017-01-01

    The importance of effective communication skills in the workplace is widely documented and recognized as a success factor in many fields of endeavor. As the workplace becomes more diverse and more global in nature, the ability to communicate across cultures is gaining in importance. A class exercise in which Panamanian educators and US students…

  3. Introducing Heuristics of Cultural Dimensions into the Service-Level Technical Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A significant problem for practitioners of technical communication is to gain the skills to compete in a global, multicultural work environment. Instructors of technical communication can provide future practitioners with the tools to compete and excel in this global environment by introducing heuristics of cultural dimensions into the…

  4. The role of culture in effective HIV/AIDS communication by theatre in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chijioke Uwah

    2014-04-04

    Apr 4, 2014 ... Keywords: theatre, culture, communities, effective communication, HIV/AIDS ... communautés cibles en tant que catalyseur pour une communication efficace au VIH/SID. .... plays are prescriptive and reflect the groups' opinion of what safe .... care and support, particularly in Africa (Airhihenbuwa, Makinwa.

  5. "How should I say this?" Agents with culturally-appropriate verbal communication styles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascarenhas, S.; Paiva, A.; Degens, D.M.; McBreen, J.; Hofstede, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    There are several cultural differences in the way humans communicate, both in verbal and non-verbal communication. Research on creating agents that are able to simulate such differences is currently growing, in part for their potential use in designing Virtual Learning Environments for intercultural

  6. The Comprehensive and Integrating Design of Subway Visual Communication and Urban Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang[1

    2016-01-01

    The subway has become an dominant form for public transportation in all the great metropolis. It not only saves energy and time ,but also relieves stress caused by the dense commuting. As a high-effi cient travel mode in modern city, the metro can not only relieve the ground traffi c pressure, but also represents the culture and value of the city, which is the essence of our life. Metro visual communication design of developed countries in the world is almost closely related to the origin of urban culture, then the metro culture with local specialties has been formed. Therefore, comparative research on the situation of metro visual communication design both can induce the integration and regeneration of urban metro visual communication design and urban culture of China, as well as the formation and development of the metro culture.

  7. The effectiveness of somatization in communicating distress in Korean and American cultural contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Eunsoo eChoi; Yulia eChentsova-Dutton; Gerrod W. Parrott

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has documented that Asians tend to somatize negative experiences to a greater degree than Westerners. It is posited that somatization may be a more functional communication strategy in Korean than American context. We examined the effects of somatization in communications of distress among participants from the US and Korea. We predicted that the communicative benefits of somatic words used in distress narratives would depend on the cultural contexts. In Study 1, we found th...

  8. IDENTITY THEFT COMMITTED THROUGH INTERNET

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Cristian MOISE

    2015-01-01

    In this study, starting with the presentation of some aspects regarding management of identity in cyberspace, it is carried out the analysis of the offence of identity theft committed through Internet. The term “identity theft” describes the criminal acts through which the offender obtains and uses in a fraudulent manner the identity of other person. These criminal acts may be carried out through the use of information and communication technology, too. The cases of identity theft committed t...

  9. Dubbing: adapting cultures in the global communication era

    OpenAIRE

    Lidia Canu

    2012-01-01

    Adapting translation for dubbing is not a mere linguistic fact: it is mainly the adaptation of cultures. In fact, audiovisual translation and adaptation implicitly takes into account the importance of the historical background behind the multiplicity of languages and cultures, and by doing so, it becomes a means of cultural diffusion. That peculiarity enables what we can describe as the “socio-anthropological function” of the adaptation of translation for dubbing, which is the obj...

  10. Interpersonal Communication in High Tech Culture: Eastern or Western?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenhart, Myra W.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates interpersonal communication in a high tech organization to test the association between high tech organizations and Western styles of symbolic interaction. Takes a diagnostic, rather than prescriptive, approach to organizational change. (MM)

  11. Communication to pediatric cancer patients and their families: A cultural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Seth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Communication is a key component of palliative care. The area of pediatric palliative care is emotionally distressing for families and healthcare providers. Inadequate communication can increase the stress and lead to mistrust or miscommunication. Materials and Methods: Reviewing the literature on communication between physicians and patients, we identified several barriers to communication such as paternalism in medicine, inadequate training in communication skills, knowledge of the grieving process, special issues related to care of children and cultural barriers. In order to fill the void in area of cultural communication, a study questionnaire was administered to consecutive families of children receiving chemotherapy at a large, north Indian referral hospital to elicit parental views on communication. Results: Most parents had a protective attitude and favored collusion, however, appreciated truthfulness in prognostication and counseling by physicians; though parents expressed dissatisfaction on timing and lack of prior information by counseling team. Conclusion: Training programs in communication skills should teach doctors how to elicit patients′ preferences for information. Systematic training programs with feedback can decrease physicians stress and burnout. More research for understanding a culturally appropriate communication framework is needed.

  12. Designing communication for collaboration across engineering cultures: A teaching case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Fadde

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This pedagogical case aims to better prepare engineering students for communication tasks in international collaborations. Its origin is an interview with a young female engineer in the United States who, when asked what might have improved her technical communication classes, answered by listing her current difficulties with intercultural and international collaboration on design projects. Her interview established a frame for the short case on international collaboration that follows. Included are materials suitable for students and resources to guide teachers.

  13. Robust relativistic bit commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Chailloux, André; Leverrier, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    Relativistic cryptography exploits the fact that no information can travel faster than the speed of light in order to obtain security guarantees that cannot be achieved from the laws of quantum mechanics alone. Recently, Lunghi et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 030502 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.030502] presented a bit-commitment scheme where each party uses two agents that exchange classical information in a synchronized fashion, and that is both hiding and binding. A caveat is that the commitment time is intrinsically limited by the spatial configuration of the players, and increasing this time requires the agents to exchange messages during the whole duration of the protocol. While such a solution remains computationally attractive, its practicality is severely limited in realistic settings since all communication must remain perfectly synchronized at all times. In this work, we introduce a robust protocol for relativistic bit commitment that tolerates failures of the classical communication network. This is done by adding a third agent to both parties. Our scheme provides a quadratic improvement in terms of expected sustain time compared with the original protocol, while retaining the same level of security.

  14. Cultural Issues in the Communication of Research on Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini Bussi, Maria G.; Martignone, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    It might be trite to observe that every research study is framed within a cultural background. In this paper we argue that the description of the cultural background is important for discussing, evaluating and exploiting internationally the findings of local educational studies. This issue is fundamental in every study in mathematics education…

  15. Culture,Textbooks and the Development of Intercultural Communicative Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN; Yuan

    2015-01-01

    <正>Byram(1993,p.13)argues that language and culture learning should be integrated with each other as language is a way of interacting with others.However,when the target language is English which is now the world’s lingua franca in the global village(Graddol,2006),the scope of target culture is becoming

  16. Communication, Cooperation, and Negotiation in Culturally Heterogeneous Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Fred E.; Triandis, Harry C.

    This research program has been concerned with three major subprojects: identifying concepts and behaviors which critically affect intercultural relations; developing principles and methods for programed self-instructional cultural training to help Americans adjust to, and work more effectively in, foreign cultures, or with persons from different…

  17. Cultures-of-Use and Morphologies of Communicative Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    In this article I revisit the cultures-of-use conceptual framework--that technologies, as forms and processes comprising human culture, mediate and assume variable meanings, values, and conventionalized functions for different communities (Thorne, 2003). I trace the antecedent arc of investigation and serendipitous encounters that led to the 2003…

  18. PEACE CULTURE IN PROGRAMS OF SOCIAL COMMUNICATION SCHOOLS OF ZULIA STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Julieta Barboza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper to search the principles for the culture of peace present in the Curriculum of the Schools of Social Communication of Zulia state. We studied the curriculum of two schools of social communication more Zulia state tuition. The study was descriptive, not experimental and transversal. A checklist was used to support a content analysis. The results showed a favorable trend for the consideration of the principles of culture of peace in the curriculum of schools of social communication in Zulia State.

  19. The dehistorization of the exercise of capitalist power and communicative domination in a cultural war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelina Gómez Martínez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a theoretical and methodological proposal that focuses on the articulation between dehistorization of the exercise of capitalist power and communicative domination to be found in cultural models absorbed by individuals under the present capitalist hegemony. The analysis is built upon the studies of communication that deal with the relations between power and modes of domination, using semiotics of culture as a tool, and demonstrate the existence of a tendency, at a global level, of certain characteristics with regards to interaction between imperialist power and communication.

  20. CULTURAL BARRIERS TO THE APPLICATION OF COMMUNICATIVE APPROACH TO LANGUAGE TEACHING IN CHINESE CLASSROOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The communicative approach has been widely accepted andused in language teaching since the 1970s in western countriesand has proved to be quite effective.However,in Chineseclassrooms,it doesn’t seem as effective as it is in a westerncontext.This paper analyses the cultural barriers to theapplication of the communicative approach in Chineseclassrooms.Namely,the acceptance of relationships based onpower and authority;the collectivism orientation of Chinasociety and the concept of"face"are three cultural factors thathinder effective communicative language teaching in China.

  1. The "Culture Problem" in Intercultural Communication: Toward a Critical Proficiency of Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunju Chung

    2013-01-01

    Intercultural Communication (INCC) is dominated by a simple conception of culture that has, in essence, led its research and literature away from attending to relations of power in intercultural relationships. INCC's traditional approach based on positivistic and static notions of culture are rather anemic in their own right but also too brittle…

  2. Communication and Assimilation of Polish Immigrants in British Columbia: An Exploration in Culture Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Godwin C.

    The problem of assimilation of immigrants was analyzed in the general framework of intercultural communication and culture learning. Results from a survey of 64 first-generation Polish immigrants in Victoria, Canada supported this theoretical approach. It was found that assimilation into Canadian culture was positively related to number of…

  3. Stress and Communication across Cultural Boundaries in the U.S. Location of a Chinese Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuanying; Jecklin, Robert

    2012-01-01

    One of the ways in which corporations influence human health occurs when a global corporation brings workers from two or more cultures together in the workplace where they experience the stress of acculturation. Researchers asked workers from two cultures at one international worksite to tell about their work, intercultural communication, thoughts…

  4. The "Culture Problem" in Intercultural Communication: Toward a Critical Proficiency of Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunju Chung

    2013-01-01

    Intercultural Communication (INCC) is dominated by a simple conception of culture that has, in essence, led its research and literature away from attending to relations of power in intercultural relationships. INCC's traditional approach based on positivistic and static notions of culture are rather anemic in their own right but also too brittle…

  5. Speeding the Development of Communications Culture Industry%开动通信文化产业快车

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王诚

    2005-01-01

    With telecom technologies application becoming wider and deeper in the social, economical and cultural parts in human society, the new communications culture wave emerges all through the world. Also the communications culture industry now has become one kind of new industry and appears in our eyes. In addition, the communications culture industry plays an important role in the economical system of human society and in the large history stage.

  6. Intercultural Communication as Viewed from the Perspective of Cross-cultural Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Ryoko

    The encounter with foreign nationals in everyday life calls for not only understanding of the other on the level of recognition but also the ability to cope with the whole spectrum of emotional reactions associated with direct experience of other cultures. Viewing the subject from the perspective of cross-cultural psychology, this paper outlines the course of human information processing that restricts cross-cultural personal acceptance and the psychological process involved in contact with other cultures. Building on this basis, it then discusses the significance of understanding other cultures and examines requirements for communication with people who have different cultural backgrounds. A particular focus is the approach to communication with international students in Japanese universities.

  7. The role of culture in effective HIV/AIDS communication by theatre in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwah, Chijioke

    2013-01-01

    The need to effectively communicate HIV/AIDS messages in South Africa, given the high prevalence of the pandemic, cannot be overemphasised. Communication scholars have long emphasised the need to recognise adherence to cultural norms of target communities as catalyst for effective HIV/AIDS communication. Unfortunately this call has not been totally heeded by the designers of HIV/AIDS communication instruments. In the case of theatre, research has shown that in South Africa, theatre groups have gone into communities with pre-packaged plays without due cognisance of the cultural norms and beliefs of the target population. This research was conducted in KwaZulu-Natal (the province with the highest prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS infection in South Africa). Using a qualitative research methodology this paper investigated the inclusion/non-inclusion of the cultural norms of the target population in the design of the dramatic performance by the theatre group in its HIV/AIDS campaigns. The findings indicate that while the group did try to incorporate aspects of the cultural norms of the target population, it did so at a level that failed to effectively communicate the HIV/AIDS message to its audiences. This paper therefore seeks to show through empirical evidence that the non-inclusion of cultural norms and values of the target population has acted as a stumbling block in the effective communication of HIV/AIDS messages by theatre groups in the country.

  8. Cross-cultural Communicative Competence Training in Maritime Spoken English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鹿学军

    2010-01-01

    <正>As a means of communication,English has been internationalized.Communication in English always happens among the seafarers from different cultures.If crews couldn’t deal with the cultural differences well,successful communication and shipboard safety,which are just what STCW (Standards on Training,Certificate and Watch -keeping) calls upon,are difficult to be arrived at. Therefore cross -cultural communicative competence training,or how to teach maritime spoken English is the problem or the challenge that we,English teachers,are facing.To show how the teaching can be made more efficient and practical so as to narrow the gap between the training of the seaman in China and the requirements of STCW,through the teaching process,including the syllabus design and the materials selecting,we must consider the notion of language function as the key point.

  9. The Relationship Between Culture and Legal Systems and the Impact on Intercultural Business Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris I. Varner

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the connections between culture, law, and intercultural business communication. Both legal systems and cultural priorities come out of the history of a country. Culture affects legal systems just as laws affect changes in culture. While there has been a substantial body of research on the impact of culture on communication in a global setting over the past few decades, there has been very little on the role of law. We focus mostly on issues of privacy and employment communication. Europeans, and in particular Germans, establish specific rules and regulations whereas Americans have fewer laws. Europeans have very detailed laws on issues of privacy, whereas Americans are more focused on freedom of speech. Tighter privacy rules directly affect communication within companies and with suppliers and customers. In Germany employment is based on a specific contract; Americans practice employment-at-will. These practices come out of cultural priorities. Germans, for example, dislike uncertainty and try to create certainty by establishing rules. Americans are more comfortable with uncertainty and prefer flexibility. International managers need to be knowledgeable about these differences and adapt to different communication styles to be successful.

  10. Shades of truth: cultural and psychological factors affecting communication in pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Yutaka; Yamada, Miwa; Fukui, Kenji

    2011-02-01

    Communication with children who have life-threatening illnesses is a major challenge. Communication practices are greatly influenced by factors such as the child's age, the parents' wishes, and the cultural norms. This article presents the case of a 12-year-old Japanese boy with advanced hepatoblastoma. The patient also was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, which impairs interpersonal communication. The case is discussed from the perspective of clinical ethics, especially with regard to truth telling. The health care team faced an ethical dilemma because of the complications involved. Physicians treating children with cancer should be aware of these issues to be able to effectively communicate with their patients.

  11. Overcoming resistance to culture change: nursing home administrators' use of education, training, and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Denise A; Lepore, Michael; Shield, Renee R; Looze, Jessica; Miller, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Nursing home culture change is becoming more prevalent, and research has demonstrated its benefits for nursing home residents and staff-but little is known about the role of nursing home administrators in culture change implementation. The purpose of this study was to determine what barriers nursing home administrators face in implementing culture change practices, and to identify the strategies used to overcome them. The authors conducted in-depth individual interviews with 64 administrators identified through a nationally representative survey. Results showed that a key barrier to culture change implementation reported by administrators was staff, resident, and family member resistance to change. Most nursing home administrators stressed the importance of using communication, education and training to overcome this resistance. Themes emerging around the concepts of communication and education indicate that these efforts should be ongoing, communication should be reciprocal, and that all stakeholders should be included.

  12. From controlled to committed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, J C

    1996-02-01

    Most of us agree that people are our most important resource. Yet we spend a minimal amount of time learning more about human behavior, communication, and how our attitudes and behavior impact employee performance. Instead we rely on traditional methods of negative reinforcement in an attempt to control our areas of responsibility. While these methods can render some short-term success, managers and organizations that succeed during these times of change and fierce competition will be those that take the time to understand and capture the power of a committed workforce. The committed workforce is energized, not simply compliant, as a result of having basic human needs for achievement satisfied, belonging to a group, and receiving recognition for its contributions. Committed workers typically describe the manager as one who has the ability to give them a great degree of control over their area of influence. We all know that we don't change our leadership style like we change clothes. Old habits die hard. it takes a personal commitment and lots of practice to rid outselves of habits and behavior that no longer serve our departments and facilities. This commitment, however, is crucial to survival. As managers, we must cope with increasing ambiguity and uncertainty in the workplace. To survive these challenges, we must improve our interpersonal skills and ability to successfully bring out the best in others. I believe that success will continue for managers who not only increase their knowledge and technical ability, but who also inspire their workers to move forward with a collective sense of enthusiasm and purpose.

  13. 1 The Moral Imperative of Language and Communication in Culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    5 (6), Serial No. 23, November ... the argument of this paper, the analytic position that tends to reduce the role ... position is morality. .... greatest effect of culture. ..... for war, conflict, violence and hatred, which lives on in peoples memory” it.

  14. Cultural communication: Constructing new dialogues in relationship marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Aksaranuwat, P. B.

    2005-01-01

    The report attempts to deepen the understanding of the elements of culture and the trust building process that is essential to relationship marketing strategies. Looking at the supplier-client relationship between a French telecom company, Orange, and their target market in Bangkok, Thailand A questionnaire survey and semi-structure interview have been used as the tools to carry out this research. The main objective of this report is to correlate cultural studies with relationship marketing s...

  15. Improving Medical Decision Making and Health Promotion through Culture-Sensitive Health Communication: An Agenda for Science and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsch, Cornelia; Böhm, Robert; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Butler, Robb; Chapman, Gretchen B; Haase, Niels; Herrmann, Benedikt; Igarashi, Tasuku; Kitayama, Shinobu; Korn, Lars; Nurm, Ülla-Karin; Rohrmann, Bernd; Rothman, Alexander J; Shavitt, Sharon; Updegraff, John A; Uskul, Ayse K

    2016-10-01

    This review introduces the concept of culture-sensitive health communication. The basic premise is that congruency between the recipient's cultural characteristics and the respective message will increase the communication's effectiveness. Culture-sensitive health communication is therefore defined as the deliberate and evidence-informed adaptation of health communication to the recipients' cultural background in order to increase knowledge and improve preparation for medical decision making and to enhance the persuasiveness of messages in health promotion. To achieve effective health communication in varying cultural contexts, an empirically and theoretically based understanding of culture will be indispensable. We therefore define culture, discuss which evolutionary and structural factors contribute to the development of cultural diversity, and examine how differences are conceptualized as scientific constructs in current models of cultural differences. In addition, we will explicate the implications of cultural differences for psychological theorizing, because common constructs of health behavior theories and decision making, such as attitudes or risk perception, are subject to cultural variation. In terms of communication, we will review both communication strategies and channels that are used to disseminate health messages, and we will discuss the implications of cultural differences for their effectiveness. Finally, we propose an agenda both for science and for practice to advance and apply the evidence base for culture-sensitive health communication. This calls for more interdisciplinary research between science and practice but also between scientific disciplines and between basic and applied research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Environmental communication and the cultural politics of environmental citizenship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, J.; Harrison, C.M.; Filius, P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of how representatives from the public, private, and voluntary sectors of two cities [Nottingham (United Kingdom) and Eindhoven (The Netherlands)] responded to the challenge of communicating more effectively with citizens about issues of sustainability. The

  17. The Cross-Cultural Communicative Barriers in Interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽华

    2009-01-01

    @@ Since primitive society,people from different areas have had communication.Now,in this ever smaller wodd.people who speak different languages have more exchanges in every field.Oral interpretation appears as a useful and effective tool to facilitatecommunication.

  18. The Influence Of Cultural Diversity On Marketing Communication: A Case Of Africans And Indians In Durban, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Abosede Ijabadeniyi; Jeevarathnam Parthasarathy Govender; Dayaneethie Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the cultural diversity between Africans and Indians in Durban, South Africa, based on marketing communication. While cross-cultural marketing research has been concentrated on Western and Eastern societies, there is a lack of such research in Africa. The study examines the cultural values of Africans and Indians based on the individualism-collectivism cultural dimension, adapted to account for marketing communication-specific cultural values (MCSCV). The study was a qu...

  19. Selected Functions of Narrative Structures in the Process of Social and Cultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Alberski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The art of narrative stems from the art of rhetoric and modes of persuasion and in this meaning is understood not just as a form of entertainment but also as a tool of communication. Any narrative communicates and conveys a message. Narrative is an important aspect of culture and as a ubiquitous component of human communication is conveyed by different works of art (literature, music, painting, sculpture, and illustrates events, emotions, phenomena and occurrences. Narrative as a form of communication involves its participants, a teller and a receiver of the message. The relation and the distance between the participants of the narrative communication process may have a different configuration and presents different effect of closeness and distance in narrative. In this meaning narrative is not just the art of telling stories, but it serves various functions, it communicates information, expresses emotions and personal events, transmits morals and cultural knowledge, provides entertainment and also helps in many ways to depict thoughts and feelings, along with disclosing the beauty of language. Narrative knowledge and narrative perception of social and cultural processes, is one of the most natural ways for a human being to acquire and organize their knowledge about the world. The ability to create narratives leads to a better understanding of the surrounding reality, and significantly influences the interpretation of social and cultural relationships.

  20. Ethics and cultural barriers to communication: Net frontiers of the organization in the digital age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Chibás Ortiz

    2016-11-01

    This article describes synthetically the importance of ethics since the dawn of humanity to the present times, making emphasis on its importance for management. It presents the concept of cyberculture in the context of contemporary organizations, as well as various definitions of ethics, discussing the affective and intuitive aspects of it and not only rational. It shows the importance of Cultural Barriers to Communication to diagnose the existence of an ethical organizational environment. This study aimed to look at how to manifest some of the various relationships between ethics and Cultural Barriers to Communication in today's digital ecosystem, and to describe some of the contemporary organizational behavior on the Internet considered ethical and unethical through the analysis of cases. We conducted a qualitative theoretical research exploratory, using for this the literature, non-participant observation, as well as cases studies. It is noteworthy that to an ethical review at the present time it takes from a casuistic approach and not just a theoretical definition of ethics. The article tries to answer questions regarding how it manifests ethics in contemporary organizations that use profitable way the new communication technologies and some of them persist Cultural Barriers to Communication, described before in the physical world. The findings indicate that the advent of new communication technologies, is being built a new digital ethics, which involves new principles, rules and behaviors of society, organizations, employees and customers. Diagnosis of Cultural Barriers to Communication helps to see this process

  1. Cross-Cultural Communication Training for Students in Multidisciplinary Research Area of Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical Engineering makes multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others. Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop Biomedical Engineering. Communication is not easy in a multidisciplinary research area, because each area has its own background of thinking. Because each nation has its own background of culture, on the other hand, international communication is not easy, either. A cross-cultural student program has been designed for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area. Students from a variety of backgrounds of research area and culture have joined in the program: mechanical engineering, material science, environmental engineering, science of nursing, dentist, pharmacy, electronics, and so on. The program works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area of biomedical engineering. Foreign language and digital data give students chance to study several things: how to make communication precisely, how to quote previous data. The experience in the program helps students not only understand new idea in the laboratory visit, but also make a presentation in the international research conference. The program relates to author's several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross-cultural student camp, multi PhD theses, various affiliations, and the creation of the interdisciplinary department.

  2. Use of New Communication Technologies to Change NASA Safety Culture: Incorporating the Use of Blogs as a Fundamental Communications Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huls, Dale Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Blogs are an increasingly dominant new communication function on the internet. The power of this technology has forced media, corporations and government organizations to begin to incorporate blogging into their normal business practices. Blogs could be a key component to overcoming NASA's "silent safety culture." As a communications tool, blogs are used to establish trust primarily through the use of a personal voice style of writing. Dissenting voices can be raised and thoroughly vetted via a diversity of participation and experience without peer pressure or fear of retribution. Furthermore, the benefits of blogging as a technical resource to enhance safety are also discussed. The speed and self-vetting nature of blogging can allow managers and decision-makers to make more informed and therefore potentially better decisions with regard to technical and safety issues. Consequently, it is recommended that NASA utilize this new technology as an agent for cultural change.

  3. Intercultural marketing: Culture and its influence on the efficiency of Facebook marketing communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Copuš Lukáš

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with intercultural marketing, which is a combination of two different phenomena - marketing and culture. The first objective of the paper lies in providing theoretical definitions of the above-mentioned areas. Subsequently, the aim is to analyse marketing communication of the selected automotive companies and determine its efficiency on social media within the context of cultural differences and cultural forms as their manifestations. A considerable amount of literature has been published on intercultural marketing, but only a few studies have concentrated on the connection with modern communication tools – i.e. social media. The data come from a research conducted online focused on Facebook. In total 2606 posts on twenty Facebook profiles of selected automotive companies were analysed. Our findings show that the use of standardization and adaptation is not related to the efficiency of marketing communication of individual Facebook profiles. One of the factors that determine the efficiency is cultural specifics visible by cultural forms which were interpreted for each selected culture. The contribution and the originality of this paper lies in providing theoretical and practical information about cultural differences on social media not only for marketing managers operating in different cultures, but also for researchers interested in intercultural marketing.

  4. Studying Mobile Media Cultural Technologies, Mobile Communication, and the IPhone

    CERN Document Server

    Hjorth, Larissa; Richardson, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    The iPhone represents an important moment in both the short history of mobile media and the long history of cultural technologies. Like the Walkman of the 1980s, it marks a juncture in which notions about identity, individualism, lifestyle and sociality require rearticulation. this book explores not only the iPhone's particular characteristics, uses and "affects," but also how the "iPhone moment" functions as a barometer for broader patterns of change. In the iPhone moment, this study considers the convergent trajectories in the evolution of digital and mobile culture, and

  5. Criteria of selection of basic linguacultural units within the context of cross-cultural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalupo Olga Ivanovna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problems associated with the analysis and selection of basic linguacultural units that are necessary for a more effective cross-cultural communication. To make the process of dialogue between different cultures and languages more appropriate and productive, it is necessary to possess certain knowledge, skills, which are acquired by man in the process of learning. Important in our opinion in this area are the mastery means which will prepare the person to communicate in a different communicative space. Such means, in our opinion, are the basic linguacultural units, which are considered as carriers of information and expression of cultural identity. They inform choice contributes to a worldview, understanding linguacultural picture of the world community. The basis of selection of linguistic units on the following criteria: the information content, functionality, sufficiency, cultural identity, realism, pivotal importance to the basic sense, social and cultural significance. Application of the proposed criteria allowing more appropriate to make the selection of the material and linguacultural integral components of the scope of cross-cultural interaction, which are characterized by their relevant material necessary for an adequate understanding of the processes occurring in different communicative space.

  6. An Empirical Research on Cross-culture Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓思

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In 2008 I worked as an intern in marketing department in TESCO which is an international retailing company in Newcastle, UK as well as the interns and the other members of the marketing department were from different countries.Actually,the marketing department was a cross-culture group.In this paper I will write

  7. Innocents Abroad: The Politics of Cross-Cultural Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufva, Hannele

    Some failure types that occur in cross-cultural interactions are described, mainly from the point of view of Finns and Finland and from primarily anecdotal and "folk theoretical" data. Material from such sources as newspapers, joke collections, proverbs, and student experiences are used as the basis of the discussion. Non-grammatical errors, or…

  8. Communication and Culture in Ancient India and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Robert T.

    The rhetorical theories and practices of ancient India and China provide the themes of this book. An examination of the relationship between culture and rhetoric, East and West, opens the book. The rhetorical milieu of India, its philosophy, social system, and uses of speech, leads to a probing of the caste system and speech of the Brahmins.…

  9. Identification of Vocal Communication of Emotions Across Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ernst G.; Zautra, Alexander

    The experiment discussed in this report investigates cross cultural ability to decode emotive meaning in extra-verbal vocal expressions of mood. The principal expectation of the study is that primitive mood expressions are understood in much the same way in all the countries tested. The moods depicted in the study--angry, sad, happy, flirtatious,…

  10. The "saying is repeating" effect: dyadic communication can generate cultural stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratanova, Boyka; Kashima, Yoshi

    2014-01-01

    It has been long established that interpersonal communication underpins the existence of cultural stereotypes. However, research has either examined the formation of new or the maintenance of existing stereotypes. In a series of three studies, the present research bridges the gap between these phases by showing that newly formed stereotypes can spread through repeated dyadic communication with others. The stereotypic representation arose due to the audience tuning in to communication to a first audience. Further transmission to two types of subsequent audiences was simulated: a newcomer and an old-timer with an unknown attitude towards the target. A "saying-is-repeating" effect was obtained: the stereotypic representation was invariably transmitted to the newcomer, regardless of whether communicators personally believed in the bias; perceived group-level consensus moderated its transmission to the old-timer. These findings demonstrate that once a stereotypic representation is formed, it is likely to spread in a community and potentially become a cultural stereotype.

  11. Mission-Based Serious Games for Cross-Cultural Communication Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrider, Peter J.; Friedland, LeeEllen; Valente, Andre; Camacho, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate cross-cultural communication requires a critical skill set that is increasingly being integrated into regular military training regimens. By enabling a higher order of communication skills, military personnel are able to interact more effectively in situations that involve local populations, host nation forces, and multinational partners. The Virtual Cultural Awareness Trainer (VCAT) is specifically designed to help address these needs. VCAT is deployed by Joint Forces Command (JFCOM) on Joint Knowledge Online (JKO) as a means to provide online, mission-based culture and language training to deploying and deployed troops. VCAT uses a mix of game-based learning, storytelling, tutoring, and remediation to assist in developing the component skills required for successful intercultural communication in mission-based settings.

  12. Folk national culture as a means of forming norms of communication in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernushevich V. A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The best carriers of playing culture are children, who possess and enjoy it. Destroyed social kids’ structures, territorial kids’ associations (family, yard, village, street communities of children interrupted generally the process of culture transmission, reproduction and passing of communication tradition. And there is a need in social-state “revivification” (recovering folk games list and its’ players, enough for folk games reproduction process. Folk game includes particular properties of relations on the levels of physical and emotional, vocal interaction, imagery-symbolic filling, special features of clothes (all aspects of communication that constitute features of national culture of the nation and make from the nation the community of people very special and different from other communities and nations. Studying of correctional possibilities of folk games within the frames of playing agendas showed that their psychological and emotional resources provide the conditions for adoption by children the norms of communication.

  13. Peers, stereotypes and health communication through the cultural lens of adolescent Appalachian mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Elizabeth; Miller, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how young Appalachian mothers retrospectively construct sexual and reproductive health communication events. Sixteen in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with mothers between the ages of 18 and 22 from the South Central Appalachian region of the USA. Findings indicate that within this population, peer influence, stereotypes medical encounters and formal health education are experienced within a culture that exhibits tension between normalising and disparaging adolescent sexuality. Theoretical and applied implications acknowledge the role of Appalachian cultural values, including egalitarianism, traditional gender roles and fatalism, in understanding the social construction of young people's sexuality in this region. Practical implications for sexual education and the nature of communication in the healthcare setting can be applied to current education curricula and medical communication practices. We suggest that future programmes may be more effective if they are adapted to the specific culture within which they are taught.

  14. Mass communication and cultural identity: the unresolved issue of national sovereignty and cultural autonomy in the wake of new communication technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uche, L U

    1988-01-01

    The trend in modern mass communication appears to be toward the imposition of the cultural, economic, and political values of the societies with the most advanced communication and information technologies and media sources. The consequence of this reality is that the cultural values, national aspirations, economic needs, and political independence of developing countries are not taken into consideration. Thus, the national interests of African states make it imperative for them to carefully evaluate, assess, and examine the development of their present media structures and ownership patterns. If the mass media is privatized, their owners serve as mouthpieces for multinational corporations. This phenomenon can severely undermine African goals of self-sufficiency in food production and industrialization, political stability that guarantees territorial integrity, and preservation of the African culture. It is imperative that African governments do not allow big multinationals to take over the molding and control of public opinion. Although modern systems of communication are exceedingly expensive and sophisticated, ways must be found to make the media public utilities.

  15. Media Education towards peace cultures. Future professionals of the communication sector as citizens-mediators

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    Eloísa NOS ALDÁS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a pioneering experience for Spanish University Communication degrees. It deals with the elective subject «Audiovisual Discourses and Peace Culture» offered in the fourth year of the Audiovisual Communication University Degree at Universitat Jaume I of Castellón. This learning project is focused on the proposals of peace research as a complementary and coincident research and educative project to educommunication. In this course students realize their role as citizens professionals of communication, and, therefore, their responsibility and that of their communicative acts in the configuration of society and culture. It focuses on the possibilities and consequences of their discourses as mediators in public communication scenarios to participate of the debate towards cultures for peace. The paper shares the design, development and results of this subject during 6 years as a university teaching project that can be extrapolated to other learning contexts. It is presented as well as an epistemological and methodological reflection that can be applied to all main subjects in the different communication university curricula so that students graduate being prepared both from a technical and commercial perspective but also from an educommunicative, critical, civic, social and cultural one. This text pays special attention to the audiovisual examples (films and documentaries above all used in the classes, to the ideas commented on them and to the methods for analyzing them taught from a cultural efficacy perspective and with the aim of detecting the discourse strategies of awareness communication to train citizenry in conflict transformation and solidarity.

  16. [Basic study to establish medication safety culture with patient-commitment style in community pharmacy: An examination from meeting reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Mitsuko; Okuda, Noriko; Kosaka, Naohiro; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Matsuura, Masayoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Yamada, Rika

    2007-12-01

    Our group conducted a Medication Safety Culture Building Drive, enlisting the cooperation of pharmacy patients to clarify obstacles and verify the effect of the measures implemented. Pharmacists at 38 community pharmacies instituted a 3-month trial period of rigorous prescription confirmation by checking filled prescriptions against the accompanying drug information (DI) in the presence of patients at pharmacy counters, whenever prescription drugs were dispensed. During the first month, 29 pharmacies reported carrying out the program with the rate of patient coverage was over 50%; while 8 others reported that rate of patient coverage was less than 50%. Factors standing in the way of checking filled prescriptions with the patients could be characterized as "physical conditions," "prescription content," or "patient attributes." The measures devised to counter these obstacles all fell within the categories of "education of patients and pharmacists," "advance arrangements made in preparation for checking," "methods of checking and nature of items checked," "checking procedure," and "DI literature." After three month, 34 pharmacies reported that the effort had been effective. During the three months, the average implementation rate (patient coverage rate) was improved from 92.5% in April to 96.5% in June (ppatients' and pharmacists' awareness regarding dispensing error prevention, 2) Increase in patients' interest in, and understanding of, their own prescription medications, 3) Increase in patients' understanding about the efforts and in number of patients cooperating with the effort.

  17. ABOUT THE TRIAD OF EDUCATION, COMMUNICATION AND PEACE CULTURE. A OVERVIEW FROM ONTHOLOGY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE.

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    Rocio Belandria Cerdeira

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a framework to explore the relationship in the triade Educaction, Communication and Peace Culture since ontology of social science. The experience is part of the doctoral process. We worked discussing scientific texts, visions about science and to explore the process of generation theories into the triade. We conclude that the science demand news theoretical and philosophical constructs in order to Guild the peace from the education and communications.

  18. Media Education towards peace cultures. Future professionals of the communication sector as citizens-mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Nos Aldás, Eloísa

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a pioneering experience for Spanish University Communication degrees. It deals with the elective subject «Audiovisual Discourses and Peace Culture» offered in the fourth year of the Audiovisual Communication University Degree at Universitat Jaume I of Castellón. This learning project is focused on the proposals of peace research as a complementary and coincident research and educative project to educommunication. In this course students realize their role as citizens profe...

  19. Institutional comunication and cultural marketing: Peculiarities in museum communication within the framework of public relations

    OpenAIRE

    Camelia BURGHELE

    2011-01-01

    Cultural management theoreticians believe that the main target of museum communication is gaining knowledge on specific messages by as large a number of people as possible. Museum public relation practice – intensified and upgraded at the same time with the revolution of the new communication technologies – is both science and art which analyse certain tendences (in attitude, taste and informal) of anticipating their consequences for implementing certain museum offer programs to appeal to the...

  20. The Effectiveness of Somatization in Communicating Distress in Korean and American Cultural Contexts

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    Eunsoo eChoi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has documented that Asians tend to somatize negative experiences to a greater degree than Westerners. It is posited that somatization may be a more functional communication strategy in Korean than American context. We examined the effects of somatization in communications of distress among participants from the US and Korea. We predicted that the communicative benefits of somatic words used in distress narratives would depend on the cultural contexts. In Study 1, we found that Korean participants used more somatic words to communicate distress than US participants. Among Korean participants, but not US participants, use of somatic words predicted perceived effectiveness of the communication and expectations of positive reactions (e.g., empathy from others. In study 2, we found that when presented with distress narratives of others, Koreans (but not Americans showed more sympathy in response to narratives using somatic words than narratives using emotional words. These findings suggest that cultural differences in use of somatization may reflect differential effectiveness of somatization in communicating distress across cultural contexts.

  1. The Effectiveness of Somatization in Communicating Distress in Korean and American Cultural Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Chentsova-Dutton, Yulia; Parrott, W Gerrod

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has documented that Asians tend to somatize negative experiences to a greater degree than Westerners. It is posited that somatization may be a more functional communication strategy in Korean than American context. We examined the effects of somatization in communications of distress among participants from the US and Korea. We predicted that the communicative benefits of somatic words used in distress narratives would depend on the cultural contexts. In Study 1, we found that Korean participants used more somatic words to communicate distress than US participants. Among Korean participants, but not US participants, use of somatic words predicted perceived effectiveness of the communication and expectations of positive reactions (e.g., empathy) from others. In Study 2, we found that when presented with distress narratives of others, Koreans (but not Americans) showed more sympathy in response to narratives using somatic words than narratives using emotional words. These findings suggest that cultural differences in use of somatization may reflect differential effectiveness of somatization in communicating distress across cultural contexts.

  2. Developing English Communication Skills in a Different Cultural Context: Matches and Mismatches

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    Nicoleta-Mariana IFTIMIE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is common knowledge that from among all the languages in the world, English has acquired the status of ‘lingua franca’, i.e., the language that is used in international communication across countries, the language that enables people of different ethnic, national and cultural backgrounds to share with others their ideas and cultures. The use of English as an international language has resulted in a growing number of people who learn and speak this language all over the world. This has important consequences for English language teaching practices, which need to aim at developing the learners’ social and professional communication skills, while catering for the dimension of intercultural communication, placed against the local cultural-educational context. This paper shares the author’s experience of developing the students’ communication skills by means of oral presentation projects in two parts of the world in which English is taught as a foreign language – Romania and Taiwan. After a brief literature review, the study compares and contrasts the two different contexts of learning. The last part of the paper presents the methodological choices made in order to reconcile the global requirement of developing the students’ communicative competence with the local issues connected to the host culture complex. While most of the studies concerned with the teaching of English as Foreign Language in the Asia Pacific region offer either the point of view of the source culture teacher or that of the target culture (native speaker of English teacher, this paper presents the perspective of a non-native teacher of English who belongs to a third culture.

  3. Assimilating to Hierarchical Culture: A Grounded Theory Study on Communication among Clinical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MinYoung; Oh, Seieun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate a substantive model that accounts for the explanatory social processes of communication in which nurses were engaged in clinical settings in Korea. Grounded theory methodology was used in this study. A total of 15 clinical nurses participated in the in-depth interviews. "Assimilating to the hierarchical culture" emerged as the basic social process of communication in which the participants engaged in their work environments. To adapt to the cultures of their assigned wards, the nurses learned to be silent and engaged in their assimilation into the established hierarchy. The process of assimilation consisted of three phases based on the major goals that nurses worked to achieve: getting to know about unspoken rules, persevering within the culture, and acting as senior nurse. Seven strategies and actions utilized to achieve the major tasks emerged as subcategories, including receiving strong disapproval, learning by observing, going silent, finding out what is acceptable, minimizing distress, taking advantages as senior nurse, and taking responsibilities as senior nurse. The findings identified how the pattern of communication in nursing organizations affected the way in which nurses were assimilated into organizational culture, from individual nurses' perspectives. In order to improve the rigid working atmosphere and culture in nursing organizations and increase members' satisfaction with work and quality of life, managers and staff nurses need training that focuses on effective communication and encouraging peer opinion-sharing within horizontal relationships. Moreover, organization-level support should be provided to create an environment that encourages free expression.

  4. The Cultural Content of Chinese and English Expressions in the Context of Intercultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔慈行

    2016-01-01

    Globalization, informatization and digitalization have been the prevailing trends in the world with the advent of 21st century. Under these circumstances, people from different countries are increasingly connecting among each other. Certainly no one can parry this trend or ignore the importance of communication. Consequently, intercultural communications occur here and there in a variety of fields, let alone cultural interactions between different regions. This paper mainly focuses on the following categories:color items, animals and idioms and allusions, which can be seen as a perfect miniature for the differences of intercul-tural communication.

  5. Master's Degree Program in Scientific and Cultural Communication: Preliminary reports on an innovative experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Vogt

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multidisiciplinary Master’s Degree Program in Scientific and Cultural Communication (MDCC began in the first semester of 2007. It is offered by the Laboratory of Advanced Studies in Journalism (Labjor of the Creativity Development Nucleus (NUDECRI and by the Institute of Language Studies (IEL, both of which are entities the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP. The program is also supported by the Department of Scientific and Technological Policy (DPCT of the Geosciences Institute (IG and by MediaTec – Media and Communication Technologies Laboratory of the Multimedia Department (DMM of the Art Institute (IA. The objective of the MDCC is to train and enable researchers with in-depth theoretical knowledge about current questions related to science communication. A global vision of the systems of science and technology are joined together with an understanding of a solid, contemporary literary and cultural repertoire. The interaction among subjects offered in the MDCC seeks to provide an education that allows critical reflection about the main accomplishments of science, technology and culture in our current society and the way in which the mass or specialized media have worked in order to communicate these accomplishments. The areas of research focus on the analysis of cultural production and science communication within the most diverse means of information, such as print, radio, television and electronic media. There is a special emphasis on areas such as science and technical history and the sociology of science, as well as other spaces of science and cultural communication, such as museums, forums and events.

  6. Communication and cultural interaction in health promotion strategies to migrant populations in Italy: the cross-cultural phone counselling experience

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    Filippo Maria Taglieri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the last 10 years migration processes have progressively increased worldwide and in Italy about 5 millions of residing migrants are estimated. To meet health needs of these new residents, effective relational and communication tools, which allow a reciprocal intercultural interaction within health care structures, are therefore necessary. AIM: This article faces the main features of the relational-communication processes associated with health promotion and care in the migrant population in Italy to the aim of identifying the key and critical points within the interaction between different cultures, focusing on the role of specific professional figures, including cultural mediators and health educators. RESULTS: Within the activity of HIV phone counselling operated by Psyco-socio-behavioural, Communication and Training Operating Unit of National Institute of Health in Italy, an intercultural approach was successfully experienced in a project targeted to migrants (2007-2008. Specifically, the presence of cultural mediators answering in the languages of main migrants' groups allowed the increase of calls from migrant people and of the information provided.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Bacteria Communication in Continuous Cultures

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    Maria Vittoria Barbarossa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing is a bacterial cell-to-cell communication mechanism and is based on gene regulatory networks, which control and regulate the production of signaling molecules in the environment. In the past years, mathematical modeling of quorum sensing has provided an understanding of key components of such networks, including several feedback loops involved. This paper presents a simple system of delay differential equations (DDEs for quorum sensing of Pseudomonas putida with one positive feedback plus one (delayed negative feedback mechanism. Results are shown concerning fundamental properties of solutions, such as existence, uniqueness, and non-negativity; the last feature is crucial for mathematical models in biology and is often violated when working with DDEs. The qualitative behavior of solutions is investigated, especially the stationary states and their stability. It is shown that for a certain choice of parameter values, the system presents stability switches with respect to the delay. On the other hand, when the delay is set to zero, a Hopf bifurcation might occur with respect to one of the negative feedback parameters. Model parameters are fitted to experimental data, indicating that the delay system is sufficient to explain and predict the biological observations.

  8. TV Commercials as Authentic Materials to Teach Communication, Culture and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkaya, Odilea Rocha

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of using authentic materials to teach foreign students to communicate in English in a natural way, teach them about the target culture, and help them to engage in critical thinking. Since authentic materials have been defined in various ways, this researcher has chosen for this article two definitions which…

  9. Socio-cultural difference in doctor-patient communication in the European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Meeuwesen, L.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: In medical encounters, good doctor-patient communication is of utmost importance in the health care process. The influence of doctor, patients and organizational charactersitics has been showed in many studies. Scarce studies have indicated the importance of cultural characteristics on communi

  10. Intercultural Awareness: Modelling an Understanding of Cultures in Intercultural Communication through English as a Lingua Franca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2011-01-01

    The use of English as a global lingua franca (ELF) raises challenges concerning how we understand the relationship between languages and cultures in intercultural communication. In the dynamic contexts of ELF this relationship needs to be viewed as situated and emergent entailing a new approach to understanding intercultural competence in…

  11. Integrated French and Spanish Curricula: Language Planning, Communicative, Linguistic and Cultural Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony

    Two guides are presented to assist in organization of a thematic approach to instruction in French and Spanish that is helpful in integrating language and culture. Each booklet contains the following elements: (1) a general introduction to the factors that must be present in the teaching situation for real communication to take place, and to…

  12. Cross-Cultural Communication and Collaboration: Case of an International e-Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, Elif; Genc-Kumtepe, Evrim

    2014-01-01

    Communication is an indispensable part of international cooperation and it requires managing different cultures. Being prepared to see and understand different values, trying to understand contrasting views in a consortium, can decrease the potential of misperception which otherwise may act as a real barrier to cooperation. This is why…

  13. Cross-Cultural Blunders in Professional Communication from a Semantic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pinfan

    2010-01-01

    Cross-cultural blunders caused by inappropriate use of language are a common problem in international professional communication. They cause misunderstanding, lead to business failures, and tend to be offensive at times. Such blunders may occur in business ads, slogans, products names, and instructions. Understanding their causes and finding…

  14. Cross Currents: Communication/Language/Cross-Cultural Skills, Volume X, Number 1, Spring 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasky, Andrew, Ed.; Brooks, Lori B., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The tenth anniversary issue of this journal contains eight articles on English teaching approaches and cross cultural communication. The articles address the following topics: textual cohesion devices, English negation, reading instruction, discourse intonation as an approach to teaching pronunciation, interpretive oral reading as a learning…

  15. Integrating Compliance, Communication, and Culture: Delivering Health Care to an Aging Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Nieli

    2008-01-01

    Older adults often get lost in the process of assessment, diagnosis and service brokering. If our concern as care providers is to enable older persons to remain independent or in the community for as long as possible, we must tap into their personal values, cultural identity and health beliefs in order to foster enhanced health care communication.…

  16. Contrastive analysis of politeness between Chinese and western in cross-cultural communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪荟瑾

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a contrastive study on politeness principles and politeness strategies between western and Chinese which plays an important role in establishing and maintaining social harmony. This thesis aims to discuss the cultural differences between western and Chinese which will enhance our intercultural awareness and communicative competence.

  17. The Corporate Communication Culture Project: Studying the Real World of Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, James T.; Kuseski, Brenda K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a business communication class assignment that helps students discover the assumptions and expectations of business culture, and develop the skills needed for the world of work in at least four areas: team skills; time and project management skills; use of technology to research, prepare, and present the project; and networking with…

  18. Organizational Culture--A Focus on Contemporary Theory/Research in Organizational Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotirin, Patricia J.

    Defining organizational culture as the amalgam of beliefs, mythology, values, and rituals that, even more than its products, differentiates it from other organizations, this paper demonstrates its utility as a synthesizing focus on current ideas about communication in organizations. Modes of thought, dominant paradigms, perspectives on…

  19. Socio-cultural difference in doctor-patient communication in the European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Meeuwesen, L.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: In medical encounters, good doctor-patient communication is of utmost importance in the health care process. The influence of doctor, patients and organizational charactersitics has been showed in many studies. Scarce studies have indicated the importance of cultural characteristics on

  20. A Confrontation with Diversity: Communication and Culture in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloway-Thomas, Carolyn; Garner, Thurmon

    2000-01-01

    Explores the framework of "creolization" and its implications for the communication discipline. Examines social and cultural factors that could shape the nature and content of persuasion in the 21st century. Emphasizes the intersection between deterritorialization and diversity. Proposes a research agenda that will include collections of…

  1. Intercultural Awareness: Modelling an Understanding of Cultures in Intercultural Communication through English as a Lingua Franca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2011-01-01

    The use of English as a global lingua franca (ELF) raises challenges concerning how we understand the relationship between languages and cultures in intercultural communication. In the dynamic contexts of ELF this relationship needs to be viewed as situated and emergent entailing a new approach to understanding intercultural competence in…

  2. Information and Communication Technology and Cultural Change How ICT Changes Self-Construal and Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Nina; Postmes, Tom; van der Vinne, Nikita; van Thiel, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies whether and how information and communication technology (ICT) changes self-construal and cultural values in a developing country. Ethiopian children were given laptops in the context of an ICT for development scheme. We compared children who used laptops (n = 69) with a control g

  3. Overcoming health care disparities via better cross-cultural communication and health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra-Hebert, Anita D; Isaacson, J Harry

    2012-02-01

    Health care disparities have multiple causes; the dynamics of the physician-patient encounter is one of the causes that can be modified. Here, we discuss specific recommendations related to cross-cultural communication and health literacy as practical steps to providing more equitable health care to all patients.

  4. Can dimensions of national culture predict cross-national differences in medical communication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwesen, L.; Brink, A. van den; Hofstede, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated at a country level how cross-national differences in medical communication can be understood from the first four of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, i.e. power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity, together with nati

  5. Concentration, financiarisation et relations entre les industries de la culture et industries de la communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Bouquillion

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cette contribution se propose d’étudier comment les transformations récentes dans les modalités de concentration, de financiarisation et d’articulation entre industries de la culture et industries de la communication contribuent à transformer les logiques qui président à la constitution des groupes industriels dans ces deux domaines et comment elles impactent les rapports de force entre ces deux types d’industries. Trois transformations principales sont relevées. Tout d’abord, l’entrée des acteurs des industries de la communication dans l’économie des contenus est massive bien que surtout concentrée sur l’aval des filières. Elle contribue aux difficultés des acteurs des industries de la culture. Ensuite, l’insertion dans la financiarisation dynamise surtout, dans la période actuelle, les acteurs des industries de la communication. Enfin, les groupes des industries de la culture ont connu, pour nombre d’entre eux, une réduction de leur périmètre et sont menacés d’être dominés par les grands acteurs des industries de la communication, lesquels ont conquis une puissance très forte depuis le milieu des années 2000.This contribution analyses how the recent transformations in the modalities of concentration, financialization and articulation between cultural industries and communications industries contribute to transform the logics which preside over the constitution of the industrial groups in these two domains and how they impact on the balance of power between these two types of industries. Three main transformations are found. First of all, the entrance of the actors of the communications industries to the economy of the contents is massive although especially concentrated downstream of the sectors. It contributes to the difficulties of the actors of the cultural industries. Then, the insertion in the financialization revitalizes especially, for the current period, the actors of the communications

  6. Evaluation of an intervention on socio cultural communication skills of international nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Shen, Jay; Bolstad, Anne L; Covelli, Margaret; Torpey, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    International nurses face a myriad of challenges in their transition, adaptation, and integration into the U.S. health care environment. This pilot intervention study examined socio-cultural competence regarding communication in a sample of international nurses working in two community hospitals in southern Nevada. Significant improvement in communication behaviors of the sampled international nurses with regard to socio-cultural skills of communication after the workshop intervention were not found. Similarly, there were no remarkable differences in standardized patient comments for most items on the checklist. However, the sampled international nurses demonstrated some highly desirable qualities such as being very personable, caring, and compassion that appeared to lay a foundation for an effective nurse-patient relationship.

  7. Communication as a strategic resource to promote Italian Institutes of Culture

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    Graziano Serragiotto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the ways in which Italy presents itself to the world is through the Italian Institute of Culture (IIC, an institution that aims at offering a cross-section of the Italian world and at the same time disseminating the rationale for its own existence. The IIC acknowledges and embraces the historical, political, and linguistic evolution of Italy and regards these as constitutional factors of its identity. In this article, we first provide background information about the Institute and display the key principles that determine how communication with outside communities takes place. Next, we adopt a theoretical model of communication in order to show how communication in and of itself has the potential to lead individuals on a path of cultural appreciation, as well as towards an appreciation for and acquisition of the Italian language.

  8. The Impact of Culture on International Management: A Survey of Project Communications in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun Tran

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the results of an exploratory survey of construction industry managersin Singapore to isolate some of the common effects of national and organisational culture,together with the personal characteristics of managers, on the efficacy of project communication.By examination of significant correlation coefficients, the various types of influencesare identified. The results of the research suggest that the managers’ attitude andbehaviours toward communication may be guided to large extent by their level of competence.The study also provides evidence to suggest that the individuals’ understanding ofthe communication process and its barriers, the way they behave with other individualsand expect to be treated, varies according to national cultures.

  9. Satisfaction with a 2-day communication skills course culturally tailored for medical specialists in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L; Alyafei, Khalid; Afana, Abdelhamid; Al-Romaihi, Sheyma; Yassin, Mohammed; Elnashar, Maha; Al-Arab, Banan; Al-Khal, Abdullatif

    2017-01-01

    Health-care communication skills training may be particularly needed in the Arabian Gulf countries because of the variety of cultures within the physician and patient populations. This study describes the implementation and results of a communication skills training program for physicians in Qatar that assessed previous training, and effect of previous training on participants' course evaluations. We conducted a 2-day communication skills training course covering seven culturally adapted modules. Educational strategies included large and small group work with the standardized patient, demonstration videos, and lectures. At the end, participants completed a course evaluation survey. Data analysis performed with SPSS; frequencies and percentages were calculated, and Chi-square test applied to evaluate statistical significance. A total of 410 physicians in Qatar have participated in the course over a period of 2 years. Evaluation ratings of the course were high. Participants rated the module on Breaking Bad News as the most useful, and the small group role-play as the most helpful course component. One-third of participants had previously participated in experiential communication skills training. There was no association between previous experience and evaluation of the course. Physicians in Qatar positively evaluated a 2-day communication skills course, though the majority of participants did not have any previous exposure to experiential communication skills training.

  10. 基于上下级关系的沟通开放性对组织承诺的影响研究%Impact of Communication Openness to Organizational Commitment Based on Superior-Subordinate Relationships

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘彧彧; 黄小科; 丁国林; 严肃

    2011-01-01

    This research is established in Chinese context, and by measuring a sample of 315 employees from Chinese enterprises, it attempts to examine the impacts of communication openness on organizational commitment and the mediating effects of leader-member exchange and Guanxi in this process. Also, we explore the impacts of age, education, position level on these variables. The main findings are shown as follows. Firstly, communication openness is significantly related to LMX,guanxi and organizational commitment. Secondly, guanxi fully mediates the relationship between communication openness and organizational commitment. Thirdly, LMX doesn't mediate the relationship between communication openness and organizational commitment directly. This research finds that personal guanxi between supervisor and subordinate plays an important role in Chinese enterprises, and the suggestions for Chinese enterprises from the result are as follows. Chinese enterprises should build effective formal communication networks to ensure that any information can transmit without obstacle. Supervisors should be more open to subordinates, especially strengthen the initiative of communication. In addition to formal LMX, supervisors need to keep good personal guanxi with subordinates, and spend time caring them to win subordinates' commitment, thus increase employees' organizational commitment.%对315位中国企业的员工进行测试,探讨沟通开放性对组织承诺的影响以及领导-成员交换和"关系"在此过程中的中介作用,并考察年龄、学历、职位级别等个人特征对各变量的影响.研究结论表明:①组织中沟通开放性对员工组织承诺有正向的影响;②沟通开放性对领导-成员交换和上下级"关系"均有正向的影响;③"关系"在沟通开放性与员工组织承诺的关系中起完全中介作用;④领导-成员交换不直接在沟通开放性与员工组织承诺的关系中起中介作用.在此基础上对中国企业提

  11. Implementing guidelines and training initiatives to improve cross-cultural communication in primary care consultations: a qualitative participatory European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, E.; Gravenhorst, K.; Dowrick, C.; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van; Driessen Mareeuw, F.A. van den; Brun, T. de; Burns, N.; Lionis, C.; Mair, F.S.; O'Donnell, C.; O'Reilly-de Brun, M.; Papadakaki, M.; Saridaki, A.; Spiegel, W.; Weel, C. van; Muijsenbergh, M.E.T.C. van den; Macfarlane, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cross-cultural communication in primary care is often difficult, leading to unsatisfactory, substandard care. Supportive evidence-based guidelines and training initiatives (G/TIs) exist to enhance cross cultural communication but their use in practice is sporadic. The objective of this

  12. Appreciating the ties that bind technical communication to culture: A dynamic model to help us understand differences in discourse structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter; Kampf, Constance

    In order to support an explicit understanding of cultural patterns as both dynamic and structured, we will examine Hofstede?s model for stabilization of cultural patterns, and use this model to explore some cultural consequences for patterns of logic and signs that influence the effectiveness...... of technical communication across cultures. In order to demonstrate the model, we will apply it to examples from different cultures, which show different patterns of logic, terminology and conventions. In light of these examples, we propose that cross-cultural technical communication studies can be situated...

  13. Study on Countermeasures of Language Exchange and Cultural Commu-nication along“the Belt and Road”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Zi-yu

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the language and cultural status along“the Belt and Road”, points out the importance of lan-guage and cultural communication to realize the“the Belt and Road”initiative, and put forward that our country should use vari-ous channels to spread the cultural connotation of“the Belt and Road”initiative, spread, study and absorb excellent culture of countries along“the Belt and Road”in spirits of open and inclusive, and enhance public support by cultural communication to promote economic cooperation, cultural prosperity and innovation of countries along the“the Belt and Road”.

  14. Improving safety culture on adult medical units through multidisciplinary teamwork and communication interventions: the TOPS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, M A; Sehgal, N L; Alldredge, B K; Gearhart, S; Auerbach, A A; Wachter, R M

    2010-08-01

    The goal of this project was to improve unit-based safety culture through implementation of a multidisciplinary (pharmacy, nursing, medicine) teamwork and communication intervention. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was used to determine the impact of the training with a before-after design. Surveys were returned from 454 healthcare staff before the training and 368 staff 1 year later. Five of eleven safety culture subscales showed significant improvement. Nurses perceived a stronger safety culture than physicians or pharmacists. While it is difficult to isolate the effects of the team training intervention from other events occurring during the year between training and postevaluation, overall the intervention seems to have improved the safety culture on these medical units.

  15. Developing Communicative and Cultural Competences in Portuguese through an Online Collaborative Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Revheim Cunha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lessons should provide opportunities to use language in relevant ways. Cultural awareness is essential, as studying a language implies learning its cultural values. ACTFL advocates that cultural understanding is vital to prepare students for the demands of today’s globalized world. The U.S. Dept. of Education National Education Technology Plan (2010 claims that learning by technology “prepares them [students] to be more productive members of a globally competitive workforce”(p. xi. In order to promote a communicative experience with a cultural focus, the concepts of collaboration and autonomy were applied in a project where students used a Brazilian website and learned about the importance of a community tradition called Amigo Secreto. Students write personal descriptions and interact online. On the last day of class, students describe their secret friends and the class must guess who they are. The objectives are for students to work collaboratively, use authentic language and improve cultural knowledge.

  16. Culture and Social Relationship as Factors of Affecting Communicative Non-verbal Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter Lipi, Afia; Nakano, Yukiko; Rehm, Mathias

    The goal of this paper is to link a bridge between social relationship and cultural variation to predict conversants' non-verbal behaviors. This idea serves as a basis of establishing a parameter based socio-cultural model, which determines non-verbal expressive parameters that specify the shapes of agent's nonverbal behaviors in HAI. As the first step, a comparative corpus analysis is done for two cultures in two specific social relationships. Next, by integrating the cultural and social parameters factors with the empirical data from corpus analysis, we establish a model that predicts posture. The predictions from our model successfully demonstrate that both cultural background and social relationship moderate communicative non-verbal behaviors.

  17. Interdisciplinary Area of Research Offers Tool of Cross-Cultural Understanding: Cross-Cultural Student Seminar for Communication Training on Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Misunderstanding often occurs in a multidisciplinary field of study, because each field has its own background of thinking. Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop the multidisciplinary field of study. Because each nation has its own cultural background, communication in an international seminar is not easy, either. A cross-cultural student seminar has been designed for communication training in the multidisciplinary field of study. Students from a variety of back grounds have joined in the seminar. Both equations and figures are effective tools for communication in the field of science. The seminar works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary field of study of biomedical engineering. An interdisciplinary area of research offers the tool of cross-cultural understanding. The present study refers to author's several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross-cultural student camp, multi PhD theses, various affiliations, and the creation of the interdisciplinary department.

  18. Communicating Culture: An Exploratory Study of the Key Concepts in Maori Culture on Maori Web Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko J Kovacic

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine how accurately the belief system or cultural concepts of Maori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, is reconstructed in the virtual world of the Internet. Nine Maori web sites were searched using a list of 44 key concepts in Maori culture. We registered how many pages within a particular web site contain each of the key concepts. These numbers were set up in a data matrix for further statistical analysis. The Multidimensional Scaling method was used to construct a spatial representation of Maori web sites in the space generated by the key concepts in Maori culture. Using the correlation coefficients between derived dimensions and the key concepts we interpreted three dimensions as General Cultural, Intra-tribe Dynamics and Educational. The position of each Maori web site in this space has been located and described.

  19. A Brief Analysis on Cross-cultural Communication Strategy of Chinese Films under the Context of Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Zhiyong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of globalization waves, the cross-cultural communication becomes more and more common nowadays. Chinese films, as a kind of mass media and the carrier of ideology, must meet the challenge in the world with active attitudes and take part in cross-cultural communication worldwide extensively. The context of globalization is not only a challenge but also an opportunity for Chinese films and if Chinese films want to be successful in the process of cross-cultural communication, it must find out a conjoint point between globalization and location to implement dual-coding of them. With the objective of consensus but different for the cultural demands of cross-cultural communication, the communicational strategies in culture,subject,art and operation must extensively use for reference and boldly create to renew the situation of Chinese films.

  20. Communication for HIV/AIDS prevention in Kenya: social-cultural considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muturi, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is spreading fast in Africa in spite of the various efforts and resources put in place to prevent it. In Kenya, reproductive health programs have used the mass media and other communication interventions to inform and educate the public about the disease and to promote behavior change and healthy sexual practices. This effort has led to a discrepancy between awareness and behavioral change among people of reproductive age. In this article I examine the discrepancy in Kenya from a communications perspective addressing social cultural and related factors contributing to the lack of change in behavior and sexual practices. I draw on the theoretical framework of Grunig's model of excellence in communication, the importance of understanding and relationship building between programs and their stakeholders. Data were gathered qualitatively using focus groups and in-depth interviews among men and women in rural Kenya. Key findings indicate that although awareness of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS is high in Kenya, a majority of the population, particularly those in the rural communities, lack understanding of the communicated messages. They also lack the knowledge of other ways of transmitting HIV particularly among those not sexually involved. Cultural beliefs, values, norms, and myths have played a role in the rapidly increasing epidemic in the rural communities and yet HIV/AIDS communication programs have not addressed these factors adequately. I conclude that successful behavior change communication must include strategies that focus on increasing understanding of the communicated messages and understanding of the audience through application of appropriate methodologies. Building a relationship with the audience or stakeholders through dialogues and two-way symmetrical communication contributes toward this understanding and the maintenance of the newly

  1. Teaching Health Sciences Students about Culturally Sensitive Communication between Health Professionals and Patients from Diverse Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Mónica; Pena, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    As members of a nationally accredited research project (I?+?D+i) InterMED (ref.: FF2011-25500) being carried out in the field of Intercultural Mediation, we are aware of the mediator's delicate role in communicative interactions between health professionals and foreign population. Sales has pointed out the dangers of stereotyping minorities and…

  2. Study protocol for improving asthma outcomes through cross-cultural communication training for physicians: a randomized trial of physician training

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Massive resources are expended every year on cross-cultural communication training for physicians. Such training is a focus of continuing medical education nationwide and is part of the curriculum of virtually every medical school in America. There is a pressing need for evidence regarding the effects on patients of cross-cultural communication training for physicians. There is a need to understand the added benefit of such training compared to more general communication. We know o...

  3. Supportive Care: Communication Strategies to Improve Cultural Competence in Shared Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Edwina A; Bekker, Hilary L; Davison, Sara N; Koffman, Jonathan; Schell, Jane O

    2016-08-10

    Historic migration and the ever-increasing current migration into Western countries have greatly changed the ethnic and cultural patterns of patient populations. Because health care beliefs of minority groups may follow their religion and country of origin, inevitable conflict can arise with decision making at the end of life. The principles of truth telling and patient autonomy are embedded in the framework of Anglo-American medical ethics. In contrast, in many parts of the world, the cultural norm is protection of the patient from the truth, decision making by the family, and a tradition of familial piety, where it is dishonorable not to do as much as possible for parents. The challenge for health care professionals is to understand how culture has enormous potential to influence patients' responses to medical issues, such as healing and suffering, as well as the physician-patient relationship. Our paper provides a framework of communication strategies that enhance crosscultural competency within nephrology teams. Shared decision making also enables clinicians to be culturally competent communicators by providing a model where clinicians and patients jointly consider best clinical evidence in light of a patient's specific health characteristics and values when choosing health care. The development of decision aids to include cultural awareness could avoid conflict proactively, more productively address it when it occurs, and enable decision making within the framework of the patient and family cultural beliefs.

  4. Comparison And Application Of Table Manners In Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊屹

    2015-01-01

    Table etiquette reflects the social-cultural meaning and values of a nation. With the development of China’s opening-up, and more western culture gets into our sights. The dining table is one of the most important places where good manners are displayed. Elegant manners at the table may bring friendship and even success. The different table manners between Chinese and British are the core of this thesis. By comparison of table manners between China and Britain, the thesis aims to make a research on the cultural differences in seating arrangement, using tableware, serving order, dining atmosphere and toasting. Furthermore, this paper displays some taboos of table manners in Chinese and British dinners, which helps a better understanding of the customs.Also,the author collected some business etiquette used in real commercial field and do a lot of investigations. With the comparative research into cultural contrast of table manners in China and Britain, I suggest that you should combine the theory and practice of table manners, understand each cultural background clearly and deeply. Therefore, we can take a better utilization of table manners in social communication and commercial affairs. I hope this paper can help people achieve a successful cross-cultural communication.

  5. Communication design for cultural heritage: disclose the identity of Ascoli Piceno experimenting with signs and symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Orfeo Oppedisano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Design for the valorisation of cultural heritage, activates some skills useful for initiating systemic processes integrated, promoting a more suitable interaction between the actors involved in the valuation of assets. In particular, communication design is a discipline that operates in the contemporary age by relating different cultural topics. It contributes to the promotion of the heritage, using the potential offered by new forms of communication, creating new systems or tools to build effective and participatory communicative relations. In this framework, the article shows and explains some experiments, about visual artifacts for cultural heritage of the city of Ascoli Piceno in order to rediscover its identity and to improve its peculiarities, carried out during a creative workshop. The workshop proposed to combine different design methods in order to offer the opportunity to develop an original approach to visual design, able to identify, in visual form, properties and characteristic of the city and its territory, as well as effective configurations to communicate it to the community. For this reason the workshop provided some methodological guidelines for the development of a design process of visual identity, through the integration of traditional operating procedures, such as watercolour drawing, and digital, such as video mapping.

  6. Cultural competency and communication skills of dental students: clinical supervisors' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, R; Ghanim, A; Morgan, M; Barrow, S

    2016-07-15

    This study explored clinical supervisor's (CS) views and experiences of dental students' cultural competence (CC) at the Melbourne Dental School, The University of Melbourne, Australia. Additionally, this study explored CS insights into how CC could be taught. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were organised with consenting CS. Interview topics included the following: the importance of CC, communication and rapport, the role of culture in oral health and the need for curriculum enhancement. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed to identify key areas using NVivo software. A total of 12 CS participated in this study. CS acknowledged the importance of CC and felt that it was important for good patient management. CS's definition of CC focused primarily on language and communication skills. CS felt that dental students were generally able to manage culturally diverse patients. However, CS indicated that additional training in this area would be beneficial. Concerns were raised about the students' ability to establish good rapport and communication, with CS highlighting areas such as misuse of interpreters and use of jargon. CS felt that clinical experience, confidence and a positive attitude are effective tools for overcoming cultural barriers. Furthermore, some CS also felt that cultural competency was a skill that is learnt through experience. For most CS, cultural competence was an important part of the clinician-patient exchange which would benefit from enhanced curriculum. They also highlighted areas where transcultural education could be improved. The majority of CS believed dental students managed culturally diverse patients well. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Analysis of Enterprise Sports Culture Festival Effects on Employees' Organizational Commitment and Job Performance%企业体育文化节对员工组织承诺和工作绩效的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢碧荣; 兰翔

    2015-01-01

    本文以参加泉州某企业举办的体育文化节员工为调查对象,通过企业体育文化节中介变量,探讨员工在参与后对企业组织承诺与个人工作绩效影响情况.结果显示:员工参与体育文化节后,对组织承诺和工作绩效具有显著提高;员工组织承诺和工作绩效具有显著正相关;不同性别和婚姻状况的员工在总体组织承诺及三维度都未达到显著性差异.而不同年龄阶段、服务年限、职务的员工在总体组织承诺及三维度认知上均存在显著性差异.%This paper, to participate in an enterprise organized the sports culture festival staff as investigation object, through corporate sports festival mediating variables, explores employee commitment and participation in the impact of the situation on individual job performance organization. The results show: after employee participation in sports and cultural holiday, organizational commitment and job performance have improved significantly;organizational commitment and job performance has a significant positive correlation; employees of different gender and marital status in the overall organizational commitment and three dimensions do not reach significance differences. The different age, length of service, staff duties are significant differences in the overall three-dimensional degree of organizational commitment and awareness.

  8. Press advertisements for food in Spain: Cultural orientations and communicative style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel García-Yeste

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the impact of cultural values on the design and communicative style of Spanish graphic advertising for food and beverages. More specifically, the influence of Hall’s (1976: 101 “context dependence” and Hofstede’s (1994: 51 “individualism index” is surveyed. Guillén-Nieto’s (2009 table of hypothetical correlations between culture and communicative style is adapted for the analysis of 100 Spanish advertisements at the macro- and microlinguistic levels. The study is organised in two stages: (i a qualitative examination of the communicative strategies found in the sample; and (ii a quantitative analysis of the previous findings in order to identify significant patterns statistically. The findings indicate that context dependence and the individualism index can be traced in the texts in relation to the verbal and non-verbal elements, the explicitness of the communicative style and the purpose of the message. A set of multimodal communicative strategies is offered at the end of the paper aimed at advertising professionals and students as well as LSP practitioners.

  9. Some Aspects of Culturally Competent Communication in Health Care in the Republic of Macedonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollozhani, Aziz; Kosevska, Elena; Petkovski, Kostadin; Memeti, Shaban; Limani, Blerim; Kasapinov, Blasko

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To examine the existing situation, barriers and consequences of the intercultural communication in health institutions and to offer training models for strengthening and improving communication skills of health professionals in the Republic of Macedonia. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the relationship between patients and health professionals. A total of 813 health professionals (302 physicians and 511 other medical staff) from different healthcare institutions, and 1016 patients participated in cross-sectional survey performed in autumn 2010. Results: The research has showed that each third examined patient thought that his/her physician or the other medical personnel had no understanding for his/her emotions and gave no answer to all of his/her questions. From the other side, 60% of the physicians declare that they have a good communication with patients speaking other language than their mother tongue. Only 60% of physicians said that they know good the culture of their patient and 52% of the other medical staff said that they adjusted the treatment to the patient culture (religion, attitudes, language, life style). Conclusion: There are some gaps in current provision of health care practice in an aspect of effective interactions and communication skills of health professionals to meet patient needs in a multicultural and multilingual setting. A training model is proposed for strengthening communication skills of health professionals. PMID:24511268

  10. Communication and Culture in Manuel Castells: Explorations of the Period 1996-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Torres

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will get involved in the analysis of the main articulation formulas Manuel Castells proposes between the notions of communication and culture, during a period of his theoretical work spannning 1996-2009. The central purpose of this piece of work is the decoding of the main theoretical operations the Spanish sociologist carries out within this framework, as well as the general views insinuated through them. For this we will pay special attention to the tactics of appropriation that displays the Catalan sociologist in relation to the theoretical sources present in this space of intersection: Jean Baudrillard, Roland Barthes y Neil Postman. The present research, that only partially addresses the different aspects that constitute the cultural theory of the author, allow us to discover the adoption by Castells of a techno mediatic conception of communication and culture, that tend to subsume his general concept of culture, and largely is recreated in the shadow of an explicit and generalist discourse of the sociocultural communication

  11. Culture of garbage to waste culture: strategic communication for changing public attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Este es un informe parcial de una compleja investigación de la cual forma parte y con la que se articula. Aquella aborda el problema de la basura como un problema más social que técnico, haciendo depender la solución del mismo del cambio cultural de la población y la participación social. La basura solo es tal cuando se mezclan los residuos, de tal manera que evitarlo es no crearla. Así, la investigación busca un cambio cultural: generar un comportamiento y actitudes proambientales mediante e...

  12. Assimilating to Hierarchical Culture: A Grounded Theory Study on Communication among Clinical Nurses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MinYoung Kim

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to generate a substantive model that accounts for the explanatory social processes of communication in which nurses were engaged in clinical settings in Korea. Grounded theory methodology was used in this study. A total of 15 clinical nurses participated in the in-depth interviews. "Assimilating to the hierarchical culture" emerged as the basic social process of communication in which the participants engaged in their work environments. To adapt to the cultures of their assigned wards, the nurses learned to be silent and engaged in their assimilation into the established hierarchy. The process of assimilation consisted of three phases based on the major goals that nurses worked to achieve: getting to know about unspoken rules, persevering within the culture, and acting as senior nurse. Seven strategies and actions utilized to achieve the major tasks emerged as subcategories, including receiving strong disapproval, learning by observing, going silent, finding out what is acceptable, minimizing distress, taking advantages as senior nurse, and taking responsibilities as senior nurse. The findings identified how the pattern of communication in nursing organizations affected the way in which nurses were assimilated into organizational culture, from individual nurses' perspectives. In order to improve the rigid working atmosphere and culture in nursing organizations and increase members' satisfaction with work and quality of life, managers and staff nurses need training that focuses on effective communication and encouraging peer opinion-sharing within horizontal relationships. Moreover, organization-level support should be provided to create an environment that encourages free expression.

  13. Psychological, cultural and communicative conditioning for sexual education of bilingual deaf pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, Mirna Maura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychological, cultural and communicative conditions are prerequisite for organizing the educative process of sexuality of deaf pupils with a bilingual approach. En Cuba such a process is developed in a bilingual environment which takes the relation of its components as starting point. Those components include psychic process, personality configurations, bilingual communication and bicultural character of deaf people. This paper is aimed at analyzing the role of each of the component in the process of education. The coordinating relations established between the components create the necessary conditions to achieve the educative goal.

  14. 浅析跨文化交际中非言语交际的问题%On nonverbal communication problems in cross-cultural communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈赛英

    2014-01-01

    随着全球经济一体化的高速发展,跨文化交际在国际交往中越来越频繁。语言是跨文化交际的重要交流工具。但跨文化交际中非言语交际同样起着重要的作用,它是语言的补充和完善,有些场合甚至可以取代语言进行交流。本文从本言语交际的定义、特点及作用与功能、分类等多方面探讨了在跨文化交际中非言语交际所涉及的问题。%With the rapid development of global economic integration, cross cultural communication has become more and more frequent in the international communication. Language is an important communication tool for intercultural communication. Butin nonverbal communication also plays an important role, it is the perfect complement and language, some occasions, can even replace the language to communicate. This paper from the definition, the characteristics and the role of verbal communication and the function, classification and other aspects of culture in cross-cultural communication is non verbal communication issues involved.

  15. PERSONAL CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE IN BIOGRAPHICAL AND HAGIOGRAPHICAL LIFE AND ACTIVITIES OF SAINT ANTHIM THE IBERIAN (GEORGIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam VAKHTANG AKHALADZE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyze the biographical and hagiographical life and multifaceted activities of St. Anthim the Iberian in cross-cultural communicative dimension. Modern Post-Global world and its Weltanschauung need not onlytrans(cross-cultural, but also trans-historical contexts. We have designated the existence of trans-cultural polylogue (dialogue of many between all historical eras and ethnicities with their cultural codes and symbols. Our research enabled us to identify the following parameters of trans-cultural communicative competence: (i adequately assess the communicative situation; (ii possession of a certain body of knowledge about the native and other cultures; (iii to put into practice intercultural communicative intentions; (iv presence of not only the ability to understand other cultures, as well as members of their own culture, but also the ability to build new patterns of behavior, based on the values and norms of different cultures; (v strive to mix our own and others' cultural identity and as a result of the exchange of positive examples of actions and patterns of decision-making to go to a qualitatively new synthesis of action; (vi check the communication results with the help of feedback. We also identified the following aspects and facts of life and activity of Anthim the Iberian in the context of cross-cultural communicative competence: (a getting a wonderful upbringing (social intercultural communicative abilities and skills, and education (the possession of a certain body of knowledge about both native and other cultures, understanding and respect for diverse cultural values; (b the forced emigration of the native culture medium (communicative and behavioral adaptation to the behavior of other cultures; (c the experience of cruelty trafficking – the kidnapping and slavery sale (the religious-spiritual, social and cross-cultural communicative negative experience and its interpretation in a truly constructive manner that

  16. Organizational Culture,Human Resource Management Practices and Organizational Commitment%组织文化、人力资源管理实践与组织承诺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊耘; 阎亮; 张克勤

    2012-01-01

    Based on the researches before, this study focuses on the influence of characteristics of organizational culture, stimulation and impartiality, on the organizational commitment and studies the mediation role of HRMPs be- tween organizational culture and commitment. Through the empirical analysis with the sample collected, results show that the affective commitment will be stronger when stimulation and impartiality are stronger; The HRMPs could fully mediated the relationship between organizational culture and commitment; The three dimensions of HRMPs, criteria of success, promotion and criteria of evaluation, rewards and punishment, could mediated the rela- tionship, but with a little differences.%在前人研究基础上,沿着组织文化特性一激励性与公平性的主线,研究其对员工组织承诺的影响,并且研究了组织人力资源管理实践在两者关系中所起到的中介作用。在所采集样本的基础上,实证分析的结果表明:组织文化的激励性与公平性越强员工情感承诺越强;组织文化的激励性与公平性通过组织的HRMPs对员工的情感承诺产生正向影响;HRMPs的三个维度,即成功标准、晋升标准、考核奖惩标准均起到中介作用,但作用的效果有所差异。

  17. Beyond the "Cultural Turn": The Politics of Recognition versus the Politics of Redistribution in the Field of Intercultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotzmann, Karin; Hernández-Zamora, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s the field of language teaching and learning has emphasised the interplay between language, culture and identity and promotes both communicative and intercultural competencies. This mirrors a general trend in the social sciences after the so-called "cultural turn" which brought about a concentration on culture, identity…

  18. Communicative Competence Approach to Person-Oriented Teaching of the Russian Language and Culture of Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Orlova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the communicative competence approach in professional training of physicians on the undergraduate level. The main emphasis is on developing linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competences while teaching the Russian language and the culture of speech. The paper is aimed at analyzing the requirements of federal state educational standards of the 3rd generation concerning the competences in the humanities which should be developed by medical students in the course of the Russian language and the culture of speech; defining the contents of the «communicative competence» term based on consideration of general European competences in mastering the language and the analysis of lingua-didactic works of modern Russian scientists; identifying the component content of linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competences of the Russian language and the culture of speech course for medical schools. The research results regarding the analysis and component content of linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competences of the Russian language and the culture of speech course have been applied while designing the Russian and the culture of speech curriculum, as well as electronic textbooks and manuals for medical students. 

  19. Institutional comunication and cultural marketing: Peculiarities in museum communication within the framework of public relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia BURGHELE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultural management theoreticians believe that the main target of museum communication is gaining knowledge on specific messages by as large a number of people as possible. Museum public relation practice – intensified and upgraded at the same time with the revolution of the new communication technologies – is both science and art which analyse certain tendences (in attitude, taste and informal of anticipating their consequences for implementing certain museum offer programs to appeal to the public.As an institution with a decisive role in guarding cultural heritage and in outlining cultural identity – as it keeps the necessary instruments for this, the specialists and also the motivation through its own purposes – the museum in its dynamic, modern, enhanced shape must provide an attractive cultural product to the public, based on a anthropological approach to cultural fact.Modern museum-ology is built upon the concept that museum is a story and modern museums stimulate to a high degree participative learning, generated by a productive dialogue.

  20. Developing English Communication Skills in a Different Cultural Context: Matches and Mismatches

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoleta-Mariana IFTIMIE

    2015-01-01

    It is common knowledge that from among all the languages in the world, English has acquired the status of ‘lingua franca’, i.e., the language that is used in international communication across countries, the language that enables people of different ethnic, national and cultural backgrounds to share with others their ideas and cultures. The use of English as an international language has resulted in a growing number of people who learn and speak this language all over the world. This has impo...

  1. Communication and cultural implications of short-term study-abroad experiences on engineering students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M. Omachinski

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Study abroad is an important international learning component to add to students’ university experience. As programs of study become more rigorous and detailed, it is difficult for students to incorporate study abroad into their schedules, especially those in engineering programs. Short-term study abroad provides engineering students with an opportunity to view engineering on a global scale and to gain cultural awareness. This research study examines the cultural adjustment, communication issues, and experiential learning of a group of engineering students who studied abroad in Germany during their winter break.

  2. Activity Theory, Hybrid Experience Space Design and Cultural Heritage Communication at Lindholm Høje

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mogens Fiil; Veirum, Niels Einar

    This paper deals with the questions of how to address the communication of cultural heritage in the post-industrialized societies of the globalized economy. The last two or three decades have radically changed the relationship between the individual and the national institutions, encompassing...... the institutions of cultural heritage, museums and foundations. From an expert founded representation of facts, based on a rational and linear understanding of knowledge being presented to a mass customer, to a situation where an individualized customer, accustomed to a range of choices and the ability to interact...

  3. Communication in cancer care: Psycho social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANTOSH K CHATURVEDI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate and sensitive cancer care.

  4. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Strohschein, Fay J; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate, and sensitive cancer care.

  5. The Cultural Consumption Barometer. A case study of communication in statistics in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BECUT Anda Georgiana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Cultural Consumption Barometer is one of the most important studies carried out by the research team of the National Institute for Cultural Research and Training, starting with 2005. The Cultural Consumption Barometer is a representative survey and its goal is the description and analysis of the cultural sector in Romania, as far as the level of the cultural consumption is concerned. The main objectives of the study are: measurement of the degree of adjustment of cultural goods distribution infrastructure to the population needs, measurement of the cultural consumption and participation, measurement of the population’s cultural needs, identification of the preferences and cultural consumption behaviour. For ten years the statistical data have been produced and presented to various categories of beneficiaries. Each year a large amount of statistical information is produced and the challenges are to present them to the general public, who is interested in this topic, as well as to the experts in various fields of culture, who are willing to use the results in a more pragmatic manner. The goal of this article is to have an in-depth insight into the topic of presenting statistical data in culture for the general public, who in most of the cases is not familiar with this approach on the cultural field. How to present statistical data to the journalists, experts in culture or local public administration representatives? What is the most relevant information and how to present it, in order for it to be used for cultural strategies and projects? How was the data from the Cultural Consumption Barometer presented in mass-media and what reactions did they generate? These are the most important questions we want to answer in our article. We shall present a case study carried out on the archives, including media news about the results of the Cultural Consumption Barometer. First, we shall present the way statistical data were selected and included in

  6. Transforming communication and safety culture in intrapartum care: a multi-organization blueprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndon, Audrey; Johnson, M Christina; Bingham, Debra; Napolitano, Peter G; Joseph, Gerald; Maxfield, David G; O'Keeffe, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Effective, patient-centered communication facilitates interception and correction of potentially harmful conditions and errors. All team members, including women, their families, physicians, midwives, nurses, and support staff, have roles in identifying the potential for harm during labor and birth. However, the results of collaborative research studies conducted by organizations that represent professionals who care for women during labor and birth indicate that health care providers may frequently witness, but may not always report, problems with safety or clinical performance. Some of these health care providers felt resigned to the continuation of such problems and fearful of retribution if they tried to address them. Speaking up to address safety and quality concerns is a dynamic social process. Every team member must feel empowered to speak up about concerns without fear of put-downs, retribution, or receiving poor-quality care. Patient safety requires mutual accountability: individuals, teams, health care facilities, and professional associations have a shared responsibility for creating and sustaining environments of mutual respect and engaging in highly reliable perinatal care. Defects in human factors, communication, and leadership have been the leading contributors to sentinel events in perinatal care for more than a decade. Organizational commitment and executive leadership are essential to creating an environment that proactively supports safety and quality. The problem is well-known; the time for action is now.

  7. Problems of communicative competence in multi-cultural medical encounters in South African health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, T

    2006-11-01

    Research in health communication shows communicative competence to be an important aspect of successful health-care. Definitions of competence involve more than the participants, however; the position and status of these participants in terms of the medical hierarchy and accepted paradigm, the language of choice, educational levels and a host of other variables affect relationships and perceptions of competence. This article grapples with a number of issues that impact on communicative competence in the health-care professions, given the multi-lingual and -cultural society within South Africa as well as emerging shifts that foreground this debate. In particular, the thorny question around language use, the hegemonies of the past regarding a dominant lingua franca and subsequent issues involving translation and interpretation are discussed.

  8. Communications as the organizing flowing space in the institutions of cultural and educational activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Анатолійович Примачок

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The main features of functional and planning and three-dimensional solutions of contemporary establishments of cultural and educational activities exemplified by the world architectural practice are examined in the article. The value of the communication system in the structure organization of these institutions is investigated. Definition, grading and ways of unified flowing space forming and methods of informing and orienteering of the human flows in this space are considered. 

  9. Living Between Two Cultures : Intercultural communication of Chinese immigrants in Uppsala

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zhenggang

    2013-01-01

    The research has focused on Chinese immigrants in Uppsala and the purpose of the research is to find out how intercultural communication has influenced the beliefs of Chinese immigrants in Uppsala. The beliefs here refer to ideas about family, education, workplace, and the state with regard to Hofstede et al.’s dimensions of national cultures. The thesis will focus on two dimensions: power distance and masculinity versus femininity. Two main concepts that are used in the thesis are intercultu...

  10. Intercultural publics and communication strategies : the case of Cultural Tourism at the Art Museum

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Pedro José de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    (Excerto) This paper intends to present a study on global flows/encounters at a leisure space. The global flow is cultural tourism and the leisure space-scape is the art museum, where differences and identities may be articulated through communication strategies developed by intercultural publics. These translations may occur at the museum ‘physical’ space or at virtual scapes like museum web pages or multimedia devices resident in an art exhibition. Such a problematics constitutes a part of ...

  11. Business communication across three European cultures: A contrastive analysis of British, Spanish and Polish email writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Giménez-Moreno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Today the most international written mode of communication within the business world is electronic correspondence. As the introductory section explains, diverse analyses of emails written in different cultures have been carried out revealing interesting differences and similarities in their discourse features and rhetorical strategies. However, a comparative examination of business emails from representative European cultures such as British (Northern Europe, Spanish (Southern Europe and Polish (Eastern Europe has not been undertaken so far. With this aim, a corpus of over 100 emails of response to business requests written in English by companies set up in these three cultures has been compiled and analysed. The main research targets are to observe the main parameters of variation across these cultures, the existent variation regarding the prototypical move structure and how register variation fluctuates depending on each culture. The results will indicate that across these cultures the move structure of this genre is more complex than current templates and existing published materials show. The study also demonstrates that, while there is a tendency to standardize email correspondence at a European level, there are certain parameters of variation that may help language learners and users to conform their messages depending on the recipient’s culture.

  12. Culture and Social Relationship as Factors of Affecting Communicative Non-Verbal Behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipi, Afia Akhter; Nakano, Yukiko; Rehm, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to link a bridge between social relationship and cultural variation to predict conversants' non-verbal behaviors. This idea serves as a basis of establishing a parameter based socio-cultural model, which determines non-verbal expressive parameters that specify the shapes....... The predictions from our model successfully demonstrate that both cultural background and social relationship moderate communicative non-verbal behaviors.......The goal of this paper is to link a bridge between social relationship and cultural variation to predict conversants' non-verbal behaviors. This idea serves as a basis of establishing a parameter based socio-cultural model, which determines non-verbal expressive parameters that specify the shapes...... of agent's non-verbal behaviors in HAI. As the first step, a comparative corpus analysis is done for two cultures in two specific social relationships. Next, by integrating the cultural and social parameters factors with the empirical data from corpus analysis, we establish a model that predicts posture...

  13. Adverse event reporting in Slovenia - the influence of safety culture, supervisors and communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birk Karin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The provision of safe healthcare is considered a priority in European Union (EU member states. Along with other preventative measures in healthcare, the EU also strives to eliminate the “causes of harm to human health”. The aim of this survey was to determine whether safety culture, supervisors and communication between co-workers influence the number of adverse event reports submitted to the heads of clinical departments and to the management of an institution. Methods. This survey is based on cross-sectional analysis. It was carried out in the largest Slovenian university hospital. We received 235 completed questionnaires. Respondents included professionals in the fields of nursingcare, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and radiological technology. Results. Safety culture influences the number of adverse event reports submitted to the head of a clinical department from the organizational point of view. Supervisors and communication between co-workers do not influence the number of adverse event reports. Conclusion. It can be concluded that neither supervisors nor the level of communication between co-workers influence the frequency of adverse event reporting, while safety culture does influence it from an organizational point of view. The presumed factors only partly influence the number of submitted adverse event reports, thus other causes of under-reporting must be sought elsewhere.

  14. Physician language ability and cultural competence. An exploratory study of communication with Spanish-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alicia; Schillinger, Dean; Grumbach, Kevin; Rosenthal, Anne; Stewart, Anita L; Wang, Frances; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2004-02-01

    We studied physician-patient dyads to determine how physician self-rated Spanish-language ability and cultural competence affect Spanish-speaking patients' reports of interpersonal processes of care. Questionnaire study of 116 Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes and 48 primary care physicians (PCPs) at a public hospital with interpreter services. Primary care physicians rated their Spanish ability on a 5-point scale and cultural competence by rating: 1) their understanding of the health-related cultural beliefs of their Spanish-speaking patients; and 2) their effectiveness with Latino patients, each on a 4-point scale. We assessed patients' experiences using the interpersonal processes of care (IPC) in diverse populations instrument. Primary care physician responses were dichotomized, as were IPC scale scores (optimal vs nonoptimal). We analyzed the relationship between language and two cultural competence items and IPC, and a summary scale and IPC, using multivariate models to adjust for known confounders of communication. Greater language fluency was strongly associated with optimal IPC scores in the domain of elicitation of and responsiveness to patients, problems and concerns [Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR], 5.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.59 to 17.27]. Higher score on a language-culture summary scale was associated with three IPC domains - elicitation/responsiveness (AOR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.1 to 19.3), explanation of condition (AOR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.0 to 7.34), and patient empowerment (AOR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.19)-and not associated with two more-technical communication domains. Physician self-rated language ability and cultural competence are independently associated with patients' reports of interpersonal process of care in patient-centered domains. Our study provides empiric support for the importance of language and cultural competence in the primary care of Spanish-speaking patients.

  15. Elementary Introduction To The Differences Of Chinese And Western Cultures And Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Introductory: At present all kinds of teaching methods are widely used in or out of the country.The important one is functional teaching method.It originated in 1970’s and was in vogue in 1980’s.The main reason is that in order to suit the needs of rapid economic development,the members of European Community try to organize more than 100 linguists and specialists of teaching methods to study and explore and find out a kind of functional teaching method,which is what we know that the language is regarded as a kind of communicative tool among human beings. From that time ,almost all the countries have adopted and arranged teaching ways and teaching contents in a practical purpose.

  16. Computer-mediated cross-cultural collaboration: attributing communication errors to the person versus the situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignovic, Jane A; Thompson, Lori Foster

    2010-03-01

    Computer-mediated communication, such as e-mail, facilitates cross-cultural interactions by enabling convenient communication. During these exchanges, the absence of contextual or situational information may cause e-mail recipients to form dispositional explanations for behavior that might in fact be driven by unseen situational constraints. To gain insight into the manner in which e-mail recipients explain behavior, the authors conducted an experiment examining how technical language violations (i.e., spelling and grammatical errors) and deviations from etiquette norms (i.e., short messages lacking a conversational tone) affect a recipient's perceptions of an e-mail sender's conscientiousness, intelligence, agreeableness, extraversion, affective trustworthiness, and cognitive trustworthiness. This study also investigated whether the effects of technical and etiquette language violations depend on the availability of information indicating the e-mail sender is from a foreign culture. Results reveal that participants formed negative perceptions of the sender of an e-mail containing technical language violations. However, most of these negative perceptions were reduced when participants had situational information indicating that the e-mail sender was from a different culture. Conversely, negative attributions stemming from etiquette violations were not significantly mitigated by knowledge that the e-mail sender was from a foreign culture.

  17. A language based on analogy to communicate cultural concepts in SETI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Paolo

    2011-02-01

    The present paper is a synthesis of three presentation given by myself at the Toulouse IAC 2001 ( Analogy as a tool to communicate abstract concepts in SETI), the Bremen IAC 2003 ( From maths to culture: towards an effective message), and the Vancouver IAC 2004 ( Philosophical and religious implications of extraterrestrial intelligent life). Its aim is to find a way to make our cultural concepts understandable to hypothetical extraterrestrials (ETs) in a SETI communication. First of all, I expose the reasons why I think that analogy could be a good tool for this purpose. Then, I try to show that this is possible only in the context of an integrated language, using both abstract symbols and pictures, also sketching two practical examples about some basic concepts of our moral and religious tradition. Further studies are required to determine whether this method could be extended to the higher-level abstract concepts in the other fields of our culture. Finally, I discuss the possible role of mathematics, logic and natural science in the construction of an analogy-based language for interstellar messages with a cultural content and a possible way of managing this matter from a social point of view.

  18. Teamwork, communication and safety climate: a systematic review of interventions to improve surgical culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Greg D; Shannon, Evan M; Dawes, Aaron J; Rollo, Johnathon C; Nguyen, David K; Russell, Marcia M; Ko, Clifford Y; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda A

    2015-07-01

    To define the target domains of culture-improvement interventions, to assess the impact of these interventions on surgical culture and to determine whether culture improvements lead to better patient outcomes and improved healthcare efficiency. Healthcare systems are investing considerable resources in improving workplace culture. It remains unclear whether these interventions, when aimed at surgical care, are successful and whether they are associated with changes in patient outcomes. PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched from January 1980 to January 2015. We included studies on interventions that aimed to improve surgical culture, defined as the interpersonal, social and organisational factors that affect the healthcare environment and patient care. The quality of studies was assessed using an adapted tool to focus the review on higher-quality studies. Due to study heterogeneity, findings were narratively reviewed. The 47 studies meeting inclusion criteria (4 randomised trials and 10 moderate-quality observational studies) reported on interventions that targeted three domains of culture: teamwork (n=28), communication (n=26) and safety climate (n=19); several targeted more than one domain. All moderate-quality studies showed improvements in at least one of these domains. Two studies also demonstrated improvements in patient outcomes, such as reduced postoperative complications and even reduced postoperative mortality (absolute risk reduction 1.7%). Two studies reported improvements in healthcare efficiency, including fewer operating room delays. These findings were supported by similar results from low-quality studies. The literature provides promising evidence for various strategies to improve surgical culture, although these approaches differ in terms of the interventions employed as well as the techniques used to measure culture. Nevertheless, culture improvement appears to be associated with other positive effects, including

  19. Communication models of institutional online communities: the role of the ABC cultural intermediary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon Hutchinson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The co­-creation of cultural artefacts has been democratised given the recent technological affordances of information and communication technologies. Web 2.0 technologies have enabled greater possibilities of citizen inclusion within the media conversations of their nations. For example, the Australian audience has more opportunities to collaboratively produce and tell their story to a broader audience via the public service media (PSM facilitated platforms of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC. However, providing open collaborative production for the audience gives rise to the problem: how might the PSM manage the interests of all the stakeholders and align those interests with its legislated Charter? This paper considers this problem through the ABC's user­ created content participatory platform, ABC Pool and highlights the cultural intermediary as the role responsible for managing these tensions. This paper also suggests cultural intermediation is a useful framework for other media organisations engaging in co­creative activities with their audiences.

  20. Gianni Vattimo on Culture, Communication, and the Move from Modernity to Postmodernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E. Harris

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Gianni Vattimo, the Italian philosopher and politician, has argued that the end of colonialism and imperialism and the rise of the society of mass communication have contributed to the emergence of the postmodern. Modernity‘s unilinear conception of history is no longer possible in the face of multiple cultures and subcultures coming to the microphone across countries in the West. This article considers this view in the light of the problematizing comments made by the philosopher Slavoj Žižek on the nature of culture – that it is something people do not take seriously and therefore people do not regard science as a culture. If science is apart from culture, then modernity can continue as the grand narrative of the increasing rationalisation of humankind as shown by the emancipating effects of science expressed through technology. Resources from Vattimo‘s broader philosophical programme are drawn upon to argue that not taking culture seriously is a postmodern condition and that science is cultural.

  1. Postmarket Requirements and Commitments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides information to the public on postmarket requirements and commitments. The phrase postmarket requirements and commitments refers to studies and clinical...

  2. NOTES ON THE APPLICATION OF THE THEORY AND PRAXIS TRAINING CURRICULUM FOR COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE OF PEACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Belandria Cerdeira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to present theoretical considerations on the application of the Theory and Praxis Training Curriculum for Communication and Culture of Peace. The theoretical study is descriptive and documentary. In the first stage were analyzed and discussed theoretical material related to the category of analysis. In a second stage developed a series of notes and reflective-critical comments, which point to consider hybrid forms of theories when designing curricular training in Communication and Culture of Peace. In conclusion, we feel the need to open the Multidisciplinary discussion on the subject, where the curriculum, the humanistic, existential communicational and bring new ways of learning, being, doing, living together, but above all to communicate, in order to take a step to build a communicative culture.

  3. Discourse in virtual cross-cultural communication: a dialogue of cultures or a clash of mentalities? (a case study research in EFL education in Russia)

    OpenAIRE

    NAZARENKO ALLA L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study research based on the experience of Moscow State University of using cross-cultural telecommunication projects as a "testing ground" for developing students' cross-cultural communicative competence. This competence was assessed in terms of success / failure of cross-cultural interaction. The transcripts of forums and chats have been analyzed as well as the results of the survey of students-participants, aimed at getting their opinion about the project ("studen...

  4. Discourse in virtual cross-cultural communication: a dialogue of cultures or a clash of mentalities? (a case study research in EFL education in Russia)

    OpenAIRE

    NAZARENKO ALLA L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study research based on the experience of Moscow State University of using cross-cultural telecommunication projects as a "testing ground" for developing students' cross-cultural communicative competence. This competence was assessed in terms of success / failure of cross-cultural interaction. The transcripts of forums and chats have been analyzed as well as the results of the survey of students-participants, aimed at getting their opinion about the project ("studen...

  5. Culturally-Based Communication about Health, Eating, and Food: Development and validation of the CHEF scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Rebecca R; Palmberg, Allison; Lydecker, Janet; Green, Brooke; Kelly, Nichole R; Trapp, Stephen; Bean, Melanie K

    2016-01-01

    Ethnic minority populations in the United States are disproportionately affected by obesity. To address this disparity, research has begun to investigate the role of culture, ethnicity, and experiences with racism on food choices and health interventions. The aim of the current study was to develop and evaluate a new scale measuring the extent to which individuals' culture, as they perceive it, influences perceptions of food-related health messages. A diverse sample of 422 college students responded to the item pool, as well as surveys on race-related stress, self-efficacy in making healthy food choices, ethnic identity, and social support for health-related behaviors. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses produced a five-factor model: Connection (the extent to which food connected individuals with their culture), Authority (beliefs that health care providers were familiar with individuals' cultural foods), Unhealthy Food Perceptions (beliefs that individuals' cultural foods were perceived as unhealthy), Healthy Food Perceptions (beliefs that others perceive individuals' cultural foods to be healthy), and Social Value (the extent to which social relationships are improved by shared cultural food traditions). Authority and Healthy Food Perceptions were related to individuals' confidence in their ability to make healthy food choices. Authority was inversely correlated with negative coping with racism-related events. Ethnic identity was significantly correlated with all but Unhealthy Food Perceptions. Race/ethnicity differences were identified for Healthy Food Perceptions, Unhealthy Food Perceptions, Social Value, Connection, but not Authority. Applications and suggestions for further research using the Culturally-based Communication about Health, Eating, and Food (CHEF) Scale are proposed.

  6. Validating Teacher Commitment Scale Using a Malaysian Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Mee Thien

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to validate an integrative Teacher Commitment scale using rigorous scale validation procedures. An adapted questionnaire with 17 items was administered to 600 primary school teachers in Penang, Malaysia. Data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA with SPSS 19.0 and AMOS 19.0, respectively. The results support Teacher Commitment as a multidimensional construct with its four underlying dimensions: Commitment to Student, Commitment to Teaching, Commitment to School, and Commitment to Profession. A validated Teacher Commitment scale with 13 items measured can be proposed to be used as an evaluative tool to assess the level to which teachers are committed to their students’ learning, teaching, school, and profession. The Teacher Commitment scale would also facilitate the identifications of factors that influence teachers’ quality of work life and school effectiveness. The practical implications, school cultural influence, and methodological limitations are discussed.

  7. Analysis on Dance Culture Communication from Cultural Perspective of Space%浅析文化空间视角下的舞蹈文化传播

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭琳

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on the cultural space of Human Geography in the theory of communication; taking dance as an example, the article explores the type of cultural space communication, analyzes environmental factors and social factors influencing the spread of dance culture space, points out that the geographical environmcnt, socal change and nationalities and education are an important factors influencing cultural space communication.%本文借鉴人文地理学关于文化空间传播的有关理论,以舞蹈为例,探讨了文化空间传播的类型,分析了影响舞蹈文化空间传播的环境因素和社会因素,指出地理环境、社会的变迁以及民族和教育是影响文化空间传播的重要因素.

  8. Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lang, R.; Singh, N.N.; Didden, H.C.M.; Green, V.A.; Marschik, P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Communication disorders are common among people with intellectual disabilities. Consequently, enhancing the communication skills of such individuals is a major intervention priority. This chapter reviews the nature and prevalence of the speech, language, and communication problems associated with

  9. Moving towards Ethnorelativism: A Framework for Measuring and Meeting Students' Needs in Cross-Cultural Business and Technical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhua

    2013-01-01

    Scholars in business and technical communication have continuously made efforts to look for effective teaching approaches for cross-cultural business and technical communication; however, little research has been conducted to study the process by which students develop intercultural competence; fewer studies have been conducted to assess learners'…

  10. Moving towards Ethnorelativism: A Framework for Measuring and Meeting Students' Needs in Cross-Cultural Business and Technical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhua

    2013-01-01

    Scholars in business and technical communication have continuously made efforts to look for effective teaching approaches for cross-cultural business and technical communication; however, little research has been conducted to study the process by which students develop intercultural competence; fewer studies have been conducted to assess learners'…

  11. Emotional Intelligence and Cross-Cultural Communication Competence: An Analysis of Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Relationships in a Diverse Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Melvin C.; Okoro, Ephraim A.; Okoro, Sussie U.

    2013-01-01

    This study discusses the significance of emotional intelligence and intercultural communication competence in globally diverse classroom settings. Specifically, the research shows a correlation between degrees of emotional intelligence and human communication competence (age, gender, and culture). The dataset consists of 364 participants. Nearly…

  12. Predicting psychological ripple effects: the role of cultural identity, in-group/out-group identification, and attributions of blame in crisis communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagondahalli, Deepa; Turner, Monique Mitchell

    2012-04-01

    Incidents of intentional food contamination can produce ripple effects in consumers such as reduced trust and increased anxiety. In their postcrisis communication, food companies often direct the blame at the perpetrator in an effort to mitigate potential losses and regain consumer trust. The attempt to placate consumers may, in itself, potentially create psychological ripple effects in message readers. This study examined the interacting influence of two message characteristics: identity of the perpetrator of the crime (in-group/out-group membership), and the attribution of blame (reason why the perpetrator committed the crime), with message receiver characteristic (cultural identity) on psychological ripple effects such as blame, trust, anxiety, and future purchase intention. Results indicated that although group membership of the perpetrator was not significant in predicting outcomes for the organization, the attribution communicated in the message was. American message receivers blamed the organization more and trusted it less when personal dispositional attributions were made about the perpetrator. Asian message receivers blamed the organization more and trusted it less when situational attributions were made about the perpetrator. Lowered trust in the company and increased anxiety correlated with lower purchase intent for both American and Asian message receivers. Implications for crisis message design are discussed.

  13. 24-Hour Relativistic Bit Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanis, Ephanielle; Martin, Anthony; Houlmann, Raphaël; Boso, Gianluca; Bussières, Félix; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which a party wishes to commit a secret bit to another party. Perfect security between mistrustful parties is unfortunately impossible to achieve through the asynchronous exchange of classical and quantum messages. Perfect security can nonetheless be achieved if each party splits into two agents exchanging classical information at times and locations satisfying strict relativistic constraints. A relativistic multiround protocol to achieve this was previously proposed and used to implement a 2-millisecond commitment time. Much longer durations were initially thought to be insecure, but recent theoretical progress showed that this is not so. In this Letter, we report on the implementation of a 24-hour bit commitment solely based on timed high-speed optical communication and fast data processing, with all agents located within the city of Geneva. This duration is more than 6 orders of magnitude longer than before, and we argue that it could be extended to one year and allow much more flexibility on the locations of the agents. Our implementation offers a practical and viable solution for use in applications such as digital signatures, secure voting and honesty-preserving auctions.

  14. A Fuzzy Commitment Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Al-saggaf, Alawi A

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempt has been made to explain a fuzzy commitment scheme. In the conventional Commitment schemes, both committed string m and valid opening key are required to enable the sender to prove the commitment. However there could be many instances where the transmission involves noise or minor errors arising purely because of the factors over which neither the sender nor the receiver have any control. The fuzzy commitment scheme presented in this paper is to accept the opening key that is close to the original one in suitable distance metric, but not necessarily identical. The concept itself is illustrated with the help of simple situation.

  15. The effects of cultural psychology on cross,cultural communication%文化心理对跨文化交际影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘思阳

    2011-01-01

    Cross-cultural communication is affected not only by linguistic factors, but also by such non-linguis- tic factors as cultural psychology. Cultural psychology is the combination of a nation' s common thoughts and spiritual structure, which reflects a corporate cultural tradition of this nation and decides the national character- istics and behavioral patterns. Because of the effects of cultural psychology,it is usually difficult for cross-cul- tural communicators to reach agreement on cognition and emotion. Ethnocentrism, prejudice and cultural stereotype are just three factors of cultural psychology which may bring obstacles to communication in various attitudes and thinking modes. So in the cross-cultural communication, cultural psychology factors must be taken into account in order to avoid communication failure%跨文化交际不仅受语言因素的影响,也受一些非语言因素,如文化心理的影响。文化心理是一个民族共同的思想组合及精神结构,它反映了一个民族共同的文化传统,决定了该民族的特征与行为模式。跨文化交际中,文化心理的影响往往使交际双方在认知和情感上难以达成共识。民族中心主义、偏见和文化定势这三种文化心理因素就以各种态度和思维模式给跨文化交际带来障碍。因此在跨文化交际中必须将文化心理因素纳入有效考虑范围,以避免交际失误。

  16. Microblogging for Language Learning: Using Twitter to Train Communicative and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borau, Kerstin; Ullrich, Carsten; Feng, Jinjin; Shen, Ruimin

    Our work analyzes the usefulness of microblogging in second language learning using the example of the social network Twitter. Most learners of English do not require even more passive input in form of texts, lectures or videos, etc. This input is readily available in numerous forms on the Internet. What learners of English need is the chance to actively produce language and the chance to use English as tool of communication. This calls for instructional methods and tools promoting ‘active’ learning that present opportunities for students to express themselves and interact in the target language. In this paper we describe how we used Twitter with students of English at the Distant College of Shanghai Jiao Tong University. We analyze the students’ messages and show how the usage of Twitter trained communicative and cultural competence.

  17. Tourism communication: the translator’s responsibility in the translation of cultural difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Agorni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tourist discourse can be considered as a specialised type of cross-cultural communication. The subject of this work is the degree of intervention translators are asked to exercise in order to achieve successful communication. Their task is not that of demonstrating their knowledge on specifi c subjects, as, rather, their capacity of mediating it, so as to make it available to a type of tourist who is necessarily different from that targeted by the original work. Hence, translators should learn to dose the amount of information tourists will be able to take in. Theoretical assumptions will be illustrated by means of a comparison between a tourist text in Italian and its translation into English. It will be demonstrated that translators’ decisions at linguistic and explanatory level allow a more or less substantial degree of reader involvement, and consequently affect the promotion of tourist destinations.

  18. Organizational Commitment in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizollah Arbabisarjou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As increase in nursing shortages, absenteeism and turn over, organizational commitment is extensively important for retention of nurses. Organizational committed staff has higher efficiency; thus, more tendency to stay and less absenteeism are their characteristics. Being aware of nursing staff’s organizational commitment provides adequate information to authorities to make- decision and lead in adopting proper methods to determine the effectiveness of the Health Centers in the country. Hence, the present study carried out to examine the amount of nurses’ organizational commitment. Materials and Methods: The nurses were 200 subjects who participated in this descriptive- analytical study. They were engaged in teaching hospitals in Zahedan in 2016. Data were collected from 200 nurses in major hospitals. Samples were selected by a random sampling method. Questionnaires, including Demographic data, Organizational Commitment Questionnaires. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 21.0 using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, variance analysis and t-test. Findings: The results showed nurses’ average age was 30.05±6.56. The female subjects were 162. The average level of organizational commitment among nurses was 74.24±8.36, emotional commitment was 25.58±3.26. The component, and continued commitment was 24.36±4.05 and 24.30±3.48 for normative commitment. There was no relationship between the age and organizational commitment, emotional and continuing commitment, but their relation was significant with normative commitment. Conclusion: The result of the present study indicated that the grade of the organizational commitment of participating nurses in was moderate, in this study. An organization requires to the staff foe gaining to its goals, who do their duty along love and enthusiasm and are committed to this organization. Proper ground should be established in order to make and maintain these features in the staff.

  19. Assessing services with communicatively impaired bilingual adults in culturally and linguistically diverse neurorehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, José G

    2015-01-01

    The combined effect of the steady increase in cultural and linguistic diversity and epidemiological factors in minority populations is estimated to continue having an impact on adult neurorehabilitation programs in the country, particularly in the number of bilingual individuals receiving clinical services. No comprehensive assessment of the present professional and clinical realities in service delivery to communicatively impaired adults in culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) neurorehabilitation contexts has been conducted. The current survey research was undertaken to examine current professional training, clinical practices, and challenges in the services rendered to the steadily increasing numbers of communicatively disordered adults in CLD neurorehabilitation programs with a special focus on bilingual persons. A 36-question, 6-section survey was administered to health care-based SLPs working with adults to examine multiple factors regarding work setting and caseload, professional training, clinical tools and procedures, service delivery issues, and suggestions to improve clinical work with bilingual adults in CLD neurorehabilitation environments. Results support that SLPs presently make sensible decisions to serve communicatively disordered bilingual adults with neuropathologies despite training gaps and scant clinical resources. Responses additionally highlight critical areas to improve professional preparation and available resources. Results are discussed in terms of strengths and weaknesses as well as their implications to professional education and target research areas in order to minimize present gaps in service delivery with bilingual speakers in CLD adult neurorehabilitation programs. As a result of this activity, the reader will be able to: (1) Discuss the demographic and epidemiological factors that suggest a continued increase in the number of communicatively impaired bilingual adults in CLD neurorehabilitation programs. (2) Describe

  20. Career Commitment, Competencies, and Citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Kerry David; Carson, Paula Phillips

    1998-01-01

    Nursing department employees (n=75) completed the Career Commitment Measure and other measures. Emotional intelligence was positively related to career commitment but not organizational commitment. Both types of commitment were positively related to organizational citizenship. (SK)

  1. Influence of Traditional Chinese Culture on the implementation of Communicative Language Teaching in a Higher Vocational College in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1980s,Chinese government promotes actively Communicative Language Teaching(CLT).But due to influence of traditional Chinese culture,teachers and learners have some difficulties in implementing the approach,especially private higher vocational college.The paper is to explore in what aspects of traditional Chinese culture influence the implementation of CLT.

  2. Influence of Traditional Chinese Culture on the implementation of Communicative Language Teaching in a Higher Vocational College in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季彦君

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1980 s,Chinese government promotes actively Communicative Language Teaching(CLT).But due to influence of traditional Chinese culture,teachers and learners have some difficulties in implementing the approach,especially private higher vocational college.The paper is to explore in what aspects of traditional Chinese culture influence the implementation of CLT.

  3. Localisation of Information and Communication Technologies in Cameroonian Languages and Cultures:Experience and Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathurin Soh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we tackle the problem of adapting Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs in local languages of Cameroon. The objectives are to reduce the digital and language divides, and to pave the way for the usage of such technologies to local populations who don’t understand this technological language. We first discuss and highlight several concerns about the localisation of ICTs. Afterwords, we address some challenges and issues to computerize cultural and linguistic features, and indigenous knowledge (IK for national languages and cultures in Cameroon. As case study, we describe our experience in localising an open source editor for the Yemba language, within the of Rural Electronic Schools in African Languages Project. Because Cameroonian languages are based on the same basic alphabet, this qualitative research is extensible to other languages.

  4. 跨文化交际中的非言语交际%On Non-verbal Communication in Cross-cultural Com-munication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛梅

    2013-01-01

    Non-verbal communication, an important means to pass information and express feelings, complements mutually with verbal communication and plays an important role in cross-cultural communication. However, non-verbal communi-cation has not been paid enough attention and has been neglected for a long time. Misunderstanding on nonverbal communication leads to the failure of the communication and affects the quality of communication. The essay analyzes the differences of non-verbal communication in cross-cultural communication from several as-pects, such as gestures, facial expressions and visual behaviors, so as to improve people's sensitivity and quality of the cross-cul-tural communication.%在跨文化交际中,非言语交际是人们传递信息、表达情感的一个重要手段,与语言交际互为补充,在跨文化交际中起着不可忽视的作用。然而,人们并没有给予非言语交际以足够的重视,使其长期处于被忽视的地位。在跨文化交际过程中,经常发生因非言语交际误解导致交际无法顺畅进行,因而影响交际质量的情况。本文从手势,面部表情,目视行为等几个方面分析非言语行为在跨文化交际中的差异,以期提高人们跨文化交际的敏感性和质量。

  5. Social commitment robots and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kerstin; Guse, Lorna; Mordoch, Elaine; Osterreicher, Angela

    2012-03-01

    In 2010, approximately 500,000 Canadians suffered from a dementia-related illness. The number of sufferers is estimated to double in about 25 years. Due to this growing demographic, dementia (most frequently caused by Alzheimer's disease) will increasingly have a significant impact on our aging community and their caregivers. Dementia is associated with challenging behaviours such as agitation, wandering, and aggression. Care providers must find innovative strategies that facilitate the quality of life for this population; moreover, such strategies must value the individual person. Social commitment robots - designed specifically with communication and therapeutic purposes - provide one means towards attaining this goal. This paper describes a study in which Paro (a robotic baby harp seal) was used as part of a summer training program for students. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the integration of social commitment robots may be clinically valuable for older, agitated persons living with dementia in long-term care settings.

  6. Developing nurses' intercultural/intraprofessional communication skills using the EXCELLence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership (EXCELL) Social Interaction Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Saras; Barker, Michelle

    2017-09-27

    To examine how the use of Social Interaction Maps (SIMs), a tool in the EXCELL (EXCELLence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership) Program can enhance the development of nurses' intercultural/intraprofessional communication skills. Nurses face communication challenges when interacting with others from similar background as well as those from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) background. We used the EXCELL Program's Social Interaction Maps (SIMs) tool to foster intercultural/intraprofessional communication skills in nurses. SIMs describe verbal and non-verbal communication behaviours that model ways of communicating in a culturally appropriate manner. The Maps include four stages of an interaction, namely: Approach, Bridging, Communicating and Departing using the acronym ABCD. Qualitative approach was used with a purposeful sample of nurses enrolled in a postgraduate course. Fifteen participants were recruited. The SIM tool was taught to participants in a workshop where they engaged in sociocultural communication activities using scenarios. Participants were asked to apply SIMs in their workplaces. Six weeks later participants completed a semi-structured open-ended questionnaire and participated in a discussion forum on their experience of using SIMs. Data were content analysed. Four themes identified in the use of the SIMS were: (i) enhancing self-awareness of communication skills; (ii) promoting skills in being non-confrontational during difficult interactions; (iii) highlighting the importance of A (Approach) and B (Bridging) in interaction with others; (iv)awareness of how others interpret what is said C (Communicating), and discussing to resolve issues before closure D (Departing). Application of the EXCELL Social Interaction Mapping tool was shown to be useful in developing intercultural/intraprofessional communication skills in nurses. Professional development programs that incorporate EXCELL Social Interaction Maps can enhance nurses

  7. Use of New Communication Technologies to Change NASA Safety Culture: Incorporating the Use of Blogs as a Fundamental Communications Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huls, Dale thomas

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore an innovative approach to culture change at NASA that goes beyond reorganizations, management training, and a renewed emphasis on safety. Over the last five years, a technological social revolution has been emerging from the internet. Blogs (aka web logs) are transforming traditional communication and information sharing outlets away from established information sources such as the media. The Blogosphere has grown from zero blogs in 1999 to approximately 4.5 million as of November 2004 and is expected to double in 2005. Blogs have demonstrated incredible effectiveness and efficiency with regards to affecting major military and political events. Consequently, NASA should embrace the new information paradigm presented by blogging. NASA can derive exceptional benefits from the new technology as follows: 1) Personal blogs can overcome the silent safety culture by giving voice to concerns or questions that are not well understood or seemingly inconsequential to the NASA community at-large without the pressure of formally raising a potential false alarm. Since blogs can be open to Agency-wide participation, an incredible amount of resources from an extensive pool of experience can focus on a single issue, concern, or problem and quickly vetted, discussed and assessed for feasibility, significance, and criticality. The speed for which this could be obtained cannot be matched through any other process or procedure currently in use. 2) Through official NASA established blogs, lessons learned can be a real-time two way process that is formed and implemented from the ground level. Data mining of official NASA blogs and personal blogs of NASA personnel can identify hot button issues and concerns to senior management. 3) NASA blogs could function as a natural ombudsman for the NASA community. Through the recognition of issues being voiced by the community and taking a proactive stance on those issues, credibility within NASA Management

  8. An Analysis of Negative Cultural Transfer and Cultural Empathy in Cross-cultural Communication%跨文化交际中的文化负迁移与适度文化移情探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李婷

    2013-01-01

    Cross-cultural communication has been part of people’s life and work in the global village and negative cultural transfer has been a hot topic in academic circles .The paper analyses negative cultural transfer in cross-cultural communication and explores the strategy of developing cultural empathy in cross-cultural communication .%  阐释了跨文化中的文化负迁移和文化移情,分析了文化负迁移现象的原因,从接触交际对象的文化、进行文化对比、坚持适度原则等方面探讨了在跨文化交际背景下文化移情培养策略。

  9. Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Editor); Sato, Yuko (Editor); Barclay, Rebecca O. (Editor); Kennedy, John M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The advent of global markets elevates the role and importance of culture as a mitigating factor in the diffusion of knowledge and technology and in product and process innovation. This is especially true in the large commercial aircraft (LCA) sector where the production and market aspects are becoming increasingly international. As firms expand beyond their national borders, using such methods as risk-sharing partnerships, joint ventures, outsourcing, and alliances, they have to contend with national and corporate cultures. Our focus is on Japan, a program participant in the production of the Boeing Company's 777. The aspects of Japanese culture and workplace communications will be examined: (1) the influence of Japanese culture on the diffusion of knowledge and technology in aerospace at the national and international levels; (2) those cultural determinants-the propensity to work together, a willingness to subsume individual interests to a greater good, and an emphasis on consensual decision making-that have a direct bearing on the ability of Japanese firms to form alliances and compete in international markets; (3) and those cultural determinants thought to influence the information-seeking behaviors and workplace communication practices of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists. In this article, we report selective results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on workplace communications. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communication, use of libraries, use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports.

  10. Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Editor); Sato, Yuko (Editor); Barclay, Rebecca O. (Editor); Kennedy, John M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The advent of global markets elevates the role and importance of culture as a mitigating factor in the diffusion of knowledge and technology and in product and process innovation. This is especially true in the large commercial aircraft (LCA) sector where the production and market aspects are becoming increasingly international. As firms expand beyond their national borders, using such methods as risk-sharing partnerships, joint ventures, outsourcing, and alliances, they have to contend with national and corporate cultures. Our focus is on Japan, a program participant in the production of the Boeing Company's 777. The aspects of Japanese culture and workplace communications will be examined: (1) the influence of Japanese culture on the diffusion of knowledge and technology in aerospace at the national and international levels; (2) those cultural determinants-the propensity to work together, a willingness to subsume individual interests to a greater good, and an emphasis on consensual decision making-that have a direct bearing on the ability of Japanese firms to form alliances and compete in international markets; (3) and those cultural determinants thought to influence the information-seeking behaviors and workplace communication practices of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists. In this article, we report selective results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on workplace communications. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communication, use of libraries, use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports.

  11. The view to another: cultural barriers to communication, new narrative and Brazil country brand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Chibás Ortiz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the importance of valuing micronarratives of foreigners (especially Cubans who live in Brazil for the formation and reformulation of their individual identity as immigrants, as well as to verify their contribution to the formation of Brazilian identity and country brand. For this, different ways to see brand Brazil are shown, from outside and from within, according to Cubans. This work analyzes Cubans micronarratives in Brazil through the results of a pilot research and analyzes some of the cultural barriers to communication faced by immigrants. We used the theoretical and practical method with qualitative and quantitative techniques such as literature review, participant observation, interviews and questionnaires. Among the results we highlight the diagnosis of cultural barriers to communication faced by Cubans, as well as the way they see the country brand before and after staying here. These results indicate that there are elements of country brand that can be told otherwise, based on micro-narratives of regular people. Also there are positive attributes of brand Brazil that are still little explored in the media.

  12. Exploring technical and cultural appeals in strategic risk communication: the Fernald radium case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jennifer Duffield

    2003-04-01

    Risk disputes are often characterized by tensions between technical and cultural understandings of risk and by communication practices that reflect those differing perspectives. This study considers how participants in risk debates draw upon and combine aspects of technical and cultural rationality as broad orientations to risk in expressing their views and formulating persuasive appeals during risk debates. Rhetorical theorist Kenneth Burke's (1984) concept of frames of acceptance is used to analyze a case study involving competing priorities for radium stored at the Fernald site, a former Department of Energy nuclear weapons facility. A rhetorical analysis is conducted using the transcript from a 1995 public meeting during which local residents and a nuclear medicine expert discussed priorities of Fernald site cleanup versus providing radium stored on site for promising cancer research. Two tensions are identified that fostered disagreement among discussants: the first a tension between a local or global context for the controversy and the second a tension between competing definitions of public participation for this issue. This study analyzes the rhetorical strategies by which participants in the Fernald radium debate articulated these tensions and argues that technical and cultural rationality (Plough & Krimsky, 1987) acted as sources of rhetorical invention influencing participants' individual frames of acceptance and the ways they defined and interpreted the situation and crafted persuasive appeals.

  13. Calibrating collective commitments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunin-Keplicz, B; Verbrugge, R; Marik,; Muller, J; Pechoucek, M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we aim to formally model the strongest motivational attitude occurring in teamwork, collective commitment. First, building on our previous work, a logical framework is sketched in which social commitments and collective intentions are formalized. Then, different versions of collective

  14. Understanding the repercussions of intercultural communicative competence: a study on the degree of students’ cultural awareness, social and communication skills

    OpenAIRE

    Malissa Maria Mahmud; Shiau Foong Wong

    2016-01-01

    Demographic change is transforming the way we communicate. In many parts of the world, the society has become increasingly multicultural and multi-ethnic. In this context, intercultural cognizance is one of the pivotal facets for intercultural communication. The recent years has seen the emergence of the intercultural communicative competence (ICC) concept permeating the education field thereby a large and growing body of literature has commenced to investigate the concept of intercultural co...

  15. 民族文化定势在跨文化交际中的影响%The Effedt of National Cultural Stereotype in Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯云菊

    2016-01-01

    文化定势在跨文化交际中是一种普遍存在、不可避免的认知方式,它是直接影响交际效果和质量的重要因素之一.对文化定势有更加客观正确的认识,能够促进跨文化之间的交流,我们要合理运用文化定势,使文化定势成为反思自我、认知他人的一个有效的基础,要正确恰当地处理文化差异性所带来的问题,达到成功交际的目的.%Stereotyping is a commonplace and inescapable cognitive approach in cross-cultural communication. It has been regarded as one of the essential factors that directly contribute to the effect and quality of cross-cultural communication. With a view to better understanding, this paper attempts to analyze from the dialectical perspective the concept of "stereotypes" , causes and their positive and negative impact on cross-cultural communication in order to promote effective cross-cultural communication.

  16. Managing by commitments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sull, Donald N

    2003-06-01

    What makes a great manager great? Despite differences in their personal attributes, successful managers all excel in the making, honoring, and remaking of commitments. Managerial commitments take many forms, from capital investments to personnel decisions to public statements, but each exerts both immediate and enduring influence on a company. A leader's commitments shape a business's identity, define its strengths and weaknesses, establish its opportunities and limitations, and set its direction. Executives can all too easily forget that commitments are extraordinarily powerful. Caught up in the present, managers often take actions that, while beneficial in the near term, impose lasting constraints on their operations and organizations. When market or competitive conditions change, they can find themselves unable to respond effectively. Managers who understand the nature and power of their commitments can wield them more effectively throughout a company's life cycle. Entrepreneurs can avoid taking actions that imprint a new venture with a dysfunctional character. Managers in established enterprises can buttress past commitments that retain their currency and learn to recognize when commitments have become roadblocks to needed changes. The manager can then replace those roadblocks with new, rejuvenating commitments. That doesn't mean you should try to anticipate all the long-run consequences of every commitment--and it certainly doesn't mean you should shy away from making commitments. But it does mean that before making important decisions about, say, operating processes or partnerships, you should always ask yourself: Is this a process or relationship that we can live with in the future? Am I locking us into a course that we'll come to regret?

  17. Organizational Commitment among Public Service Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brian S.; Worchel, Stephen; Woehr, David J.

    1998-01-01

    A study that examined factors associated with organizational commitment among 64 blue-collar workers found that the following were positively and significantly related: promotion satisfaction, job characteristics, communication, leadership satisfaction, job satisfaction, intrinsic and extrinsic exchange, and intrinsic and extrinsic rewards.…

  18. Organizational Commitment among Public Service Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brian S.; Worchel, Stephen; Woehr, David J.

    1998-01-01

    A study that examined factors associated with organizational commitment among 64 blue-collar workers found that the following were positively and significantly related: promotion satisfaction, job characteristics, communication, leadership satisfaction, job satisfaction, intrinsic and extrinsic exchange, and intrinsic and extrinsic rewards.…

  19. Cultura trabajo- familia y compromiso organizacional en empresa de servicios Cultura trabalho-família e compromisso organizacional numa empresa de serviços Work-family culture and organizational commitment in a services company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Eduardo Jiménez Figueroa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la relación entre la cultura trabajo-familia existente en una empresa de servicios financieros y el compromiso organizacional en los empleados, controlando variables sociodemográficas. A 219 trabajadores técnicos y profesionales entre 19 y 64 años, pertenecientes a 16 sucursales ubicadas en la región del Maule (Chile les fueron aplicados tres instrumentos de medición de las variables referidas. Se observa una relación significativa entre las variables constitutivas de la dimensión cultura trabajo-familia y el compromiso organizacional donde la cultura está fuertemente asociada a éste (r = 0,483, p = 0,05, Se registra que mientras más apoyo directivo desde la empresa es percibido por parte de los trabajadores mayor es el compromiso de éstos con aquélla y, particularmente, con su compromiso de tipos normativo (r = 0,417; p>0,000 y afectivo (r = 0,347; p>0,000.Analisa-se a relação entre a cultura trabalho-família existente numa empresa de serviços financeiros e o compromisso organizacional dos empregados, controlando-se variáveis sociodemográficas. A 219 trabalhadores técnicos e profissionais entre 19 e 64 anos, pertencentes a 16 sucursais localizadas na região do Maule (Chile, foram aplicados três instrumentos de medida das variáveis referidas. Observa-se uma relação significativa entre as variáveis constitutivas da dimensão cultura trabalho-família e o compromisso organizacional, estando a cultura fortemente associada a este (r = 0,483, p=0,05. Observou-se que quanto mais apoio diretivo da empresa é percebido por parte dos trabalhadores, maior é o compromisso destes com aquela e, particularmente, seu compromisso dos tipos normativo (r =0,417; p>0,000 e afetivo (r=0,347; p>0,000.It is analyzed the relationship between work-family culture with the organizational commitment of employees, controlling sociodemographical variables. 219 technical workers and professionals, between 19 and 64 years old, from a

  20. Organizational culture, creative behavior, and information and communication technology (ICT) usage: a facet analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Abraham; Sternberg, Akiva; Elizur, D

    2008-04-01

    Despite the prominence of organizational culture (OC), this concept is controversial and its structure has yet to be systematically analyzed. This study develops a three-pronged formal definitional framework on the basis of facet theory (FT) and explores behavior modality, referent, and object. This facet analysis (FA) of OC accounts successfully for variation in both creative behavior at work and the usage of information and communication technologies (ICTs). An analysis of data collected from 230 employees in the financial industry indicates that a radex structure was obtained for work and ICT. The behavior modality facet ordered the space from center to periphery, and referents facet relates to the direction angles away from the origin.

  1. Enhancing Space Science Communication with Cross-Cultural Venues in Latino Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P. A.; Reiff, P.; Sumners, C.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    Brownsville, Texas in the Rio Grande Valley is the site of an annual space science outreach event that illustrates successful methods of communicating science across cultural and economical boundaries. The Lower Rio Grande valley is predominantly rural, Spanish speaking with large portions of the population at or below the poverty line. Many of the Latino students drop out of school before receiving a high school diploma. For the past four years the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) has brought a group of educators, high school and undergraduate students to Houston for training at Johnson Space Center and the Houston Museum of Natural Science. The group subsequently organizes a one day event for 5th-8th grade students, teachers and administrators that is focused on a space science theme. In 2006 over 500 participants learned about NASA's return to the Moon. The attendees listened to a talk by a NASA scientist, viewed exhibits of lunar materials and participated in 20 different hands-on activities. Examples of the activities were the effects of the Sun's solar winds on regolith formation, lunar craters, potential water resources and future exploration. The event is a success because it is locally supported and organized by UTB and its students. UTB has taken "ownership" of the yearly activity. Outside support is limited to scientific data and information, supplying a guest speaker and materials support. Materials support can include NASA displays, telescopes, a portable planetarium and selected planetarium shows. Communication barriers between English speaking and Spanish speaking are eliminated as over ninety percent of the local leaders are bilingual. Additionally the portable planetarium has Spanish language programs. This is an example of an activity that crosses across cultural boundaries and can be exported to other regions of the western hemisphere.

  2. Quality of healthcare services and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanian, Akram; Rezaei, Tayyebeh; Abdullahzadeh, Farahnaz; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Dianat, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study investigated quality of healthcare services from patients' perspectives and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 surgery patients and 101 nurses caring them in a public hospital in Tabriz-Iran. Data were collected using the service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL), hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC) and nurse physician professional communication questionnaire. Results: The highest and lowest mean (±SD) scores of the patients' perception on the healthcare services quality belonged to the assurance 13.92 (±3.55) and empathy 6.78 (±1.88) domains,respectively. With regard to the patient safety culture, the mean percentage of positive answers ranged from 45.87% for "non-punitive response to errors" to 68.21% for "organizational continuous learning" domains. The highest and lowest mean (±SD) scores for the nurse physician professional communication were obtained for "cooperation" 3.44 (±0.35) and "non-participative decision-making" 2.84 (±0.34) domains, respectively. The "frequency of reported errors by healthcare professionals" (B=-4.20, 95% CI = -7.14 to -1.27, Pquality of healthcare services. Conclusion: Organizational culture in dealing with medical error should be changed to non-punitive response. Change in safety culture towards reporting of errors, effective communication and teamwork between healthcare professionals are recommended.

  3. Culture Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Warner-Søderholm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Whether managers are concerned with financial issues, marketing, or human resource management (HRM, cultural values and practices do matter. The purpose of this article is to understand Norwegian managers’ cultural values within the cross-cultural landscape of her neighbors in the “Scandinavian cluster.” Clearly, subtle but disturbing differences may surface even when representatives from similar cultures work together. As a follow on from the GLOBE project, data based on the GLOBE instrument were collected on culture and communication values in Norway from 710 Norwegian middle managers for this present study. Although the Scandinavian cultures appear ostensibly similar, the results illustrate that research can reveal subtle but important cultural differences in nations that are similar yet dissimilar. All three Scandinavian societies appear intrinsically egalitarian; they appear to value low Power Distance, directness, and consensus in decision making and to promote Gender Egalitarianism. Nevertheless, there are significant differences in the degrees of commitment to these values by each individual Scandinavian partner. These differences need to be understood and appreciated to avoid misunderstandings.

  4. Behavioural innovation and cultural transmission of communication signal in black howler monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseño-Jaramillo, M; Estrada, A; Lemasson, A

    2015-08-25

    Social traditions based on communication signals are widespread in birds, cetaceans and humans, but surprisingly rare in nonhuman primates known for having genetically-determined vocal repertoires. This study presents the first description of a singular case of behaviour associated with calling (placing a hand in front of the mouth while vocalizing: HFM) in black howler monkeys. We showed, first, that HFM was found only in a subset of the groups observed, at the same geographical location, and was age- and sex-specific. There was an audience effect on HFM, with highest rates when a neighbouring group was visible. HFM was non-randomly combined with audio-visual signals and always performed while roaring. High HFM rates triggered more vocal responses from group members and male neighbours, and HFM signalers temporally synchronized their behaviour in a predictable way. Finally, the positioning of the hand systematically modified the call's auditory structure. Altogether these results support the idea that HFM is an innovated, culturally transmitted communication signal that may play a role in inter-group competition and intra-group cohesion. This study opens new lines of research about how nonhuman primates developed strategies to overcome their constraints in acoustic plasticity very early in the primate lineage.

  5. 文化身份对跨文化交际的影响%Cultural Identity in Intercultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹佳学; 王晓玲

    2014-01-01

    文化身份体现文化个体或者群体对自身文化的归属感,有着不同文化背景和文化身份人之间交换信息和交流思想时候,就产生了跨文化交际。因此,了解不同文化群体的文化身份如何影响人们的交际是很重要的。%Cultural identity reflects the sense of belonging of cultural individual or groups .When people who have different cultural backgrounds exchange their information and share their thoughts , intercultural communication comes into being .Therefore ,it is necessary to understand how cultural identity to infect people ’ s communication .

  6. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Children's Communication Checklist-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vanessa Barbosa Soares da; Harsányi, Estefânia; Martins-Reis, Vanessa de Oliveira; Kummer, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    To translate the Children's Communication Checklist-2 (CCC-2) into Brazilian-Portuguese, to make its cross-cultural adaptation and to assess its internal reliability. The translation and cross-cultural adaptation followed the recommendations of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. The test was administered to 20 parents or caregivers of individuals with autism in order to investigate the level of understandability of the object under study. After implementing the necessary adjustments, the final version of the Brazilian-Portuguese CCC-2 was achieved. Parents and/or caregivers did not make any suggestion for its adaptation. The final version was certified by the author of the original instrument and by the publisher responsible for marketing the CCC-2. Reliability of the instrument is acceptable, with values of internal consistency of its subscales ranging from 0.75 to 0.90. The instrument can be used in the clinical evaluation of children with autism and developmental language disorder. However, further studies are needed to assess the reliability and validity of the instrument in Brazil.

  7. A rapid co-culture stamping device for studying intercellular communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh-Barforoushi, Amin; Shemesh, Jonathan; Farbehi, Nona; Asadnia, Mohsen; Yeoh, Guan Heng; Harvey, Richard P.; Nordon, Robert E.; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of tissue development and repair depends on communication between neighbouring cells. Recent advances in cell micro-contact printing and microfluidics have facilitated the in-vitro study of homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell interaction. Nonetheless, these techniques are still complicated to perform and as a result, are seldom used by biologists. We report here development of a temporarily sealed microfluidic stamping device which utilizes a novel valve design for patterning two adherent cell lines with well-defined interlacing configurations to study cell-cell interactions. We demonstrate post-stamping cell viability of >95%, the stamping of multiple adherent cell types, and the ability to control the seeded cell density. We also show viability, proliferation and migration of cultured cells, enabling analysis of co-culture boundary conditions on cell fate. We also developed an in-vitro model of endothelial and cardiac stem cell interactions, which are thought to regulate coronary repair after myocardial injury. The stamp is fabricated using microfabrication techniques, is operated with a lab pipettor and uses very low reagent volumes of 20 μl with cell injection efficiency of >70%. This easy-to-use device provides a general strategy for micro-patterning of multiple cell types and will be important for studying cell-cell interactions in a multitude of applications.

  8. Risk perception, scientific culture and communication media; Percepcion del riesgo, cultura cientifica y medios de comunicacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto Lobo, M. R.

    2002-07-01

    The people who asked me to give a talk for the Spanish Nuclear Society's 28th Annual Meeting, at the invitation of WIN (Women in Nuclear), have challenged me, or at least that is what my colleagues believe, to tackle the difficult task of venturing into fields unfamiliar to anyone who is not involved in University teaching in communication and journalism. However, the challenge was very appealing to me, first of all because it was an invitation from WIN (Women in Nuclear), which I would like to congratulate, together with the Steering Committee, for having selected Salamanca as the meeting venue in this very important year for this city (it has been selected as European cultural city for 2002, along with the Belgian city of Bruges), If there is any place that has been immersed in scientific culture throughout the centuries it is Salamanca, where every one of its stones could tell us a history of the convergence and divergence between knowledge and society. This Universidad Pontificia of Salamanca also encloses centuries of wisdom within its walls. I have mentioned the first reason for accepting the challenge: the invitation from WIN Espana. The second reason why I accepted is that, some years ago, the world of nuclear energy, them unknown to me, started coming up in conversations with friends, one of whom works in this field. That history of discovery began in a levelly little Swiss town, in Grundenwald, not far from Eintein's Bern, whom I will mention later on.

  9. Master's Degree Program in Scientific and Cultural Communication: Preliminary reports on an innovative experience in Brazil (Portuguese original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Vogt

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multidisiciplinary Master’s Degree Program in Scientific and Cultural Communication (MDCC began in the first semester of 2007. It is offered by the Laboratory of Advanced Studies in Journalism (Labjor of the Creativity Development Nucleus (NUDECRI and by the Institute of Language Studies (IEL, both of which are entities the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP. The program is also supported by the Department of Scientific and Technological Policy (DPCT of the Geosciences Institute (IG and by MediaTec – Media and Communication Technologies Laboratory of the Multimedia Department (DMM of the Art Institute (IA. The objective of the MDCC is to train and enable researchers with in-depth theoretical knowledge about current questions related to science communication. A global vision of the systems of science and technology are joined together with an understanding of a solid, contemporary literary and cultural repertoire. The interaction among subjects offered in the MDCC seeks to provide an education that allows critical reflection about the main accomplishments of science, technology and culture in our current society and the way in which the mass or specialized media have worked in order to communicate these accomplishments. The areas of research focus on the analysis of cultural production and science communication within the most diverse means of information, such as print, radio, television and electronic media. There is a special emphasis on areas such as science and technical history and the sociology of science, as well as other spaces of science and cultural communication, such as museums, forums and events.

  10. Alzheimer's: From Caring to Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Home Current issue contents Alzheimer's: From Caring to Commitment From Caring to Commitment ... Caring to Commitment During her sister’s battle with Alzheimer’s, Anne Murphy stayed by her side and continues ...

  11. 文学与传播(专题讨论)——%Cultural Issues in Literature Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣翼

    2012-01-01

    文学传播是整体的文学活动的一个方面。文学创作主要涉及作者,文学接受主要涉及读者,而在两者之间的文学传播中则是非人格的文化发挥作用。文学传播作为文化,首先是语言文化,语言不只是充当工具,也可以成为一种建构的力量;其次是传媒文化,传媒的形式成为铸造人的心灵的模具;再次是审美文化,传播中的一些状况就可能成为新的审美的动力。文学传播过程人的因素需要关注,而其作为文化又超越了具体的单个人。%Literature communication is one aspect of the whole literature activities. Literature creation mainly involves writers and literature reception mainly relates to readers, while literature communication between the two involves mainly impersonal culture. As culture, literature communication is first a language culture because language is not just a tool but also a power for construction; then it is a media culture, the form of media has become a casting mold of human mind; it is also an aesthetic culture, some situations in literature communication may become a new aesthetic motivation. The factor of human needs is worthy of attention in literature communication, while as a term of culture it goes beyond single individuals.

  12. Organizational commitment: Does religiosity matter?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrukh, Muhammad; Wei Ying, Chong; Abdallah Ahmed, Nazar Omer

    2016-01-01

    .... Findings and contribution: The findings showed a positive relationship between religiosity, affective and normative commitment while no association was found between religiosity and continuance commitment...

  13. Gender Difference in Language Communication and Its Cultural and So-cial Origins:A Review and Critique of Sex Stereotype and Its Representa-tions in Linguistic Communicative Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Xiao-tong

    2015-01-01

    This essay mainly attempts to analyze the gender difference in language communication and its cultural and social ori⁃gins by reviewing and critiquing a published essay Sex Stereotype and Its Representations in Linguistic Communicative Competence. Firstly, a brief introduction is made to overview the present studies on gender difference in language. Then the body respectively an⁃alyzes the cultural and social origins of gender difference in language and their concrete manifestations in language communication with an empirical review and critique of Sex Stereotype and Its Representations in Linguistic Communicative Competence. Finally, the conclusion part renders the reflection on gender difference in language communication.

  14. Postcultural Communication?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Iben

    2015-01-01

    When we as scholars use the concept of intercultural communication in its classic definition, as communication between people with different cultural backgrounds, we perpetuate the notion that national differences influence communication more than other differences; in doing so, ethnic minorities...

  15. Understanding Mexicans and Americans: A Mexican-U.S. Communication Lexicon of Images, Meanings, and Cultural Frames of Reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Guerrero, Rogelio; And Others

    This "communication lexicon," a new source of information in the field of language and area studies, describes how selected themes such as family, society, work, and entertainment are perceived and understood by members of the Mexican, Colombian, and United States cultures. It identifies broad trends of perceptions and evaluations…

  16. Understanding the Role of Culture and Communication in Implementing Planned Organizational Change: The Case of Compstat in Police Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Despite the popularity of planned change efforts, the failure rates of implementation are as high as 50 to 70 percent (Lewis & Seibold, 1998). While these efforts are affected by technical issues, the organizations' approach to change, structure, technological capabilities, and organizational culture and communication practices are…

  17. Knowledge contained and knowledge constrained in the communication across culture: a case on Scandinavian managers in an international setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob

    that the use of social constructivist theories with regard to interaction and knowledge sharing may be the way forward. Based on the authors own empirical research involving Scandinavian managers in engaging in cross cultural communication it is shown that barriers to a positive link between cross...

  18. Multilevel Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness in Indian Technical Education: The Mediating Role of Communication, Power and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochhayat, Jyotiranjan; Giri, Vijai N.; Suar, Damodar

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a new conceptualization of educational leadership with a multilevel and integrative approach. It examines the impact of multilevel leadership (MLL) on the effectiveness of technical educational institutes through the mediating effects of organizational communication, bases of power and organizational culture. Data were…

  19. Structural Equation Modeling of Classification Managers Based on the Communication Skills and Cultural Intelligence in Sport Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool NAZARI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to develop structural equation model category managers on communication skills and cultural intelligence agencies had Isfahan Sports. Hence study was of structural equation modeling. The statistical population of this research formed the provincial sports administrators that according formal statistical was 550 people. Research sample size the sample of 207subjects was randomly selected. Cochran's sample size formula was used to determine. Measuring research and Communication Skills (0.81, Cultural Intelligence Scale (0.85 category manager's questionnaire (0.86, respectively. For analysis descriptive and inferential statistics SPSS and LISREL was used. Model results, communication skills, cultural intelligence and athletic directors classification of the fit was good (RMSEA=0.037, GFI= 0.902, AGFI= 0.910, NFT= 0.912. The prerequisite for proper planning to improve communication skills and cultural intelligence managers as influencing exercise essential while the authorial shave the right to choose directors analyst and intuitive strategies for management position shave because it looks better with the managers can be expected to exercise a clearer perspective.

  20. Student Perceptions of Teachers' Nonverbal and Verbal Communication: A Comparison of Best and Worst Professors across Six Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, Alexia; Guerrero, Laura K.

    2010-01-01

    Students from six countries--Australia, Japan, Mexico, Sweden, Taiwan, and the United States--recalled the extent to which their best or worst professors used various forms of communication that have been associated with effective teaching. Across cultures, best professors were perceived to employ more nonverbal expressiveness, relaxed movement,…