WorldWideScience

Sample records for culture academic discourses

  1. The concept of culture in academic and public discourses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristoffanini, Pablo Rolando

    2012-01-01

    The present article is an exploratory examination of some of the problems and consequences that the application of different theoretical approaches to the study of culture entails. The aim is to show through examples some of the strengths and weaknesses of the main theoretical currents that have...

  2. Academic Discourse in Portugal: A Whole Different Ballgame?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Despite the existence of many contrastive studies that have drawn attention to academic discourse practices in other cultures, the formal constitution of the discipline known as Contrastive Rhetoric may ultimately have served to reinforce the hegemony of English Academic Discourse (EAD). That is to say, by focusing upon the technical question of…

  3. Networking into Academic Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warschauer, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Examines the experiences of three instructors in Hawaii who have attempted to integrate online communication into their academic writing courses. Emphasizes that the underlying assumptions of what academic writing constitutes are fundamental in influencing how teachers integrate technology in the classroom. (Author/VWL)

  4. [Psychotherapy as cultural discourse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefik, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    It is impossible to think about psychotherapy without reference to the cultural context. In order to understand the development of this domain it is helpful to apply the concept of cultural discourse. When we think about the over one hundred years' history of psychotherapy it becomes clear that understanding of a person, his/her difficulties, psychopathology, the role of a psychotherapist, psychotherapy and its limitations have been changing. It depended on the acknowledged epistemological horizon. Therefore it is important to observe the process of creating discourses related to psychotherapeutic "reality". These discourses are not simply descriptive but they participate in creation of reality. They are not neutral, on the contrary, their application has broad practical, theoretical, ethical and legal consequences. An attempt to describe the culture, or better cultures, we are immersed in, is an attempt to describe the identity of contemporary psychotherapists. This article, referring to the constructionists' perspective and works of Michael Foucault, presents how cultural changes influence psychotherapists' ways of thinking, their practice and presence in social space.

  5. Definitions, Discourses and Dilemmas: Policy and Academic Engagement with the Sexualisation of Popular Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Maddy; Garner, Maria

    2012-01-01

    While debates around sexualisation are underway in academic, policy, practitioner and popular contexts, there are tensions as well as connections across and within these arenas. This article traces the origins of policymakers' engagement with sexualisation and reflects on the conclusions from the recent reviews commissioned by the current and…

  6. Teaching the Conventions of Academic Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonney, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on disciplinary discourses, it's not surprising that so little recent attention has been devoted to identifying conventions that are universal in academic discourse. In this essay, the author argues that there are shared features that unite academic writing, and that by introducing these features to first-year students…

  7. Coherence relations in academic spoken discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Desiderato Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available According to Rhetorical Structure Theory, implicit propositions emerge from the combination of pieces of text which hang together. Implicit propositions have received various labels as coherence relations, discourse relations, rhetorical relations or relational propositions. When two portions of a text hold a relation, the addressee of the text may recognize the connection even without the presence of a formal sign as a conjunction or a discourse marker. In this paper we claim that some intrinsic spoken discourse phenomena like paraphrasing, repetition, correction and parenthetical insertion hold coherence relations with other portions of discourse and, thus, may be considered strategies for the construction of coherence. The analysis, based on academic spoken discourse (five university lectures in Brazilian Portuguese, shows that these phenomena are recurring and relevant for the study of spoken discourse.

  8. Cultural Dimensions Of Legal Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierocka Halina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the intention for precision and accuracy, legal discourse is oftentimes complex, archaic and ambiguous - which gives rise to contentious interpretation. Moreover, little or no attention is paid to the cultural dimension of legal discourse, which plays a critical role in the translation and interpretation of legal texts, as well as in the application of law. This paper endeavours to illustrate the impact the culture, or, more precisely, legal culture has on the way legal texts are construed or translated and to present problems which arise in the interpretation, translation and application of law as a result of cultural diversities

  9. Critical Language Study and Translation: The Case of Academic Discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Karen

    2006-01-01

    This chapter uses Critical Discourse Analysis to show the very different ideologies encoded into Portuguese and English academic discourse,arguing that translation from one to the other is virtually impossible within the genre of the academic article.

  10. Ambivalences: Voices of Indonesian Academic Discourse Gatekeepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basthomi, Yazid

    2012-01-01

    This article presents voices of academic discourse gatekeepers in the Indonesian context. It reports on results of an attempt to re-read (re-analyze and re-interpret) the transcripts of interviews with Indonesian journal editors/reviewers in the area of English Language Teaching (ELT). The interviews were made with five editors/reviewers of two…

  11. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  12. Bell Discourse in Russian Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Элеонора Р Лассан

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the symbolic meaning of Russian ringing of bell in the Russian discourse. According to Lotman’s definition of symbol, it has dual nature: an invariant essence and its modification in relation to the cultural context. The article introduces informative and linguistic modifications of the bell topic in the Russian poetic discourse of the 19th, the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century. The author of the article provides the detailed analysis of such discursive descriptions of bell ringing as the ringing of church bells and alarm . The author arrives at the conlusion that the alarm topic prevails in contemporary poetry and this indicates the state of public dissatisfaction. In the 19th and the 20th centuries lexemes the ringing of church bells and alarm were used literally, but in the 21st century lexeme alarm acquires metaphorical meaning of call for blood.

  13. Academic discourse and narratives of literacy as 'equipment for living'

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Kris

    2011-01-01

    In his article "Academic Discourse and Narratives of Literacy as 'Equipment for Living'" Kris Rutten discusses practices of academic discourse and argues that students entering higher education have to become part of a specific community of institutional discourse. Rutten claims that narratives of and about literacy — narratives that revolve around issues dealing with language and the acquisition of literacy — "dramatize" the tension of moving from one discourse community to another. By chart...

  14. Understanding Resistance: An Analysis of Discourses in Academic Staff Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Using social realist theory and critical discourse analysis, this article examines a number of discourses which construct academic staff attitudes to teaching and learning in their disciplines. It seeks to explain academics' resistance to engaging in activities aimed at professionalising academic practice. The research described in the article…

  15. Miscommunication and Discourse Practices in Occupational Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlyk, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the contrasting discourse practices and occupational cultures of engineers and marketing representatives. The article argues that strong occupational cultures have different value systems and discourse practices. The article stresses the need for an interdisciplinary approach combining linguistic and cultural analyses to reduce…

  16. Resistance to Classroom Participation: Minority Students, Academic Discourse, Cultural Conflicts, and Issues of Representation in Whole Class Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John Wesley

    2011-01-01

    When trying to utilize class discussions as an effective pedagogical tool, teachers need to be aware of the conflicts that may arise due to issues of personal and cultural representation, linguistic differences, and misunderstandings of the tacit "rules" for participation. Because of cultural and linguistic variances in student populations, not…

  17. Does Size Matter? Dominant Discourses about Penises in Western Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan McKee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The fact that a large penis is important for giving women sexual pleasure is a dominant discourse—even though it must never be spoken—in Western cultures. And this is an interesting fact, for many reasons. It is interesting for making us think about how discourses work, and how we may know them to be dominant. It suggests that a discourse that is almost never spoken publicly may still be a dominant one. It suggests that there is at least one dominant discourse in Western culture that is in the hands of women, and that can be extremely powerful against men when used correctly. And it suggests—to me, at least—that in cultural studies we should pay more attention to the discursive resources in the cultures that surround us, and the ways in which they might be used, rather than insistently looking only to academic writing for ways to progress particular political ends.

  18. Discourses of Consumption in US-American Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Turner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores varieties and examples of discourses of consumption, focusing primarily on US-American cultural discourses. The international community has in recent years developed an extremely valuable body of literature examining strategies for facilitating sustainable consumption; economic ramifications of varying consumption behaviors; attitudes and social structures that encourage or discourage sustainable consumption; approaches to consumption as a component of a sustainable or “green” lifestyle; and considerations of consumption practices in relation to inequities between North and South. The United States has made relatively few contributions to this body of literature thus far. But although the U.S. has not been one of the primary sources of academic literature on sustainable consumption, several types of discourses on consumption have become prominent in U.S. popular culture. These types of discourses include examinations of the moral status of consumption; investigations of the environmental or health consequences of modern consumption behaviors; explorations and critiques of green consumerism; and discourses that either construct or critique the commodification of the nonhuman world to produce objects for consumption. Throughout this paper I outline and offer examples of these strains of popular discourse, drawing on a newly-emerging body of U.S. literature and critically analyzing instances of discourse about sustainable consumption in film, television, internet, and print media. I conclude by examining new perspectives on sustainable coexistence that offer transformative possibilities for establishing relationships with the more-than-human world that are not based primarily on consumption.

  19. Cultural awareness or a national monocultural discourse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    to define culture education as focusing mainly on adult foreigners' adaptation to Danish Culture rather than on intercultural competence, cultural understanding and cultural awareness. This reflects a tendency in Danish society towards a national monocultural discourse that is exclusionary and detrimental...

  20. Cultural awareness or a national monocultural discourse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    to define culture education as focusing mainly on adult foreigners' adaptation to Danish Culture rather than on intercultural competence, cultural understanding and cultural awareness. This reflects a tendency in Danish society towards a national monocultural discourse that is exclusionary and detrimental...

  1. The cultural approach in the development discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MACIA MARTÍNEZ, Irene

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We will try to analyse scope of the theoretical reflections making emphasis in the cultural element within the development discourse. Our analysis is carried out through a short study of different branches of Sociology and Anthropology interpretative perspectives regarding the development concept. Focusing the attention on cultural diversity, we want to analyse the presence of this matter in development policies. In the first place, we have carried out researches about the suitability of some universal values and its cross-cultural potential. Secondly, we have analysed how pluralism has shaped the development discourse and the language used for International Cooperation

  2. Tracing therapeutic discourse in material culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, I

    1999-12-01

    Approaches to language and subjectivity from post-structuralist theory outside psychology and from deconstructive perspectives within counselling and psychotherapy have questioned the way therapeutic relationships are formed in Western culture. Discourse analysis has been developed as a methodological framework to take this questioning further, and to provide detailed readings of therapeutic patterns of meaning. Foucauldian discourse analytic approaches help us to address how we are made into selves that speak, how we experience the self therapeutically. I will elaborate this methodological framework through an analysis of a piece of text--an item of consumer packaging--tracing the contours of therapeutic discourse through a series of 20 methodological steps. Therapeutic discourse draws the reader in as the kind of subject who must feel a relationship at some depth with the (imagined) authors for the text to work. This paper thus illustrates the value of discourse analytic readings of texts, and helps us to reflect upon our commitment to discourses of counselling and psychotherapy as empowering stories and as culturally-specific patterns of subjectivity.

  3. Chatting in Paragraphs: Towards Academic Discourse in Foreign Language Chat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Adam

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of an individual student's increasing approximation of academic discourse during a third-semester Spanish class that included chat-based instruction. During both chat-based activities and oral discussions in class, the student's language use became increasingly characterized by longer turns and the use of…

  4. Second Language Students' Discourse Socialization in Academic Online Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Yoon-kyung Kecia

    2011-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of second language (L2) students' class participation in English-language university courses in two different modes: face-to-face off-line and asynchronous online. The study addressed (1) what characteristics of academic online discourse were created in graduate courses; (2) how students reported their…

  5. Causal Discourse Analyzer: Improving Automated Feedback on Academic ESL Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukharev-Hudilainen, Evgeny; Saricaoglu, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    Expressing causal relations plays a central role in academic writing. While it is important that writing instructors assess and provide feedback on learners' causal discourse, it could be a very time-consuming task. In this respect, automated writing evaluation (AWE) tools may be helpful. However, to date, there have been no AWE tools capable of…

  6. Stance Taking and Passive Voice in Turkish Academic Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeksiz, Zeynep Erk

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at describing the functions of passive voice and how authors reflect their stance through those functions in Turkish academic discourse. Depending on the findings of a corpus based research, this study makes a counterpoint to functionalist views on the ground that passivization does not necessarily result in promoting agents in…

  7. Academic Discourse Socialization through Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mei-ching

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the nature of small-group discussion and explores how it fosters oral academic discourse socialization in a TESOL postgraduate course. The participants included four native-English speaking and six non-native English Speaking postgraduate students at a state university in the U.S. The findings revealed that small-group…

  8. Causal Discourse Analyzer: Improving Automated Feedback on Academic ESL Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukharev-Hudilainen, Evgeny; Saricaoglu, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    Expressing causal relations plays a central role in academic writing. While it is important that writing instructors assess and provide feedback on learners' causal discourse, it could be a very time-consuming task. In this respect, automated writing evaluation (AWE) tools may be helpful. However, to date, there have been no AWE tools capable of…

  9. Academic Discourse Socialization through Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mei-ching

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the nature of small-group discussion and explores how it fosters oral academic discourse socialization in a TESOL postgraduate course. The participants included four native-English speaking and six non-native English Speaking postgraduate students at a state university in the U.S. The findings revealed that small-group…

  10. Credibility and Accountability in Academic Discourse: Increasing the Awareness of Ghanaian Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adika Gordon S. K.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Drawing from a social constructionist perspective to written scholarly communication, this paper argues that training in academic writing for students in higher education especially in second language contexts should go beyond emphasis on grammatical correctness and paragraphing strategies, and also focus on the rhetorical character of academic discourse together with the mastery of its communicative protocols. Using the University of Ghana as a reference point, the paper reviews a selection of Ghanaian graduate students’ awareness of the protocols that govern academic discourses in scholarly writing, and in consideration of their unique educational and socio-cultural circumstances, the paper proposes strategies, from the pedagogical and institutional standpoints, aimed at increasing students’ awareness of the relevant communicative practices that engender credibility and accountability.

  11. NEGOTIATING INTO ACADEMIC DISCOURSES: TAIWANESE AND U.S. COLLEGE STUDENTS IN RESEARCH WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Liu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross-national, or cross-cultural, studies of academic writing have moved beyond contrastive rhetoric’s textual focus to broad concerns of students’ first-and second-language literacy development. However, we remain in the dark as to how, in a micro view, students initiate into academic discourses in cross-national contexts. Situating our study in first-year writing courses in a Taiwanese and a U.S. university, we examined students’ negotiation acts when they struggled to enter into social science discourses. Our study reveals that students in both institutions negotiated with academic writing at metacognitive, textual, and contextual levels. They brought rhetorical values, such as writing as a display of knowledge or writing grounded in evidential research, into their writing that they acquired in high school. Further, teachers’ expectations, their new perceptions of research and writing, and their dreams and experiences all came into play in their writing.

  12. (Emerging Discourses: Architecture and Cultural Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McGaughey

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Three recent works, Rosalind Galt’s Pretty, Anne Cheng’s Second Skin, and Daniel Purdy’s On the Ruins of Babel incorporate architectural history and architectural discourse into their analyses in ways that are new to their respective fields ranging from studies of film, gender, and race to intellectual history. Placing these three works in one essay allows for a detailed review of the ways in which each author employs architecture, at the same time as it reveals the benefits and challenges of incorporating architecture into cultural studies. The essay discusses the contributions of each work to their fields and also takes advantage of the different approaches to culture and architecture to explore the ways in which this relationship might continue to inform and generate productive studies.

  13. The discourse of the linguistic diversity in academic texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Krause-Lemke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Concepts of language and identity underlying academic texts on acquisition and language teaching are discussed to investigate how the texts deal with language teaching ​​within the different language contexts in Brazil. When texts as taken as an object of academic study, it remains to understand how language and identity are interconnected within the construction of language policies when a multilingual situation in Brazil is held to be the parameter. Analysis is foregrounded on current critical perspectives for language studying by Hall (2006 and Iglesias (2009 on identity concepts and by Bourdieu (2008 on language and discourse, through its problematization as an object of domination and symbolic capital. Results reveal a shift in some scholarly productions when they shun hegemonic conceptions about language and its teaching and instead establish a new discourse based on the linguistic diversity in Brazil. The new discourse, however, has not yet been incorporated to policies and pedagogical practices within Brazilian educational context, albeit present in many productions analyzed.

  14. Intercultural and Transnational Negotiation of English Academic Written Discourse: A Few Cases in the USA, South Korea and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Hanzhou

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to explore the issue of intercultural and transnational negotiation in written English communication. I am interested in the reciprocal development of written discourse across cultural boundaries. My analysis focuses on academic writers' sense of self and their individual ability to reach otherness when they share the roles of…

  15. Profiling academic research on discourse studies and second language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Castañeda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is little profiling academic research on discourse studies in relation to second language learning from a regional perspective. Thisstudy aims at unveiling what, when, where and who constitute scholarly work in research about these two interrelated fields. A dataset wasconfigured from registers taken from Dialnet and studied using specialized text-mining software. Findings revealed myriad research interests,few prolific years and the lack of networking. It is recommended to trace out our research as an ELT community locally and globally.

  16. Academic Discussions: An Analysis of Instructional Discourse and an Argument for an Integrative Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth, Tracy; Ross Anderson, Trisha L.; Snow, Elana H.; Selman, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the structure of academic discussions during the implementation of a literacy curriculum in the upper elementary grades. The authors examine the quality of academic discussion, using existing discourse analysis frameworks designed to evaluate varying attributes of classroom discourse. To integrate the overlapping qualities…

  17. German Influences on the Spanish Academic Discourse in Educational Sciences between 1945 and 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roith, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The idiosyncrasy of national academic discourses in educational sciences and the flow of ideas between them is a topic that has inspired recent research, even though it has not been treated very exhaustively. This study presents some results of an investigation into German influences on the Spanish academic discourse in educational sciences…

  18. Rabbinic Discourse, Law and the Culture of Opposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Skoll

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A style of discourse associated with a rabbinic tradition in Judaism exemplifies a core oppositional process of the persistent identity system of Jewish culture. Based in an interpretation of law as represented by Torah and Talmud, this style of discourse undermines central reifications of the Greco-Roman-Christian tradition, which constitutes the historical framework for contemporary Western cultural hegemony. A central precept is that identity is contingent and not, as in the predominant Western tradition, something that is natural, transcendent, and absolute. The implicit critique of Western identity allows rabbinic discourse to deconstruct and challenge the authority of law and governmentality.

  19. Conjunctions in ELF academic discourse: a corpus-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Centonze

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – Conjunctions as fundamental elements in the construction of discourse cohesion represent a relatively neglected research area, due to their complexity and the bewildering number of “conjunctive relations” (Halliday and Hasan 1976: 226 that they may express in context, as also highlighted in Christiansen (2011. In addition to this, there does not seem to be a shared view as far as the classification and denomination of the different kinds of conjunctions are concerned (cf. Halliday and Hasan 1976; Vande Kopple 1985; Martin and Rose 2003; Hyland 2005b. The selection of a specific type of conjunction acquires more importance because they are typically open to so many different interpretations, especially when the participants in the speech event come from diverse lingua-cultural backgrounds (cf. Guido 2007; Guido 2008; Cogo et al. 2011.Following the taxonomy provided by Halliday and Hasan (1976 for conjunctions, our study attempts to shed light on the usage of conjunctions by ELF speakers in specific contexts. We shall consider ten transcripts taken from the VOICE Corpus (Seidlhofer et. al 2013, namely five interviews and five conversations in multicultural academic contexts (approximately 4,000 words each, and analyze the number of instances for each type of conjunction (additive, adversative, clausal, temporal as well as continuatives in depth, by adopting a quantitative as well as a qualitative method and by using TextSTAT 2.9 (Huning 2012. We shall then move on to the analysis of conjunctions with respect to their internal properties/collocates and eventually see the occurrence of conjunctions by comparing them with the two different speech events which are chosen as the subject of our study, i.e. interviews and conversations. We shall see the extent to which certain conjunctions are more restricted than others in terms of usage (cf. Leung 2005 in both types of speech events, despite the great number of options available to the

  20. Uncovering Metaethical Assumptions in Bioethical Discourse across Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Laura Specker

    2016-03-01

    Much of bioethical discourse now takes place across cultures. This does not mean that cross-cultural understanding has increased. Many cross-cultural bioethical discussions are marked by entrenched disagreement about whether and why local practices are justified. In this paper, I argue that a major reason for these entrenched disagreements is that problematic metaethical commitments are hidden in these cross-cultural discourses. Using the issue of informed consent in East Asia as an example of one such discourse, I analyze two representative positions in the discussion and identify their metaethical commitments. I suggest that the metaethical assumptions of these positions result from their shared method of ethical justification: moral principlism. I then show why moral principlism is problematic in cross-cultural analyses and propose a more useful method for pursuing ethical justification across cultures.

  1. THE USE OF STATISTIC KNOWLEDGE IN ACADEMIC DISCOURSES OF LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Sperrhake

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes how discourses of literacy, illiteracy and alphabetic literacy have used statistical knowledge. We carried out a search into digital files of journals specialized in Education and Statistics, as well as into CAPES Thesis Database. From the selected corpus, it is possible to perceive the following kinds of uses: 1 statistics used as empirical material; 2 statistics used as methodological procedure; 3 reference to statistical knowledge. Besides evidencing how the statistical knowledge has been used, the analysis of academic productions has enabled us to perceive other two points: the appearance of levels of alphabetic literacy, and the change in the understanding of the relationship of the subject with reading and writing.

  2. ’Interdisciplinarity’ and Epistemic Authority in Academic Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte

    This presentation discusses the development of a field theoretical framework to explore the discursive constructions of ’interdisciplinarity’(id) in academic discourse, with the purpose of identifying epistemic authority on research processes involving more than one ’discipline’. The literature...... on ’id’ is vast, and dispersed across fields such as e.g. interdisciplinary studies, social epistemology, sociology, philosophy, and history of science. The literature is characterized by considerable terminological and conceptual ambiguity. Often ’id’ is addressed as a generic phenomenon, with analyses......). The focus of the presentation is the very process of developing a relational framework, including a language that helps me objectify my relation to the object of ’id’ and get away from pre-constructed categories. Thus, the construction of my object of research involves several interrelated processes...

  3. DISCOURSE OF POWER AND DISCOURSE OF MASSES IN MODERN PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY: CULTURAL, BIOLOGICAL AND RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Karpenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is the identification of anthropological content of the power and mass discourses in contemporary social transformations. The theme of philosophical and anthropological meaning of discourse communication between mass and power in post-modern society acquires the significant relevance because of technologization of the governance processes and transformation of previously sacred power as a set of standard procedures. Methodology of the paper consists on the disclosure of cultural peculiarities and substantial forms of power discourse and mass discourse properties in major directions of philosophical anthropology of middle XX and at the beginning of the XXI century. Scientific novelty. The directions of the institutional sense expression in the discourse of power supply are disclosed and the process of mixing power and management and representative anthropology is fixed. The biological, cultural and religious levels of displaying the anthropological significance discourse of power are identified. The definition is given to the anthropic content of discursive power of speech activities and methods and philosophical reflection of the discursive self-expression of powerful masses. The specificity of the interaction of power and mass discourses of national and universal semantic spaces are defined. In conclusions it is indicated that the anthropic space of the contemporary mass human is narrowing significantly, because the individuals’ participation in technology of society management is finally excluded. On this basis even the key aspect of mass discourse breaks – the mass narrations about the power, because the power performs the direct intervention in the mass discourse structure of sense-creation by the way of suggestion.

  4. Analysing Cultural Models in Socio-Cultural Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Laura

    2007-01-01

    This paper illustrates how classroom discourse demands a multi-layered analysis. The first analysis focuses on classroom discourse and provides a picture of pupil participation in teacher-pupil interactions: who is inducted into discourse and who is not. However, this local micro-analysis does not afford interpretation at the level of the…

  5. Oral Academic Discourse Socialization of In-Service Teachers in a TEFL Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Parviz; Samad, Arshad Abd.

    2015-01-01

    Oral academic discourse socialization refers to a process through which students learn about the conventions and practices of their disciplinary fields while doing academic spoken practices. In this study, it refers to the interactions of the participant teachers with their peers and instructors as well as their engagement with academic texts.…

  6. Cultural Collisions in L2 Academic Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Reviews research on writing and culture, focusing on the collisions of cultures when discourse practices second language writers are expected to reproduce clash with what they know, believe, and value in their first language writing. Describes collisions of culture in writing regarding voice, organization, reader/writer responsibility, topic, and…

  7. Academic capitalism and academic culture: A case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mendoza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this department and they consider industrial sponsorship as a highly effective vehicle for enhancing the quality of education of students and pursuing their scientific interests. This study provides valuable insights to federal and institutional policiescreated to foster industry-academia partnerships and commercialization of academic research.

  8. The Performance of Academic Identity as Pedagogical Model and Guide in/through Lecture Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, David

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that lecture discourse has the capacity to support students in their transition into modes of social critique and that the lecturer, through an enactment of an academic identity in lecture discourse, plays a crucial role as both model and guide. Certain crucial phases and sub-phases of lectures are used to model an engagement…

  9. Academic Culture: A student’s guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Simms

    2006-04-01

    By JEAN BRICK National Centre for English Language Teaching and Research (NCELTR 2006, Sydney, ISBN 978 74138 135 (pbk ISBN 1 74138 135 5 (pbk 263 pages Jean Brick’s book is an excellent guide to academic culture and skills for students and academics alike. Although she describes the book as being about academic culture it is much more than that. I found it to be a comprehensive, useful and very readable guide to English for a variety of academic purposes.

  10. Tarpkalbiniai ir tarpdalykiniai mokslo kalbos tyrimai: medžiagos ir metodų pasirinkimo iššūkiai tyrėjams | Cross-linguistic and cross-disciplinary studies of academic discourse: Challenges for the researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Šinkūnienė

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent trends in academic discourse analysis reveal a keen scholarly interest in cross-disciplinary and cross-linguistic variation in academic texts. While most of the research is still on the English language, the last few decades have seen an upsurge of interest in academic discourse produced in other languages, frequently comparing it to patterns of writing and argumentation in Anglo-American scientific texts. Numerous studies attempt to outline the universal features of academic discourse as well as to highlight the specific ones, typical only of some of the disciplines or cultural communities. Thus, features of academic discourse are often interpreted within the “big” (i. e. national and “small” (i. e. disciplinary culture context (cf. Atkinson 2004. The paper briefly reviews trends in current academic discourse research, mainly in the genre of the research article. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the challenges that researchers of academic discourse face while compiling specialized comparable corpora for their cross-disciplinary and cross-linguistic analyses and to highlight certain methodological issues which are important in this type of analyses. As noted by many researchers in the field, the reliability of the results and a better empirical grounding primarily depend on the appropriately selected common ground of comparison. An overview of recently published research on cross-linguistic and cross-disciplinary aspects of academic discourse reveals various methodological solutions to corpus design and data analysis.

  11. The Cultural Divide of Discourse: Understanding How English-Language Learners' Primary Discourse Influences Acquisition of Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Lydia

    2008-01-01

    As the minority population and achievement gap in the United States continue to grow, the rapidly increasing epidemic of leaving English-language learners (ELLs) behind is one of grave concern for educators. Due to disparities between academic Discourses and ELLs' primary Discourse, a free and equal education, as claimed by the U.S. government,…

  12. Academic discourse: Dissociating standardized and conversational measures of language proficiency in bilingual kindergarteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, Kathleen F; Bialystok, Ellen

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between performance on standardized measures of language proficiency and conversational measures of the same features used in academic discourse among 24 monolingual and 25 bilingual kindergarteners. Academic discourse performance was considered for both its linguistic and its genre features in two discourse forms: narrative and explanation. Bilinguals performed more poorly than monolinguals on standardized measures of language proficiency, yet they performed similarly to monolinguals in the discourse-based linguistic and genre features. Moreover, genre features were more strongly related to linguistic features assessed through discourse than to standardized tests of these same features. These findings indicate that standardized measures of language proficiency underrepresent the abilities of bilingual children and that children's second language proficiency may be more accurately reflected in conversation.

  13. On “Pedagogisation” of School through Academic Discourse on Education: Toward Autoethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusława Dorota Gołębniak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The text addresses the anxiety, triggered by an inability to transcend the tension-fraught theory-practice relationship, which the author and her colleagues—academic educators—experience in educating teachers. Twenty years ago the already documented discrepancy between the scholarly discourse on teaching and actual school realities could be, and indeed was, interpreted as a communist legacy and instrumentally employed in the scientistic system. Today, however, as the discourse on education is being Europeanised (lifelong learning policy, international research and development projects, student and teacher mobility schemes, serious reflection and re-thinking must be provoked by empirical findings which prove that in school practice the quasi-traditional model of transmission (of culture, knowledge, ideology has only ostensibly been abandoned for teaching in which school’s space of communication is used to promote individual and collective learning models. Interrogating the mechanisms of invisibility, in school practice, of comprehensive theories of learning (developed also outside psychology and both formal and grass-root support for redefining education in official state policies (for example, the school assessment systems or project-based learning, the author adopts the perspective of so-called engaged scholarship (first-person action research and autoethnography, which she treats not only as a strategy of combining the autobiographical and the personal with the cultural and the social in research and writing but also as a theoretical foundation for highlighting the political factors at work in education.

  14. French for specific purpose; French for academic purpose; academic writing; types of discourse; academic discourse; course design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Lallouet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available French for academic purpose is a recent development of French for specific purposes. This new branch of didactics aims to facilitate studies of non-native speakers at French or French speaking universities. Its concern is also to analyze the needs and diffi culties of foreign students so that a tailored course enabling them to follow any course in their fi eld of study could be worked up. The purpose of this article is to see if such an approach can be applied into a department of French where French language is at the same time aim, content and means of study. It will be briefl y explained what French for academic purpose is all about. We will then outline the diffi culties experienced by our students when writing their BA and MA theses. Finally we will take into account the practical aspects and     difficulties of such an approach.

  15. Discourse Issues in Cross-Cultural Pragmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Diana

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on recent research in cross-cultural pragmatics as distinct from interlanguage pragmatics. The essential difference between the two lies in the perspective from which each views cross-cultural communication. (Author/VWL)

  16. Assumptions on culture in discourse on ethnic minority health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    as contributing to low levels of knowledge about health and to adverse health behavior. Thus, the texts present cultural beliefs and practices as contributing to the high prevalence of lifestyle diseases among ethnic minority population groups. The analysis, however, demonstrates that a more nuanced discourse...

  17. A Discourse Analysis of Collaboration between Academic and Student Affairs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Needham Yancey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the nature of collaboration between academic affairs and student affairs units in the community college context from a qualitative perspective. A discourse analysis study was conducted to explore the ways in which collaborative practice was discussed and understood by chief and midlevel academic and…

  18. What Makes an Excellent Lecturer? Academics' Perspectives on the Discourse of "Teaching Excellence" in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Margaret; Su, Feng

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), we examine academics' perspectives on the discourse of "teaching excellence" based on an empirical study with 16 participants from five post-1992 universities. The article reports the findings on academics' views of the term and concept of "teaching excellence",…

  19. CULTURAL TRANSFER IN TRAVEL GUIDE TRANSLATION: DISCOURSE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikova Elina Yuryevna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intercultural communication and dialogue between various social and political structures and their globalized conditions immediately lead to the development of tourism and services market in this area, including translation services. The study of linguocultural characteristics of a travel guide in terms of pragmatically adequate translation is an interesting aspect for the analysis of the development and functioning of logics of modern interaction planes because the mass tourism participants' communicative characteristics are determined, on the one hand, by the universal, global, economic, social and cultural programmes of mass tourism and, on the other hand, by the local and national peculiarities of tourism discourse in general. The choice of linguistic means in travel guides is determined by their communicative and pragmatic as well as ethno-cultural characteristics that form the main discourse oriented translation programme. The translation of the travel guide texts to German supposes significant differences at out- and in-text levels to achieve maximum compliance with the potential recipients' expectations. The analysis of the two translations of the Russian-language travel guide made to German by the native German speaker and the non-native German speaker let define the so-called sharp edges in the cultural transfer of the information important for the discourse. The travel guide is characterized by the specific features of the touristics discourse, on the one hand, and by the interesting experience of translating, on the other hand.

  20. Psychotherapy as cultural discourse [Psychoterapia jako dyskurs kulturowy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józefik, Barbara

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is impossible to think about psychotherapy without reference to the cultural context. In order to understand the development of this domain it is helpful to apply the concept of cultural discourse. When we think about the over one hundred years` history of psychotherapy it becomes clear that understanding of a person, his/her difficulties, psychopathology, the role of a psychotherapist, psychotherapy and its limitations have been changing. It depended on the acknowledged epistemological horizon. Therefore it is important to observe the process of creating discourses related to psychotherapeutic “reality”. These discourses are not simply descriptive but they participate in creation of reality. They are not neutral, on the contrary, their application has broad practical, theoretical, ethical and legal consequences. An attempt to describe the culture, or better cultures, we are immersed in, is an attempt to describe the identity of contemporary psychotherapists. This article, referring to the constructionists` perspective and works of Michael Foucault, presents how cultural changes influence psychotherapists` ways of thinking, their practice and presence in social space.

  1. Between Academic Theory and Folk Wisdom: Local Discourse on Differential Educational Attainment in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carmen M.

    2001-01-01

    In the multiethnic South Pacific nation of Fiji--a former British colony--the impact of Western theoretical hegemony on educational discourse is evident. Results of extensive fieldwork show how themes of achievement motivation, differential valuation of education, and cultural deficit theory combine with surviving colonial discourse and…

  2. Assumptions about culture in discourse on ethnic minority health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This paper is interested in the way the concept of culture is deployed in documents aimed at investigating, informing on and promoting aspects of ethnic minority health. Within a health-political discourse focusing increasingly on individual lifestyles, ethnic minority health became subject to increased political and professional interest in the last decades of the twentieth and the first decade of the twenty-first century. Analysis of the discourse on ethnic minority health emerging in five texts addressing health professionals shows that the culture of ethnic minority citizens is primarily seen as contributing to low levels of knowledge about health and to adverse health behavior. Thus, the texts present cultural beliefs and practices as contributing to the high prevalence of lifestyle diseases among ethnic minority population groups. The analysis, however, demonstrates that a more nuanced discourse is evolving, taking the complexity of the culture concept into account. In accordance with Danish health-political priorities, the most recent text analyzed in this study promotes an individualistic approach to both ethnic minority and Danish ethnic majority citizens.

  3. Does cultural capital really affect academic achievement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides new estimates of the causal effect of cultural capital on academic achievement. The author analyzes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth – Children and Young Adults and uses a fixed effect design to address the problem of omitted variable bias which has resulted...... cultural mobility theory (cultural capital more important in low-SES environments) for indicators capturing “concerted cultivation.”...... previously reported; and (3) the effect of cultural capital varies in high- and low-SES environments. Results mostly support cultural reproduction theory (cultural capital more important in high-SES environments) for cultural capital indicators capturing familiarity with legitimate culture and mostly support...

  4. Gender culture of feminism in sociological discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Svyatnenko

    2016-10-01

    The popularity essentialist postulates in the interpretation of the gender is combined with the unpopularity of its interpretation towards man as such. Existentialist interpretations in terms of the existence allow to transfer the masculinity into the unreachable sphere, while making the femininity to be only a set of quite predictable and trivial features. In the socio-cultural aspect, it describes the masculine beginning as transcidental and such which forms the vertical towards the cultural system and feminine one being such which forms the horizontal and immanent one with more developed system of binary oppositions (centered movement - female, centripetal movement- male; construction - male, adaptation – female, etc.. The binary model, where differences are placed between the poles of femininity and masculinity, has a strong «defense mechanism» that prevents any attempt to go beyond this rigid design. If we attribute these differences of fundamental nature accenting to «sexual differences» and make them a leading structures of subjectivity, then we surpass all other personal characteristics or we are even limited by it. The demand variety plays on the same trivial opposition of «male» and «female».

  5. The Professional Agency of Teacher Educators amid Academic Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokka, Paivi; Etelapelto, Anneli; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Agency has been seen as fundamental in the renegotiation of professional identities. However, it is unclear how teacher educators exercise their professional agency in their work, and how multiple discourses frame and restrict the practice of their professional agency. This study examines how teacher educators practise agency in negotiating their…

  6. Oral Academic Discourse Socialisation: Challenges Faced by International Undergraduate Students in a Malaysian Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoodh, Omer Hassan Ali

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a qualitative study which examines the challenges faced by six international undergraduate students in their socialisation of oral academic discourse in a Malaysian public university. Data were collected employing interviews. Students' presentations were also collected. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed verbatim and…

  7. L2 Academic Discourse Socialization through Oral Presentations: An Undergraduate Student's Learning Trajectory in Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides an in-depth, longitudinal account of an undergraduate student's L2 discourse socialization in an academic exchange program in Canada. By invoking Rogoff's (1995) notion of participatory appropriation, this qualitative case study examined an L2 student's task-related strategies and performance as they evolved over time in…

  8. "Social Skills": Following a Travelling Concept from American Academic Discourse to Contemporary Danish Welfare Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, Annick; Jensen, Sune Qvotrup; Laursen, Julie; Pedersen, Oline

    2016-01-01

    The article traces the origin and development of the concept of social skills in first and foremost American academic discourse. As soon as the concept of social skills was coined, the concern for people lacking such skills started and has been on the increase ever since (now sharing public attention with related concepts such as self-control,…

  9. "Of"-Constructions in the Predicate of "Demonstrate" and "Show" in Academic Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liyin; Chung, Siaw-Fong

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates "of"-constructions in the predicates of two reporting verbs, "demonstrate" and "show," in academic discourse. A construction perspective is taken to examine how the two predicate constructions (["demonstrate" N1 "of" N2] and ["show" N1 "of" N2]) would…

  10. Doing Culture, Doing Race: Everyday Discourses of "Culture" and "Cultural Difference" in the English as a Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ena

    2015-01-01

    While current conceptualisations of the inextricable connection between language and culture in English language education are largely informed by complex sociocultural theories that view culture as constructed in and through social practices among people, classroom practices continue to be influenced by mainstream discourses of culture that…

  11. Doing Culture, Doing Race: Everyday Discourses of "Culture" and "Cultural Difference" in the English as a Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ena

    2015-01-01

    While current conceptualisations of the inextricable connection between language and culture in English language education are largely informed by complex sociocultural theories that view culture as constructed in and through social practices among people, classroom practices continue to be influenced by mainstream discourses of culture that…

  12. Constitutions of Nature by Teacher Practice and Discourse in Ontario Grade 9 and 10 Academic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeg, Darren Glen

    This thesis presents an ethnographic study, based broadly on principles and methods of institutional ethnography, on the constitution of nature by nine Ontario Grade 9 and 10 Academic Science teachers. The intent of this methodological approach is to examine how the daily practice of participants works toward constituting nature in specific ways that are coordinated by the institution (Ontario public school and/or school science). Critical Discourse Analysis and general inductive analysis were performed on interview transcripts, texts related to teaching science selected by participants, and policy documents (i.e. curriculum; assessment policy) that coordinate science teacher practice. Findings indicate specific, dominant, and relatively uniform ontological and epistemological constitutions of nature. Nature was frequently constituted as a remote object, distant from and different than students studying it. More complex representations included constituting nature as a model, machine, or mathematical algorithm. Epistemological constitutions of nature were enacted through practices that engaged students in manipulating nature; controlling nature, and dominating nature. Relatively few practices that allow students to construct different constitutions of nature than those prioritized by the institution were observed. Dominant constitutions generally assume nature is simply the material to study, from which scientific knowledge can be obtained, with little ethical or moral consideration about nature itself, or how these constitutions produce discourse and relationships that may be detrimental to nature. Dominant constitutions of nature represent a type of objective knowledge that is prioritized, and made accessible to students, through science activities that attain a position of privilege in local science teacher cultures. The activities that allow students to attain the requisite knowledge of nature are collected, collated, and shared among existing science teachers

  13. The influence of academic discourses on medical students' identification with the discipline of family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Charo; López-Roig, Sofía; Pawlikowska, Teresa; Schweyer, François-Xavier; Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Pastor-Mira, Maria Angeles; Hugé, Sandrine; Spencer, Sarah; Lévasseur, Gwenola; Whitehead, Ian; Tellier, Pierre-Paul

    2015-05-01

    To understand the influence of academic discourses about family medicine on medical students' professional identity construction during undergraduate training. The authors used a multiple case study research design involving international medical schools, one each from Canada, France, Spain, and the United Kingdom (UK). The authors completed the fieldwork between 2007 and 2009 by conducting 18 focus groups (with 132 students) and 67 semistructured interviews with educators and by gathering pertinent institutional documents. They carried out discursive thematic analyses of the verbatim transcripts and then performed within- and cross-case analyses. The most striking finding was the diverging responses between those at the UK school and those at the other schools. In the UK case, family medicine was recognized as a prestigious academic discipline; students and faculty praised the knowledge and skills of family physicians, and students more often indicated their intent to pursue family medicine. In the other cases, family medicine was not well regarded by students or faculty. This was expressed overtly or through a paradoxical academic discourse that stressed the importance of family medicine to the health care system while decrying its lack of innovative technology and the large workload-to-income ratio. Students at these schools were less likely to consider family medicine. These results stress the influence of academic discourses on medical students' ability to identify with the practice of family medicine. Educators must consider processes of professional identity formation during undergraduate medical training as they develop and reform medical education.

  14. The cultural counter-discourse on Lisbon’s slums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Loria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The urban periphery —slums— of Lisbon will be observed as the space of manifestation of the counter-discourse of contemporaneity with respect to the symbolic and cultural imaginary of Portugal. The music, as a production of the residents of the slums, particularly rap music, and contemporary cinema, as a mean of representation of these places, have contributed to the decentralization of the national imaginary and to the deconstruction of Portugalidade, showing the changes in social and cultural profile of the country in recent decades . To address this issue, we will focus on the critical production of some theorists such as Stuart Hall and Roger Haesbaert which have reflected respectively on the theme of diaspora and the concept of reterritorialization.

  15. Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael McCarthy

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction The study of discourse is the study of language independently of the notion of the sentence. This usually involves studying longer (spoken and written) texts but, above all, it involves examining the relationship between a text and the situation in which it occurs. So, even a short notice saying No Bicycles can be studied as discourse.

  16. Classroom Culture Promotes Academic Resiliency

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTullio, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Resiliency is what propels many students to continue moving forward under difficult learning and life conditions. We intuitively think that such resilience is a character quality that cannot be taught. On the contrary, when a teacher sets the right conditions and culture for it in the classroom by teaching collaboration and communication skills,…

  17. An Analysis of Dissertation Abstracts In Terms Of Translation Errors and Academic Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan TERZI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating English abstracts of MA and PhD dissertations published in Turkish language and identifying translation errors and problems concerning academic style and discourse. In this study, a random selection of MA and PhD dissertation abstracts both from the dissertations of Turkish speaking researchers and English-speaking researchers were used. The corpus consists of 90 abstracts of MA and PhD dissertations. The abstracts of these dissertations were analyzed in terms of problems stemming from translation issues and academic discourse and style. The findings indicated that Turkish-speaking researchers rely on their translation skills while writing their abstracts in English. Contrary to initial expectations, the results of the analysis of rhetorical moves did not indicate great differences in terms of the move structures, from which we concluded that there might be some universally accepted and attended rhetorical structure in dissertation abstracts.

  18. Images Bridging Home and Academic Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Sophia

    Often students are unable to draw upon their personal worlds and individual experiences to enrich their writing, suggesting a disparity between home and academic cultures. In light of this apparent disparity, teachers must try to bridge the gap, a task that is possible when the teacher focuses on the germinal, emotional, and unifying qualities of…

  19. Discourses of Anti-corruption in Mexico. Culture of Corruption or Corruption of Culture?

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela Coronado

    2008-01-01

    In the context of global capitalism the so-called developing countries are considered ‘commodities’ in offer in the global economy as emerging markets or for foreign investment. Countries need to show they are potentially highly competitive with low risk. The value of country characteristics is set by globalised managerial discourses, based on postcolonial ideologies that rate cultures and societies in terms of linear notions of progress and civilisation. Cultures and behaviours are judged po...

  20. Students' Use of Asynchronous Discussions for Academic Discourse Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Gulbahar H.; Amaro-Jimenez, Carla; Beckett, Kelvin S.

    2010-01-01

    Our universities are becoming increasingly diverse at the same time as online asynchronous discussions (OADs) are emerging as the most important forum for computer mediated communication (CMC) in distance education. But there is shortage of studies that explore how graduate students from different ethnic, linguistic and cultural backgrounds use…

  1. "Western discourse" and contemporary Chinese culture%"西方话语"与中国现当代文化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王富仁

    2007-01-01

    Starting with the differentiation between the basic terms such as discourse and discourse hegemony,and Western culture and Western discourse,this paper gives a survey of the relationship between contemporary Chinese culture and Westem culture.It holds that we should be opposed to the hegemony of the Western discourse while affirming the general tendency that Chinese culture is shifting from being closed to being open.However,this tendency should not be entirely attributed to China's submission to the hegemony of Westem discourse when China accepts the influence from the Westem culture in the process of renovating Chinese contemporary culture.

  2. Deaf Culture and Competing Discourses in a Residential School for the Deaf: "Can Do" versus "Can't Do"

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Catherine A.; Placier, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    From an ethnographic case study of a state-funded residential school for the Deaf, the authors employed Critical Discourse Analysis to identify competing discourses in the talk of educators. These discourses are embedded in the historical oppression and labeling of deaf people as disabled and the development of Deaf culture as a counter-discourse.…

  3. Perezhivanie and classroom discourse: a cultural-historical perspective on "Discourse of design based science classroom activities"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan; March, Sue

    2015-06-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser challenge the `argumentation focus of science lessons' and propose that through a `design-based approach' emergent conversations with the teacher offer possibilities for different types of discussions to enhance pedagogical discourse in science classrooms. This important paper offers a "preliminary contribution to a general theory" regarding the link between activity types and discourse practices. Azevedo, Martalock and Keser offer a general perspective with a sociocultural framing for analysis of classroom discourse. Interestingly the specific concepts drawn upon are from conversation analysis; there are few sociocultural concepts explored in detail. Therefore, in this article we focus on a cultural historical (Vygotsky in The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky. The history and development of higher mental functions, vol 4. Plenum Press, New York, 1987; The Vygotsky reader. Black, Cambridge, 1994) methodology to explore, analyse and explain how we would use a different theoretical lens. We argue that a cultural historical reading of argumentation in science lessons and design based activity will expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's proposed general theory of activity types and discourse practices. Specifically, we use Lev Vygotksy's idea of perezhivanie as the unit of analysis to reconceptualise this important paper. We focus on the holistic category of students' emotional experience through discourse while developing scientific awareness.

  4. Assessment - enabling participation in academic discourse and the implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anass Bayaga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study was an exploration of how to develop assessment resources and processes via in-depth interviews with 30 teachers. The focus was on how teachers use and apply different assessment situations. The methodology, which was a predominately qualitative approach and adopted case study design, sought to use a set of criteria based on constructs from literature reviews to evaluate assessments. Thus these characteristics guided the study which included: a brief description of assessment and moderation; assessment materials/resources; assessment objectives; assessment activities; assessment/re-evaluation; and alignment/consistency. The case (one site and 30 respondents were selected purposively. The study revealed that assessors need to use different methods of assessment depending on the socio-cultural setting of learners' environment and resources, if applicable. We argue that teachers should note the socialisation within their domain as well as the culture of their domain and domain-specific ways of talking, acting, and seeing the world.

  5. Towards a systemic functional model for comparing forms of discourse in academic writing Towards a systemic functional model for comparing forms of discourse in academic writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriel Bloor

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on research into the variation of texts across disciplines and considers the implications of this work for the teaching of writing. The research was motivated by the need to improve students’ academic writing skills in English and the limitations of some current pedagogic advice. The analysis compares Methods sections of research articles across four disciplines, including applied and hard sciences, on a cline, or gradient, termed slow to fast. The analysis considers the characteristics the texts share, but more importantly identifies the variation between sets of linguistic features. Working within a systemic functional framework, the texts are analysed for length, sentence length, lexical density, readability, grammatical metaphor, Thematic choice, as well as various rhetorical functions. Contextually relevant reasons for the differences are considered and the implications of the findings are related to models of text and discourse. Recommendations are made for developing domain models that relate clusters of features to positions on a cline. This article reports on research into the variation of texts across disciplines and considers the implications of this work for the teaching of writing. The research was motivated by the need to improve students’ academic writing skills in English and the limitations of some current pedagogic advice. The analysis compares Methods sections of research articles across four disciplines, including applied and hard sciences, on a cline, or gradient, termed slow to fast. The analysis considers the characteristics the texts share, but more importantly identifies the variation between sets of linguistic features. Working within a systemic functional framework, the texts are analysed for length, sentence length, lexical density, readability, grammatical metaphor, Thematic choice, as well as various rhetorical functions. Contextually relevant reasons for the differences are considered

  6. Review: Rainer Diaz-Bone (2002. Kulturwelt, Diskurs und Lebensstil [Cultural World, Discourse and Life Style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Angermüller

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In his work on the discourse of popular music DIAZ-BONE opens BOURDIEU's theory of distinction to a discursive approach. Analyzing the discourse of German heavy metal and techno zines, the author demonstrates the usefulness of a theory of discourse based on the notion of difference and opposition for the sociology of culture. He criticizes BOURDIEU for his reductionist tendency and underlines the relative autonomy of discursive patterns for establishing a system of hierarchical cultural values. In his analysis DIAZ-BONE finds that the discourse about heavy metal music gives, amongst others, a prominent role to "authenticity" and "artisan solidity", whereas the discourse about techno DJs rather highlights technical innovation and cultural networking. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs040126

  7. Critical Pedagogy, Internationalisation, and a Third Space: Cultural Tensions Revealed in Students' Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Margaret Jane; Brooks, Catherine F.

    2017-01-01

    Set within the context of a global pursuit towards the internationalisation of higher education, this paper critically examines student discourse in a globally connected classroom between learners in the USA and Singapore. It makes salient some of the cultural assumptions and tensions that undergird students' discourse in collaborative…

  8. The Role of Academic Discourse in Minority Students' Academic Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John W.; Ali-Khan, Carolyne

    2013-01-01

    Many minority students enter the university without the discursive ''codes of power" that they need both to find academic success and to self-identify as scholars. High schools and college preparatory programs too often ignore the role that academic language and literacy play in success at the college level. Even when academic…

  9. Features structuring image of Ukraine in socio-political and socio-cultural discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Pocelujko

    2015-08-01

    Layers of socio-political discourse under defined-State officially and historically historiographical discourses. These discourses present the image of the state in the context of national history as the source, where by means of targeted public policy is formed and implemented state identity as the language of institutional communication. Images states that officially created in-state and historically historiographic discourses as a set of ethnic myths, frames, stereotypes intended to create mechanisms of perception and interpretation of the past of the country, used in educational policy as a tool for national identity with the corresponding identity discourse. Socio-cultural discourse and the corresponding image of the state is characterized by a strong plurality, conceptuality, multyparadyhmality. In the socio-cultural discourse is conceptualization image of the state as part of the living world as opposed to social and political discourse, in which the image of the state appears more like dogmatic ideological construct, which tends to uniqueness. In the scientific discourse in constructing the image of the state is dominated intellectual and conceptual component, while in the state mediadyskurs-image formed on the basis of emotional and social representations stained. Latest distributed in makroteksts designed to create appropriate social attitudes, sensatsion, mobilizing different social groups on a variety of events and more

  10. Parenting Styles and Academic Achievement: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kwok; Lau, Sing; Lam, Wai-Lim

    1998-01-01

    Investigated relationships between parenting style and adolescents' academic achievement in Hong Kong, United States, and Australia. Found cultural differences in general and academic authoritarianism and general authoritativeness. Academic achievement was negatively related to academic authoritarianism and was positively related to general…

  11. Two left feet : dancing in academe to the rhythms of neoliberal discourse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGloin, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the recommendations by the 2008 Bradley Report into higher education, cultural competence training has attracted attention and funding in Australian universities. This paper attempts to initiate a conversation about the implications of cultural competence in its current formation as it also attends to the tensions we experience as non-Indigenous educators teaching both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. We argue that current models of cultural competence are structured by the prevailing neoliberalist discourse that continues to regulate Australian universities, through language and practice. Drawing on the metaphor of dance, we locate the ‘steps’ that find us, awkwardly at times, attempting to balance the demands of university policy with the cultural diversity and multiple subjectivities of our students. We contend that from within the current framework of cultural competence, attempts to locate an ethical practice that speaks to the increasingly culturally diverse student cohorts in our classrooms are becoming increasingly complex.

  12. Two Left Feet: Dancing in Academe to the Rhythms of Neoliberal Discourse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen McGloin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Following the recommendations by the 2008 Bradley Report into higher education, cultural competence training has attracted attention and funding in Australian universities. This paper attempts to initiate a conversation about the implications of cultural competence in its current formation as it also attends to the tensions we experience as non-Indigenous educators teaching both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. We argue that current models of cultural competence are structured by the prevailing neoliberalist discourse that continues to regulate Australian universities, through language and practice. Drawing on the metaphor of dance, we locate the ‘steps’ that find us, awkwardly at times, attempting to balance the demands of university policy with the cultural diversity and multiple subjectivities of our students. We contend that from within the current framework of cultural competence, attempts to locate an ethical practice that speaks to the increasingly culturally diverse student cohorts in our classrooms are becoming increasingly complex.

  13. Collective narrative: the narrative on Croatian language from academic to far-right discourses in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ilić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a case of under-represented narrative data which I call “collective narratives”. Drawing upon the concept of group-defining stories, it is argued that these narratives embody an antidote to the ’canonical’ Labovian paradigm as they construct collective subjectivity and causality. The paper explores how “collective narrative” is utilized in the discursive production of national identity by using a case study on Croatian language narrative which is perpetuated in some academic and far-right discourses in Serbia.

  14. "Finding Foucault": Orders of Discourse and Cultures of the Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    The idea of finding Foucault first looks at the many influences on Foucault, including his Nietzschean acclamations. It examines Foucault's critical history of thought, his work on the orders of discourse with his emphasis on being a pluralist: the problem he says that he has set himself is that of the individualization of discourses. Finally, it…

  15. "Finding Foucault": Orders of Discourse and Cultures of the Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    The idea of finding Foucault first looks at the many influences on Foucault, including his Nietzschean acclamations. It examines Foucault's critical history of thought, his work on the orders of discourse with his emphasis on being a pluralist: the problem he says that he has set himself is that of the individualization of discourses. Finally, it…

  16. Sophisticated Chaos: The Influence of Academic Discourse on Student Success in First-Year English Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Students' conceptualizations of academic writing are often based on their cultural and social expectations of what it means to be a student or an instructor in the academy. These expectations are as varied as any target population and continue to grow as multi-cultural heritages continue to expand. First-year student writers' performances are…

  17. Paraphrastic and non-paraphrastic reformulation and discourse ethos in academic writing in Spanish. Contrasts between specialized and advanced writing

    OpenAIRE

    Negroni, María Marta García

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this article is paraphrastic reformulation, non-paraphrastic reformulation and discourse ethos and its traces in academic writing in Spanish. It analyzes the use of connective devices and discourse markers in texts written by specialists (discourse linguists) and texts written by graduation students in this area. O artigo tem como tema a reformulação parafrástica, não parafrástica e ethos discursivo e suas marcas na escrita acadêmica em espanhol. Analisa o uso de marcadores ...

  18. The Relationship between Practitioners and Academics--Anti-Academic Discourse Voiced by Finnish Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiho, Anne; Ruoholinna, Tarita

    2013-01-01

    Nursing in Western countries has become increasingly more theoretical, and nurse education has been integrated more often with the higher education system. Historically, nursing has been viewed as a non-academic domain. Establishing Nursing Science (NS) in Finland in the 1970s has meant that the new discipline is defined as the core of nurse…

  19. Organizational Culture and Discourses: a Case of Change in a Brazilian Public Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindomar Pinto da Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the use of the discourse as a strategy for the dissemination of new cultural values in a State Secretary beginning in 1995. For this purpose, discourse analysis was used according to the concept by Fiorin (1997 based on the concepts of figures, themes and ways to manipulate discourses. It is a descriptive and exploratory study. The theoretical discussion was based on the concept of organizational culture in the dimensions of artifacts and cultural values. The analysis was carried out from the documents of the organization, including the projects of modernization, plans of action, reports of strategic planning, laws and decrees. Furthermore, the official journal of the organization from 1998 to 2006 was analyzed. For the years 2007 and 2009, the analysis was conducted based on the organization’s website. The results show that there was deep concern with regard to the theme of organizational culture during the whole process of modernization. They also indicate that the organization used different discourse resources to guide the individual behavior of its members such as seduction, temptation, intimidation and provocation. They also show that the official discourses are not in harmony with the various discourses found in the organization due to the plurality of values that are shared by the organizational actors.

  20. Introduction to the Spanish national team for intercultural studies of academic discourse (ENEIDA) project and research group

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Ana I.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a growing move towards publication in English-medium journals among multilingual researchers and a growing demand for materials (Swales and Feak, 2004) and courses in skills relevant to publishing in English for Research Publication Purposes (ERPP) (Moreno 2011). Research into academic writing has also flourished world-wide (Swales 2004), with crosscultural and intercultural studies of academic discourse across various languages and English being an area of i...

  1. Utilizing a Culture of Trust to Promote Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsart, Robyn; McCarthy, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    A simple Internet search of "academic dishonesty" reveals a continuing conversation among individuals within the academic community who are asking what academic dishonesty is, who is cheating, why students are cheating, and how we stop them from cheating. This article addresses these questions and provides a model for creating a culture of trust…

  2. Utilizing a Culture of Trust to Promote Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsart, Robyn; McCarthy, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    A simple Internet search of "academic dishonesty" reveals a continuing conversation among individuals within the academic community who are asking what academic dishonesty is, who is cheating, why students are cheating, and how we stop them from cheating. This article addresses these questions and provides a model for creating a culture of trust…

  3. Food security and food insecurity in Europe: An analysis of the academic discourse (1975-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch, Anita; Kjærnes, Unni

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we address the academic discourse on food insecurity and food security in Europe as expressed in articles published in scientific journals in the period 1975 to 2013. The analysis indicates that little knowledge has been produced on this subject, and that the limited research that has been produced tends to focus on the production of food rather than on people's access to food. The lack of knowledge about European food insecurity is particularly alarming in these times, which are characterised by increasing social inequalities and poverty, as well as shifting policy regimes. More empirical, comparative and longitudinal research is needed to survey the extent of food security problems across European countries over time. There is also a need to identify groups at risk of food insecurity as well as legal, economic, practical, social, and psychological constraints hindering access to appropriate and sufficient food.

  4. The Interaction of Discipline and Culture in Academic Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golebiowski, Zosia; Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that consideration of discipline and culture are complex and interrelated issue in academic writing and that this complexity and interrelationship can be seen at several different levels in specialized academic texts. Reviews research on contrastive rhetoric to investigate the impact of cultural and disciplinary factors on text construction…

  5. Cultural Identification and Academic Achievement among African American Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Miles Anthony; Hudley, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between intercultural perceptions, identity, and academic achievement among African American males. Specifically, this study investigated the relationship of academic achievement, cultural mistrust, oppositional cultural attitudes, ethnic identity development and educational outcome expectations and value,…

  6. Discourse Approaches to Oral Language Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard F.

    2002-01-01

    Looks at a sample conversation and examines layers of interpretation that different academic traditions have constructed to interpret it. Reviews studies that have compared the discourse of oral interaction in assessment with oral discourse in contexts outside the assessment. Discusses studies that related ways of speaking to cultural values of…

  7. Discourses of Anti-corruption in Mexico. Culture of Corruption or Corruption of Culture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Coronado

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of global capitalism the so-called developing countries are considered ‘commodities’ in offer in the global economy as emerging markets or for foreign investment. Countries need to show they are potentially highly competitive with low risk. The value of country characteristics is set by globalised managerial discourses, based on postcolonial ideologies that rate cultures and societies in terms of linear notions of progress and civilisation. Cultures and behaviours are judged positively or negatively according to the position countries supposedly have in the evolution of world society. In this framework one element that countries need to eradicate or reduce in order to be seen as ‘attractive’ is corruption. Towards this aim international and national government and non-government organisations have put in place anti-corruption campaigns. In communications with the general public, these schemes represent actors and acts of corruption through discursive strategies that characterize world cultures and their links with corruption in terms of postcolonial ideologies. In this paper I focus on the implications of the metaphor ‘culture of corruption’ for rating countries, questioning its effectiveness in anti-corruption campaigns. I argue that anti-corruption instruments based on postcolonial ideologies corrupt representations of national cultures and peoples behaviours, instead of targeting local and global sectors that gain from institutionalised corruption. Through the analysis of anti-corruption cultural texts publicly available in Mexico I illustrate how the ideological misrepresentation of corruption fails its stated aim, to transform a ‘culture of corruption’ into a ‘culture of legality’.

  8. HEDGING THROUGH THE USE OF MODAL AUXILIARIES IN ENGLISH ACADEMIC DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tofan Dwi Hardjanto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As a communicative strategy, hedging plays a central role in academic writing. Numerous different linguistic forms can be used to express this strategy. This article attempts to investigate modal auxiliary verbs as the principal means of expressing hedging in English academic discourse. For this purpose, a corpus of 75 primary empirical research articles from economics, linguistics, medicine, natural sciences and engineering was analyzed quantitatively with the help of corpus linguistic method. The results revealed that modal auxiliaries were used most frequently in linguistics and economics and least frequently in engineering and natural sciences while their use in medicine came in between. This seems to suggest that there is noticeable disciplinary variation in the degree of hedging through the use of modal auxiliaries in English research articles. Modal auxiliaries tend to be more common in soft sciences than in hard sciences whereas their use in health sciences in comparison with soft and hard sciences does not seem to show any significant difference.

  9. Analysis of pedagogical and cultural situations from the vantage point of discourse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José Murillo-Murgueítio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper encompasses analyses of pedagogical and cultural situations from the perspective of some of the authors studied in our discourse analysis class. Cultural authenticity and cultural stereotypes are dealt with stemming from real issues and mirroring them through the lens of Kramsch ́s (1998 insights. McCarthy (1994 is referred to when a curricular principle, the familiar to unfamiliar principle is considered as a pedagogical approach in ESL teaching.

  10. The Dynamics of Organizational Culture and Academic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Planning approaches are in a dynamic relationship with organizational culture. This article uses a case study of academic planning at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona to draw a correspondence between types of organizational culture and planning approaches. The case study shows the differing conceptions of organizational culture held…

  11. 英语学术语篇的对话性分析%The Dialogism in English Academic Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁庆福

    2011-01-01

    对话性是话语或语篇中存在两个以上相互作用的声音.它们形成同意和反对、肯定和补充、提问和回答等关系。学术语篇中不仅包含了作者,而且体现了作者之外其他人的声音。英语学术语篇的对话性可以通过间接转述、直接引用、评注词语、名物化、修辞和其它语法手段表达出来。以对话性作为一种阅读指导思想,语篇将得到更加全面而透彻的理解。%Dialogism means the multi-voice in a discourse which contains such relationships as approval and disapproval, affirmation and complement, question and answer and so forth. In the light of dialogism, this paper points out that academic discourse contains the author's voice and others" as well. The dialogism in English academic discourse can be expressed through direct and indirect speech, implication- carrying words, nominalization, figures of speech, grammatical structures and so on. English academic discourse not only contains the voice of the author but contains the voice outside the author. It is concluded that a discourse can be understood better when dialogism is taken as the ideology of reading.

  12. Discourses about Gender among Hmong American Policymakers: Conflicting Views about Gender, Culture, and Hmong Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Bic; Leet-Otley, Jill

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we draw on research with Hmong American community members to contribute to a more complex understanding of Hmong culture. Specifically, in a critical discourse analysis of interviews with 3 influential Hmong American politicians, we highlight the divergent perspectives on early marriage, Hmong gender norms, and the struggles of…

  13. The Class and Cultural Functions of Obesity Discourse: Our Latter Day Child Saving Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John; Davies, Brian; Rich, Emma

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the inexorable rise of "health" as regulative discourse, highlighting its class and cultural dimensions. With reference to the policy content of recent obesity reports, analysis suggests that contemporary concerns around obesity are but a modern variant of earlier eighteenth and nineteenth century child saving crusades whose…

  14. The fragmented discourse of the 'knowledgeable doer': nursing academics' and nurse managers' perspectives on a master's education for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Jonathan; Hyde, Abbey

    2009-05-01

    There has been a proliferation of taught masters' degrees for nurses in recent years, and like masters' programmes in other disciplines, the aspirations of such educational endeavours are far from unanimous. This article reports on part of a wider study, and focuses on a qualitative analysis of the perspectives of two key sets of stakeholders, namely academic education providers, and senior clinical nursing personnel, on masters' education for nurses. Fifteen participants were interviewed in depth, and data were subjected to a qualitative content analysis. Findings indicated that while both sets of participants invoked the discourse of the 'knowledgeable doer', that is, the notion of amalgamating a high level of theoretical knowledge with practical know how, there were also differences in how each group deployed this discourse. Academics tended to emphasise the 'knowing that' or theoretical aspect of the discourse, whereas those in senior clinical roles adduced the practical component more strongly. We argue that the discourse of the 'knowledgeable doer' is far from stable, unified and universally agreed, but rather comprises competing elements with some emphasised over others according to the subject position of the particular individual. We locate the diverse perspectives of the two sets of stakeholders within debates about the status of masters' programmes in relation to vocational and liberal education.

  15. Socialization to the Academic Culture: a Framework of Inquiry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mendoza.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to provide a theoretical framework and methodology for the understanding and study of the academic culture. It is based on previous works on organizational culture with emphasis on sociological and cognitive perspectives and applicable to all types of organizations. In particular, this article describes the application of socialization and sensemaking perspectives to the formation and development of the organizational culture in academic departments with emphasis on how new faculty members socialize and engage in sensemaking as they gain full membership in their entering department. It also provides a specific methodology to systematically assess potential cultural shifts in academic departments as incoming faculty interact with faculty in the entering academic unit.

  16. Cultural politics and discourse construction of regional identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Ignacio Campos Winter

    2016-07-01

    institutions and the construction of Rivers Region cultural identity. In this context, it was identified the problem of the tension between the self-construction of the Cultural Policy 2011-2016 (hereinafter PC as a state policy foreign to the ideologies of the successive governments and the position of various authors who argue that the PC it would be informed by a neoliberal ideology which promote certain cultural identities at the expense of others. Taking as a case study the Cultural Policy of the Rivers Region 2011 - 2016 (hereinafter PCRR and using as a theoretical approach the socialconstructionism and methodological discursive psychology, the objective was to analyse the discursive elaboration of PCRR and interpret their function of subjectivation of the many cultural subjectivities that constitute the cultural identity of the Rivers Region. The analysis of the results confirmed that the PCRR would inequitably promoting cultural identities through strengthening foreign subjectivities and undermining local subjectivities. It concludes that the cultural institutions would discursively managing inequivalent sites of enunciation between individuals and groups invested with the diverse cultural subjectivities that constitute the regional and national cultural identities.

  17. Changing of the Utopian discourse in the cultural context of Modern times

    OpenAIRE

    Nātriņa, Iveta

    2011-01-01

    The promotion paper analyzes the development of the utopian discourse from the utopia as a concept emerging in the sixteenth century, when T.More published his work ‘Utopia’ in 1516 until the utopia becoming a general concept in the cultural context of the eighteenth century. In order to address the variations in the utopian discourse, the space and time utopia classification is applied an also has been specified in the study. Hermeneutic text analysis has been used to analyze the utopian wor...

  18. Workplace culture in academic libraries the early 21st century

    CERN Document Server

    Blessinger, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Workplace culture refers to conditions that collectively influence the work atmosphere. These can include policies, norms, and unwritten standards for behavior. This book focuses on various aspects of workplace culture in academic libraries from the practitioners' viewpoint, as opposed to that of the theoretician. The book asks the following questions: What conditions contribute to an excellent academic library work environment? What helps to make a particular academic library a great place to work? Articles focus on actual programs while placing the discussion in a scholarly context. The book

  19. Culturally Diverse Students in Higher Education: Challenges and Possibilities within Academic Literacy Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tkachenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With growing diversity in the population, higher education faces a new situation with increasing student diversity. In our paper, we will explore questions concerning the consequences student diversity has for higher-education institutions. Based on our experience from three different R&D projects, the differences in culture and academic literacy practices give culturally diverse students challenges that have often been ignored in academia. Some other studies also document that this group of students has a much higher risk of dropping out and underachieving than majority students (Andersen & Skaarer- Kreutz, 2007; Støren, 2009. In our paper, we are going to discuss the students’ challenges and discourse of remediation that is often associated with their challenges and suggest how higher-education institutions can adjust their practices to be more oriented to intercultural communication. Intercultural communication as a dialogic approach may create dynamics in academic tutoring and lead to mutual change/transformation instead of a one-way adaptation of existing academic literacy norms. We argue that all teachers should be aware of cultural differences in literacy practices in the education systems and strive to adjust their teaching practices to the diversity in the classroom. This approach, we believe, can contribute to a better learning environment for all students, independently of their backgrounds. 

  20. Using Social Media to Measure Student Wellbeing: A Large-Scale Study of Emotional Response in Academic Discourse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkova, Svitlana; Han, Kyungsik; Corley, Courtney D.

    2016-11-15

    Student resilience and emotional well-being are essential for both academic and social development. Earlier studies on tracking students' happiness in academia showed that many of them struggle with mental health issues. For example, a 2015 study at the University of California Berkeley found that 47% of graduate students suffer from depression, following a 2005 study that showed 10% had considered suicide. This is the first large-scale study that uses signals from social media to evaluate students' emotional well-being in academia. This work presents fine-grained emotion and opinion analysis of 79,329 tweets produced by students from 44 universities. The goal of this study is to qualitatively evaluate and compare emotions and sentiments emanating from students' communications across different academic discourse types and across universities in the U.S. We first build novel predictive models to categorize academic discourse types generated by students into personal, social, and general categories. We then apply emotion and sentiment classification models to annotate each tweet with six Ekman's emotions -- joy, fear, sadness, disgust, anger, and surprise and three opinion types -- positive, negative, and neutral. We found that emotions and opinions expressed by students vary across discourse types and universities, and correlate with survey-based data on student satisfaction, happiness and stress. Moreover, our results provide novel insights on how students use social media to share academic information, emotions, and opinions that would pertain to students academic performance and emotional well-being.

  1. Organizational Culture and Academic Achievement in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Westhuizen, Philip C.; Mosoge, M. J.; Swanepoel, L. H.; Coetsee, L. D.

    2005-01-01

    A number of factors have been identified that affect academic achievement of learners. Among these factors, organizational culture seems to be a key factor. This is a complex factor characterized by many variables. To classify the variables included in organizational culture, a theoretical model was constructed. Two sets of variables were…

  2. Listening to the World: Cultural Issues in Academic Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Helen

    This book explores why students from other cultures often find it difficult to learn academic writing and understand its purpose in a U.S. university. The book discusses how these students' writing is influenced by cultures where people communicate indirectly and holistically, value the wisdom of the past, and downplay the individual in favor of…

  3. Popular Culture and the Academic Library: The Nye Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Jannette

    1980-01-01

    Describes the Russel B. Nye popular culture collection, explores the role of academic libraries in this area, and examines the collection building process for popular culture materials. The reactions of library staff and patrons are included. Seven references are listed. (RAA)

  4. A Cultural Analysis of the Achievement Gap Discourse: Challenging the Language and Labels Used in the Work of School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Roderick L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I critique the labels and terms used to frame practices aimed at closing the achievement gap. I examine how an unacknowledged "achievement gap Discourse" has emerged from the language that informs practices and policies of contemporary school reform. I use Gee's uppercase "Discourse" and a cultural analytic…

  5. Pacific discourses about cultural heritage and its protection: An introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The articles collected in this special issue aim at addressing the debate about the protection and use of cultural heritage in the Pacific within the context of globalization. Contributions aim specifically at analyzing the tension that exists between, on the one hand, political, legal and economic

  6. Pacific discourses about cultural heritage and its protection: An introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The articles collected in this special issue aim at addressing the debate about the protection and use of cultural heritage in the Pacific within the context of globalization. Contributions aim specifically at analyzing the tension that exists between, on the one hand, political, legal and economic

  7. Does cultural capital really affect academic achievement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier

    2011-01-01

    in too optimistic results in previous research. After controlling for family and individual fixed effects, the author reports that (1) six indicators of cultural capital have mostly positive direct effects on children’s reading and math test scores; (2) the effect of cultural capital is smaller than...

  8. Cultural similarity and adjustment of expatriate academics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    The findings of a number of recent empirical studies of business expatriates, using different samples and methodologies, seem to support the counter-intuitive proposition that cultural similarity may be as difficult to adjust to as cultural dissimilarity. However, it is not obvious that these res...

  9. The Construction of Pop Culture in Advertising Discourse:Taking Coca-Cola Advertising as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    官慧东

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes Coca-Cola advertising under Fairclough’s three-dimensional framework in the hope that con⁃sumers can better understand ideology behind advertising discourse. It reveals that Coca-Cola Company tries to construct pop cultures in its advertising discourse, in order to get recognition from its consumers. In turn, it contributes to the construction of the pop culture among the younger generation.

  10. A cultural historical theoretical perspective of discourse and design in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan

    2015-06-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser have initiated an important conversation in science education as they use sociocultural theory to introduce design based scenarios into the science classroom. This response seeks to expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article The discourse of design- based science classroom activities by using a specific perspective within a sociocultural framework. Through using a cultural historical (Vygotsky in The history and development of higher mental functions, Plenum Press, New York, 1987) reading of design based activity and discourse in the science classroom, it is proposed that learning should be an integral part of these processes. Therefore, everyday and scientific concepts are explained and expanded in relation to Inventing Graphing and discourse presented in Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article. This response reports on the importance of teacher's being explicit in relation to connecting everyday and scientific concepts alongside design based activity and related science concepts when teaching students. It is argued that explicit teaching of concepts should be instigated prior to analysis of discourse in the science classroom as it is only with experience and understanding these processes that students have the resources to call upon to argue like practicing scientists.

  11. A critical discourse analysis of British national newspaper representations of the academic level of nurse education: too clever for our own good?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Karen

    2012-12-01

    This critical discourse analysis examines articles about the academic level of nurse education that appeared in British national newspapers between 1999 and 2009. British newspaper journalists regularly attribute problems with recruitment into nursing and nursing care to the increasing academic nature of nurse education. It is impossible to separate discourse about nurse education from the wider nursing discourse. Many journalists laud a traditional and stereotypical construct of nurse identity and suggest that increasing nurse education produces nurses who are 'too clever to care'. This article argues that whilst nurses lack a voice in the National press, they have little input into the construction of newspaper discourse about nurse education and subsequently, limited influence on resulting public opinion, government policy and the morale of nurses.

  12. Predicting changes in children's self-perceptions of academic competence: a naturalistic examination of evaluative discourse among classmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermatt, Ellen Rydell; Pomerantz, Eva M; Ruble, Diane N; Frey, Karin S; Greulich, Faith Knesz

    2002-11-01

    Classroom discourse was examined as a predictor of changes in children's beliefs about their academic capabilities. Kindergarten, first-grade, and second-grade students (N = 106) participated in 2 waves of data collection, approximately 1 year apart. During the 1st year of the study, children's verbal interactions with their classmates were observed and recorded. Children rated their self-perceptions of academic competence during the 1st and 2nd years. Analyses revealed that changes over time in children's competence perceptions could be predicted from the types of statements that children made and had directed toward them by classmates. Examining sequences of child and classmate statements proved helpful in explaining the observed changes in children's perceptions of competence.

  13. Applying Cultural Project Based Learning to Develop Students' Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawati, Lulus

    2015-01-01

    Writing is considered to be the most demanding and difficult skill for many college students, since there are some steps to be followed such as prewriting, drafting, editing, revising and publishing. The interesting topic like culture including lifestyle, costume, and custom is necessary to be offered in Academic Writing class. Accordingly, this…

  14. Hispanic Cultural Survival and Academic Achievement: A Partnership That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Manuel G.

    The life of Benito Juarez--who broke all odds to achieve academically, politically, and socially--serves proof that Hispanics can achieve without sacrificing their cultural heritage. The current educational achievement of Hispanics in California and elsewhere in the nation is a matter for serious consideration. Nearly 50% of all Hispanics enrolled…

  15. Hispanic Cultural Survival and Academic Achievement: A Partnership That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Manuel G.

    The life of Benito Juarez--who broke all odds to achieve academically, politically, and socially--serves proof that Hispanics can achieve without sacrificing their cultural heritage. The current educational achievement of Hispanics in California and elsewhere in the nation is a matter for serious consideration. Nearly 50% of all Hispanics enrolled…

  16. The Academic Library and the Culture for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, Jon R.

    2016-01-01

    Several components of a campus culture affect learning, yet assessments regularly neglect some of them. Academic librarians should evaluate how they impact courses and student learning through their support of these neglected components. Assessment goals to address some of the components include measuring the level of support for courses with…

  17. On Cultures and Artscience: Interdisciplinarity and Discourses of “Twos” and “Threes” after Snow’s Two Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Sørensen Vaage

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At least since C.P. Snow’s seminal Rede lecture The Two Cultures, the idea of a significant difference in kind between the natural sciences and the arts and humanities has been prevalent in Western culture. A gap has been perceived to exist not only in methodology and theory, but more fundamentally, in understandings and worldviews. This has resulted in a dichotomous debate both in academic and media discourses. As a reaction to this, and parallel in time, some actors have strived to achieve a ‘third culture’. This is a common attitude in the still emerging field of ‘artscience’, whose actors seek to combine the advantages and knowledges of the sciences with those of the arts and humanities. Researchers from every concerned field have contributed to the exploration of the interface between ‘art’ and ‘science’. However, I argue in this article that the very term artscience, in simply joining together the words ‘art’ and ’science’, is reenforcing an old notion of a binary opposition between these two fields. The idea of ‘two cultures’, still implied within the image of a ‘third culture’, disguises the plurality of perceptions and approaches within and across fields. While useful in pointing out lack of communication between fields, it tends to overemphasize divisions, ignore complexities, and, in some cases, leave out important parts of the picture. I suggest that the discourse of the ‘third culture’ and the term ‘artscience’ may jointly occlude the multiple possible constellations of practitioners, roles and approaches, and may be a potential limitation to interdisciplinary collaborations.

  18. A Response to Professor Wu Zongjie's "Interpretation, Autonomy, and Transformation: Chinese Pedagogic Discourse in a Cross-Cultural Perspective"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    In response to an essay by Prof Wu Zongjie that was published in the "Journal of Curriculum Studies" [43(5), (2011), 569-590], I argue that, despite dramatic changes that have taken place in the language of Chinese academic discourse and pedagogy, evidence derived from the fields of psychology and the history of Chinese educational…

  19. Mingling and Debating Practices of Academic Discourse Exchange%学术话语的交融与交锋

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田海龙

    2015-01-01

    As a widely used concept in humanities and social sciences, “discourse” has been defined differently in different disciplines and by different scholars. This paper, by reviewing these different definitions and then adopting a CDA definition, discusses the association of discourse with the concept of discourse system. It then proposes a discourse approach to academic discourse exchange, highlighting the mingling and debating practices by investigating the discursive strategies in terms of aca ̄demic norms and language use.%“话语”是一个在社会科学领域中广泛使用的术语,其含义非常丰富。这不仅表现为其含义在不同学科中有所区别,也表现为同一学科中不同学者对其定义不同。文章讨论“话语”的这些不同含义,并在“批评话语分析”对“话语”的定义基础上,讨论其与“话语体系”的联系,并从话语体系的角度对“学术话语交流”进行解读,将学术话语之间的交流理解为话语的“交融”与“交锋”。文章以此为出发点,进一步探讨学术话语交融和交锋的机制和策略。

  20. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  1. American academic headache specialists in neurology: practice characteristics and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, A G

    2004-07-01

    Headache diagnosis and treatment is the most important focus or concentration area for practising neurologists in America. The American Headache Society, formerly the American Association for the Study of Headache, is made up predominantly of neurologists. Recognition of the importance of the teaching and practice of headache medicine, especially migraine, is still incomplete at many academic teaching institutions. Suggestions that this results from inadequate academic hierarchies and education at graduate and post-graduate levels have been made. We therefore undertook a survey of academic practitioners of headache medicine in departments of neurology with membership of the American Headache Society. Subjects and addresses were identified using the 1999-2000 membership directory of the American Headache Society. Practice characteristics and time distribution were assessed. Teaching in undergraduate and resident programmes was also assessed. Fifty-five surveys from 46 institutions in 25 states were judged as adequate for this report. Academic neurologists with interest in headache medicine spent most of their time in clinic, with less than 25% spent doing either research or teaching. Medical schools had an average of 1 h of preclinical and 2 h of clinical teaching in headache. Neurology residents received an average of 3 h of didactic instruction in headache. This report is the first of its kind to review the practice characteristics and culture of headache medicine in the setting of academic departments of neurology. It describes a clinical practice similar to those of other non-academic American neurologists.

  2. Pride and loathing in history : the national character discourse and the Chinese search for a cultural identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shu, Chunyan

    2013-01-01

    This research examines three intellectual approaches in contemporary China to the question of cultural identity by focusing on the discourse of national character, which has been employed by cultural critics to attribute China's “lack of modernity” to the perseverance of Confucian tradition and the

  3. Collisions of Culture: Academic Culture in the Neoliberal University

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCompte, Margaret D.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how different constituencies in a major research university tried to initiate change despite disagreements over common goals, norms and principles. The context was a culture war. The university administration wanted to impose a corporatising and privatising philosophy which it felt was crucial to preserving the…

  4. "I Don't Read Fiction": Academic Discourse and the Relationship between Health and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinning, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between health (H) and physical education (PE) has long been the subject of debate. Recently, however, the obesity crisis has raised this relationship to a new level of attention. At the risk of simplifying things, there are two "positions" that seem to characterize the discourse regarding this new relationship. One…

  5. PISA as a Political Tool in Spain: Assessment Instrument, Academic Discourse and Political Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Gil, Leoncio; Hernández Beltrán, Juan Carlos; García Redondo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This study examines to what extent there is a sort of "political appropiation" by political parties when they seek to set a discourse about the Spanish PISA outcomes. We have consistently found that programs for assessing the competencies of students, especially PISA, have become tools of rationalization and the legitimization of…

  6. Organizational Culture Impact on Psychological Empowerment of Academic Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Kseanela SOTIROFSKI

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to examine the dimensions that have impact to the psychological empowerment academic staff in Albanian universities. Despite the factors like professional growth, self-efficacy, and decision making we especially get focused on the organizational culture thinking that it can have a powerful influence on the psychological empowerment, because it describes the link between contextual factors and employees’ work behaviors. The research question of this study is: Whic...

  7. Research on the Interpersonal Function of Language in Academic Discourse%学术语篇中言据性表征的人际功能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪; 张威

    2016-01-01

    Academic discourse should not only contain ideational context,but also devices having textual and interpersonal functions.In an objective and impersonal way,academic writing was seen primarily as a vehicle for transmitting information tra-ditionally.Nowadays,the interactions between writers and readers in academic discourse is the focus and purpose for most per-spectives on English.Evidentiality is an important function of the discourse.As a research,the article attempt to explore the evidentiality of academic discourse in interpersonal metafuncation perspectives.%学术话语不仅具备概念功能,还具备了人际与语篇功能.传统意义上讲,学术论文写作首先被看成传递信息的工具,具有客观性与实在性.当今,学术语篇中作者与读者间的信息交流逐渐成为学术目的、写作的焦点,言据性是语篇的一个重要功能.本文主要从人际功能视角来探究学术语篇中言据性特征.

  8. Student Evaluation and an Introduction to Academic Discourse: "I Didn't Like it, and I Don't Know How to Improve it, Because it Works"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, Michael; Creel, Gill

    2006-01-01

    Drawing from the theories of Paulo Freire, Patricia Bizzell, and Ira Shor, this article describes a five-year ongoing classroom research project that examines the use of peer evaluation as a process for teaching academic discourse. The findings of the project suggest a critical and democratic pedagogical antidote to the national "standards"…

  9. The Career Perceptions of Academic Staff and Human Resource Discourses in English Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strike, Tony; Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out findings from research that considered the interplay between English national policy developments in human resources management in higher education and the personal stories of academic staff as career participants. Academic careers are pursued in an institutional and national policy context but it was not clear that the formal…

  10. "I Know I'm Unlovable": Desperation, Dislocation, Despair, and Discourse on the Academic Job Hunt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Andrew F.

    2012-01-01

    Failure, according to the academic canonical narrative, is anything other than a tenure-track professorship. The academic job hunt is fraught with unknowns: a time of fear, hope, and despair. This personal narrative follows the author's three-year journey from doctoral candidate, to visiting assistant professor, to the unemployment line. Using a…

  11. The Europeanization of the Academic Environment: Discourse Analysis from a Neo-institutional Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISABELA IEŢCU-FAIRCLOUGH

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the neo-institutional theory which deals with the ways in which institutions, seen as sets of cognitive, normative and regulatory elements, manage - or not - human action, this work investigates a series of aspects of the reform of the University institution in Romania. The empirical data include strategic documents issued by the University of Bucharest [Analiza diagnostic 2007: Universitatea din Bucureşti în context naţional şi mondial - (Diagnostic analysis 2007: The University of Bucharest in the national and international contexts]. The analytical framework is provided by the neo-institutional theory and by the critical discourse analysis. The study shows that the cognitive and normative dimensions of institutional transformation are poignantly represented in the institutional discourse. However, the regulatory constitution, the framework of regulations and measures which should be adopted in order to translate the institutional project into practice, is absent.

  12. 英汉医药学术语篇中作者自称语的对比研究%A Contrastive Study of Self-mentioning Markers between English and Chinese Academic Discourse of Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘跃良; 陈玮

    2016-01-01

    Based on self-built corpora,this study contrastively analyzes the use of self-mentioning markers in English and Chinese academic discourse of medicine. Results show that they occur in both type of discourse but differ greatly in the quantity and way of realization. The factors leading to these differences are discussed from the perspective of language,culture and academic traditions. The research results may benefit the English syllabus de-signing of graduate students in medical and pharmaceutical universities,and academic English writing and its teaching as well.%基于自建语料库对英汉医药学术语篇中作者自称语使用情况进行对比分析,发现在两种语篇中,都普遍用到作者自称语,但在使用数量和具体方式上,有很大的差异。造成这些差异的原因有语言上的,也有文化上的,还有学术常规方面的。此项研究结果对于医药院校研究生英语课程设置和学术英语写作教学有一定的启示。

  13. The Academic Neutrality Argument: Philosophical Discourse and La Regle du Jeu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, James

    1981-01-01

    Presents case studies representing various points of view on the question of whether academic institutions can remain neutral. Excerpts are presented from the writings of Kenneth Strike, Robert H. Ennis, John Dewey, and Louis Althusser. (DB)

  14. Organizational Culture Impact on Psychological Empowerment of Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kseanela SOTIROFSKI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to examine the dimensions that have impact to the psychological empowerment academic staff in Albanian universities. Despite the factors like professional growth, self-efficacy, and decision making we especially get focused on the organizational culture thinking that it can have a powerful influence on the psychological empowerment, because it describes the link between contextual factors and employees’ work behaviors. The research question of this study is: Which type of culture is needed in a university that improves academic staff to get empowered? This study aimed to examine the relationship between organizational culture and psychological empowerment of academicians in university `Aleksander Moisiu` in Albania.A total of 46 interviews are made with the academic staff.Results of the study showed that organizational culture have a great impact on the psychological empowerment of academicians and its dimensions. The dominant culture in research universities was hierarchy culture, while the strongest predictor of psychological empowerment was clan culture. Keywords: organizational culture, psychological empowerment, university. Normal 0 14 false false false IT X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabella normale"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  15. Do Cultural Attitudes Matter? The Role of Cultural Orientation on Academic Self-Concept among Black/African College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendi S.; Chung, Y. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The authors explored the relationship between academic self-concept and noncognitive variables (i.e., Africentric cultural orientation, academic class level, gender, and involvement in culturally relevant school and community activities) among Black/African college students. Results indicated that Africentric cultural orientation and academic…

  16. On the Innovation of Academic Discourse System of Philosophy and Social Sciences in China%论中国哲学社会科学学术话语体系的创新

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯旺舟; 李春梅

    2015-01-01

    The innovation of academic discourse system of philosophy and social sciences in China is a major strategic task, which relates to the cause vicissitudes of socialism with Chinese characteristics. The innovation of academic discourse system of philosophy and social sciences in China is the need of strengthen Marx ideology construction, promoting the China cultural soft power and enhancing the international discourse right, highlighting traditional Chinese culture. The innovation of academic discourse system of philosophy and social sciences in China faces the urgency, which must persevere in using the marxist method, adhere to the implementation of "Chinese dream" as the center of the target, adhere to the three confidence, adhere to the importance of the role of new media, adhere to study on foreign Marxist, adhere to the inheriting and develop-ing the traditional Chinese culture, adhere to the leading role of colleges and universities.%中国哲学社会科学学术话语体系创新是一项重大的战略任务,关系着中国特色社会主义事业的兴衰成败。创新中国哲学社会科学学术话语体系是加强马克思主义意识形态建设的需要,是增强中国文化软实力和提升国际话语权的需要,是彰显中国优秀传统文化的需要。为此,必须坚持马克思主义的方法,坚持以实现“中国梦”为中心目标,坚持三个自信,坚持重视新媒体的作用,坚持加强国外马克思主义研究,坚持继承和发展中国传统文化,坚持发挥高校的引领作用。

  17. Strategies to Enhance Student Success: A Discourse Analysis of Academic Advice in International Student Handbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romerhausen, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    As the population of international students continues to rise at U.S. colleges and universities, multiple academic obstacles pose barriers to success. Research on strategies of intervention has primarily included face-to-face interactions while an exploration of other assistance approaches is minimal in comparison. This study explored the role…

  18. Credibility and Accountability in Academic Discourse: Increasing the Awareness of Ghanaian Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adika, Gordon S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from a social constructionist perspective to written scholarly communication, this paper argues that training in academic writing for students in higher education especially in second language contexts should go beyond emphasis on grammatical correctness and paragraphing strategies, and also focus on the rhetorical character of academic…

  19. Writing as Design: Enabling Access to Academic Discourse in a Multimodal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, A.

    2012-01-01

    This article builds on and contributes to work in writing pedagogy, with a particular focus on multimodality. Research on writing and academic literacies have examined changing texts in higher education, yet there has not been a particular emphasis on how these texts are reconfigured in the multimodal moment. This article examines the implications…

  20. Competing Discourses of Academic Spanish in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Michael D.; Guerrero, Maria Consuelo

    2017-01-01

    In this descriptive study the efforts of a faculty to prepare a cohort of pre-service bilingual education teachers to pass a newly adopted state certification test of academic Spanish are presented. The faculty's efforts were aimed at offsetting a low pass rate on this test, but unfortunately efforts fell short. To unpack this outcome, the authors…

  1. Moulding Interpersonal Relations through Conditional Clauses: Consensus-Building Strategies in Written Academic Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchal, Krystyna

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the interpersonal potential of the conditional clause as a rhetorical device for establishing a dialogue between the author and the reader of an academic text in search for shared understanding and consensus. It presents a corpus-based analysis of functions conditional clauses play in linguistics research articles in an…

  2. Competing Discourses of Academic Spanish in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Michael D.; Guerrero, Maria Consuelo

    2017-01-01

    In this descriptive study the efforts of a faculty to prepare a cohort of pre-service bilingual education teachers to pass a newly adopted state certification test of academic Spanish are presented. The faculty's efforts were aimed at offsetting a low pass rate on this test, but unfortunately efforts fell short. To unpack this outcome, the authors…

  3. Dominant articulations in academic business and society discourse on NGO-business relations: a critical assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laasonen, S.; Fougère, M.; Kourula, A.

    2012-01-01

    Relations between non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and companies have been the subject of a sharply increasing amount of publications in recent years within academic business journals. In this article, we critically assess this fast-developing body of literature, which we treat as forming a ‘bu

  4. Translating Cultural References in Tourism Discourse: the Case of the Apulian Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariacristina Petillo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide a reflection on cultural references in tourism discourse, highlighting the difficulties translators may face when dealing with culture-bound words (Newmark 1988: 95-102; Katan 1999: 45-65; Oltra Ripoll 2005: 76-78. On the basis of a corpus of texts belonging to different genres, this study will investigate how the lexical features described by G. Dann in terms of languaging (1996: 183 are differently displayed and distributed, and whether a different rate of languaging could be said to enhance or detract from the communicative effectiveness of the selected texts: a guidebook, a monograph and five tourist brochures about the Southern Italian region of Apulia. Some of the most relevant translation choices will be reflected upon, showing how different communicative strategies are at work and end up producing “a different emphasis and degree of explanation” (Poncini 2006: 145 in the foreign tourists’ comprehension of Apulian cultural references.

  5. Cultural and Cognitive Predictors of Academic Motivation among Mexican American Adolescents: Caution against Discounting the Impact of Cultural Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Watson, Brandy; López, Belem; Ojeda, Lizette; Rodriguez, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of cognitive (i.e., grit, hope, and academic skepticism) and cultural variables (i.e., generational status, familismo, ethnic identity, and bicultural stress) on academic motivation among 181 Mexican American adolescents. Results indicated that hope, grit, and familismo positively predicted academic motivation.…

  6. Cultural and Cognitive Predictors of Academic Motivation among Mexican American Adolescents: Caution against Discounting the Impact of Cultural Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Watson, Brandy; López, Belem; Ojeda, Lizette; Rodriguez, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of cognitive (i.e., grit, hope, and academic skepticism) and cultural variables (i.e., generational status, familismo, ethnic identity, and bicultural stress) on academic motivation among 181 Mexican American adolescents. Results indicated that hope, grit, and familismo positively predicted academic motivation.…

  7. Pulp Poets and Superhero Prophets: A Case for Popular Culture in Academic Library Collection Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, William M.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, popular culture was neglected and frowned upon by academics. In recent years, cultural critics, including librarians, have found popular culture materials to be didactic tools, and vital to the study of society and the zeitgeist that has prevailed at the time of their production. As a result, many academic librarians have found it…

  8. Pulp Poets and Superhero Prophets: A Case for Popular Culture in Academic Library Collection Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, William M.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, popular culture was neglected and frowned upon by academics. In recent years, cultural critics, including librarians, have found popular culture materials to be didactic tools, and vital to the study of society and the zeitgeist that has prevailed at the time of their production. As a result, many academic librarians have found it…

  9. Hizb ut-Tahrir in the press II: Exploring differences between academic discourses and editorial choices in Europe and Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Volf

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes academic discourses on Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami (HT in various disciplines, provides an overview of media frames applied to HT in German, British and Kyrgyz quality newspapers, and examines the differences between the conclusions of scholars and mass media representations of HT. The introductory section of the paper briefly presents a group of selected authors and texts, illustrates the importance of drawing parallels between academic and journalistic discourses on HT, and explains the choice of the countries used in the study. The methodological section specifies the questions, sources and methods of research. Finally, there is a detailed presentation and discussion of the findings, followed by a summary of the conclusions.

  10. [Political-academic discourse and integration of handicapped people: from appearances to the senses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Inacia Sátiro; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena; de Sousa, Rosiléa Alves

    2003-12-01

    Our aim was to analyze law no. 3.298/99 and course plans in undergraduate nursing programs in order to confirm the inclusion of the item for participation of nurses in the Handicapped People (HP) integration process. We read the plans of courses from four universities; identified the courses in common and distributed them according to the level of health care. The proposals of the law are universal, equal, and democratic; the plans of courses analyzed adopt most of the actions recommended by the Ministry of Health in order to prevent deficiencies. Nevertheless, academic practice exercises prevention/treatment of diseases, silencing concern over the insertion of nurse in the HP integration process.

  11. Meaning Making, Agency, and Languaging in Dialogic Interactions on Academic Writing Tasks: A Sociocultural Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand Saadi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    For Vygotsky, language is a cultural-psychological concept emerged from social interactions and is applied for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, meaning making, and knowledge construction. In this study, a sociocultural perspective was applied to analyze the language produced by 40 sophomore Iranian EFL learners during dialogic…

  12. The Role of Culture, Competitiveness and Economic Performance in Explaining Academic Performance: A Global Market Analysis for International Student Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Chris; Hamin

    2011-01-01

    A nation's culture, competitiveness and economic performance explain academic performance. Partial Least Squares (PLS) testing of 2252 students shows culture affects competitiveness and academic performance. Culture and economic performance each explain 32%; competitiveness 36%. The model predicts academic performance when culture, competitiveness…

  13. The Role of Culture, Competitiveness and Economic Performance in Explaining Academic Performance: A Global Market Analysis for International Student Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Chris; Hamin

    2011-01-01

    A nation's culture, competitiveness and economic performance explain academic performance. Partial Least Squares (PLS) testing of 2252 students shows culture affects competitiveness and academic performance. Culture and economic performance each explain 32%; competitiveness 36%. The model predicts academic performance when culture, competitiveness…

  14. Interpretation, Autonomy, and Transformation: Chinese Pedagogic Discourse in a Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zongjie

    2011-01-01

    With the modernization of Chinese society, beginning in the early-20th century, the Chinese language has experienced a fundamental change that has transformed Chinese pedagogic practices. Modern Chinese discourses, whether of social or scientific practices or on China's intellectual heritage, are largely articulated in westernized discourses that…

  15. The Influence of Academic Culture on Quality Management System ISO 9001 Maintenance within Malaysian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basir, Siti Arni; Davies, John; Douglas, Jacqueline; Douglas, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of the elements of academic culture on quality management system ISO 9001 maintenance within Malaysian universities. There is a dearth of empirical studies on maintaining ISO 9001, particularly in the higher education context. From the literature review, academic culture was classified according to four…

  16. Development and Standardization of Inventory for Measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esomonu, Nkechi Patricia-Mary; Okeaba, James Uzoma

    2016-01-01

    The study developed and standardized an Inventory for measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture named Inventory for Students' Integration into University Academic Culture (ISIUAC). The increase in dropout rates, substance use, cultism and other deviant behaviours in Nigerian universities makes it necessary for one to ask the…

  17. Academic Stress in an Achievement Driven Era: Time and School Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowka, Karyn Anne Kowalski

    2014-01-01

    Whether academic achievement is defined as passing a state-mandated test for graduation or earning "A's" in a rigorous course load and having a resume full of extra-curricular accomplishments, the pressure to achieve is pervading public education, creating a culture of competition and causing academic stress. A culture of competition…

  18. THE INTERPLAY OF MUSEUM DISCOURSE AND POPULAR CULTURE: HOW, WHEN AND WHERE HISTORY COMES ALIVE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Lukić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Museum as an institution has been, throughout history, inevitably connected with ideology, involved in establishing and shaping of cultural memory, and crea-tion and affirmation of collective identities, based on scientific knowledge and interpretation of the past. Nowadays, other, more effective media are involved in those processes, e.g. film, which is examined in the paper as such a medium. Also, museums and media have been used for spreading different prejudices and stereotypes – some of our identities are often based on such preju-dices, either about our own or somebody else’s past or present. Nevertheless, museum as an institution has an aura of highest authority, based on scientific knowledge and legitimized by museum collections. Museum is seen as trustworthy, unbiased and objective. Such privileged status of museums is argued and contested, and the complexities of museum discourse are traced through critical analysis of the current policy of the American Museum of Natural History in New York and this muse-um’s participation in the production of a movie Night at the Museum (2006. As part of a “global village,” museum visitors are impacted by certain stereotypical images circulating within and outside of museums, which are a dense package of ideas (rooted in science, folklore, ide-ology, politics, etc. that thrive in cultural memory and collective imagination. These are constructed and circu-lated as commonsense or consensus narratives, en-trenched in the minds of the public, and they can take hold persistently against current scientific opinions. Mass media images that museum visitors bring with them to the museum are inevitably shaping their inter-pretations of exhibitions. What happens then, when a museum gets involved with Hollywood industry? What are the consequences of such an interaction? This pa-per’s aim is to shed some light on those consequences in the particular case of the AMNH.

  19. An academic writing paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    A key to understanding academic writing for publication lies in the tension between the need for scholars to demonstrate originality, and the need for academic discourse communities to continue using their shared repetoire1 of concepts, vocabulary, and genre structures. This tension can...... draw on knowledge resources available in organizational and cultural contexts. To explore this tension in different cultural contexts, this paper examines how Ph.d students recognize and use knowledge resources as they learn about and respond to academic publishing. Sites of research include East...... Carolina University, USA and the Aalto School of Economics in Helsinki, Finland. Findings describe processes through which ph.d. students express their identity in the field with respect to both innovation and their participation in discourse communities. References: Nonaka I.; Toyama R.; Konno N. (2000...

  20. CONFIGURATION OF CULTURAL NORMS IN TRADITIONAL RICE PLANTING RITUAL DISCOURSE THE TRADITIONAL FARMING COMMUNITY OF BAYAN, NORTH LOMBOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Netra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the study of traditional rice planting ritual discourse of the traditional farming community of Bayan, North Lombok in an ethno-pragmatic perspective.  It is specifically aimed at describing the cultural norms and their meaning configurations.  The theory used in the study is the cultural scripts developed by Wierzbicka (2002a considering that cultural norms constitute rules and regulations in social interaction practices. They can be investigated from the use of grammatical aspects of language and linguistic routines which are context-bound. They can be configured by paraphrasing in simple and mini language using single space. The results of the study showed that there were some cultural norms found on the traditional rice planting ritual discourse of the traditional farming community of Bayan, North Lombok. They included: (1 asserting thought and hope, (2 respecting other entities, (3 apologizing, (4 promising, and (5 giving advice. The configuration of these cultural norms was in accordance with the understanding of local cultural scripts and wisdom in terms of rituals of the local farming system. The configuration is constructed in low-level script with components of “when” and “if”. It contains the aspects of thinking, speaking, and doing. It is derived from the semantic primes of both evaluation and perception.

  1. Civilization, Culture, and Race in John Crawfurd’s Discourses on Southeast Asia: Continuities and Changes, c.1814-c.1868

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation I examine the uses of the notions of civilization, race, and culture within a set of British 19th century discourses on especially Southeast Asian societies, their present state and history. Taking the point of departure in John Crawfurd’s (1783-1868) publications, it contains...... to be primarily descriptive, they nonetheless were normatively cogent in their inherent hierarchal and classificatory structures, as well as in providing a theoretical template delineating the naturalized historical trajectories. Arguing that the notions of civilization, race and culture were pivotal key concepts...

  2. Hedging in Discourse Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xin

    2015-01-01

    In this article an attempt to enhance the awareness of hedging use in discourse analysis and academic writing is made by analyzing hedges employed in two comparable texts. The discourse analysis is conducted from“content-oriented”hedges and“reader-oriented”hedges. The article suggests that hedging can dampen utterances and statements, weaken the force of what one says and show politeness to the listeners or readers, which varies from different discourse styles of various genres.

  3. The Culture of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the Academic Framework: Some Literary Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya Rao

    2011-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is swiftly emerging as an integral part of corporate culture and discourse. Associated with notions of responsibility, accountability and community involvement, it remains privileged with concerns that increasingly define the new millennium. Less developed, however, is the relevance of CSR ideas to academic…

  4. [Academic international cultural exchange: an experience of personal and scientific growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmolin, Indiara Sartori; Pereira, Eliane Ramos; Silva, Rose Mary Costa Rosa Andrade; Gouveia, Maria José Baltazar; Sardinheiro, José Júlio

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the student experience to integrate an international academic mobility program during undergraduate nursing. It is reported academic experience in Portugal, Algarve University, made possible by the Federal University of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The experience of exchange performed within six months, enabled the acquisition of new scientific knowledge and cultural rights, including innovations in healthcare technology, development of research and academic links. As contributions are expected to stimulate and intensify the international mobility especially at undergraduate level, considering its importance to the improvement of academic excellence and the Brazilian higher education through scientific and cultural exchange abroad.

  5. The "Sandwich Generation" in Korean Academe: Between Traditional Academic Authority and Meritocratic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Cheol; Kim, Yangson; Lim, Heejin; Shim, Bongsup; Choi, Younggi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how academics hired during the period of rapid neoliberal reforms differ from the senior academics hired before the reforms and the junior academics hired after the reforms were institutionalized. The faculty members who were employed in a period of radical reform may be impacted by the additional requirements and tasks…

  6. From Critical Discourse Analysis to Positive Discourse Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄茜然

    2014-01-01

    Different Scholars have different views of the definition of Discourse Analysis;it ’s a research method that can be used by scholars with a variety of academic and non-academic affiliations, coming from a variety of disciplines, to answer a variety of questions. Critical Discourse Analysis is a branch of Discourse Analysis; this paper introduces its development, guidance theory and approach of it. As Positive Discourse Analysis is the extension of Critical Discourse Analysis, this paper introduces the produc-tion and main theories of it. At last, a comparison was made between them.

  7. Exploring the National Discourse of Chinese Educational Researches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shusheng

    2006-01-01

    Academic discourse is a wav of questioning and exposition in academic research.For a long time,talking about China in a Westem Way has caused two harmful consequences.which separated theoretical research from its object and from its subject of researches in the field of Chinese educational studies.With the prerequisite of cherishing our own culture.it is an inner need for Chinese educational development to explore the national discourse in educational studies.i.e.,talking about Chinese problems in the Chinese way.

  8. 英汉语言学学术语篇言据性对比研究%Comparative Study of Evidentiality in Chinese and English Linguistic Academic Discourses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    水无砥; 纪永娟

    2015-01-01

    以语言学领域核心期刊《当代语言学》和 Journal ofPragmatics中选取的文章为语料建立相应的英汉语料库。依据胡壮麟提出的可证性理论修正模式,就据素频率及种类分布,对英汉语言学学术语篇中的可证性特点进行了探讨。研究发现:(1)在英汉语言学学术语篇中,言据性存在显著性差异;(2)不同的语用策略使得两种语言在言据性特征上存在明显差异。在英语语言中,作者更倾向于直接选取语用策略和条件假设策略,而汉语语言作者更多地选取间接语用策略;(3)英汉语言学学术语篇中据素使用存在相似性,即传闻、演绎和归纳据素使用比例较高,而预期、信度和信念据素使用偏低;(4)言据性与学术语篇特点密切相关。%The paper makes comparative study on evidentiality in Chinese and English linguistic academic discourses on the basis of Hu’s Model of Evidentilaity.The corpora include selected theses from core journals,Contemporary Linguis-tics and Generals ofPragmatics,in the field of linguistics.The findings are:(1 )Evidentiality varies significantly in Chi-nese and English linguistic academic discourses;(2)Different pragmatic strategies lead to significant differences in evi-dentiality.In English,the authors tend to direct pragmatic strategy and conditional assumption strategy,while Chinese authors incline indirect pragmatic strategy;(3)There exist evidential similarities in Chinese and English linguistic aca-demic discourses,that is,hearsay,induction,deduction evidentials show high distribution frequency but that of belief, expectation,evidentials are low in both languages;(4)Evidentiality do have relationship with academic discourses.

  9. [The two (and more) cultures of the "clone". Utopia and fiction in post-war discourses of life sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Since the late 1950s, "two cultures" has become a catch phrase for describing a deep divide between science and literature. When Charles P. Snow, who initiated this discussion, introduced the notion of "two cultures" in a lecture at the University in Cambridge in 1959, he referred to an incompatibility of scientific and literary worldviews in Western Societies. His thesis of two contradicting cultures immediately received a huge variety of different responses from philosophers, scientists, novelists and literary scholars. However, this article argues that this widespread debate was part of a broader post-war discourse on the impact of modern science on society, in which especially the idea of "scientific progress" was at stake. Central to this debate was the question of how scientific and technological progress could affect the notion of the "human" itself. The paper analyses the emerging discourse on cloning against this background. The constitutive role of fiction and imagination in both fields, science and literature, is explored by tracing the scientific, utopian and literary cultures in which figures of human clones have taken different shapes since the 1960s. At that time, scientists developed utopian views in which the "clone" became a metaphor for future possibilities of transcending and reshaping the human nature. Science fiction writers reacted to this by portraying the human clone as an individual and by depicting human clone figures in a psychological way

  10. "The Voice inside Herself": Transforming Gendered Academic Identities in Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Janice; Wallin, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    This paper traces the academic identity formation(s) of 10 Canadian female academics whose disciplinary knowledge is in the field of educational administration. We trace the ways in which discourses of gender, institutional power, and other cultural and social influences shaped their sense of themselves as academics in the highly patriarchal…

  11. Academic Culture in Malaysia: Sources of Satisfaction and Frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Wan, Chang; Chapman, David W.; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md; Hutcheson, Sigrid; Lee, Molly; Austin, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the sources of satisfaction and frustration among Malaysian academics across three types of higher education institutions (HEIs)--public research university, public comprehensive university and private non-profit university. Based on interview with 67 academics across six HEIs, there is a clear pattern and relationship between…

  12. The Interpersonal Meta-discourse Study on the Academic Writing%学术英语写作中的人际元话语研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹

    2016-01-01

    This study researches about the interpersonal meta‐discourse features in two academic fields :the social sciences (SS) and natural sciences (NS) with the help of genre analysis .A contrastive research is conducted between the two fields of articles about the use of interpersonal meta‐discourse markers ,as hedges ,emphatics and attitude markers .T he analysis result show s that the choice of interpersonal meta‐discourse markers is determined by the type of articles .Besides ,the findings could be references for socio‐linguistic research and ESP course design .%借助文体类型分析理论,探讨社会科学和自然科学学术领域英文论文中人际元话语的使用特点,对比研究情态词、推测副词和态度标记语这三种人际元话语模式在这两类学术论文中的使用频率,结果表明语篇所使用的人际元话语是由文章的类型决定。本研究对于社会语言学和特殊用途英语写作教学具有参考意义。

  13. The Effect of Culture on the Academic Honesty of Marketing and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, Janice; Reardon, James; McCorkle, Denny E.

    2010-01-01

    Two trends in marketing higher education include (a) growing opportunities for intercultural encounters in the classroom and (b) a growing concern about student academic honesty. Research regarding the relationship between specific cultural measures and academic honesty is sparse in the context of marketing and business programs in higher…

  14. Unforgiving Confucian Culture: A Breeding Ground for High Academic Achievement, Test Anxiety and Self-Doubt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, Lazar

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews findings from several studies that contribute to our understanding of cross-cultural differences in academic achievement, anxiety and self-doubt. The focus is on comparisons between Confucian Asian and European regions. Recent studies indicate that high academic achievement of students from Confucian Asian countries is…

  15. The Effect of Culture on the Academic Honesty of Marketing and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, Janice; Reardon, James; McCorkle, Denny E.

    2010-01-01

    Two trends in marketing higher education include (a) growing opportunities for intercultural encounters in the classroom and (b) a growing concern about student academic honesty. Research regarding the relationship between specific cultural measures and academic honesty is sparse in the context of marketing and business programs in higher…

  16. Consuming America : A Data-Driven Analysis of the United States as a Reference Culture in Dutch Public Discourse on Consumer Goods, 1890-1990

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, M.J.H.F.

    2017-01-01

    Consuming America offers a data-driven, longitudinal analysis of the historical dynamics that have underpinned a long-term, layered cultural-historical process: the emergence of the United States as a dominant reference culture in Dutch public discourse on consumer goods between 1890 and 1990. The

  17. Sociocultural Theories, Academic Achievement, and African American Adolescents in a Multicultural Context: A Review of the Cultural Compatibility Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Noel, La Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Several theories suggest that African American culture facilitates academic achievement, but others suggest that identifying with Black culture contributes to the achievement gap by undermining the academic performance among youth. These opposing perspectives are labeled "cultural compatibility theories" and "cultural incompatibility theories,"…

  18. Academic Literacy and Cultural Familiarity: Developing and Assessing Academic Literacy Resources for Chinese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Fiona; Whitelaw, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Academic dishonesty, including plagiarism, is a chronic problem. This paper reports the results of a project undertaken at a public funded university in Melbourne, Australia, in partnership with colleagues from a public funded university in Beijing, China, to combat this and other problems associated with academic literacy. The prime focus of the…

  19. Registers in the Academic Writing of African American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrquin, Anna F.

    2006-01-01

    The study examines the development of the registers of academic writing by African American college-level students through style and grammar: indirection inherent in the oral culture of the African American community and the paratactic functions of "because." Discourse analysis of 74 samples of academic writing by 20 African American undergraduate…

  20. A Cultural Historical Theoretical Perspective of Discourse and Design in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser have initiated an important conversation in science education as they use sociocultural theory to introduce design based scenarios into the science classroom. This response seeks to expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article "The discourse of design-based science classroom activities" by…

  1. Academic misconduct in nursing students: behaviors, attitudes, rationalizations, and cultural identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrink, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about academic misconduct in associate degree nursing students enrolled in two nursing programs in the northeastern United States. Study respondents (n = 193) identified the frequency of engagement in behaviors of misconduct in both the classroom and clinical setting and their attitudes toward the identified behaviors of misconduct, neutralization behaviors, ethical standards of the nursing profession, and the ethic of caring within the nursing profession. Findings were consistent with previous research on academic misconduct in baccalaureate nursing students. Analysis of self-reported cultural identities refuted the prevailing literature on academic misconduct across differing cultures and nations.

  2. Native and Non-Native Perceptions on a Non-Native Oral Discourse in an Academic Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Dikilitaş

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study investigates discourse-level patterns typically employed by a Turkish lecturer based on the syntactic patterns found in the collected data. More specifically, the study aims to reveal how different native and non-native speakers of English perceive discourse patterns used by a non-native lecturer teaching in English. The data gathered from a Turkish lecturer teaching finance, and the interviews both with the lecturer and the students. The lecturer and the students were videotaped and the data was evaluated by content analysis. The results revealed a difference between the way non-native and native speakers evaluate an oral discourse of a non-native lecturer teaching in English. Native speakers of English found the oral performance moderately comprehensible, while non-native speakers found it relatively comprehensible.

  3. The influence of habitus in the relationship between cultural capital and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, S Michael

    2013-01-01

    Scholars routinely use cultural capital theory in an effort to explain class differences in academic success but often overlook the key concept of habitus. Rich, longstanding debates within the literature suggest the need for a closer examination of the individual effects of cultural capital and habitus. Drawing upon the writings of Pierre Bourdieu, I use a longitudinal dataset to examine the effects of multiple operationalizations of cultural capital on academic achievement and the mediating effects of habitus. Using first difference models to control for time-invariant unobserved characteristics, I find that typical operationalizations of cultural capital (i.e. high-arts participation and reading habits) have positive effects on GPA that are completely mediated through habitus. These results stress the importance of habitus in the relationship between cultural capital and academic achievement for disadvantaged youth.

  4. Understanding Discourse Competence in Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masduki Masduki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Discourse as a communication event is influenced by topic being communicated, interpersonal relationship between the communicants, and communication channel used in context. Whatever senses created by the communicants is fully related to culture and situation being involved. Participating in conversation, reading, writing, and translating, activates discourse competence, which requires the use of a set of strategy to realize or mobilize all declarative knowledge in the real context of communication. Further, this article highlights the discourse competence and how it is culturally implemented in translation as an activity of transferring messages. The discussion covers the overview of discourse competence, discourse approach, and discourse competence in translation.

  5. Autoriaus pozicijos adverbialai ir adverbializacija lietuvių mokslo kalboje. Stance adverbials and adverbialization in Lithuanian academic discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelija Usonienė

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the necessity of distinguishing a semantic-functional class of stance adverbials in Lithuanian. Following Biber et al. (1999 and Hasselgård (2010 an attempt is made to show that alongside circumstance adverbials there are also linking adverbials and stance adverbials in Lithuanian. The means of realization of stance adverbials in Lithuanian is not only adverbs but also so called modal words (galbūt ‘maybe’, tikriausiai ‘most probably’, various particles (taigi ‘therefore’, visgi ‘still’, ‘nevertheless’, CTPs (manoma ‘it is believed’, natūralu ‘naturally’, various adverbial clauses (kaip matyti ‘as it is seen, as one can see’, kaip žinoma ‘as is known’ but also prepositional phrases (pasak X ‘according to X’. The article devotes much attention to the semantic classification of the basic types of stance adverbials, which has been illustrated by the language data collected from the Corpus of Academic Lithuanian (Corpus Academicum Lithuanicum – CorALit – http://coralit.lt. The paper also touches upon the process of adverbialization and its relationship to grammaticalization which presupposes the desemanticization and (intersubjectivization of the linguistic expressions under analysis. Many Lithuanian verbal and adjectival CTPs like žinoma ‘it is known’, suprantama ‘it is understood’, tarkim ‘let’s say’ can develop into stance adverbials and further into discourse markers by losing any links to the original lexical meaning of the verb they have evolved from. ------ Straipsnio tikslas parodyti, kodėl reikėtų ir kodėl galima būtų skirti semantinę-funkcinę adverbialų klasę lietuvių kalboje. Pastaroji nėra tapatinama su prieveiksmiais kaip tradicine kalbos dalimi gramatikoje ar aplinkybėmis kaip tradicine sakinio dalimi sintaksėje. Be to, nėra kvestionuojamas aptariamų kalbos reiškinių statusas kalbos dalių ar sakinio dalių po

  6. Reform-Oriented Mathematics in Three 6th Grade Classes: How Teachers Draw in ELLs to Academic Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Thomas, Holly

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, mathematics has been considered easy for English language learners (ELLs) due to the belief that math is a "universal language." At the same time, reform-oriented mathematics curricula, designed to promote mathematical discourse, are increasingly being adopted by schools serving large numbers of ELLs. CMP, the Connected Math…

  7. Making the Tacit Explicit: Rethinking Culturally Inclusive Pedagogy in International Student Academic Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes an approach, broadly inspired by culturally inclusive pedagogy, to facilitate international student academic adaptation based on rendering tacit aspects of local learning cultures explicit to international full degree students, rather than adapting them. Preliminary findings are presented from a focus group-based exploratory…

  8. Deflating the "Confucian Heritage Culture" Thesis in Intercultural and Academic English Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Shaun

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops an interdisciplinary critical perspective on the concept of "Confucian Heritage Cultures" (CHC), used in intercultural and English language teaching theory to explain the supposed culturally distinct learning habits, expectations and schemas many Asian students bring to academic classrooms in English-speaking…

  9. Building a Culture of Academic Integrity: What Students Perceive and Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jessica A.; Glanzer, Perry L.

    2017-01-01

    McCabe, Butterfield, & Treviño (2012) recently proposed a model for helping universities cultivate a moral culture of academic integrity. This qualitative study examined how a national sample of 75 students perceived the moral culture within their university using the McCabe et al. model as a basis for analysis. The analysis revealed that…

  10. Plagiarism, Cultural Diversity and Metaphor--Implications for Academic Staff Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leask, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Plagiarism is a complex, culturally loaded concept which causes much anxiety for both academics and students. Exactly what constitutes plagiarism is dependent on a number of contextual factors. Despite the difficulties associated with defining and detecting plagiarism, it is said to be on the increase, and students from "other cultures"…

  11. Organisational Culture and Values and the Adaptation of Academic Units in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zilwa, Deanna

    2007-01-01

    This study explores connections between the organisational culture and values of academic units in Australian universities and their efforts to adapt to external environmental pressures. It integrates empirical findings from case studies with theories of organisational culture and values and adaptation. It identifies seven dimensions of academic…

  12. Discourse Manifestation of Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Владимир Ильич Карасик

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with approaches to discourse studies. The approaches may be regarded as discourse dimensions associated with models presented and substantiated by M.M. Bakhtin, J. Habermas, Yu.M. Lotman and M.A.K. Halliday. They comprise contents, participants, tonality, channel and communicative actions. The approaches described complement each other and make it possible to synthesize the results achieved in Text Linguistics, Pragmatics, Social Linguistics, and Discourse Studies. They are joined by and oriented towards the concept of Language Personality, i.e. persons who manifest themselves in various kinds of communicative situations. However, each discourse dimension corresponds to a certain type of discourse. A Topic Approach to discourse focuses upon its contents (its referential substance and specifies the correlation between explicit and implicit meaning expression. A Subject Approach to discourse makes it possible to single out and describe two basic types of communication as presented in Personality bound and Status bound discourse, the former diverges into two subtypes - Habitual and Existential communication, whereas the latter is manifested in various kinds of Institutional discourse. A Tonality Approach to discourse highlights different types of stylistic and emotional modes of communication and correspondingly characterizes personality types who are engaged in such situations. A Regime Approach is concentrated on communication channel and technical peculiarities of behavior determined by those restrictions. An Action Approach to discourse gives us a broader understanding of a performative act, i.e. an action incorporated in culture and a situational behavioral interaction.

  13. Cultural Enrichment: Connecting African American Elementary Children to Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    A large, growing number of mis-educated American citizens are being produced by America's public schools. Many of these students are being funneled into the penal system shortly after dropping out of high school. This phenomenon is especially prevalent among African American male students, many of whom have withdrawn academically years prior…

  14. School Culture, Basic Psychological Needs, Intrinsic Motivation and Academic Achievement: Testing a Casual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Badri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Culture is s common system of believes, values and artifacts that the members of a society use it in their relations, and it transfers from one generation to another. The school culture is a system of norms, meanings and values between school members. One of STD (self-determination theory components is basic psychological needs that emphasizes on Relatedness, Competence and Autonomy to accomplish the motivation. Motivation involves the processes that energize, direct, and sustain behavior. It seems that school culture, basic psychological needs and motivation has immense effect on academic achievement. The purpose of the present research was to examine the relation between students' perceived school culture, basic psychological needs, intrinsic motivation and academic achievement in a causal model. 296 high school students (159 females and 137 males in Tabriz, north - west of Iran, participated in this research and completed the students' perceived school culture questionnaire based on Hofstede's cultural dimensions (femininity, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism and power distance, basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation. The results of the path analysis showed that fulfillment of basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation has positive effect on academic achievement. Uncertainty avoidance and power distance have also negative effect on fulfillment of psychological needs, but the influence of femininity on this variable was positive. Also, collectivism has no significant effect on it. In general, the findings showed that if school culture supports students' autonomy, they will experience fulfillment of their basic psychological needs, and attain higher intrinsic motivation and academic achievement.

  15. The socio-cultural-symbolic nexus in the perpetuation of female genital cutting: a critical review of existing discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esho, Tammary

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Female Genital Cutting (FGC, also known as Female Genital Mutilation (FGM and Female Circumcision (FC, continues to be a prevalent practice in many parts of the world and especially in Africa. This is somewhat perplexing given the concerted efforts aimed at eradicating this practice. This article argues that the perpetuation of FGC is due to the unintended effects of marginalization experienced by individuals and groups of women as a result of the approach of some of the anti-FGC global discourses and policies put forward to eradicate the practice. This, we argue, happens when the social structure that provides such groups and individuals with a sense of identity and belonging breaks down. Therefore, the attack on what practicing communities consider to be of crucial cultural value causes a re-focus on the practice resulting in a re-formulation and re-invention of these practices in a bid to counter the feelings of alienation. FGC is thus reframed and reconstructed as a reaction against these campaigns. This article intends to investigate the socio-cultural-symbolic nexus surrounding the practice of FGC, its meaning and implications with respect to its continued existence. It draws examples mainly from communities in Kenya that practice FGM as a rite of passage into adulthood. Herein, perhaps, lies the driving force behind the practice in this contemporary age: it carries a lot of significance with respect to transformational processes, and it is seen as crucial in the representation of the body, identity and belonging. The aim of this article is not to defend FGC’s continuation, but rather to explore the interplay between its changing socio-cultural dimensions as a counter-reaction to the eradication discourse and policies. In this way we will try to explore some of the factors that lay behind its perpetuation.

  16. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

  17. Academic Globalization: Cultureactive to Ice- the Cross-Cultural, Crossdisciplinary and Cross-Epistemological Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szabo White

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Commensurate with the concept of Academic Globalization, coupled with the foray of Globalization, this paper underscores the cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary and cross-epistemological transformation from the first-generation Cultureactive to the second-generation InterCultural Edge [ICE]. The former is embedded in the experiential works of cross-cultural consultant. Richard Lewis and the latter is grounded in established theoretical frameworks. Both serve to underscore the impact of the Globalization Phenomenon, as manifested in and enabled by the acceleration of academic and practitioner cross-cultural activities. The contribution of this paper is the celebration of the longawaited arrival of ICE [InterCultural Edge]. While previous research streams have underscored global similarities and differences among cultures, a previous paper [19] established that cross-professional rather than cross-cultural differences are more paramount. Employing Cultureactive and the LMR framework, it was noted that business versus non-business predisposition had a more direct impact on one's individual cultural profile than did nationality. Regardless of culture, persons involved in business are characterized primarily by linear-active modes of communication, and persons involved in non-business activities typically employ more multiactive/hybrid and less linear modes of communication. The pivotal question is this: Now that we have a new and improved tool, are we in a better position to assess and predict leadership, negotiating styles, individual behaviors, etc., which are central to academic globalization and preparing global business leaders?

  18. Academic Globalization: Cultureactive to Ice- the Cross-Cultural, Crossdisciplinary and Cross-Epistemological Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szabo White

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Commensurate with the concept of Academic Globalization, coupled with the foray of Globalization, this paper underscores the cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary and cross-epistemological transformation from the first-generation Cultureactive to the second-generation InterCultural Edge [ICE]. The former is embedded in the experiential works of cross-cultural consultant. Richard Lewis and the latter is grounded in established theoretical frameworks. Both serve to underscore the impact of the Globalization Phenomenon, as manifested in and enabled by the acceleration of academic and practitioner cross-cultural activities. The contribution of this paper is the celebration of the longawaited arrival of ICE [InterCultural Edge]. While previous research streams have underscored global similarities and differences among cultures, a previous paper [19] established that cross-professional rather than cross-cultural differences are more paramount. Employing Cultureactive and the LMR framework, it was noted that business versus non-business predisposition had a more direct impact on one's individual cultural profile than did nationality. Regardless of culture, persons involved in business are characterized primarily by linear-active modes of communication, and persons involved in non-business activities typically employ more multiactive/hybrid and less linear modes of communication. The pivotal question is this: Now that we have a new and improved tool, are we in a better position to assess and predict leadership, negotiating styles, individual behaviors, etc., which are central to academic globalization and preparing global business leaders?

  19. Impact of a continuing professional development intervention on midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Tania; Creedy, Debra K; West, Roianne

    2017-06-01

    Cultural safety in higher education learning and teaching environments is paramount to positive educational outcomes for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (hereafter called First Peoples) students. There is a lack of research evaluating the impact of continuing professional development on midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety. To implement and evaluate a continuing professional development intervention to improve midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety in supporting First Peoples midwifery students success. A pre-post intervention mixed methods design was used. Academics (n=13) teaching into a Bachelor of Midwifery program agreed to participate. The intervention consisted of two workshops and five yarning circles across a semester. Data included the Awareness of Cultural Safety Scale, self-assessment on cultural safety and perceptions of racism, evaluation of the intervention, participants' journal entries, and researcher's reflections. Responses on the Awareness of Cultural Safety Scale revealed significant improvement in participants' awareness of cultural safety. There was an upward trend in self-assessment ratings. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention or workshops and yarning circles. Participants' journal entries revealed themes willingness to participate and learn, confidence as well as anger and distress. Increased awareness of cultural safety can be transformative for midwifery academics. Workshops and yarning circles can support academics in moving beyond a 'sense of paralysis' and engage in challenging conversations to transform their learning and teaching and in turn foster a culturally safe learning and teaching environment for First Peoples midwifery students towards success. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Comprehension Process of Audit and Accounting Culture through the Academic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dobre

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available While the organizational culture and the professional culture are centered on serving the customer, the accounting and audit culture are focused on helping all accounting users. Mainly, culture operates with information that is prepared, disclosed and, in the same time, interpreted by its receivers and senders. The way each of us interprets the information or offers judgments and opinions, depends on our referential framework, that is a combination of our educational, developmental intellectual culture and work related experiences. The present study tries to point out how these concepts are understood by students from the academic environment and how knowledge gathered during their educational cycle can be transferred into practice.

  1. 学术期刊征稿启事的批评话语分析%Critical Discourse Analysis of Paper Calls by Academic Journals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱琴琴; 张结根

    2015-01-01

    The article,exemplified by the paper calls of core journals on foreign language and literature studies,presents a critical discourse analysis of paper calls by academic journals at textual,sentential and lexical levels,and from the perspectives including genre,information salience,thematic structure,presup-position,modality and diction.By examining the discoursal features,it aims to reveal the implied ideology of journals,the power relation between journals and authors,and to propose critically some corresponding suggestions as to the composition of paper calls.%以外语类核心期刊征稿启事为语料,从语篇、句法和词语三个层面,从话语体裁、信息突显、主位结构、预设、情态和措辞等多角度,展开对学术期刊征稿启事的批评话语分析,旨在通过分析此类话语的语言特征,揭示其中隐含的期刊意识形态、期刊与作者之间的权力关系,并为学术期刊征稿启事的编写相应地提出一些批评性建议。

  2. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: structure, function, and culture (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Larrabee, Hollynn; Dyne, Pamela L; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    Strategies for approaching generational issues that affect teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology in emergency medicine (EM) have been reported. Tactics to address generational influences involving the structure and function of the academic emergency department (ED), organizational culture, and EM schedule have not been published. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic EM. Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can address some common issues encountered in academic EM. By understanding the differences and strengths of each of the cohorts in academic EM departments and considering simple mitigating strategies, faculty leaders can maximize their cooperative effectiveness and face the challenges of a new millennium.

  3. Bioethics as public discourse and second-order discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Loretta M

    2009-06-01

    Bioethics is best viewed as both a second-order discipline and also part of public discourse. Since their goals differ, some bioethical activities are more usefully viewed as advancing public discourse than academic disciplines. For example, the "Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights" sponsored by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization seeks to promote ethical guidance on bioethical issues. From the vantage of philosophical ethics, it fails to rank or specify its stated principles, justify controversial principles, clarify key terms, or say what is meant by calling potentially conflicting norms "foundational." From the vantage of improving the public discourse about bioethical problems and seeking ethical solutions in the public arena, however, this document may have an important role. The goals and relations between bioethics as a second-order discipline and public discourse are explored.

  4. Critical Discourse Analysis of City Cultural Identity Construction—A Case Study of Video Xi tang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李漾

    2012-01-01

      With the rapid development of science and technology, video has become a very important way to demonstrate the city itself. This paper, based on Fairclough’s three-dimensional conception of discourse to the video of Xitang, analyzes the on-screen titles of this video to reveal the ideology behind it. Through the analysis, it points out that this video, while protecting Xi⁃tang’s own unique traditional characteristics, it tries to cater for the needs not only Chinese people but also foreigners. To some extent, it tries to promote Xitang itself.

  5. Facilitating a research culture in an academic library: top down and bottom up approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Pickton, Miggie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:\\ud The purpose of this paper is to consider why and how a research culture might be established in an academic library and to describe and evaluate efforts to achieve this at the University of Northampton. \\ud Design/methodology/approach:\\ud Contextualised within current literature on this topic, the paper examines the top down and bottom up approaches taken to facilitate practitioner research in one academic library. \\ud Findings:\\ud The approaches taken have led to a significant in...

  6. Mining the Cultural Evidence: Situating Planning and Leadership within the Academic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Shepstone

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study investigated organizational culture in two academic librariesin order to propose culturally responsive strategies for developing planning andleadership initiatives. A case study conducted at the University of SaskatchewanLibrary (Shepstone & Currie, 2008 was replicated at two other Canadian academiclibraries to generate some comparative data on organizational culture in Canadianacademic libraries.Methods – The Competing Values Framework (Cameron & Quinn, 1999, 2006provided the theoretical framework and the methodology for diagnosing andunderstanding organizational culture. The Organizational Culture AssessmentInstrument (OCAI was administered by questionnaire to all library staff at MountRoyal University and Carleton University libraries.Results – Scores on the OCAI were used to graphically plot and describe the currentand preferred culture profiles for each library. We compared the cultures at the threelibraries and proposed strategies for initiating planning and developing leadershipthat were appropriate for the preferred cultures.Conclusions – This research demonstrates that academic library culture can be diagnosed, understood, and changed in order to enhance organizational performance. Examining organizational culture provides evidence to guide strategy development, priority setting and planning, and the development of key leadership abilities and skills. Creating culturally appropriate support mechanisms, opportunities for learning and growth, and a clear plan of action for change and improvement are critical.

  7. Culture and Embodied Cognition: Moral Discourses in Internet Support Groups for Overeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatow, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that a modified version of Bourdieu's "habitus" concept can generate insights into moral culture and the ways people use culture to make changes in their lives. If revised in light of recent findings from cognitive neuroscience, the habitus allows for the analysis of culture as embodied cognitive structures linking individuals…

  8. Discourse Analysis in Ethnographic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the contribution of ethnographic research to discourse analysis, focusing on discourse practices as a reflection of cultural context; educational applications and the discontinuity issue; literacy as a focus of discourse-oriented ethnographic research; and implications for applied linguistics. A 9-citation annotated and a 50-citation…

  9. On Cultural And Academic Exchanges Between China And African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ahavugimana

    international relations: “The liberal institutionalists want to show realists .... by Western programmes, contain more subjects from Europe and. America than .... culture or ways of life is increasing in the public sphere. .... A Preliminary Mapping of.

  10. The Two Cultures of Academe: A Overlooked Planning Hurdle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Colleges have two different cultures, the corporate community that views the institution as a business organization, and the traditional community of scholars. Coexistence affects planning, assessment, and institutional change. Collaboration requires understanding of the history and nature of the university and a special kind of leadership. (MSE)

  11. Feudalism and Academia: UK Academics' Accounts of Research Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holligan, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of research cultures in university education departments is still evolving, particularly in connection with the departments which have achieved a high ranking in the UK government's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), and also the conditions under which "knowledge workers" operate are under-researched, although this is…

  12. A longitudinal study of self-esteem, cultural identity, and academic success among American Indian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M.; Spicer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Latent growth curve modeling was used to estimate developmental trajectories of self-esteem and cultural identity among American Indian high school students and to explore the relationships of these trajectories to personal resources, problem behaviors, and academic performance at the end of high school. The sample included 1,611 participants from the Voices of Indian Teens project, a three-year longitudinal study of adolescents from three diverse American Indian cultural groups in the wester...

  13. English and French Pedagogical Cultures: Convergence and Divergence in Cameroonian Primary School Teachers' Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Edith

    2012-01-01

    This article approaches the phenomenon of the continuing influence of French and English pedagogical cultures in Africa relying on post-modern notions of time and space. It reports on a project carried out in Cameroon where both cultures are in contact and where the teachers from two primary schools were observed and interviewed over a period of…

  14. Information technology leadership in academic medical centers: a tale of four cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, C P

    1999-07-01

    Persons and groups within academic medical centers bring consistent and predictable viewpoints to planning and decision making. The varied professional and academic cultures of these individuals appear to account primarily for the diversity of their viewpoints. Understanding these professional cultures can help leaders achieve some predictability in the complex environments for which they are responsible. Leaders in information technology in particular, in order to be successful, must become part-time anthropologists, immersing themselves in the varied workplaces of their constituents to understand the work they do and the cultures that have grown up around this work. Only in this way will they be able to manage the challenges that arise continuously as the technology and the needs it can address change over time. In this article, the author briefly describes the concept of culture, portrays four specific professional cultures that typically coexist in academic medical centers, and argues that understanding these cultures is absolutely critical to effective management and use of information resources.

  15. The Cultural/Economic Logic of “Festival Nationalism”: An Analysis of “Anti-Korea” & “Anti-China” Discourses in Taiwanese Media Reports on Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-De Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For making an “imagined community,” the nationalist not only invents the concepts of “us” or “our traditions” to maintain national identity but also constructs the images of “others” or “our enemies” to differentiate them from us. In Taiwan, the major “enemies” are Korea and China, two neighbor countries having close relationship with Taiwan in politics, economy, and culture fields. By both quantitative content analysis and qualitative discourse analysis of the media reports on related sport events since the 1980s, this paper examines the development and characteristics of “anti-Korea” and “anti-China” discourse. First, the amounts of both anti-Korea and anti-China discourse have increased in the globalization era of 2000s in which Taiwanese economy became in relative disadvantage to Korea and China. Moreover, the number of anti-Korea discourses is obviously more than that of anti-China through the 1980s to 2000s, while the later has increased in the 2000s as the Chinese economy grew rapidly. Second, these nationalist discourses have been transformed from “politic speech” under the governmental control in the 1980s and 1990s, to a “non-politic/entertaining sentimental performances” by ordinary people and celebrities or artists in the entertainment industry in the 2000s. Third, the so-called “festival nationalism” on Taiwanese media nationalism discourse in the globalization era mainly concentrated on anti-Korea sentiment reports, which was resulted from the competitions of the national economy and the entertainment industry among the three East Asian countries. This paper, thus, illustrates how sporting nationalism have been influenced by the economic competitions, and also demonstrates the transformation and re-construction of nationalism by the cultural economy, rather than built by political power, in the globalization age.

  16. Academic Culture and Citizenship in Transitional Societies: Case Studies from China and Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelényi, Katalin; Rhoads, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Through organizational case studies conducted at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies in China and Central European University in Hungary, this paper examines academic culture and citizenship in societies transitioning from communist to market-driven social and economic structures. The article presents a new model of citizenship, representing…

  17. The Role of the Culture of Japanese Students in Acquisition of Academic English: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, Patricia Anne

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study examines the role of Japanese students' culture and its effects on the rate of acquisition of academic English. It is based on observation of classes in Japanese schools, both in Japan and Germany, as well as in an international school, together with interviews, questionnaires, student responses and case studies over a…

  18. Archimedes, Reading, and the Sustenance of Academic Research Culture in Library Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Amanda

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the history of academic research, library instruction, and the role of leisure, reflection, and creativity. Suggests that these cultural elements should be introduced to undergraduates and contends that deep reading, rather than information literacy competency, cultivates these elements. Examines productivity and the faculty research…

  19. Socio-Cultural Adaptation, Academic Adaptation and Satisfaction of International Higher Degree Research Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Baohua; Wright, Ewan

    2016-01-01

    The number of international higher degree research students has grown at a significant rate in recent years, with Australia becoming a hub for attracting such students from around the world. However, research has identified that international higher degree research students often encounter a wide range of academic and socio-cultural challenges in…

  20. Scholarship in Occupational Therapy Faculty: The Interaction of Cultural Forces in Academic Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow-Royer, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades there has been heightened interest in redefining faculty scholarship in higher education (Boyer, 1990). Trends have included the development of cultural frameworks for understanding how disciplines and institutions influence faculty work and how socialization processes impact academic career development. Despite the fact…

  1. The Role of the Culture of Japanese Students in Acquisition of Academic English: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, Patricia Anne

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study examines the role of Japanese students' culture and its effects on the rate of acquisition of academic English. It is based on observation of classes in Japanese schools, both in Japan and Germany, as well as in an international school, together with interviews, questionnaires, student responses and case studies over a…

  2. Women Mentoring in the Academe: A Faculty Cross-Racial and Cross-Cultural Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guramatunhu-Mudiwa, Precious; Angel, Roma B.

    2017-01-01

    Two women faculty members, one White from the southeastern United States and one Black African from Zimbabwe, purposefully explored their informal mentoring relationship with the goal of illuminating the complexities associated with their cross-racial, cross-cultural experience. Concentrating on their four-year mentor-mentee academic relationship…

  3. Cultural Models of Education and Academic Performance for Native American and European American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryberg, Stephanie A.; Covarrubias, Rebecca; Burack, Jacob A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the role of cultural representations of self (i.e., interdependence and independence) and positive relationships (i.e., trust for teachers) in academic performance (i.e., self-reported grades) for Native American ("N"?=?41) and European American ("N"?=?49) high school students. The Native American students endorsed…

  4. The National Year of Reading: Celebrating the Role of Literature in an Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    2012, the National Year of Reading (NYR), was celebrated in libraries, schools and community centres throughout Australia. At the University of Adelaide, we celebrated our academic culture of literary teaching and research with a range of programmes and initiatives based in the humanities faculty. The Barr Smith Library played an integral part in…

  5. The Role of the Culture of Japanese Students in Acquisition of Academic English: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, Patricia Anne

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study examines the role of Japanese students' culture and its effects on the rate of acquisition of academic English. It is based on observation of classes in Japanese schools, both in Japan and Germany, as well as in an international school, together with interviews, questionnaires, student responses and case studies over a…

  6. Opening Spaces of Academic Culture: Doors of Perception; Heaven and Hell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Chad; Whitman, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    Academic culture is a distinct and unique field, and perhaps may best be conceptualised as a space. Although access to university has traditionally been restricted, recent efforts on a number of fronts have attempted to "open" the space of the academy. In particular, enabling programmes such as Preparatory Programs and Foundation Courses…

  7. The Relationship between Cultural Identity and Academic Achievement of Asian American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven K.

    A study investigated the relationship between students' level of interest in maintaining their cultural identity and their academic achievement. Subjects were 105 United States-born Chinese-American and Korean-American high school students attending two public high schools in Southern California. The two groups represented the largest minority…

  8. Scholarship in Occupational Therapy Faculty: The Interaction of Cultural Forces in Academic Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow-Royer, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades there has been heightened interest in redefining faculty scholarship in higher education (Boyer, 1990). Trends have included the development of cultural frameworks for understanding how disciplines and institutions influence faculty work and how socialization processes impact academic career development. Despite the fact…

  9. The CPAI-2 As a Culturally Relevant Personality Measure in Differentiating among Academic Major Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Alexander; Fan, Weiqiao; Cheung, Fanny M.; Leong, Frederick T. L.; Cheung, Shu Fai

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether the Cross-Cultural (Chinese) Personality Assessment Inventory-2 (CPAI-2), developed by the combined emic-etic approach, could provide useful information for us to understand the relations between personality and the key academic major groups in the Chinese context. Participants in this study included 989 university students…

  10. Organizational Cynicism, School Culture, and Academic Achievement: The Study of Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Engin; Kilicoglu, Gökhan; Yilmaz, Derya

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain constructed theoretical models that organizational cynicism perceptions of primary school teachers affect school culture and academic achievement, by using structural equation modeling. With the assumption that there is a cause-effect relationship between three main variables, the study was constructed with…

  11. Cross-Cultural Findings of Computer Literacy Among the Academic Olympians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokelainen, Petri; Tirri, Kirsi; Campbell, James R.

    This paper investigates computer literacy related cross-cultural factors that predict academic ability among mathematically gifted Olympians in Finland (N=72, 68 males and 4 females) and the United States (N=80, all males). The following research questions were formulated: (1) What is the nature of the connection between computer skills and…

  12. 中外医学学术论文英文摘要中元话语使用对比研究%A Comparative Study of Meta Discourse in Chinese and English Medical Academic Abstracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓芳; 曹凤龙

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In order to promote medical research fruits and communication, the use of meta discourse in Chinese and English medical academic abstracts is explored. Methods: This paper discusses the uses of meta discourse in Chinese and English Medical Academic Abstracts, and samples are analyzed to find out the differences. Conclusion: Meta discourse in English Medical Academic Abstracts are used more than that in Chinese medical academic abstracts.%目的:为了推动中外医学研究成果与交流,探索元话语在中外医学学术论文中的使用不同。方法:本文阐述了元话语在英文摘要中的运用,采用定性与定量分析相结合的方法,选取语料样本对比中外医学学术论文摘要中元话语的使用特征。结论:在中外医学论文摘要中,中国学者使用元话语要比英语本族人的使用要少,并且交互式话语和互动式话语的十项子类别也出现了显著性的差异。

  13. 从文化话语视角论杭州的城市文化传播%Criticism on the Urban Cultural Communication by Cultural Discourse Studies Paradigm:Taking Hangzhou as the Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈白颖

    2013-01-01

    Culture and communication are inseparable .Driven by globalization ,the internationalization of Chinese mass media is increasing its might . In the process of urban development ,media discourses play an important role in the construction and communication of urban culture .Actually ,we need the support of discourse strategies to generate the vigor growing force of urban culture and turn it into the real soft power .Grounded on Chinese Discourse Studies Paradigm , this paper researches the representative discourses on“food ,shelter ,transportation ,travel ,shopping and entertainment”publicized by Hangzhou mass media in these two years .It analyzes the urban cultural features these discourses embody and reveals the influence they bring on the urban development .In consideration of the era background and require-ments ,the paper explores the discourse strategies on the communication of urban culture at the end .%在城市发展的进程中,媒体宣传话语对城市文化气质的建构与传播发挥着重要作用,要让一座城市的文化具备内在生长力,并转化为真正的软实力,需要话语策略的支持。本文以文化话语研究范式为基础,以近两年杭州媒体对于城市吃、住、行、游、购、娱六个方面具有代表性的宣传文本为研究对象,分析这些话语的特征及其所体现的城市文化气质,并结合文化背景与时代要求,探索城市文化传播与发展的话语策略。

  14. Los Programas de Inmersion Bilingue y la Adquisicion del Discurso Academico (Bilingual Immersion Programs and the Acquisition of Academic Discourse).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Bonilla, Guadalupe

    2002-01-01

    A study examined the strategies used by a fourth-grade teacher in a two-way bilingual immersion program (English/Spanish) that contributed to students' development of academic language in Spanish. Analysis of a science lesson highlighted the use of an appropriate Spanish-language textbook and the teacher's use of visual elements, repetition,…

  15. Accommodation and resistance to the dominant cultural discourse on psychiatric mental health: oral history accounts of family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschma, Geertje

    2007-12-01

    Oral history makes a critical contribution in articulating the perspectives of people often overlooked in histories written from the standpoint of dominating class, gender, ethnic or professional groups. Using three interrelated approaches - life stories, oral history, and narrative analysis - this paper analyzes family responses to psychiatric care and mental illness in oral history interviews with family members who experienced mental illness themselves or within their family between 1930 and 1975. Interviews with three family members in Alberta, Canada are the primary focus. These stories provide an important avenue to understand the meaning and transformations of mental health-care from the point of view of families. Family members' stories reveal contradictory responses to the dominant cultural discourse. Using a performative framework of interpretation, the narratives reveal a complex interplay between medical, social and cultural conceptions of mental illness, deepening our understanding of its meaning. The history of mental health-care can be substantially enriched by the analysis of family members' stories, not only revealing the constructed nature of mental illness, but also illustrating the family as a mediating context in which the meaning of mental illness is negotiated.

  16. A longitudinal study of self-esteem, cultural identity, and academic success among American Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M; Spicer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Latent growth curve modeling was used to estimate developmental trajectories of self-esteem and cultural identity among American Indian high school students and to explore the relationships of these trajectories to personal resources, problem behaviors, and academic performance at the end of high school. The sample included 1,611 participants from the Voices of Indian Teens project, a 3-year longitudinal study of adolescents from 3 diverse American Indian cultural groups in the western United States. Trajectories of self-esteem were clearly related to academic achievement; cultural identity, in contrast, was largely unrelated, with no direct effects and only very small indirect effects. The relationships between self-esteem and success were mediated by personal resources and problem behaviors.

  17. Balancing Two Cultures: American Indian/Alaska Native Medical Students' Perceptions of Academic Medicine Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, John Paul; Poll-Hunter, Norma; Stern, Nicole; Garcia, Andrea N; Brewster, Cheryl

    2016-08-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) remain underrepresented in the academic medicine workforce and little is known about cultivating AI/AN medical students' interest in academic medicine careers. Five structured focus groups were conducted including 20 medical students and 18 physicians. The discussion guide explored factors influencing AI/AN trainees' academic medicine career interest and recommended approaches to increase their pursuit of academia. Consensual qualitative research was employed to analyze transcripts. Our research revealed six facilitating factors, nine dissuading factors, and five recommendations towards cultivating AI/AN pursuit of academia. Facilitators included the opportunity to teach, serving as a role model/mentor, enhancing the AI/AN medical education pipeline, opportunities to influence institution, collegiality, and financial stability. Dissuading factors included limited information on academic career paths, politics, lack of credit for teaching and community service, isolation, self-doubt, lower salary, lack of positions in rural areas, lack of focus on clinical care for AI/AN communities, and research obligations. Recommendations included heighten career awareness, recognize the challenges in balancing AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborate with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, identify concordant role models/mentors, and identify loan forgiveness programs. Similar to other diverse medical students', raising awareness of academic career opportunities especially regarding teaching and community scholarship, access to concordant role models/mentors, and supportive institutional climates can also foster AI/AN medical students' pursuit of academia. Unique strategies for AI/AN trainees include learning how to balance AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborating with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, and increasing faculty opportunities in rural areas.

  18. Popular Public Discourse at Speakers' Corner: Negotiating Cultural Identities in Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    1996-01-01

    In this paper I examine how cultural identities are actively negotiated in popular debate at a multicultural public setting in London. Speakers at Speakers' Corner manage the local construction of group affiliation, audience response and argument in and through talk, within the context of ethnic......, religious and general topical 'soap-box' oration. However, audiences are not passive receivers of rhetorical messages. They are active negotiators of interpretations and alignments that may conflict with the speaker's and other audience members' orientations to prior talk. Speakers' Corner is a space...... in which participant 'citizens' in the public sphere can actively struggle over cultural representation and identities. Using transcribed examples of video data recorded at Speakers' Corner my paper will examine how cultural identity is invoked in the management of active participation. Audiences...

  19. Latinx Popular Culture Imaginaries: Examining Puerto Rican Children's Social Discourses in Interpreting Telenovelas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carmen Liliana; Costa, María del Rocío; Soto, Nayda

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a collaboration project within one urban Puerto Rican classroom, focused on constructing a critical literacy inquiry curriculum grounded in the students' out-of-school literacy practices in their communities, including their experiences with media and popular culture. We focused on a critical literacy and media inquiry…

  20. Latinx Popular Culture Imaginaries: Examining Puerto Rican Children's Social Discourses in Interpreting Telenovelas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carmen Liliana; Costa, María del Rocío; Soto, Nayda

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a collaboration project within one urban Puerto Rican classroom, focused on constructing a critical literacy inquiry curriculum grounded in the students' out-of-school literacy practices in their communities, including their experiences with media and popular culture. We focused on a critical literacy and media inquiry…

  1. Reconciling Form and Content: Acquisition of Cross-Cultural Discourse Structures by Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Elena; Hammer, Judith E.

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the ability of advanced Russian learners of English as a foreign language (FL) to compose authentic essays in the target language (TL) reflecting morphosyntactic, discursive, and cross-cultural expectations. Thirty-four students at Russian universities were asked to utilize their TL, English, to write compositions focusing on…

  2. Essence or Practice? Conflicting Cultural Values in Chinese EFL Textbooks: A Discourse Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tao

    2012-01-01

    While increasing attention is being paid to the ideological debate on Confucian-influenced cultural values communicated in Chinese language textbooks, EFL textbooks remain under-examined since the TEFL/TESOL is typically assumed to be "technical" and "neutral". Drawing on critical theoretical perspectives on curriculum,…

  3. "Tranfronterizos"' Socialization into Mathematical Discourse: Capitalizing on Language and Cultural Resources or Caught between Conflicting Ideologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquinca, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Studies of "transfronterizos" have highlighted the potential ways in which these students might draw on their linguistic, cultural, or knowledge capital on both sides of the border. However, because "transfronterizos" may cross borders to participate in institutional contexts, such as schooling, they can find themselves in the interstices of…

  4. "Reading across Communities" in Biliteracy Practices: Examining Translocal Discourses and Cultural Flows in Literature Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    The engagement of immigrant children in literature discussion groups in an elementary school classroom in the United States is studied in this article. The analysis shows how the students' responses are embedded in translocal movements across places, time, and people that can be characterized as constructing dynamic cultural flows. The findings…

  5. Culture-Blind? Parental Discourse on Religion, Ethnicity and Secularism in the French Educational Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveaud, Maroussia

    2008-01-01

    This article examines policy mediation and adaptation in a context where religious, ethnic and other cultural identities are not officially recognised in the public sphere but considered part of the private sphere. French educational policy is firmly rooted within a secular Republican framework which relies on a colour-blind approach to promote…

  6. 构建中国特色哲学社会科学学术话语的思考%Reflections on Building the Academic Discourse of Philosophy and Social Sciences With Chinese Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐卫平; 姜裕富

    2016-01-01

    哲学社会科学学术话语权是一个国家软实力的表现。话语权的争夺,实质是意识形态领导权的争夺。西方国家总是凭借其在话语权中的优势地位,极力宣扬渗透西方国家价值观思想的“普世价值”,并以此来评价他国事务,干涉他国内政。构建哲学社会科学学术话语的中国特色,必须尊重哲学社会科学的发展规律,善于研究中国现象、总结中国经验、提炼中国学术话语,用中国实践中发展起来的中国理论讲好中国故事。%The academic discourse of philosophy and social sciences is the expression of a nation’s soft power. Competing for the academic discourse is virtually for the ideological leadership. With their advantageous position,Western countries publicize and permeate vigorously“Universal Value”,by which Western countries appraise businesses of other countries,and interfere in the internal affairs of other countries. In terms of the construction of Chinese characteristics of the academic discourse of phi-losophy and social sciences,we must respect the law of the development of philosophy and social sci-ences,be good at studying the Chinese phenomenon,sum up China’s experiences,refine the academic discourse in China,and speak good Chinese stories by developed theories in China’s practice.

  7. THE STRUCTURE OF A CULTURAL CONCEPT: MEANS OF LANGUAGE AND DISCOURSE REPRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kononova Inna Vladimirovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers some modern approaches to the analysis of the structure of a cultural concept and introduces a new method that is an efficient addition to current trends on the concept structure investigation accepted in modern linguistics. The structure of a cultural concept is viewed as including imagery, associative, notional, evaluative, etymological and historical components. The national peculiarity of a cultural concept is reflected mainly in its evaluative and associative components and is largely determined by its etymological component. The associative component of a cultural concept is formed by the dominant associative relations (thematic, paradigmatic, syntagmatic of its language representatives. The notional component has some intersection zones with the associative one as it can be drawn from the dominant associative links. However, the generic features of a concept constitute the basic part of the notional component. The imagery component of a concept may include a visually-perceptible representation (a perceptual image or a combination of conceptual metaphors deduced by a native speaker from the collocations of the word(s, representing the concept in the language. The suggested method can be used in analyzing the diachronic changes of the national concept sphere. Theoretical statements are exemplified with the structural analysis of the British ethical concept SELF-POSSESSION. The language data observation helps to discover the interrelations of the concept in question with some other dominant concepts of the ethical concept sphere represented by British English. The author emphasizes cultural importance of the concept within the bounds of the British national mentality. Representation of the analyzed concept in the phraseological fund of the language is in the focus of the author's attention.

  8. Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine: Critical Mass or Critical Actors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, Deborah L; Newbill, Sharon L; Cardinali, Gina; Morahan, Page S; Chang, Shine; Magrane, Diane

    2017-05-01

    By 2006, women constituted 34% of academic medical faculty, reaching a critical mass. Theoretically, with critical mass, culture and policy supportive of gender equity should be evident. We explore whether having a critical mass of women transforms institutional culture and organizational change. Career development program participants were interviewed to elucidate their experiences in academic health centers (AHCs). Focus group discussions were held with institutional leaders to explore their perceptions about contemporary challenges related to gender and leadership. Content analysis of both data sources revealed points of convergence. Findings were interpreted using the theory of critical mass. Two nested domains emerged: the individual domain included the rewards and personal satisfaction of meaningful work, personal agency, tensions between cultural expectations of family and academic roles, and women's efforts to work for gender equity. The institutional domain depicted the sociocultural environment of AHCs that shaped women's experience, both personally and professionally, lack of institutional strategies to engage women in organizational initiatives, and the influence of one leader on women's ascent to leadership. The predominant evidence from this research demonstrates that the institutional barriers and sociocultural environment continue to be formidable obstacles confronting women, stalling the transformational effects expected from achieving a critical mass of women faculty. We conclude that the promise of critical mass as a turning point for women should be abandoned in favor of "critical actor" leaders, both women and men, who individually and collectively have the commitment and power to create gender-equitable cultures in AHCs.

  9. The Cultural Politics of National Testing and Test Result Release Policy in South Korea: A Critical Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Youl-Kwan; Kang, Mi Ok

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the ideological construction of educational discourses embedded within the South Korean print media. Significantly, these discourses have recently promoted the resurrection of a sweeping national testing and test results release policy. Through careful examination of the "test plus release" policy, the authors show…

  10. Arugula, Pine Nuts, and Hegemony: Seven Women's Choreopoetic Reflection on the Absence of Cultural Relevance in Educational Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    William-White, Lisa; Sagir, Aneela; Flores, Nancy; Jung, Gretchen; Ramirez, Angela; Osalbo, Jennifer; Doan, Hong-An

    2012-01-01

    Choreopoetic narrative storytelling is presented here, where discourse centered on the intersections of race, class, identity, and critical consciousness is performed in a multi-perspectival interpretation of the hegemonic discourses dominating the educational domain as a result of No Child Left Behind. This interpretative and reflective piece…

  11. Perspective: the negativity bias, medical education, and the culture of academic medicine: why culture change is hard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haizlip, Julie; May, Natalie; Schorling, John; Williams, Anne; Plews-Ogan, Margaret

    2012-09-01

    Despite ongoing efforts to improve working conditions, address well-being of faculty and students, and promote professionalism, many still feel the culture of academic medicine is problematic. Depression and burnout persist among physicians and trainees. The authors propose that culture change is so challenging in part because of an evolutionary construct known as the negativity bias that is reinforced serially in medical education. The negativity bias drives people to attend to and be more greatly affected by the negative aspects of experience. Some common teaching methods such as simulations, pimping, and instruction in clinical reasoning inadvertently reinforce the negativity bias and thereby enhance physicians' focus on the negative. Here, the authors examine the concept of negativity bias in the context of academic medicine, arguing that culture is affected by serially emphasizing the inherent bias to recognize and remember the negative. They explore the potential role of practices rooted in positive psychology as powerful tools to counteract the negativity bias and aid in achieving desired culture change.

  12. Fat bodies and thin bodies. Cultural, biomedical and market discourses on obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Arnaiz, Mabel

    2010-10-01

    This article addresses the question of why dieting, health, and the care of the body have come to play such a central role in our daily lives, and explores the relationship of these practices to the emergence of obesity as a social and health problem. Messages urging people to regulate their food intake and get more exercise in order to avoid obesity conflict with warnings that anorexia and bulimia are among the possible consequences of overly strict diets and excessive physical activity. The relationship between diet, beauty and health has been appropriated and re-elaborated as a marketing strategy with wide-ranging cultural consequences. "Being on a diet" is no longer only a matter of biology, nutrition, medicine or science; it is also about culture, politics and society.

  13. Vernacular Languages and Cultures in Rural Development: Theoretical Discourse and Some Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Nercissians

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of language and culture in rural development projects is investigated. Examples taken from the context of Northern Iran, the significance of which is not confined to its agricultural and forestry resources and extends beyond national borders, are presented. A starting point of the analysis is an appreciation of diversity, not only in the biological, but also in the cultural sense, as an asset and viewing development endeavors as sense making acts. It is further argued that new intangible forms of capital are increasingly gaining in importance in the contemporary world. Capital is considered not merely as an asset, but as a relation having accumulation moment as well, and impact on the regeneration of cultural and economic divides. A central concern is enhancing social inclusion and promoting conditions for making voices of otherness heard. It is deemed that vernacular voices encompass valuable indigenous knowledge and modes of perception, the negligence of which can undermine the success of rural development projects.

  14. Locating Cosmopolitanism Within Academic Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Kirpitchenko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intensified academic mobility is an enticing platform for examining the emerging manifestations of cosmopolitanism in expanding intercultural encounters. Cosmopolitanism calls for a dialogue between cultures and for reciprocal appropriation and internalization of cultures within one’s own culture. This paper endeavors to locate empirical evidence on evolving cosmopolitanism in everyday intercultural interactions and academic experiences. It is guided by the methodological applications of cosmopolitanism and the way cosmopolitanism is redefining the sociological frame of reference. This paper presents discussion and empirical testing of three defining features of cosmopolitanism according to Beck (2002: globality, plurality and civility. Mirroring these guiding principles, this research attempted to identify and analyze cosmopolitan values and dispositions in everyday intercultural encounters, discourses, situations and experiences. This paper presented an argument that cosmopolitan values and dispositions tend to create mutually beneficial conditions for intercultural inclusion and academic mobility provides a fertile ground for their current and future exploration.

  15. Appreciative inquiry for leading in complex systems: supporting the transformation of academic nursing culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Roseanne C; Horton-Deutsch, Sara; Pesut, Daniel J

    2007-07-01

    Increasingly complex environments in which nurse educators must function create distinct challenges for leaders in nursing education. Complexity is found in the presence of knowledge-driven economies, advancements in technology, and the blurring of campus boundaries created by online learning versus traditional classroom education. A dual bureaucracy of faculty and administration coexists in nursing education. The transformation of bureaucratic culture is a strategic challenge for academic leaders who strive to move dichotomous groups toward a collective vision of a preferred future. This article advocates for the affirmative administrative process of appreciative inquiry for academic nursing leadership, in nudging the dual bureaucracy toward transformational change. The intent and characteristics of appreciative inquiry are discussed, appreciative leadership strategies and actions are explained, methods for leading cultural paradigm shift are outlined, and an exemplar of the actualization of appreciative inquiry is presented.

  16. Popular Public Discourse at Speakers' Corner: Negotiating Cultural Identities in Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    1996-01-01

    In this paper I examine how cultural identities are actively negotiated in popular debate at a multicultural public setting in London. Speakers at Speakers' Corner manage the local construction of group affiliation, audience response and argument in and through talk, within the context of ethnic......, religious and general topical 'soap-box' oration. However, audiences are not passive receivers of rhetorical messages. They are active negotiators of interpretations and alignments that may conflict with the speaker's and other audience members' orientations to prior talk. Speakers' Corner is a space...

  17. “We are azorean”: discourses and practices of folk culture in Santa Catarina (Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Leal, João

    2005-01-01

    Etnográfica, Vol. IX, N.1, pp. 171-193 The development of the Azoreanist movement is a major feature in the contemporary cultural and political scene of the state of Santa Catarina(southern Brazil). Aimed at the rediscovery and celebration of the Azorean roots of the island of Santa Catarina and other coastal areas of the state, the Azoreanist movement dates back to the 1940s and, having remained an elite endeavor for several decades, recently became a very influential movement...

  18. Cultural Competency Education in Academic Dental Institutions in Australia and New Zealand: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Sheree L; Hayes, Melanie J; Taylor, Jane A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the status of cultural competency education in Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy programs. The study sought to explore the extent to which cultural competence is included in these programs' curricula, building on similar studies conducted in the United States and thus contributing to the international body of knowledge on this topic. A 12-item instrument was designed with questions in four areas (demographics, content of cultural competency education, organization of overall program curriculum, and educational methods used to teach cultural competence) and was sent to all Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy educational programs. Of the total 24 programs, 15 responded for a response rate of 62.5%. The results showed that lectures were the most frequent teaching method used in cultural competency education; however, the variation in responses indicated inconsistencies across study participants, as discussions and self-directed learning also featured prominently in the responses. The majority of respondents reported that cultural competence was not taught as a specific course but rather integrated into their programs' existing curricula. The variations in methods may indicate the need for a standardized framework for cultural competency education in these countries. In addition, the notion of cultural competency education in academic dental institutions demands additional evaluation, and further research is required to develop a solid evidence base on which to develop cultural competency education, specifically regarding content, most effective pedagogies, and assessment of student preparedness.

  19. Big-fish-little-pond effect on academic self-concept. A cross-cultural (26-country) test of the negative effects of academically selective schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W; Hau, Kit-Tai

    2003-05-01

    Academically selective schools are intended to affect academic self-concept positively, but theoretical and empirical research demonstrates that the effects are negative. The big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE), an application of social comparison theory to educational settings, posits that a student will have a lower academic self-concept in an academically selective school than in a nonselective school. This study, the largest cross-cultural study of the BFLPE ever undertaken, tested theoretical predictions for nationally representative samples of approximately 4,000 15-year-olds from each of 26 countries (N = 103,558) who completed the same self-concept instrument and achievement tests. Consistent with the BFLPE, the effects of school-average achievement were negative in all 26 countries (M beta = -.20, SD = .08), demonstrating the BFLPE's cross-cultural generalizability.

  20. English language status and English communication in culturally diverse academic departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Communicating in a common language can function as a general frame of reference in culturally diverse organizations, providing that the status of the language permits its use. Based on a large-scale survey of 489 academic members of sixteen culturally diverse science departments at three...... universities, results showed that English fluency had a positive association with inter-individual communication and management communication, both in English, while linguistic distance only had a positive relationship with inter-individual communication in English. Implications of these findings are discussed...

  1. Academic Globalization: Universality of Cross-Cultural And Cross-Disciplinary LMR Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szabo White

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of this paper suggests that previous research underscoring cross-cultural differences may be misleading, when in fact it is cross-professional rather than cross-cultural differences that should be emphasized. Employing the LMR framework, this paper concludes that business or non-business predisposition has a more direct impact on one's individual cultural profile than does nationality. Regardless of culture, persons involved in business are characterized primarily by linear-active modes of communication, and persons not involved in business typically employ less linear and more multi-active/hybrid modes of communication. The linkages among individual characteristics, communication styles, work behaviors, and the extent to which the LMR constructs can facilitate and predict leadership, negotiating styles, individual behaviors, etc. are central to academic globalization and preparing global business leaders.

  2. Continuing the dialogue: postcolonial feminist scholarship and Bourdieu - discourses of culture and points of connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J M; Reimer Kirkham, S; Browne, A J; Lynam, M J

    2007-09-01

    Postcolonial feminist theories provide the analytic tools to address issues of structural inequities in groups that historically have been socially and economically disadvantaged. In this paper we question what value might be added to postcolonial feminist theories on culture by drawing on Bourdieu. Are there points of connection? Like postcolonial feminists, he puts forward a position that aims to unmask oppressive structures. We argue that, while there are points of connection, there are also epistemologic and methodologic differences between postcolonial feminist perspectives and Bourdieu's work. Nonetheless, engagement with different theoretical perspectives carries the promise of new insights - new ways of 'seeing' and 'understanding' that might enhance a praxis-oriented theoretical perspective in healthcare delivery.

  3. Audit Cultures and Quality Assurance Mechanisms in England: A Study of Their Perceived Impact on the Work of Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Proponents of the concept of the audit culture in UK higher education argue that from the late 1990s onward audit functioned as a form of power control and had a profound effect on academics and their work. Such arguments continued to be made into the early 2000s. Since then, however, the level of external scrutiny surrounding UK academics'…

  4. A Cultural Hybridization Perspective: Emerging Academic Subculture among International Students from East Asia in U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the emerging academic subculture of international students from East Asia in U.S. academics from the cultural hybridization perspective. In a knowledge-based economy, international education plays a pivotal role in the global educational environment. Advocacy of international student mobility is essential; international…

  5. Audit Cultures and Quality Assurance Mechanisms in England: A Study of Their Perceived Impact on the Work of Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Proponents of the concept of the audit culture in UK higher education argue that from the late 1990s onward audit functioned as a form of power control and had a profound effect on academics and their work. Such arguments continued to be made into the early 2000s. Since then, however, the level of external scrutiny surrounding UK academics'…

  6. ppropriation of scientific discourse by protestant biology students: the contribution of Bakhtin's language theory to educational research and culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Sepulveda

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies about the relations between classroom discourse interactions and processes of teaching and learning show that science learning is related to a process structured by speech genres and ways of establishing semantic links between events, objects, and people. Accordingly, it has been emphasized that science education research needs to incorporate theories and methods developed for the interpretative analysis of discourse. This paper shows the heuristic power that an interpretative analysis of discourse based on Bakhtin’s theory of language can have in the investigation of meaning making in science education in multicultural contexts. With this purpose, we discuss here results obtained in the analysis of the discourse about “nature” or “natural world” of protestant Biology preservice teachers of a Brazilian university, produced in the context of semi-structured interviews.

  7. Fixed Links and Vague Discourses About Culture and the Making of Cross-border Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Stöber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been en vogue for official bodies to focus on ‘culture’ as a strategic factor for the development of spatial entities such as cross-border regions in the making. This focus places high expectations and a strong belief in the power of ‘culture’. In this paper I will argue that in region building processes the focus on ‘culture’ is often due to an overriding wish to develop an economic well-functioning region. Moreover, it seems like ‘culture’ is used as a tool to distract people from a critique of bigger infrastructure projects that such developments entail. In order to strengthen these arguments, the paper will focus on two examples from Northern Europe, the existing Danish-Swedish Øresund link as well as the planned link between Denmark and Germany across the Femernbelt. In the course of the paper, focus will be on central bodies or actors that are taking up the issue of culture within a regional context. Hence, the concept of governance, particularly that of networked governance structures as well co-governance will be briefly discussed. All in all, the paper shows the ‘fragmented complexity of agency and the multitude of actors related to region building’ (Paasi 2010:2300.

  8. Discourse Analysis for Legal Culture Research Innovation%话语分析之于法律文化研究拓新

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈子远

    2013-01-01

    Research of Chinese legal culture grew vigorously and declined suddenly, the main reason is that the research conclusion cannot reasonably explain contemporary legal culture phenomenon, and no innovation of methodology is the main sticking point. Culture is a set of rules system, and discourses are a kind of power control rules. Judging by the appearance instead of in-depth study, the scholars may be confused in the narrative discourse of Chinese legal history created by rulers of ancient China. Discourse system of Confucianism ideology with a core of moral determinism dominated the people’s"truth"knowledge and value judgment on Chinese tradition law. Critical discourse analysis from linguistics methods can help people read, interpret or recreate text and discourse cultural connotation through the cover of ideology.%  中国法律文化研究由勃兴而忽亡,研究结论不能合理解释当代法律文化现象是根本原因,方法论没有革故鼎新是主要症结。文化是一套规则体系,话语是一种权力支配规则。流于“貌阅”而不能深入挖潜的研习定势下,学者们不免惑于统治者编造的中国法律史叙事话语。儒学意识形态下道德决定论为核心的话语体系支配了人们对中国传统法的“真理”性认识和价值判断。源于批判语言学的话语分析方法,有助于人们穿越意识形态的遮蔽,解读、诠释或重现文本与话语的文化内涵。

  9. Experiencing the culture of academic medicine: gender matters, a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Civian, Janet T; Brennan, Robert T; Dottolo, Andrea L; Krupat, Edward

    2013-02-01

    Energized and productive faculty are critical to academic medicine, yet studies indicate a lack of advancement and senior roles for women. Using measures of key aspects of the culture of academic medicine, this study sought to identify similarity and dissimilarity between perceptions of the culture by male and female faculty. The C - Change Faculty Survey was used to collect data on perceptions of organizational culture. A stratified random sample of 4,578 full-time faculty at 26 nationally representative US medical colleges (response rate 52 %). 1,271 (53 %) of respondents were female. Factor analysis assisted in the creation of scales assessing dimensions of the culture, which served as the key outcomes. Regression analysis identified gender differences while controlling for other demographic characteristics. Compared with men, female faculty reported a lower sense of belonging and relationships within the workplace (T = -3.30, p values and those of their institutions (T = -2.06, p ethical/moral distress, perception of institutional commitment to faculty advancement, or perception of institutional change efforts to improve support for faculty. Faculty men and women are equally engaged in their work and share similar leadership aspirations. However, medical schools have failed to create and sustain an environment where women feel fully accepted and supported to succeed; how can we ensure that medical schools are fully using the talent pool of a third of its faculty?

  10. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members' organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet networks, in order to promote university netiquette and

  11. Interactive Discourse Structuring in L2 Guest Lectures: Some Insights from a Comparative Corpus-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camiciottoli, Belinda Crawford

    2004-01-01

    Interactive discourse structuring is used to guide listeners through on-going speech and has been shown to have a positive effect on lecture comprehension, particularly in L2 settings. As mobility increases in the academic world, there are more opportunities for lecture events characterized not only by linguistic/cultural diversity, but also by…

  12. Something to Talk About: Re-thinking Conversations on Research Culture in Canadian Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi LM Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As Canadian academic librarians have experienced an increasing presence in faculty associations and unions, expectations of librarian scholarship and research have increased as well. However, literature from the past several decades on academic librarianship and scholarship focuses heavily on obstacles faced by librarians in their research endeavours, which suggests that the research environment at many academic libraries has stalled. Though many have called for the development of a research culture, little has been said regarding how the profession might go about encouraging this development, and conversations often become mired in the contemplation of obstacles. As a way to move forward, we suggest building upon pre-existing strengths by adopting the model of “intellectual communities” put forward by Walker et al. They describe four qualities necessary for strong “intellectual communities”: shared purpose; diverse and multigenerational community; flexible and forgiving community; and respectful and generous community. Although these qualities are often embedded within our libraries, they need to be made a conscious part of our research environment through reflection and conversation. Working toward strong research cultures requires that we focus less on obstacles and more on reflective and productive activities that build on our strengths.

  13. 中国学术话语的“主权让渡”现象及其成因%The Sovereignty Assignment Phenomenon in Chinese Academic Discourse and Its Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑荣

    2013-01-01

    改革开放以来,中国学术产品如雨后春笋般涌现,学术的繁荣是不争的事实。但学术繁荣的背后也潜藏着一些危机,那就是学术话语的“主权让渡”现象,其集中表现为中国学术话语中的“西方主义”和中国当代学术话语体系的“失语”现象。究其成因,除了流于表面的中国学术界的盲目崇洋心理,更有隐匿于背后的深层的文化、制度、科技和社会等原因,其反映的是中国学界学术自觉意识的缺失。%Since the reform and opening up ,Chinese academic products has been sprung up like mush-rooms ,as a result of w hich the academic blossom is an uncontroversial issue .Nonetheless ,behind the aca-demic prosperity ,there is hiding some latent crises ,w hich can be addressed as the"sovereignty assignment phenomenon"and mainly reflected in westernism in Chinese academic discourses and the aphasia phenome-non in the contemporary academic discourse system .The underlying reason is nothing but blind western-worship psychological state of Chinese academic circle and their loss of self -consciousness .

  14. Changing the Engineering Student Culture with Respect to Academic Integrity and Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDeGrift, Tammy; Dillon, Heather; Camp, Loreal

    2017-08-01

    Engineers create airplanes, buildings, medical devices, and software, amongst many other things. Engineers abide by a professional code of ethics to uphold people's safety and the reputation of the profession. Likewise, students abide by a code of academic integrity while learning the knowledge and necessary skills to prepare them for the engineering and computing professions. This paper reports on studies designed to improve the engineering student culture with respect to academic integrity and ethics. To understand the existing culture at a university in the USA, a survey based on a national survey about cheating was administered to students. The incidences of self-reported cheating and incidences of not reporting others who cheat show the culture is similar to other institutions. Two interventions were designed and tested in an introduction to an engineering course: two case studies that students discussed in teams and the whole class, and a letter of recommendation assignment in which students wrote about themselves (character, strengths, examples of ethical decisions) three years into the future. Students were surveyed after the two interventions. Results show that first-year engineering students appreciate having a code of academic integrity and they want to earn their degree without cheating, yet less than half of the students would report on another cheating student. The letter of recommendation assignment had some impact on getting students to think about ethics, their character, and their actions. Future work in changing the student culture will continue in both a top-down (course interventions) and bottom-up (student-driven interventions) manner.

  15. “文化消亡话语”之解读与反思%Interpretation of and Reflection upon the "Discourse of Cultural Extinction"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈爱国

    2012-01-01

    The writing of ethnography can be carried out and accomplished under two discourses. One is the discourse of "cultural extinction", and the other is that of "cultural generation". American cultural critic James Clifford once pointed out in his writings that modem anthropology regards the variation of the other culture as cuhural extinction and assumes the record and saving of the other fading culture as its own duty. While analyzing the hidden political appeal of the "extinction" discourse, Clifford recommends the expression of the other culture under the discourse of "cultural generation". In the current context of preserving intangible cultural heritage, the discourse of "cultural extinction" plays an important role, which is closely related to the policy, practice and theories of preservation. In the light of various field studies on protection and commercial exploitation of shadow plays, this paper interprets the positive mean- ing of "cultural extinction discourse" for China and reflects on the numerous problems it may bring to the maintenance of rural cultural traditions and positions of heritage bearers.%民族志的撰写可以在两种话语下展开与完成:其一是“文化消亡话语”,其二为“文化生成话语”。美国的文化批评家詹姆斯·克利福德曾在其论著中指出近代人类学把他者文化的变异视为文化的消亡,并以记录和解救他者日渐消逝的文化为己任。克利福德在剖析这一“文化消亡话语”在人类学民族志撰写过程中所隐藏的政治性的同时,提倡应以“文化生成话语”来表述他者的文化。在当下非物质文化遗产保护的语境下,“文化消亡话语”也扮演着举足轾重的角色。正如我们时常提及传统或原生态的遗失这些话语那样,“文化消亡话语”与非遗保护的政策、实践以及理论层面的展开都息息相关。本文以对皮影戏保护和商业利用状况展

  16. "A good spot": Health promotion discourse, healthy cities and heterogeneity in contemporary Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Eva Ladekjaer; Manderson, Lenore

    2009-06-01

    Health promotion at a community level has gained popularity in recent decades within and outside academic environments. The health promotion discourse is part of a wider political discourse, aimed at empowering individuals to take control of their own lives and enabling them to be engaged, responsible and active citizens in their own communities. Key values of the discourse, deriving from a democratic and individualistic culture, are evident in how local authorities develop and implement policies aimed at promoting population health and wellbeing. In this article, we draw on data from a relatively poor multicultural Danish community incorporated in the WHO Healthy Cities Programme. We explore how key terms of the health promoting discourse are constructed, operationalized and resisted by different subgroups. The contradictions that emerge challenge how we comprehend communities in relation to safety and harmony, and how people within defined communities are involved in common community life.

  17. Games and Metaphor - A critical analysis of the metaphor discourse in game studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möring, Sebastian Martin

    This doctoral dissertation critically investigates how the concept of metaphor is used with regard to games in game studies. The goal is to provide the field with a self-understanding of its metaphor discourse which has not been researched so far. The thesis departs from the observation...... that the notion of metaphor has been present in the discourse of game studies since it emerged as an academic field and focuses on questions such as: What are the motivations and effects of calling games metaphors in the game studies discourse? Which problems arise from that with regard to other established...... and game theory, cultural theory, semiotics, linguistics, philosophy, and game studies it investigates the metaphor discourse of game studies in the fashion of a meta-study. The main part of this thesis is devoted to three particular problems which have been derived from observations in the overview...

  18. Academic Culture, Business Culture, and Measuring Achievement Differences: Internal Auditing Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Benjamin S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored whether university internal audit directors' views of culture and measuring achievement differences between their institutions and a business were related to how they viewed internal auditing priorities and uses. The Carnegie Classification system's 283 Doctorate-granting Universities were the target population.…

  19. Academic Culture, Business Culture, and Measuring Achievement Differences: Internal Auditing Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Benjamin S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored whether university internal audit directors' views of culture and measuring achievement differences between their institutions and a business were related to how they viewed internal auditing priorities and uses. The Carnegie Classification system's 283 Doctorate-granting Universities were the target population.…

  20. What Does the Digital Student Want? Cross-Cultural Collaboration and Wikis in Academic Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Pisanski Peterlin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available New online educational tools have opened new possibilities for cross-cultural collaboration which supports critical thinking and encourages learner autonomy. Nevertheless, the success of a crosscultural collaborative experience cannot be taken for granted, since it inevitably involves the need to bridge transcultural differences. This paper presents an American-Slovene cross-cultural collaborative project with a focus on the perceptions of the Slovene student-participants. In particular, it examines their views of one of the components of the collaborative project, specifically, the collaborative wiki writing assignment, introduced to develop the students’ academic literacy skills. The findings of the questionnaire study show that the participants’ experiences with the cross-cultural collaboration were positive, although their answers reveal a slight preference for less challenging activities. Nevertheless, even the fairly demanding writing assignment was generally perceived to be interesting and useful: while its full interactive potential was not realized due to the participants’ reluctance to engage in editing, the wiki is clearly an efficient tool for promoting academic literacy.

  1. [Discourse analysis: research potentialities to gender violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azambuja, Mariana Porto Ruwer; Nogueira, Conceição

    2009-01-01

    In the last few years we see the growing use of the terms 'discourse' and 'discourses analysis' in academic and research contexts, frequently without a precise definition. This fact opens space for critics and mistakes. The aim of this paper is to show a brief contextualization of discursive studies, as well as tasks/steps to Discourse Analysis process by the Social Construcionism perspective. As examples we used fragments of an interview with a Family Doctor about gender violence. In the results we detach the potential of Discourse Analysis to deconstruct the existing discourses to subsequently (re)construction in the way to a more holistic view about gender violence problem.

  2. Discourse Analysis and Language Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦钧玮

    2008-01-01

    A considerable portion of the work of discourse analysis as a research method can be find in the two major families of discourse analysis are linguistic-based analysis (such as conversation),and culturally or socially based discursive practices The potential of both families,along with examples of both,are discussed.

  3. 论学术论文的评价功能及其话语体系%On the Evaluation Function of the Academic Paper and Its Discourse System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余和生; 吴伟红; 徐志远

    2015-01-01

    The academic paper refers to the theoretical article which presents the research result after a study on a specific topic of a certain scientific field .Recently ,because the right of academic discourse was externalized ,”academic papers” have been entitled as”CSSCI journal papers” ,”core journals” and so on .All these impractical and formal external halos have led to a serious dis-placement of academic evaluation .The academic paper has a function of reflecting things .This function can be classified into three types:papers of subject nature ,papers of doctrinal nature ,and papers of scholarship .Thus ,people can establish a new system of academic evaluation based on the three types of academic papers ,and this evaluation system can be used as an academic evaluation system for the administration of scientific research ,the expert evaluation and journal publication and also for the innovation of the system of academic discourse .%学术论文,指的是对某一科学领域中的专门问题进行研究后表述研究成果的理论性文章。近年来,由于学术话语权的外化,有些“学术论文”被人为地冠以“CSSCI期刊论文”“核心期刊论文”等等不切实际的形式化的外在光环,引发了学术评价的严重错位。从学术论文本身所具有的反映事物的功能来看,它有三大类型,即:学科性论文、学理性论文、学问性论文。可以建立一套基于学术论文三种类型的学术评价体系,作为科研管理、专家评审、期刊出版物等的学术评价依据,创新学术话语体系。

  4. Do PhD supervisors play a role in bridging academic cultures?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliot, Dely; Kobayashi, Sofie

    , we strongly argue that PhD supervisors also have a significant part to play in facilitating successful transition of their PhD students to a new academic culture. Literature in doctoral education recognises the importance of ‘pastoral care’ in the supervisory bond for nurturing students’ overall...... learning, e.g. confidence and capacity-building in preparation for independent research (Cotterall, 2013; Wright, 2003). Pastoral care arguably includes supervisors’ efforts to facilitate the transition to the new learning environment. Yet, more in-depth examination of this aspect of the supervisory...

  5. Sociocultural Theories, Academic Achievement, and African American Adolescents in a Multicultural Context: A Review of the Cultural Incompatibility Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Noel, La

    2011-01-01

    Some theories have posited that African American youth are academic underachievers because of sociocultural factors. We label this point of view the cultural incompatibility perspective. Ogbu's oppositional culture theory and Steele's stereotype threat theory are selected as popular examples of this viewpoint. A critical review of the literature…

  6. Decolonializing Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvesson, Mats; Kärreman, Dan

    2011-01-01

    a critical and perhaps provocative overview of some of the more recent work and tendencies within the field. It is argued that discourse continues to be used in vague and all-embracing ways, where the constitutive effects of discourse are taken for granted rather than problematized and explored. The article......Organizational discourse has emerged as a large research field and references to discourse are numerous. As with all dominating approaches problematizations of assumptions are important. This article, partly a follow up of the authors’ frequently cited 2000 Human Relations article, provides...... identifies three particular problems prevalent in the current organizational discourse literature: reductionism, overpacking, and colonization and suggests three analytical strategies to overcome these problems: counter-balancing concepts — aiming to avoid seeing ‘everything’ as discourse — relativizing...

  7. A Brief Introduction of Three World Famous Academic Periodical%Discourse & Society等三个学术期刊的简介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓武

    2003-01-01

    Discourse & society(),Discourse studies()and Discourse Process(演讲修辞)这三种在国际语言学界久负盛名的从事语篇研究的专业性期刊的基本情况、栏目设置、刊登文献的学术范围、特点,研究方法以及在学术界的地位作了介绍.

  8. Discourse Analysis in Career Counseling and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Graham B.; Bakker, Terri M.

    2010-01-01

    Discourse analysis can be used to understand and interpret culturally and socially produced meanings regarding work and to outline how specific rules and conventions can configure meaning production of work in context. The implications of some core concepts in discourse analysis pertinent to career counseling are explored, including discourse,…

  9. Expanding discourse repertoires with hybridity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Gregory J.

    2012-09-01

    In "Hybrid discourse practice and science learning" Kamberelis and Wehunt present a theoretically rich argument about the potential of hybrid discourses for science learning. These discourses draw from different forms of "talk, social practice, and material practices" to create interactions that are "intertextually complex" and "interactionally dynamic." The hybrid discourse practices are described as involving the dynamic interplay of at least three key elements: "the lamination of multiple cultural frames, the shifting relations between people and their discourse, and the shifting power relations between and among people." Each of these elements requires a respective unit of analysis and are often mutually reinforcing. The authors present a theoretically cogent argument for the study of hybrid discourse practices and identify the potential such discourses may have for science education. This theoretical development leads to an analysis of spoken and written discourse around a set of educational events concerning the investigation of owl pellets by two fifth grade students, their classmates, and teacher. Two discourse segments are presented and analyzed by the authors in detail. The first is a discourse analysis of the dissection of the owl pellet by two students, Kyle and Max. The second analysis examines the science report of these same two students. In this article, I pose a number of questions about the study with the hope that by doing so I expand the conversation around the insightful analysis presented.

  10. Academic Stress as a Health Measure and Its Relationship to Patterns of Emotion in Collectivist and Individualist Cultures: Similarities and Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormi-Nouri, Reza; MacDonald, Shane; Farahani, Mohammad-Naghy; Trost, Kari; Shokri, Omid

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates academic stress in two different cultures, the Iranian as a collectivist culture, and the Swedish as an individualist culture. A total of 616 university students (312 Iranian and 304 Swedish) participated in the study. The results show that Swedish students experience more academic stress than Iranian students.…

  11. El discurso literario caribeño, baluarte identitario de la cultura latinoamericana The Caribbean literary discourse, identity bholds of Latin American culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Goenaga Conde

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available La literatura caribeña, por filiación histórico - cultural, pertenece a y es fiel exponente de la cultura latinoamericana. Su literariedad se ha construido sobre la base de un discurso identitario de defensa de su cultura única y, a la vez plural, que la distingue de los referentes occidentales preestablecidos por los centros de poder socioeconómico. El siguiente trabajo muestra los momentos y fases fundamentales de la evolución y desarrollo de la expresión identitaria caribeña a través de una selección cuidadosa de ejemplos de su discurso literario, con vistas a promover una cabal comprensión de los valores extra literarios de esta literatura. Puesto que este discurso literario se alza sobre un supuesto ideoestético de profunda raigambre ontológica, aproximarse a él presupone penetrar en la esencia de la historia y del patrimonio cultural de esta área. Por ello, dado el valor de este tema, se recomienda su estudio por la importancia que tiene para la formación sociocultural de los docentes cubanos, especialmente aquellos que laboran en entornos multiculturales.Due to historical and cultural filiations, the Caribbean literature is part and a true example of the Latin American culture. Its literary particularities are based on an identity discourse, which defends a unique and, at the same time, plural culture that distinguishes it from western referents pre-established by socioeconomic power centers. This paper presents the fundamental evolution and development phases of the Caribbean identity expression. Some examples of this literary discourse were carefully selected to further an accurate understanding of its extra literary values. Since this literary discourse is based on an aesthetic ideal of deeply ontological roots, an approach to it means penetrating the essence of the region’s history and cultural patrimony. The study of the topic is important to form Cuban professors socioculturally, particularly those who work in

  12. Academic Globalization And Ice: Cross-Cultural Research And Transnational Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szabo White

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As the Lion said to the Man, "There are many statues of men slaying lions, but if only the lions were sculptors there might be quite a different set of statues." - Aesop Commensurate with Aesop's message of the sculptor matters, so does the communicator, the language and surprisingly, business context. The evolution from the experientially-based Cultureactive to the theoretically-based ICE, from first-generation to second-generation, this paper underscores the marriage of cross-cultural research and transnational education. Both Cultureactive and ICE serve at the pleasure of Globalization, and more importantly, Academic Globalization and Transnational Education. The impetus for this paper derives from two pivotal questions: Does one's professional lens create similarities more dominant than culture; and does English evoke responses significantly different from those of one's native language. ICE emerged from Cultureactive when validity and reliability research issues became noteworthy. Known as the ABC research team, Adair, Buchan and Chen [1] and [2] capitalized upon both Hall's low context/high context communication tool and Triandis' model of subjective culture to result in the theoretical underpinnings for ICE. This conceptual reconfiguration is also grounded in the works of Trompenaars, Holtgraves, Hampden-Turner, Thomas and Kilman, Yamagishi, and Bearden, Money and Nevins [3], [11], [20], [22] and [24]. ICE implementation strategies include the employment of Myers Briggs typologies. The contribution of this paper is the celebration of the first year of ICE [InterCultural Edge], and its far-reaching ramifications. Previous research streams have underscored global similarities and differences among cultures, and a previous paper [23] established that cross-professional rather than cross-cultural differences are more paramount in assessing communication differences. This study employs Cultureactive and the LMR model, noting that business

  13. Academic Work—Faster, Higher, Further? On the (Missing Proportion of Work to Spare Time in the (Cultural Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Dressel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We make the practices of the academic production of knowledge a subject of critical discussion by focusing on the world of academic work and the academics themselves. Based on interviews with academics in the field of cultural sciences we conclude that with regard to their daily routines, their annual schedules, and their life-courses the so-called private life (family life, leisure time etc. becomes dominated by the social and cultural logics of the working sphere. Although it might appear exaggerated, we will refer to the humanities as a "total institution" which entails social, physical, and mental costs for its "inmates" as well as for those who never managed to become "inmates" (in spite of their efforts and those who don’t belong to the institution any more. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801385

  14. Relations Among Cultural Learning Beliefs, Self-Regulated Learning, and Academic Achievement for Low-Income Chinese American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bempechat, Janine; Li, Jin; Ronfard, Samuel

    2016-12-16

    This mixed-methods study of urban low-income, English-proficient Chinese American, second-generation 15-year-olds (conducted in 2004; N = 32) examined the relation among the virtue model of learning communicated by parents and adolescents' learning beliefs, self-regulated learning (SRL) behaviors, and academic achievement. Analysis of in-depth individual interviews revealed that for these adolescents, perceptions of family educational socialization predicted students' endorsement of their culture's virtue-oriented learning beliefs and that adolescents' endorsement of these learning beliefs predicted their academic achievement. Importantly, adolescents' reported that use of SRL strategies mediated the relationship between their endorsement of virtue-oriented learning beliefs and their academic achievement. Findings are discussed in the context of further research linking cultural learning beliefs, SRL, and children's academic achievement.

  15. Gender Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAN Fan-min

    2016-01-01

    Gender discourse was paid much attention in recent years. The primary objective of this fundamental research is to perceive the distinction between direct and indirect in gender discourse. The method used in this study is known as contrastive and analysis which illustrates men and women's differences.

  16. DYNAMICS OF METAPHORIC MODELLING OF THE CONCEPT OF TERRORISM IN AMERICAN MASS MEDIA DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rykova, O.V.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The topicality of the research in modern linguistics is defined by the importance of studying the problem of the dynamic nature of the concept content, the need to define the connection type between the concept and discourse as well as to reveal the dependence of the concept content and verbalization means from the type of discourse. The subject of the research is dynamic properties of the verbalization of a socially marked concept in American mass media discourse. The aim is to define the dynamics of structuring and explicating the knowledge about terrorism in mass media discourse. To reach the aim the following tasks are set: to determine the corpus of linguistic units which serve as verbalizers of the concept of terrorism in American mass media discourse; to define the dynamics of the verbal representation of the concept of terrorism in American mass media discourse as exemplified by metaphoric modelling. The practical applicability of the research consists in the possibility of using its main points and results in such academic courses as general linguistics, stylistics, cultural linguistics, special courses in cognitive linguistics, theory of conceptual metaphor, discourse study and in lexicographic practice.

  17. Circles of Culture and Cognition: A Sociocognitive Study of Collaboration within and among Academic Groups of Teachers in a Rural School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Linda L.

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic case study examined the roles of district and school macro-culture and teacher sub-group micro-culture in influencing the nature and extent of teachers' professional collaboration. Informed by the sociocognitive theory that learning is rooted in social relationships and develops through interpersonal discourse and activity, the…

  18. Cohesion in Written Business Discourse: Some Contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Ann M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes study to determine whether "constellations" of cohesive items occur in letters, reports, and textbooks. Concludes cohesive elements can be identified in each type of discourse but generalizations cannot be made about cohesive features in broad classes of applied and academic English for Business and Economics (EBE) discourse. (Author/BK)

  19. Discourses of space

    CERN Document Server

    Ajtony, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Ever since the emergence of the spatial turn in several scientific discourses, special attention has been paid to the surrounding space conceived as a construct created by the dynamics of human activity. The notion of space assists us in describing the most varied spheres of human existence. We can speak of various physical, metaphysical, social and cultural, and communicative spaces, as structuring components providing access to various literary, linguistic, social and cultural phenomena, th...

  20. Predictors of cultural capital on science academic achievement at the 8th grade level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misner, Johnathan Scott

    The purpose of the study was to determine if students' cultural capital is a significant predictor of 8th grade science achievement test scores in urban locales. Cultural capital refers to the knowledge used and gained by the dominant class, which allows social and economic mobility. Cultural capital variables include magazines at home and parental education level. Other variables analyzed include socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and English language learners (ELL). This non-experimental study analyzed the results of the 2011 Eighth Grade Science National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The researcher analyzed the data using a multivariate stepwise regression analysis. The researcher concluded that the addition of cultural capital factors significantly increased the predictive power of the model where magazines in home, gender, student classified as ELL, parental education level, and SES were the independent variables and science achievement was the dependent variable. For alpha=0.05, the overall test for the model produced a R2 value of 0.232; therefore the model predicted 23.2% of variance in science achievement results. Other major findings include: higher measures of home resources predicted higher 2011 NAEP eighth grade science achievement; males were predicted to have higher 2011 NAEP 8 th grade science achievement; classified ELL students were predicted to score lower on the NAEP eight grade science achievement; higher parent education predicted higher NAEP eighth grade science achievement; lower measures of SES predicted lower 2011 NAEP eighth grade science achievement. This study contributed to the research in this field by identifying cultural capital factors that have been found to have statistical significance on predicting eighth grade science achievement results, which can lead to strategies to help improve science academic achievement among underserved populations.

  1. The Scimitar, the Dagger, and the Glove: Intercultural Differences in the Rhetoric of Criticism in Spanish, French, and English Medical Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salager-Meyer, Francoise; Ariza, Maria Angeles Alcaraz; Zambrano, Nahirana

    2003-01-01

    Addresses the socio-pragmatic phenomenon of academic conflict from a cross-cultural and diachronic perspective. It is examined by combining a quantitative approach and a qualitative discoursal analysis of its salient rhetorical features in corpus of Spanish, French, and English medical articles published between 1930 and 1995. (VWL)

  2. The Scimitar, the Dagger, and the Glove: Intercultural Differences in the Rhetoric of Criticism in Spanish, French, and English Medical Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salager-Meyer, Francoise; Ariza, Maria Angeles Alcaraz; Zambrano, Nahirana

    2003-01-01

    Addresses the socio-pragmatic phenomenon of academic conflict from a cross-cultural and diachronic perspective. It is examined by combining a quantitative approach and a qualitative discoursal analysis of its salient rhetorical features in corpus of Spanish, French, and English medical articles published between 1930 and 1995. (VWL)

  3. Culturally Diverse Undergraduate Researchers' Academic Outcomes and Perceptions of Their Research Mentoring Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars-Winston, Angela M.; Branchaw, Janet; Pfund, Christine; Leverett, Patrice; Newton, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated the specific factors in mentoring relationships between undergraduate researchers (mentees) and their mentors in the biological and life sciences that account for mentees' positive academic and career outcomes. Using archival evaluation data from more than 400 mentees gathered over a multi-year period (2005-2011) from several undergraduate biology research programs at a large, Midwestern research university, we validated existing evaluation measures of the mentored research experience and the mentor-mentee relationship. We used a subset of data from mentees (77% underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities) to test a hypothesized social cognitive career theory model of associations between mentees' academic outcomes and perceptions of their research mentoring relationships. Results from path analysis indicate that perceived mentor effectiveness indirectly predicted post-baccalaureate outcomes via research self-efficacy beliefs. Findings are discussed with implications for developing new and refining existing tools to measure this impact, programmatic interventions to increase the success of culturally diverse research mentees and future directions for research.

  4. Building a Culture of Continuous Quality Improvement in an Academic Radiology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Gregory L; Paushter, David M

    2016-04-01

    As we enter a new era of health care in the United States, radiologists must be adequately prepared to prove, and continually improve, our value to our customers. This goal can be achieved in large part by providing high-quality services. Although quality efforts on the national and international levels provide a framework for improving radiologic quality, some of the greatest opportunities for quality improvement can be found at the departmental level, through the implementation of total quality management programs. Establishing such a program requires not only strong leadership and employee engagement, but also a firm understanding of the multiple total quality management tools and continuous quality improvement strategies available. In this article, we discuss key tools and strategies required to build a culture of continuous quality improvement in an academic department, based on our experience. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Competency-based medical education and scholarship: Creating an active academic culture during residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Azzam, Amin

    2015-10-01

    The competency-based medical education movement has been adopted in several medical education systems across the world. This has the potential to result in a more active involvement of residents in the educational process, inasmuch as scholarship is regarded as a major area of competency. Substantial scholarly activities are well within the reach of motivated residents, especially when faculty members provide sufficient mentoring. These academically empowered residents have the advantage of early experience in the areas of scholarly discovery, integration, application, and teaching. Herein, the authors review the importance of instituting the germinal stages of scholarly productivity in the creation of an active scholarly culture during residency. Clear and consistent institutional and departmental strategies to promote scholarly development during residency are highly encouraged.

  6. Solutions to academic failure: The cognitive and cultural realities ofEnglish as the medium of instruction among black learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gamaroff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa, black learners who are speakers of Bantu languages have to use a second language, namely English, as the medium of instruction from Std 3 onwards. The differences between English language-culture and Bantu languages-culture(s have generated a host of problems (and pseudo-problems?, where the main problem is academic failure. Three solutions to academic failure are discussed in the light of cultural and cognitive factors in multicultural education: 1. The use of the mother tongue as the exclusive medium of instruction 2. Critical Language Study (CLS and People's English 3. The separation of high ability learners from limited ability learners in the teaching situation. It is emphasised that culture is closely connected to a symbolic system, and thus an understanding of cognitive processes in academic learning requires an understanding of culture, and vice versa. Ultimately, of primary importance in academic study are the cognitive underpinnings of Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP developed in the first language. In Suid-Afrika word swart leerders wie se moedertaal een van die Afrika tale is, tans vanaf st. 3 in 'n tweede taal, naamlik Engels, onderrig. As gevolg van die verskille tussen die Engelse taalkultuur en die taalkulture van die A.frika tale het daar 'n groot aantal probleme (en pseudoprobleme? ontstaan, waarvan akademiese mislukking die belangrikste is. Drie oplossings vir hierdie akademiese mislukking word bespreek aan die hand van kulturele en kognitiewe faktore in multikulturele onderwys: 1. Die gebruik van die moedertaal as eksklusiewe medium van onderrig 2. "Critical Language Study" (CLS en "People's English" 3. Die afsonderlike hantering van hoogsbegaafde en minder begaafde leerlinge. Dit moet beklemtoon word dat kultuur nouverwant is aan 'n simbolesisteem. Gevolglik is 'n be grip van die kognitiewe prosesse betrokke by akademiese leer 'n voorvereiste vir 'n be grip van kultuur, en omgekeerd. Vera

  7. The role of cultural diversity climate in recruitment, promotion, and retention of faculty in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Eboni G; Gozu, Aysegul; Kern, David E; Powe, Neil R; Wand, Gary S; Golden, Sherita; Cooper, Lisa A

    2005-07-01

    Ethnic diversity among physicians may be linked to improved access and quality of care for minorities. Academic medical institutions are challenged to increase representation of ethnic minorities among health professionals. To explore the perceptions of physician faculty regarding the following: (1) the institution's cultural diversity climate and (2) facilitators and barriers to success and professional satisfaction in academic medicine within this context. Qualitative study using focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Nontenured physicians in the tenure track at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Focus groups and interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed for thematic content in a 3-stage independent review/adjudication process. Study participants included 29 faculty representing 9 clinical departments, 4 career tracks, and 4 ethnic groups. In defining cultural diversity, faculty noted visible (race/ethnicity, foreign-born status, gender) and invisible (religion, sexual orientation) dimensions. They believe visible dimensions provoke bias and cumulative advantages or disadvantages in the workplace. Minority and foreign-born faculty report ethnicity-based disparities in recruitment and subtle manifestations of bias in the promotion process. Minority and majority faculty agree that ethnic differences in prior educational opportunities lead to disparities in exposure to career options, and qualifications for and subsequent recruitment to training programs and faculty positions. Minority faculty also describe structural barriers (poor retention efforts, lack of mentorship) that hinder their success and professional satisfaction after recruitment. To effectively manage the diversity climate, our faculty recommended 4 strategies for improving the psychological climate and structural diversity of the institution. Soliciting input from faculty provides tangible ideas regarding interventions to improve an institution's diversity

  8. Discourse comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graesser, A C; Millis, K K; Zwaan, R A

    1997-01-01

    The field of discourse processing has dissected many of the levels of representation that are constructed when individuals read or listen to connected discourse. These levels include the surface code, the propositional textbase, the referential situation model, the communication context, and the discourse genre. Discourse psychologists have developed models that specify how these levels are mentally represented and how they are dynamically built during comprehension. This chapter focuses on the meaning representations that are constructed when adults read written text, such as literary stories, technical expository text, and experimenter-generated "textoids." Recent psychological models have attempted to account for the identification of referents of referring expressions (e.g. which person in the text does she refer to), the connection of explicit text segments, the establishment of local and global coherence, and the encoding of knowledge-based inferences.

  9. The "Processes" of Learning: On the Use of Halliday's Transitivity in Academic Skills Advising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Of the different uses of discourse analysis, one of the more significant is the way it can be used to introduce students to the culture and literary practices of the disciplines. This article describes how one type of analysis--Halliday's transitivity--has been used in an academic advising context to assist students struggling to write effectively…

  10. Modeling the Relationship between Lexico-Grammatical and Discourse Organization Skills in Middle Grade Writers: Insights into Later Productive Language Skills That Support Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Emily Phillips; Uccelli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Learning to write in middle school requires the expansion of sentence-level and discourse-level language skills. In this study, we investigated later language development in the writing of a cross-sectional sample of 235 upper elementary and middle school students (grades 4-8) by examining the use of (1) lexico-grammatical forms that support…

  11. Modeling the Relationship between Lexico-Grammatical and Discourse Organization Skills in Middle Grade Writers: Insights into Later Productive Language Skills That Support Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Emily Phillips; Uccelli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Learning to write in middle school requires the expansion of sentence-level and discourse-level language skills. In this study, we investigated later language development in the writing of a cross-sectional sample of 235 upper elementary and middle school students (grades 4-8) by examining the use of (1) lexico-grammatical forms that support…

  12. The Translatology Reflection on Chinese Academic Discourse System:“Reverse Geyi” or “Bilateral Huitong”%中国学术话语体系的译学审思--“反向格义”抑或“中西会通”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘琳玲; 朱守信

    2015-01-01

    “反向格义”与“中西会通”是构建中国学术话语存在的两种认知取向和方法选择。近现代中西学术交流在反向格义过程中完成了对中国学术的形塑,同时也造就了中国学术对西方话语的依附,给中国学术带来相当的片面性偏差。对中国学术而言,不能为了避免西方话语的反向格义而在学术上走向自我封闭,会通中西方已有学术资源进行思想创新是建设中国学术话语体系应有的实践智慧和理性诉求。中国学术的发展道路不是简单地“去西方话语”,而是要以中国立场寻求与西方学术的深度对话,唯此才能避免在格义天平首鼠两端,在中西会通基础上建立中国学术话语的主体性。%The key of constructing Chinese academic discourse system is how to establish an interactive academic dialogue relationship between China and West. “Reverse geyi” and “bilateral huitong” are the two cognitive orientation and method choices in building Chinese academic discourse system. The modern construction of Chinese academic system was completed in the process of reverse geyi, yet it created an academic path dependence on Western discourse which has considerably undermined China’s academic development. Chinese academia should self-isolate just in order to avoid reverse geyi of Western discourse. Integrate bilateral existing academic resources between China and West to make innovation is the practical wisdom and rational pursuit of building Chinese academic discourse system. The path of China’s academic development is not simply to “wiping off Western discourse”, but to seek deep dialogue with Western academia on the stance of China. Only in this way, can we get rid of the swing trap of geyi, and establish Chinese academic discourse subjectivity on the basis of bilateral huitong.

  13. Appreciating the ties that bind technical communication to culture: A dynamic model to help us understand differences in discourse structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter; Kampf, Constance

    In order to support an explicit understanding of cultural patterns as both dynamic and structured, we will examine Hofstede?s model for stabilization of cultural patterns, and use this model to explore some cultural consequences for patterns of logic and signs that influence the effectiveness...... of technical communication across cultures. In order to demonstrate the model, we will apply it to examples from different cultures, which show different patterns of logic, terminology and conventions. In light of these examples, we propose that cross-cultural technical communication studies can be situated...

  14. 追寻与建构:开启我国高等教育管理学术话语的新视域%Opening the New Perspective of Academic Discourse in China ’s Higher Educational Administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋园园

    2014-01-01

    为解除形而上学的定义输入开放式话语,有必要从理论自觉语境中,对引进西方的教育管理思想进行提炼和总结,以语言为进路在认识论意义的场域,依托高等教育管理话语流变的规律与特点,来嫁接与推展我国高等教育管理的核心价值理念,形成大致认同的高等教育管理学说及学术成果;与此同时,对我国高等教育管理的现实话语进行洞察,从管理的各种活动中找寻语言的根系,整合“他理论”话语与“自我管理实践”话语内涵,以再现我国高等教育管理科学话语共同体发展进步的要求。%In order to remove the metaphysical open discourse of definition input ,it is necessary to extract the imported basing point vocabulary of higher educational administration theory from the new perspective of public administration. Relying on the diversified discourse circles of higher educational administration ,we may engraft and expand the core value conception of China ’s higher educational administration ,so that roughly recognized theory and academic outcome of higher educational administration emerge. At the same time ,in order to embody the progress requirement of body of knowledge in China ’s higher educational administration ,we need to penetrate the actual discourse of China’s higher educational administration,look for the rooting system of language from various management activities,and integrate the “he theory”discourse and the discourse implication of “self-management practice”.

  15. 批评话语研究的超学科与跨文化转向——以文化遗产的中国话语重构为例%Transdisciplinary and Cross-Cultural Turn of Critical Discourse Studies: A Case of Remaking Chinese Cultural Heritage Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宗杰; 侯松

    2012-01-01

    批评话语分析如何通过跨文化转向,吸纳不同文化的思维方式从而实现跨学科、超学科的拓展,这是该领域需要思考的一个重要课题。本研究从中国本土传统出发,挖掘以“春秋笔法”为要义的话语观、批判观、历史观和言说方式,将其运用到具体的文化遗产实践和研究中去,从而拓展话语学的超学科领地和文化多样性。文章通过具体实例的文本分析,特别展现民族志如何通过吸收“叙而不作”的历史书写,形成一种针对当下的话语批判风格,使批判成为一种具有积极意义的教化和建构活动。%A significant agenda for Critical Discourse Studies (CDS) is how it may accomplish transdisciplinary transfor- mation through adopting alternative ways of cultural thinking. For culturally enriching CDS, the article probes into the Confu- cian wisdom in discourse critique, featured by the "Chunqiu Style" (chunqiu bifa), and attempts to use it for transdiciplinary practice in the area of cultural heritage studies. With a textual analysis of a case, it demonstrates how CDS might be a form of ethnography absorbing the Confucian "transmitting not creating" historiography, and whereby develop a new way of discourse critique that functions to educate, moralize and transform the present.

  16. Comparatively Studying on the Meta-discourse of English Abstracts in Academic Journal%学术期刊英文摘要的元话语对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明明; 佟敏强

    2015-01-01

    基于对英语母语者的期刊英文摘要语料库(NSE)和中国作者的期刊英文摘要语料库(CSE)中元话语的检索和数据分析,探讨元话语运用上的对比特征。中国学术论文作者和英语母语者撰写英文摘要时,元话语运用特征既有相似性也存在差异。元话语的类型选择和分布频次特征主要决定于体裁惯例和文化差异这两种变量的互动。%The author attempts to discuss the characteristics of meta-discourse after comparing,searching and analyzing data of meta-discourse between NSE’s and CSE’s corpus of journal English abstracts. When compi-ling English abstracts,NSE and CSE use meta-discourse,which shows similarities and differences. Meta-dis-course type selection and characteristics of distribution frequency depend mainly on the interaction of two kinds of variables,genre convention and cultural difference.

  17. Appreciating the ties that bind technical communication to culture: A dynamic model to help us understand differences in discourse structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter; Kampf, Constance

    In order to support an explicit understanding of cultural patterns as both dynamic and structured, we will examine Hofstede?s model for stabilization of cultural patterns, and use this model to explore some cultural consequences for patterns of logic and signs that influence the effectiveness of ...

  18. Critical Discourse Analysis. The Elaboration of a Problem Oriented Discourse Analytic Approach After Foucault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Diaz-Bone

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The German discourse researcher Siegfried JÄGER from Duisburg is the first to have published a German-language book about the methodology of discourse analysis after FOUCAULT. JÄGER integrates in his work the discourse analytic work of Jürgen LINK as well as the interdisciplinary discussion carried on in the discourse analytic journal "kultuRRevolution" (Journal for Applied Discourse Analysis. JÄGER and his co-workers were associated with the Duisburger Institute for Language Research and Social Research (DISS, see http://www.diss-duisburg.de/ for 20 years, developing discourse theory and the methodology of discourse analysis. The interview was done via e-mail. It depicts the discourse analytic approach of JÄGER and his co-workers following the works of FOUCAULT and LINK. The interview reconstructs JÄGERs vita and his academic career. Further topics of the interview are the agenda of JÄGERs discourse studies, methodological considerations, the (problematic relationship between FOUCAULDian discourse analysis and (discourses, linguistics, styles and organization of research and questions concerning applied discourse analytic research as a form of critical intervention. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0603219

  19. Changing the culture of academic medicine to eliminate the gender leadership gap: 50/50 by 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valantine, Hannah; Sandborg, Christy I

    2013-10-01

    Central to the daily struggles that successful working women face is the misalignment of the current work culture and the values of the workforce. In addition to contributing to work-life integration conflicts, this disconnect perpetuates the gender leadership gap. The dearth of women at the highest ranks of academic medicine not only sends a clear message to women that they must choose between career advancement and their personal life but also represents a loss of talent for academic health centers as they fail to recruit and retain the best and the brightest. To close the gender leadership gap and to meet the needs of the next generation of physicians, scientists, and educators, the authors argue that the culture of academic medicine must change to one in which flexibility and work-life integration are core parts of the definition of success. Faculty must see flexibility policies, such as tenure clock extensions and parental leaves, as career advancing rather than career limiting. To achieve these goals, the authors describe the Stanford University School of Medicine Academic Biomedical Career Customization (ABCC) model. This framework includes individualized career plans, which span a faculty member's career, with options to flex up or down in research, patient care, administration, and teaching, and mentoring discussions, which ensure that faculty take full advantage of the existing policies designed to make career customization possible. The authors argue that with vision, determination, and focus, the academic medicine community can eliminate the gender leadership gap to achieve 50/50 by 2020.

  20. Capitalist Discourse, Subjectivity and Lacanian Psychoanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheule, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies how subjectivity in capitalist culture can be characterized. Building on Lacan's later seminars XVI, XVII, XVIII, and XIX, the author first outlines Lacan's general discourse theory, which includes four characteristic discourses: the discourse of the master, the discourse of the university, the discourse of the hysteric and the discourse of the analyst. Next, the author explores the subjectivity and the mode of dealing with jouissance and semblance, which is entailed in a fifth type of discourse, the capitalist discourse, discussed by Lacan (1972). Indeed, like the other discourses that Lacan discerns, the discourse of the capitalist can be thought of as a mode of dealing with the sexual non-rapport. It is argued that in the case of neurosis the discourse of the capitalist functions as an attempt to ignore the sexual non-rapport and the dimension of the unconscious. Psychosis, by contrast, is marked by an a priori exclusion from discourse. In that case, consumerist ways of relating to the other might offer a semblance, and thus the possibility of inventing a mode of relating to the other. Two clinical vignettes are presented to illustrate this perspective: one concerning the neurotic structure and one concerning the psychotic structure. PMID:28018280

  1. Applying Discourse Analysis in ELT: a Five Cs Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖巧慧

    2009-01-01

    Based on a discussion of definitions on Discourse analysis,discourse is regard as layers consist of five elements--cohesion, coherence, culture, critique and context. Moreover, we focus on applying DA in ELT.

  2. Metaphors in political discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diković Jovana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes metaphors usage within political discourse, i.e rhetoric of political public speech. The analysis is based on public speech held at Vukovi sabori manifestations from 1987-2005, by active politicians or cultural elite at a given time period. Manifestations such as Vukovi sabori or Saborski dani were created primarily as purely cultural and artistic; however, they have also proven to be a good medium for messages with clear political agenda, hidden in metaphors of the speakers. These metaphors, in a political rhetoric, are thus seen as an instrument used to channel desired aims and win over potential voters. On the other hand, they also could be taken as one of the indicators of ideological-political paradigm change after 2000. In both cases, these metaphors are analyzed as a potential for promoting certain interests carrying heavy influence on key values and attitudes within the political discourse.

  3. Intra-entrepreneurial culture and its effect on the innovation´s academic spin-offn-off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Monge Agüero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims empirically verify relationship between the intrapreneurship culture and innovation in companies denominated Spin-off academic of Costa Rican public universities. We found and studied 44 Spin-off academic, we use IBM SPSS statistics 19 Software and make descriptive and correlation analysis, are revealing that the more used practices are teamwork, risk tolerance and compensation and incentives; and to a lesser extent, practices of support of management and flexibility in corporate structure, and empower reviewers. About incidence of entrepreneurship on a Culture of innovation, the results showed that exists no effect on the variables of a autonomy, b risk tolerance, c compensation and incentives and d teamwork. However, a very positive and significant result was obtained for practice support of management and flexibility of the corporate structure, for processes innovation. These findings are important for academic entrepreneurs, as it enables them test the usefulness of a corporate entrepreneurship culture for the development of their organizations. They are also important for academic institutions, because allows them promote programs of research, training and consulting in the field of entrepreneurship, and thus achieve greater innovation and business competitiveness.

  4. Diversifying the academic public health workforce: strategies to extend the discourse about limited racial and ethnic diversity in the public health academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annang, Lucy; Richter, Donna L; Fletcher, Faith E; Weis, Megan A; Fernandes, Pearl R; Clary, Louis A

    2010-01-01

    While public health has gained increased attention and placement on the national health agenda, little progress has been made in achieving a critical mass of underrepresented minority (URM) academicians in the public health workforce. In 2008, a telephone-based qualitative assessment was conducted with URM faculty of schools of public health to discuss this issue. As a result, we present successful strategies that institutional leaders can employ to extend the discourse about addressing limited diversity in the public health academy.

  5. The Cross-Cultural Generalizability of a New Structural Model of Academic Self-Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich; Hornung, Caroline; Reichert, Monique; Martin, Romain

    2009-01-01

    Prior research on the structure of academic self-concepts has demonstrated academic self-concepts to be domain-specific and hierarchically organized, but has largely failed to support the hypothesis that general academic self-concept is at the apex of the hierarchy. The present study investigates a new multidimensional nested-factor model of…

  6. Examining the Cross-Cultural Effect between Moral Suasion and Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Academic and workplace dishonesty have become a growing and costly problem within society. While academic misconduct is nothing new, over the past 40 years the problem appears to be getting worse. The literature indicated a steady increase in academic cheating rates over the past four decades from 50% to as much as 75%. Compounding this problem…

  7. Examining the Cross-Cultural Effect between Moral Suasion and Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Academic and workplace dishonesty have become a growing and costly problem within society. While academic misconduct is nothing new, over the past 40 years the problem appears to be getting worse. The literature indicated a steady increase in academic cheating rates over the past four decades from 50% to as much as 75%. Compounding this problem…

  8. The Glut of Academic Publishing: A Call for a New Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Stanley W.; Grody, Wayne W.; McKelvey, Bill; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Academic publishing has already reached a point where too much material of too little substance is being published, and this trend is continuing. The ostensible reason for academic publishing is to communicate useful information to academic peers. But of all papers published in the "top" scientific journals, only 40.6 percent were cited at least…

  9. Challenges Facing Chinese Academic Staff in a UK University in Terms of Language, Relationships and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hui-hua

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment of international academic staff is viewed as one of the strategies to internationalise the universities. International academic staff, however, usually encounter many challenges when in a foreign context. This study aims to investigate the challenges of Chinese academic staff teaching in the UK in terms of language, relationships…

  10. English translation of Chinese culturally - loaded words from perspective of power discourse%从权力话语角度看汉语文化负载词的英译

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昆鹏; 魏天婵

    2011-01-01

    翻译与政治的关系密不可分,权力话语影响到翻译过程的各个环节。翻译汉语文化负载词应突出汉语文化的话语权力,在全球化的背景下,抵制文化霸权主义对本土文化的冲击。文章主张采用异化翻译策略,在平等的文化交流中宣扬中国文化,在获得平等话语权力的同时,促进中外交流。%Translation and politics are closely related and power discourse influences every stage of translating process. The power discourse of Chinese culture should be emphasized in translating Chinese culturally - loaded words, which can help to resist the impact of cultural hegemony on Chinese culture. Foreignization should be adopted to spread Chinese culture when Chinese culturally -loaded words are rendered, thus promoting intercultural communication in equal power discourse context.

  11. Preparing culture change agents for academic medicine in a multi-institutional consortium: the C - change learning action network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Krupat, Edward; Schnell, Eugene R; Kern, David E

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests an ongoing need for change in the culture of academic medicine. This article describes the structure, activities and evaluation of a culture change project: the C - Change Learning Action Network (LAN) and its impact on participants. The LAN was developed to create the experience of a culture that would prepare participants to facilitate a culture in academic medicine that would be more collaborative, inclusive, relational, and that supports the humanity and vitality of faculty. Purposefully diverse faculty, leaders, and deans from 5 US medical schools convened in 2 1/2-day meetings biannually over 4 years. LAN meetings employed experiential, cognitive, and affective learning modes; innovative dialogue strategies; and reflective practice aimed at facilitating deep dialogue, relationship formation, collaboration, authenticity, and transformative learning to help members experience the desired culture. Robust aggregated qualitative and quantitative data collected from the 5 schools were used to inform and stimulate culture-change plans. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods were used. Participants indicated that a safe, supportive, inclusive, collaborative culture was established in LAN and highly valued. LAN members reported a deepened understanding of organizational change, new and valued interpersonal connections, increased motivation and resilience, new skills and approaches, increased self-awareness and personal growth, emotional connection to the issues of diversity and inclusion, and application of new learnings in their work. A carefully designed multi-institutional learning community can transform the way participants experience and view institutional culture. It can motivate and prepare them to be change agents in their own institutions. Copyright © 2013 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical

  12. 学术语篇中第一人称代词的语篇功能研究%On the Textual Function of the First Person Pronoun in Academic Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秋成; 刘晋

    2016-01-01

    指出英语学术语篇中是否应该运用第一人称代词存在众多争议,通过剖析英语学术语篇中第一人称代词的身份,阐释第一人代词在英语学术语篇中的语篇功能。认为第一人称代词在学术语篇中对于作者观点构建至关重要,恰当运用第一人称代词不仅不会使论文缺少权威性,相反它能帮助论文撰写者在写作过程中聚焦自己的身份和观点,因此有利于作者形成连贯明确的主题观念。%The application of the first person pronoun in English academic discourse arouses researchers' controversy. The study analyzes the textual function of the first person pronoun in English academic discourse by a thorough review of the existing literature on the identity of the first person pronoun. It finds that the first person pronoun is a key element to the construction of writer's ideas, and it won't threaten the paper's authority but can help the writer focus on his or her identity and idea;further more form a much clearer theme if he or she can use the first person pronoun properly.

  13. Architectural discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; Nørgaard, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Using a multimodal social semiotic perspective, this article presents an analysis of the University of Southern Denmark as a text with particular focus on discourse and framing (cf. van Leeuwen 2005). The university consists of an original part and more recent extensions. The article examines how...... the original and the new parts of the buildings respectively realize different discourses related to education and the educational system more generally, and in particular how framing plays an important role in this respect. While employing van Leeuwen’s system network for framing (2005: 18) for the analysis......, the analysis also points to potentially useful adjustments....

  14. Architectural discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; Nørgaard, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Using a multimodal social semiotic perspective, this article presents an analysis of the University of Southern Denmark as a text with particular focus on discourse and framing (cf. van Leeuwen 2005). The university consists of an original part and more recent extensions. The article examines how...... the original and the new parts of the buildings respectively realize different discourses related to education and the educational system more generally, and in particular how framing plays an important role in this respect. While employing van Leeuwen’s system network for framing (2005: 18) for the analysis...

  15. Who are the Students of the UNAM’s Master in Education?: Influence of Cultural Capital and Habitus in the Academic Development on a Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba Angélica Sánchez Dromundo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes cultural capital and habitus that students have when entering to the National Autonomous University of Mexico’s Master in Education. The analysis was done in terms of three groups: capital heirs, those groups whose family contributes or inherits cultural and class capital; those coming from a “declining” class, whose family have not achieved academic degrees but inherit some cultural capital; and those who are the first in their family group having studied higher education. Such classification allows to know the students academic background, and to envision from such data, several possibilities of their academic integration to the program. This paper identifies certain groups with small academic cultural capital and habitus, who would have serious incorporation and academic development difficulties from the beginning. The data was obtained from their life experience, their institutional documents and curriculum vitae.

  16. 论文化心理认知功能在话语意义建构中的作用%On Functions of Cultural Psychological Cognition in the Meaning Construction of Discourses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鹤三

    2012-01-01

    在话语意义建构过程中,文化心理的认知功能为话语语义传递提供了认知心理基础的舞台,这不仅能为表述者展现表述的心理场景,而且还为表述者提供了因心理预期而产生的心理空间,从而使话语操控成为可能,以图控制他人的思维和行为。%Cultural psychological cognitive function in the meaning construction of discourses not only plays the role of psychological cognitive base to transfer the meaning of discourses with psychological scenes for users,but also the role of psychological expectations on the level of thinking for discourse manipulators to control other peoples'thingking and actions.

  17. The Cultural Politics of Mixed-Income Schools and Housing: A Racialized Discourse of Displacement, Exclusion, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I examine the contested and racially coded cultural politics of creating mixed-income schools in mixed-income communities. Policymakers claim deconcentrating low-income people will reduce poverty and improve education. However, based on activist research in Chicago, I argue these policies are grounded in "culture of…

  18. Island of Memories. Postcolonial Historiography and Public Discourse in Contemporary Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-chih Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The re-discovery of Taiwanese history along with both official and local initiatives of cultural heritage and public commemorations constitutes an important postcolonial cultural phenomenon. This paper discusses the “memory boom” in post-martial law Taiwan and examines its implications in our understanding of history, culture, and modernity in East Asian context. The major arguments of this paper can be summarised in three parts. The first section introduces the emergence of new academic and public discourses in Taiwan in the post-martial law era. The second and main section offers four major examples of postcolonial historiography and public discourse including national commemoration, ethnic revival, the heritage movement and Taiwanese wartime experience. The final section further illustrates the features of Taiwan’s postcolonial historiography in terms of history and memory with topical discussions on the rethinking of the modernity question and the reinterpretation of Japanese colonial heritage.

  19. Impact of a learning circle intervention across academic and service contexts on developing a learning culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rachel; Henderson, Amanda; Cooke, Marie; Creedy, Debra

    2011-05-01

    Partnerships between university schools of nursing and health services lead to successful learning experiences for students and staff. A purposive sample of academics and students from a university school of nursing and clinicians from three health institutions involved in clinical learning (n=73) actively participated in a learning circles intervention conducted over 5 months in south east Queensland. Learning circle discussions resulted in enhanced communication and shared understanding regarding: (1) staff attitudes towards students, expectations and student assessment; (2) strategies enhancing preparation of students, mechanisms for greater support of and recognition of clinicians; (3) challenges faced by staff in the complex processes of leadership in clinical nursing education; (4) construction of learning, ideas for improving communication, networking and sharing; and (5) questioning routine practices that may not enhance student learning. Pre-post surveys of hospital staff (n=310) revealed significant differences across three sub-scales of 'accomplishment' (t=-3.98, pLearning circles can positively enhance organisational learning culture. The intervention enabled participants to recognise mutual goals. Further investigation around staff perception of their influence on their workplace is required. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 基于文化激进主义的新诗话语重构%New Poetry Discourse Reconstruction Based on Cultural Radicalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红伟

    2015-01-01

    长期以来,中国新诗深受五四新文化运动的影响,并随着新文化运动的发展而不断改变和创新,从传统古体诗歌的经典体式里成功突围,形成了中国新诗的新风格。新诗的产生与当时的政治背景、文化背景紧密相连,是政治和文化的激烈运动,促使中国文学的求新求变,完成了文学本身的蜕变。新文化运动的主流思潮是文化激进主义,而文化激进主义最显著的特征就是反传统,与传统彻底决裂,中国新诗在文化激进主义的影响下,不断探索中国新诗的出路,实现了中国新诗的话语重构。%For a long time,Chinese new poetry was influenced by the May fourth new culture movement.And with the development of the new culture movement and continuous change and innovation,it breakthroughs suc-cessfully from the traditional archaism poetry in the classic style of poetry,and formed a new style of Chinese new poetry.The generation of new poetry is closely combined with the political background,cultural background,and it is also the political and cultural movement,which is to promote Chinese literature pursuing new changes,and to complete the transformation of literature itself.The mainstream of the new culture movement is cultural radicalism, and the anti- tradition is the most notable features of cultural radicalism,which makes a clean break with the tradi-tion.Under the influence of Chinese new poetry in the cultural radicalism,it constantly explores the way of Chinese new poetry,and Chinese new poetry discourse reconstruction is realized.

  1. Organizational Culture And Emotional Intelligence As Predictors Of Job Performance Among Library Personnel In Academic Libraries In Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igbinovia, Magnus O.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate organizational culture and emotional intelligence as predictors of job performance among library personnel in Edo state, Nigeria. The survey research design was employed for the study with a population size of 181 library personnel in the 15 academic libraries under study, and due to the manageable population size, total enumeration was adopted as the sampling technique. The questionnaire was used to elicit data from the respondents. Of the 181 copies of the questionnaire administered, 163 copies were retrieved and found valid for analysis constituting a 90% response rate. Four research questions and four null hypotheses (tested at 0.05 level of significance were formulated to guide the study. The tool used to analyze the research question was descriptive statistics (percentage, mean, and standard deviation and inferential statistics (correlation and multiple regression for testing the hypotheses. The findings of the study revealed that there is a high level of job performance, good organizational culture, and high level of emotional intelligence among the personnel. Organizational culture and emotional intelligence jointly and significantly predict job performance of personnel. There is significant positive correlation between organizational culture and job performance. The linear combination of emotional intelligence and organizational culture predict job performance of library personnel in the academic libraries under study. The research concludes that there is a need for high job performance in libraries which is predicted by the organizational culture of the library and the level of emotional intelligence of the library personnel.

  2. On Academic Conflict in Medical Research Articles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-mei; CHEN Ning; NIE Wen-xin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of academic conflicts, if any, in medical research articles. Methods: Twenty-seven and 25 medical research articles in the field of internal medicine were selected from English and Chinese respectable jour⁃nals, respectively. Then, the speech acts that reflected a conflict between a scientist’s knowledge claim and another scientist’s knowledge claim were manually searched and recorded in each paper. Data were analyzed using non-parametric Chi-test. Results:There were 123 academic conflicts recorded in the English corpus and 49 Academic Conflicts in the Chinese corpus. Significant difference was observed in the overall frequency of academic conflicts between the English and Chinese medical discourse (p=0.001). Besides, as for the distribution within research articles, introduction and discussion sections were the sections where Aca⁃demic Conflict speech acts were most likely to occur in both corpra. Conclusion: The Chinese scholars are less likely to criticize peers. Introduction and discussion sections were the sections where Academic Conflict speech acts were most likely to occur. Our results are in agreement with previous results and confirmed the claim that highly different cultures vary in their discourse prefer⁃ences. Our findings are of pedagogical significance.

  3. Professional discourse and service cultures: an organisational typology developed from health and welfare services for people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, T; Cochrane, A; Greenwell, S

    2003-09-01

    This study focuses upon the effect of social policy upon a particular area of service provision. It is influenced by the Foucauldian concept of governmentality and the proposition by Lewis et al. that social policy needs to be understood in local contexts. Only through understanding the partial and fragmented impact of policy can we gain a clear insight into the outcomes for users. The study is undertaken through an exploration of the micro politics of organisations providing health and welfare services for people with learning disabilities. It involves an approach to discourse analysis that focuses upon text developed from interviews with service providers, which is brought into contact with published literature in an iterative process. The interpretation of the text produces four themes: power, trust, citizenship and managerialism. The development of these themes and a further holistic interpretation of the text suggest an emerging organisational typology. A typology based upon different articulations of the themes noted that work to produce particular outcomes for service users.

  4. Academic nurse leaders' role in fostering a culture of civility in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia M; Springer, Pamela J

    2010-06-01

    Academic incivility is disruptive behavior that substantially or repeatedly interferes with teaching and learning. Incivility on college campuses jeopardizes the welfare of all members of the academy. Academic nurse leaders play a critical role in preventing and addressing academic incivility because these behaviors can negatively affect learning and harm faculty-student relationships. Although studies on student and faculty incivility have been conducted in nursing education, there are no known studies regarding the perceptions of academic nurse leaders about this problem. This is the first known study to investigate the perceptions of 126 academic nurse leaders (deans, directors, and chairpersons) from 128 associate degree in nursing and bachelor of science nursing programs in a large western state. Academic nurse leaders responded to five open-ended questions regarding their perceptions of stressors that affect nursing faculty and students, the uncivil behaviors exhibited by both groups, and the role of leadership in preventing and addressing incivility in nursing education.

  5. The Roles of Racial Discrimination, Cultural Mistrust, and Gender in Latina/o Youth's School Attitudes and Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Adina C; Sánchez, Bernadette

    2016-12-01

    Gender gaps in achievement are particularly pronounced among Latina/os, who are among the population most affected by the academic achievement gap. This study examined the roles of racial discrimination, cultural mistrust, and economic value of education in the academic achievement of urban, low-income Latina/o adolescents. Participants were 346 high school students. Structural equation modeling revealed that the model of associations was a better fit for male students than for female students. Cultural mistrust mediated the relationship between racial discrimination and values of education, and perceived limitations of education predicted lower attendance rates for male students but not for female students. Implications for future research and interventions are discussed. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2016 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  6. Caught in the crosshairs: identity and cultural authority within chiropractic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Russell, Yvonne

    2011-06-01

    In this paper the discourse over identity and cultural authority within the profession of chiropractic in the United States has been analyzed using critical discourse analysis. As the profession struggles to construct one singular image, versions of self must be internally debated and also shaped in consideration of larger, external forces. The dilemma of remaining tied to a marginal professional status must be balanced against considerations of integration. Written texts from chiropractic journals and newspapers are analyzed in a multidimensional approach that considers the rhetorical devices and thematic issues of identity construction; the representation of various voices within the discourse (both heard and unheard); and the extent to which external pressures affect the projection of cultural authority for the profession. A heterogeneous discourse characterized by conflict was found, with discrepancies between everyday chiropractors in actual practice versus academic chiropractors and leaders particularly over the idea, practice and significance of science for the profession.

  7. Associations among teacher-student interpersonal relationships and students’ intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and academic achievement: A cross cultural study

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    This cross-cultural study explored associations among teacher-student relationship, students’ intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and students’ academic achievement in grade 5 and 6 students from Vancouver, Canada (n = 102) and Hong Kong, China (n = 207). Hong Kong students perceived their teachers to be more dissatisfied, strict, admonishing, and uncertain, while Vancouver students perceived their teachers to be more helpful and friendly. Students’ levels of intrinsic and extrinsic motivatio...

  8. Effect Of Leadership Function And Organization Cultural On The Performance Of Employees In The Field Of Academic University Ichsan Gorontalo

    OpenAIRE

    Zuchri Abdussamad; Swastiani Dunggio

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify and analyze the level of influence the function of leadership and organizational culture on employee performance in academic areas at the University of Gorontalo Ichsan either simultaneously or partially. The analytical method used is multiple linear regression. The sampling technique used in this research is purposive sample that is making the subject based on their specific purpose and techniques of data collection through questionnaire observation interview. The...

  9. Associations among teacher-student interpersonal relationships and students’ intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and academic achievement: A cross cultural study

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    This cross-cultural study explored associations among teacher-student relationship, students’ intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and students’ academic achievement in grade 5 and 6 students from Vancouver, Canada (n = 102) and Hong Kong, China (n = 207). Hong Kong students perceived their teachers to be more dissatisfied, strict, admonishing, and uncertain, while Vancouver students perceived their teachers to be more helpful and friendly. Students’ levels of intrinsic and extrinsic motivatio...

  10. Discourse in virtual cross-cultural communication: a dialogue of cultures or a clash of mentalities? (a case study research in EFL education in Russia)

    OpenAIRE

    NAZARENKO ALLA L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study research based on the experience of Moscow State University of using cross-cultural telecommunication projects as a "testing ground" for developing students' cross-cultural communicative competence. This competence was assessed in terms of success / failure of cross-cultural interaction. The transcripts of forums and chats have been analyzed as well as the results of the survey of students-participants, aimed at getting their opinion about the project ("studen...

  11. Discourse in virtual cross-cultural communication: a dialogue of cultures or a clash of mentalities? (a case study research in EFL education in Russia)

    OpenAIRE

    NAZARENKO ALLA L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study research based on the experience of Moscow State University of using cross-cultural telecommunication projects as a "testing ground" for developing students' cross-cultural communicative competence. This competence was assessed in terms of success / failure of cross-cultural interaction. The transcripts of forums and chats have been analyzed as well as the results of the survey of students-participants, aimed at getting their opinion about the project ("studen...

  12. Educational Thought of Ukraine and Poland Within Renaissance Culture: from the History of Intellectual Discourse of Xvi-xvii Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petruk Natalia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the peculiarities of formation of pedagogical thought in Ukraine and Poland during the propagation of Renaissance ideas into pedagogical culture of XVI-XVII centuries. It has been emphasized that founders of humanistic pedagogical culture in Ukraine were such outstanding scientists as Grygoriy Sanotskyi, Yuriy Drogobych, Mikolaj Kopernik, Pavlo Krosnenskyi and others. Problems of new man's formation, understanding his life purpose, expressions of his civic and spiritual activities, reevaluation of manual labour, peculiarities of moral education are studied on the basis of comparative analysis of famous Ukrainian-Polish humanists' works of XVI-XVII centuries. It has been stressed that the existence of close spiritual and intellectual relations between Ukrainian and Polish culture enabled the formation of humanistic pedagogical principles, European cultural and educational space, as well as the strengthening European life values. Educational thought of XVI-XVII centuries has been analyzed in the context of problems associated with the propagation of humanistic thinking among Ukrainian and Polish intellectuals, the reevaluation of man's role in the different spheres of life, the development of new educational culture in Ukraine.

  13. Predominant discourses in Swedish nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth; Pilhammar-Anderson, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the predominant discourse in the field of Swedish nursing in 2000, 25 years after nursing was introduced as an academic discipline in Sweden. The method used was content analysis and deconstructive analysis of discourses. Laws, statutes, regulations, and examination requirements, including official reports, recruitment campaigns, and media coverage, were analyzed. The findings uncovered competing discourses striving to gain hegemony. In the public sector, official requirements competed against the media fixation on gender stereotypes and the realities of local recruitment campaigns. Media has a major role in disseminating prevailing conceptions and conventions pertaining to the nursing profession. As a result, decision makers, students, patients, and family members could get lower expectations of the professional competence of nursing practitioners than would otherwise have been the case in the absence of media exposure.

  14. Credibility Discourse of PR Agencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksson, Maria; Jørgensen, Poul Erik Flyvholm

    2008-01-01

    This research examines the credibility discourse posted on the corporate websites of 60 British, Danish and Norwegian public relations agencies. The purpose was to determine the nature and patterns of the statements of credibility that PR agencies from different cultures have considered...... instrumental in establishing dependable and likeable images of their ethos. More specifically, the study seeks to establish whether there are distinct cross-cultural preferences in PR credibility discourse. Our assumption was that British and Scandinavian PR agencies assign similar relative importance...

  15. An academic writing paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    A key to understanding academic writing for publication lies in the tension between the need for scholars to demonstrate originality, and the need for academic discourse communities to continue using their shared repetoire1 of concepts, vocabulary, and genre structures. This tension can be highli...

  16. English At Academic Setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹悦

    2008-01-01

    This article is to help students to notice that academic writing is the essential part of university study and setting,audience,purpose and also discourse community and its expectations are all its concerns.Through academic writing,students may begin to learn how to make sense in their particular field of study.

  17. An Analysis of the Three Vulgar Cultural Characteristics of Network Discourse in the New Period%新时期网络话语的"三俗"文化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭学修

    2015-01-01

    Three vulgar culture in the network discourse reflected prominently since the New Stage.Three vulgar culture in the network discourse mainly showed that:aesthetics of the ugliness as beauty;the vulgar swear words;the grandstanding title party and the overflowed language violence and so on. The forma-tion of the discourse vulgar cultural has its profound social,cultural and economic reasons.%新时期以来"三俗"文化在网络话语中具有突出的表现.网络话语"三俗"文化主要表现为:以丑为美的审美观、低俗詈骂司空见惯、哗众取宠的语用观以及语言暴力大肆泛滥等.网络话语"三俗"文化形成是社会转型期深刻的社会经济文化等诸多因素综合作用的结果.

  18. Cultural realities of being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cultural Realities of Being offers a dialogue between academic activity and everyday lives by providing an interface between several perspectives on human conduct. Very often, academic pursuits are arcane and obscure for ordinary people, this book will attempt to disentangle these dialogues......, lifting everyday discourse and providing a forum for advancing discussion and dialogue. Nandita Chaudhary, S. Anandalakshmy and Jaan Valsiner bring together contributors from the field of cultural psychology to consider how people living within social groups, regardless of how liberal, are guided...... by collective reality and interconnected with life circumstances. The book discusses experiences and events in the lives of people of Indian cultures covering topics including family, food, pilgrimages, social dynamics and truth, in order to expand the material on human phenomena under the broad frame...

  19. Considerations on TV Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisa Gales

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Media has become a very powerful cultural institution in the last past decades of the 20th century and inspired many critical studies in disciplines such as linguistics, semiotics, pragmatics, discourse studies and not least, in the field of mass communication itself. The first studies of media language focused on easily observable surface structures, such as the biased or partisan use of words in the description of Us and Them, especially along political and social lines, for instance in the representations of communists. The traditional approach on the analysis of the biased, stereotypical - sexist or racist images in the media, has taken into account both texts, as well as illustrations of photos. Semiotics found its way into media studies quite early, and thus brought some basic structural notions to the study of media discourse and a necessary component of a broader study of media images.

  20. The Relationship among Parental Involvement, Learning, and Academic Achievement: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conant, Alison

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this QUAN-qual mixed methods study was to investigate how parents from various ethnicities and socioeconomic status construct their expectations of academic achievement and the impact these expectations have on academic success for the student. Data was gathered by using The Parent Survey of Family and Community Involvement in the…

  1. Understanding Relationships between Academic Staff and Administrators: An Organisational Culture Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hui-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to advance the understanding of relationships between university academic staff and administrators through information in interviews with 18 academic staff members and 18 administrators at a large public research university in the United States. Through exploring the first-hand insights and perceptions of interviewees from an…

  2. Target-Setting, Early-Career Academic Identities and the Measurement Culture of UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Early-career academics are subject to a barrage of formal measurements when they secure a first academic post in a UK university. To support this process, guidance is provided by universities on what is measured, though this can lack disciplinary nuance. This article analyses the perceptions of a sample of social scientists of the process of…

  3. Libraries, Librarians, and the Discourse of Fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Gary P.; Radford, Marie L.

    2001-01-01

    Presents examples of representations of libraries and librarians taken from modern popular culture, including popular film, television, and novels, and using Foucault's approach to discourse, asserts that such representations are made possible by, and decoded within, the structures of a discourse of fear, a practice of speech and symbols that…

  4. DIVERSIDAD CULTURAL Y APRENDIZAJE COLABORATIVO: ANÁLISIS DEL DISCURSO DOCENTE / DIVERSIDADE CULTURAL E APRENDIZAGEM COLABORATIVA: ANÁLISE DO DISCURSO DOCENTE / CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND COLLABORATIVE LEARNING: TEACHER´S DISCOURSE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Pizzinato*

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEste artículo presenta el análisis del discurso docente en el proceso de evaluación de una investigación/intervencióneducativa de carácter colaborativo, en un contexto multiétnico y multicultural. Los datos indican que pese a que la actividadhaya sido evaluada como positiva, establecer una relación cooperativa de enseñanza/aprendizaje/conocimiento en un aulaconvencional no se ha visto como posible para las maestras. Los aspectos pedagógicos han sido destacados, aunque eluso del espacio para la reflexión sobre la identidad y sus marcadores haya sido evaluada como negativa. Además de eso, elrechazo hacia los valores, narrativas y prácticas sociales de los alumnos lleva a pensar sobre cuánto estas actitudescorroboran el fracaso escolar y con la discriminación de tales alumnos.RESUMENOO presente artigo tem como objetivo apresentar a análise do discurso docente no processo de avaliação de umapesquisa/intervenção educativa, de caráter colaborativo, em um contexto multiétnico/cultural. Os dados indicam que apesarde atividade ter sido avaliada como positiva não se avalia como possível tal tipo de relação ensino/aprendizagem/conhecimentoem uma sala de aula convencional. Os aspectos pedagógicos foram ressaltados, ainda que o uso do espaço para a reflexãosobre a identidade e seus marcadores tenha sido avaliado como negativo. Além disso, o rechaço aos valores, narrativas epráticas sociais dos alunos leva a pensar o quanto tais atitudes corroboram com o fracasso escolar e com a discriminaçãode tais alunos.ABSTRACTThis article aims to present an analysis of some teacher´s discourse on the evaluation process of an educationalresearch/intervention of collaborative nature, in a multiethnic context and culture. The data indicates that although theactivity was assessed as positive, was evaluated as impossible to apply this type of teaching/learning/knowledge in aconventional classroom. The pedagogical aspects were

  5. Discoursive Practice and Cultural Position——A Study of Introduction of Western Literary Theories:1993-2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Specialty:Comparative Literature and World Literature Observing,examining and studying five theoretical periodicals of foreign literary theories in China,this dissertation aims at studying closely the introduction of western literary theories into China ever since the cultural transformation in 1990s.

  6. Cultural Reductionism and the Media: Polarising Discourses around Schools, Violence and Masculinity in an Age of Terror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Martin; Keddie, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a media analysis of three interrelated sets of newspaper articles dealing with youth, schooling and violence. Understanding the media as a dominant and powerful cultural text that creates the realities it describes, the paper takes a critical view of the 'standpoint' of recent media representations of the Cronulla (Sydney,…

  7. Promises and Problems of Teaching with Popular Culture: A Linguistic Ethnographic Analysis of Discourse Genre Mixing in a Literacy Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefstein, Adam; Snell, Julia

    2011-01-01

    This article problematises a broad consensus in favour of importing popular culture into classrooms as a means of engaging pupils, transforming interactional norms and facilitating pupil understanding. A literacy lesson in which an English primary school teacher invoked the televised talent show, "X factor", in organising the class to…

  8. Critical Discourse Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜梅香

    2006-01-01

    This paper is about the discourse analysis and illustrate the approach to analysis the Critical discourses and the discourses about the educational situation of China. And it also includes the condensed theoretical support of the Critical discourse analysis and analysis of the sample I of the discourses between an illiterate person and the literate.

  9. "That Ain't Going to Get You a Professorship": Discourses of Writing and the Positioning of Academics' Work with Student Writers in UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of academic literacies research has enhanced our understanding of university writing as contested, institutionally situated practice with important consequences, particularly for students as they learn to negotiate the writing demands of university study. Less empirical attention has been paid to the practices of subject academics…

  10. The Role of Institutional, Family and Peer-Based Discourses and Practices in the Construction of Students' Socio-Academic Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, David; Jociles, Maria Isabel; Franze, Adela; Moscoso, Maria Fernanda; Calvo, Albano

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss findings from multi-level ethnography conducted in a secondary school located in Madrid (Spain). The study focuses on the variety of institutional, family and peer-based factors that contribute to the construction of students' socio-academic trajectories. In particular, we attempt to understand the role these social…

  11. Literacy and Academic Texts: Writing Control in the Colombian Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Maldonado García

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article of reflection proposes an archaeological reading of a file made up of corpus of published research in Spanish and governmental documents, published in the last decade, that analyze the written production in the Colombian higher education (ES and that are marked by two discourses in Tension: studies of cognitive language and cultural-linguistic studies. Through the archaeological reading of Foucauldian court, the emergence of two controversial scenarios is shown. First stage: the Academic Literacy (AA discourse, in the beginning, was closer to the psycho-cognitive perspective and the literacy approach closer to the cultural perspective; however, with the passing of the days, both recognize the importance of cultural and cognitive and nourish each other, thus generating an opacity and a discursive fusion. Second, these two discourses created a robust investigative field, composed of networks and groups, which denounced the writers' incompetence of Colombian teachers and then control the evaluation of writing.

  12. ENTRE O PÚBLICO E O PRIVADO: DISCURSOS SOBRE A FEMINILIDADE NOS ENUNCIADOS DO CURRÍCULO CULTURAL DA TELENOVELA. BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE: DISCOURSES ABOUT FEMININITY IN THE STATEMENTS OF THE CULTURAL CURRICULUM OF THE SOAP OPERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Rufino dos Santos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Com vistas a apreender formas de articulação do masculino e feminino em seus papéis sociais no âmbito do espaço público e do espaço privado nos enunciados da telenovela decidiu-se pela análise da função enunciativa do discurso da feminilidade. O presente texto representa um recorte da pesquisa de mestrado em educação, a qual recorreu à articulação entre Análise do Discurso na perspectiva de Michel Foucault e os Estudos Culturais, por se configurar como uma possibilidade metodológica na análise de questões situadas nos lugares e não lugares onde se dá a ação educativa relacionada às problemáticas culturais de nosso tempo.In order to learn ways of articulation of male and female in their social roles within the public and private spaces in the statements of soap operas, it was decided to analyze the enunciative function of the femininity discourse. This paper is part of a Masters in Education research which linked the discourse analysis from the perspective of Michel Foucault and Cultural Studies, as it is configured as a possibility in the analysis of methodological issues located in places and non-places where the educational action related to cultural issues of our time takes place.

  13. Culturally-loaded Chinese Discourse of Gu-qin and Its Inspiration to Translation-Based on a Maxim from a Chinese Classics The Roots of Wis-dom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by one of the maxims in a Chinese classics entitled The Roots of Wisdom, the present paper borrows the typi-cal culturally-loaded Chinese discourses of Gu-qin—"stringed lute"and"non-stringed lute"—to add to the literary translation terminology and to enrich some Chinese literary translation theories. On the basis of analyzing some related theories in linguis-tics , pragmatics, aesthetics and communication which show different perspectives relevant with the study of translation, the present paper offers a new angle to illustrate how the Chinese discourses of Gu-qin, rich in cultural implications, can best de-scribe translation and bring new vigor and vitality into the diversity and further expansion of the field of translation research.

  14. Shirley Jackson’s Literary Discourse and the Allegation of Feminism as Socio-Cultural Subversion in Mid-Twentieth Century America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Vargas Cohen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Shirley Jackson (1916-1965 managed to combine the dual role of being a woman and a writer in mid-twentieth century American society. This article seeks to unravel some of the intricacies behind this brittle balance. Despite and/or because of her condition as mother and professional her literary achievements as a chronicler of the “Age of Anxiety” were laudable and therefore worthy of further investigation. To better understand the historical experience of professional women in that context, a review of post-war US, especially regarding gender roles, ensues not only as historical background but as methodological hotbed for literary analysis. Ms. Jackson’s literary practice helped raise the charges of feminism against her under the allegation of cultural subversion and social sedition. Finally, the question of whether she was indeed a feminist is debated taking intoconsideration her literary discourse, particularly the representations of female characters as discerningly portrayed in her fictional works, correlated to her social and historical milieu.

  15. The mediating role of cultural coping behaviours on the relationships between academic stress and positive psychosocial well-being outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ben C H; Soucie, Kendall M; Huang, Siqi; Laith, Refa

    2017-03-10

    While culture's effect on the coping process has long been acknowledged in the stress-coping literature conceptually, empirical evidence and attempts to discern the specific relationship between culture and coping remain very scarce. Against this backdrop, the present study applied the Cultural Transactional Theory (Chun, Moos, & Cronkite, 2006) to examine the mediating role of cultural coping behaviours (Collective, Engagement and Avoidance Coping) on the relationship between academic stress (AS) and two positive psychosocial well-being outcome measures: Collective Self-esteem (CSE) and Subjective Well-being (SWB). Responses from a sample of undergraduate students in Canada (N = 328) were analysed to test a theory-driven, hypothesised model of coping using structural equation modelling (SEM). As hypothesised, the SEM results showed that: (a) the proposed cultural coping model fit the data well; (b) Engagement Coping and Collective Coping partially mediated the association between AS and the outcomes and (c) the path relationships among the constructs were in the hypothesised directions. A set of preliminary exploratory analyses indicated that Collective Coping was most strongly endorsed by the African/Black and the Middle Eastern cultural groups as compared to other ethnic groups. Implications of the study's findings for future research and practice concerning culture, stress, and coping are discussed.

  16. Parent Rated Symptoms of Inattention in Childhood Predict High School Academic Achievement Across Two Culturally and Diagnostically Diverse Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astri J. Lundervold

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate parent reports of childhood symptoms of inattention as a predictor of adolescent academic achievement, taking into account the impact of the child’s intellectual functioning, in two diagnostically and culturally diverse samples.Method: Samples: (a an all-female sample in the U.S. predominated by youth with ADHD (Berkeley Girls with ADHD Longitudinal Study [BGALS], N = 202, and (b a mixed-sex sample recruited from a Norwegian population-based sample (the Bergen Child Study [BCS], N = 93. Inattention and intellectual function were assessed via the same measures in the two samples; academic achievement scores during and beyond high school and demographic covariates were country-specific.Results: Childhood inattention predicted subsequent academic achievement in both samples, with a somewhat stronger effect in the BGALS sample, which included a large subgroup of children with ADHD. Intellectual function was another strong predictor, but the effect of early inattention remained statistically significant in both samples when intellectual function was covaried.Conclusion: The effect of early indicators of inattention on future academic success was robust across the two samples. These results support the use of remediation procedures broadly applied. Future longitudinal multicenter studies with pre-planned common inclusion criteria should be performed to increase our understanding of the importance of inattention in primary school children for concurrent and prospective functioning.

  17. Examining the relation between ratings of executive functioning and academic achievement: findings from a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorell, Lisa B; Veleiro, Alberto; Siu, Angela F Y; Mohammadi, Hiwa

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the relation between academic performance and ratings of executive functioning in children aged 6-11 from four countries: Sweden, Spain, Iran, and China. Ratings of executive functioning were made by both parents and teachers using the Childhood Executive Functioning Inventory (CHEXI). The results showed that the Chinese sample was generally rated as having more executive deficits compared to the other samples. The finding that executive functioning deficits are exacerbated in China is most likely the result of cultural biases. Boys were generally rated as having poorer executive functioning compared to girls, except in Iran where parents, but not teachers, rated girls as having poorer executive functioning compared to boys. However, this opposite pattern of results found for Iran is not likely to reflect true gender differences in executive functioning. Despite some differences in the levels of executive functioning across countries, both the inhibition and working memory subscales of the CHEXI were related to academic achievement in all four countries, except for CHEXI parent ratings in China. Altogether, the results indicate that the CHEXI may be used as a screening measure for early academic difficulties, although cultural biases clearly have to be taken into consideration.

  18. The cultural background of the non-academic concept of psychology in Japan: its implications for introductory education in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitaka, Yuki; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    No research has empirically explored the non-academic concept of psychology itself (implicit theories) in non-Western cultures despite a widely held belief that this understanding differs cross-culturally. This study examined whether the non-academic concept of psychology among inexperienced Japanese students differed from the concept held by students of other countries. In Japanese, psychology is referred to as , which includes the ideographic character , literally meaning heart. This fact led us to hypothesize that psychology will be disproportionately associated with emotion among Japanese students. Indeed, our findings among Japanese students produced a J-curve, indicating that our prediction was true. We posit that this issue has never been discussed in Japan because a majority of people share this concept of psychology. In our second study, we examined not only preference in students' association of intelligence or emotion but also heart or mind with psychology. Finally, we identified whether students' believe that psychology encompasses both the heart and the mind. We conclude with a discussion of the importance of explicitly defining the non-academic concept of psychology in early psychology education in Japan.

  19. Building a Culture of Authentic Partnership: One Academic Health Center Model for Nursing Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Janie; Swartz, Colleen

    2017-09-01

    Senior nursing leaders from the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Nursing and UK HealthCare have explored the meaning of an authentic partnership. This article quantifies the tangible benefits and outcomes from this maturing academic nursing and clinical practice partnership. Benefits include inaugural academic nursing participation in health system governance, expanded integration of nursing research programs both in the college and in the health science center, and the development of collaborative strategies to address nursing workforce needs.

  20. A discourse on creating and rendering educational and cultural enrichment services to rural migrant workers by public libraries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zizhou; Charles; C.Yan

    2009-01-01

    As far as China’s enormous success in her economic reforms and development is concerned,Chinese rural migrant workers indeed have had their biggest share of contributions.Yet ironically in return,they have only received a disproportionate meager share of benefit rewards.These people represent a huge economically deprived group at the bottom of the social totem pole in China’s metropolises.On the whole as a social group,their educational attainment is relatively low as compared to their average urban coworkers.As such being the case,their rights to access some of the cost-free cultural and educational enrichment programs in the society are limited and not always assured.Nevertheless and in general speaking,they manifest a strong and consistent desire to acquire all sorts of new and practical knowledge by means of accessing the resources and facilities of their local public libraries.It is suggested in this paper that public libraries are in a good position to give strong support to the central government’s strategic planning for the development of a public culture service systema).In implementing such a government initiative with an unswerving purpose of advancing social justice and equality,public libraries should strife to provide as many as possible their library services at no cost to the public,especially to those socially deprived rural migrant workers.

  1. Changing the culture of academic medicine: the C-Change learning action network and its impact at participating medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupat, Edward; Pololi, Linda; Schnell, Eugene R; Kern, David E

    2013-09-01

    The culture of academic medicine has been described as hierarchical, competitive, and not highly supportive of female or minority faculty. In response to this, the authors designed the Learning Action Network (LAN), which was part of the National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine (C-Change). The LAN is a five-school consortium aimed at changing the organizational culture of its constituent institutions. The authors selected LAN schools to be geographically diverse and representative of U.S. medical schools. Institutional leaders and faculty representatives from constituent schools met twice yearly for four years (2006-2010), forming a cross-institutional learning community. Through their quarterly listing of institutional activities, schools reported a wide array of actions. Most common were increased faculty development and/or mentoring, new approaches to communication, and adoption of new policies and procedures. Other categories included data collection/management, engagement of key stakeholders, education regarding gender/diversity, and new/expanded leadership positions. Through exit interviews, most participants reported feeling optimistic about maintaining the momentum of change. However, some, especially in schools with leadership changes, expressed uncertainty. Participants reported that they felt that the LAN enabled, empowered, facilitated, and/or caused the reported actions.For others who might want to work toward changing the culture of academic medicine, the authors offer several lessons learned from their experiences with C-Change. Most notably, people, structures, policies, and reward systems must be put into place to support cultural values, and broad-based support should be created in order for changes to persist when inevitable transitions in leadership occur.

  2. International academic service learning: lessons learned from students' travel experiences of diverse cultural and health care practices in morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddoura, Mahmoud; Puri, Aditi; Dominick, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Academic service learning (ASL) is an active teaching-learning approach to engage students in meaningful hands-on activities to serve community-based needs. Nine health professions students from a private college and a private university in the northeastern United States volunteered to participate in an ASL trip to Morocco. The participants were interviewed to reflect on their experiences. This article discusses the lessons learned from students' ASL experiences regarding integrating ASL into educational programs. The authors recommend a paradigm shift in nursing and dental hygiene curricula to appreciate diversity and promote cultural competency, multidisciplinary teamwork, and ethics-based education.

  3. Theories of Specialized Discourses and Writing Fellows Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Carol; Trachsel, Mary

    2008-01-01

    How much do specialized academic discourse communities matter to undergraduate writers? To what degree should theories of specialized discourses influence the design of undergraduate Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) programs? At the University of Iowa, where an undergraduate Writing Fellows program engages peer tutors in writing-intensive…

  4. Power and Place in the Discourse of Global Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmenter, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    This article critically examines the creation of the dominant academic discourse of global citizenship education, highlights gaps of thinking in the current discourse based on empirical research, and suggests some of the areas of translation/mediation/engagement that exist or need to exist in order to further research in the area. It uses a…

  5. Becoming and being academic women in Cambodia: Cultural and other understandings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TW Maxwell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cambodia’s higher education is under development. This is the first study of the role of women teaching in a university in Cambodia. There has been many studies of academic women in western countries and these guided the 16 interviews in Khmer that were carried out by young female researchers, translated by them and then analysed with the assistance of NVivo. Becoming an academic for many Cambodian women meant support from their parents and others close to them. Receipt of an international scholarship may have been critical. Perhaps the most important issue for these academic women was the need to balance demands on their time. Teaching hours could be negotiated, potentially at least, but only where the student numbers warranted it. An affirmative action approach appears to have developed at one of the two universities. Areas for future research are identified.

  6. 离散语境下的文化身份认同--以《断背山》中的埃尼斯为例%Ennis's Cultural Identification in Diasporic Discourse in Brokeback Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈倩

    2016-01-01

    主流文化主导下不同文化各自发声,吸引了学者们将更多关注点转向边缘文化,其中离散问题以及在离散语境下的文化身份认同问题成了热点。电影作为文化表征的重要媒介之一,对于反映社会现状起着重要作用。以李安的《断背山》为例,探讨在离散语境下的文化身份认同问题,揭示文化身份的异质性与开放性,旨在说明边缘文化身份通过可与主流文化身份的杂交与协商来为个人发声,实现自身的文化价值。%Despite the predominance of mainstream culture , articulations of diverse cultural voices ap-peal to increasing studies on marginalized cultures and communities , of which diaspora issue and cultural i-dentification in diasporic discourse are major foci .As one of the most important media for cultural represen-tations , cinema serves well in mirroring and reflecting social issues .Hence , this paper intends to apply cul-tural theories to analyze Ennis's cultural identification in diasporic discourse in Any Lee's Brokeback Moun-tain.In so doing , this paper wishes to bring to light the fluidity and hybridity of cultural identity , so as to argue that marginalized cultural identity is capable of speaking and representing its own interests and values through hybridization and negotiation strategies within dominant social context .

  7. Academic Dishonesty: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of U.S. and Chinese Marketing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawwas, Mohammed Y. A.; Al-Khatib, Jamal A.; Vitell, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Chinese as well as American business colleges are attempting to improve morality of their students due to recent scandals in both countries. This study investigates several beliefs and values, opportunism, and certain demographic variables that might contribute to the academic dishonesty of American and Chinese marketing students. The findings…

  8. Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) Academics' Perceptions about Research in a Transitional Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Millwater, Jan; Hudson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Research capacity building has become a prominent theme in higher education institutions in China and across the world. However, Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language academics' research output has been quite limited. In order to build their research capacity, it is necessary to understand their perceptions about research. This case study…

  9. Academics, the "Cultural Third Mission" and the BBC: Forgotten Histories of Knowledge Creation, Transformation and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David N.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on historical dimensions of knowledge creation and transformation by university academics. It explores their often overlooked role in the broadcast output of BBC radio in disseminating knowledge and ideas outside the educational environment, directly into the homes of the audience. Examples of this activity include the Open…

  10. Professional Culture Fit and Work-Related Quality of Life in Academic Departments: A Phenomenographic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales Opazo, Tatiana Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Although quality of life (QoL) has been a highly investigated issue over the last decades, there is still little agreement on its definition, and even less information about the validity of its measurements in specific settings. Additionally, in complex institutions like a university, functional units such as academic department usually are more…

  11. Modifiers in BASE and MICASE: A Matter of Academic Cultures or Lecturing Styles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Yen

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the occurrence of modifiers in a variety of settings, especially academic research writing and casual spoken contexts. This study extends previous research in two ways: (1) it examines pragmatic force modifiers (PFMs) (and) in lectures in BASE and MICASE in order to reveal their functions specific to the…

  12. Cultural Diversity in the Curriculum: Perceptions and Attitudes of Irish Hospitality and Tourism Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Frances; Hearns, Niamh; Baum, Tom; Murray, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Academics are facing significant challenges in preparing indigenous students for employment in the multicultural working environment of hospitality and tourism organisations. In dealing with the impact of the new skills and flexibilities demanded by increasing globalisation, the indigenous workforce needs to possess a multicultural perspective and…

  13. Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) Academics' Perceptions about Research in a Transitional Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Millwater, Jan; Hudson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Research capacity building has become a prominent theme in higher education institutions in China and across the world. However, Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language academics' research output has been quite limited. In order to build their research capacity, it is necessary to understand their perceptions about research. This case study…

  14. Cross-Cultural Invariance of the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory: Adolescent Samples from Canada and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Rebecca P.; Klassen, Robert M.; Chong, Wan Har; Huan, Vivien S.; Wong, Isabella Y. F.; Yeo, Lay See; Krawchuk, Lindsey L.

    2009-01-01

    We provide further evidence for the two-factor structure of the 9-item Academic Expectations Stress Inventory (AESI) using confirmatory factor analysis on a sample of 289 Canadian adolescents and 310 Singaporean adolescents. Examination of measurement invariance tests the assumption that the model underlying a set of scores is directly comparable…

  15. Cultural Diversity in the Curriculum: Perceptions and Attitudes of Irish Hospitality and Tourism Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Frances; Hearns, Niamh; Baum, Tom; Murray, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Academics are facing significant challenges in preparing indigenous students for employment in the multicultural working environment of hospitality and tourism organisations. In dealing with the impact of the new skills and flexibilities demanded by increasing globalisation, the indigenous workforce needs to possess a multicultural perspective and…

  16. Grammatical Metaphor and the Discourse Construction of English Academic Writing%语法隐喻与英语学术论文的语篇建构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金海萍

    2012-01-01

    语法隐喻理论是系统功能语言学的重要组成部分。本文通过语法隐喻理论中的概念隐喻和人际隐喻中的情态隐喻来分析英语学术论文中应该注意的一些问题,并且通过举例说明语法隐喻是解决这些问题的理想方式。%Grammatical metaphor is an important branch of system-functional linguistics. On the basis of the concept metaphor of the grammatical metaphor and the model metaphor of the human metaphor, this paper analyses some factors that should be paid attention to in English academic writing. And grammatical metaphor is illustrated to be the best way to solve these problems.

  17. Discourse, Statement and Speech Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Александровна Красина

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Being a component of socio-cultural interaction discourse constitutes a sophisticated cohesion of language form, meaning and performance, i.e. communicative event or act. Cohesion with event and performance let us treat discourse as a certain lifeform, appealing both to communicative interaction and pragmatic environment using the methodology of studies of E. Benveniste, M. Foucault, I. Kecskes, J.R. Searle et al. In linguistics and other fields of humanitarian knowledge the notion of discourse facilitates the integration of studies in humanities. Principles of integration, incorporation into broad humanitarian context reveal some topics of discourse-speech act-utterance interaction which leads to substantive solutions of a number of linguistic topics, in particular, that of an utterance. Logicians determine utterance through proposition; linguists - through sentence, while speech act theory does it by means of illocutionary act. Integrated in a discourse or its part, utterance makes up their integral constituents although not unique ones. In relation to speech acts, utterance happens to be the unique definitional domain synchronically modelling and denoting speech act by means of propositional content. The goal of the research is to show the conditions of interaction and correlation of discourse, speech act and utterance as linguistic constructions, reveal some similarities and differences of their characteristics and prove the importance of the constructive role of utterance as a minimal unit of speech production. Discourse-speech act-utterance correlation supports the utterance role of a discrete unit within syntactic continuum, facing both language and speech: still, it belongs exclusively neither to language nor speech, but specifies their interaction in course of speech activity exposing simultaneously its nature of an ‘atom of discourse’ and creating the definitional domain of a speech act.

  18. 从学术纠纷案看司法的“学术尊重”--基于话语分析的方法%A Study of Judicial Academic Deference from the Perspective of an Academic Dispute Case:A Discourse Analysis Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高益民; 张奂奂; 刘志朋

    2016-01-01

    美国司法界在处理“法庭上的高校”争议的历史中,发展出了“学术尊重”原则,据此对高校的学术自由提供保障。而在实际的司法审查中,“学术尊重”原则却不断遭受质疑,司法机关常常陷入两难困境:如何平衡学术自由权利在高校作为高等教育组织机构和教师个体之间的关系。本文从话语分析的角度对近年来引起美国社会关注的一例学术纠纷案进行深入的文本分析,从而帮助辨识法院在处理上述关系时的态度立场和价值取向,准确把握学术尊重、学术自由和大学自治三者的关系和意涵。%American courts established the doctrine of academic deference in dealing with disputes related to universities to guarantee the academic autonomy of universities .However ,in practical judicial reviews ,this doctrine has been questioned constantly and left judicial authority to fall into a dilemma :How academic freedom as a connection relating educational institutions and individual teachers could be balanced at universities .This paper ,based on the approach of discourse analysis ,elaborates a recent case of an academic dispute w hich drew with drawing the American society ’s attention .Readers will be benefitted to distinguish the attitude and value of the courts w hen handling above issues and to understand the substantive meaning of academic deference ,uni‐versity autonomy and academic freedom in a more precise way .

  19. African American History and Culture: A Grassroots Interpretation of Culturally-Relevant Teaching for Academic Achievement and College Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Beverly E.

    2008-01-01

    The Achievement, Confidence and Excellence (ACE) Academy in Memphis is a partnership involving the University of Memphis, its Benjamin Hooks Institute for Social Change, and three area school districts. ACE operates as a Saturday Institute, serving three hundred seventh to twelfth grade African American students. Grounded in culturally relevant…

  20. Discourse, Subject, and Agency. Linking Discourse Analysis and Biographical Research with the Help of the Concept of Articulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Spies

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available For a significant period of time biographical research did not focus on the influence of discourses on biographical narratives. In contrast, discourse analysis often disregarded the subject-constituting impact of discourses. This article deals with the theoretical question of how to work with both: discourse and subject. Therefore, I will introduce Stuart HALL's concept of articulation. Since the early 1990's HALL has been working on questions of (cultural identity. In this context he developed an understanding of subjects that enables them not only to be seen as effects of discourses, but also allows focusing on discourses in subject conceptions. Neither biographical research nor discourse analysis In German speaking countries have embraced the work of HALL. But his concept of articulation could link biographical research and discourse analysis, and could also be used for further empirical work. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0902369

  1. Effect Of Leadership Function And Organization Cultural On The Performance Of Employees In The Field Of Academic University Ichsan Gorontalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuchri Abdussamad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify and analyze the level of influence the function of leadership and organizational culture on employee performance in academic areas at the University of Gorontalo Ichsan either simultaneously or partially. The analytical method used is multiple linear regression. The sampling technique used in this research is purposive sample that is making the subject based on their specific purpose and techniques of data collection through questionnaire observation interview. The results showed that the leadership function variable X1 significantly influence employee performance dependent variable Y to the direction of a positive coefficient of 0.298. The value of each additional 1 meaningful leadership function the performance of employees increased by 0.298 or 29.80. Variable organizational culture X2 significantly influence employee performance dependent variable Y to the direction of a positive coefficient of 0.530. The value of each additional 1 means the culture of the organization the performance of employees increased by 0.530 or 53.00. testing the R2 value of 0.586 58.60 indicated that the contribution of independent variables consisting of a leadership function and organizational culture on employee performance.

  2. From a Socratic to an Autocratic Discourse:Translating a European Text for an American Audience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørreklit, Hanne

    This paper uses discourse analysis to contrast the original and the published versions of an article which was written by European academics and published in the US practitioner-oriented journal, Strategic Finance. The original version, submitted by the researchers, was rewritten by a professional...... of academics and practitioners, as the discourse analysis progressed it became clear that the differences we were observing were due more to differences between European and American discourses, than to differences between academics and practitioners. In this paper we trace the different discourses in Europe...

  3. Culture, Communication, and Competence: A Commentary on Variables Affecting Social and Academic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Rob

    2011-01-01

    The editors of this special issue have recruited six papers focused on the ways that language and communication interact with culture to influence student behavior. Two themes that emerge from these papers are the fundamental role of communication in learning and living, and the impact of culture on the functions of communication. The present…

  4. The Benefits of Collective Pedagogical Teacher Culture for Diverse Students' Mathematics Achievement by Academic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Stephanie; Mickelson, Roslyn Arlin; Stearns, Elizabeth; Bottia, Martha; Banerjee, Neena

    2011-01-01

    Most studies of educational organizations have focused on structural features of schools, such as size, resources, and infrastructure. Research on schools' organizational culture is more sparse. Yet, these studies have suggested that the organizational culture of schools can have important implications for teaching practices and student outcomes.…

  5. Culture, Communication, and Competence: A Commentary on Variables Affecting Social and Academic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Rob

    2011-01-01

    The editors of this special issue have recruited six papers focused on the ways that language and communication interact with culture to influence student behavior. Two themes that emerge from these papers are the fundamental role of communication in learning and living, and the impact of culture on the functions of communication. The present…

  6. IMMIGRATION AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT: THE EFFECTS OF SOCIO CULTURAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çağdaş Şirin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Academic engagement during the high school years, a period in which young people go through tremendous change, is one of the key predictors of success for college entrance and later developmental periods. This study aims to evaluate the effect of immigration on the academic achievement of high school students. Participants were 1016 students (545 male, 567 female attending high schools from four provinces in Istanbul that have the highest rates of immigration (Zeytinburnu, Gaziosmanpasa, Büyükçekmece and Esenyurt Regions. The sample was drawn from students in all four years of High School. This study provides a snapshot of migrant students’ academic achievement profiles as well as the demographic determinants that might have an influence on their performance such as gender, number of siblings, generation, working status and selected majors variables. Results demonstrated that third generation have higher English score but lower Turkish language score than the first generation, gender plays a significant role on English and Turkish Language score but not on Math score.

  7. Cultural Renaissance and Academic Promotion--Starting with the Current Academic Atmosphere%文化复兴与学术提升--从当下时风说起

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    长北

    2016-01-01

    This paper starts from different types of hype and plagiarism in the society and reveals the current unhealthy academic atmosphere. It suggests that the current academic atmosphere be rectiifed and culture and academia be in their simple natural ecology, after which, there is a chance for China to achieve cultural renaissance and academic promotion instead of being superifcialy prosperous but essentialy just bubbling.%本文从社会炒作和抄手剽窃谈到当下不良风气,提出匡正时风,让文化和学术回到平实的自然生态,中国的文化才有望复兴,中国的学术才有望提升,而不至于表面繁荣实质虚胖虚热。

  8. Discourses of Plagiarism: Moralist, Proceduralist, Developmental and Inter-Textual Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposi, David; Dell, Pippa

    2012-01-01

    This paper reconstructs prevalent academic discourses of student plagiarism: moralism, proceduralism, development, and writing/inter-textuality. It approaches the discourses from three aspects: intention, interpretation and the nature of the academic community. It argues that the assumptions of the moralistic approach regarding suspect intention,…

  9. Discourses of Plagiarism: Moralist, Proceduralist, Developmental and Inter-Textual Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposi, David; Dell, Pippa

    2012-01-01

    This paper reconstructs prevalent academic discourses of student plagiarism: moralism, proceduralism, development, and writing/inter-textuality. It approaches the discourses from three aspects: intention, interpretation and the nature of the academic community. It argues that the assumptions of the moralistic approach regarding suspect intention,…

  10. Mentoring Faculty: A US National Survey of Its Adequacy and Linkage to Culture in Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T; Civian, Janet T; Vasiliou, Vasilia; Coplit, Lisa D; Gillum, Linda H; Gibbs, Brian K; Brennan, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) describe the quantity and quality of mentoring faculty in US academic health centers (AHCs), (2) measure associations between mentoring and 12 dimensions that reflect the culture of AHCs, and (3) assess whether mentoring predicts seriously contemplating leaving one's institution. During 2007-2009, our National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine (C - Change) conducted a cross-sectional study of faculty from 26 representative AHCs in the United States using the 74-item C - Change Faculty Survey to assess relationships of faculty characteristics and various aspects of the institutional culture (52% response rate). Among the 2178 eligible respondents (assistant, associate, and full professors), we classified their mentoring experience as either inadequate, neutral, or positive. In this national sample, 43% of the 2178 respondents had inadequate mentoring; only 30% had a positive assessment of mentoring. There was no statistical difference by sex, minority status, or rank. Inadequate mentoring was most strongly associated with less institutional support, lower self-efficacy in career advancement, and lower scores on the trust/relationship/inclusion scale. The percent of faculty who had seriously considered leaving their institution was highest among those who had inadequate mentoring (58%), compared to those who were neutral (28%) or had positive mentoring (14%) (all paired comparisons, p US AHCs, mentoring was frequently inadequate and this was associated with faculty contemplating leaving their institutions. Positive mentoring, although less prevalent, was associated with many other positive dimensions of AHCs. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  11. Análise crítica do discurso e teorias culturais: hibridismo necessário Critical discourse analysis and cultural theory: towards a much needed hybridity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Pagano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta uma reflexão teórica sobre a análise de discurso crítica (Chouliaraki e Fairclough, 1999 e os estudos culturais e pós-coloniais, como espaços híbridos de saberes complementares que informam os estudos do papel da linguagem nas representações de identidades culturais híbridas. Propõe-se uma articulação do conceito bakhtiniano de hibridização textual - adotado na análise crítica do discurso como peça fundamental da prática de interpretação textual e expandido para dar conta de gêneros de discursos emergentes -, com o conceito de hibridismo cultural de Homi Bhabha (1998, uma reelaboração também do conceito de Bakhtin que visa dar conta do espaço pós-colonial ambivalente das culturas. Uma análise do poema "Para ouvir e entender 'Estrela' ", do escritor brasileiro negro Cuti, é apresentada para ilustrar o potencial dessa articulação teórica para investigar manifestações culturais que buscam interrogar um sistema de valores e conceitos em torno da obliteração das diferenças raciais e sua inserção no espaço político e cultural da nação.This paper invites theoretical reflection on critical discourse analysis (Chouliaraki e Fairclough, 1999, cultural studies and postcolonial studies as sites of hybridity of complementary knowledges which inform studies of the role of language in the representations of hybrid cultural identities. A theoretical dialogue is proposed between Bakhtin's concept of textual hybridization - borrowed by critical discourse analysis as a fundamental notion in textual interpretation and expanded so as to account for genres pertaining to emerging discourses -, and Homi Bhabha's concept of cultural hybridity, also drawing on Bakhtin in order to explain ambivalence in postcolonial cultures. An analysis of the poem "Para ouvir e entender 'Estrela' ", by black Brazilian writer Cuti, is carried out in order to illustrate the potentiality of this theoretical dialogue for

  12. An academic-marketing collaborative to promote depression care: a tale of two cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Richard L; Epstein, Ronald M; Bell, Robert A; Rochlen, Aaron B; Duberstein, Paul; Riby, Caroline H; Caccamo, Anthony F; Slee, Christina K; Cipri, Camille S; Paterniti, Debora A

    2013-03-01

    Commercial advertising and patient education have separate theoretical underpinnings, approaches, and practitioners. This paper aims to describe a collaboration between academic researchers and a marketing firm working to produce demographically targeted public service anouncements (PSAs) designed to enhance depression care-seeking in primary care. An interdisciplinary group of academic researchers contracted with a marketing firm in Rochester, NY to produce PSAs that would help patients with depressive symptoms engage more effectively with their primary care physicians (PCPs). The researchers brought perspectives derived from clinical experience and the social sciences and conducted empirical research using focus groups, conjoint analysis, and a population-based survey. Results were shared with the marketing firm, which produced four PSA variants targeted to gender and socioeconomic position. There was no simple, one-to-one relationship between research results and the form, content, or style of the PSAs. Instead, empirical findings served as a springboard for discussion and kept the creative process tethered to the experiences, attitudes, and opinions of actual patients. Reflecting research findings highlighting patients' struggles to recognize, label, and disclose depressive symptoms, the marketing firm generated communication objectives that emphasized: (a) educating the patient to consider and investigate the possibility of depression; (b) creating the belief that the PCP is interested in discussing depression and capable of offering helpful treatment; and (c) modelling different ways of communicating with physicians about depression. Before production, PSA prototypes were vetted with additional focus groups. The winning prototype, "Faces," involved a multi-ethnic montage of formerly depressed persons talking about how depression affected them and how they improved with treatment, punctuated by a physician who provided clinical information. A member of the

  13. 高校图书馆文化责任及其实现%Discussion on Cultural Responsibility of Academic Library and Its Realization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢婧

    2015-01-01

    Academic library is playing an increasingly important role in the culture construction in China and the improvement of the cultural accomplishment of the w hole nation in the information age .From the perspectives of cultural accumulation ,cultural integration ,cultural transmission and cultural edu‐cation ,this paper introduces the content of cultural responsibility of academic library ,and proposes the implementation way of promoting the cultural responsibility of academic library .%信息时代,高校图书馆越来越多地参与到国家文化建设和提高全民族文化素养的任务之中。文章从文化积累、文化整合、文化传播、文化教育等方面阐述了高校图书馆文化责任的内容,提出了实现高校图书馆文化责任的策略与途径。

  14. 媒介推力与文化强势:对中国体育话语权缺失的再认识%Media Thrust and Culture Mighty:Reconsideration on the Loss of China Sports Discourse Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程雪峰

    2015-01-01

    2012年伦敦奥运会及近些年世界重大体育赛事中,中国运动员遭遇不公正判罚的事件屡屡出现,有人认为,主要原因在于中国体育话语权的缺失。针对这一问题,研究打破单纯从竞技体育“本体”出发的研究方法,从体育话语权的内涵界定、话语权生成的支配性结构及其配置性资源和权威性资源等方面进行分析,拓展了对体育话语权的认识空间,对于转型时期中国体育话语权的增强及体育文化的发展具有一定的探索意义。%In the 2 0 1 2 London Olympic Games and some world significant events in recent years,Chinese athletes often received unfair treatments.Some professionals believed that the main reason for this is the lack of discourse power of China sports.In this paper,research methods not only simply analyzed from the "body" of competitive sports,but also from the definition of the discourse power,dominant structure of its generation,allocative resources and authoritative resources to expand the cognitive space of sports discourse power,to enhance the discourse power of China sports and to develop China sports culture in a transitional period.

  15. An Academic-Marketing Collaborative to Promote Depression Care: A Tale of Two Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Richard L.; Epstein, Ronald M.; Bell, Robert A.; Rochlen, Aaron B.; Duberstein, Paul; Riby, Caroline H.; Caccamo, Anthony F.; Slee, Christina K.; Cipri, Camille S.; Paterniti, Debora A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Commercial advertising and patient education have separate theoretical underpinnings, approaches, and practitioners. This paper aims to describe a collaboration between academic researchers and a marketing firm working to produce demographically targeted public service anouncements (PSAs) designed to enhance depression care-seeking in primary care. Methods An interdisciplinary group of academic researcherss contracted with a marketing firm in Rochester, NY to produce PSAs that would help patients with depressive symptoms engage more effectively with their primary care physicians (PCPs). The researchers brought perspectives derived from clinical experience and the social sciences and conducted empirical research using focus groups, conjoint analysis, and a population-based survey. Results were shared with the marketing firm, which produced four PSA variants targeted to gender and socioeconomic position. Results There was no simple, one-to-one relationship between research results and the form, content, or style of the PSAs. Instead, empirical findings served as a springboard for discussion and kept the creative process tethered to the experiences, attitudes, and opinions of actual patients. Reflecting research findings highlighting patients’ struggles to recognize, label, and disclose depressive symptoms, the marketing firm generated communication objectives that emphasized: a) educating the patient to consider and investigate the possibility of depression; b) creating the belief that the PCP is interested in discussing depression and capable of offering helpful treatment; and c) modelling different ways of communicating with physicians about depression. Before production, PSA prototypes were vetted with additional focus groups. The winning prototype, “Faces,” involved a multi-ethnic montage of formerly depressed persons talking about how depression affected them and how they improved with treatment, punctuated by a physician who provided clinical

  16. Global and Local Discourses on Climate Change: A Perspective from the Concept of Embeddedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailab Kumar Rai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has been becoming a major order of business of all including researchers and academics. This is known that global, national and local organizations, institutions and even the individuals are partaking into the issues with their own perspectives and skills of negotiations. Despite the series of international efforts and attempts, there are also a series of national concerns, efforts and attempts in combating against the effects of global climate change. This paper is an attempt to draw on the overview of contexts and concerns of international communities for combating global climate change and its discursive influence in national policy discourses. Moreover, the paper attempts to assess the local socio-cultural discourses and dynamics of climate change in relation to global and national discourses. Finally the paper highlights on how global and local climate change knowledge networks and epistemic communities either from political processes or the socio-economic fabrics are interrelated and determinant to each other. Keywords: climate change; discourses; embeddeness; dynamics; global; local DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v4i0.4518 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.4 2010 pp.143-180

  17. Materiality and discourse in school curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valero, Paola

    2013-01-01

    materiality and discourse together in such a way that we might better address the political realities of education. From various international, historical, and theoretical contexts, we critically examine how discourse and materiality intricately define and describe the classifications by which notions...... of intellectual, social, and economic poverty are organized in the curriculum. Our focus on school mathematics is essential, since this is a curricular area that is seldom approached as a field of cultural politics....

  18. Classroom Discourse Analysis in Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡骏

    2012-01-01

    This paper begins with a brief introduction of discourse analysis,and then it discusses two aspects of traditional classroom teaching discourse: the I-R-F sequence and turn-taking.The emphases of the paper lay on how language teachers can use classroom discourse analysis to do research and create learning environment,and how language learners can use it to achieve language proficiency and cultural competence.

  19. The Ramadan Controversy Dilemmas in Mediating between Cultures through the Study of Dutch and Iranian Media Discourses in the Post-Iranian Uprising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Arora (Payal); A. Panikkar (Ashok)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPlaying the role of mediator between Islam and the West is one that is particularly fraught with danger. Mediators often find themselves in a critical dilemma of placement of the self within larger contesting discourses. Tariq Ramadan, a Swiss-born Islamic scholar, is one such appointed

  20. Playing the triangle: Cosmopolitanism, Cultural Capital and Social Capital as intersecting scholarly discourses about social inclusion and marginalisation in Australian public policy debates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jakubowicz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A constant challenge for scholarly research relates to its impact on and integration into public policy. Where the policy issues are ‘wicked’, as are those concerning intercultural relations and social cohesion, social science research often becomes implicated in real-world problem solving which occurs within everyday political manoeuvring. This paper takes three empirical problems, and three conceptual approaches, and explores what happens when they are pressed together. In particular the paper explores how together they can enhance the social value of the concept of ‘social inclusion’. Cosmopolitanism has a myriad of possible definitions, but is perhaps best addressed in anthropological fashion, by trying to capture the space formed by its presumptive antagonists: nationalism, prejudice, localism, parochialism, and ‘rootedness’ (as in ‘rootless cosmopolitan’. Cultural capital, as developed by Bourdieu, concerns a disposition of mind and body that empowers members of those particular groups that have the resource in socially–approved abundance to operate the cultural apparatus of a society and therefore the power system, to their mutual and individual benefit. Social capital, removed of the vestiges of Marxist class analysis that lurk in Bourdieu’s explorations of education and social power, harks back to another sociological forebear. Emile Durkheim, whose vision of modernity as a constantly incipient catastrophe that could only be held off by a reinvigoration of collective consciousness, has influenced through the Talcott Parsons school of social systemics Robert Putnam (and Australian politician and academic Andrew Leigh’s focus on ‘bonding’ and ‘bridging’ social capital. Having examined these concepts the paper applies them sequentially to three cases of state/civil society relations, through the February 2011 People of Australia multiculturalism policy, the place of young Muslims in Australian society, and the

  1. Effect of youth culture music on high school students' academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, J C; Collins, B R

    1975-03-01

    This study investigated the assumption that youth culture orientation adversely affects school performance, using rock music as the youth culture component. Adolescents in grades 9-12 were assigned to a subject matter topic in the area of literature, mathematics, physical science, or social science and requested to study this topic intensely for 30 min in a music condition consisting of rock, classical, or no music. The subjects then were tested on their retention of the factual content of the article either immediately after the study period, 1 day later, or 3 days later. Retention was significantly lower in the rock music condition. Students recalled more content in the literature topic and in the immediate test. The results are discussed with reference to a social learning theory interpretation of youth culture.

  2. Academic Language in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on defining academic language in physical education and provides a step-by-step approach designed to help preservice and inservice teachers understand and incorporated academic language into their lesson planning. It provides examples of discipline-specific vocabulary, language functions, syntax, and discourse, aiming to…

  3. Academic Language in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on defining academic language in physical education and provides a step-by-step approach designed to help preservice and inservice teachers understand and incorporated academic language into their lesson planning. It provides examples of discipline-specific vocabulary, language functions, syntax, and discourse, aiming to…

  4. Immediation (Cultures of Immediacy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    2017-01-01

    The 21st century´s media praxis is increasingly characterized by the emerging “cultural principle”, “condition” or “culture of immediacy”. The processes summarized under the term immediation suggest the closure of the spatio-temporal “gap” between agencies and the media involved, resulting...... with a complex interplay of social-, security-, science- and economy-related issues. The growing interest in immediation confirms its status as a new but as yet underestimated paradigm for the arts, sciences and humanities which calls for a future-focused inquiry into the cultures of immediacy. However......, in academic and popular discourse, the focus is on documenting either (societal) challenges or (technical) solutions. This paper seeks to address this imbalance by responding to an urgent need for a systematic understanding of immediation’s major forms of appearance: 1. today´s worldwide closed...

  5. Sociology of Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Oscar Garcia

    Sociology of Discourse takes the perspective that collective actors like social movements are capable of creating social change from below by creating new institutions through alternative discourses. Institutionalization becomes a process of moving away from existing institutions towards creating...

  6. English Computer Discourse: Some Characteristic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Rusko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of virtual discourse is coming into focus of linguistic research. This interest results from the rapid spread of information technology, modern Internet culture incipience, a symbol of information revolution, new opportunities and threats that accompany computer civilization. The emergence of the communicative environment as a particular sphere of language actualization, necessitates new language means of communication or transformation and reframing the already existing ones. Obviously, it’s time to talk about the formation of a new discourse in the new communicative space – computer (electronic, virtual discourse, which subsequently may considerably affect the speech behavior of society. The present article makes an attempt to identify some linguistic and communicative features of virtual discourse. Computer discourse, being a sub-language of hybrid character, combines elements of oral and written discourse with its own specific features. It should be noted that in the context of information culture the problem of communication interaction is among the most topical issues in science and education. There is hardly any doubt that the study and advancement of virtual communication culture is one of higher education distinctive mission components.

  7. Exploring the National Discourse of Chinese Educational Researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusheng, Yu

    2006-01-01

    Academic discourse is a way of questioning and exposition in academic research. For a long time, talking about China in a Western way has caused two harmful consequences, which separated theoretical research from its object and from its subject of researches in the field of Chinese educational studies. With the prerequisite of cherishing our own…

  8. Discurso pedagógico e fracasso escolar Discurso pedagógico y fracaso escolar Pedagogic discourse and academic failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Floriana Damiani

    2006-12-01

    variado que examinó el riesgo del fracaso asociado a diferentes variables personales y familiares de los niños. Estos resultados confirman los encontrados en otras investigaciones, indicando la importante influencia de factores como grupo étnico, renta familiar, número de hermanos, escolaridad de los padres, tipo de vivienda, entre otros, sobre el desempeño de los niños. La segunda parte del trabajo relata estudios de caso de dos escuelas (que atienden poblaciones con los mismos factores de riesgo cuyas tasas de reprobación y evasión eran contrastantes (altas en una escuela y bajas en otra. Los resultados apuntan a que las instituciones de enseñanza difieren entre sí y también a la importancia de factores intraescolares, en especial el discurso pedagógico de las escuelas (concepto definido por Bernstein, para el desempeño de los niños. El énfasis en los aspectos académicos de la escolarización (discurso instruccional, verificado en la escuela con menores tasas de reprobación y evasión, posibilitó el cambio de una de las importantes correlaciones, encontrada también en otras investigaciones, entre fracaso escolar de los estudiantes y bajo nivel de escolarización de sus padres. La escuela que presentaba mayores tasas de fracaso era caracterizada por un discurso pedagógico regulativo (asistencialista.This paper presents the findings of an investigation which, in its first part, identified risk factors for school failure (understood as grade retention and/or drop-out in a cohort of all children born in the city Pelotas (RS hospitals, in 1982. This was accomplished through a multivariate model which examined the risk for failure associated to children's personal and family variables. The results confirm findings from other research, suggesting the important influence exerted by factors such as ethnic group, family income, number of siblings, parents' level of schooling, type of dwelling, among others, over children's academic attainment. The second part

  9. Bridges and Barriers: Factors Influencing a Culture of Assessment in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Meredith Gorran; Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke; Houk, Amy Harris

    2015-01-01

    In an environment in which libraries need to demonstrate value, illustrating how the library contributes to student learning is critical. Gathering and analyzing data to tell the library's story as well as identify areas for improvement require commitment, time, effort, and resources--all components of a culture of assessment. This paper presents…

  10. Ideology and Audit Culture: Standardized Service Quality Surveys in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilburn, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between the standardized service quality survey LibQUAL+ and the rise of audit culture. Recent scholarship examining assessment and accountability systems and the ideological principles driving their implementation in higher education raises concerns about the impact these systems have on teaching, learning,…

  11. Popular Culture and Academic Literacies Situated in a Pedagogical Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    This critical participatory action research study sought to understand what happens when students' interest and experiences with popular culture are integrated into a standards-based sixth grade English language arts curriculum. Multiple data sources were analyzed using the theoretical concept of third space. Findings showed that (a) a democratic,…

  12. Academic Integrity, Remix Culture, Globalization: A Canadian Case Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Tokaryk, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a case study at a Canadian university that used a combination of surveys and focus groups to explore faculty members' and students' perceptions of plagiarism. The research suggests that the globalization of education and remix culture have contributed to competing and contradictory understandings of plagiarism…

  13. Ideology and Audit Culture: Standardized Service Quality Surveys in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilburn, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between the standardized service quality survey LibQUAL+ and the rise of audit culture. Recent scholarship examining assessment and accountability systems and the ideological principles driving their implementation in higher education raises concerns about the impact these systems have on teaching, learning,…

  14. Academic Integrity, Remix Culture, Globalization: A Canadian Case Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Tokaryk, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a case study at a Canadian university that used a combination of surveys and focus groups to explore faculty members' and students' perceptions of plagiarism. The research suggests that the globalization of education and remix culture have contributed to competing and contradictory understandings of plagiarism…

  15. Culturally Responsive Caring and Expectations for Academic Achievement in a Catholic School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallavis, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article draws from a larger dissertation study that applied ethnographic and historical research methods to explore the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and Catholic schooling in immigrant communities. In particular, this article presents qualitative data analysis to describe student achievement expectations at a contemporary…

  16. The Art of War for Librarians: Academic Culture, Curriculum Reform, and Wisdom from Sun Tzu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempcke, Ken

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the need for campuswide, organizational change to address the academy culture to be successful and suggests that in order for librarians to be effective in initiating information literacy or other educational reforms they must be seen as equals by faculty, in teaching and in governance. (Author/LRW)

  17. Cultural and academic meetings in the writing classroom : China and the West

    OpenAIRE

    Mattisson Ekstam, Jane

    2015-01-01

    With growing numbers of Chinese students entering Western universities, cultural understanding is of increasing importance, not least in higher education. Without a good understanding of the academic conventions of Western universities, Chinese students, and undergraduates in particular, are at a disadvantage in the multi-cultural classroom. Lack of knowledge of structural influences on higher education, including teacher-student relations, reference management practices, and assessment proce...

  18. Neutrosophic elements in discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentin Smarandache

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Discourse analysis is a synergy of social science disciplines, including linguistics, education, sociology, anthropology, social work, cognitive psychology, social psychology, area studies, cultural studies, international relations, human geography, communication studies, and translation studies, subject to its own assumptions, dimensions of analysis, and methodologies. The aim of this paper is to present the applicability of (t, i, f-Neutrosophic Social Structures, introduced for the first time as new type of structures, called (t, i, f-Neutrosophic Structures, and presented from a neutrosophic logic. Neutrosophy theory can be assimilated to interpret and evaluate the individual opinion of social structures. This type of analyse already tested and applied in mathematics, artificial inteligence as well can be applied in social sciences by reseachers in social sciences, communication, sociology, psycology.

  19. Discourse segmentation and ambiguity in discourse structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, J.; Evers-Vermeul, J.; Sanders, T.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Discourse relations hold between two or more text segments. The process of discourse annotation not only involves determining what type of relation holds between segments, but also indicating the segments themselves. Often, segmentation and annotation are treated as individual steps, and separate gu

  20. 冷媒介的崛起与中国文化话语权的建构%Rise of Cold Midea andConstruction of Chinese cultural discourse right

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨拓

    2015-01-01

    In cold media era dominated by the network media,Heat culture dominated by alphabetic writing meet with Cold culture dominatied by hieroglyphs,knowing text and produce a cultural exchange and blend. Such blend process,not simply cultural assimilation,and even cultural Westernization,but a mutual listening and communication process. There-fore,we should seize new media properties,and relying on the advantages of our own traditional culture,we should construct theoretical discourse system of Chinese characteristics and make our own voice on the world stage dialogue.%在以网络媒介为主导的冷媒介时代,由拼音文字主导的热文化在与由象形文字、会意文字主导的冷文化产生了碰撞与交融,此种融合过程,并不是简单的文化同化,甚至文化西化,而是一种相互的倾听与交流的过程。因此,我们必须抓住新的媒介特性,依托自身传统文化的优势建构起具有中国特色的理论话语体系,在世界对话的舞台上发出自己的声音。

  1. Investigating Stratification within Higher Education through Examining the Status of Students in Different Academic Majors in Terms of Cultural, Social and Economic Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Seyyed Jamal Mir

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to explore the status of stratification within higher education through measuring cultural, economic and social capital of students in major academic disciplines across universities in Urmia, Northwestern Iran. The findings indicate that there are stratification structures in the presence of students in…

  2. Sean Leneghan, The Varieties of Ecstasy Experience: An Exploration of Person, Mind and Body in Sydney’s Club Culture (Saarbrücken: Lambert Academic Publishing, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Langridge

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the book: The Varieties of Ecstasy Experience: An Exploration of Person, Mind and Body in Sydney’s Club Culture, by Sean Leneghan. Lambert Academic Publishing: Saarbrücken, Germany, 2011. ISBN: 978-3-8454-1634-2. 286 pp. (Paperback $112 U.S.

  3. Research and Teaching Cultures in Two Contrasting UK Policy Contexts: Academic Life in Education Departments in Five English and Scottish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Rosemary; Lucas, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The paper explores academic staff and departmental research and teaching cultures in the Education Departments of five universities in Scotland and England, countries with increasingly diverging public policies in respect of education. The relationship between research and teaching, how the purposes of universities are defined and the status of…

  4. Senior Level First-Generation College Student Descriptions of the Impact of Academic Self-Efficacy, Parental Support, and Cultural Capital on College Enrollment and Matriculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Michele A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the strategies employed by senior level first-generation college students (FGCS) as it pertains to academic self-efficacy, parental support, and cultural capital and their role in college enrollment and matriculation. The examination also included additional emergent factors that contributed to FGCS…

  5. Evaluation of the culture of safety: survey of clinicians and managers in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronovost, P J; Weast, B; Holzmueller, C G; Rosenstein, B J; Kidwell, R P; Haller, K B; Feroli, E R; Sexton, J B; Rubin, H R

    2003-12-01

    Despite the emphasis on patient safety in health care, few organizations have evaluated the extent to which safety is a strategic priority or their culture supports patient safety. In response to the Institute of Medicine's report and to an organizational commitment to patient safety, we conducted a systematic assessment of safety at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) and, from this, developed a strategic plan to improve safety. The specific aims of this study were to evaluate the extent to which the culture supports patient safety at JHH and the extent to which safety is a strategic priority. During July and August 2001 we implemented two surveys in disparate populations to assess patient safety. The Safety Climate Scale (SCS) was administered to a sample of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other ICU staff. SCS assesses perceptions of a strong and proactive organizational commitment to patient safety. The second survey instrument, called Strategies for Leadership (SLS), evaluated the extent to which safety was a strategic priority for the organization. This survey was administered to clinical and administrative leaders. We received 395 completed SCS surveys from 82% of the departments and 86% of the nursing units. Staff perceived that supervisors had a greater commitment to safety than senior leaders. Nurses had higher scores than physicians for perceptions of safety. Twenty three completed SLS surveys were received from 77% of the JHH Patient Safety Committee members and 50% of the JHH Management Committee members. Management Committee responses were more positive than Patient Safety Committee, indicating that management perceived safety efforts to be further developed. Strategic planning received the lowest scores from both committees. We believe this is one of the first large scale efforts to measure institutional culture of safety and then design improvements in health care. The survey results suggest that strategic planning of patient safety needs

  6. Is There a Place for Cross-cultural Contastive Rhetoric in English Academic Writing Courses?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lin

    2016-01-01

    This is a primary study investigating the pedagogical approach of employing cross-cultural contrastive rhetoric (CCCR) comparisons in graduate-level writing courses. Two 501-level (advanced) classes were recruited to participate in this study: one class received CCCR instruction and participated in CCCR discussions, and the other class did not receive CCCR instruction and discussions. The study entailed both quantitative and qualitative investigations involving the grading of the results, the...

  7. Deng Zhenglais Search for the “Ideal Image” or the Paradigmatic Crisis of Chinese Law? Discussion from the Perspective of the Legal Culture Discourse in the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S. Schick-Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first decade of the 21st century, the author of the book entitled “Wither Chinese Jurisprudence“ stepped forward to offer a critique of the unquestioned and undertheorized orientation of the Chinese legal science towards modernity. Widely and critically discussed, Deng Zhenglai's appeal for a new ideal picture of Chinese law based on a reinterpretation and new understanding of China herself can be seen both as a seizure in and outcome of the many discussions on law and culture that had started off in the first decade of reform and opening and were continued in the times of a “Socialist rule of law with Chinese characteristics”. The following text shows that the issue of identity of Chinese legal scholars was an inherent part of the discourse on Chinese legal culture, and that Dengs book has to be understood in this context.

  8. LINGUISTIC AND CULTURAL FEATURES OF ACADEMIC TEXTS IN GERMAN AND FRENCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A training text in a foreign language is a fundamental communicative unit of the learning process. However there is tracing a tendency to explain the text as a global fact in the scientific literature and to study language’s contacts with different sides of human activity, which are actualizing through the text. The data shows at first that linguistic and cultural features of training texts are connected with communicative directivity of the foreign language learning process, second, they are due to the goals and objectives of learning. In the article the cultural component of training texts is reviewed, the types of texts determining sociolinguistic behavior of the characters, with which someone learning foreign language should identify himself, are marked, sociocultural subject of texts of tutorials in German and French is analyzed. A pragmatic aspect of training texts is studied separately, quantitative and genre texts’ relations and authentic and quasi-realistic texts’ relations in German and French are compared. Studying of features of training text in foreign language allows characterize it as a universal unit, which fosters to form a communicative competence and influence the recipient complex. Results of the study expand knowledge about the methodical potential of a training text in learning a foreign language and culture and are of interest for experts in the fields of linguistic, linguodidactics and intercultural communication

  9. The effect of professional culture on intrinsic motivation among physicians in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Today, most healthcare organizations aim to manage professionals' motivation through monetary incentives, such as pay for performance. However, addressing motivation extrinsically can involve negative effects, such as disturbed teamwork, gaming the system, and crowd-out of intrinsic motivation. To offset these side effects, it is crucial to support professionals' intrinsic motivation actively, which is largely determined by enjoyment- and obligation-based social norms that derive from professionals' culture. For this study, a professional culture questionnaire was designed and validated, the results of which uncovered three factors: relationship to work, relationship to colleagues, and relationship to organization. These factors served as independent variables for regression analyses. Second, Amabile's validated work preference inventory was used to measure intrinsic motivation as a dependent variable. The regression analysis was controlled for sex, age, and experience. The study revealed that relationship to work had the strongest (and a positive) impact on intrinsic motivation in general and on Amabile's intrinsic subscales, enjoyment and challenge. Relationship to organization had a negative impact on intrinsic motivation and both subscales, and relationship to colleagues showed a low positive significance for the intrinsic scale only. Healthcare organizations have mostly focused on targeting professionals' extrinsic motivation. However, managing dimensions of professional culture can help support professionals' intrinsic motivation without incurring the side effects of monetary incentives.

  10. Exploring the Dominant Discourse of Baccalaureate Nursing Education in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Yousefy, Alireza; Mohammadi, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Understanding how academic dominant discourse is implicated in the shaping of nursing identity, professional aspirations and socialization of nursing students is useful as it can lead to strategies that promote nursing profession. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative research conducted through discourse analysis approach. Semi-structured interviews, focus group, and direct observation of undergraduate theoretical and clinical courses were used to collect the data. Participants were 71 nursing students, 20 nursing educators, and 5 nursing board staffs from five universities in Iran. Results: Data analysis resulted in the development of four main themes that represent essential discourses of nursing education. The discourses explored are theoretical and scientific nursing, domination of biomedical paradigm, caring as an empty signifier, and more than expected role of research in nursing education discourse. Conclusions: The results indicated that academics attempt to define itself based on “scientific knowledge” and faculties seek to socialize students by emphasizing the scientific/theoretical basis of nursing and research, with the dominance of biomedical discourse. It fails to conceptually grasp the reality of nursing practice, and the result is an untested and impoverished theoretical discourse. The analysis highlights the need for the formation of a strong and new discourse, which contains articulation of signifiers extracted from the nature of the profession.

  11. Discourse analysis: towards an understanding of its place in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Marie

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes how discourse analysis, and in particular critical discourse analysis, can be used in nursing research, and provides an example to illustrate the techniques involved. Discourse analysis has risen to prominence in the 1980s and 1990s in disciplines such as the social sciences, literary theory and cultural studies and is increasingly used in nursing. This paper investigates discourse analysis as a useful methodology for conducting nursing research. Effective clinical reasoning relies on employing several different kinds of knowledge and research that draw on different perspectives, methodologies and techniques to generate breadth of knowledge and depth of understanding of clinical practices and patients' experiences of those practices. The steps in a discourse analysis include: choosing the text, and identifying the explicit purpose of the text, the processes used for claiming authority connections to other discourses, construction of major concepts, processes of naming and categorizing, construction of subject positions, construction of reality and social relations and implications for the practice of nursing. The limitations of discourse analysis, its relationship to other qualitative approaches and questions for evaluating the rigour of research using discourse analysis are also explored. The example of discourse analysis shows how a text influences the practice of nursing by shaping knowledge, values and beliefs. Discourse analysis can make a contribution to the development of nursing knowledge by providing a research strategy to examine dominant discourses that influence nursing practice.

  12. Bridging Cultures and Crossing Academic Divides: Teaching the Americas in the New Millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Akbar Gilliam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available African Diaspora Studies and Latin American (and Latino Studies are traditionally seen as two distinct disciplines, each having its own perspective, each having its particular areas of concern.  Some scholars, however, see each of these fields of study as complementary, and take the position that neither field can be fully understood or appreciated without including the history, culture and theoretical framework of the other.  I make this argument based on four factors: 1 Over 90% of the Africans brought to the Americas as slaves were sent to Latin America  2 A documented shared history for more than 500 years 3 A trend toward interdisciplinarity and multicultural perspective among scholars in the two fields  4 The shared political genesis of Black Studies and Latino Studies in the 1960s and 1970s. As someone who teaches Spanish language, and researches Afro-Hispanic writers and themes, I welcomed the challenge to enhance an existing Latin American and Latino Studies course with a curriculum to more fully reflect the development of the modern Americas as both a clash and combination of African, Native American (indigenous, and European peoples: their bloodlines, cultures, languages, faith traditions, and political struggles.  This course is called “Founding Myths and Cultural Conquest in Latin America.”  It is one of two courses prerequisite to a major or minor in Latin American and Latino Studies, and is now regularly cross-listed in the African and Black Diaspora Studies Program. Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso

  13. Iranian Agricultural Academic Staff’s Organizational Culture and their Psychological Empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Gholifar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Faculties’ empowerment is one of the effective tools for increasingproductivity and optimum use of their individual and groupabilities and capacities to reach organizational goals. Organizationalculture is the main component of decision making in universitiesand one of the requirements of psychological empowerment (i.e.meaning, competence, self-determination, trust, impact. Giventhe importance of these two variables and their possible relations;and as the main purpose of this study, the supposed correlationbetween Iran agricultural colleges’ faculties’ psychological empowermentand their organizational culture was investigated. Sothis descriptive correlation study surveyed agricultural faculties tomeasure their psychological empowerment and also organizationalculture in their colleges. A multi-stage random Sampling approachwas implemented. The national sample consisted of 404 facultymembers. Factor analysis determined three components of organizationalculture (i.e. team-orientations, empowerment and capabilitydevelopment. All components of psychological empowermentwere significantly and positively correlated with team-orientationsand empowerment while the capability development was only significantlycorrelated with trust.

  14. Orientalist discourse in media texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Mora

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available By placing itself at the center of the world with a Eurocentric point of view, the West exploits other countries and communities through inflicting cultural change and transformation on them either from within via colonialist movements or from outside via “Orientalist” discourses in line with its imperialist objectives.The West has fictionalized the “image of the Orient” in terms of science by making use of social sciences like anthropology, history and philology and launched an intensive propaganda which covers literature, painting, cinema and other fields of art in order to actualize this fiction. Accordingly, the image of the Orient – which has been built firstly in terms of science then socially – has been engraved into the collective memory of both the Westerner and the Easterner.The internalized “Orientalist” point of view and discourse cause the Westerner to see and perceive the Easterner with the image formed in his/her memory while looking at them. The Easterner represents and expresses himself/herself from the eyes of the Westerner and with the image which the Westerner fictionalized for him/her. Hence, in order to gain acceptance from the West, the East tries to shape itself into the “Orientalist” mold which the Westerner fictionalized for it.Artists, intellectuals, writers and media professionals, who embrace and internalize the stereotypical hegemonic-driven “Orientalist” discourse of the Westerner and who rank among the elite group, reflect their internalized “Orientalist” discourse on their own actions. This condition causes the “Orientalist” clichés to be engraved in the memory of the society; causes the society to view itself with an “Orientalist” point of view and perceive itself with the clichés of the Westerner. Consequently, the second ring of the hegemony is reproduced by the symbolic elites who represent the power/authority within the country.The “Orientalist” discourse, which is

  15. Words Matter: Discourse and Numeracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L. Tunstall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Here I discuss elements of critical discourse analysis (CDA and their importance in relation to quantitative literacy (QL. Through an overview of theory, synthesis of research, and examples, I argue that the discursive nature of textbooks has a nontrivial impact on students' mathematical dispositions - an important component of QL. In particular, texts are a means of disseminating the culture of mathematics, one which has a tendency to paint mathematics as esoteric and male-dominated. Such a characterization has profound implications for the numeracy community, one of which is that we cannot assume that changes in curriculum are sufficient for effecting QL -- simply transitioning to more contextualized mathematics is not enough. Furthermore, it is critical that we examine our own discourse--whether spoken or through text--for ways in which we may be implicitly or explicitly prolong a view of mathematics in which students have little agency.

  16. Against the Dark: Antiblackness in Education Policy and Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    I argue that analyses of racial(ised) discourse and policy processes in education must grapple with cultural disregard for and disgust with blackness. This article explains how a theorization of antiblackness allows one to more precisely identify and respond to racism in education discourse and in the formation and implementation of education…

  17. Rhetorical Aspects of Discourses in Present-day Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    as well as an analytical tool for the critique of public argumentation. This led to the development of new theories from New Rhetoric over Rhetorical Criticism to theories of genre and discourse, reflecting the view that rhetoric must be understood and used against the social and cultural framework...... in which it is embedded. The contributions of this book reflect this multi-faceted approach to rhetoric, discourse and genre through their focus upon and analysis of different institutionalised discourses. Thus, within the three sections of political, journalistic and organisational discourse, the articles...

  18. Liberty but Not License: Publicity, Academic Freedom, and the Professionalization of the Professoriate, 1890-1929

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberler, Zachary James

    2013-01-01

    This historical dissertation explores the public and academic discourse regarding the concept of academic freedom from 1890-1929, with the foundation of the American Association of University Professors in 1915 serving as a general midpoint of the analysis. Throughout this period the public academic freedom discourse was consistently connected to…

  19. Misconduct Policies, Academic Culture and Career Stage, Not Gender or Pressures to Publish, Affect Scientific Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fanelli

    Full Text Available The honesty and integrity of scientists is widely believed to be threatened by pressures to publish, unsupportive research environments, and other structural, sociological and psychological factors. Belief in the importance of these factors has inspired major policy initiatives, but evidence to support them is either non-existent or derived from self-reports and other sources that have known limitations. We used a retrospective study design to verify whether risk factors for scientific misconduct could predict the occurrence of retractions, which are usually the consequence of research misconduct, or corrections, which are honest rectifications of minor mistakes. Bibliographic and personal information were collected on all co-authors of papers that have been retracted or corrected in 2010-2011 (N=611 and N=2226 papers, respectively and authors of control papers matched by journal and issue (N=1181 and N=4285 papers, respectively, and were analysed with conditional logistic regression. Results, which avoided several limitations of past studies and are robust to different sampling strategies, support the notion that scientific misconduct is more likely in countries that lack research integrity policies, in countries where individual publication performance is rewarded with cash, in cultures and situations were mutual criticism is hampered, and in the earliest phases of a researcher's career. The hypothesis that males might be prone to scientific misconduct was not supported, and the widespread belief that pressures to publish are a major driver of misconduct was largely contradicted: high-impact and productive researchers, and those working in countries in which pressures to publish are believed to be higher, are less-likely to produce retracted papers, and more likely to correct them. Efforts to reduce and prevent misconduct, therefore, might be most effective if focused on promoting research integrity policies, improving mentoring and training

  20. Misconduct Policies, Academic Culture and Career Stage, Not Gender or Pressures to Publish, Affect Scientific Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Daniele; Costas, Rodrigo; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The honesty and integrity of scientists is widely believed to be threatened by pressures to publish, unsupportive research environments, and other structural, sociological and psychological factors. Belief in the importance of these factors has inspired major policy initiatives, but evidence to support them is either non-existent or derived from self-reports and other sources that have known limitations. We used a retrospective study design to verify whether risk factors for scientific misconduct could predict the occurrence of retractions, which are usually the consequence of research misconduct, or corrections, which are honest rectifications of minor mistakes. Bibliographic and personal information were collected on all co-authors of papers that have been retracted or corrected in 2010-2011 (N=611 and N=2226 papers, respectively) and authors of control papers matched by journal and issue (N=1181 and N=4285 papers, respectively), and were analysed with conditional logistic regression. Results, which avoided several limitations of past studies and are robust to different sampling strategies, support the notion that scientific misconduct is more likely in countries that lack research integrity policies, in countries where individual publication performance is rewarded with cash, in cultures and situations were mutual criticism is hampered, and in the earliest phases of a researcher's career. The hypothesis that males might be prone to scientific misconduct was not supported, and the widespread belief that pressures to publish are a major driver of misconduct was largely contradicted: high-impact and productive researchers, and those working in countries in which pressures to publish are believed to be higher, are less-likely to produce retracted papers, and more likely to correct them. Efforts to reduce and prevent misconduct, therefore, might be most effective if focused on promoting research integrity policies, improving mentoring and training, and encouraging

  1. Addressing Racialized Multicultural Discourses in an EAP Textbook: Working toward a Critical Pedagogies Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Christian W.

    2016-01-01

    Racialized multicultural discourses emerge in the TESOL classroom via textbook representations of immigrant success stories and perceived racial and cultural differences among students. Although liberal multicultural discourses may be well intentioned, these discourses warrant closer examination for the ways in which they can essentialize cultural…

  2. Discourse analysis and Foucault's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen I.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Discourse analysis is a method with up to now was less recognized in nursing science, althoughmore recently nursing scientists are discovering it for their purposes. However, several authors have criticized thatdiscourse analysis is often misinterpreted because of a lack of understanding of its theoretical backgrounds. In thisarticle, I reconstruct Foucault’s writings in his “Archaeology of Knowledge” to provide a theoretical base for futurearchaeological discourse analysis, which can be categorized as a socio-linguistic discourse analysis.

  3. Spoken Discourse Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xi; CHEN Man-ping

    2015-01-01

    A number of approaches have been developed to analyze spoken discourse, based on different theoretical perspectives.I would classify the approaches into two categories according to their attitudes toward the nature of spoken discourse in this essay. The first group regards spoken discourse in a more static point of view, while the second one takes more consideration of the dynam⁃ic nature of it.

  4. Computing Parallelism in Discourse

    CERN Document Server

    Gardent, C; Gardent, Claire; Kohlhase, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Although much has been said about parallelism in discourse, a formal, computational theory of parallelism structure is still outstanding. In this paper, we present a theory which given two parallel utterances predicts which are the parallel elements. The theory consists of a sorted, higher-order abductive calculus and we show that it reconciles the insights of discourse theories of parallelism with those of Higher-Order Unification approaches to discourse semantics, thereby providing a natural framework in which to capture the effect of parallelism on discourse semantics.

  5. University Subj ect Evaluation Based on the International Academic Discourse Vision:Taking 1387 World Universities in Chemistry Subject for Example%国际学术话语权视角下的大学学科评价研究--以化学学科世界1387所大学为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,the voice from Chinese academia to enhance the international academic discourse of China has gotten higher and higher.Editorial board members of international academic j ournals control the international academic discourse and play an important role in the university disci-pline construction.Using a sample of 1387 universities having editorial board members in 396 SCI jour-nals of chemistry subject,the present study builds a subject ranking in chemistry based on the interna-tional academic discourse vision and discusses the characteristics of this ranking.The results show thatthere is a certain gap between top Chinese universities and first-class foreign universities in chemistry;the ranking based on editorial board members are positively and significantly related to the subj ect com-prehensive ranking,number of articles,total number of citations and h-index,respectively,but their correlation level is different.%近年来,关于提升我国国际学术话语权的呼声越来越高。国际学术期刊编委掌控着国际学术话语权,在大学的学科建设中扮演着重要角色。本研究以国际学术期刊编委数量作为学科评价指标,选取化学学科396本 SCI 期刊中拥有编委的1387所大学作为评价对象,构建出一套国际学术话语权视角下的化学学科排名,并探讨了该排名的特点。研究发现:我国化学领域的名牌大学在拥有的国际期刊编委数量方面还与国外一流大学存在着一定差距;编委排名与大学学科综合排名、论文数量、总被引频次、h 指数等科研产出指标均存在着积极显著的相关关系,但相关程度又各有不同。

  6. “Caught between a rock and a hard place” – between discourses of empowerment and solicitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn; Høj, Michaela; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern;

    2017-01-01

    communicative practices, we investigated the established normative organisational logics behind explanations and strategies related to non-attendance. We performed a critical discourse analysis on material collected through participatory research throughout 2015. Three discourses were identified: solicitude......, responsibility and youth discourse. Although the discourses were complex and entangled, they were used by all practitioners. Furthermore, some of the discourses, especially the responsibility and the solicitude discourses were inherently tension-filled, and practitioners experienced frustration in dealing...... with these tensions. The youth discourse can be understood as a coping mechanism to deal with these tensions because it distributes responsibility for non-attendance to general social and cultural processes....

  7. Science learning in the context of discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Silvania Sousa

    2013-06-01

    The original article by Kamberelis and Wehunt (2012) discusses an interesting and important research subject in science education as it focus on classroom interactions and the characteristics of the discourse production of interlocutors. The authors start from the premise that discourse heterogeneity is constitutive of social activities, which is supported by others like Mikhail Bakhtin (Speech genres and other late essays. University of Texas Press, Austin, 1981) and Erving Goffman (Frame analysis: an essay on the organization of experience. Harper and Row, London, 1974). They also present the definitions of three key elements that organize hybrid discourse: (a) lamination of multiple cultural frames, (b) shifting relations between people and their discourse, and (c) shifting power relations between people. Finally, the authors analyze how these three elements organize students' science discourse in the classroom and how it contributes to the creation of a micro-community of practice capable of helping the emergence of a disciplinary knowledge that is legitimized by and strengthens the identity of the group. In the present commentary, I discuss how Michael Foucault's (1970) concept of discursive procedure may help us to analyze the (often neglected) teacher's role in the development of hybrid discourse practices.

  8. Academic literacy in mathematics for English Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Moschkovich, JN

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. This paper uses a sociocultural conceptual framework to provide an integrated view of academic literacy in mathematics for English Learners. The proposed definition of academic literacy in mathematics includes three integrated components: mathematical proficiency, mathematical practices, and mathematical discourse. The paper uses an analysis of a classroom discussion to illustrate how the three components of academic literacy in mathematics are intertwined, how academic l...

  9. Alienation (Entfremdung and Strangeness (Fremdheit: two Western cultural paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Vasconcelos de Melo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alienation and strangeness could be understood as markers of cultural paradigms. The first term is related to modernity as the second is to postmodernity. One stands for identity, the other for alterity. While the existence of the phenomenon of alienation becomes disputable, the discourse of strangeness becomes intensified in the European academic sphere. In a way, the discourse of strangeness is labeled by a cultural critic, which tries to justify "strange" for centuries dispelled by the European culture. Meanwhile, a phenomenology of alienation is developed to re-structure the term. Both phenomena are connected insofar as alienation can be understood as a temporary moment of strangeness. Both theories turned out to be productive in literary analysis.

  10. Studies of Discourse and Governmentality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    have attempted to critically rethink Foucault’s ideas. This is the first volume that attempts to revisit and expand studies of governmentality by connecting it to the theories and methods of discourse analysis. The volume draws on different theoretical stances and methodological approaches including...... critical discourse analysis, conversation analysis, dialogic analysis, multimodal discourse analysis, the discourse-historical approach, corpus analysis and French discourse analysis. The volume is relevant to students and scholars in the fields of critical discourse studies, conversation analysis...

  11. "Uni Has a Different Language?…?to the Real World": Demystifying Academic Culture and Discourse for Students from Low Socioeconomic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Jade; Devlin, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    The Australian government has set ambitious targets for increased higher-education participation of people from low socioeconomic backgrounds. There is, thus, a pressing need to explore how best to empower these students with what they require to progress and succeed at university. The paper draws on a literature review and qualitative data from a…

  12. Political discourse in the news: democratizing responsibility or aestheticizing politics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chouliaraki, Syragoula Milner

    2000-01-01

    critical discourse analysis, deliberative democracy, media discourse, nationalism, recontextualization......critical discourse analysis, deliberative democracy, media discourse, nationalism, recontextualization...

  13. Discourse Systems and Aspirin Bottles: On Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James Paul

    1988-01-01

    Any use of language involves the following interlocking systems: (1) referential; (2) contextualization; and (3) ideology. These together constitute culturally viable "discourse systems." Examination of these systems as they operate in daily contexts reveals a paradox in the concept of literacy. (Author/BJV)

  14. Creativity in Recent Educational Discourse in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christine

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers an analysis of creativity in educational discourse in England over the Labour government's three terms in office. It traces the changing definitions and uses of the term in relation to agendas about raising standards in schools, promoting the arts and cultural education, and developing entrepreneurialism. In particular, it offers…

  15. Discourse Futures and Discourse-to-Come

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    assemblages, and ‘the future’, in order to develop a prefigurative discourse studies for social change that is relevant to the turbulent twenty first century. This exploration of key issues is illustrated with three case studies: (a) reality TV parenting programmes, (b) the “Earth Hour” global media campaign...... to profile in future research. This includes mapping the mediated discourses and social interactional encounters interleaved with the ever changing practices and powers of, for example, control, freedom, access, mobility, cleanliness, comfort, convenience, consumption, waste, recycling and reuse......, implementing and managing democratic social change and transformation, with an explicit focus on shaping a just future. Work in discourse studies will be compared and contrasted with contemporary ideas about governmentality, mobility, infrastructure, social movements, consumption practices, sociotechnical...

  16. Linking Discourse and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Tim; Jensen, Ole B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to explore how spatialities are contructed in spatial policy discourses and to explore how these construction processes might be conceptualised and analysed.......The aim of the paper is to explore how spatialities are contructed in spatial policy discourses and to explore how these construction processes might be conceptualised and analysed....

  17. Linking Discourse and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Tim; Jensen, Ole B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to explore how spatialities are contructed in spatial policy discourses and to explore how these construction processes might be conceptualised and analysed.......The aim of the paper is to explore how spatialities are contructed in spatial policy discourses and to explore how these construction processes might be conceptualised and analysed....

  18. Borders of Discourse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Janni Berthou

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to discuss a fundamentally different approach to discourse analysis by using a pragmatic point of departure for understanding use of language. Using an empirical example from a construction project it is discussed how material as well as societal dimensions of collaboration...... functions as borders for transformations of discourse – and these dimensions are most often intertwined...

  19. Discourses of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, Theo

    2009-01-01

    This lecture discusses the concept of lifestyle, which emerged in the field of marketing in the 1970s, as a new, and increasingly pervasive, discourse of identity cutting through older "demographic" discourses. Distributed by mediated experts and role models, and realized through the semiotics of "composites of connotation", it redraws the…

  20. Emotion in obesity discourse: understanding public attitudes towards regulations for obesity prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Lucy C; Warin, Megan J; Moore, Vivienne M; Street, Jackie M

    2016-05-01

    Intense concern about obesity in the public imagination and in political, academic and media discourses has catalysed advocacy efforts to implement regulatory measures to reduce the occurrence of obesity in Australia and elsewhere. This article explores public attitudes towards the possible implementation of regulations to address obesity by analysing emotions within popular discourses. Drawing on reader comments attached to obesity-relevant news articles published on Australian news and current affairs websites, we examine how popular anxieties about the 'obesity crisis' and vitriol directed at obese individuals circulate alongside understandings of the appropriate role of government to legitimise regulatory reform to address obesity. Employing Ahmed's theorisation of 'affective economies' and broader literature on emotional cultures, we argue that obesity regulations achieve popular support within affective economies oriented to neoliberal and individualist constructions of obesity. These economies preclude constructions of obesity as a structural problem in popular discourse; instead positioning anti-obesity regulations as a government-endorsed vehicle for discrimination directed at obese people. Findings implicate a new set of ethical challenges for those championing regulatory reform for obesity prevention.