WorldWideScience

Sample records for culturally tailored genetic

  1. Promoting a Culture of Tailoring for Systems Engineering Policy Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Van A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed an integrated systems engineering approach to promote a culture of tailoring for program and project policy requirements. MSFC's culture encourages and supports tailoring, with an emphasis on risk-based decision making, for enhanced affordability and efficiency. MSFC's policy structure integrates the various Agency requirements into a single, streamlined implementation approach which serves as a "one-stop-shop" for our programs and projects to follow. The engineers gain an enhanced understanding of policy and technical expectations, as well as lesson's learned from MSFC's history of spaceflight and science missions, to enable them to make appropriate, risk-based tailoring recommendations. The tailoring approach utilizes a standard methodology to classify projects into predefined levels using selected mission and programmatic scaling factors related to risk tolerance. Policy requirements are then selectively applied and tailored, with appropriate rationale, and approved by the governing authorities, to support risk-informed decisions to achieve the desired cost and schedule efficiencies. The policy is further augmented by implementation tools and lifecycle planning aids which help promote and support the cultural shift toward more tailoring. The MSFC Customization Tool is an integrated spreadsheet that ties together everything that projects need to understand, navigate, and tailor the policy. It helps them classify their project, understand the intent of the requirements, determine their tailoring approach, and document the necessary governance approvals. It also helps them plan for and conduct technical reviews throughout the lifecycle. Policy tailoring is thus established as a normal part of project execution, with the tools provided to facilitate and enable the tailoring process. MSFC's approach to changing the culture emphasizes risk-based tailoring of policy to achieve increased flexibility, efficiency

  2. Synthetic biology: Tailor-made genetic codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Michael C.; Noireaux, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Expanding the range of amino acids polymerizable by ribosomes could enable new functionalities to be added to polypeptides. Now, the genetic code has been reprogrammed using a reconstituted in vitro translation system to enable synthesis of unnatural peptides with unmatched flexibility.

  3. Optimal Path Planning for Mobile Robot Using Tailored Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xiao Xian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During routine inspecting, mobile robot may be requested to visit multiple locations to execute special tasks occasionally. This study aims at optimal path planning for multiple goals visiting task based on tailored genetic algorithm. The proposed algorithm will generate an optimal path that has the least idle time, which is proven to be more effective on evaluating a path in our previous work. In proposed algorithm, customized chromosome representing a path and genetic operators including repair and cut are developed and implemented. Afterwards, simulations are carried out to verify the effectiveness and applicability. Finally, analysis of simulation results is conducted and future work is addressed.

  4. Culturally tailored postsecondary nutrition and health education curricula for indigenous populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McConnell

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . In preparation for the initial offering of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF, Interior–Aleutians Campus Rural Nutrition Services (RNS program, a literature review was conducted to establish the need for the proposed program and to substantiate the methodology for delivering integrated, culturally tailored postsecondary education and extension to Alaska Natives and rural Alaskans. There was a striking absence of peer-reviewed journal articles describing culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations. Objective . To complete and discuss a current (November 2012 literature review for culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula designed and delivered for indigenous populations. Methods/Design . The author conducted an expanded online search that employed multiple configurations of key terms using Google and Google Scholar, as well as pertinent sources. The author located archived reports in person and contacted authors by email. Results . The expanded search produced a modest amount of additional literature for review. A disappointing number of publications describing or evaluating culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula in mainstream institutions are available. Related resources on culturally tailored extension and resources for the development and delivery of culturally tailored nutrition and health curricula were identified. Conclusions . The present results demonstrate a significant absence of literature on the topic, which may or may not indicate the absence of sufficient culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations. There are indications that culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations have the potential to effectively address certain issues of health literacy and health disparities.

  5. Native American Indian Adolescents: Response to a Culturally Tailored, School-Based Substance Abuse Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchell, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    Native American Indian adolescent substance abuse has been a longstanding health concern. There are few culturally tailored interventions for mild to moderate substance users. The purpose of this study was to measure the response of Native American Indian adolescents from the Plains tribal groups to a school-based culturally tailored substance…

  6. Measuring organisational-level Aboriginal cultural climate to tailor cultural safety strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladman, Justin; Ryder, Courtney; Walters, Lucie K

    2015-01-01

    Australian medical schools have taken on a social accountability mandate to provide culturally safe contexts in order to encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to engage in medical education and to ensure that present and future clinicians provide health services that contribute to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Many programs have sought to improve cultural safety through training at an individual level; however, it is well recognised that learners tend to internalise the patterns of behaviour to which they are commonly exposed. This project aimed to measure and reflect on the cultural climate of an Australian rural clinical school (RCS) as a whole and the collective attitudes of three different professional groups: clinicians, clinical academics and professional staff. The project then drew on Mezirow's Transformative Learning theory to design strategies to build on the cultural safety of the organisation. Clinicians, academic and professional staff at an Australian RCS were invited to participate in an online survey expressing their views on Aboriginal health using part of a previously validated tool. Survey response rate was 63%. All three groups saw Aboriginal health as a social priority. All groups recognised the fundamental role of community control in Aboriginal health; however, clinical academics were considerably more likely to disagree that the Western medical model suited the health needs of Aboriginal people. Clinicians were more likely to perceive that they treated Aboriginal patients the same as other patients. There was only weak evidence of future commitments to Aboriginal health. Importantly, clinicians, academics and professional staff demonstrated differences in their cultural safety profile which indicated the need for a tailored approach to cultural safety learning in the future. Through tailored approaches to cross-cultural training opportunities we are likely to ensure

  7. Culturally tailored postsecondary nutrition and health education curricula for indigenous populations

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Background. In preparation for the initial offering of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), Interior Aleutians Campus Rural Nutrition Services (RNS) program, a literature review was conducted to establish the need for the proposed program and to substantiate the methodology for delivering integrated, culturally tailored postsecondary education and extension to Alaska Natives and rural Alaskans. There was a striking absence of peer-reviewed journal articles describing culturally tailored ...

  8. Evaluation of a Culturally Tailored Skills Intervention for Latinos with Persistent Psychotic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausbach, Brent T.; Bucardo, Jesus; Cardenas, Veronica; McKibbin, Christine L.; Barrio, Concepcion; Goldman, Sherrill R.; Jeste, Dilip V.; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-nine Latino participants diagnosed with persistent psychotic disorders were assigned to either a culturally tailored skills-training intervention (n = 21), an equivalent non-tailored intervention (n = 15), or a community-based support group (n = 23). Participants completed a number of skills-based performance assessments (e.g., UCSD performance-based skills assessment; UPSA) and a well-being measure prior to and immediately post-treatment. Compared to those in the non-tailored intervention, participants receiving the tailored intervention showed significant improvement in several outcomes. These results indicate that Latino individuals with persistent psychotic disorders benefit from interventions which consider cultural values and mores. PMID:19779589

  9. Culturally-Tailored Smoking Cessation for American Indians: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shireman Theresa I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoking is the number one cause of preventable death among American Indian and Alaska Natives, AI/ANs. Two out of every five AI/AN will die from tobacco-related diseases if the current smoking rates of AI/ANs (40.8% persist. Currently, there is no proven, effective culturally-tailored smoking cessation program designed specifically for a heterogeneous population of AI. The primary aim of this group randomized clinical trial is to test the efficacy of "All Nations Breath of Life" (ANBL program compared to a non-tailored "Current Best Practices" smoking cessation program among AI smokers. Methods We will randomize 56 groups (8 smokers per group to the tailored program or non-tailored program for a total sample size of 448 American Indian smokers. All participants in the proposed study will be offered pharmacotherapy, regardless of group assignment. This study is the first controlled trial to examine the efficacy of a culturally-tailored smoking cessation program for American Indians. If the intervention is successful, the potential health impact is significant because the prevalence of smoking is the highest in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01106456

  10. Primary care physicians' concerns about offering a genetic test to tailor smoking cessation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Douglas E; Youatt, Emily J; Shields, Alexandra E

    2007-12-01

    We assessed the importance assigned by primary care physicians to eight factors influencing whether they would order a genetic test to individually tailor smoking cessation treatment. A random sample of United States primary care physicians was surveyed about how important each of eight factors were in the decision to order the test. Broadly, these factors included the ability of the test to improve treatment, the patient's reaction to test results, concern about misuse of test results, and the ability of the physician's office to manage informed consent for the test. Physicians indicated the most important factor they would consider in ordering a genetic test to tailor smoking cessation treatment was the ability to improve cessation outcomes. However, when told the genotype identified by the test was associated with stigma-inducing mental health conditions, physicians emphasized the importance of possible racial, insurance, and employment discrimination in their decisions. Primary care physicians are eager to improve smoking cessation treatment, but the collateral information generated by genetic testing to tailor treatment may be an impediment unless proper antidiscrimination measures are in place.

  11. LGBTQ Youth and Young Adult Perspectives on a Culturally Tailored Group Smoking Cessation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, Neill Bruce; Shuh, Alanna; Wong-Francq, Katy; Dash, Darly; Abramowicz, Aneta

    2017-01-25

    The prevalence of smoking among LGBTQ youth and young adults (YYAs) is much higher than that of non-LGBTQ young people. The current study explored LGBTQ YYA perceptions of a culturally tailored group smoking cessation counselling program, along with how the intervention could be improved. We conducted focus groups (n = 24) with 204 LGBTQ YYAs in Toronto and Ottawa, Canada. Open-ended questions focused on their feelings, likes and dislikes, concerns and additional ideas for a culturally tailored group cessation counselling intervention. Focus group transcripts were coded thematically and analyzed. Overall, YYAs were ambivalent towards the concept of a culturally tailored, group cessation counselling program. Although several participants were attracted to the LGBTQ friendly and social benefits of such a program (eg, good support system), many also had concerns. Particularly, the possibility that other group members might trigger them to smoke was a frequently stated issue. Focus group members also noted lack of motivation to attend the group, and that the group program may be inaccessible depending on where and when the program was offered. Several suggestions were made as to how to ameliorate the expressed issues related to inaccessibility or lack of attractiveness. This study is among the first to gain the perspectives of LGBTQ YYAs on culturally tailored group cessation strategies in Canada. We identified components of group cessation programs that are both favored and not favored among LGBTQ YYAs, as well as suggestions as to how to make group cessation programs more appealing. This study is particularly relevant as smoking cessation programs are one of the most commonly offered and published cessation interventions for the LGBTQ community, yet little is understood in terms of preferences of LGBTQ YYA smokers. Given the disparity in the prevalence of smoking among LGBTQ young people compared to their non-LGBTQ peers, research on effective intervention strategies

  12. Culturally Tailored Smoking Cessation for Arab American Male Smokers in Community Settings: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, Linda; Corcoran, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use is a serious public health problem among Arab Americans with limited English proficiency. The main goal of this study was to develop a culturally-tailored and linguistically-sensitive Arabic-language smoking cessation program. A secondary goal was to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting Arab Americans through a faith-based community organization which serves as a neighborhood social center for the city of Richmond’s Arab Americans. Eight first-generation Arab American men aged 2...

  13. Cultural tailoring for the promotion of Hepatitis B screening in Turkish Dutch: A protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. de Zwart (Onno); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); Y.J.J. van der Veen (Ytje)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) is an important health problem in the Turkish community in the Netherlands, and promotion of screening for HBV in this risk group is necessary. An individually tailored intervention and a culturally tailored intervention have been dev

  14. Culture and genetic screening in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegede, Ayodele S

    2009-12-01

    Africa is a continent in transition amidst a revival of cultural practices. Over previous years the continent was robbed of the benefits of medical advances by unfounded cultural practices surrounding its cultural heritage. In a fast moving field like genetic screening, discussions of social and policy aspects frequently need to take place at an early stage to avoid the dilemma encountered by Western medicine. This paper, examines the potential challenges to genetic screening in Africa. It discusses how cultural practices may affect genetic screening. It views genomics science as a culture which is trying to diffuse into another one. It argues that understanding the existing culture will help the diffusion process. The paper emphasizes the importance of genetic screening for Africa, by assessing the current level of burden of diseases in the continent and shows its role in reducing disease prevalence. The paper identifies and discusses the cultural challenges that are likely to confront genetic screening on the continent, such as the worldview, rituals and taboos, polygyny, culture of son preference and so on. It also discusses cultural practices that may promote the science such as inheritance practices, spouse selection practices and naming patterns. Factors driving the cultural challenges are identified and discussed, such as socialization process, patriarchy, gender, belief system and so on. Finally, the paper discusses the way forward and highlights the ethical considerations of doing genetic screening on the continent. However, the paper also recognizes that African culture is not monolithic and therefore makes a case for exceptions.

  15. Motivating underserved Vietnamese Americans to obtain colorectal cancer screening: evaluation of a culturally tailored DVD intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Tran, Marie; Jin, Seok Won; Bliss, Robin; Yeazel, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death among Vietnamese Americans, yet screening remains underutilized. We investigated the effectiveness of a culturally tailored DVD intervention in promoting CRC screening among unscreened Vietnamese Americans age 50 and over. Using a community-based participatory research approach, we conducted a trial comparing twenty-eight subjects who received a mailed DVD in Vietnamese, with twenty-eight subjects who received a mailed brochure in Vietnamese. Subjects completed telephone surveys at baseline, One-month, and one-year. The primary outcome was receipt of screening. Secondary measures were participants' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about CRC screening. Two focus groups explored the intervention's acceptability and effectiveness. At one year, CRC screening rates of 57.1% and 42.9% were observed in experimental and control group respectively (p=0.42), Subjects in both groups showed increased knowledge about CRC after one month. Focus group findings revealed that the DVD was an effective method of communicating information and would help promote screening. The findings suggest that culturally tailored, linguistically appropriate content is more important than the type of media used. This relatively low intensity, low cost intervention utilizing a DVD can be another useful method for outreach to the often hard-to-reach unscreened population.

  16. Avoiding a knowledge gap in a multiethnic statewide social marketing campaign: is cultural tailoring sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchthal, O Vanessa; Doff, Amy L; Hsu, Laura A; Silbanuz, Alice; Heinrich, Katie M; Maddock, Jay E

    2011-03-01

    In 2007, the State of Hawaii, Healthy Hawaii Initiative conducted a statewide social-marketing campaign promoting increased physical activity and nutrition. The campaign included substantial formative research to develop messages tailored for Hawaii's multiethnic Asian and Pacific Islander populations. The authors conducted a statewide random digital dialing telephone survey to assess the campaign's comparative reach among individuals with different ethnicities and different levels of education and income. This analysis suggests that the intervention was successful in reaching its target ethnic audiences. However, a knowledge gap related to the campaign appeared among individuals with incomes less than 130% of the poverty level and those with less than a high school education. These results varied significantly by message and the communication channel used. Recall of supermarket-based messages was significantly higher among individuals below 130% of the poverty level and those between 18 and 35 years of age, 2 groups that showed consistently lower recall of messages in other channels. Results suggest that cultural tailoring for ethnic audiences, although important, is insufficient for reaching low-income populations, and that broad-based social marketing campaigns should consider addressing socioeconomic status-related channel preferences in formative research and campaign design.

  17. Developing culturally sensitive cancer genetics communication aids for African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Bonnie Jeanne; Kinney, Anita Yeomans; Ellis, Sara Marie

    2003-04-15

    The goal of this project was to develop educational materials to communicate genetic health information in a culturally sensitive manner. These materials were designed to communicate information about cancer risk, genetic testing options, and health management options in an African American kindred with a known BRCA1 mutation. Educational materials were pilot-tested in four African American focus groups varying in socioeconomic status and gender. The audiotaped focus groups consisted of presentation of the educational materials, followed by a feedback session led by an African American facilitator. Qualitative analysis of the focus group transcripts identified important themes and the educational materials were revised in response to the participants' suggestions. The products included a booklet and a flip chart for use in educational sessions. Focus group participants recommended a substantial reduction in technical detail, and recommended that information be personalized and made relevant to the lives of the target population. Other critical themes included the importance of building trust in the medical system and avoiding words and images that have strong negative associations in the African American community. Strategies that were successful included nontechnical images to explain genetic concepts, clip art images to energize and personalize word slides, vibrant color, identifiably African American figures, and the development of themes relevant to many African Americans. The use of these materials in an ongoing study offering BRCA1 counseling and testing to a large, rural Louisiana-based kindred will provide additional feedback about the effectiveness of the culturally tailored genetic education and counseling materials.

  18. Follow-up effects of a tailored pre-counseling website with question prompt in breast cancer genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, Akke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Ausems, Margreet G E M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pre-counseling education helps counselees to prepare for breast cancer genetic counseling and might subsequently result in more positive experiences, improved cognitive outcomes and more experienced control. This study assessed the effects of a website with tailored information and a blan

  19. Cultural tailoring for the promotion of Hepatitis B screening in Turkish Dutch: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenbach Johan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hepatitis B virus infection (HBV is an important health problem in the Turkish community in the Netherlands, and promotion of screening for HBV in this risk group is necessary. An individually tailored intervention and a culturally tailored intervention have been developed to promote screening in first generation 16-40 year old Turkish immigrants. This paper describes the design of the randomized controlled trial, which will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the two tailored internet interventions as compared to generic online information on HBV, and to assess the added value of tailoring on socio-cultural factors. Methods/Design A cluster randomized controlled trial design, in which we invite all Rotterdam registered inhabitants born in Turkey, aged 16-40 (n = 10,000, to visit the intervention website is used. A cluster includes all persons living at one house address. The clusters are randomly assigned to either group A, B or C. On the website, persons eligible for testing will be selected through a series of exclusion questions and will then continue in the randomly assigned intervention group. Group A will receive generic information on HBV. Group B will receive individually tailored information related to social-cognitive determinants of screening. Group C will receive culturally tailored information which, next to social-cognitive factors, addresses cultural factors related to screening. Subsequently, participants may obtain a laboratory form, with which they can be tested free of charge at local health centres. The main outcome of the study is the percentage of eligible persons tested for HBV through to participation in one of the three groups. Measurements of the outcome behaviour and its determinants will be at baseline and five weeks post-intervention. Discussion This trial will provide information on the effectiveness of a culturally tailored internet intervention promoting HBV-screening in first

  20. Cultural targeting and tailoring of shared decision making technology: a theoretical framework for improving the effectiveness of patient decision aids in culturally diverse groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Dana L; Friend, John; Schapira, Marilyn; Stiggelbout, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Patient decision aids are known to positively impact outcomes critical to shared decision making (SDM), such as gist knowledge and decision preparedness. However, research on the potential improvement of these and other important outcomes through cultural targeting and tailoring of decision aids is very limited. This is the case despite extensive evidence supporting use of cultural targeting and tailoring to improve the effectiveness of health communications. Building on prominent psychological theory, we propose a two-stage framework incorporating cultural concepts into the design process for screening and treatment decision aids. The first phase recommends use of cultural constructs, such as collectivism and individualism, to differentially target patients whose cultures are known to vary on these dimensions. Decision aid targeting is operationalized through use of symbols and values that appeal to members of the given culture. Content dimensions within decision aids that appear particularly appropriate for targeting include surface level visual characteristics, language, beliefs, attitudes and values. The second phase of the framework is based on evidence that individuals vary in terms of how strongly cultural norms influence their approach to problem solving and decision making. In particular, the framework hypothesizes that differences in terms of access to cultural mindsets (e.g., access to interdependent versus independent self) can be measured up front and used to tailor decision aids. Thus, the second phase in the framework emphasizes the importance of not only targeting decision aid content, but also tailoring the information to the individual based on measurement of how strongly he/she is connected to dominant cultural mindsets. Overall, the framework provides a theory-based guide for researchers and practitioners who are interested in using cultural targeting and tailoring to develop and test decision aids that move beyond a "one-size fits all" approach

  1. Testing the Feasibility of a Culturally Tailored Breast Cancer Screening Intervention with Native Hawaiian Women in Rural Churches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Park, Soon H.; Ward, Margaret E.; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report on the feasibility of delivering a church-based breast cancer screening intervention tailored on the cultural strengths of rural-dwelling Hawaiians. Native Hawaiian women are burdened by disproportionately high mortality from breast cancer, which is attributed to low participation in routine mammography. Mammography is proven to…

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Culturally Tailored Educational Video: Changing Breast Cancer-Related Behaviors in Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Judy H.; Liang, Wenchi; Schwartz, Marc D.; Lee, Marion M.; Kreling, Barbara; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2008-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated a culturally tailored video guided by the health belief model to improve Chinese women's low rate of mammography use. Focus-group discussions and an advisory board meeting guided the video development. A 17-min video, including a soap opera and physician-recommendation segment, was made in Chinese languages. A…

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Culturally Tailored Educational Video: Changing Breast Cancer-Related Behaviors in Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Judy H.; Liang, Wenchi; Schwartz, Marc D.; Lee, Marion M.; Kreling, Barbara; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2008-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated a culturally tailored video guided by the health belief model to improve Chinese women's low rate of mammography use. Focus-group discussions and an advisory board meeting guided the video development. A 17-min video, including a soap opera and physician-recommendation segment, was made in Chinese languages. A…

  4. Genetics and culture: the geneticization thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Have, H A

    2001-01-01

    The concept of 'geneticization' has been introduced in the scholarly literature to describe the various interlocking and imperceptible mechanisms of interaction between medicine, genetics, society and culture. It is argued that Western culture currently is deeply involved in a process of geneticization. This process implies a redefinition of individuals in terms of DNA codes, a new language to describe and interpret human life and behavior in a genomic vocabulary of codes, blueprints, traits, dispositions, genetic mapping, and a gentechnological approach to disease, health and the body. This article analyses the thesis of 'geneticization'. Explaining the implications of the thesis, and discussing the critical refutations, it is argued that 'geneticization' primarily is a heuristic tool that can help to re-focus the moral debate on the implications of new genetic knowledge towards interpersonal relations, the power of medicine, the cultural context and social constraints, rather than emphasizing issues as personal autonomy and individual rights.

  5. Genetic drift of HIV populations in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yegor Voronin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Populations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 undergo a surprisingly large amount of genetic drift in infected patients despite very large population sizes, which are predicted to be mostly deterministic. Several models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but all of them implicitly assume that the process of virus replication itself does not contribute to genetic drift. We developed an assay to measure the amount of genetic drift for HIV populations replicating in cell culture. The assay relies on creation of HIV populations of known size and measurements of variation in frequency of a neutral allele. Using this assay, we show that HIV undergoes approximately ten times more genetic drift than would be expected from its population size, which we defined as the number of infected cells in the culture. We showed that a large portion of the increase in genetic drift is due to non-synchronous infection of target cells. When infections are synchronized, genetic drift for the virus is only 3-fold higher than expected from its population size. Thus, the stochastic nature of biological processes involved in viral replication contributes to increased genetic drift in HIV populations. We propose that appreciation of these effects will allow better understanding of the evolutionary forces acting on HIV in infected patients.

  6. THE EFFECT OF A CULTURALLY TAILORED SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION INTERVENTION WITH PLAINS INDIAN ADOLESCENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchell, Beverly A; Robbins, Leslie K; Lowe, John A; Hoke, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effects of incorporating tribal specific cultural beliefs into a tailored substance abuse prevention intervention for at risk rural Oklahoma Native American Indian (NAI) Plains adolescents. The 10 hour Native American Talking Circle Intervention, a school-based, group substance abuse prevention program, was implemented over a 8.5 week period and evaluated using a one group, pretest-posttest design. Measurements were from the Native Self-Reliance Questionnaire and the Substance Problems Scale from Global Appraisal of Individual Needs-Quick (GAIN-Q). One-tailed, paired sample t-tests demonstrated significant increase in self-reliance, from 86.227 to 92.204 (t (43) = -2.580, p = .007) and a decrease in substance abuse/use, from 2.265 to 1.265 (t (33) = 1.844, p = .007). The Native Talking Circle Intervention based on tribal-specific values and beliefs was shown to be effective with substance abuse/use at-risk NAI Plains tribal adolescents.

  7. Development of E-Info geneca: a website providing computer-tailored information and question prompt prior to breast cancer genetic counseling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Dulmen, S. van; Otten, R.; Bensing, J.M.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the stepwise development of the website ‘E-info geneca’. The website provides counselees in breast cancer genetic counseling with computer-tailored information and a question prompt prior to their first consultation. Counselees generally do not know what to expect from genetic

  8. Worldwide genetic and cultural change in human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanza, Nicole; Feldman, Marcus W

    2016-12-01

    Both genetic variation and certain culturally transmitted phenotypes show geographic signatures of human demographic history. As a result of the human cultural predisposition to migrate to new areas, humans have adapted to a large number of different environments. Migration to new environments alters genetic selection pressures, and comparative genetic studies have pinpointed numerous likely targets of this selection. However, humans also exhibit many cultural adaptations to new environments, such as practices related to clothing, shelter, and food. Human culture interacts with genes and the environment in complex ways, and studying genes and culture together can deepen our understanding of human evolution.

  9. Glossogeny and phylogeny: cultural evolution meets genetic evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2008-08-01

    Evolutionary theorists since Darwin have been interested in the parallels and interactions between biological and cultural evolution. Recent applications of empirical techniques originally developed to analyze molecular genetic data to linguistic data offer new insights into the historical evolution of language, revealing fascinating parallels between language change and biological evolution. This work offers considerable potential toward unified theories of genetic and cultural change.

  10. Factors influencing voluntary premarital medical examination in Zhejiang province, China: a culturally-tailored health behavioral model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Premarital medical examination (PME) compliance rate has dropped drastically since it became voluntary in China in 2003. This study aimed to establish a prediction model to be a theoretic framework for analyzing factors affecting PME compliance in Zhejiang province, China. Methods A culturally-tailored health behavioral model combining the Health Behavioral Model (HBM) and the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) was established to analyze the data from a cross-sectional questionnaire survey (n = 2,572) using the intercept method at the county marriage registration office in 12 counties from Zhejiang in 2010. Participants were grouped by high (n = 1,795) and low (n = 777) social desirability responding tendency (SDRT) by Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS). A structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to evaluate behavioral determinants for their influences on PME compliance in both high and low SDRT groups. Results 69.8% of the participants had high SDRT and tended to overly report benefits and underreport barriers, which may affect prediction accuracy on PME participation. In the low SDRT group, the prediction model showed the most influencing factor on PME compliance was behavioral intention, with standardized structural coefficients (SSCs) being 0.75 (P social environmental factors. The verified prediction model was tested to be an effective theoretic framework for the prediction of factors affecting voluntary PME compliance. It also should be noted that internationally available behavioral theories and models need to be culturally tailored to adapt to particular populations. This study has provided new insights for establishing a theoretical model to understand health behaviors in China. PMID:24972866

  11. Tailoring microfluidic systems for organ-like cell culture applications using multiphysics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmeyer, Britta; Schütte, Julia; Böttger, Jan; Gebhardt, Rolf; Stelzle, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Replacing animal testing with in vitro cocultures of human cells is a long-term goal in pre-clinical drug tests used to gain reliable insight into drug-induced cell toxicity. However, current state-of-the-art 2D or 3D cell cultures aiming at mimicking human organs in vitro still lack organ-like morphology and perfusion and thus organ-like functions. To this end, microfluidic systems enable construction of cell culture devices which can be designed to more closely resemble the smallest functional unit of organs. Multiphysics simulations represent a powerful tool to study the various relevant physical phenomena and their impact on functionality inside microfluidic structures. This is particularly useful as it allows for assessment of system functions already during the design stage prior to actual chip fabrication. In the HepaChip®, dielectrophoretic forces are used to assemble human hepatocytes and human endothelial cells in liver sinusoid-like structures. Numerical simulations of flow distribution, shear stress, electrical fields and heat dissipation inside the cell assembly chambers as well as surface wetting and surface tension effects during filling of the microchannel network supported the design of this human-liver-on-chip microfluidic system for cell culture applications. Based on the device design resulting thereof, a prototype chip was injection-moulded in COP (cyclic olefin polymer). Functional hepatocyte and endothelial cell cocultures were established inside the HepaChip® showing excellent metabolic and secretory performance.

  12. Culturally-Tailored Education Programs to Address Health Literacy Deficits and Pervasive Health Disparities among Hispanics in Rural Shelbyville, Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Irma N; Ramos, Kenneth S; Boerner, Aisa; He, Qiang; Tavera-Garcia, Marco A

    2013-11-16

    This investigation was conducted to evaluate the impact of culturally-tailored education on health knowledge among Hispanic residents of rural, Shelbyville, KY. The program identified specific pathways to address health literacy deficits and disparities identified through a community-wide health assessment completed in 2010. A total of 43 Hispanic males who shared deficiencies in community-wide health infrastructure were enrolled in the program. The curriculum included an introductory session followed by five, subject-specific, sessions offered on a weekly basis from February to April 2011. Pre/post-test assessments showed marked improvement in knowledge base for all participants after each session, most notably related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The group reconvened in January 2012 for follow-up instruction on cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as global assessment of knowledge retention over a nine-month period. Comparisons of pre/post testing in cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as global health-related knowledge showed significant gains for all parameters. Health education programs that embrace perceptions of the community of their own health, and that integrate knowledge into culturally-sensitive education, significantly improved health knowledge among Hispanic residents in rural Kentucky. Such gains may translate into sustainable improvements in health literacy and help reduce health disparities.

  13. The need for a culturally-tailored gatekeeper training intervention program in preventing suicide among Indigenous peoples: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra Farah Nasir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a leading cause of death among Indigenous youth worldwide. The aim of this literature review was to determine the cultural appropriateness and identify evidence for the effectiveness of current gatekeeper suicide prevention training programs within the international Indigenous community. Method Using a systematic strategy, relevant databases and targeted resources were searched using the following terms: ‘suicide’, ‘gatekeeper’, ‘training’, ‘suicide prevention training’, ‘suicide intervention training’ and ‘Indigenous’. Other internationally relevant descriptors for the keyword “Indigenous” (e.g. “Maori”, “First Nations”, “Native American”, “Inuit”, “Metis” and “Aboriginal” were also used. Results Six articles, comprising five studies, met criteria for inclusion; two Australian, two from USA and one Canadian. While pre and post follow up studies reported positive outcomes, this was not confirmed in the single randomised controlled trial identified. However, the randomised controlled trial may have been underpowered and contained participants who were at higher risk of suicide pre-training. Conclusion Uncontrolled evidence suggests that gatekeeper training may be a promising suicide intervention in Indigenous communities but needs to be culturally tailored to the target population. Further RCT evidence is required.

  14. The need for a culturally-tailored gatekeeper training intervention program in preventing suicide among Indigenous peoples: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Bushra Farah; Hides, Leanne; Kisely, Steve; Ranmuthugala, Geetha; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Black, Emma; Gill, Neeraj; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Toombs, Maree

    2016-10-21

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among Indigenous youth worldwide. The aim of this literature review was to determine the cultural appropriateness and identify evidence for the effectiveness of current gatekeeper suicide prevention training programs within the international Indigenous community. Using a systematic strategy, relevant databases and targeted resources were searched using the following terms: 'suicide', 'gatekeeper', 'training', 'suicide prevention training', 'suicide intervention training' and 'Indigenous'. Other internationally relevant descriptors for the keyword "Indigenous" (e.g. "Maori", "First Nations", "Native American", "Inuit", "Metis" and "Aboriginal") were also used. Six articles, comprising five studies, met criteria for inclusion; two Australian, two from USA and one Canadian. While pre and post follow up studies reported positive outcomes, this was not confirmed in the single randomised controlled trial identified. However, the randomised controlled trial may have been underpowered and contained participants who were at higher risk of suicide pre-training. Uncontrolled evidence suggests that gatekeeper training may be a promising suicide intervention in Indigenous communities but needs to be culturally tailored to the target population. Further RCT evidence is required.

  15. Turn off the TV and dance! Participation in culturally tailored health interventions: implications for obesity prevention among Mexican American girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Kathryn J; Mendoza, Sonia; Fernández, María; Haydel, K Farish; Fujimoto, Michelle; Tirumalai, Evelyn C; Robinson, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    Our evaluation study identifies facilitators and barriers to participation among families participating in the treatment arm of Stanford ECHALE. This culturally tailored obesity prevention trial consisted of a combined intervention with two main treatment components: 1) a folkloric dance program; and 2) a screen time reduction curriculum designed for 7-11 year old Latinas and their families. We conducted 83 interviews (40 parents and 43 girls) in participant homes after 6 months of enrollment in the ECHALE trial. The Spradley ethnographic method and NVivo 8.0 were used to code and analyze narrative data. Three domains emerged for understanding participation: 1) family cohesiveness; 2) perceived gains; and 3) culturally relevant program structure. Two domains emerged for non-participation: program requirements and perceived discomforts. Non-parametric, Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the relationships with participant attendance data. Sustained participation was most strongly influenced by the domain perceived gains when parents reported better self-esteem, confidence, improved attitude, improved grades, etc. (Spearman r = .45, P = .003). Alternatively, under the domain, perceived discomforts, with subthemes such as child bullying, participation in the combined intervention was inversely associated with attendance (Spearman r = -.38, P = .02). Family-centered, school-based, community obesity prevention programs that focus on tangible short-term gains for girls may generate greater participation rates, enhance social capital, and promote community empowerment. These factors can be emphasized in future obesity prevention program design and implementation.

  16. 3D printing – a key technology for tailored biomedical cell culture lab ware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmieder Florian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Today’s 3D printing technologies offer great possibilities for biomedical researchers to create their own specific laboratory equipment. With respect to the generation of ex vivo vascular perfusion systems this will enable new types of products that will embed complex 3D structures possibly coupled with cell loaded scaffolds closely reflecting the in-vivo environment. Moreover this could lead to microfluidic devices that should be available in small numbers of pieces at moderate prices. Here, we will present first results of such 3D printed cell culture systems made from plastics and show their use for scaffold based applications.

  17. Short-term effectiveness of a culturally tailored educational intervention on foot self-care among type 2 diabetes patients in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa Adarmouch

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: There was a general improvement in foot-care practices after the intervention. Our findings suggest the role of literacy and previous patient education in shaping the observed variation. Culturally tailored interventions targeting other disease management domains are needed in our context.

  18. Satisfaction with a 2-day communication skills course culturally tailored for medical specialists in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L; Alyafei, Khalid; Afana, Abdelhamid; Al-Romaihi, Sheyma; Yassin, Mohammed; Elnashar, Maha; Al-Arab, Banan; Al-Khal, Abdullatif

    2017-01-01

    Health-care communication skills training may be particularly needed in the Arabian Gulf countries because of the variety of cultures within the physician and patient populations. This study describes the implementation and results of a communication skills training program for physicians in Qatar that assessed previous training, and effect of previous training on participants' course evaluations. We conducted a 2-day communication skills training course covering seven culturally adapted modules. Educational strategies included large and small group work with the standardized patient, demonstration videos, and lectures. At the end, participants completed a course evaluation survey. Data analysis performed with SPSS; frequencies and percentages were calculated, and Chi-square test applied to evaluate statistical significance. A total of 410 physicians in Qatar have participated in the course over a period of 2 years. Evaluation ratings of the course were high. Participants rated the module on Breaking Bad News as the most useful, and the small group role-play as the most helpful course component. One-third of participants had previously participated in experiential communication skills training. There was no association between previous experience and evaluation of the course. Physicians in Qatar positively evaluated a 2-day communication skills course, though the majority of participants did not have any previous exposure to experiential communication skills training.

  19. Assessing the cross-cultural applicability of tailored advertising: a comparative study between the Netherlands and Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maslowska, E.; Smit, E.G.; van den Putte, B.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of tailored advertising in two European Union member states: a longstanding member with a long history of advertising, the Netherlands; and a new member with a shorter advertising tradition, Poland. The positive effects of tailored advertising are hypothesised

  20. Assessing the cross-cultural applicability of tailored advertising: a comparative study between the Netherlands and Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maslowska, E.; Smit, E.G.; van den Putte, B.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of tailored advertising in two European Union member states: a longstanding member with a long history of advertising, the Netherlands; and a new member with a shorter advertising tradition, Poland. The positive effects of tailored advertising are hypothesised t

  1. Statistical Inference of Biometrical Genetic Model With Cultural Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaobo; Ji, Tian; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Heping; Zhong, Shouqiang

    2013-01-01

    Twin and family studies establish the foundation for studying the genetic, environmental and cultural transmission effects for phenotypes. In this work, we make use of the well established statistical methods and theory for mixed models to assess cultural transmission in twin and family studies. Specifically, we address two critical yet poorly understood issues: the model identifiability in assessing cultural transmission for twin and family data and the biases in the estimates when sub-models are used. We apply our models and theory to two real data sets. A simulation is conducted to verify the bias in the estimates of genetic effects when the working model is a sub-model.

  2. ?Can you keep it real?? : Practical, and culturally tailored lifestyle recommendations by Mexican American women diagnosed with type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Benavides-Vaello, Sandra; Brown, Sharon A.; Vandermause, Roxanne

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this article is to engage clinicians in a dialogue about ideas on how to provide more specific, contextually relevant, practical and culturally tailored diabetes self-management recommendations as suggested by Mexican-American women diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Current diabetes self-management recommendations, targeting Mexican Americans in particular, remain largely broad (?reduce your calorie intake? or ?cut back on carbs?), overly ambitious (?stop eating tortil...

  3. Conservation of Genetic Diversity in Culture Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAXIM A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The most important international document relating to the conservation of biodiversity is one adopted by theUN in Rio de Janeiro (1992 that "Convention on Biodiversity". Based on this agreement, the EU has taken a series ofmeasures to reduce genetic erosion in agriculture, which grew with the expansion of industrialized agriculture.Throughout its existence, mankind has used some 10,000 growing plant species. According to FAO statistics, today,90% of food production is ensured by some 120 growing plant species. In addition to drastic reduction in specificdiversity, the advent of industrialized agriculture has generated a process of strong genetic erosion. Old varieties andlocal varieties of crops have mostly been affected, in favour of "modern" varieties. Landraces are characterized by highheterogenity. They have the advantage of being much better adapted to biotic and abiotic stress conditions (diseases,pests, drought, low in nutrients, etc. and have excellent taste qualities, which can justify a higher price recovery thancommercial varieties. Thanks to these features, these crops need small inputs, which correspond to the concept ofsustainable development. Landraces are an invaluable genetic potential for obtaining new varieties of plants and are bestsuited for crop cultivation in ecological systems, becoming more common. Also, for long term food security in thecontext of global warming, rich genetic diversity will be require. “In situ” and “ex situ” conservation are the two majorstrategies used in the conservation of plant genetic resources. There is a fundamental difference between these twostrategies: “ex situ” conservation involves sampling, transfer and storage of a particular species population away fromthe original location, while “in situ” conservation (in their natural habitat implies that the varieties of interest,management and monitoring their place of origin takes place in the community to which they belong. These

  4. Design of a comparative effectiveness evaluation of a culturally tailored versus standard community-based smoking cessation treatment program for LGBT smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Alicia K; McConnell, Elizabeth A; Li, Chien-Ching; Vargas, Maria C; King, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Smoking prevalence rates among the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population are significantly higher than the general population. However, there is limited research on smoking cessation treatments in this group, particularly on culturally targeted interventions. Moreover, there are few interventions that address culturally specific psychosocial variables (e.g., minority stress) that may influence outcomes. This paper describes the protocol for a comparative effectiveness trial testing an evidence-based smoking cessation program, Courage to Quit, against a culturally tailored version for LGBT smokers, and examines the role of culturally specific psychosocial variables on cessation outcomes. To examine the effectiveness of a culturally targeted versus standard smoking cessation intervention, the study utilizes a 2-arm block, randomized, control trial (RCT) design. Adult LGBT participants (n = 400) are randomized to one of the two programs each consisting of a six-session group program delivered in a community center and an eight week supply of the transdermal nicotine patch. Four individualized telephone counseling sessions occur at weeks 2, 5, 7, and 9, at times of greatest risk for relapse. Study outcome measures are collected at baseline, and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post quit date. Primary outcomes are expired air carbon monoxide verified 7-day point-prevalence quit rates at each measurement period. Secondary outcomes assess changes in cravings, withdrawal symptoms, smoking cessation self-efficacy, and treatment adherence. Additionally, study staff examines the role of culturally specific psychosocial variables on cessation outcomes using path analysis. Determining the efficacy of culturally specific versus standard evidence based approaches to smoking cessation is a critical issue facing the field today. This study provides a model for the development and implementation of a culturally tailored smoking cessation intervention for LGBT

  5. Studies on Genetic Transformatiom of Embryogenic Suspension Cultures of Sweetpotato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Hong; LIU Qing-chang

    2003-01-01

    Genetic transformation of embryogenic suspension cultures of sweetpotato cv. Lizixiang wasconducted by using Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A208SE harboring the binary vectors pROA93 with β-glucronidase (GUS) and neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT Ⅱ ) genes. The results indicated that embryogenicsuspension cultures precultured for 1 -3 d were suitable for the transformation. The optimal cocultivation timewas 4 - 5 d. The optimal concentration of kanamycin was 50-75 mg L-1 for suspension culture and 100 mg L-1for embryogenic callus proliferation and plant regeneration. The optimal concentration of carbencillin was 100mg L-1. Transgenic plants identified with GUS assays and PCR analyses were obtained.

  6. Genetic and cultural kinship among the Lamaleran whale hunters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvard, Michael

    2011-07-01

    The human ability to form large, coordinated groups is among our most impressive social adaptations. Larger groups facilitate synergistic economies of scale for cooperative breeding, such economic tasks as group hunting, and success in conflict with other groups. In many organisms, genetic relationships provide the structure for sociality to evolve via the process of kin selection, and this is the case, to a certain extent, for humans. But assortment by genetic affiliation is not the only mechanism that can bring people together. Affinity based on symbolically mediated and socially constructed identity, or cultural kinship, structures much of human ultrasociality. This paper examines how genetic kinship and two kinds of cultural kinship--affinal kinship and descent--structure the network of cooperating whale hunters in the village of Lamalera, Indonesia. Social network analyses show that each mechanism of assortment produces characteristic networks of different sizes, each more or less conducive to the task of hunting whales. Assortment via close genetic kin relationships (r = 0.5) produces a smaller, denser network. Assortment via less-close kin relations (r = 0.125) produces a larger but less dense network. Affinal networks are small and diffuse; lineage networks are larger, discrete, and very dense. The roles that genetic and cultural kinship play for structuring human sociality is discussed in the context of these results.

  7. Introduction: integrating genetic and cultural evolutionary approaches to language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; McElligott, Alan G; Adger, David

    2011-04-01

    The papers in this special issue of Human Biology address recent research in the field of language evolution, both the genetic evolution of the language faculty and the cultural evolution of specific languages. While both of these areas have received increasing interest in recent years, there is also a need to integrate these somewhat separate efforts and explore the relevant gene-culture coevolutionary interactions. Here we summarize the individual contributions, set them in the context of the wider literature, and identify outstanding future research questions. The first set of papers concerns the comparative study of nonhuman communication in primates and birds from both a behavioral and neurobiological perspective, revealing evidence for several common language-related traits in various nonhuman species and providing clues as to the evolutionary origin and function of the human language faculty. The second set of papers discusses the consequences of viewing language as a culturally evolving system in its own right, including claims that this removes the need for strong genetic biases for language acquisition, and that phylogenetic evolutionary methods can be used to reconstruct language histories. We conclude by highlighting outstanding areas for future research, including identifying the precise selection pressures that gave rise to the language faculty in ancestral hominin species, and determining the strength, domain specificity, and origin of the cultural transmission biases that shape languages as they pass along successive generations of language learners.

  8. GENETIC DIVERSITY AND THE ORIGINS OF CULTURAL FRAGMENTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Quamrul; Galor, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance attributed to the effects of diversity on the stability and prosperity of nations, the origins of the uneven distribution of ethnic and cultural fragmentation across countries have been underexplored. Building on the role of deeply-rooted biogeographical forces in comparative development, this research empirically demonstrates that genetic diversity, predominantly determined during the prehistoric “out of Africa” migration of humans, is an underlying cause of various existing manifestations of ethnolinguistic heterogeneity. Further exploration of this uncharted territory may revolutionize the understanding of the effects of deeply-rooted factors on economic development and the composition of human capital across the globe. PMID:25506084

  9. Deaf Adults' Reasons for Genetic Testing Depend on Cultural Affiliation: Results from a Prospective, Longitudinal Genetic Counseling and Testing Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E.; Fox, Michelle; Dutton, Loriel; Tullis, LeeElle; Linden, Joyce; Kobayashi, Yoko; Zhou, Jin; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne W.; Palmer, Christina G. S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between cultural affiliation and deaf adults' motivations for genetic testing for deafness in the first prospective, longitudinal study to examine the impact of genetic counseling and genetic testing on deaf adults and the deaf community. Participants (n = 256), classified as affiliating with hearing, Deaf,…

  10. Development of a culturally tailored Internet intervention promoting hepatitis B screening in the Turkish community in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Veen, Ytje J. J.; Van Empelen, Pepijn; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infections are an important health problem in the Turkish community in the Netherlands. Screening for hepatitis B should be promoted through public health interventions, which take into account the socio-cultural and behavioural determinants that influence screening. The Interventi

  11. Culturally informed and flexible family-based treatment for adolescents: a tailored and integrative treatment for Hispanic youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, Daniel A; Mena, Maite P

    2009-06-01

    The increasing utilization of evidence-based treatments has highlighted the need for treatment development efforts that can craft interventions that are effective with Hispanic substance abusing youth and their families. The list of evidence-based treatments is extremely limited in its inclusion of interventions that are explicitly responsive to the unique characteristics and treatment needs of young Hispanics and that have been rigorously tested with this population. Some treatments that have been tested with Hispanics do not articulate the manner in which cultural characteristics and therapy processes interact. Other treatments have emphasized the important role of culture but have not been tested rigorously. The value of well designed interventions built upon an appreciation for unique patient characteristics was highlighted by Beutler et al. (1996) when they argued that "psychotherapy is comprised of a set of complex tasks, and practitioners need comprehensive knowledge of how different processes used in psychotherapy interact with patient characteristics in order to make treatment decisions that will maximize and optimize therapeutic power" (p. 30). A focus on how treatment processes interact with patient characteristics is particularly relevant in the Hispanic population because of the considerable heterogeneity beneath the Hispanic umbrella. Our new program of clinical research focuses on articulating how the varied profiles with regard to immigration stressors, acculturation processes, values clashes, sense of belonging to the community, discrimination, and knowledge about issues important to adolescent health can be more effectively addressed by a culturally informed treatment.

  12. Effectiveness of a Group-Based Culturally Tailored Lifestyle Intervention Program on Changes in Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes among Asian Indians in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupal M. Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used an experimental, pretest-posttest control group repeated measures design to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based culturally appropriate lifestyle intervention program to reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM among Gujarati Asian Indians (AIs in an urban community in the US. Participants included 70 adult AIs in the greater Houston metropolitan area. The primary outcomes were reduction in weight and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c and improvement in physical activity. Participants were screened for risk factors and randomly assigned to a 12-week group-based lifestyle intervention program (n=34 or a control group (n=36 that received standard print material on diabetes prevention. Participants also completed clinical measures and self-reported questionnaires about physical activity, social, and lifestyle habits at 0, 3, and 6 months. No significant baseline differences were noted between groups. While a significant decline in weight and increase in physical activity was observed in all participants, the intervention group lowered their HbA1c (p<0.0005 and waist circumference (p=0.04 significantly as compared to the control group. Findings demonstrated that participation in a culturally tailored, lifestyle intervention program in a community setting can effectively reduce weight, waist circumference, and HbA1c among Gujarati AIs living in the US.

  13. Unity in diversity: results of a randomized clinical culturally tailored pilot HIV prevention intervention trial in Baltimore, Maryland, for African American men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Karin; Kuramoto, Satoko J; German, Danielle; Fields, Errol; Spikes, Pilgrim S; Patterson, Jocelyn; Latkin, Carl

    2013-06-01

    Unity in Diversity was a randomized controlled trial of a culturally tailored HIV prevention intervention for African American men who have sex with men. The intervention condition was six group-based sessions and one individual session. The control condition was a single-session HIV prevention review. Participants were aged 18 years or older, identified as African American/Black race, reported having at least two sex partners in the prior 90 days (at least one of whom must be a male partner), unprotected anal sex with male partner in the prior 90 days, and willing to test for HIV. Retention exceeded 95% at 3-month follow-up. Results of multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for baseline risk, HIV status, and health insurance indicate intervention efficacy in decreasing the number of male sex partners and marginal effects on condom use with male partners and HIV-negative/unknown partners. Specifically, intervention condition was associated with increased odds of zero male sex partners (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26-7.28), condom use with male partners (AOR = 2.64, 95% CI = 0.95-7.36), and HIV-negative/unknown status partners (AOR = 3.19, 95% CI = 0.98-10.38) at follow-up. These results contribute to the limited number of culturally appropriate models of HIV prevention intervention that are urgently needed for African American men who have sex with men to address their persistently high rates of HIV.

  14. Tailoring the refractive index of ITO thin films by genetic algorithm optimization of the reactive DC-sputtering parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari Pour, Elnaz; Shafai, Cyrus

    2017-02-01

    The variation of oxygen concentration in the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) structure highly impacts its electrical and optical characteristics. In this work, we investigated the effect of oxygen partial flow (O2/O2+Ar) and deposition pressure (p) on the refractive index (n) of reactive sputtered ITO thin films. A statistical study with a Genetic Algorithm (GA) optimization was implemented to find optimal deposition conditions for obtaining particular refractive indices. Several samples of ITO thin films with refractive indices ranging from 1.69 - 2.1 were deposited by DC sputtering technique at various oxygen concentrations and deposition pressures, in order to develop the statistical database. A linear polynomial surface was locally fitted to the data of O2/O2+Ar, p, and n of deposited films. This surface was then used as the fitness function of the GA. By defining the desired n as the objective value of the GA, the optimized deposition conditions can be found. Two cases were experimentally demonstrated, with the GA determining the needed process parameters to deposit ITO with n=2.2 and n=1.6. Measured results were very close to desired values, with n=2.25 and n=1.62, demonstrating the effectiveness of this method for predicting needed reactive sputtering conditions to enable arbitrary refractive indices.

  15. Addressing health disparities through patient education: the development of culturally-tailored health education materials at Puentes de Salud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Isobel; O'Brien, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    The availability of culturally appropriate written health information is essential for promoting health in diverse populations. Lack of English fluency has been shown to negatively impact health outcomes for Latinos in the United States. The authors conducted a needs assessment at a clinic serving Latino immigrants, focusing on patients' health and previous experiences with written health information. Based on these results and a literature review, we developed 10 Spanish language brochures to better serve the target population. This article outlines the process of developing and implementing this intervention, which can serve as a model for similar projects targeting diverse populations.

  16. Exploring why junk foods are 'essential' foods and how culturally tailored recommendations improved feeding in Egyptian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavle, Justine A; Mehanna, Sohair; Saleh, Gulsen; Fouad, Mervat A; Ramzy, Magda; Hamed, Doaa; Hassan, Mohamed; Khan, Ghada; Galloway, Rae

    2015-07-01

    In Egypt, the double burden of malnutrition and rising overweight and obesity in adults mirrors the transition to westernized diets and a growing reliance on energy-dense, low-nutrient foods. This study utilized the trials of improved practices (TIPs) methodology to gain an understanding of the cultural beliefs and perceptions related to feeding practices of infants and young children 0-23 months of age and used this information to work in tandem with 150 mothers to implement feasible solutions to feeding problems in Lower and Upper Egypt. The study triangulated in-depth interviews (IDIs) with mothers participating in TIPs, with IDIs with 40 health providers, 40 fathers and 40 grandmothers to gain an understanding of the influence and importance of the role of other caretakers and health providers in supporting these feeding practices. Study findings reveal high consumption of junk foods among toddlers, increasing in age and peaking at 12-23 months of age. Sponge cakes and sugary biscuits are not perceived as harmful and considered 'ideal' common complementary foods. Junk foods and beverages often compensate for trivial amounts of food given. Mothers are cautious about introducing nutritious foods to young children because of fears of illness and inability to digest food. Although challenges in feeding nutritious foods exist, mothers were able to substitute junk foods with locally available and affordable foods. Future programming should build upon cultural considerations learned in TIPs to address sustainable, meaningful changes in infant and young child feeding to reduce junk foods and increase dietary quality, quantity and frequency.

  17. SisterTalk: final results of a culturally tailored cable television delivered weight control program for Black women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risica, Patricia Markham; Gans, Kim M; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Kirtania, Usree; Lasater, Thomas M

    2013-12-27

    Obesity among Black women continues to exceed that of other women. Most weight loss programs created without reference to specific cultural contexts are less effective for Black than White women. Weight control approaches accessible to Black women and adapted to relevant cultural contexts are important for addressing this problem. This paper reports the final results of SisterTalk, the randomized controlled trial of a cable TV weight control program oriented toward Black women. A five group design included a comparison group and a 2 × 2 factorial comparison of a) interactive vs. passive programming and b) telephone social support vs no telephone support, with 12 weekly initial cable TV programs followed by 4 monthly booster videos. At baseline, 3, 8, and 12 months post randomization, telephone and in person surveys were administered on diet, physical activity, and physical measurements of height and weight were taken to calculate body mass index (BMI). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine differences over time, and between treatment and comparison groups. Dose variables reflecting use of the TV/video and written materials were also assessed. At 3 months, BMI, weight, and dietary fat were significantly lower and physical activity significantly higher among women exposed to the Cable TV intervention compared to the wait-list comparison group. Significant dietary fat differences were still observed at 8 and 12 month evaluations, but not BMI or physical activity differences. Main effects were not observed for interactive programming or enhanced social support at any time point. Within the intervention group, higher watching of the TV series and higher reading of educational materials were both (separately) associated with significantly lower dietary fat. Cable TV was an effective delivery channel to assist Black women with weight control, increasing physical activity and decreasing dietary fat during an initial intervention period, but only dietary

  18. Deaf Adults’ Reasons for Genetic Testing Depend on Cultural Affiliation: Results From a Prospective, Longitudinal Genetic Counseling and Testing Study

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E.; Fox, Michelle; Dutton, Loriel; Tullis, LeeElle; Linden, Joyce; Kobayashi, Yoko; Zhou, Jin; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne W.; Palmer, Christina G. S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between cultural affiliation and deaf adults’ motivations for genetic testing for deafness in the first prospective, longitudinal study to examine the impact of genetic counseling and genetic testing on deaf adults and the deaf community. Participants (n = 256), classified as affiliating with hearing, Deaf, or both communities, rated interest in testing for 21 reasons covering 5 life domains. Findings suggest strong interest in testing to learn why they ...

  19. NUTRITION AND FITNESS: CULTURAL, GENETIC AND METABOLIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Selected Proceedings of the International Congress and Exhibition on Nutrition, Fitness and Health, Shanghai, November 30 to December 2, 2006 The book presents selected papers from the International Congress and Exhibition on Nutrition, Fitness and Health held in Shanghai, China from November 30 to December 2, 2006. PURPOSE This volume is designed to update interested parties on the nutrition and fitness issues from the cultural, genetic and metabolic point of views. FEATURES The book starts with a keynote presentation on nutrition, fitness and the concept of positive health from ancient times to the present. Subsequently papers focusing on the role of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in health and disease follow. Other topics addressed are non-conventional genetic risk factors for cardiovascular disease; the impact of the APO E genotype on health, nutrition and fitness; nutrition in the prevention of chronic disease; and, the connection between exercise and obesity. The formation is concluded by the papers on nutritional risk factors for gastrointestinal cancers, Mediterranean diets as a global resource in health and disease, and the role of politics and politicians on the relevant issues. AUDIENCE Obviously; dieticians, nutritionists, geneticists and exercise physiologists will be interested in these proceedings since the book covers broadly their field. Then again; health care providers, historians, general practitioners and scientists in industry and government might benefit as well. ASSESSMENT It is safe to say that this volume represent a helpful source for anybody who is involved with Nutrition, Fitness and Health in one way or another

  20. Improvement in Depressive Symptoms Among Hispanic/Latinos Receiving a Culturally Tailored IMPACT and Problem-Solving Intervention in a Community Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Álvaro; González, Patricia; Castañeda, Sheila F; Simmons, Alan; Buelna, Christina; Lemus, Hector; Talavera, Gregory A

    2015-05-01

    The present study investigated whether a culturally-tailored problem-solving intervention delivered by a trained depression care specialist (DCS) would improve depressive symptoms over a 6 month period among Hispanic/Latino patients in a federally-qualified community health center by the California-Mexico border. Participants included 189 low income Hispanic/Latino patients of Mexican heritage. Based on the improving mood-promoting access to collaborative treatment (IMPACT) evidence-based treatment, patients received evidence-based problem-solving therapy. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) was administered to assess changes in self-reported depressive symptoms between baseline and monthly for a 6-month follow up period. The majority of participants were female (72.5%) with a mean age of 52.5 (SD = 11.7). The mean PHQ-9 at baseline was 16.9 (SD = 4.0) and at the 6-month follow-up, the average PHQ-9 decreased to 9.9 (SD = 5.7). A linear mixed model analysis showed significant improvement in PHQ-9 scores over a 6 month period (F = 124.1; p Hispanic/Latino low-income patients.

  1. "Can you keep it real?" : Practical, and culturally tailored lifestyle recommendations by Mexican American women diagnosed with type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides-Vaello, Sandra; Brown, Sharon A; Vandermause, Roxanne

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to engage clinicians in a dialogue about ideas on how to provide more specific, contextually relevant, practical and culturally tailored diabetes self-management recommendations as suggested by Mexican-American women diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Current diabetes self-management recommendations, targeting Mexican Americans in particular, remain largely broad ("reduce your calorie intake" or "cut back on carbs"), overly ambitious ("stop eating tortillas"), and relatively ineffective (Svedbo Engström et al., BMJ Open 6(3):e010249, 2016; Johansson et al., Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being 11, 2016; Oomen et al., The Diabetes Educ 25:220-225, 1999; Franek, Ont Health Technol Assess Ser 13(9):1-60, 2013; Purnell et al. Patient 9:349, 2016). A secondary and focused analysis (N = 12) was performed on data gathered from a larger qualitative study (N = 16), which explored diabetes among Mexican-American women residing in rural South Texas. Findings from the secondary analysis were that study informants elicited more realistic or contextually relevant, specific self-management strategies that reflected the cognitive, emotive, and behavioral areas but were reframed within the context of the Mexican-American culture. Self-management strategies fell into the categories of: (a) environmental controls, (b) avoiding overeating, (c) lifestyle changes, (d) cooking tips, and (e) active self-management. Diabetes remains a serious health threat to Mexican Americans, women in particular. Few individuals attain glycemic control, likely due in part to the disconnect between global and non-contextual self-management recommendations offered by health care providers and the need for more detailed and realistic guidance required for the day-to-day self-management of diabetes.

  2. Is there a genetic contribution to cultural differences? Collectivism, individualism and genetic markers of social sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Baldwin M; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2010-06-01

    Genes and culture are often thought of as opposite ends of the nature-nurture spectrum, but here we examine possible interactions. Genetic association studies suggest that variation within the genes of central neurotransmitter systems, particularly the serotonin (5-HTTLPR, MAOA-uVNTR) and opioid (OPRM1 A118G), are associated with individual differences in social sensitivity, which reflects the degree of emotional responsivity to social events and experiences. Here, we review recent work that has demonstrated a robust cross-national correlation between the relative frequency of variants in these genes and the relative degree of individualism-collectivism in each population, suggesting that collectivism may have developed and persisted in populations with a high proportion of putative social sensitivity alleles because it was more compatible with such groups. Consistent with this notion, there was a correlation between the relative proportion of these alleles and lifetime prevalence of major depression across nations. The relationship between allele frequency and depression was partially mediated by individualism-collectivism, suggesting that reduced levels of depression in populations with a high proportion of social sensitivity alleles is due to greater collectivism. These results indicate that genetic variation may interact with ecological and social factors to influence psychocultural differences.

  3. A pilot study: the development of a culturally tailored Malaysian Diabetes Education Module (MY-DEMO) based on the Health Belief Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmad, Badariah; Ramadas, Amutha; Kia Fatt, Quek; Md Zain, Anuar Zaini

    2014-01-01

    .... Contrastingly, few structured and validated diabetes modules are available in Malaysia. This pilot study aims to develop and validate diabetes education material suitable and tailored for a multicultural society like Malaysia...

  4. Genetic variation of natural and cultured stocks of Paralichthys olivaceus by allozyme and RAPD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Feng; ZHANG Peijun; WANG Keling; XIANG Jianhai

    2007-01-01

    Population genetics of the left-eyed flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, including natural and cultured stocks distributed in the coastal waters near Qingdao of eastern maritime China, was analyzed in allozyme and RAPD. The results showed that among total 29 gene loci of 15 isozymes, 9 and 7 were polymorphic in natural and cultured stocks, respectively. The status of genetic diversity in P olivaceus is low in terms of polymorphic loci in chi-square test and genetic departure index of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. More alleles in IDHP, CAT, GDH and Ldh-C allozymes were found in the fish, which could be used as markers in assortive breeding and distinguishing stock, population or species evolution. Total 88 and 86 RAPD bands ranging from 200 to 2 500 bp were recognized individually in average of 7.8-8.0 bands per primer. The genetic diversity in cultured stock is lower than that in natural ones showing an obviously decreasing genetic divergence. Therefore, effective countermeasures must be taken to protect genetic resources of marine cultured fishes. The 2 markers have their own pros and cons. Combining the 2 markers to investigate the genetic variation of populations is suggested. The results provide basic data of this flounder and they are useful for studying genetic improvement and genetic resources of the fish.

  5. Computerized tools in psychology: cross cultural and genetically informative studies of memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismatullina V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we presented the computerized tools for psychological studies of memory. The importance of implementing computerized automated tools for psychological studies is discussed. It has been shown that this tools can be used both for cross-cultural and genetically informative studies. The validity of these tools for cross-cultural and genetically informative studies of memory can be seen as the first step to use automated computerized tools for big data collection in psychology.

  6. Cultural beliefs on disease causation in the Philippines: challenge and implications in genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Peter James B; Tan, Michael L; Baluyot, Melissa Mae P; Villa, Angela Q; Talapian, Gay Luz; Reyes, Ma Elouisa; Suarez, Riza Concordia; Sur, Aster Lynn D; Aldemita, Vanessa Dyan R; Padilla, Carmencita David; Laurino, Mercy Ygona

    2014-10-01

    The provision of culturally competent health care is an important professional issue recognized by the pioneer genetic counselors in the Philippines. Being an archipelago consisting of 7,107 islands, the Philippines has approximately 175 ethnolinguistic groups with their own unique cultural identity and health practices. The emphasis on culture in our genetic counseling training recognizes its crucial role in molding an individual's conceptualization of health, as well as other life aspects, especially since the Filipino culture is a mixture of indigenous as well as imported and borrowed elements. As part of this endeavor, we will describe in this paper seven common Filipino cultural beliefs: namamana, lihi, sumpa, gaba, pasma, namaligno, and kaloob ng Diyos. We will also share examples on how these common beliefs provide explanation as cause of illness and its implications in our genetic counseling profession.

  7. Cultural Concerns when Counseling Orthodox Jewish Couples for Genetic Screening and PGD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazi, Richard V; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2015-12-01

    There is a spectrum of attitudes within the Orthodox Jewish community towards genetic testing and PGD. Increased understanding of the belief systems of the Orthodox Jewish population will enhance the genetic counselors' ability to better serve this unique group of patients. By improving cultural competence, genetic counselors can help patients choose the testing options that they deem appropriate, while simultaneously respecting the patient's belief system.

  8. The double pedigree: a method for studying culturally and genetically inherited behavior in tandem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Danchin

    Full Text Available Transgenerational sources of biological variation have been at the center of evolutionary studies ever since Darwin and Wallace identified natural selection. This is because evolution can only operate on traits whose variation is transmitted, i.e. traits that are heritable. The discovery of genetic inheritance has led to a semantic shift, resulting in the tendency to consider that only genes are inherited across generations. Today, however, concepts of heredity are being broadened again to integrate the accruing evidence of non-genetic inheritance, and many evolutionary biologists are calling for the inclusion of non-genetic inheritance into an inclusive evolutionary synthesis. Here, we focus on social heredity and its role in the inheritance of behavioral traits. We discuss quantitative genetics methods that might allow us to disentangle genetic and non-genetic transmission in natural populations with known pedigrees. We then propose an experimental design based on cross-fostering among animal cultures, environments and families that has the potential to partition inherited phenotypic variation into socially (i.e. culturally and genetically inherited components. This approach builds towards a new conceptual framework based on the use of an extended version of the animal model of quantitative genetics to integrate genetic and cultural components of behavioral inheritance.

  9. The double pedigree: a method for studying culturally and genetically inherited behavior in tandem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Etienne; Pujol, Benoit; Wagner, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    Transgenerational sources of biological variation have been at the center of evolutionary studies ever since Darwin and Wallace identified natural selection. This is because evolution can only operate on traits whose variation is transmitted, i.e. traits that are heritable. The discovery of genetic inheritance has led to a semantic shift, resulting in the tendency to consider that only genes are inherited across generations. Today, however, concepts of heredity are being broadened again to integrate the accruing evidence of non-genetic inheritance, and many evolutionary biologists are calling for the inclusion of non-genetic inheritance into an inclusive evolutionary synthesis. Here, we focus on social heredity and its role in the inheritance of behavioral traits. We discuss quantitative genetics methods that might allow us to disentangle genetic and non-genetic transmission in natural populations with known pedigrees. We then propose an experimental design based on cross-fostering among animal cultures, environments and families that has the potential to partition inherited phenotypic variation into socially (i.e. culturally) and genetically inherited components. This approach builds towards a new conceptual framework based on the use of an extended version of the animal model of quantitative genetics to integrate genetic and cultural components of behavioral inheritance.

  10. Genetic and Cultural Deficit Theories: Two Sides of the Same Racist Coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persell, Caroline Hodges

    1981-01-01

    Examines the current models (genetic-deficit and cultural-deprivation) which explain IQ and achievement differences between members of the dominant and nondominant cultures. Concludes that both paradigms place blame on children and their families, and divert attention from the need to equalize wealth and power. (DA)

  11. A bio-cultural approach to the study of food choice: The contribution of taste genetics, population and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide S; Giuliani, Cristina; Antinucci, Marco; Morini, Gabriella; Garagnani, Paolo; Tofanelli, Sergio; Luiselli, Donata

    2017-03-31

    The study of food choice, one of the most complex human traits, requires an integrated approach that takes into account environmental, socio-cultural and biological diversity. We recruited 183 volunteers from four geo-linguistic groups and highly diversified in terms of both genetic background and food habits from whom we collected genotypes and phenotypes tightly linked to taste perception. We confirmed previous genetic associations, in particular with stevioside perception, and noted significant differences in food consumption: in particular, broccoli, mustard and beer consumption scores were significantly higher (Adjusted P = 0.02, Adjusted P groups. Licorice and Parmesan cheese showed lower consumption and liking scores in the Sri Lankan group (Adjusted P = 0.001 and Adjusted P contribution of genetics, population diversity and cultural aspects in taste perception and food consumption.

  12. Simultaneous comparison of cultural, genetic and morphological evolution among reed bunting Emberiza schoeniclus populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matessi, Giuliano; Pilastro, Andrea; Marin, Guglielmo

    2004-01-01

    similarly to microsatellite frequencies, and could be actually more genetic in nature. This could explain the incongruent results given by the analysis of the two "cultural" variation measures, which may refer to different aspects of song evolution. Acoustic properties of song may have evolved in response......We compared cultural, genetic and morphological variation in a set of 10 reed bunting  Emberiza schoeniclus populations of two subspecies groups, the northern thin billed and southern thick billed. We used four different markers of variation: two cultural divergence measures, quantitative...... characters and memetic frequencies; one measure of genetic divergence, i.e. microsatellite allele frequencies; and one measure of morphological divergence of populations, i.e. bill height. We calculated correlations among the divergence measures and estimated cultural evolutionary rates between and within...

  13. Molecular markers for genetic stability of intergeneric hybrids Fragaria x Potentilla derived from tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Nicoleta SUTAN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of growth regulators, explant source and culture age on genetic stability of plants obtained from tissue culture propagation of ornamental strawberry “Serenata” were examined. Genomic DNAs of in vitro-derived shoots and control plant were extracted and compared by RAPD-PCR analyses. Ten primers (from 48 previously tested were selected and used in RAPD analysis to prove the clonal fidelity (i.e. genetic stability of the tissue culture-derived ornamental strawberry plants. The lack of polymorphisms in micropropagated plants screened through molecular markers was used to suggest genetic fidelity. Identicaly banding patterns of the RAPD profiles obtaining from vitroplants, regenerated via organogenesis or meristems culture, suggested that in the ornamental strawberry, variety “Serenata”, neither explant source, nor callus age or limited number of subcultures, in basal media supplemented with low concentration of growth regulators, were associated with occurence of somaclonal variation.

  14. Familial resemblance of borderline personality disorder features: genetic or cultural transmission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn A Distel

    Full Text Available Borderline personality disorder is a severe personality disorder for which genetic research has been limited to family studies and classical twin studies. These studies indicate that genetic effects explain 35 to 45% of the variance in borderline personality disorder and borderline personality features. However, effects of non-additive (dominance genetic factors, non-random mating and cultural transmission have generally not been explored. In the present study an extended twin-family design was applied to self-report data of twins (N = 5,017 and their siblings (N = 1,266, parents (N = 3,064 and spouses (N = 939 from 4,015 families, to estimate the effects of additive and non-additive genetic and environmental factors, cultural transmission and non-random mating on individual differences in borderline personality features. Results showed that resemblance among biological relatives could completely be attributed to genetic effects. Variation in borderline personality features was explained by additive genetic (21%; 95% CI 17-26% and dominant genetic (24%; 95% CI 17-31% factors. Environmental influences (55%; 95% CI 51-60% explained the remaining variance. Significant resemblance between spouses was observed, which was best explained by phenotypic assortative mating, but it had only a small effect on the genetic variance (1% of the total variance. There was no effect of cultural transmission from parents to offspring.

  15. Obesity among Black Adolescent Girls: Genetic, Psychosocial, and Cultural Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, Sylvan I.; LaPoint, Velma

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the causes, consequences, and prevention of obesity among a subgroup of the American population, Black adolescent girls. Using an ecological perspective on obesity among Black adolescent girls, including feminist-womanist perspectives and historical and medical sociological perspectives, the authors discuss genetic,…

  16. Obesity among Black Adolescent Girls: Genetic, Psychosocial, and Cultural Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, Sylvan I.; LaPoint, Velma

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the causes, consequences, and prevention of obesity among a subgroup of the American population, Black adolescent girls. Using an ecological perspective on obesity among Black adolescent girls, including feminist-womanist perspectives and historical and medical sociological perspectives, the authors discuss genetic,…

  17. Genetic variability of tissue cultured Sorghum bicolor (L) Moench as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    john

    Key words: Cultivars, tissue culture regenerates, water stress tolerance, simple sequence repeats. ... salinity ranges for soils in Kenya where wild sorghum grow) NaCl ... in 1X TBE [(1 M Tris – HCl pH 7.5), 1 M boric acid and 0.5 M EDTA.

  18. New frontiers in the study of human cultural and genetic evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cody T; Richerson, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    In this review, we discuss the dynamic linkages between culture and the genetic evolution of the human species. We begin by briefly describing the framework of gene-culture coevolutionary (or dual-inheritance) models for human evolutionary change. Until recently, the literature on gene-culture coevolution was composed primarily of mathematical models and formalized theory describing the complex dynamics underlying human behavior, adaptation, and technological evolution, but had little empirical support concerning genetics. The rapid progress in the fields of molecular genetics and genomics, however, is now providing the kinds of data needed to produce rich empirical support for gene-culture coevolutionary models. We briefly outline how theoretical and methodological progress in genome sciences has provided ways for the strength of selection on genes to be evaluated, and then outline how evidence of selection on several key genes can be directly linked to human cultural practices. We then describe some exciting new directions in the empirical study of gene-culture coevolution, and conclude with a discussion of the role of gene-culture evolutionary models in the future integration of medical, biological, and social sciences.

  19. Genetic instability of sugarcane plants derived from meristem cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucchi Maria Imaculada

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The RADP (Random amplified polymorphic DNA technique was used to detect tissue-culture-induced variations in sugarcane. Plants of the Brazilian variety RB83-5486 propagated via rhizomes and via meristem cultures were studied. The polymorphism rate for 98 RAPD loci was 6.93% when the plants derived from meristems. Besides, in order to evaluate the influence of the number of subcultures on the generation of somaclonal variation, field-grown RB83-5486 plants derived from 10 meristems were studied after five subcultivations. Although different rates of polymorphism were observed, there was no direct association with the stage of subcultivation. The analysis of plants of two sugarcane varieties cultivated in vitro from meristems showed that variety RB83-5486 was more unstable than variety SP80-185.

  20. The history of genetics in Mexico in the light of A Cultural History of Heredity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Ana

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I analyze the conditions for scientific research and the social relationships that allowed the establishment of genetics in Mexico, in the laboratory, the clinic and in agronomy. I give three examples to illustrate how the cultural history of heredity has enlightened this work: the introduction and institutionalization of Mendelism in Mexico, the hereditarian ideas of medical doctors in the late nineteenth century, and the introduction of medical genetics in Mexico.

  1. Genetic synthetic lethality screen at the single gene level in cultured human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, Arnold H.; Dafni, Naomi; Dotan, Iris; Oron, Yoram; Canaani, Dan

    2001-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated the feasibility of a chemical synthetic lethality screen in cultured human cells. We now demonstrate the principles for a genetic synthetic lethality screen. The technology employs both an immortalized human cell line deficient in the gene of interest, which is complemented by an episomal survival plasmid expressing the wild-type cDNA for the gene of interest, and the use of a novel GFP-based double-label fluorescence system. Dominant negative genetic suppressor elem...

  2. Feeder-free culture of human embryonic stem cells in conditioned medium for efficient genetic modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braam, Stefan R; Denning, Chris; Matsa, Elena; Young, Lorraine E; Passier, Robert; Mummery, Christine L

    2008-01-01

    Realizing the potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in research and commercial applications requires generic protocols for culture, expansion and genetic modification that function between multiple lines. Here we describe a feeder-free hESC culture protocol that was tested in 13 independent hESC lines derived in five different laboratories. The procedure is based on Matrigel adaptation in mouse embryonic fibroblast conditioned medium (CM) followed by monolayer culture of hESC. When combined, these techniques provide a robust hESC culture platform, suitable for high-efficiency genetic modification via plasmid transfection (using lipofection or electroporation), siRNA knockdown and viral transduction. In contrast to other available protocols, it does not require optimization for individual lines. hESC transiently expressing ectopic genes are obtained within 9 d and stable transgenic lines within 3 weeks.

  3. Blending genetics and sociocultural historical inquiry: ethics, culture, and human subjects protection in international cross cultural research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Deborah A; Caldwell, Dennis; Taylor, Andre D; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the implementation and difficulties when conducting genetics research in a rural, traditional West African culture within the frame of the United States' grounded research ethics. Research challenges are highlighted by Western researchers following U.S. Institutional Review Board (IRB) guidelines and practices in a non-Western country. IRB concepts are culture bound in Western ideals that may not have synchronicity and compatibility with non-Western cultures. Differences in sociocultural norms, traditions, language, and geography were influencing factors that can affect application of IRB principles. Suggestions for change are offered, which will potentially aid researchers considering application of IRB requirements when conducting research in non-Westernized, non-industrialized countries.

  4. Production of justicidin B, a cytotoxic arylnaphthalene lignan from genetically transformed root cultures of Linum leonii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasilev, Nikolay; Elfahmi, [No Value; Bos, Rein; Kayser, Oliver; Momekov, Georgi; Konstantinov, Spiro; Ionkova, Iliana

    2006-01-01

    Callus and hairy root cultures of Linum leonii were established. The genetic transformation in hairy roots was proven by PCR analysis, which showed integration of rol A and rol C genes into the plant genome. Calli and hairy roots accumulate the arylnaphthalene lignan justicidin B as a major constitu

  5. Genetic, environmental and cultural factors influencing the resistance to septoria tritici blotch (Mycosphaerella graminicola) in wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simón, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    KeyWord:Genetic, environmental and cultural factors influencing the resistance to septoria tritici blotch (Mycosphaerella

  6. Genetic, environmental and cultural factors influencing the resistance to septoria tritici blotch (Mycosphaerella graminicola) in wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simón, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    KeyWord:Genetic, environmental and cultural factors influencing the resistance to septoria tritici blotch (Mycosphaerella

  7. Cultural challenges to biotechnology: Native American genetic resources and the concept of cultural harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsosie, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the intercultural context of issues related to genetic research on Native peoples. In particular, the article probes the disconnect between Western and indigenous concepts of property, ownership, and privacy, and examines the harms to Native peoples that may arise from unauthorized uses of blood and tissue samples or the information derived from such samples. The article concludes that existing legal and ethical frameworks are inadequate to address Native peoples' rights to their genetic resources and suggests an intercultural framework for accommodation based on theories of intergroup equality and fundamental human rights.

  8. Genetic diversity based on SSR analysis of the cultured snakehead fish, Channa argus, (Channidae) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S-R; Li, J-L; Xie, N; Zhu, L-M; Wang, Q; Yue, G-H

    2014-02-13

    The snakehead fish Channa argus is an important food fish in China. We identified six microsatellite loci for C. argus. These six microsatellite loci and four other microsatellite markers were used to analyze genetic diversity in four cultured populations of C. argus (SD, JX, HN, and ZJ) and determine their relationships. A total of 154 alleles were detected at the 10 microsatellite loci. The average expected and observed heterozygosities varied from 0.70-0.84 and 0.69-0.83, respectively, and polymorphism information content ranged between 0.66 and 0.82 in the four populations, indicating high genetic diversity. Population JX deviated from mutation-drift equilibrium and may have experienced a recent bottleneck. Analysis of pairwise genetic differentiation revealed FST values that ranged from 0.028 to 0.100, which indicates a moderate level of genetic differentiation. The largest distances were observed between populations HN and SD, whereas the smallest distances were obtained between populations HN and JX. Genetic clustering analysis demonstrated that the ZJ and HN populations probably share the same origin. This information about the genetic diversity within each of the four populations, and their genetic relationships will be useful for future genetic improvement of C. argus through selective breeding.

  9. Tailored Porous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

    1999-11-09

    Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

  10. [Genetic regulation of T-lymphocyte responsiveness to PHA is independent of culture conditions (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiffel, C; Liacopoulos-Briot, M; Decreusefond, C; Lambert, F

    1979-01-01

    A maximal interline separation has been obtained after 10 consecutive generations of selective breeding for the character "quantitative in vitro response of lymph node lymphocytes to the mitogenic effect of phytohaemagglutinin". At the selection limit the difference between high and low responder lines was about 20-fold. A similar interline separation has been demonstrated for the T-mitogen effect of concanavalin A. The identical response to PPD (purified protein derivative of tuberculin), a B mitogen, proved that the genetic selection has only modified the potentialities of T lymphocytes. During the selective breeding, responsiveness to PHA stimulation has been always measured under identical culture conditions. To demonstrate that the interline difference in responsiveness was due essentially to genetic factors independent of environmental effects, a systematic study of various culture conditions has been undertaken. The optimal stimulation was found after two days of culture for high line cells and after three days for low line cells. The difference between maximal responses was only slightly lower than that obtained after a two-day culture as used for the selection test. Increase in cell concentrations produced higher thymidine incorporation. In the two lines, a linear correlation was established between the cell concentration and the response produced. The maximal response given by the highest number of low line lymphocytes was equivalent to that given by a number, 11-fold smaller, of high line cells. Within certain limits, changes in the amount of tritiated thymidine added to the culture did not affect the interline separation. With a thymidine of high specific activity, a sub-evaluation of uptake by high line cells decreased the interline difference. Results in mixed culture of lymph node cells from high and low lines indicated that the low response was not due to the release of inhibiting factors or to the presence of suppressive cells in low responder mice

  11. Sex-specific genetic diversity is shaped by cultural factors in Inner Asian human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Nina; Hegay, Tatyana; Mennecier, Philippe; Georges, Myriam; Laurent, Romain; Whitten, Mark; Endicott, Philipp; Aldashev, Almaz; Dorzhu, Choduraa; Nasyrova, Firuza; Chichlo, Boris; Ségurel, Laure; Heyer, Evelyne

    2017-04-01

    Sex-specific genetic structures have been previously documented worldwide in humans, even though causal factors have not always clearly been identified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ethnicity, geography and social organization on the sex-specific genetic structure in Inner Asia. Furthermore, we explored the process of ethnogenesis in multiple ethnic groups. We sampled DNA in Central and Northern Asia from 39 populations of Indo-Iranian and Turkic-Mongolic native speakers. We focused on genetic data of the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. First, we compared the frequencies of haplogroups to South European and East Asian populations. Then, we investigated the genetic differentiation for eight Y-STRs and the HVS1 region, and tested for the effect of geography and ethnicity on such patterns. Finally, we reconstructed the male demographic history, inferred split times and effective population sizes of different ethnic groups. Based on the haplogroup data, we observed that the Indo-Iranian- and Turkic-Mongolic-speaking populations have distinct genetic backgrounds. However, each population showed consistent mtDNA and Y chromosome haplogroups patterns. As expected in patrilocal populations, we found that the Y-STRs were more structured than the HVS1. While ethnicity strongly influenced the genetic diversity on the Y chromosome, geography better explained that of the mtDNA. Furthermore, when looking at various ethnic groups, we systematically found a genetic split time older than historical records, suggesting a cultural rather than biological process of ethnogenesis. This study highlights that, in Inner Asia, specific cultural behaviors, especially patrilineality and patrilocality, leave a detectable signature on the sex-specific genetic structure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Interface between culturally based preferences and genetic preferences: female mate choice in Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugatkin, L A

    1996-01-01

    The relative contribution of genetic and socio-cultural factors in the shaping of behavior is of fundamental importance to biologists and social scientists, yet it has proven to be extremely difficult to study in a controlled, experimental fashion. Here I describe experiments that examined the strength of genetic and cultural (imitative) factors in determining female mate choice in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata. Female guppies from the Paria River in Trinidad have a genetic, heritable preference for the amount of orange body color possessed by males. Female guppies will, however, also copy (imitate) the mate choice of other females in that when two males are matched for orange color, an "observer" female will copy the mate choice of another ("model") female. Three treatments were undertaken in which males differed by an average of 12%, 24%, or 40% of the total orange body color. In all cases, observer females viewed a model female prefer the less colorful male. When males differed by 12% or 24%, observer females preferred the less colorful male and thus copied the mate choice of others, despite a strong heritable preference for orange body color in males. When males differed by 40% orange body color, however, observer females preferred the more colorful male and did not copy the mate choice of the other female. In this system, then, imitation can "override" genetic preferences when the difference between orange body color in males is small or moderate, but genetic factors block out imitation effects when the difference in orange body color in males is large. This experiment provides the first attempt to experimentally examine the relative strength of cultural and genetic preferences for a particular trait and suggests that these two factors moderate one another in shaping social behavior. PMID:11607646

  13. Beliefs in genetic determinism and attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research: psychometric scale properties, construct associations, demographic correlates, and cross-cultural comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Swami, Viren; Loibl, Lisa Mariella; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-12-01

    Using two new scales, this study examined beliefs in genetic determinism and attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research in student samples from Austria, Malaysia, Romania, and the United Kingdom. For both constructs, effects of culture were detectable, whereas those related to key demographics were either small and inconsistent across samples (political orientation and religiosity) or zero (sex and age). Judged from factorial dimensionality and internal consistency, the psychometric properties of both scales were satisfactory. Belief in genetic determinism had lower prevalence and corresponded only modestly to positive attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research which had higher prevalence. The correlations of both constructs with a preference of inequality among social groups (social dominance orientation) were modest and inconsistent across samples. Both scales appear appropriate for cross-cultural applications, in particular for research into lay theories and public perceptions regarding genetic vs environmental effects on human behavior, mental disorders, and behavioral and psychiatric genetic research related to these.

  14. Achilles' heel of pluripotent stem cells: genetic, genomic and epigenetic variations during prolonged culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Redi, Carlo Alberto; Garagna, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells differentiate into almost any specialized adult cell type of an organism. PSCs can be derived either from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-giving rise to embryonic stem cells-or after reprogramming of somatic terminally differentiated cells to obtain ES-like cells, named induced pluripotent stem cells. The potential use of these cells in the clinic, for investigating in vitro early embryonic development or for screening the effects of new drugs or xenobiotics, depends on capability to maintain their genome integrity during prolonged culture and differentiation. Both human and mouse PSCs are prone to genomic and (epi)genetic instability during in vitro culture, a feature that seriously limits their real potential use. Culture-induced variations of specific chromosomes or genes, are almost all unpredictable and, as a whole, differ among independent cell lines. They may arise at different culture passages, suggesting the absence of a safe passage number maintaining genome integrity and rendering the control of genomic stability mandatory since the very early culture passages. The present review highlights the urgency for further studies on the mechanisms involved in determining (epi)genetic and chromosome instability, exploiting the knowledge acquired earlier on other cell types.

  15. Biological ancestries, kinship connections, and projected identities in four central Anatolian settlements: insights from culturally contextualized genetic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcumen, Ömer; Gultekin, Timur; Alakoc, Yesim Dogan; Tug, Aysim; Gulec, Erksin; Schurr, Theodore G

    2011-01-01

    Previous population genetics studies in Turkey failed to delineate recent historical and social factors that shaped Anatolian cultural and genetic diversity at the local level. To address this shortcoming, we conducted focused ethnohistorical fieldwork and screened biological samples collected from the Yuksekyer region for mitochondrial, Y chromosome, and autosomal markers and then analyzed the data within an ethnohistorical context. Our results revealed that, at the village level, paternal genetic diversity is structured among settlements, whereas maternal genetic diversity is distributed more homogenously, reflecting the strong patrilineal cultural traditions that transcend larger ethnic and religious structures. Local ancestries and origin myths, rather than ethnic or religious affiliations, delineate the social boundaries and projected identities among the villages. Therefore, we conclude that broad, ethnicity-based sampling is inadequate to capture the genetic signatures of recent social and historical dynamics, which have had a profound influence on contemporary genetic and cultural regional diversity.

  16. Oat Anther Culture and Use of DH-Lines for Genetic Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviharju, Elina; Moisander, Sirpa; Tanhuanpää, Pirjo

    2017-01-01

    Possibility to make doubled haploids (DHs) from varying crossing populations is a useful tool for enhancing cultivar breeding, and a source of valuable material for genetic research. Oats is reported to be recalcitrant in anther culture with low response and genotype dependency. However, the best recoveries reported have reached up to 30 green regenerants per 100 isolated anthers, which clearly addresses the potential of this technique. In this chapter, one successful oat anther culture protocol is described in detail. Due to the total homozygosity reached in one generation, DH-lines are also an excellent material for genetic mapping. In this chapter, the use of DH-mapping population for marker analyses and linkage mapping is presented.

  17. Healing of the canoe: preliminary results of a culturally tailored intervention to prevent substance abuse and promote tribal identity for Native youth in two Pacific Northwest tribes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Dennis M; Thomas, Lisa Rey; Sigo, Robin Little Wing; Price, Laura; Lonczak, Heather; Lawrence, Nigel; Ahvakana, Katie; Austin, Lisette; Lawrence, Albie; Price, Joseph; Purser, Abby; Bagley, Lenora

    2015-01-01

    Using Community-based and Tribal Participatory Research (CBPR/TPR) approaches, an academic-tribal partnership between the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute and the Suquamish and Port Gamble S'Klallam Tribes developed a culturally grounded social skills intervention to promote increased cultural belonging and prevent substance abuse among tribal youth. Participation in the intervention, which used the Canoe Journey as a metaphor for life, was associated with increased hope, optimism, and self-efficacy and with reduced substance use, as well as with higher levels of cultural identity and knowledge about alcohol and drugs among high school-age tribal youth. These results provide preliminary support for the intervention curricula in promoting positive youth development, an optimistic future orientation, and the reduction of substance use among Native youth.

  18. Complex Ancient Genetic Structure and Cultural Transitions in Southern African Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montinaro, Francesco; Busby, George B. J.; Gonzalez-Santos, Miguel; Oosthuitzen, Ockie; Oosthuitzen, Erika; Anagnostou, Paolo; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Pascali, Vincenzo L.; Capelli, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of the structure of southern African populations has been the subject of numerous genetic, medical, linguistic, archaeological, and anthropological investigations. Current diversity in the subcontinent is the result of complex events of genetic admixture and cultural contact between early inhabitants and migrants that arrived in the region over the last 2000 years. Here, we analyze 1856 individuals from 91 populations, comprising novel and published genotype data, to characterize the genetic ancestry profiles of 631 individuals from 51 southern African populations. Combining both local ancestry and allele frequency based analyses, we identify a tripartite, ancient, Khoesan-related genetic structure. This structure correlates neither with linguistic affiliation nor subsistence strategy, but with geography, revealing the importance of isolation-by-distance dynamics in the area. Fine-mapping of these components in southern African populations reveals admixture and cultural reversion involving several Khoesan groups, and highlights that Bantu speakers and Coloured individuals have different mixtures of these ancient ancestries. PMID:27838627

  19. Complex Ancient Genetic Structure and Cultural Transitions in Southern African Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montinaro, Francesco; Busby, George B J; Gonzalez-Santos, Miguel; Oosthuitzen, Ockie; Oosthuitzen, Erika; Anagnostou, Paolo; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Capelli, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of the structure of southern African populations has been the subject of numerous genetic, medical, linguistic, archaeological, and anthropological investigations. Current diversity in the subcontinent is the result of complex events of genetic admixture and cultural contact between early inhabitants and migrants that arrived in the region over the last 2000 years. Here, we analyze 1856 individuals from 91 populations, comprising novel and published genotype data, to characterize the genetic ancestry profiles of 631 individuals from 51 southern African populations. Combining both local ancestry and allele frequency based analyses, we identify a tripartite, ancient, Khoesan-related genetic structure. This structure correlates neither with linguistic affiliation nor subsistence strategy, but with geography, revealing the importance of isolation-by-distance dynamics in the area. Fine-mapping of these components in southern African populations reveals admixture and cultural reversion involving several Khoesan groups, and highlights that Bantu speakers and Coloured individuals have different mixtures of these ancient ancestries. Copyright © 2017 Montinaro et al.

  20. Tailoring of onboard system software

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭俊杰; 洪炳镕; 魏振华; 乔永强

    2003-01-01

    Tailoring of an operating system and an in embedded real-time operating system in particular is es-sential for both, kernel and operation. But many of current embedded real-time operating systems provide somebasic tailoring at the cost of depleting the flexibility of hardware, which causes the lack of flexibility, and de-grades their tailors. A layered modular tailoring model has been proposed together with some tailoring operationsto improve the flexibility of the systems, and algorithms have been proposed for verification of tailoring opera-tions with the current operating system.

  1. Genetic transformation of Metroxylon sagu (Rottb.) cultures via Agrobacterium-mediated and particle bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Evra Raunie; Hossain, Md Anowar; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2014-01-01

    Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu) is a perennial plant native to Southeast Asia and exploited mainly for the starch content in its trunk. Genetic improvement of sago palm is extremely slow when compared to other annual starch crops. Urgent attention is needed to improve the sago palm planting material and can be achieved through nonconventional methods. We have previously developed a tissue culture method for sago palm, which is used to provide the planting materials and to develop a genetic transformation procedure. Here, we report the genetic transformation of sago embryonic callus derived from suspension culture using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and gene gun systems. The transformed embryoids cells were selected against Basta (concentration 10 to 30 mg/L). Evidence of foreign genes integration and function of the bar and gus genes were verified via gene specific PCR amplification, gus staining, and dot blot analysis. This study showed that the embryogenic callus was the most suitable material for transformation as compared to the fine callus, embryoid stage, and initiated shoots. The gene gun transformation showed higher transformation efficiency than the ones transformed using Agrobacterium when targets were bombarded once or twice using 280 psi of helium pressure at 6 to 8 cm distance.

  2. Genetic Transformation of Metroxylon sagu (Rottb. Cultures via Agrobacterium-Mediated and Particle Bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evra Raunie Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu is a perennial plant native to Southeast Asia and exploited mainly for the starch content in its trunk. Genetic improvement of sago palm is extremely slow when compared to other annual starch crops. Urgent attention is needed to improve the sago palm planting material and can be achieved through nonconventional methods. We have previously developed a tissue culture method for sago palm, which is used to provide the planting materials and to develop a genetic transformation procedure. Here, we report the genetic transformation of sago embryonic callus derived from suspension culture using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and gene gun systems. The transformed embryoids cells were selected against Basta (concentration 10 to 30 mg/L. Evidence of foreign genes integration and function of the bar and gus genes were verified via gene specific PCR amplification, gus staining, and dot blot analysis. This study showed that the embryogenic callus was the most suitable material for transformation as compared to the fine callus, embryoid stage, and initiated shoots. The gene gun transformation showed higher transformation efficiency than the ones transformed using Agrobacterium when targets were bombarded once or twice using 280 psi of helium pressure at 6 to 8 cm distance.

  3. Adaptation of the genetically tractable malaria pathogen Plasmodium knowlesi to continuous culture in human erythrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Robert

    2012-12-24

    Research into the aetiological agent of the most widespread form of severe malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, has benefitted enormously from the ability to culture and genetically manipulate blood-stage forms of the parasite in vitro. However, most malaria outside Africa is caused by a distinct Plasmodium species, Plasmodium vivax, and it has become increasingly apparent that zoonotic infection by the closely related simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is a frequent cause of life-threatening malaria in regions of southeast Asia. Neither of these important malarial species can be cultured in human cells in vitro, requiring access to primates with the associated ethical and practical constraints. We report the successful adaptation of P. knowlesi to continuous culture in human erythrocytes. Human-adapted P. knowlesi clones maintain their capacity to replicate in monkey erythrocytes and can be genetically modified with unprecedented efficiency, providing an important and unique model for studying conserved aspects of malarial biology as well as species-specific features of an emerging pathogen.

  4. Genetic diversity of PCR-positive, culture-negative and culture-positive Mycobacterium ulcerans isolated from Buruli ulcer patients in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Williamson

    Full Text Available Culture of Mycobacterium ulcerans from Buruli ulcer patients has very low sensitivity. Thus confirmation of M. ulcerans infection is primarily based on PCR directed against IS2404. In this study we compare the genotypes obtained by variable number of tandem repeat analysis of DNA from IS2404-PCR positive cultures with that obtained from IS2404 positive, culture-negative tissue. A significantly greater genetic heterogeneity was found among culture-negative samples compared with that found in cultured strains but a single genotype is over-represented in both sample sets. This study provides evidence that both the focal location of bacteria in a lesion as well as differences in the ability to culture a particular genotype may underlie the low sensitivity of culture. Though preliminary, data from this work also suggests that mycobacteria previously associated with fish disease (M. pseudoshottsii may be pathogenic for humans.

  5. Genetic composition of cultured and wild mussels Mytilus from The Netherlands and transfers from Ireland and Great Britain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijewski, T.; Wijsman, J.W.M.; Hummel, H.; Wenne, R.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic composition of wild and cultured mussel populations from the Oosterschelde, The Netherlands, is compared to representative samples of mussel shipments from culture sites in Ireland and Great Britain. A total of 2272 mussels from 27 samples were assayed for the nuclear DNA markers Me 1511

  6. Genetic population structure in an equatorial sparrow: roles for culture and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, J E; Fleischer, R C; Danner, R M; Moore, I T

    2017-06-01

    Female preference for local cultural traits has been proposed as a barrier to breeding among animal populations. As such, several studies have found correlations between male bird song dialects and population genetics over relatively large distances. To investigate whether female choice for local dialects could act as a barrier to breeding between nearby and contiguous populations, we tested whether variation in male song dialects explains genetic structure among eight populations of rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) in Ecuador. Our study sites lay along a transect, and adjacent study sites were separated by approximately 25 km, an order of magnitude less than previously examined for this and most other species. This transect crossed an Andean ridge and through the Quijos River Valley, both of which may be barriers to gene flow. Using a variance partitioning approach, we show that song dialect is important in explaining population genetics, independent of the geographic variables: distance, the river valley and the Andean Ridge. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that song acts as a barrier to breeding among populations in close proximity. In addition, songs of contiguous populations differed by the same degree or more than between two populations previously shown to exhibit female preference for local dialect, suggesting that birds from these populations would also breed preferentially with locals. As expected, all geographic variables (distance, the river valley and the Andean Ridge) also predicted population genetic structure. Our results have important implications for the understanding whether, and at what spatial scale, culture can affect population divergence. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  7. HIGH DENSITY CULTIVATION OF GENETICALLY-ENGINEERED CHO CELL LINES WITH MICROCARRIER CULTURE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖成祖; 黄子才; 刘凤云; 郭志霞; 高丽华

    1994-01-01

    Genetically-enginecred CHO cell lines,rβ-13and CLF-8B2,were cultivated with the MC-1 microcarrier cul-ture system.The cell density could be enhanced by increasing the concentration of microcarrier.At a microcarrier concentration of 10 mg/ml.the cell density could reach 4 to 5×106 cells/ml.It was shown that these cell itnes would spontaneously release from the microcarrier to attach to and proliferate on fresh microcatriera.We were thus able to scale up cultivation using a simple methcd,i.e.by adding fresh mlcrocarriers and medium directiy in-to the culture system to about 2,4 or 8 times the original volume.Using a 2 L bioreactor for several weeks at medium perfusion rates of 0.5 to 3working volumes.Prourokinase was stably secreted.

  8. Improvement of tissue culture, genetic transformation, and applications of biotechnology to Brassica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanfar, Seyed Ali; Orbovic, Vladimir; Moradpour, Mahdi; Abdul Aziz, Maheran; Karan, Ratna; Wallace, Simon; Parajuli, Saroj

    2017-04-01

    Development of in vitro plant regeneration method from Brassica explants via organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis is influenced by many factors such as culture environment, culture medium composition, explant sources, and genotypes which are reviewed in this study. An efficient in vitro regeneration system to allow genetic transformation of Brassica is a crucial tool for improving its economical value. Methods to optimize transformation protocols for the efficient introduction of desirable traits, and a comparative analysis of these methods are also reviewed. Hence, binary vectors, selectable marker genes, minimum inhibitory concentration of selection agents, reporter marker genes, preculture media, Agrobacterium concentration and regeneration ability of putative transformants for improvement of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Brassica are discussed.

  9. Effectiveness of a Group-Based Culturally Tailored Lifestyle Intervention Program on Changes in Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes among Asian Indians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rupal M; Misra, Ranjita; Raj, Sudha; Balasubramanyam, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    This study used an experimental, pretest-posttest control group repeated measures design to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based culturally appropriate lifestyle intervention program to reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) among Gujarati Asian Indians (AIs) in an urban community in the US. Participants included 70 adult AIs in the greater Houston metropolitan area. The primary outcomes were reduction in weight and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and improvement in physical activity. Participants were screened for risk factors and randomly assigned to a 12-week group-based lifestyle intervention program (n = 34) or a control group (n = 36) that received standard print material on diabetes prevention. Participants also completed clinical measures and self-reported questionnaires about physical activity, social, and lifestyle habits at 0, 3, and 6 months. No significant baseline differences were noted between groups. While a significant decline in weight and increase in physical activity was observed in all participants, the intervention group lowered their HbA1c (p Gujarati AIs living in the US.

  10. The impact of bitter taste receptor genetics on culturable bacteria in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, D I; Christensen, J M; Alvarado, R; Sacks, R; Harvey, R J

    2017-03-01

    Extra-oral bitter taste receptors have been associated with innate bacterial defence mechanisms. Genetic variation in T2R38 functionality has been shown to be associated with susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). We sought to independently assess the influence of bitter taste receptor genotype on the presence of culturable bacteria in the sinuses. A cross-sectional analysis of patients with CRS undergoing surgery was performed. Middle meatal nasal swabs were sent for microbiological evaluation at the time of the procedure. Mucosal biopsies were taken and sent for bitter taste receptor genotype analysis. Sequencing of 3 polymorphisms in the TAS2R38 gene was performed to identify genotypes as super-tasters (PAV/PAV), non-tasters (AVI/AVI) or heterozygous expression (PAV/AVI). The presence of culturable organisms and common pathogens were compared with bitter taste receptor genotypes. 25 patients (age 52.4 +/- 18.28 years, 51% female) were assessed. Super-tasters comprised 16% of the group, 24% were non-tasters and 48% had heterozygous expression. A cultured pathogen was grown in 48% of patients; 32% gram-positive, 20% gram-negative, 28% grew Staphylococcus aureus and 12% Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A non-taster genotype was predictive of colonised pathogens. Tissue eosinophilia (more than 10 HPF) was seen in 48%. Even in a small sample of patients with CRS, non-taster T2R38 genotype appears to predict the presence of culturable bacteria colonising the sinus cavity at the time of surgery for their condition. A genetic link to patients more likely to become infected is likely.

  11. Climate change underlies global demographic, genetic, and cultural transitions in pre-Columbian southern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Haak, Wolfgang; Mächtle, Bertil; Masch, Florian; Llamas, Bastien; Cagigao, Elsa Tomasto; Sossna, Volker; Schittek, Karsten; Isla Cuadrado, Johny; Eitel, Bernhard; Reindel, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Several archaeological studies in the Central Andes have pointed at the temporal coincidence of climatic fluctuations (both long- and short-term) and episodes of cultural transition and changes of socioeconomic structures throughout the pre-Columbian period. Although most scholars explain the connection between environmental and cultural changes by the impact of climatic alterations on the capacities of the ecosystems inhabited by pre-Columbian cultures, direct evidence for assumed demographic consequences is missing so far. In this study, we address directly the impact of climatic changes on the spatial population dynamics of the Central Andes. We use a large dataset of pre-Columbian mitochondrial DNA sequences from the northern Rio Grande de Nasca drainage (RGND) in southern Peru, dating from ∼840 BC to 1450 AD. Alternative demographic scenarios are tested using Bayesian serial coalescent simulations in an approximate Bayesian computational framework. Our results indicate migrations from the lower coastal valleys of southern Peru into the Andean highlands coincident with increasing climate variability at the end of the Nasca culture at ∼640 AD. We also find support for a back-migration from the highlands to the coast coincident with droughts in the southeastern Andean highlands and improvement of climatic conditions on the coast after the decline of the Wari and Tiwanaku empires (∼1200 AD), leading to a genetic homogenization in the RGND and probably southern Peru as a whole.

  12. History, Culture and Development as a Basis of Historical-Genetic Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martsinkovskaya T.D.,

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methodological problems of modern psychology are considered, the necessity of creation psychology as multi-paradigm science, which includes both — humanitarian and natural sciences is shown. The maintenance of two levels of determination of mentality’s formation, significant for the different spheres of mental development reveals. The first level, directed on maintaining emotional well-being is associated with general laws of formation of the psyche, while the second is directed on personal self-realization and mental development process mediated by cultural and individual translators. The concept «psychological transitivity» is entered and options of creation of the methodology adequate to challenges of the present, the necessity of mentality’s investigation in the modern unstable and uncertain world are shown. The structure of historical-genetic paradigm discovers and reveals the maintenance of its four levels: common patterns of psychological science, psychics in the context of history and culture, the analysis of scientific schools, analysis of selected problems. The theoretical and practical value of historical-genetic paradigm is shown

  13. Growth performance of three pejerrey genetic groups in intensive culture system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Aldrighi Tavares

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the growth performance of Odontesthes bonariensis, O. humensis and hybrid (O. bonariensis X O. humensis in intensive culture system for a period of 180 days, using the body weight (W, total length (Lt, condition factor (CF, allometric coefficient (b, specific growth rate (SGR and estimates of body weight and maximum total length (Wmax, Ltmax as indicators. Fish were randomly selected from three genetic groups (Bonariensis, Humensis and Hybrid, divided into water recirculation system consisting of 12 tanks (50 L. 12 measurements of body weight and total length (0, 2, 7, 14, 21, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 180 days were taken by means of a random sample of 10 subjects per replicate. All genetic groups grew in weight and length over the period analyzed, being influenced by the genetics of each species. O. bonariensis showed the best performance in growth and hybrid fish showed intermediate growth and estimated maximum body weight exceeding the pure species. Based on these results, it would be helpful the selective breeding and formation of domesticated strains.

  14. Genetic modulation of the overexpression of tailoring genes eryK and eryG leading to the improvement of erythromycin A purity and production in Saccharopolyspora erythraea fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Deng, Wei; Wu, Jiequn; Qian, Jiangchao; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang; Liu, Wen

    2008-03-01

    Erythromycin A (Er-A) is the most potent and clinically important member in the Er family produced by Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Er-B and Er-C, which are biologically much less active and cause greater side effects than Er-A, serve as the intermediates for Er-A biosynthesis and impurities in fermentation processes of many industrial strains. In this study, systematical modulation of the amounts of tailoring enzymes EryK (a P450 hydroxylase) and EryG (an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent O-methyltransferase) was carried out by genetic engineering in S. erythraea, including alterations of gene copy number ratio and organization and integrating the locus on the chromosome by homologous recombination. Introduction of additional eryK and eryG genes into S. erythraea showed significant impacts on their transcription levels and enhanced the biotransformation process from Er-D to Er-A with gene dose effects. At the eryK/eryG copy number ratio of 3:2 as well as their resultant transcript ratio of around 2.5:1 to 3.0:1, Er-B and Er-C were nearly completely eliminated and accordingly converted to Er-A, and the Er titer was improved by around 25% in the recombinant strain ZL1004 (genotype PermK*-K-K-G + PermE*-K + PermA*-G) and ZL1007 (genotype PermK*-K-G-K + PermE*-K + PermA*-G). This study may contribute to the continuous efforts toward further evaluation of the Er-producing system, with the aims of improving Er-A purity and production at the fermentation stage and lowering the production costs and environmental concerns in industry.

  15. Left or right? Sources of political orientation: the roles of genetic factors, cultural transmission, assortative mating, and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Christian; Bleidorn, Wiebke; Riemann, Rainer

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we used an extended twin family design to investigate the influences of genetic and cultural transmission as well as different sources of nonrandom mating on 2 core aspects of political orientation: acceptance of inequality and rejecting system change. In addition, we studied the sources of phenotypic links between Big Five personality traits and political beliefs using self- and other reports. Data of 1,992 individuals (224 monozygotic and 166 dizygotic twin pairs, 92 unmatched twins, 530 spouses of twins, 268 fathers, and 322 mothers) were analyzed. Genetically informative analyses showed that political attitudes are genetically but not environmentally transmitted from parents to offspring and that a substantial proportion of this genetic variance can be accounted for by genetic variance in personality traits. Beyond genetic effects and genotypic assortative mating, generation-specific environmental sources act to increase twins' and spouses' resemblance in political beliefs. The results suggest multiple sources of political orientations in a modern democracy.

  16. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  17. Study on Hydroxyurea Response in Hemoglobinopathies Patients Using Genetic Markers and Liquid Erythroid Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Serena; Agrigento, Veronica; Troia, Antonio; Di Maggio, Rosario; Sacco, Massimiliano; Maggio, Aurelio; D’Alcamo, Elena; Di Marzo, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) may ameliorate the clinical course of hemoglobinopathies. Hydroxyurea (HU) is the only inducer approved for the treatment of these diseases able to stimulate HbF production but patients’ response is highly variable indicating the utility of the identification of pharmacogenomic biomarkers in order to predict pharmacological treatment efficacy. To date few studies to evaluate the role of genetic determinants in HU response have been conducted showing contradictory results. In this study we analyzed BCL11A, GATA-1, KLF-1 genes and γ-globin promoter in 60 alleles from 30 hemoglobinopathies patients under HU treatment to assess the role of these markers in HU response. We did not find any association between these genetic determinants and HU response. Before treatment started, the same patients were analyzed in vitro using liquid erythroid cultures in a test able to predict their response to HU. The results of our analysis confirm the absence of pharmacogenomic biomarker associated to HU response indicating that, the quantification of γ-globin mRNA fold increase remains the only method able to predict in vivo patients response to the drug. PMID:28053695

  18. Genetic biasing through cultural transmission: do simple Bayesian models of language evolution generalize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dediu, Dan

    2009-08-07

    The recent Bayesian approaches to language evolution and change seem to suggest that genetic biases can impact on the characteristics of language, but, at the same time, that its cultural transmission can partially free it from these same genetic constraints. One of the current debates centres on the striking differences between sampling and a posteriori maximising Bayesian learners, with the first converging on the prior bias while the latter allows a certain freedom to language evolution. The present paper shows that this difference disappears if populations more complex than a single teacher and a single learner are considered, with the resulting behaviours more similar to the sampler. This suggests that generalisations based on the language produced by Bayesian agents in such homogeneous single agent chains are not warranted. It is not clear which of the assumptions in such models are responsible, but these findings seem to support the rising concerns on the validity of the "acquisitionist" assumption, whereby the locus of language change and evolution is taken to be the first language acquirers (children) as opposed to the competent language users (the adults).

  19. Culture creates genetic structure in the Caucasus: Autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal variation in Daghestan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpending Henry C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Near the junction of three major continents, the Caucasus region has been an important thoroughfare for human migration. While the Caucasus Mountains have diverted human traffic to the few lowland regions that provide a gateway from north to south between the Caspian and Black Seas, highland populations have been isolated by their remote geographic location and their practice of patrilocal endogamy. We investigate how these cultural and historical differences between highland and lowland populations have affected patterns of genetic diversity. We test 1 whether the highland practice of patrilocal endogamy has generated sex-specific population relationships, and 2 whether the history of migration and military conquest associated with the lowland populations has left Central Asian genes in the Caucasus, by comparing genetic diversity and pairwise population relationships between Daghestani populations and reference populations throughout Europe and Asia for autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal markers. Results We found that the highland Daghestani populations had contrasting histories for the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome data sets. Y-chromosomal haplogroup diversity was reduced among highland Daghestani populations when compared to other populations and to highland Daghestani mitochondrial DNA haplogroup diversity. Lowland Daghestani populations showed Turkish and Central Asian affinities for both mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal data sets. Autosomal population histories are strongly correlated to the pattern observed for the mitochondrial DNA data set, while the correlation between the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome distance matrices was weak and not significant. Conclusion The reduced Y-chromosomal diversity exhibited by highland Daghestani populations is consistent with genetic drift caused by patrilocal endogamy. Mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal phylogeographic comparisons indicate a common Near Eastern

  20. [Phenotypic and genetic features of cultural-morphologic variants of Bacillus anthracis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsygankova, O I; Eremenko, E I; Tsygankova, E A; Buravtseva, N P; Riazanova, A G

    2008-01-01

    Comparative analysis of MVLA-genotypes of 6 Bacillus anthracis strains and 40 their variants differing on capsule- and toxin synthesis, hemolytic, proteolytic and lecitinase activity, nutritional requirements, susceptibility to anthrax bacteriophages, virulence, immunogenicity, and presence of genes for capsule and toxin synthesis was performed. Results of phylogenetic analysis of 5 chromosome locuses and plasmid locus pXO1aat which are variable for this sample of B. anthracis cultures showed that all strains divided on 2 main clusters - A and B. Cluster A consisted of 5 genotypes whereas cluster B - of 1 genotype. All highly virulent original strains and variants with characteristic phenotype Cap(CO2)(+)(O2)(-)Tox(+)ProtA(+)Hly(+) Lec(-)Trp(+) had identical genotype in 4 groups and in 5th group differences were present only in vrrA locus. All original strains and variants with the most atypical complex of phenotypic characteristics Cap (CO2)(+)(O2)(+)Tox(-)ProtA(-)Hly(-)Lec(-)Trp(-) also had the same genotype belonging to cluster B and diverged on characteristic of 5 chromosomal VNTR locuses and pXO1aat locus from typical strains. Absence of toxin production in vitro was not related to loss of genetic determinants of toxin components. Cultures with typical characteristics, one of which was ability to produce toxin in vitro, had larger sizes of amplicons of pXO1aat locus (135 and 132 nbp), whereas atoxigenic original strains and variants with complex of atypical characteristics and identical chromosome genotype had the smallest sizes (123 bnp). All original cultures were isolated in Russia, their genotypes are described for the first time.

  1. Genetic diversity of cultured and wild populations of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii based on microsatellite analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii culture in the Western Hemisphere is primarily, if not entirely, based on thirty-six individual prawn introduced to Hawaii from Malaysia in 1965 and 1966. Little information is available regarding the genetic background or current population status of cult...

  2. Imposing nonlinear constraints when estimating genetic and cultural transmission under assortative mating: a simulation study using Mx and BUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Stéphanie Martine

    2009-01-01

    Modeling both genetic and cultural transmission in parent-offspring data in the presence of phenotypic assortment requires the imposition of nonlinear constraints. This article reports a simulation study that determined how well the structural equation modeling software package Mx and the

  3. Imposing Nonlinear Constraints When Estimating Genetic and Cultural Transmission Under Assortative Mating: A Simulation Study Using Mx and BUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Stephanie M.

    2009-01-01

    Modeling both genetic and cultural transmission in parent-offspring data in the presence of phenotypic assortment requires the imposition of nonlinear constraints. This article reports a simulation study that determined how well the structural equation modeling software package Mx and the Bayesian-o

  4. Tissue culture-induced genetic and epigenetic variation in triticale (× Triticosecale spp. Wittmack ex A. Camus 1927) regenerants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machczyńska, Joanna; Zimny, Janusz; Bednarek, Piotr Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Plant regeneration via in vitro culture can induce genetic and epigenetic variation; however, the extent of such changes in triticale is not yet understood. In the present study, metAFLP, a variation of methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, was used to investigate tissue culture-induced variation in triticale regenerants derived from four distinct genotypes using androgenesis and somatic embryogenesis. The metAFLP technique enabled identification of both sequence and DNA methylation pattern changes in a single experiment. Moreover, it was possible to quantify subtle effects such as sequence variation, demethylation, and de novo methylation, which affected 19, 5.5, 4.5% of sites, respectively. Comparison of variation in different genotypes and with different in vitro regeneration approaches demonstrated that both the culture technique and genetic background of donor plants affected tissue culture-induced variation. The results showed that the metAFLP approach could be used for quantification of tissue culture-induced variation and provided direct evidence that in vitro plant regeneration could cause genetic and epigenetic variation.

  5. Cultural transmission of tool use combined with habitat specializations leads to fine-scale genetic structure in bottlenose dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopps, Anna M; Ackermann, Corinne Y; Sherwin, William B; Allen, Simon J; Bejder, Lars; Krützen, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Socially learned behaviours leading to genetic population structure have rarely been described outside humans. Here, we provide evidence of fine-scale genetic structure that has probably arisen based on socially transmitted behaviours in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in western Shark Bay, Western Australia. We argue that vertical social transmission in different habitats has led to significant geographical genetic structure of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes. Dolphins with mtDNA haplotypes E or F are found predominantly in deep (more than 10 m) channel habitat, while dolphins with a third haplotype (H) are found predominantly in shallow habitat (less than 10 m), indicating a strong haplotype-habitat correlation. Some dolphins in the deep habitat engage in a foraging strategy using tools. These 'sponging' dolphins are members of one matriline, carrying haplotype E. This pattern is consistent with what had been demonstrated previously at another research site in Shark Bay, where vertical social transmission of sponging had been shown using multiple lines of evidence. Using an individual-based model, we found support that in western Shark Bay, socially transmitted specializations may have led to the observed genetic structure. The reported genetic structure appears to present an example of cultural hitchhiking of mtDNA haplotypes on socially transmitted foraging strategies, suggesting that, as in humans, genetic structure can be shaped through cultural transmission.

  6. Genetic study of axon regeneration with cultured adult dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijilafu; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2012-08-17

    It is well known that mature neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) cannot regenerate their axons after injuries due to diminished intrinsic ability to support axon growth and a hostile environment in the mature CNS(1,2). In contrast, mature neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) regenerate readily after injuries(3). Adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are well known to regenerate robustly after peripheral nerve injuries. Each DRG neuron grows one axon from the cell soma, which branches into two axonal branches: a peripheral branch innervating peripheral targets and a central branch extending into the spinal cord. Injury of the DRG peripheral axons results in substantial axon regeneration, whereas central axons in the spinal cord regenerate poorly after the injury. However, if the peripheral axonal injury occurs prior to the spinal cord injury (a process called the conditioning lesion), regeneration of central axons is greatly improved(4). Moreover, the central axons of DRG neurons share the same hostile environment as descending corticospinal axons in the spinal cord. Together, it is hypothesized that the molecular mechanisms controlling axon regeneration of adult DRG neurons can be harnessed to enhance CNS axon regeneration. As a result, adult DRG neurons are now widely used as a model system to study regenerative axon growth(5-7). Here we describe a method of adult DRG neuron culture that can be used for genetic study of axon regeneration in vitro. In this model adult DRG neurons are genetically manipulated via electroporation-mediated gene transfection(6,8). By transfecting neurons with DNA plasmid or si/shRNA, this approach enables both gain- and loss-of-function experiments to investigate the role of any gene-of-interest in axon growth from adult DRG neurons. When neurons are transfected with si/shRNA, the targeted endogenous protein is usually depleted after 3-4 days in culture, during which time robust axon growth has already occurred

  7. Regulating genetically modified food. Policy trajectories, political culture, and risk perceptions in the U.S., Canada, and EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlers, Anton E

    2010-09-01

    This paper examines whether national differences in political culture add an explanatory dimension to the formulation of policy in the area of biotechnology, especially with respect to genetically modified food. The analysis links the formulation of protective regulatory policies governing genetically modified food to both country and region-specific differences in uncertainty tolerance levels and risk perceptions in the United States, Canada, and European Union. Based on polling data and document analysis, the findings illustrate that these differences matter. Following a mostly opportunistic risk perception within an environment of high tolerance for uncertainty, policymakers in the United States and Canada modified existing regulatory frameworks that govern genetically modified food in their respective countries. In contrast, the mostly cautious perception of new food technologies and low tolerance for uncertainty among European Union member states has contributed to the creation of elaborate and stringent regulatory policies governing genetically modified food.

  8. Towards tailored radiopeptide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radojewski, Piotr [University Hospital Bern, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Dumont, Rebecca [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); UCLA, Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marincek, Nicolas; Walter, Martin A. [University Hospital Bern, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Brunner, Philippe; Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Briel, Matthias [University Hospital Basel, Basel Institute for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Somatostatin receptor-targeted radiopeptide therapy is commonly performed using single radioisotopes. We evaluated the benefits and harms of combining radioisotopes in radiopeptide therapy in patients with neuroendocrine tumor. Using multivariable-adjusted survival analyses and competing risk analyses we evaluated outcomes in patients with neuroendocrine tumor receiving {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC, {sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC or their combination. {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC plus {sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC treatment was associated with longer survival than {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC (66.1 vs. 47.5 months; n = 1,358; p < 0.001) or {sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC alone (66.1 vs. 45.5 months; n = 390; p < 0.001). {sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC was associated with longer survival than {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC in patients with solitary lesions (HR 0.3, range 0.1 - 0.7; n = 153; p = 0.005), extrahepatic metastases (HR 0.5, range 0.3 - 0.9; n = 256; p = 0.029) and metastases with low uptake (HR 0.1, range 0.05 - 0.4; n = 113; p = 0.001). {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC induced higher hematotoxicity rates than combined treatment (9.5 % vs. 4.0 %, p = 0.005) or {sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC (9.5 % vs. 1.4 %, p = 0.002). Renal toxicity was similar among the treatments. Using {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu might facilitate tailoring radiopeptide therapy and improve survival in patients with neuroendocrine tumors. (orig.)

  9. Increased risk of genetic and epigenetic instability in human embryonic stem cells associated with specific culture conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibon Garitaonandia

    Full Text Available The self-renewal and differentiation capacities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs make them a promising source of material for cell transplantation therapy, drug development, and studies of cellular differentiation and development. However, the large numbers of cells necessary for many of these applications require extensive expansion of hPSC cultures, a process that has been associated with genetic and epigenetic alterations. We have performed a combinatorial study on both hESCs and hiPSCs to compare the effects of enzymatic vs. mechanical passaging, and feeder-free vs. mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder substrate, on the genetic and epigenetic stability and the phenotypic characteristics of hPSCs. In extensive experiments involving over 100 continuous passages, we observed that both enzymatic passaging and feeder-free culture were associated with genetic instability, higher rates of cell proliferation, and persistence of OCT4/POU5F1-positive cells in teratomas, with enzymatic passaging having the stronger effect. In all combinations of culture conditions except for mechanical passaging on feeder layers, we noted recurrent deletions in the genomic region containing the tumor suppressor gene TP53, which was associated with decreased mRNA expression of TP53, as well as alterations in the expression of several downstream genes consistent with a decrease in the activity of the TP53 pathway. Among the hESC cultures, we also observed culture-associated variations in global gene expression and DNA methylation. The effects of enzymatic passaging and feeder-free conditions were also observed in hiPSC cultures. Our results highlight the need for careful assessment of the effects of culture conditions on cells intended for clinical therapies.

  10. Genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jussila, Minna M. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Viikki Biocenter, PO Box 56, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: minna.m.jussila@helsinki.fi; Jurgens, German [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Viikki Biocenter, PO Box 56, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Lindstroem, Kristina [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Viikki Biocenter, PO Box 56, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Suominen, Leena [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Viikki Biocenter, PO Box 56, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-01-15

    A collection of 50 indigenous meta-toluate tolerating bacteria isolated from oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis on selective medium was characterized and identified by classical and molecular methods. 16S rDNA partial sequencing showed the presence of five major lineages of the Bacteria domain. Gram-positive Rhodococcus, Bacillus and Arthrobacter and gram-negative Pseudomonas were the most abundant genera. Only one-fifth of the strains that tolerated m-toluate also degraded m-toluate. The inoculum Pseudomonas putida PaW85 was not found in the rhizosphere samples. The ability to degrade m-toluate by the TOL plasmid was detected only in species of the genus Pseudomonas. However, a few Rhodococcus erythropolis strains were found which were able to degrade m-toluate. A new finding was that Pseudomonas migulae strains and a few P. oryzihabitans strains were able to grow on m-toluate and most likely contained the TOL plasmid. Because strain specific differences in degradation abilities were found for P. oryzihabitans, separation at the strain level was important. For strain specific separation (GTG){sub 5} fingerprinting was the best method. A combination of the single locus ribotyping and the whole genomic fingerprinting techniques with the selective partial sequencing formed a practical molecular toolbox for studying genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere. - Bacterial diversity during rhizoremediation in oil-contaminated soil is characterized by a combination of molecular methods.

  11. GENETIC VARIABILITY OF CULTURED PLANT TISSUES UNDER NORMAL CONDITIONS AND UNDER STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgikh Yu.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variability induced by in vitro conditions known as somaclonal variation is of practical interest due to its potential uses in plant breeding but, on the other hand, if clonal propagation or transformation is main goal, it becomes an unwelcome phenomenon. Thus, it is important to know frequency, the genomic distribution, the mechanisms and factors influencing somaclonal variation. We studied variability of PCR-based DNA markers of cultured tissues and regenerated plants of maize and bread wheat. The original A188 line of maize and the somaclones obtained were tested using 38 RAPD and 10 ISSR primers. None of the A188 plants showed variation in the RAPD and ISSR spectra for any of the primers used. However, the PCR spectra obtained from the somaclones demonstrated some variations, i.e., 22 RAPD primers and 6 ISSR primers differentiated at least one somaclonal variant from the progenitor line. Six SCAR markers were developed based on several RAPD and ISSR fragments. The inheritance of these SCAR markers was verified in the selfing progeny of each somaclone in the R1–R4 generations and in the hybrids, with A188 as the parental line in the F1 and F2 generations. These markers were sequenced and bioinformatic searches were performed to understand the molecular events that may underlie the variability observed in the somaclones. All changes were found in noncoding sequences and were induced by different molecular events, such as the insertion of long terminal repeat transposon, precise miniature inverted repeat transposable element (MITE excision, microdeletion, recombination, and a change in the pool of mitochondrial DNA. In two groups of independently produced somaclones, the same features (morphological, molecular were variable, which confirms the theory of ‘hot spots’ occurring in the genome. The presence of the same molecular markers in the somaclones and in different non-somaclonal maize variants suggests that in some cases

  12. Analysis of genetic and cultural conservation value of three indigenous Croatian cattle breeds in a local and global context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramljak, J; Ivanković, A; Veit-Kensch, C E; Förster, M; Medugorac, I

    2011-02-01

    It is widely accepted that autochthonous cattle breeds can be important genetic resources for unforeseeable environmental conditions in the future. Apart from that, they often represent local culture and tradition and thus assist in the awareness of ethnic identity of a country. In Croatia, there are only three indigenous cattle breeds, Croatian Buša, Slavonian Syrmian Podolian and Istrian Cattle. All of them are threatened but specialized in a particular habitat and production system. We analysed 93 microsatellites in 51 animals of each breed to get thorough information about genetic diversity and population structure. We further set them within an existing frame of additional 16 breeds that have been genotyped for the same marker set and cover a geographical area from the domestication centre near Anatolia, through the Balkan and alpine regions, to the north-west of Europe. The cultural value was evaluated regarding the role in landscape, gastronomy, folklore and handicraft. The overall results recognize Croatian Buša being partly admixed but harbouring an enormous genetic diversity comparable with other traditional unselected Buša breeds in the Anatolian and Balkan areas. The Podolian cattle showed the lowest genetic diversity at the highest genetic distance to all remaining breeds but are playing an important role as part of the cultural landscape and thus contribute to the tourist industry. The genetic diversity of the Istrian cattle was found in the middle range of this study. It is already included in the tourist industry as a local food speciality. Current and future conservation strategies are discussed.

  13. Tactical Utility of Tailored Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-10

    www.popsci.com/ cars /article/2011-06/how-first- crowdsourced-military- car -can-remake-future-defense- manufacturing Tactical Utility of Tailored Systems...year lead time to develop a piece of equipment, if we were able to collapse the pace of which that manufacturing takes place, that would save taxpayers...within budget. This paper hopes to explore the idea of combining virtual environments and rapid manufacturing to create tailored materiel specific

  14. Selective breeding for desiccation tolerance in liquid culture provides genetically stable inbred lines of the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbesse, Samuel; Sumaya, Nanette Hope; Dörfler, Anna Verena; Strauch, Olaf; Ehlers, Ralf-Udo

    2013-01-01

    The entomopathogenic nematode (EPN) Heterorhabditis bacteriophora is used in biological plant protection to control pest insects. In the past, several attempts targeted at an enhancement of the desiccation tolerance of EPN by genetic selection in order to improve their storage stability. The subsequent loss of improved beneficial traits after release of selection pressure has often been reported. In order to stabilize progress of selective breeding, selection during liquid culturing was tested against propagation in host insects. After release of the selection pressure, the tolerance was monitored over additional reproductive cycles in vivo and in vitro to compare the stability of the trait. Furthermore, it was tested whether the virulence of the selected strains would be impaired. Exposure to desiccation stress prior to propagation, in vivo or in vitro, both resulted in increasing desiccation tolerance. When selection pressure was released, the gained tolerance was lost again during in vivo production, whereas the tolerance was maintained at a high level when EPNs were cultured in liquid culture. In Heterorhabditis sp., liquid culture conditions produce highly homozygous, genetically stable inbred lines. The investigation provides easily applicable methods to improve and stabilize beneficial traits of heterorhabditid EPNs through selective breeding in liquid culture. Compared to nematodes from in vivo propagation, production in liquid media yielded EPN of higher virulence.

  15. Effects of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    . The culturable heterotrophic diversity was investigated by colony morphology and colony appearance on solid LB medium. Functional diversity was analysed as sole carbon utilisation patterns in ECOplates. Genetic diversity was measured as bands on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGCE) gels obtained...... analysed by Shannon-Weaver indices, functional diversity was found to increase almost immediately after mercury addition and to remain at a level higher than the control soil for the rest of the experiment. The fraction of culturable heterotrophic bacteria increased from 1% to 10% of the total bacterial...

  16. Studies on Immature Embryo Culture in vitro in Wheat:Genetic Stability analysis of Somatic variation in main agronomic characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWenxiang; Zenghanbing; 等

    1995-01-01

    The genetic stablility of variations of main agronomic characteristics in progenies from the regenerated plants of immature embryo culture in vitro was studied.The results showed that the variations of earliness in maturity,high 1000-grain weight,plant height and grain weight per spike were heritable and tended to be stable in IE3 and completely stable in IE4,The wide variation of main agronomic characteristics induced by embryo culture in vitro provided the probability of sclection in wheat improvement.Some somaclonal lines with useful variations could be used directly in wheat production.

  17. Validated Liquid Culture Monitoring System for Lifespan Extension of Caenorhabditis elegans through Genetic and Dietary Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Myat Thu Thu; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Munesue, Seiichi; Han, Dong; Harada, Shin-Ichi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Nutritional and genetic factors influence aging and life expectancy. The reduction of food intake without malnutrition, referred to caloric restriction (CR), has been shown to increase lifespan in a wide variety of species. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is one of the principle models with which to study the biology of aging and search for anti-aging compounds. In this study, we validated and optimized a high-throughput liquid culture system to monitor C. elegans lifespan with minimized mechanical stress. We used alive and ultraviolet (UV)-killed Escherichia coli (E. coli) OP50 at 10(8) or 10(9) colony-forming units (cfu)/ml to feed Bristol N2 wild-type (WT) and mutant worms of a well-characterized insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (ILS) pathway: the insulin receptor homolog daf-2 (e1370), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase age-1 (hx546), and transcriptional factor FOXO homolog daf-16 (mu86 and mgDf50). Compared with alive E. coli at 10(9) cfu/ml, supplementations of alive E. coli at 10(8) cfu/ml or UV-killed E. coli at 10(9) cfu/ml dramatically prolonged lifespan in WT and age-1 mutants, and to a lesser extent, in daf-2 and daf-16 mutants, suggesting that signaling pathways in CR and ILS do not overlap fully. Feeding 10(8) cfu/ml UV-killed E. coli, which led to maximally saturated longevity in WT and daf-2 mutant, can prolonged lifespan in age-1, but not daf-16, mutants. This approach will be useful for investigating the biology of aging, physiological responses and gene functions under CR conditions and also for screening pharmacologic compounds to extend lifespan or affect other biologic processes.

  18. Human adipose stromal cells (ASC for the regeneration of injured cartilage display genetic stability after in vitro culture expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Neri

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells are emerging as an extremely promising therapeutic agent for tissue regeneration due to their multi-potency, immune-modulation and secretome activities, but safety remains one of the main concerns, particularly when in vitro manipulation, such as cell expansion, is performed before clinical application. Indeed, it is well documented that in vitro expansion reduces replicative potential and some multi-potency and promotes cell senescence. Furthermore, during in vitro aging there is a decrease in DNA synthesis and repair efficiency thus leading to DNA damage accumulation and possibly inducing genomic instability. The European Research Project ADIPOA aims at validating an innovative cell-based therapy where autologous adipose stromal cells (ASCs are injected in the diseased articulation to activate regeneration of the cartilage. The primary objective of this paper was to assess the safety of cultured ASCs. The maintenance of genetic integrity was evaluated during in vitro culture by karyotype and microsatellite instability analysis. In addition, RT-PCR array-based evaluation of the expression of genes related to DNA damage signaling pathways was performed. Finally, the senescence and replicative potential of cultured cells was evaluated by telomere length and telomerase activity assessment, whereas anchorage-independent clone development was tested in vitro by soft agar growth. We found that cultured ASCs do not show genetic alterations and replicative senescence during the period of observation, nor anchorage-independent growth, supporting an argument for the safety of ASCs for clinical use.

  19. Genetic study of human cells in vitro. Carbohydrate variants from cultures of HeLa and conjunctival cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANG, R S

    1960-02-01

    The isolation of carbohydrate variants from cultures of HeLa and conjunctival cells was described. Factors inherent in the cell culture system, such as parent populations and dialyzed serums, have been shown to influence the outcome of variant isolations. Established stable variants incorporated significantly more pentoses or lactate into various cell fractions than the parent cultures. Besides their abilities to propagate continuously in the selecting environments, the variants multiplied slower, were more susceptible to sub-zero preservation and the cytotoxic effect of D-2-deoxyglucose, showed lower cloning efficiencies and were less susceptible to the deleterious effect of glucose oxidase. The ribose variants also differed from the parent cultures in morphological appearance such as formation of multinucleated cells and ring-shaped colonies. They converted more ribose into other component sugars of mucopolysaccharides than the parent cultures. Preliminary analyses of the mucopolysaccharides extracted from the ribose variants and parent cultures showed large difference in their carbohydrate (Molisch-positive materials) and DNA ratios. Evidence suggests that a sequence of interrelated events from genetic selection to primitive morphogenesis has been established.

  20. Genetic fallout in biocultural landscapes: molecular imperialism and the cultural politics of (not) seeing transgenes in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophe Bonneuil; Foyer, Jean; Wynne, Brian

    2014-12-01

    This article explores the trajectory of the global controversy over the introgression (or not) of transgenes from genetically modified maize into Mexican indigenous maize landraces. While a plurality of knowledge-making processes were deployed to render transgenes visible or invisible, we analyze how a particular in vitro based DNA-centered knowledge came to marginalize other forms of knowledge, thus obscuring other bio-cultural dimensions key to the understanding of gene flow and maize diversity. We show that dominant molecular norms of proof and standards of detection, which co-developed with the world of industrial monocropping and gene patenting, discarded and externalized non-compliant actors (i.e. complex maize genomes, human dimensions of gene flow). Operating in the name of high science, they hence obscured the complex biological and cultural processes that maintain crop diversity and enacted a cultural-political domination over the world of Mexican landraces and indigenous communities.

  1. Optimization to the Culture Conditions for Phellinus Production with Regression Analysis and Gene-Set Based Genetic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongwei; Xin, Yuezhen; Wang, Xun; Sun, Beibei; Xia, Shengyu; Li, Hui; Zhu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus is a kind of fungus and is known as one of the elemental components in drugs to avoid cancers. With the purpose of finding optimized culture conditions for Phellinus production in the laboratory, plenty of experiments focusing on single factor were operated and large scale of experimental data were generated. In this work, we use the data collected from experiments for regression analysis, and then a mathematical model of predicting Phellinus production is achieved. Subsequently, a gene-set based genetic algorithm is developed to optimize the values of parameters involved in culture conditions, including inoculum size, PH value, initial liquid volume, temperature, seed age, fermentation time, and rotation speed. These optimized values of the parameters have accordance with biological experimental results, which indicate that our method has a good predictability for culture conditions optimization.

  2. Do parental perceptions and motivations towards genetic testing and prenatal diagnosis for deafness vary in different cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Risha; Puri, Ratna D; Saxena, Renu; Verma, Ishwar C

    2013-01-01

    Surveys of attitudes of individuals with deafness and their families towards genetic testing or prenatal diagnosis have mostly been carried out in the West. It is expected that the perceptions and attitudes would vary amongst persons of different cultures and economic background. There is little information on the prevailing attitudes for genetic testing and prenatal diagnosis for deafness in developing countries. Therefore, this study evaluates the motivations of Indian people with inherited hearing loss towards such testing. Twenty-eight families with history of congenital hearing loss (23 hearing parents with child/family member with deafness, 4 couples with both partners having deafness and 1 parent and child with deafness) participated in a semi-structured survey investigating their interest, attitudes, and intentions for using genetic and prenatal testing for deafness. Participants opinioned that proper management and care of individuals with deafness were handicapped by limited rehabilitation facilities with significant financial and social burden. Nineteen (68%) opted for genetic testing. Twenty-six (93%) expressed high interest in prenatal diagnosis, while 19 (73%) would consider termination of an affected fetus. Three hearing couples, in whom the causative mutations were identified, opted for prenatal diagnosis. On testing, all the three fetuses were affected and the hearing parents elected to terminate the pregnancies. This study provides an insight into the contrasting perceptions towards hearing disability in India and its influence on the desirability of genetic testing and prenatal diagnosis.

  3. Non-genetic transmission of information: Candidate cognitive processes and the evolution of culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, H C

    1995-12-01

    The evolution of dual-inheritance systems, specifically the evolution of human culture, are considered as evolutionary events of profound significance. In this paper I adopt the view commonly held amongst biologists in recent years that human cultural change can be fruitfully understood as cultural evolution. Such an approach does not deny the possibility of understanding cultural change from other viewpoints. It does, however, have the advantage of having to be couched in explicitly psychological terms. Using the replicator-interactor theory of Dawkins and Hull I explore what cognitive mechanisms might be identified as having the properties of a replicator, and how reconstructions of human evolution may help in identifying such mechanisms.

  4. Improved growth media and culture techniques for genetic analysis and assessment of biomass utilization by Caldicellulosiruptor bescii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Joel; Chung, Daehwan; Cha, Minseok; Copeland, Jennifer; Grayeski, Philip; Westpheling, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Methods for efficient growth and manipulation of relatively uncharacterized bacteria facilitate their study and are essential for genetic manipulation. We report new growth media and culture techniques for Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, the most thermophilic cellulolytic bacterium known. A low osmolarity defined growth medium (LOD) was developed that avoids problems associated with precipitates that form in previously reported media allowing the monitoring of culture density by optical density at 680 nm (OD(680)) and more efficient DNA transformation by electroporation. This is a defined minimal medium and does not support growth when a carbon source is omitted, making it suitable for selection of nutritional markers as well as the study of biomass utilization by C. bescii. A low osmolarity complex growth medium (LOC) was developed that dramatically improves growth and culture viability during storage, making it a better medium for routine growth and passaging of C. bescii. Both media contain significantly lower solute concentration than previously published media, allowing for flexibility in developing more specialized media types while avoiding the issues of growth inhibition and cell lysis due to osmotic stress. Plating on LOD medium solidified by agar results in ~1,000-fold greater plating efficiency than previously reported and allows the isolation of discrete colonies. These new media represent a significant advance for both genetic manipulation and the study of biomass utilization in C. bescii, and may be applied broadly across the Caldicellulosiruptor genus.

  5. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Coffea arabica (L. is greatly enhanced by using established embryogenic callus cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lashermes Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following genome sequencing of crop plants, one of the main challenges today is determining the function of all the predicted genes. When gene validation approaches are used for woody species, the main obstacle is the low recovery rate of transgenic plants from elite or commercial cultivars. Embryogenic calli have frequently been the target tissue for transformation, but the difficulty in producing or maintaining embryogenic tissues is one of the main problems encountered in genetic transformation of many woody plants, including Coffea arabica. Results We identified the conditions required for successful long-term proliferation of embryogenic cultures in C. arabica and designed a highly efficient and reliable Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method based on these conditions. The transformation protocol with LBA1119 harboring pBin 35S GFP was established by evaluating the effect of different parameters on transformation efficiency by GFP detection. Using embryogenic callus cultures, co-cultivation with LBA1119 OD600 = 0.6 for five days at 20 °C enabled reproducible transformation. The maintenance conditions for the embryogenic callus cultures, particularly a high auxin to cytokinin ratio, the age of the culture (optimum for 7-10 months of proliferation and the use of a yellow callus phenotype, were the most important factors for achieving highly efficient transformation (> 90%. At the histological level, successful transformation was related to the number of proembryogenic masses present. All the selected plants were proved to be transformed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization. Conclusion Most progress in increasing transformation efficiency in coffee has been achieved by optimizing the production conditions of embryogenic cultures used as target tissues for transformation. This is the first time that a strong positive effect of the age of the culture on transformation efficiency was demonstrated. Our

  6. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschini Alessia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT or knock-in (KI mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. Results KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Conclusions Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  7. [Tailor-made strategy in HCV treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2012-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global health problem and a leading cause of end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Treatment of HCV infection with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin can eradicate chronic HCV infection in approximately 50% of patients infected with high viremia of HCV genotype 1, and spontaneous viral clearance was observed in approximately 30% of individuals with acute infection. These findings were strongly expected to reflect variations of the host genome. Significant breakthrough by the genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach led to the discovery of genetic polymorphisms playing a major role in the evolution of infection, as well as on treatment response and adverse effects. Herein, we present current evidence with regard to the relationship between host variations and clinical outcome of hepatitis C, and focus on the potential clinical implications with respect to tailor-made therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

  8. Correlation between the Chemical and Genetic Relationships among Thymus saturejoides Genotypes Cultured under in vitro and in vivo Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, Aicha; Udupa, Sripada M; Iraqi, Driss; Meksem, Khalid; Hmamouchi, Mohamed; ElMeskaoui, Abdelmalek

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the in vitro and in vivo essential oil (EO) composition and genetic variability in six micropropagated genotypes of Thymus saturejoides Coss., a Mediterranean medicinal and aromatic plant, were analyzed by GC/MS and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Yield and composition of the EO varied between genotypes. Cluster analysis based on RAPD data and EO grouped the six genotypes in three groups in both culture conditions, thus showing considerable intraspecific genetic and chemical variations. Applying the Mantel test, the result showed a significant correlation between the two proximity matrices RAPD and EO obtained from in vitro genotypes, whereas this correlation was not observed when using the EO obtained from the in vivo genotypes.

  9. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  10. Imposing nonlinear constraints when estimating genetic and cultural transmission under assortative mating: a simulation study using Mx and BUGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Stéphanie M

    2009-01-01

    Modeling both genetic and cultural transmission in parent-offspring data in the presence of phenotypic assortment requires the imposition of nonlinear constraints. This article reports a simulation study that determined how well the structural equation modeling software package Mx and the Bayesian-oriented BUGS software package can handle such nonlinear constraints under various conditions. Results generally showed good and comparable results for Mx and BUGS, although BUGS was much slower than Mx. However, since BUGS uses Markov-chain Monte Carlo estimation it could be used for parent-offspring models with non-normal data and/or item-response theory models.

  11. Genetic Diversity and Differentiation of the Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides Between and Within Cultured Stocks and Wild Populations Inferred from Microsatellite DNA Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoran Lin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we employed microsatellite DNA markers to analyze the genetic diversity and differentiation between and within cultured stocks and wild populations of the orange-spotted grouper originating from the South China Sea and Southeast Asia. Compared to wild populations, genetic changes including reduced genetic diversity and significant differentiation have taken place in cultured grouper stocks, as shown by allele richness and heterozygosity studies, pairwise Fst, structure, molecular variance analysis, as well as multidimensional scaling analysis. Although two geographically adjacent orange-spotted grouper populations in China showed negligible genetic divergence, significant population differentiation was observed in wild grouper populations distributed in a wide geographical area from China, through Malaysia to Indonesia. However, the Mantel test rejected the isolation-by-distance model of genetic structure, which indicated the genetic differentiation among the populations could result from the co-effects of various factors, such as historical dispersal, local environment, ocean currents, river flows and island blocks. Our results demonstrated that microsatellite markers could be suitable not only for genetic monitoring cultured stocks but also for revealing the population structuring of wild orange-spotted grouper populations. Meanwhile, our study provided important information for breeding programs, management of cultured stocks and conservation of wild populations of the orange-spotted grouper.

  12. AGROBACTERIUM-MEDIATED GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF SORGHUM USING TISSUE CULTURE-BASED AND POLLEN-MEDIATED APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkonin L.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic transformation is a powerful tool for genetic improvement of arable crops. Genetic engineering approaches are especially important for modification of starch and protein contents, vitamin and micronutrient concentration, improvement of nutritive value of protein fractions, and increase tolerance to environmental stresses. Application of transgenic technologies for genetic improvement of sorghum, a highly productive heat tolerant and drought resistant crop, is extremely important since climate aridization in many regions all over the globe hampers sustainable production of traditional cereals, such as wheat, maize and barley. However, sorghum, in spite of great number of investigations, is one of the most recalcitrant crop species to genetic modification. The most frequently reported problems are a low frequency of transformation and silencing of transgenes. Using the A. tumefaciens strain AGL0/p35SGIB with the bar and gus-intron genes under the nos and CaMV35S promoters, respectively, we studied different methods of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of the grain sorghum: in vitro culture-based techniques, by inoculation of immature embryos or embryo-derived calli, and pollen-mediated approach, by inoculation of flowering panicles. Four lines of grain sorghum – Milo-10, [9E] Milo-10 (CMS-line, KVV-114, and KVV-45 – were used. In both approaches, for activation of vir-genes agrobacterial cell suspension was grown in the AB or modified AB media with acetosyringone at room temperature. In vitro culture approach was effective for obtaining transgenic plants in the lines Milo-10 and KVV-45, which were able to produce embryogenic callus from immature embryos after their co-cultivation with agrobacterial cell suspension. Callus cultures tolerant to glufosinate ammonium (GA and capable to plant regeneration were obtained. The frequency of immature embryos producing PCR-positive transgenic plants varied in different experiments

  13. Genetic Differentiation in South Amerindians Is Related to Environmental and Cultural Diversity: Evidence from the Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R.; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; De Stefano, Gian Franco; Labarga, Cristina Martinez; Rickards, Olga; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Santos, Fabrício R.

    2001-01-01

    The geographic structure of Y-chromosome variability has been analyzed in native populations of South America, through use of the high-frequency Native American haplogroup defined by the DYS199-T allele and six Y-chromosome–linked microsatellites (DYS19, DYS389A, DYS389B, DYS390, DYS391, and DYS393), analyzed in 236 individuals. The following pattern of within- and among-population variability emerges from the analysis of microsatellite data: (1) the Andean populations exhibit significantly higher levels of within-population variability than do the eastern populations of South America; (2) the spatial-autocorrelation analysis suggests a significant geographic structure of Y-chromosome genetic variability in South America, although a typical evolutionary pattern could not be categorically identified; and (3) genetic-distance analyses and the analysis of molecular variance suggest greater homogeneity between Andean populations than between non-Andean ones. On the basis of these results, we propose a model for the evolution of the male lineages of South Amerindians that involves differential patterns of genetic drift and gene flow. In the western part of the continent, which is associated with the Andean area, populations have relatively large effective sizes and gene-flow levels among them, which has created a trend toward homogenization of the gene pool. On the other hand, eastern populations—settled in the Amazonian region, the central Brazilian plateau, and the Chaco region—have exhibited higher rates of genetic drift and lower levels of gene flow, with a resulting trend toward genetic differentiation. This model is consistent with the linguistic and cultural diversity of South Amerindians, the environmental heterogeneity of the continent, and the available paleoecological data. PMID:11353402

  14. Towards tailor-made participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika

    2012-01-01

    Public participation has become an important element of governance in many Western European countries. However, among scholars and practitioners there is a recognition that participatory governance processes tend to produce systematic exclusions. Knowledge about 'who' participates and 'how......' they participate can enhance our understanding of participatory processes. This paper presents some characterisations of citizens based on a review of the literature on participation. In addition, examples of how to tailor participation for different type of citizens are provided based on studies of urban...... regeneration programmes and local environmental initiatives in Denmark. The paper concludes that in order to broaden the inclusion of affected citizens, public authorities need to be tailor participation processes by applying distinct approaches to different types of citizens...

  15. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Joel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  16. ZERODUR TAILORED for cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, R.; Westerhoff, T.

    2014-07-01

    ZERODUR® glass ceramic from SCHOTT is known for its very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) at room temperature and its excellent CTE homogeneity. It is widely used for ground-based astronomical mirrors but also for satellite applications. Many reference application demonstrate the excellent and long lasting performance of ZERODUR® components in orbit. For space application a low CTE of the mirror material is required at cryogenic temperatures together with a good match of the thermal expansion to the supporting structure material. It is possible to optimize the coefficient of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® for cryogenic applications. This paper reports on measurements of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® down to cryogenic temperatures of 10 K performed by the PTB (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstallt, Braunschweig, Germany, the national metrology laboratory). The ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO presented in this paper has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion down to 70 K. The maximum absolute integrated thermal expansion down to 10 K is only about 20 ppm. Mirror blanks made from ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO can be light weighted to almost 90% with our modern processing technologies. With ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO, SCHOTT offers the mirror blank material for the next generation of space telescope applications.

  17. Deep drawing simulation of Tailored Blanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den A.; Meinders, V.T.; Stokman, B.

    1998-01-01

    Tailored blanks are increasingly used in the automotive industry. A tailored blank consists of different metal parts, which are joined by a welding process. These metal parts usually have different material properties. Hence, the main advantage of using a tailored blank is to provide the right mater

  18. A cross-cultural comparison of consumers' purchase intentions with regard to genetically modified foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    1999-01-01

    CONSUMERS' PURCHASE INTENTIONS WITH REGARD TO GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS ARE INVESTIGATED THROUGH A CROSS-NATIONAL SURVEY IN DENMARK, GERMANY, GREAT BRITAIN AND ITALY, USING BEER AND YOGHURT AS EXAMPLES (N=1000 PER PRODUCT). RESULTS SHOW THAT GENERALLY COGNITIVE STRUCTURES OF ITALIAN CONSUMERS...

  19. Culture, threat, and mental illness stigma: identifying culture-specific threat among Chinese-American groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lawrence H; Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Kotabe, Hiroki; Link, Bruce G; Saw, Anne; Wong, Gloria; Phelan, Jo C

    2013-07-01

    We incorporate anthropological insights into a stigma framework to elucidate the role of culture in threat perception and stigma among Chinese groups. Prior work suggests that genetic contamination that jeopardizes the extension of one's family lineage may comprise a culture-specific threat among Chinese groups. In Study 1, a national survey conducted from 2002 to 2003 assessed cultural differences in mental illness stigma and perceptions of threat in 56 Chinese-Americans and 589 European-Americans. Study 2 sought to empirically test this culture-specific threat of genetic contamination to lineage via a memory paradigm. Conducted from June to August 2010, 48 Chinese-American and 37 European-American university students in New York City read vignettes containing content referring to lineage or non-lineage concerns. Half the participants in each ethnic group were assigned to a condition in which the illness was likely to be inherited (genetic condition) and the rest read that the illness was unlikely to be inherited (non-genetic condition). Findings from Study 1 and 2 were convergent. In Study 1, culture-specific threat to lineage predicted cultural variation in stigma independently and after accounting for other forms of threat. In Study 2, Chinese-Americans in the genetic condition were more likely to accurately recall and recognize lineage content than the Chinese-Americans in the non-genetic condition, but that memorial pattern was not found for non-lineage content. The identification of this culture-specific threat among Chinese groups has direct implications for culturally-tailored anti-stigma interventions. Further, this framework might be implemented across other conditions and cultural groups to reduce stigma across cultures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Serenomyces associated with palms in southeastern USA: isolation, culture storage and genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M L; Des Jardin, E A

    2014-01-01

    Serenomyces is a genus belonging to the family Phaeochoraceae, which is known to occur only in association with the plant family Arecaceae (palms). It is presumed to be one of the causes of a leaf disease referred to as either rachis blight or petiole blight, depending on the palm species affected. The fungus is not readily observed, with few reports in the literature; it cannot be readily isolated from tissue, with only one known instance of it being cultured on artificial media and has no DNA sequences deposited in GenBank. Over an 8 y period, leaves symptomatic for rachis or petiole blight were obtained from Florida and South Carolina, USA. The fungus was induced to produce ascospores, and single-spore isolates were obtained in culture and, in some instances, induced to produce ascospores in culture. Based on ascospores size and ITS sequencing, Serenomyces from Phoenix canariensis and P. dactylifera form one group, Serenomyces from Thrinax radiata form a second group and Serenomyces from Sabal palmetto form a third. All three groups are most similar morphologically to Serenomyces phoenicis. Due to the observed instability of Serenomyces in culture, we have suggestions regarding the storage of this fungus.

  1. Genetic and functional characterization of culturable plant-beneficial actinobacteria associated with yam rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam Palaniyandi, Sasikumar; Yang, Seung Hwan; Damodharan, Karthiyaini; Suh, Joo-Won

    2013-12-01

    Actinobacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of yam plants from agricultural fields from Yeoju, South Korea and analyzed for their genetic and plant-beneficial functional diversity. A total of 29 highly occurring actinobacterial isolates from the yam rhizosphere were screened for various plant-beneficial traits such as antimicrobial activity on fungi and bacteria; biocontrol traits such as production of siderophore, protease, chitinase, endo-cellulase, and β-glucanase. The isolates were also screened for plant growth-promoting (PGP) traits such as auxin production, phosphate solubilization, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, and in vitro Arabidopsis growth promotion. 16S rDNA sequence-based phylogenetic analysis was carried out on the actinobacterial isolates to determine their genetic relatedness to known actinobacteria. BOX-PCR analysis revealed high genetic diversity among the isolates. Several isolates were identified to belong to the genus Streptomyces and a few to Kitasatospora. The actinobacterial strains exhibited high diversity in their functionality and were identified as novel and promising candidates for future development into biocontrol and PGP agents. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Time Series with Tailored Nonlinearities

    CERN Document Server

    Raeth, C

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated how to generate time series with tailored nonlinearities by inducing well- defined constraints on the Fourier phases. Correlations between the phase information of adjacent phases and (static and dynamic) measures of nonlinearities are established and their origin is explained. By applying a set of simple constraints on the phases of an originally linear and uncor- related Gaussian time series, the observed scaling behavior of the intensity distribution of empirical time series can be reproduced. The power law character of the intensity distributions being typical for e.g. turbulence and financial data can thus be explained in terms of phase correlations.

  3. Culturing-based Temperature Calibration of a Genetically Distinct, Alkenone-producing Haptophyte Species isolated from Lake George, ND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Andersen, R. A.; Huang, Y.; Amaral-Zettler, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Lacustrine alkenones are rapidly becoming an important tool for continental paleoclimate reconstructions. However, DNA sequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA marker genes has uncovered multiple species of haptophytes in different lakes. To date, there are only two isolated lacustrine species Chrysotila lamellosa and Isochrysis galbana available for culture studies. In our study, we report the isolation of a new haptophyte species from Lake George (LG) that, based on analyses of partial large subunit rRNA gene sequences, is genetically distinct from both Chrysotila lamellosa and Isochrysis galbana. We examined alkenone unsaturation index UK37 values for the LG species at 4°C, 10°C, 15°C, 20°C and 25°C as a function of temperature in a culture experiment. The temperature sensitivity of the new species was significantly higher than previously cultured Isochrysis galbana and Chrysotila lamellosa strains, with a slope that was 25 to 100 % higher. We found that the best linear relationship was obtained when two double-bond alkenones were excluded from the calibration (we developed an index termed UK''37 = [C37:4] / [C37:3+C37:4]). In particular, UK''37 is more linear to the growth temperature than UK37 at low (4-10°C) and high (20-25°C) temperature ranges. Our experiments show that both UK37 and UK''37 of this new alkenone-produced species is strongly controlled by culture temperature and can be used for paleoclimate reconstruction. However, we recommend the use of UK''37 index to reconstruct temperature if the haptophyte's growing environment falls within temperature extremes (4-10°C and 20-25°C). This newly cultivated species broadens our ability of applying lacustrine haptophyte calibrations to continental paleothermometry.

  4. Genetic diversity of culturable Vibrio in an Australian blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Tzu Nin; Bolch, Christopher J S

    2015-09-17

    Bacillary necrosis associated with Vibrio species is the common cause of larval and spat mortality during commercial production of Australian blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. A total of 87 randomly selected Vibrio isolates from various stages of rearing in a commercial mussel hatchery were characterised using partial sequences of the ATP synthase alpha subunit gene (atpA). The sequenced isolates represented 40 unique atpA genotypes, overwhelmingly dominated (98%) by V. splendidus group genotypes, with 1 V. harveyi group genotype also detected. The V. splendidus group sequences formed 5 moderately supported clusters allied with V. splendidus/V. lentus, V. atlanticus, V. tasmaniensis, V. cyclitrophicus and V. toranzoniae. All water sources showed considerable atpA gene diversity among Vibrio isolates, with 30 to 60% of unique isolates recovered from each source. Over half (53%) of Vibrio atpA genotypes were detected only once, and only 7 genotypes were recovered from multiple sources. Comparisons of phylogenetic diversity using UniFrac analysis showed that the culturable Vibrio community from intake, header, broodstock and larval tanks were phylogenetically similar, while spat tank communities were different. Culturable Vibrio associated with spat tank seawater differed in being dominated by V. toranzoniae-affiliated genotypes. The high diversity of V. splendidus group genotypes detected in this study reinforces the dynamic nature of microbial communities associated with hatchery culture and complicates our efforts to elucidate the role of V. splendidus group bacteria in vibriosis.

  5. [Pharmacogenetics and tailored drug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F.C.; Borregaard, N.

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics traditionally designates the study of genetically determined variation in metabolism of drugs and toxins from the environment. The concept of phamacogenetics has been widened to encompass how essential genetic alterations central to the development of diseases may by used to target...

  6. Are There Cultural Differences in Parental Interest in Early Diagnosis and Genetic Risk Assessment for Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiet, Claire; Couchon, Elizabeth; Carr, Kelly; Carayol, Jerôme; Cohen, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are many societal and cultural differences between healthcare systems and the use of genetic testing in the US and France. These differences may affect the diagnostic process for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in each country and influence parental opinions regarding the use of genetic screening tools for ASD. Methods: Using an internet-based tool, a survey of parents with at least one child with ASD was conducted. A total of 162 participants from the US completed an English version of the survey and 469 participants from France completed a French version of the survey. Respondents were mainly females (90%) and biological parents (94.3% in the US and 97.2% in France). Results: The mean age of ASD diagnosis reported was not significantly different between France (57.5 ± 38.4 months) and the US (56.5 ± 52.7 months) (p = 0.82) despite significant difference in the average age at which a difference in development was first suspected [29.7 months (±28.4) vs. 21.4 months (±18.1), respectively, p = 7 × 10−4]. Only 27.8% of US participants indicated that their child diagnosed with ASD had undergone diagnostic genetic testing, whereas 61.7% of the French participants indicated this was the case (p = 2.7 × 10−12). In both countries, the majority of respondents (69.3% and 80% from France and the US, respectively) indicated high interest in the use of a genetic screening test for autism. Conclusion: Parents from France and the US report a persistent delay between the initial suspicion of a difference in development and the diagnosis of ASD. Significantly fewer US participants underwent genetic testing although this result should be regarded as exploratory given the limitations. The significance of these between country differences will be discussed. PMID:24795872

  7. Culturally relevant inquiry-based laboratory module implementations in upper-division genetics and cell biology teaching laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students' interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students' professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate.

  8. A genetic engineering approach to genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gero, J S; Kazakov, V

    2001-01-01

    We present an extension to the standard genetic algorithm (GA), which is based on concepts of genetic engineering. The motivation is to discover useful and harmful genetic materials and then execute an evolutionary process in such a way that the population becomes increasingly composed of useful genetic material and increasingly free of the harmful genetic material. Compared to the standard GA, it provides some computational advantages as well as a tool for automatic generation of hierarchical genetic representations specifically tailored to suit certain classes of problems.

  9. Navigating the cultural geography of indigenous peoples’ attitude toward genetic research: the Ohana (family heart project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Vawer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Little is known about the burden of heart failure among indigenous populations, including Native Hawaiians (NH. Recent concerns about genetic research in the NH community resonate with similar concerns raised by American Indian, Alaskan Native and Canadian First Nations communities and have raised questions about the best way to proceed with studies involving biological specimens. Objective . To help us plan a study to investigate disparities in heart failure incidence and outcomes in a NH community, we performed a qualitative study to examine the community's expectations for heart failure research that includes the collection of biological specimens. Methods . Eighty-five NH with a personal or family history of heart failure, who lived in a geographically isolated community in the state of Hawai‘i participated in 1 of 16 semi-structured interviews. Interviews were conducted in a standard manner, with open-ended questions designed to explore their expectations for a heart failure research study that included the collection of biological specimens. Interviews were analyzed thematically through iterative readings and coding. †Deceased. Results . Four key themes regarding heart failure research with the use of biological specimens characterized their expectations: (a Need to foster trust between investigator and community; (b Establish a partnership with the community to identify needs and goals; (c Need for mutual benefit to investigator and community; (d Identification of a key voice to represent the community. Participants expressed strong support for research. However, the strength of that support was directly related to the strength of the relationship between the research team and the community. The collection of biological specimens for genetic analyses was not an explicit concern or barrier per se. Conclusions . It appears feasible to conduct a heart failure research study that includes the collection of biological samples

  10. Navigating the cultural geography of indigenous peoples' attitude toward genetic research: the Ohana (family) heart project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawer, May; Kaina, Patsy; Leonard, Ann; Ogata, Michael; Blackburn, Beth; Young, Malia; Seto, Todd B

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the burden of heart failure among indigenous populations, including Native Hawaiians (NH). Recent concerns about genetic research in the NH community resonate with similar concerns raised by American Indian, Alaskan Native and Canadian First Nations communities and have raised questions about the best way to proceed with studies involving biological specimens. To help us plan a study to investigate disparities in heart failure incidence and outcomes in a NH community, we performed a qualitative study to examine the community's expectations for heart failure research that includes the collection of biological specimens. Eighty-five NH with a personal or family history of heart failure, who lived in a geographically isolated community in the state of Hawai'i participated in 1 of 16 semi-structured interviews. Interviews were conducted in a standard manner, with open-ended questions designed to explore their expectations for a heart failure research study that included the collection of biological specimens. Interviews were analyzed thematically through iterative readings and coding. four key themes regarding heart failure research with the use of biological specimens characterized their expectations: (a) Need to foster trust between investigator and community; (b) Establish a partnership with the community to identify needs and goals; (c) Need for mutual benefit to investigator and community; (d) Identification of a key voice to represent the community. Participants expressed strong support for research. However, the strength of that support was directly related to the strength of the relationship between the research team and the community. The collection of biological specimens for genetic analyses was not an explicit concern or barrier per se. It appears feasible to conduct a heart failure research study that includes the collection of biological samples. However, success will likely require addressing the community's expectations, including

  11. Long term culture of mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxia promotes a genetic program maintaining their undifferentiated and multipotent status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Carvalho Marcelo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bone marrow, hematopietic and mesenchymal stem cells form a unique niche in which the oxygen tension is low. Hypoxia may have a role in maintaining stem cell fate, self renewal and multipotency. However, whereas most studies addressed the effect of transient in vitro exposure of MSC to hypoxia, permanent culture under hypoxia should reflect the better physiological conditions. Results Morphologic studies, differentiation and transcriptional profiling experiments were performed on MSC cultured in normoxia (21% O2 versus hypoxia (5% O2 for up to passage 2. Cells at passage 0 and at passage 2 were compared, and those at passage 0 in hypoxia generated fewer and smaller colonies than in normoxia. In parallel, MSC displayed (>4 fold inhibition of genes involved in DNA metabolism, cell cycle progression and chromosome cohesion whereas transcripts involved in adhesion and metabolism (CD93, ESAM, VWF, PLVAP, ANGPT2, LEP, TCF1 were stimulated. Compared to normoxic cells, hypoxic cells were morphologically undifferentiated and contained less mitochondrias. After this lag phase, cells at passage 2 in hypoxia outgrew the cells cultured in normoxia and displayed an enhanced expression of genes (4-60 fold involved in extracellular matrix assembly (SMOC2, neural and muscle development (NOG, GPR56, SNTG2, LAMA and epithelial development (DMKN. This group described herein for the first time was assigned by the Gene Ontology program to "plasticity". Conclusion The duration of hypoxemia is a critical parameter in the differentiation capacity of MSC. Even in growth promoting conditions, hypoxia enhanced a genetic program that maintained the cells undifferentiated and multipotent. This condition may better reflect the in vivo gene signature of MSC, with potential implications in regenerative medicine.

  12. Genetically engineered binding proteins as biosensors for fermentation and cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xudong; Tolosa, Leah; Simpson, Jen; Rao, Govind

    2003-12-20

    The signal-transduction properties and the potential applications of two engineered binding proteins from E. coli were extensively studied. Both proteins have a single cysteine mutation in their polypeptide chains, which allow the introduction of an environmentally sensitive fluorophore: ANS for glucose-binding protein (GBP) and acrylodan for glutamine-binding protein (QBP). Both proteins respond to their ligands in the micromolar range. The proteins can be stored at 4 degrees C for at least 5 months. Apparent binding constant, protein concentration, and fluorophore are three major factors that affect the biosensor's responsive ranges. The binding of the ligand is quick and reversible in solution, but the unfavorable dissociation equilibrium and mass-transfer resistance for encapsulated proteins can delay the response to several minutes and the recovery to hours. Simulated results show that using dialysis tubing with a diameter of 1 mm or less is possible to reduce the recovery time to less than 30 minutes. The potential applications of GBP were studied in yeast fermentation and E. coli fermentations in three different scales: 150 mL, 5 mL, and 100 microL. The results were compared with an YSI 2700 Chemistry Analyzer. Although the latter could not give reliable results for the E. coli fermentations as the glucose concentration in LB medium is close to its lower detection limit, the glucose biosensor presented here was successfully applied to each situation. Glutamine-binding protein was tested in cell cultures of two different scales (100 mL and 100 microL) and the results were also compared with those obtained with YSI. Both QBP and YSI gave good results for the 100-mL cell culture, but the relatively large sample volume requirement of YSI (at least 5 microL) prevented it from being used in the 100-microL cell culture. Because of their small sample volume requirements (less than 1 microL) and high sensitivity, the assays described here might find wide applications

  13. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  14. Culturable endophytes of medicinal plants and the genetic basis for their bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristin I; Qing, Chen; Sze, Daniel Man-Yuen; Roufogalis, Basil D; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-08-01

    The bioactive compounds of medicinal plants are products of the plant itself or of endophytes living inside the plant. Endophytes isolated from eight different anticancer plants collected in Yunnan, China, were characterized by diverse 16S and 18S rRNA gene phylogenies. A functional gene-based molecular screening strategy was used to target nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and type I polyketide synthase (PKS) genes in endophytes. Bioinformatic analysis of these biosynthetic pathways facilitated inference of the potential bioactivity of endophyte natural products, suggesting that the isolated endophytes are capable of producing a plethora of secondary metabolites. All of the endophyte culture broth extracts demonstrated antiproliferative effects in at least one test assay, either cytotoxic, antibacterial or antifungal. From the perspective of natural product discovery, this study confirms the potential for endophytes from medicinal plants to produce anticancer, antibacterial and antifungal compounds. In addition, PKS and NRPS gene screening is a valuable method for screening isolates of biosynthetic potential.

  15. Tailor-made fructan synthesis in plants: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Arkel, Jeroen; Sévenier, Robert; Hakkert, Johanna C; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Koops, Andries J; van der Meer, Ingrid M

    2013-03-01

    Fructan, a fructose polymer, is produced by many bacteria and plants. Fructan is used as carbohydrate reserve, and in bacteria also as protective outside layer. Chicory is a commercial fructan producing crop. The disadvantage of this crop is its fructan breakdown before harvest. Studies using genetically modification showed that fructan biosynthesis is difficult to steer in chicory. Alternatives for production of tailor-made fructan, fructan with a desired polymer length and linkage type, are originally non-fructan-accumulating plants expressing introduced fructosyltransferase genes. The usage of bacterial fructosyltransferases hindered plant performance, whereas plant-derived fructan genes can successfully be used for this purpose. The polymer length distribution and the yield are dependent on the origin of the fructan genes and the availability of sucrose in the host. Limitations seen in chicory for the production of tailor-made fructan are lacking in putative new platform crops like sugar beet and sugarcane and rice.

  16. Taming Parasites by Tailoring Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjian Ren

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The next-generation gene editing based on CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats has been successfully implemented in a wide range of organisms including some protozoan parasites. However, application of such a versatile game-changing technology in molecular parasitology remains fairly underexplored. Here, we briefly introduce state-of-the-art in human and mouse research and usher new directions to drive the parasitology research in the years to come. In precise, we outline contemporary ways to embolden existing apicomplexan and kinetoplastid parasite models by commissioning front-line gene-tailoring methods, and illustrate how we can break the enduring gridlock of gene manipulation in non-model parasitic protists to tackle intriguing questions that remain long unresolved otherwise. We show how a judicious solicitation of the CRISPR technology can eventually balance out the two facets of pathogen-host interplay.

  17. Molecular tailoring of solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Evenson, S A

    1997-01-01

    The overall performance of a material can be dramatically improved by tailoring its surface at the molecular level. The aim of this project was to develop a universal technique for attaching dendrimers (well-defined, nanoscale, functional polymers) and Jeffamines (high molecular weight polymer chains) to the surface of any shaped solid substrate. This desire for controlled functionalization is ultimately driven by the need to improve material compatibility in various biomedical applications. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used initially to study the packing and structure of Langmuir-Blodgett films on surfaces, and subsequently resulted in the first visualization of individual, spherically shaped, nanoscopic polyamidoamine dendrimers. The next goal was to develop a methodology for attaching such macromolecules to inert surfaces. Thin copolymer films were deposited onto solid substrates to produce materials with a fixed concentration of surface anhydride groups. Vapor-phase functionalization reactions were t...

  18. Targeted therapy: tailoring cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yan; Quentin Qiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapies include small-molecule inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies,have made treatment more tumor-specific and less toxic,and have opened new possibilities for tailoring cancer treatment.Nevertheless,there remain several challenges to targeted therapies,including molecular identification,drug resistance,and exploring reliable biomarkers.Here,we present several selected signaling pathways and molecular targets involved in human cancers including Aurora kinases,PI3K/mTOR signaling,FOXO-FOXM1 axis,and MDM2/MDM4-p53 interaction.Understanding the molecular mechanisms for tumorigenesis and development of drug resistance will provide new insights into drug discovery and design of therapeutic strategies for targeted therapies.

  19. Tailoring Magnetism in Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutic, Igor; Abolfath, Ramin; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2007-03-01

    We study magnetism in magnetically doped quantum dots as a function of particle numbers, temperature, confining potential, and the strength of Coulomb interaction screening. We show that magnetism can be tailored by controlling the electron-electron Coulomb interaction, even without changing the number of particles. The interplay of strong Coulomb interactions and quantum confinement leads to enhanced inhomogeneous magnetization which persists at substantially higher temperatures than in the non-interacting case or in the bulk-like dilute magnetic semiconductors. We predict a series of electronic spin transitions which arise from the competition between the many-body gap and magnetic thermal fluctuations. Cond-mat/0612489. [1] R. Abolfath, P. Hawrylak, I. Zuti'c, preprint.

  20. Tailored logistics: the next advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J B; O'Conor, J; Rawlinson, R

    1993-01-01

    How many top executives have ever visited with managers who move materials from the factory to the store? How many still reduce the costs of logistics to the rent of warehouses and the fees charged by common carriers? To judge by hours of senior management attention, logistics problems do not rank high. But logistics have the potential to become the next governing element of strategy. Whether they know it or not, senior managers of every retail store and diversified manufacturing company compete in logistically distinct businesses. Customer needs vary, and companies can tailor their logistics systems to serve their customers better and more profitably. Companies do not create value for customers and sustainable advantage for themselves merely by offering varieties of goods. Rather, they offer goods in distinct ways. A particular can of Coca-Cola, for example, might be a can of Coca-Cola going to a vending machine, or a can of Coca-Cola that comes with billing services. There is a fortune buried in this distinction. The goal of logistics strategy is building distinct approaches to distinct groups of customers. The first step is organizing a cross-functional team to proceed through the following steps: segmenting customers according to purchase criteria, establishing different standards of service for different customer segments, tailoring logistics pipelines to support each segment, and creating economics of scale to determine which assets can be shared among various pipelines. The goal of establishing logistically distinct businesses is familiar: improved knowledge of customers and improved means of satisfying them.

  1. Tailor-made ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jork, C. [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik, Fachgebiet Thermodynamik und Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kristen, C. [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik, Fachgebiet Thermodynamik und Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Pieraccini, D. [University of Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica Bioorganica e Biofarmacia, via Bonanno 33, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Stark, A. [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Institut fuer Technische Chemie und Umweltchemie, Lessingstrasse 12, 07743 Jena (Germany); Chiappe, C. [University of Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica Bioorganica e Biofarmacia, via Bonanno 33, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Beste, Y.A. [BASF AG, GCT/A-L540, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Arlt, W. [Universitaet Erlangen/Nuernberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)]. E-mail: wolfgang.arlt@cbi.uni-erlangen.de

    2005-06-15

    This article presents a first consequent thermodynamic optimization of ionic liquids (IL) as entrainers in the distillative separation of both an azeotropic aqueous (tetrahydrofuran + water) and a close-boiling aromatic test system (methylcyclohexane + toluene) on the basis of COSMO-RS predictions. The use of this method allows for the preselection from the large pool of available IL. Thus, favorable structural variations were identified and used for tailoring IL entrainers. For the prediction of activity coefficients with COSMO-RS, the use of different conformations of the components, derived from conformational analyses, leads to varying results. The simulations showed that the influence of conformations of the volatile components and the ionic liquids depends largely on the type of the phase equilibrium, which is investigated. The approach to tailor ionic liquids as additives for separation science starts with the prediction of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. The simulation indicated that a higher degree of branching or longer alkyl substituents on the cation, as well as a low nucleophilicity of the anion decreases both selectivity and capacity in the polar test mixture. However, COSMO-RS calculations for the non-polar mixture showed that the selection of an entrainer for this system is more complicated, because - contrarily to (tetrahydrofuran + water) - structural variations of the IL entrainer cause converse changes in selectivity and capacity: while the selectivity for toluene increases with a lower degree of branching and a shorter alkyl substituent of the cation as well as with a lower nucleophilicity of the anion, these properties decrease the capacity. In this work, the most favorable IL entrainers were synthesized and the separation factors of the test systems were experimentally validated at finite dilution.

  2. Genetic and Cultural Reconstruction of the Migration of an Ancient Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Desmond D; Raina, Anupuma; Aston, Christopher E; Sanghera, Dharambir K

    2015-01-01

    A rare R1a1 Y-haplogroup (Y-HG) L657 clade subtype designated as LPKSTR is found in most male members of a clan of "founder" families within the Goud Saraswat Brahmin community in Lotli town in Western India. TMRCA calculations using pairwise comparisons to control cohorts suggested a probable migration history distinct from the canonical narrative for medieval migration of orthodox Brahmin families to South India. Using Y-HG centroid analysis, chi-square analysis of TMRCA distributions and archeological find-spots, and discriminant function analysis we show that the parental Z93 L342.2 subclade in which LPKSTR occurs originated in West Asia and that LPKSTR individuals migrated toward the southeast by a Bolan Pass route distinct from the traditionally presumed route of Brahmin ingress into the Indian subcontinent. The proposed migration route is supported by archeological, toponymic, numismatic, linguistic, iconographic, and literary data. Lastly, we present cultural metrics demonstrating that these LPKSTR lineages retained distinct family practices with respect to literacy, religious practice, and emigration not shared with orthodox Brahmins of canonical geographic origin within the same community, despite centuries of intermarriage. Long-term transmission of differentiated family practices within a patrilineal endogamous community has rarely been documented.

  3. Genetic and Cultural Reconstruction of the Migration of an Ancient Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond D. Mascarenhas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare R1a1 Y-haplogroup (Y-HG L657 clade subtype designated as LPKSTR is found in most male members of a clan of “founder” families within the Goud Saraswat Brahmin community in Lotli town in Western India. TMRCA calculations using pairwise comparisons to control cohorts suggested a probable migration history distinct from the canonical narrative for medieval migration of orthodox Brahmin families to South India. Using Y-HG centroid analysis, chi-square analysis of TMRCA distributions and archeological find-spots, and discriminant function analysis we show that the parental Z93 L342.2 subclade in which LPKSTR occurs originated in West Asia and that LPKSTR individuals migrated toward the southeast by a Bolan Pass route distinct from the traditionally presumed route of Brahmin ingress into the Indian subcontinent. The proposed migration route is supported by archeological, toponymic, numismatic, linguistic, iconographic, and literary data. Lastly, we present cultural metrics demonstrating that these LPKSTR lineages retained distinct family practices with respect to literacy, religious practice, and emigration not shared with orthodox Brahmins of canonical geographic origin within the same community, despite centuries of intermarriage. Long-term transmission of differentiated family practices within a patrilineal endogamous community has rarely been documented.

  4. Genetic and Cultural Reconstruction of the Migration of an Ancient Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Desmond D.; Raina, Anupuma; Aston, Christopher E.; Sanghera, Dharambir K.

    2015-01-01

    A rare R1a1 Y-haplogroup (Y-HG) L657 clade subtype designated as LPKSTR is found in most male members of a clan of “founder” families within the Goud Saraswat Brahmin community in Lotli town in Western India. TMRCA calculations using pairwise comparisons to control cohorts suggested a probable migration history distinct from the canonical narrative for medieval migration of orthodox Brahmin families to South India. Using Y-HG centroid analysis, chi-square analysis of TMRCA distributions and archeological find-spots, and discriminant function analysis we show that the parental Z93 L342.2 subclade in which LPKSTR occurs originated in West Asia and that LPKSTR individuals migrated toward the southeast by a Bolan Pass route distinct from the traditionally presumed route of Brahmin ingress into the Indian subcontinent. The proposed migration route is supported by archeological, toponymic, numismatic, linguistic, iconographic, and literary data. Lastly, we present cultural metrics demonstrating that these LPKSTR lineages retained distinct family practices with respect to literacy, religious practice, and emigration not shared with orthodox Brahmins of canonical geographic origin within the same community, despite centuries of intermarriage. Long-term transmission of differentiated family practices within a patrilineal endogamous community has rarely been documented. PMID:26491681

  5. The genetic diversity of culturable nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the rhizosphere of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venieraki, Anastasia; Dimou, Maria; Pergalis, Panagiotis; Kefalogianni, Io; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2011-02-01

    A total of 17 culturable nitrogen-fixing bacterial strains associated with the roots of wheat growing in different regions of Greece were isolated and characterized for plant-growth-promoting traits such as auxin production and phosphate solubilization. The phylogenetic position of the isolates was first assessed by the analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene. The comparative sequence analysis and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences show that the isolates recovered in this study are grouped with Azospirillum brasilense, Azospirillum zeae, and Pseudomonas stutzeri. The diazotrophic nature of all isolates was confirmed by amplification of partial nifH gene sequences. The phylogenetic tree based on nifH gene sequences is consistent with 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The isolates belonging to Azospirillum species were further characterized by examining the partial dnaK gene phylogenetic tree. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the ipdC gene was present in all Azospirillum isolates, suggesting that auxin is mainly synthesized via the indole-3-pyruvate pathway. Although members of P. stutzeri and A. zeae are known diazotrophic bacteria, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation and characterization of strains belonging to these bacterial genera associated with wheat.

  6. Formability of stainless steel tailored blanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2004-01-01

    In a number of systematic tests, the formability of tailored blanks consisting of even and different combinations of AISI304 and AISI316 in thickness of 0.8 mm and 1.5 mm have been investigated. In order to analyse the formability of tailored blanks with different sheet thickness, a method based ...

  7. Genetic variation of the bud and leaf phenology of seventeen poplar clones in a short rotation coppice culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, A; Laureysens, I; Ceulemans, R

    2004-01-01

    Leaf phenology of 17 poplar ( Populus spp.) clones, encompassing spring phenology, length of growth period and end-of-year phenology, was examined over several years of different rotations. The 17 poplar clones differed in their latitude of origin (45 degrees 30'N to 51 degrees N) and were studied on a short rotation experimental field plantation, situated in Boom (province of Antwerpen, Belgium; 51 degrees 05'N, 04 degrees 22'E). A similar, clear pattern of bud burst was observed during the different years of study for all clones. Clones Columbia River, Fritzi Pauley, Trichobel (Populus trichocarpa) and Balsam Spire (Populus trichocarpa x Populus balsamifera) from 45 degrees 30'N to 49 degrees N reached bud burst (expressed as day of the year or degree day sums) almost every year earlier than clones Wolterson (Populus nigra), Gaver, Gibecq and Primo (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra) (50 degrees N to 51 degrees N). This observation could not be generalised to end-of-season phenology, for which a yearly returning pattern for all clones was lacking. Late bud burst and early leaf fall of some clones (Beaupré, Boelare, IBW1, IBW2, IBW3) was brought about by increasing rust incidence during the years of observation. For these clones, the variability in leaf phenology was reflected in high coefficients of variation among years. The patterns of genetic variation in leaf phenology have implications for short rotation intensive culture forestry and management of natural populations. Moreover, the variation in phenology reported here is relevant with regard to the genetic mapping of poplar.

  8. AGROBACTERIUM-MEDIATED GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF SORGHUM USING TISSUE CULTURE-BASED AND POLLEN-MEDIATED APPROACHES

    OpenAIRE

    Elkonin L.A.; O.N. Nosova; J.V. Italianskaya

    2012-01-01

    Genetic transformation is a powerful tool for genetic improvement of arable crops. Genetic engineering approaches are especially important for modification of starch and protein contents, vitamin and micronutrient concentration, improvement of nutritive value of protein fractions, and increase tolerance to environmental stresses. Application of transgenic technologies for genetic improvement of sorghum, a highly productive heat tolerant and drought resistant crop, is extremely important since...

  9. Culturing of the first 37:4 predominant lacustrine haptophyte: Geochemical, biochemical, and genetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toney, Jaime L.; Theroux, Susanna; Andersen, Robert A.; Coleman, Annette; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Huang, Yongsong

    2012-02-01

    Long chain alkenones (LCAs) are potential biomarkers for quantitative paleotemperature reconstructions from lacustrine environments. However, progress in this area has been hindered, because the conditions necessary for the growth of haptophytes responsible for alkenone distributions in lake sediments: the predominance of C 37:4 LCA are not known. Here we report the first enrichment culturing of a novel haptophyte phylotype (Hap-A) from Lake George, ND that produces predominantly C 37:4-LCA. Hap-A was enriched from its resting phase collected from deep sediments rather than from water column samples. In contrast, enrichments from near surface water yielded a different haptophyte phylotype (Hap-B), closely related to Chrysotila lamellosa and Pseudoisochrysis paradoxa, which does not display C 37:4-LCA predominance (similar enrichments have been reported previously). The LCA profile in sediments resembles that of enrichments containing Hap-A, suggesting that Hap-A is the dominant alkenone producer of the sedimentary LCAs. In enrichments, increased lighting appeared to be crucial for triggering alkenone production. Both U37K and U38K indices show a promising, positive relationship with temperature for Hap-A in enrichments, but the offset from the environmental calibration suggests that other factors (e.g., the growth stage or nutrients) may influence the absolute U37K value. Based on 18S rRNA gene analyses, several lakes from the Northern Great Plains, as well as Pyramid Lake, NV and Tso Ur, Tibetan Plateau, China contain the same two haptophyte phylotypes. Analysis of surface sediment from the Great Plains lakes show the Hap-A-type LCA distribution, whereas Pyramid and Tso Ur show the Hap-B type distribution. Waters of the Great Plain lakes are dominated by sulfate ions, whereas those Pyramid and Tso Ur are dominated by carbonate ions, suggesting that the sulfate to carbonate ratio may be a determining factor for the dominance of the Hap-A and Hap-B phylotypes in

  10. Genetic Algorithmic Optimization of PHB Production by a Mixed Culture in an Optimally Dispersed Fed-batch Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap R. Patnaik

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB is an energy-storage polymer whose properties are similar to those of chemical polymers such as polyethylene and polypropylene. Moreover, PHB is biodegradable, absorbed by human tissues and less energy-consuming than synthetic polymers. Although Ralstonia eutropha is widely used to synthesize PHB, it is inefficient in utilizing glucose and similar sugars. Therefore a co-culture of R. eutropha and Lactobacillus delbrueckii is preferred since the latter can convert glucose to lactate, which R. eutropha can metabolize easily. Tohyama et al. [24] maximized PHB production in a well-mixed fed-batch bioreactor with glucose and (NH42SO4 as the primary substrates. Since production-scale bioreactors often deviate from ideal laboratory-scale reactors, a large bioreactor was simulated by means of a dispersion model with the kinetics determined by Tohyama et al. [24] and dispersion set at an optimum Peclet number of 20 [32]. The time-dependent feed rates of the two substrates were determined through a genetic algorithm (GA to maximize PHB production. This bioreactor produced 22.2% more PHB per liter and 12.8% more cell mass than achieved by Tohyama et al. [24]. These results, and similar observations with other fermentations, indicate the feasibility of enhancing the efficiency of large nonideal bioreactors through GA optimizations.

  11. Quality control of laser tailor welded blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Tailor welded blanks were widely used in the automobile industry for their special advantages. A combination of different materials, thickness, and coatings could be welded together to form a blank for stamping car body panels. With the gradually growing consciousness on safety requirement of auto body structural, the business of laser tailor welded blanks is developing rapidly in China. Laser tailor welded blanks were just the semi products between steel factory and automobile manufacturers. As to the laser welding defects such as convexity and concavity, automobile industry had the strict requirement. In this paper, quality standard on laser tailor welded blanks were discussed. As for the production of laser tailor welded blanks, online quality control of laser tailor welded blanks was introduced. The image processing system for welding laser positioning and weld seam monitoring were used in the production of laser tailor welded blanks. The system analyzes images from the individual cameras and transmits the results to the machine control system via a CAN bus.

  12. Optimization of a feed medium for fed-batch culture of insect cells using a genetic algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marteijn, R.C.L.; Jurrius, O.; Dhont, J.; Gooijer, de C.D.; Tramper, J.; Martens, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Insect cells have been cultured for over 30 years, but their application is still hampered by low cell densities in batch fermentations and expensive culture media. With respect to the culture method, the fed-batch culture mode is often found to give the best yields. However, optimization of the

  13. Effectiveness of different methods for delivering tailored nutrition education to low income, ethnically diverse adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Kim M; Risica, Patricia M; Strolla, Leslie O; Fournier, Leanne; Kirtania, Usree; Upegui, David; Zhao, Julie; George, Tiffiney; Acharyya, Suddhasatta

    2009-05-05

    improve effectiveness. Future studies should determine which variables are mediators of dietary change and whether these differ by participant demographics. Moreover, future research should differentiate the effects of tailoring vs. cultural adaptation in ethnically diverse populations and study the dissemination of tailored interventions into community-based settings. Current Controlled Trials # NCT00301691.

  14. Macromolecular crowding for tailoring tissue-derived fibrillated matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Valentina; Friedrichs, Jens; Weber, Heather M; Prewitz, Marina C; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Werner, Carsten

    2017-06-01

    Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials characteristics only. In this work, we demonstrate how macromolecular crowding (MMC) - the supplementation of matrix reconstitution media with synthetic or natural macromolecules in ways to create excluded volume effects (EVE) - can be employed for tailoring important structural and biophysical characteristics of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices. Porcine kidneys were decellularized, ground and the obtained extracellular matrix (ECM) preparations were reconstituted under varied MMC conditions. We show that MMC strongly influences the fibrillogenesis kinetics and impacts the architecture and the elastic modulus of the reconstituted matrices, with diameters and relative alignment of fibrils increasing at elevated concentrations of the crowding agent Ficoll400, a nonionic synthetic polymer of sucrose. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MMC modulates the distribution of key ECM molecules within the reconstituted matrix scaffolds. As a proof of concept, we compared different variants of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices in cell culture experiments referring to specific requirements of kidney tissue engineering approaches. The results revealed that MMC-tailored matrices support the morphogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) into capillary networks and of murine kidney stem cells (KSCs) into highly branched aggregates. The established methodology is concluded to provide generally applicable new options for tailoring tissue-specific multiphasic matrices in vitro. Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials

  15. Evaluation of genetic homogeneity in tissue culture regenerates of Jatropha curcas L. using flow cytometer and DNA-based molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Mangal S; Yadav, P; Mastan, Shaik G; Prakash, Ch R; Singh, A; Agarwal, Pradeep K

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to evaluate the reliability of in vitro propagation methods for elite genotypes of Jatropha curcas L., that maintain genetic integrity of tissue culture (TC) regenerates among two regeneration systems developed through direct shoot bud regeneration using nodal/apical shoot segments (protocol-A) and in vitro-derived leaves (protocol-B) as explants. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR), simple sequence repeat (SSR) molecular markers, and flow cytometery (FCM) were employed to evaluate genetic homogeneity in TC-regenerates at different passages of subcultures. RAPD markers showed genetic homogeneity in fifth-generation TC-regenerates of both protocols. ISSR markers showed genetic stability of leaf regenerates (protocol-B) at 10th generation. FCM analysis of TC-regenerates at 10th generation in protocol-B and at 20th generation in both protocols, showed stability of ploidy level. SSR assessment of TC-regenerates at 20th generation in both protocols confirmed genetic homogeneity. The results confirmed the genetic stability of the TC-regenerates and demonstrated the reliability of the regeneration systems developed so far using explants of two different origins, for large-scale multiplication of elite genotypes of Jatropha.

  16. Tailor made preservation strategies : Food Innovation Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankestijn, J.

    2013-01-01

    High quality, long shelf life, clean label, less salt: food must comply with many requirements. From genomics and mild preservation to a ‘Quick Scan’ for process hygiene, TNO helps manufacturers to develop a tailor made preservation strategy.

  17. User-tailored Inter-Widget Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Hoisl, Bernhard; Waglecher, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Drachsler, H., Hoisl, B., & Wagenlecher, C. (2010, 16 September). User-tailored Inter-Widget Communication. Extending the Shared Data Interface for the Apache Wookie Engine, International Conference on Interactive Computer Aided Learning 2010, Hasselt, Belgium.

  18. Culture and establishment of self-renewing human and mouse adult liver and pancreas 3D organoids and their genetic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broutier, Laura; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Hindley, Christopher J; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-09-01

    Adult somatic tissues have proven difficult to expand in vitro, largely because of the complexity of recreating appropriate environmental signals in culture. We have overcome this problem recently and developed culture conditions for adult stem cells that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from small intestine, stomach, liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D structures that we have termed 'organoids'. We provide a detailed protocol that describes how to grow adult mouse and human liver and pancreas organoids, from cell isolation and long-term expansion to genetic manipulation in vitro. Liver and pancreas cells grow in a gel-based extracellular matrix (ECM) and a defined medium. The cells can self-organize into organoids that self-renew in vitro while retaining their tissue-of-origin commitment, genetic stability and potential to differentiate into functional cells in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo (hepatocytes and endocrine cells). Genetic modification of these organoids opens up avenues for the manipulation of adult stem cells in vitro, which could facilitate the study of human biology and allow gene correction for regenerative medicine purposes. The complete protocol takes 1-4 weeks to generate self-renewing 3D organoids and to perform genetic manipulation experiments. Personnel with basic scientific training can conduct this protocol.

  19. Genetic characteristics and migration history of a bronze culture population in the West Liao-River valley revealed by ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjie; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Yongbin; Li, Chunxiang; Si, Dayong; Zhou, Hui; Cui, Yinqiu

    2011-12-01

    In order to study the genetic characteristics of the Lower Xiajiadian culture (LXC) population, a main bronze culture branch in northern China dated 4500-3500 years ago, two uniparentally inherited markers, mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome single-nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs), were analyzed on 14 human remains excavated from the Dadianzi site. The 14 sequences, which contained 13 haplotypes, were assigned to 9 haplogroups, and Y-SNP typing of 5 male individuals assigned them to haplogroups N (M231) and O3 (M122). The results indicate that the LXC population mainly included people carrying haplogroups from northern Asia who had lived in this region since the Neolithic period, as well as genetic evidence of immigration from the Central Plain. Later in the Bronze Age, part of the population migrated to the south away from a cooler climate, which ultimately influenced the gene pool in the Central Plain. Thus, climate change is an important factor, which drove the population migration during the Bronze Age in northern China. Based on these results, the local genetic continuity did not seem to be affected by outward migration, although more data are needed especially from other ancient populations to determine the influence of return migration on genetic continuity.

  20. Tailoring thermal interfaces with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Indira

    mobility via pre-cure gelation, and hinder crosslinking. This thesis also demonstrates novel techniques to create tailored nanowires and networks for high k nanocomposites. Branched Ag nanowires are synthesized via controlled interruptions to microwave-stimulated polyvinylpyrrolidone-directed polyol-reduction of silver nitrate. Microwave exposure results in micrometer-long nanowires passivated with polyvinylpyrrolidone. Cooling the reaction mixture by interrupting microwave exposure promotes nanocrystal nucleation at low-surfactant coverage sites. The nascent nuclei grow into nanowire branches upon further microwave exposure. Dispersions of low fractions of the branched nanowires in polydimethylsiloxane yield up to 60 % higher thermal conductivity than that obtained using unbranched nanowire fillers. A forty-fold thermal conductivity increase is obtained by in situ welding of silver nanowire fillers inside polydimethylsiloxane using microwaves. Even for ≤ 0.04 filler volume fractions, welding facilitates nanowire networking that counteracts thermal transport bottlenecks associated with the low polymer thermal conductivity and high polymer-filler interface thermal resistances. The transparency of the polymer to microwaves precludes thermal degradation, and the composites retain high mechanical compliance as indicated by thesis further explores the use of external stimuli in the form of magnetic fields to reversibly induce nanoparticle networking and gate heat transport at interfaces, a requirement in many emerging applications. It is demonstrated that magnetic field actuation of ~ 3 - 16 vol. % of magnetite or cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in a fluid matrix yields ~16 times enhancement of the no field effective thermal conductivity, but only in a gradient magnetic field. Heat transfer modeling shows that the enhancement arises from magnetic field gradient driven bulk convection, rather than the expected nanoparticle network formation.

  1. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Lopansri, Bert K; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T; Tran, Nam K; Polage, Christopher R; Thomson, Kenneth S; Hanson, Nancy D; Winegar, Richard; Buchan, Blake W

    2015-08-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  2. Reasoning About Cultural and Genetic Transmission: Developmental and Cross-Cultural Evidence From Peru, Fiji, and the United States on How People Make Inferences About Trait Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Cristina; Boyd, Robert; Henrich, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Using samples from three diverse populations, we test evolutionary hypotheses regarding how people reason about the inheritance of various traits. First, we provide a framework for differentiat-ing the outputs of mechanisms that evolved for reasoning about variation within and between (a) biological taxa and (b) culturally evolved ethnic categories from (c) a broader set of beliefs and categories that are the outputs of structured learning mechanisms. Second, we describe the results of a modified "switched-at-birth" vignette study that we administered among children and adults in Puno (Peru), Yasawa (Fiji), and adults in the United States. This protocol permits us to study perceptions of prenatal and social transmission pathways for various traits and to differentiate the latter into vertical (i.e., parental) versus horizontal (i.e., peer) cultural influence. These lines of evidence suggest that people use all three mechanisms to reason about the distribution of traits in the population. Participants at all three sites develop expectations that morphological traits are under prenatal influence, and that belief traits are more culturally influenced. On the other hand, each population holds culturally specific beliefs about the degree of social influence on non-morphological traits and about the degree of vertical transmission-with only participants in the United States expecting parents to have much social influence over their children. We reinterpret people's differentiation of trait transmission pathways in light of humans' evolutionary history as a cultural species. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  3. TAILORING IMMUNOTOXIN AS ANTICANCER DRUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoso Cornain

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The conventional treatments for cancer have been considered unsatisfatory, with limited efficiency in terms of discriminative cancer cell adverse reaction against the normal compartments, a number of immunological approaches had been implemented. Since cancer cells could exhibit tumor specific antigen (s, a highly specific antibody could be used to direct any anticancer drug, biological agent or radioisotope selectively against the cancer cells and does not harm the normal cells. The specific antibody could be raised by immunization with purified tumor specific antigen (s. The biological agent could be obtained as toxin, either derived from bacteria e.g. diphtheria toxin or derived from plants e.g. castor ricin, which could destroy and kill cancer cells after contacts. A hybrid molecule constructed between antibody and toxin has been known as "immunotoxin". The selectivity of the antibody against a given tumor specific antigen could be increased by using a monoclonal antibody, made by hybridoma technique and immunological engineering. Accordingly, the efficiency of the destructive or killing effect of the toxin could be eventually increased by purification technique, biochemical and genetic engineering. In a preliminary study ricin from castor (Ricinus communis have been purified and separated into two protein fractions (RCAI = 12.000 dalton and RCA II = 60.000 - 65.000 dalton. The latter showed toxin property, and was tested in vitro both against normal cells and against cancer cells. In the microcy totoxicity assay the ricin showed both the short term and the long term killing effect as measured after 1, 4, 16 and 24 hours. The killing effect against cancer cells was stronger as compared to that against normal cells. The acute or short term effect was observed at lower concentration of ricin (10-6 and 10-12 g/ml after 1 and 4 hours contacts. The long term effect resulted in 90% and nearly 100% cytotoxicity in higher concentration of ricin

  4. Is the genetic structure of human personality universal? A cross-cultural twin study from North America, Europe, and Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Shinji; Suzuki, Atsunobu; Ando, Juko; Ono, Yutaka; Kijima, Nobuhiko; Yoshimura, Kimio; Ostendorf, Fritz; Angleitner, Alois; Riemann, Rainer; Spinath, Frank M; Livesley, W John; Jang, Kerry L

    2006-06-01

    This study examined whether universality of the 5-factor model (FFM) of personality operationalized by the Revised NEO Personality Inventory is due to genetic influences that are invariant across diverse nations. Factor analyses were conducted on matrices of phenotypic, genetic, and environmental correlations estimated in a sample of 1,209 monozygotic and 701 dizygotic twin pairs from Canada, Germany, and Japan. Five genetic and environmental factors were extracted for each sample. High congruence coefficients were observed when phenotypic, genetic, and environmental factors were compared in each sample as well as when each factor was compared across samples. These results suggest that the FFM has a solid biological basis and may represent a common heritage of the human species.

  5. Impact of human genome initiative-derived technology on genetic testing, screening and counseling: Cultural, ethical and legal issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trottier, R.W.; Hodgin, F.C.; Imara, M.; Phoenix, D.; Lybrook, S. (Morehouse Coll., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Medicine); Crandall, L.A.; Moseley, R.E.; Armotrading, D. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Coll. of Medicine)

    1993-01-01

    Genetic medical services provided by the Georgia Division of Public Health in two northern and two central districts are compared to services provided in a district in which a tertiary care facility is located. Genetics outreach public health nurses play key roles in Georgia's system of Children's Health Services Genetics Program, including significant roles as counselors and information sources on special needs social services and support organizations. Unique features of individual health districts, (e.g., the changing face of some rural communities in ethnocultural diversity and socioeconomic character), present new challenges to current and future genetics services delivery. Preparedness as to educational needs of both health professionals and the lay population is of foremost concern in light of the ever expanding knowledge and technology in medical genetics. Perspectives on genetics and an overview of services offered by a local private sector counselor are included for comparison to state supported services. The nature of the interactions which transpire between private and public genetic services resources in Georgia will be described. A special focus of this research includes issues associated with sickle cell disease newborn screening service delivery process in Georgia, with particular attention paid to patient follow-up and transition to primary care. Of particular interest to this focus is the problem of loss to follow-up in the current system. Critical factors in education and counseling of sickle cell patients and the expectations of expanding roles of primary care physicians are discussed. The Florida approach to the delivery of genetic services contrasts to the Georgia model by placing more emphasis on a consultant-specialist team approach.

  6. Material and Thickness Grading for Aeroelastic Tailoring of the Common Research Model Wing Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    This work quantifies the potential aeroelastic benefits of tailoring a full-scale wing box structure using tailored thickness distributions, material distributions, or both simultaneously. These tailoring schemes are considered for the wing skins, the spars, and the ribs. Material grading utilizes a spatially-continuous blend of two metals: Al and Al+SiC. Thicknesses and material fraction variables are specified at the 4 corners of the wing box, and a bilinear interpolation is used to compute these parameters for the interior of the planform. Pareto fronts detailing the conflict between static aeroelastic stresses and dynamic flutter boundaries are computed with a genetic algorithm. In some cases, a true material grading is found to be superior to a single-material structure.

  7. Genetic diversity and differentiation of masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou masou) between and within cultured populations inferred from microsatellite DNA analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiying JIA; Yuyong ZHANG; Shuqiang CHEN; Lianyu SHI

    2012-01-01

    Masu salmon,Oncorhynchus masou masou,is one of the most valuable fishery species that has been introduced to China,though to date no studies on the genetic diversity and genetic relationship among hatchery populations has been performed with molecular markers.We undertook such a study and sampled 120 individuals from three hatchery stocks and analyzed 20 microsatellite loci.All loci were polymorphic and a total of 91 alleles were detected.A relatively low level of genetic diversity was revealed with effective number of allele of 3.1094,3.3299 and 3.1894 and expected heterozygosity of 0.6600,0.6648 and 0.6638 in the three stocks,respectively.Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were found due to heterozygote deficit.Accordingly,evidence of genetic bottlenecks were found in the three stocks.An individual assignment test demonstrated that 85% of individuals were correctly assigned into their original stocks.Pairwise Fst revealed that significant differentiation occurred between these three stocks.The results of the study indicated that disequilibrium of genetic structure and differentiation has occurred in all three stocks.This information collectively provides a basis for measures to avoid of loss of genetic diversity and introgression in Chinese aquaculture.

  8. Understanding tailoring in communicating about health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawkins, Robert P.; Kreuter, Matthew; Resnicow, Kenneth; Fishbein, Martin; Dijkstra, Arie

    2008-01-01

    'Tailoring' refers to any of a number of methods for creating communications individualized for their receivers, with the expectation that this individualization will lead to larger intended effects of these communications. Results so far have been generally positive but not consistently so, and thi

  9. LIFE-STYLE SEGMENTATION WITH TAILORED INTERVIEWING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMAKURA, WA; WEDEL, M

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a tailored interviewing procedure for life-style segmentation. The procedure assumes that a life-style measurement instrument has been designed. A classification of a sample of consumers into life-style segments is obtained using a latent-class model. With these segments, the tai

  10. Tailoring endocrine treatment for early breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontein, Duveken Berthe Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes several important aspects of adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-sensitive, early-stage breast cancer. In our ongoing efforts to tailor treatment so as to provide the best possible care to each of our patients, we studied the influence of various

  11. Tailoring endocrine treatment for early breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontein, Duveken Berthe Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes several important aspects of adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-sensitive, early-stage breast cancer. In our ongoing efforts to tailor treatment so as to provide the best possible care to each of our patients, we studied the influence of various

  12. User-tailored E-health services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Klooster, J.W.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes a method to offer personalised healthcare. It is motivated by a desire for more efficient healthcare, as population ages and care demand and costs increase. Developing and testing individually tailored health services using ICT fits in this motivation, as it leads to more

  13. Tailoring group velocity by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stainko, Roman; Sigmund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a systematic method for the tailoring of dispersion properties of slab-based photonic crystal waveguides. The method is based on the topology optimization method which consists in repeated finite element frequency domain analyses. The goal of the optimization process is to come...

  14. Space and Missile Systems Center Tailoring: Tailoring Instructions for MIL-STD-882E

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Space Command SPACE AND MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER TAILORING TAILORING INSTRUCTIONS FOR MIL- STD -882E APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...for MIL- STD -882E 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 SMC Tailoring of MIL- STD -882E, System Safety FOREWORD This

  15. Tailoring Hydrogel Viscoelasticity with Physical and Chemical Crosslinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Bartnikowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological tissues are viscoelastic, demonstrating a mixture of fluid and solid responses to mechanical strain. Whilst viscoelasticity is critical for native tissue function, it is rarely used as a design criterion in biomaterials science or tissue engineering. We propose that viscoelasticity may be tailored to specific levels through manipulation of the hydrogel type, or more specifically the proportion of physical and chemical crosslinks present in a construct. This theory was assessed by comparing the mechanical properties of various hydrogel blends, comprising elastic, equilibrium, storage and loss moduli, as well as the loss tangent. These properties were also assessed in human articular cartilage explants. It was found that whilst very low in elastic modulus, the physical crosslinks found in gellan gum-only provided the closest approximation of loss tangent levels found in cartilage. Blends of physical and chemical crosslinks (gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA combined with gellan gum gave highest values for elastic response. However, a greater proportion of gellan gum to GelMA than investigated may be required to achieve native cartilage viscoelasticity in this case. Human articular chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogels remained viable over one week of culture. Overall, it was shown that viscoelasticity may be tailored similarly to other mechanical properties and may prove a new criterion to be included in the design of biomaterial structures for tissue engineering.

  16. Use of Long-Term E. Coli Cultures: To Study Generation of Genetic Diversity & Teach General Microbiology Laboratory Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Angela; Finkel, Steven E.; Erbe, Jarrod

    2005-01-01

    A novel method of studying the generation of genetic diversity in an undergraduate microbiology laboratory is described. The basis of this approach is the accumulation of mutations that confer a competitive advantage, or growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype, to E. coli grown in stationary phase for extended periods of time.

  17. Use of Long-Term E. Coli Cultures: To Study Generation of Genetic Diversity & Teach General Microbiology Laboratory Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Angela; Finkel, Steven E.; Erbe, Jarrod

    2005-01-01

    A novel method of studying the generation of genetic diversity in an undergraduate microbiology laboratory is described. The basis of this approach is the accumulation of mutations that confer a competitive advantage, or growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype, to E. coli grown in stationary phase for extended periods of time.

  18. Cell culture isolation and sequence analysis of genetically diverse US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains including a novel strain with a large deletion in the spike gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Saif, Linda J; Marthaler, Douglas; Esseili, Malak A; Meulia, Tea; Lin, Chun-Ming; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Jung, Kwonil; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qiuhong

    2014-10-10

    The highly contagious and deadly porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) first appeared in the US in April 2013. Since then the virus has spread rapidly nationwide and to Canada and Mexico causing high mortality among nursing piglets and significant economic losses. Currently there are no efficacious preventive measures or therapeutic tools to control PEDV in the US. The isolation of PEDV in cell culture is the first step toward the development of an attenuated vaccine, to study the biology of PEDV and to develop in vitro PEDV immunoassays, inactivation assays and screen for PEDV antivirals. In this study, nine of 88 US PEDV strains were isolated successfully on Vero cells with supplemental trypsin and subjected to genomic sequence analysis. They differed genetically mainly in the N-terminal S protein region as follows: (1) strains (n=7) similar to the highly virulent US PEDV strains; (2) one similar to the reportedly US S INDEL PEDV strain; and (3) one novel strain most closely related to highly virulent US PEDV strains, but with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. Representative strains of these three genetic groups were passaged serially and grew to titers of ∼5-6log10 plaque forming units/mL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation in cell culture of an S INDEL PEDV strain and a PEDV strain with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. We also designed primer sets to detect these genetically diverse US PEDV strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of periodontopathogenic bacteria in pregnant women by traditional anaerobic culture method and by a commercial molecular genetic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbán, Edit; Terhes, Gabriella; Radnai, Márta; Gorzó, István; Nagy, Elisabeth

    2010-06-01

    To culture facultative and strict anaerobic bacteria is a well-established method for analyzing subgingival plaque samples. Micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus (HAIN Lifescience GmbH, Nehren, Germany) tests are two commercially available rapid PCR-based methods for the identification and quantification of putative periodontopathogen bacteria. In this study, we compared these commercial PCR-based hybridization methods with conventional anaerobic culture technique. A total of 36 subgingival plaque samples were collected from periodontal pockets of pregnant women with chronic localized periodontitis. Aliquots of these samples were evaluated with species-specific probes provided by micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus tests simultaneously, and from the same samples anaerobic and capnophylic bacteria were cultured on selective media. The overall agreement between both methods was excellent for Eubacterium nodatum, Tannerella forsythia and Porphyromonas gingivalis (97-92%), fair for Capnocytophaga sp, Eikenella corrodens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Prevotella intermedia (91-89%) and poor for Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra (Micromonas micros), and Campylobacter rectus (86-78%). Discrepancies in the results may be explained by inability of culture method to distinguish between closely related taxa (e.i P. intermedia/Prevotella. nigrescens), and problems of keeping periodontopathogen bacteria viable, which is required for successful detection by standard culture method. Nucleic acid-based methods may replace cultivation method as frequently used methods in microbiological diagnosis of progressive periodontitis, thus micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus tests can be recommended where culture of periodontopathogenic bacteria is not performed in routine microbiology laboratories to analyze subgingival plaque samples.

  20. Tailored information about cancer risk and screening: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Dulmen, S. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study interventions that provide people with information about cancer risk and about screening that is tailored to their personal characteristics. We assess the tailoring characteristics, theory base and effects on risk perception, knowledge and screening behavior of these

  1. Tailored Trustworthy Spaces: Solutions for the Smart Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — The NITRD workshop on Tailored Trustworthy Spaces: Solutions for the Smart Grid was conceived by the Federal government to probe deeper into how Tailored Trustworthy...

  2. All-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Weiwen; Long, Xin; Zhang, Siteng; Cui, Yuanjun; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Radar has been widely used in military, security, and rescue. Metamaterial cloak is employed in stealth targets to evade radar detection. Hence modern radar should be reconfigurable at multi-bands for detecting stealth targets, which might be realized based on microwave photonics. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar architecture. It is a coherent system utilizing one mode-locked laser for both signal generation and reception. Heterodyning of two individually filtered optical pulses that are pre-chirped via wavelength-to-time mapping generates wideband linearly-chirped radar signal. The working bands can be flexibly tailored with desired bandwidth at user-preferred carrier frequency. After modulated onto the pre-chirped optical pulse, radar echoes are time-stretched and frequency-compressed by several times. The digitization becomes much easier without loss of detection ability. We believe that the demonstration can innovate the radar's architecture with ultra-high range resolution.

  3. Gust response of aeroelastically tailored wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, S.; Capuzzi, M.; Langston, D.; Bossanyi, E.; McCann, G.; Weaver, PM; Pirrera, A.

    2016-09-01

    Some interesting challenges arise from the drive to build larger, more durable rotors that produce cheaper energy. The rationale is that, with current wind turbine designs, the power generated is theoretically proportional to the square of blade length. One enabling technology is aeroelastic tailoring that offers enhanced combined energy capture and system durability. The design of two adaptive, aeroelastically tailored blade configurations is considered here. One uses material bend-twist coupling; the other combines both material and geometric coupling. Each structural design meets a predefined coupling distribution, whilst approximately matching the stiffness of an uncoupled baseline blade. A gust analysis shows beneficial flapwise load alleviation for both adaptive blades, with the additional benefits of smoothing variations in electrical power and rotational speed.

  4. Metamaterials with tailored nonlinear optical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husu, Hannu; Siikanen, Roope; Mäkitalo, Jouni; Lehtolahti, Joonas; Laukkanen, Janne; Kuittinen, Markku; Kauranen, Martti

    2012-02-08

    We demonstrate that the second-order nonlinear optical response of noncentrosymmetric metal nanoparticles (metamolecules) can be efficiently controlled by their mutual ordering in an array. Two samples with minor change in ordering have nonlinear responses differing by a factor of up to 50. The results arise from polarization-dependent plasmonic resonances modified by long-range coupling associated with metamolecular ordering. The approach opens new ways for tailoring the nonlinear responses of metamaterials and their tensorial properties.

  5. Tailored Training in Vehicle Maintenance Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    G. A., Wampler, R. L., & Dyer, J. L. (2007). Techniques and practices in the training of digital operator skills . (Research Report 1878...occur in technical, functional courses where graduates must be proficient in clearly defined skills , based on specified performance standards, upon...tailored training in the Army is most likely to occur in technical, functional courses where graduates must be proficient in clearly defined skills

  6. Mad cows, mad corn and mad communities: the role of socio-cultural factors in the perceived risk of genetically-modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Melissa L

    2002-02-01

    The rapid globalization of the world economy has increased the need for a knowledge base of reliable socio-cultural differences in perceptions, values and ways of thinking about new food technologies. Awareness of socio-cultural differences is important because collaborative efforts to deal with food hazards presuppose some understanding of where, how and why the viewpoints of various stakeholders may differ. In the present paper factors that influence public perceptions of genetically-modified (GM) food are discussed, with a special focus on the unique circumstances of populations in the USA, Europe and developing countries. It is argued that effective communication and decision making about the risk of GM food depends critically on understanding how socio-cultural groups differ in their values and in the way they deal with the risks and benefits of new technologies. The implications of psychological aspects of perceived risk (including the roles of qualitative dimensions of risk, world views and trust) for public acceptance of new food technologies are highlighted.

  7. Mass propagation and genetic improvement of forest trees for biomass production by tissue culture. [Sapium sebiferum, Leucaena leucocephala, and Copaifera multijuga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venketeswaran, S.; Gandhi, V.

    1982-01-01

    Wood derived from forest trees can serve as a major alternative source of energy and fuel because of the current energy shortage and increase in price of oil and natural gas. Normally, trees take several years to grow and produce seeds. But, in recent years, test tube trees have been produced in large numbers (as many as 3000 plants per year) from one seedling using tissue culture by treating a few cells of a tree with specific chemical substances. Tissue culture is a promising technique for mass production of large numbers of superior trees, derived through genetic improvement, and may prove widely applicable to trees which show promise as energy sources. Three selected tree genera, viz. Sapium sebiferum (Chinese Tallow), Leucaena leucocephala (giant ipil-ipil, a tropical legume) and Copaifera multijuga (Copaiba tree from Brazil) have been studied because of their potential usefulness for biomass production. Regeneration of vegetatively produced plantlets has been achieved from embyros and callus cells grown in specific culture medium for two of the above genera. High yields of protoplasts have been obtained isolated from cells of different plant parts and grown as calli. Conditions which will enable callus derived from protoplasts to undergo in vitro regeneration, plantlet formation and eventually growth into plants are being investigated. 16 figures.

  8. A versatile, non genetically modified organism (GMO)-based strategy for controlling low-producer mutants in Bordetella pertussis cultures using antigenic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, Philippe; Slock, Thomas; Smessaert, Vincent; De Rop, Philippe; Dehottay, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    The uncontrolled presence of non-producer mutants negatively affects bioprocesses. In Bordetella pertussis cultures, avirulent mutants emerge spontaneously and accumulate. We characterized the dynamics of accumulation using high-throughput growth assays and competition experiments between virulent and avirulent (bvg(-) ) isolates. A fitness advantage of bvg(-) cells was identified as the main driver for bvg(-) accumulation under conditions of high virulence factor production. Conversely, under conditions that reduce their expression (antigenic modulation), bvg(-) takeover could be avoided. A control strategy was derived, which consists in applying modulating conditions whenever virulence factor production is not required. It has a wide range of applications, from routine laboratory operations to vaccine manufacturing, where pertussis toxin yields were increased 1.4-fold by performing early pre-culture steps in modulating conditions. Because it only requires subtle modifications of the culture medium and does not involve genetic modifications, this strategy is applicable to any B. pertussis isolate, and should facilitate regulatory acceptance of process changes for vaccine production. Strategies based on the same concept, could be derived for other industrially relevant micro-organisms. This study illustrates how a sound scientific understanding of physiological principles can be turned into a practical application for the bioprocess industry, in alignment with Quality by Design principles. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Lay Health Influencers: How They Tailor Brief Tobacco Cessation Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Nicole P.; Castaneda, Heide; Nichter, Mark; Nichter, Mimi; Wind, Steven; Carruth, Lauren; Muramoto, Myra

    2012-01-01

    Interventions tailored to individual smoker characteristics have increasingly received attention in the tobacco control literature. The majority of tailored interventions are generated by computers and administered with printed materials or web-based programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the tailoring activities of community lay…

  10. Lay Health Influencers: How They Tailor Brief Tobacco Cessation Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Nicole P.; Castaneda, Heide; Nichter, Mark; Nichter, Mimi; Wind, Steven; Carruth, Lauren; Muramoto, Myra

    2012-01-01

    Interventions tailored to individual smoker characteristics have increasingly received attention in the tobacco control literature. The majority of tailored interventions are generated by computers and administered with printed materials or web-based programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the tailoring activities of community lay…

  11. Genetic Research Methodology Meets Early Childhood Science Education Research: A Cultural-Historical Study of Child’s Scientific Thinking Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fragkiadaki G.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study reported in this paper aims to structure a cultural-historical understanding on how early childhood children experience science and how they develop scientific thinking as they interact with the social, cultural and material world. Moving beyond the cognitive dimensions of learning by interrelating different aspects of the process of children’s scientific thinking development constitutes a research prior- ity for the study. From a wide range of collected data, in the present article one qualitative empirical case study is presented. The detailed single example that is analyzed refers to a kindergarten female student, aged 5.2 years old, from an urban area of Greece. A developmental research methodology as specified from the requirements of cultural-historical theory framework is used. Following four of the main principles of the experimental genetic method, this study creates a fecund ground for a cultural-historical exploration and interpretation of the very processes of the child’s development. The collection of the data was achieved through expanded, open-type conversations conducted at three concrete phases between the case study child, two of her peers and the educator. Drawing upon the system of theoretical concepts of cultural- historical theory the analysis is mainly based on the concept of perezhivanie as analytical tool as well as the concept of the developmental trajectories. The concept of the conceptualization of a precursor model as a theoretical tool that derives from the field of Science Education is also used. The analysis gives insights into how a certain social situation between children and educators in kindergarten settings becomes the unique social situation of a child’s development. Using as a base the dialectic perspective that Vygotsky posed in the analysis of human psyche, the study in this paper offers a creative insight in order to elaborate on a broad and dynamic understanding of the child

  12. A functional selection of viral genetic elements in cultured cells to identify hepatitis C virus RNA translation inhibitors †

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffrelo, Loic; Chabas, Sandrine; Reigadas, Sandrine; Pflieger, Aude; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Rumi, Julie; Ventura, Michel; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Staedel, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    We developed a functional selection system based on randomized genetic elements (GE) to identify potential regulators of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA translation, a process initiated by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). A retroviral HCV GE library was introduced into HepG2 cells, stably expressing the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) under the control of the HCV IRES. Cells that expressed transduced GEs inhibiting HSV-TK were selected via their resistance to ganciclovir. S...

  13. Heritable tissue culture induced genetic variation in sunflower (helianthus annuus l) as a tool for crop improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Encheva Julia; Tsvetkova F.; Ivanov Petar

    2004-01-01

    Immature zygotic embryos from the Bulgarian fertility restorer line R 147 (male component of the commercial hybrid Albena) were used as donor material for induction of direct organogenesis in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L). Range of spontaneous somaclonal variation among the progenies of regenerants has been assessed. Genetic modifications observed in the regenerants included agronomic traits such as oil content in seed, 1000-seed weight, plant height petiole length, internode length, number...

  14. Determination of genetic stability in long-term somatic embryogenic cultures and derived plantlets of cork oak using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Tina; Pinto, Glória; Loureiro, João; Costa, Armando; Santos, Conceição

    2006-09-01

    Microsatellites were used to test genetic stability in somatic embryos (SE) of Quercus suber L. The SE were obtained by a simple somatic embryogenesis protocol: leaf explants from two adult plants (QsG0, QsG5) and from two juvenile plants (QsGM1, QsGM2) were inoculated on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and zeatin. Calluses with primary embryogenic structures were transferred to MSWH (MS medium without growth regulators) and SE proliferated by secondary somatic embryogenesis. High morphological heterogeneity was found among cotyledonary SE. However, converted plants looked morphologically normal with well-developed rooting systems and shoots. The genetic stability of the plant material during the somatic embryogenesis process was evaluated by using six to eight nuclear microsatellites transferred from Q. myrsinifolia Blume, Q. petraea (Matts.) Liebl. and Q. robur L. Five of eight microsatellites distinguished among the genotypes analyzed, and for QsG0, QsGM1 and QsGM2, uniform microsatellite patterns were generally observed within and between SE and the respective donor genotypes. For genotype QsG5, the same pattern was observed in all samples analyzed except one, where the mutation percentage was 2.5%. We conclude that microsatellite markers can be used to assess genetic stability of clonal materials and to determine genetic stability throughout the process of somatic embryogenesis. The simple somatic embryogenesis protocol described has potential for the commercial propagation of Q. suber because it results in a low percentage of mutations.

  15. Ethical, cultural and spiritual objections to genetically modified organisms: a review of the New Zealand process and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jean S

    2004-06-01

    The New Zealand Royal Commission on Genetic Modification was directed to investigate the strategic options available to address the use of genetically modified organisms and products. The Commission spent 14 months hearing submissions in public meetings and formal hearings. Over 10,000 written public submissions were received. Most were against any use of the technology in food, and many were angry at the lack of product labelling and therefore choice. Few were supportive, although there was little objection to the use of genetic technology or modified organisms in containment, especially for medical research. Many New Zealanders had strong spiritual objections to the creation of transgenic animals containing human DNA, which they described as "playing God" or "interfering with Nature". Many expressed lack of trust in scientists and biotechnology companies. Despite these views, the Commission concluded that New Zealand should keep its options open and proceed carefully, minimising and managing risks. The Commission recommended that Government establish a Bioethics Council to act as a transparent advisory body and prepare guidelines on biotechnology, enabling public education and participation in decision-making.

  16. Reduced lipid oxidation in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic subjects may be of genetic origin: evidence from cultured myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaster, Michael; Rustan, Arild C; Aas, Vigdis; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2004-03-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle in vivo is associated with reduced lipid oxidation and lipid accumulation. It is still uncertain whether changes in lipid metabolism represent an adaptive compensation at the cellular level or a direct expression of a genetic trait. Studies of palmitate metabolism in human myotubes established from control and type 2 diabetic subjects may solve this problem, as genetic defects are preserved and expressed in vitro. In this study, total uptake of palmitic acid was similar in myotubes established from both control and type 2 diabetic subjects under basal conditions and acute insulin stimulation. Myotubes established from diabetic subjects expressed a primary reduced palmitic acid oxidation to carbon dioxide with a concomitantly increased esterification of palmitic acid into phospholipids compared with control myotubes under basal conditions. Triacylglycerol (TAG) content and the incorporation of palmitic acid into diacylglycerol (DAG) and TAG at basal conditions did not vary between the groups. Acute insulin treatment significantly increased palmitate uptake and incorporation of palmitic acid into DAG and TAG in myotubes established from both study groups, but no difference was found in myotubes established from control and diabetic subjects. These results indicate that the reduced lipid oxidation in diabetic skeletal muscle in vivo may be of genetic origin; it also appears that TAG metabolism is not primarily affected in diabetic muscles under basal physiological conditions.

  17. [Plants regeneration from genetically transformed root and callus cultures of periwinkle Vinca minor L. and foxglove purple Digitalis purpurea L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshina, L G; Bulko, O V

    2014-01-01

    Plants regenerated from hairy roots and calluses of foxglove purple and periwinkle have been obtained. It was found that organogenesis in hairy root culture occurs spontaneously on hormone-free medium but with different efficiencies. The frequency of direct shoot formation from root cultures was up to 60% in Digitalis and 3.7% in Vinca. Addition of 1 mg/l BA, 0.1 mg/l NAA and 5% sucrose to B5 medium increased regenerative capacity of Vinca roots up to 19.1%. Regenerated plants showed morphological features typically seen in Ri-transgenic plants. They include growth and plagiotropism of the root system, increased shoot formation, changed leaf morphology and short internodes.

  18. Establishment of pomegranate (Punica granatum) hairy root cultures for genetic interrogation of the hydrolyzable tannin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Nadia N; Bandaranayake, Pradeepa C G; Tian, Li

    2012-09-01

    In contrast to the numerous reports on the human therapeutic applications of hydrolyzable tannins (HTs), genes involved in their biosynthesis have not been identified at the molecular level from any plant species. Although we have previously identified candidate HT biosynthetic genes in pomegranate using transcriptomic and bioinformatic analyses, characterization of in planta enzyme function remains a critical step in biochemical pathway elucidation. We here report the establishment of a pomegranate (Punica granatum) hairy root culture system that produces HTs. Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains transformed with a binary vector harboring a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) gene were used for hairy root induction, allowing visual, non-destructive, detection of transgene incorporation. It also demonstrated that the pomegranate hairy root culture system is suitable for expressing heterologous genes (YFP in this case). Expression of 26 putative UDP-glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes, obtained from a pomegranate fruit peel (a tissue highly abundant in HTs) RNA-Seq library, were verified in wild type and hairy roots. In addition, two candidate UGTs for HT biosynthesis were identified based on HPLC and differential gene expression analyses of various pomegranate tissues. Together with in vitro enzyme activity assays, the hairy root culture system holds great promise for revealing the undivulged HT biosynthetic pathway using pomegranate as a model system.

  19. 共培养环境对玉米遗传转化的影响%Study on Co-culture System to Genetic Transformation of Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏伟; 梁业红; 史振声; 张世煌

    2011-01-01

    以携带pCAMBIAl301(含GUS基因)质粒的EHAl05菌株侵染玉米优良自交系齐319幼胚诱导的胚性愈伤组织,共培养5d(特殊试验除外)后,对GUS基因瞬时表达率影响玉米转化的共培养环境进行研究.结果表明,玉米转化效率随共培养基pH降低而升高,临界共培养pH为5.2;共培养基中添加200μmol/L乙酰丁香酮(AS)对提高玉米愈伤组织的转化率是必要的;共培养3和5d的GUS表达率呈现先升高后降低的趋势,以25℃共培养3d的GUS表达率最高,为33.74%.%An optimized transformation system was developed for maize elite inbred lines using Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated gene transfer by studying various important co-culture systems that affect the efficiency of genetic transformation. The system was performed by transient expression of GUS gene after embryogenic callus co-cultured for five days (except special experiment). The study using the embryogenic callus derived from immature embryos of maize inbred line Qi 319 showed that the genetic transformation efficiency was increased with the decreasing of co-cultivation medium pH. The appropriate pH of co-cultivation medium was 5. 2. It was beneficial to add acetosyringone (AS) into co-cultivation medium for improving transformation efficiency. The result also indicated that the transformation efficiency after adding 200 μmol/L acetosyringone (AS) into the co-cultivation medium was significantly higher than other treatments. Both of the GUS gene expression efficiencies co-cultured for three days and five days were increased at first and then decreased. The highest expression efficiency of GUS gene could reach 33. 74% when co-cultured three days in dark at 25 ℃.

  20. Genetically engineering Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 for the sustainable production of the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Dan; Daddy, Soumana; He, Qingfang

    2014-07-01

    p-Coumaric acid is the precursor of phenylpropanoids, which are plant secondary metabolites that are beneficial to human health. Tyrosine ammonia lyase catalyzes the production of p-coumaric acid from tyrosine. Because of their photosynthetic ability and biosynthetic versatility, cyanobacteria are promising candidates for the production of certain plant metabolites, including phenylpropanoids. Here, we produced p-coumaric acid in a strain of transgenic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis 6803). Whereas a strain of Synechocystis 6803 genetically engineered to express sam8, a tyrosine ammonia lyase gene from the actinomycete Saccharothrix espanaensis, accumulated little or no p-coumaric acid, a strain that both expressed sam8 and lacked slr1573, a native hypothetical gene shown here to encode a laccase that oxidizes polyphenols, produced ∼82.6 mg/L p-coumaric acid, which was readily purified from the growth medium.

  1. Genetic diversity of Cercospora kikuchii isolates from soybean cultured in Argentina as revealed by molecular markers and cercosporin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurá, María Cristina; Latorre Rapela, María Gabriela; Vaccari, María Celia; Maumary, Roxana; Soldano, Anabel; Mattio, Mónica; González, Ana María

    2011-05-01

    Leaf blight and purple seed, caused by the fungal pathogen Cercospora kikuchii (Matsumoto & Tomoyasu) M. W. Gardner are very important diseases of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in Argentina. The aims of this work were: (a) to confirm and to assess the genetic variability among C. kikuchii isolates collected from different soybean growing areas in Santa Fe province using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers and sequence information from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA and (b) to analyze the cercosporin production of the regional C. kikuchi isolates in order to assess whether there was any relationship between the molecular profiles and the toxin production. Isolates from different regions in Santa Fe province were studied. The sequence of the ITS regions showed high similarity (99-100%) to the GenBank sequences of C. kikuchii BRCK179 (accession number AY633838). The ISSR markers clustered all the isolates into many groups and cercosporin content was highly variable among isolates. No relationship was observed between ITS region, ISSR groups and origin or cercosporin content. The high degree of genetic variability and cercosporin production among isolates compared in this study characterizes a diverse population of C. kikuchii in the region.

  2. A Study of Mercury Methylation Genetics: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of hgcAB in Pure Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, G. A.; Wymore, A. M.; King, A. J.; Podar, M.; Hurt, R. A., Jr.; Santillan, E. F. U.; Gilmour, C. C.; Brandt, C. C.; Brown, S. D.; Palumbo, A. V.; Elias, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Two proteins (HgcA and HgcB) have been determined to be essential for mercury (Hg)-methylation and either one alone is not sufficient for this process. Detection and quantification of these genes to determine at risk environments is critical. Universal degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers spanning hgcAB were developed to ascertain organismal diversity and validate that both genes were present as an established prerequisite for Hg-methylation. To confirm this approach, an extensive set of pure cultures with published genomes (including methylators and non-methylators: 13 Deltaproteobacteria, 9 Firmicutes, and 10 methanogenic Archaea) were assayed with the newly designed universal hgcAB primer set. A single band within an agarose gel was observed for the majority of the cultures with known hgcAB and confirmed via Sanger sequencing. For environmental applications, once the potential for Hg-methylation is established from PCR amplification with the universal hgcAB primer set, quantification of clade-specific hgcAB gene abundance is desirable. We developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) degenerate primers targeting hgcA from each of the three dominate clades (Deltaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and methanogenic Archaea) known to be associated with anaerobic Hg-methylation. The qPCR primers amplify virtually all hgcA positive cultures overall and are specific for their designed clade. Finally, to ensure the procedure is robust and sensitive in complex environmental matrices, cells from all clades were mixed in different combinations and ratios to assess qPCR primer specificity. The development and validation of these high fidelity quantitative molecular tools now allows for rapid and accurate risk management assessment in any environment.

  3. Tailored antireflective biomimetic nanostructures for UV applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhard, Christoph; Pacholski, Claudia; Spatz, Joachim P [Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lehr, Dennis; Brunner, Robert; Helgert, Michael [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Sundermann, Michael, E-mail: Pacholski@mf.mpg.de [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 56, D-73447 Oberkochen (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    Antireflective surfaces composed of biomimetic sub-wavelength structures that employ the 'moth eye principle' for reflectance reduction are highly desirable in many optical applications such as solar cells, photodetectors and laser optics. We report an efficient approach for the fabrication of antireflective surfaces based on a two-step process consisting of gold nanoparticle mask generation by micellar block copolymer nanolithography and a multi-step reactive ion etching process. Depending on the RIE process parameters nanostructured surfaces with tailored antireflective properties can easily be fabricated that show optimum performance for specific applications.

  4. Ameliorating risk: Culturable and metagenomic monitoring of the 14 year decline of a genetically engineered microorganism at a bioremediation field site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Smart, Abby E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chauhan, Archana [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ripp, Steven Anthony [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Williams, Daniel [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burton, Whitney [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moser, Scott [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Sayler, Gary [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 represented the first genetically engineered microorganism to be approved in the United States for field release for applications related to subsurface soil bioremediation. In October 1996, strain HK44 was introduced into a replicated semi-contained array of soil lysimeters where its luciferase (luxCDABE)-based bioluminescent response to soil-borne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants was detected and monitored for the next two years. At the termination of this experiment, it was decided that the lysimeters remain available for future longer-term monitoring efforts, and were thus covered and left essentially undisturbed until the initiation of a large sampling event in 2010, fourteen years after the original release. Although after extensive sampling culturable HK44 cells were not found, additional molecular and metagenomic analyses indicated that genetic signatures of HK44 cells still persisted, with genes diagnostic for the bioluminescent transposon carried by strain HK44 (luxA and tetA) being found at low concentrations (< 5000 copies/g).

  5. Genetic counseling for sex chromosome anomalies (SCAs) in Israel and Germany: assessing medical risks according to the importance of fertility in two cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiloni-Dolev, Yael

    2006-12-01

    In this article, I report findings from a comparative study of Israeli and German genetic counselors. Specifically, it concerns counselors' attitudes and risk assessments relating to prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome anomalies (SCAs) such as Klinefelter and Turner syndromes. Data collected through in-depth interviews with counselors in both countries (N = 32) are presented, and the types of claims experts deploy in their personal and professional estimation of the risks involved in SCAs are analyzed. The article concludes by suggesting that the counselors rhetoric concerning SCAs, whose major manifestation is the future infertility of the unborn child as well as their estimations of the related risks, should be situated in a broader cultural context, that of local Israeli and German understandings of the importance of fertility, and not in their professional nondirective ethos. Hence, to understand the practice of genetic counselors in two late-modern societies, one must understand the unique relationship between the individual bodies of pregnant women and the body politics of their nations, a relationship mediated by the counselors, who are the bearers of knowledge and expertise in this field.

  6. MECHANISMS OF RESISTANCE TO CIPROFLOXACIN AND GENETIC DIVERSITY OF ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS ORIGINATING FROM URINE CULTURES PERFORMED FOR ROMANIAN ADULTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Violeta Corina; Oprea, Mihaela; Neacşu, Gabriela; Gîlcă, Ramona; Popa, Mircea Ioan; Usein, Codruţa-Romaniţa

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) with Escherichia coli are among the most common infections presenting in general practice. Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are relied on for their empirical therapy but recent reports indicate a concerning increase in the percentage of FQ-resistant E. coli isolates in many countries, including Romania. Sixty E. coli strains with ciprofloxacin resistance and cephalosporin susceptibility isolated from urine specimens of non-hospitalized patients during a five-month period (October 2014 - February 2015) were further analyzed to determine the molecular basis of FQ resistance (i.e. mutations in chromosomal gyrA, gyrB, parC genes and presence of plasmid-borne qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6'-Ib-cr genes), the phylogenetic background (i.e. phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2, C, D, E, F or clade I), O25b/ST131 status, and genetic relatedness inferred from the XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles as a measure of isolate-specific genetic composition. The PCR-based phylotyping showed that most strains were assigned to non-B2 phylogenetic groups (i.e. group A/21 strains, group B1/14 strains, group B2/10 strains, group C/8 strains, group D/3 strains, group F/4 strains). Already described chromosomal mutations associated to FQ resistance were found, the strains being double gyrA mutants (i.e. Ser83Leu, Asp87Asn) with one or two parC mutations (e.g. Ala56Thr, Ser80Ile, Glu84Gly). Seven percent of the strains harboured plasmid-borne genes qnrS1 (2 strains) and aac(6'-Ib-cr (2 strains). Based on the PCR results, 15% of the strains were members of the O25b/ST131 clone and possessed the gyrA/parC allele combination which is considered as hallmark of H30 subclone. PFGE genotyping revealed a genetically diverse population of FQ-resistant E. coli. ST131 strains displayed more homogeneous PFGE profiles than non-ST131. The ST131 cluster extended to 77.74% similarity versus 60% overall. These findings underscore the need for ongoing surveillance to capture the

  7. What's in a Surname? Physique, Aptitude, and Sports Type Comparisons between Tailors and Smiths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Rieder, Stephan; Stieger, Stefan; Swami, Viren

    2015-01-01

    Combined heredity of surnames and physique, coupled with past marriage patterns and trade-specific physical aptitude and selection factors, may have led to differential assortment of bodily characteristics among present-day men with specific trade-reflecting surnames (Tailor vs. Smith). Two studies reported here were partially consistent with this genetic-social hypothesis, first proposed by Bäumler (1980). Study 1 (N = 224) indicated significantly higher self-rated physical aptitude for prototypically strength-related activities (professions, sports, hobbies) in a random sample of Smiths. The counterpart effect (higher aptitude for dexterity-related activities among Tailors) was directionally correct, but not significant, and Tailor-Smith differences in basic physique variables were nil. Study 2 examined two large total-population-of-interest datasets (Austria/Germany combined, and UK: N = 7001 and 20,532) of men's national high-score lists for track-and-field events requiring different physiques. In both datasets, proportions of Smiths significantly increased from light-stature over medium-stature to heavy-stature sports categories. The predicted counterpart effect (decreasing prevalences of Tailors along these categories) was not supported. Related prior findings, the viability of possible alternative interpretations of the evidence (differential positive selection for trades and occupations, differential endogamy and assortative mating patterns, implicit egotism effects), and directions for further inquiry are discussed in conclusion.

  8. What’s in a Surname? Physique, Aptitude, and Sports Type Comparisons between Tailors and Smiths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Rieder, Stephan; Stieger, Stefan; Swami, Viren

    2015-01-01

    Combined heredity of surnames and physique, coupled with past marriage patterns and trade-specific physical aptitude and selection factors, may have led to differential assortment of bodily characteristics among present-day men with specific trade-reflecting surnames (Tailor vs. Smith). Two studies reported here were partially consistent with this genetic-social hypothesis, first proposed by Bäumler (1980). Study 1 (N = 224) indicated significantly higher self-rated physical aptitude for prototypically strength-related activities (professions, sports, hobbies) in a random sample of Smiths. The counterpart effect (higher aptitude for dexterity-related activities among Tailors) was directionally correct, but not significant, and Tailor-Smith differences in basic physique variables were nil. Study 2 examined two large total-population-of-interest datasets (Austria/Germany combined, and UK: N = 7001 and 20532) of men’s national high-score lists for track-and-field events requiring different physiques. In both datasets, proportions of Smiths significantly increased from light-stature over medium-stature to heavy-stature sports categories. The predicted counterpart effect (decreasing prevalences of Tailors along these categories) was not supported. Related prior findings, the viability of possible alternative interpretations of the evidence (differential positive selection for trades and occupations, differential endogamy and assortative mating patterns, implicit egotism effects), and directions for further inquiry are discussed in conclusion. PMID:26161803

  9. Genetic variation and balancing selection at MHC class II exon 2 in cultured stocks and wild populations of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Z N; Yang, S; Fan, B; Wang, L; Lin, H R

    2012-11-12

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play vital roles in triggering adaptive immune responses and are considered the most variable molecules in vertebrates. Recently, many studies have focused on the polymorphism and evolution mode of MHC in both model and non-model organisms. Here, we analyzed the MHC class II exon 2-encoding β chain in comparison with the mitochondrial Cytb gene and our previously published microsatellite data set in three cultured stocks and four wild populations of the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) in order to investigate its genetic variation and mechanism of evolution. We detected one to four alleles in one individual, suggesting that at least two loci exist in the orange-spotted grouper, as well as a particularly high level of allelic diversity at the MHC loci. Furthermore, the cultured stocks exhibited reduced allelic diversity compared to the wild counterparts. We found evidence of balancing selection at MHC class II exon 2, and codon sites under positive selection were largely correspondent to the protein-binding region. In addition, MHC class II exon 2 revealed significant differences between population differentiation patterns from the neutral mitochondrial Cytb and microsatellites, which may indicate local adaptation at MHC loci in orange-spotted grouper originating from the South China Sea and Southeast Asia.

  10. Laser cutting of sheets for Tailored Blanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1999-01-01

    Over the past few years there has been an enormous increase in the use of tailored blanks, especially in the automotive industry. Often the sheets for tailored blanks are shear cut, but results have been reported that the allowable sheet gap distance should not exceed 0.1 mm in order to obtain...... sound welds. Laser cutting the sheets may therefore be an alternative to shear cutting, if the cut kerf squareness can be kept below 0.05 mm.In a number of systematic laboratory experiments the effects of the major process parameters in laser cutting have been investigated. Each cut was quantified...... by the squareness, the surface roughness and the burr height. Mild steel as well as high strength steel with and with out galvanisation with thickness' of 0.7(5) and 1.25 were used.In the tests the difference in cut quality between a 5" and a 7.5" focusing lens were tested and the effect of using pulsed mode laser...

  11. Genetic mutations in live infectious bronchitis vaccine viruses following single or dual in vitro infection of tracheal organ cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Christopher; Bennett, Sarah; Forrester, Anne; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2016-12-01

    Despite regular co-vaccination of two different strains of live infectious bronchitis vaccine viruses, little is known about possible mutations in these viruses following vaccination. As an alternative to chicks, this study used an in vitro infection model to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the part-S1 gene of two live infectious bronchitis virus vaccine strains (793B and Massachusetts) following single or dual inoculation onto tracheal organ cultures. Results indicate that viral titres reduced over the duration of the study; conversely, the amount of detected infectious bronchitis virus genome increased. Results demonstrate a greater number of non-synonymous SNPs in both vaccine strains when they are co-inoculated, compared with the single inoculations. The influence of the increased SNP and hydrophobic properties of the translated proteins on the vaccine viruses' virulence is unknown.

  12. Deep Drawing of High-Strength Tailored Blanks by Using Tailored Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mennecart

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In most forming processes based on tailored blanks, the tool material remains the same as that of sheet metal blanks without tailored properties. A novel concept of lightweight construction for deep drawing tools is presented in this work to improve the forming behavior of tailored blanks. The investigations presented here deal with the forming of tailored blanks of dissimilar strengths using tailored dies made of two different materials. In the area of the steel blank with higher strength, typical tool steel is used. In the area of the low-strength steel, a hybrid tool made out of a polymer and a fiber-reinforced surface replaces the steel half. Cylindrical cups of DP600/HX300LAD are formed and analyzed regarding their formability. The use of two different halves of tool materials shows improved blank thickness distribution, weld-line movement and pressure distribution compared to the use of two steel halves. An improvement in strain distribution is also observed by the inclusion of springs in the polymer side of tools, which is implemented to control the material flow in the die. Furthermore, a reduction in tool weight of approximately 75% can be achieved by using this technique. An accurate finite element modeling strategy is developed to analyze the problem numerically and is verified experimentally for the cylindrical cup. This strategy is then applied to investigate the thickness distribution and weld-line movement for a complex geometry, and its transferability is validated. The inclusion of springs in the hybrid tool leads to better material flow, which results in reduction of weld-line movement by around 60%, leading to more uniform thickness distribution.

  13. A functional selection of viral genetic elements in cultured cells to identify hepatitis C virus RNA translation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrelo, Loic; Chabas, Sandrine; Reigadas, Sandrine; Pflieger, Aude; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Rumi, Julie; Ventura, Michel; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Staedel, Cathy

    2008-09-01

    We developed a functional selection system based on randomized genetic elements (GE) to identify potential regulators of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA translation, a process initiated by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). A retroviral HCV GE library was introduced into HepG2 cells, stably expressing the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) under the control of the HCV IRES. Cells that expressed transduced GEs inhibiting HSV-TK were selected via their resistance to ganciclovir. Six major GEs were rescued by PCR on the selected cell DNA and identified as HCV elements. We validated our strategy by further studying the activity of one of them, GE4, encoding the 5' end of the viral NS5A gene. GE4 inhibited HCV IRES-, but not cap-dependent, reporter translation in human hepatic cell lines and inhibited HCV infection at a post-entry step, decreasing by 85% the number of viral RNA copies. This method can be applied to the identification of gene expression regulators.

  14. The value of blastocyst culture on preimplantation genetic diagnosis%囊胚培养在植入前遗传学诊断中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    偶健; 王玮; 马燕琳; 周知; 丁洁; 王馥新; 段程颖; 李林江; 郑爱燕

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the value of blastocyst culture for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD).Methods Day 3 embryos were biopsied and analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique.Embryos with normal FISH results were cultured into blastocysts,and the ones with better morphology scores were transferred.Fourteen embryos with abnormal FISH results were cultured into blastocysts.Part of the cells taken from the blastocysts were amplified by whole genomic amplification (WGA) and assessed by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis.Results Six blastocysts with normal FISH results were transferred in 5 cycles.Four healthy babies of 3 cycles were delivered.Another one was a singleton pregnancy but with embryo growth arrest,whose villus karyotype was normal.Fourteen embryos with abnormal FISH results were cultured into blastocysts and analyzed by array-CGH.Six blastocysts were normal by array-CGH.Conclusion FISH combined with blastocyst culture may further ensure the accuracy of PGD result.Detection at the blastocyst stage can avoid false positive results and mosaic interferences on Day 3 stage and are therefore more authentic.%目的 探讨囊胚培养在植入前遗传学诊断(preimplantation genetic diagnosis,PGD)中的应用价值.方法 受精后第3天(Day 3)行胚胎活检,进行荧光原位杂交(fluorescent in situ hybridization,FISH).对于诊断为正常的胚胎,培养到囊胚阶段后选择形态评分优良的囊胚进行移植;对于诊断为异常的胚胎,有14个培养到囊胚阶段,各取其一部分细胞用于全基因组扩增(whole genomic amplification,WGA),将扩增后的DNA用微阵列比较基因组杂交(array-based comparative genomic hybridization,arrayCGH)进行再次检测.结果 FISH诊断为正常的6个囊胚进行了5个周期的胚胎移植,3个周期成功生育了4个健康婴儿,1个周期单胎妊娠见胚囊后流产,绒毛染色体检测为正常核型.FISH诊断为异常的14

  15. Plant Regeneration from Immature Inflorescence Culture and Genetic Transformation of Wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum × A. Desertorum cv. Hycrest-Mengnong)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Xiu-wen; WEI Jian-hua; XU Chun-bo; MI Fu-gui; YUN Jin-feng

    2006-01-01

    The plants of hybrid wheatgrass (A. Cristatum ×A. Desertorum cv. Hycrest-Mengnong) were directly induced from embryogenic callus regenerated from immature inflorescence. Immature inflorescence was cultured on improved MS medium containing 2.0-3.0 mg L-1 2,4-D to regenerate callus. The calli were then transferred to hormone-free MS medium for differentiation and 1/2 MS medium for rooting. Results showed that callus initiation frequency was 83.4% and plant regeneration frequency was 59.6%. Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (bar) gene was transformed into the hybrid wheatgrass by particle bombardment. Resistant callus was obtained using selecting agent, herbicide glufosinate of 0.5 mg L-1, and some transgenic plants were recovered in vitro. The transgenic plants were identified by PCR and Southern blot analysis and these plants developed normally in the glufosinate medium, whereas the nontransgenic plants did not. The results demonstrated that bar cDNA integrated into the genomic DNA of the transgenic plants. The transgenic frequencies of bar gene were 1.1%.

  16. Cytochrome P450 genetic polymorphism in neonatal drug metabolism: role and practical consequences towards a new drug culture in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanni, D; Ambu, R; Gerosa, C; Nemolato, S; Castagnola, M; Van Eyken, P; Faa, G; Fanos, V

    2014-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 superfamily (CYP450) in humans is formed by 57 functional monooxygenases critical for the metabolism of numerous endogenous and exogenous compounds. The superfamily is organized into 18 families and 44 subfamilies. CYP nomenclature is based on the identity of amino acids. The most important functions of the CYP450 are related to metabolism of endogenous compounds, detoxification of exogenous xenobiotics and decomposition of the vast majority of currently used drugs. The expression of CYP450 enzymes in the human body is characterized by a marked substrate and tissue specificity, the most important being localized in the liver, but also present in kidney, lung, brain, breast, prostate and in the small intestine. The human cytochrome P450 3A gene family (CYP3A) accounts for the largest portion of CYP450 proteins in human liver and includes 4 genes: CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, CYP3A43. Multiple and complex genetic variations, marked interindividual, interethnic and gender variability have been reported regarding CYP3A isoform expression and activity. Multiple factors may affect CYP3A expression and activity, such as inducers like rifampicin, phenobarbital, 3-methylcholantrene, beta-naphtoflavone, and dexamethasone. The maturation of organ systems, paralleled by ontogeny of drug-metabolizing enzymes during fetal life and in the first months of postnatal life, surely exerts profound effects on drug disposition, probably being the predominant factor accounting for age-associated changes in drug clearance. In fact, drug dosage in the perinatal period represents a continuous challenge for neonatologists. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief review of the pharmacokinetic differences between neonates and adults, showing the peculiarities of liver CYP450-related drug metabolism in the perinatal period and at birth, and to report the toxic mechanisms of liver injury in neonates, due to the most frequently utilized drugs in NICU centers.

  17. Tailoring Accelerating Beams in Phase Space

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Yuanhui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate design of wavefront will enable light fields propagating along arbitrary trajectories thus forming accelerating beams in free space. Previous ways of designing such accelerating beams mainly rely on caustic methods, which start from diffraction integrals and only deal with two-dimensional fields. Here we introduce a new perspective to construct accelerating beams in phase space by designing the corresponding Wigner distribution function (WDF). We find such a WDF-based method is capable of providing both the initial field distribution and the angular spectrum in need by projecting the WDF into the real space and the Fourier space respectively. Moreover, this approach applies to the construction of both two- and three-dimensional fields, greatly generalizing previous caustic methods. It may therefore open up a new route to construct highly-tailored accelerating beams and facilitate applications ranging from particle manipulation and trapping to optical routing as well as material processing.

  18. Tailoring the multipoles in THz toroidal metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Longqing; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-08-01

    The multipoles play a significant role in determining the resonant behavior of subwavelength resonators that form the basis of metamaterial and plasmonic systems. Here, we study the impact of multipoles including toroidal dipole on the resonance intensity and linewidth of the fundamental inductive-capacitance (LC) resonance of a metamaterial array. The dominant multipoles that strongly contribute to the resonances are tailored by spatial rearrangement of the neighboring resonators such that the mutual interactions between the magnetic, electric, and toroidal configurations lead to enormous change in the linewidth as well as the resonance intensity of the LC mode. Manipulation of the multipoles in a metamaterial array provides a general strategy for the optimization of the quality factor of metamaterial resonances, which is fundamental to its applications in broad areas of sensing, lasing and nonlinear optics where stronger field confinement plays a significant role.

  19. Tailored Patient Information Some Issues and Questions

    CERN Document Server

    Reiter, E R; Reiter, Ehud; Osman, Liesl

    1997-01-01

    Tailored patient information (TPI) systems are computer programs which produce personalised heath-information material for patients. TPI systems are of growing interest to the natural-language generation (NLG) community; many TPI systems have also been developed in the medical community, usually with mail-merge technology. No matter what technology is used, experience shows that it is not easy to field a TPI system, even if it is shown to be effective in clinical trials. In this paper we discuss some of the difficulties in fielding TPI systems. This is based on our experiences with 2 TPI systems, one for generating asthma-information booklets and one for generating smoking-cessation letters.

  20. Tailored nanoporous gold for ultrahigh fluorescence enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, X Y; Guan, P F; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2011-03-07

    We report molecular fluorescence enhancement of free-standing nanoporous gold in which the nanoporosity can be arbitrarily tailored by the combination of dealloying and electroless gold plating. The nanoporous gold fabricated by this facile method possesses unique porous structures with large gold ligaments and very small pores, and exhibits significant improvements in surface enhanced fluorescence as well as structure rigidity. It demonstrates that the confluence effect of improved quantum yield and excitation of fluorophores is responsible for the large fluorescence enhancement due to the near-field enhancement of nanoporous gold, which arises from the strong electromagnetic coupling between neighboring ligaments and the weakening of plasmon damping of the large ligaments because of the small pore size and large ligament size, respectively.

  1. Tailoring quantum structures for active photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsova, Nadezda

    This work is dedicated to the tailoring of quantum structures, with particular attention to the integration of selective area grown (SAG) active material into photonic crystal (PhC) slabs. The platform based on active PhC is vital to the realization of highly efficient elements with low energy...... consumption for on-chip and chip-to-chip optical communication. In order to develop metal-organic vapor phase epitaxial selective area etching and growth, a mask was fabricated in the HSQ e-beam resist including optimization of exposure and development conditions. By use of CBr4 as an etchant, in situ etching...... area and between the structures oriented along the [0-1-1] and [0-11] directions. Strong wavelength dependence with variations of the mask width of a few μm and opening sizes of hundreds of nanometers was observed. Incorporation of an active medium into PhC structures has showed promising results...

  2. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H.; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This “reverse engineering” of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  3. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-24

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This "reverse engineering" of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  4. Tailored cognitive-behavioral therapy for fibromyalgia: two case studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koulil, S. van; Lankveld, W. van; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Helmond, T. van; Vedder, A.; Hoorn, H. van; Cats, H.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Evers, A.W.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To illustrate a multidisciplinary group treatment for patients with fibromyalgia (FM) tailored to the patient's cognitive-behavioral pattern. METHOD: In a case-study design the tailored treatment approaches of two FM patients were described. One patient characterized by avoidance behavior

  5. The value of tailored communication in promoting medication intake behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linn, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about appropriate methods to address medication intake behavior in individual patients and how content should be tailored to the needs of these patients. This dissertation aims to develop a theoretical and evidence-based tailored multimedia intervention to improve medication intake b

  6. Tailored information about cancer risk and screening: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Dulmen, S. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study interventions that provide people with information about cancer risk and about screening that is tailored to their personal characteristics. We assess the tailoring characteristics, theory base and effects on risk perception, knowledge and screening behavior of these intervention

  7. Effects of tailoring health messages on physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Smeets (Tamara); J. Brug (Hans); H. de Vries (Hein)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractComputer-tailored printed education can be a promising way of promoting physical activity. The present study tested whether computer-tailored feedback on physical activity is effective and whether there are differences between respondents with low and high motivation to change. Responden

  8. Tailoring enzyme-rich environmental DNA clones: a source of enzymes for generating libraries of unnatural natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Jacob J; Craig, Jeffrey W; Calle, Paula Y; Brady, Sean F

    2010-11-10

    A detailed bioinformatics analysis of six glycopeptide biosynthetic gene clusters isolated from soil environmental DNA (eDNA) megalibraries indicates that a subset of these gene clusters contains collections of tailoring enzymes that are predicted to result in the production of new glycopeptide congeners. In particular, sulfotransferases appear in eDNA-derived gene clusters at a much higher frequency than would be predicted from the characterization of glycopeptides from cultured Actinomycetes . Enzymes found on tailoring-enzyme-rich eDNA clones associated with these six gene clusters were used to produce a series of new sulfated glycopeptide derivatives in both in vitro and in vivo derivatization studies. The derivatization of known natural products with eDNA-derived tailoring enzymes is likely to be a broadly applicable strategy for generating libraries of new natural product variants.

  9. Application of a Genetic Algorithm in a Collaborative Process to Resolve Hydrology and Physical Reality with Both Western and Maori Cultural Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheer, D.; Sheer, A.; Lebherz, S.

    2009-12-01

    Lakes Rotorua and Rotoiti are two sizeable, culturally and economically important lakes on the North Island of New Zealand. Rotorua outflows traverse the short Ohau Channel before entering Lake Rotoiti. Ohau channel flows are partially controlled by a stoplog structure. Rotoiti outflows to the Kaituna River are fully controlled by the Okere Gate structure. The structures are managed by Environment Bay of Plenty (EBOP), a government agency. Management objectives include maintaining minimum lake levels to support recreational boating, restricting maximum lake levels to avoid residential flooding, minimum instream flows below the lower lake to maintain aquatic ecosystems, limits on maximum releases to control erosion and prevent flooding. In addition, management seeks to provide for a minimum annual variation in lake levels to control the growth of aquatic plants in the littoral zone and to periodically expose beaches with important cultural value to the indigenous Maori population. The levels necessary to expose beaches may be lower than the minimum levels desired to support boating. Records of beach exposure are scant; the existence of beaches may depend on climate cycles. There is flow dependent recreational rafting below Okere Gates. This rafting is economically valuable, but is also contentious because the reach of Kaituna River flows through important Maori cultural areas, including grave sites. The Maoris have expressed a preference for replacing the Okere Gates with a fixed stepped weir, although the existing gates can be relatively easily operated to reproduce the flows over any of the fixed weir designs so far proposed. HydroLogics created a model of the two-lake system using its OASIS software system. The inflows to the lakes were estimated based on available historical flow and lake level data and on flow estimates derived from Mike-11 modeling of historical lake outlet configurations. A custom genetic algorithm (GA) was created to “wrap” the

  10. Tailoring the volatility and stability of oligopeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schätti, J.; Sezer, U.; Pedalino, S.; Cotter, J. P.; Mayor, M.

    2017-01-01

    Amino acids are essential building blocks of life, and fluorinated derivatives have gained interest in chemistry and medicine. Modern mass spectrometry has enabled the study of oligo‐ and polypeptides as isolated entities in the gas phase, but predominantly as singly or even multiply charged species. While laser desorption of neutral peptides into adiabatically expanding supersonic noble gas jets is possible, UV–VIS spectroscopy, electric or magnetic deflectometry as well as quantum interferometry would profit from the possibility to prepare thermally slow molecular beams. This has typically been precluded by the fragility of the peptide bond and the fact that a peptide would rather ‘fry’, i.e. denature and fragment than ‘fly’. Here, we explore how tailored perfluoroalkyl functionalization can reduce the intermolecular binding and thus increase the volatility of peptides and compare it to previously explored methylation, acylation and amidation of peptides. We show that this strategy is essential and enables the formation of thermal beams of intact neutral tripeptides, whereas only fragments were observed for an extensively fluoroalkyl‐decorated nonapeptide. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28608445

  11. Facile Preparation of Optically Tailored Hybrid Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Fernández de Ávila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead sulfide nanoparticles (PbS NPs have been synthesized directly in poly[2-methoxy-5-(3′,7′-dimethyloctyloxy-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MDMO-PPV semiconducting polymer by a simple low temperature method. Hybrid solutions with different concentrations of PbS with respect to the polymer have been prepared and characterized first in solution and then as thin film nanocomposites deposited on quartz substrates by spin coating. Quenching of photoluminescence emission is observed both in solutions and thin films when the ratio of PbS NPs increases with respect to the polymer, suggesting the occurrence of Dexter energy transfer from the polymer to the PbS NPs. Optical absorption is markedly increased for hybrid solutions compared to pure polymer. In thin nanocomposite films an enhancement of absorbance is observed with increasing PbS NPs concentration, which is more pronounced below 400 nm. The reported results could lead to the development of a method for tailoring the optical response of devices based on PbS NP-polymer nanocomposite by controlling the PbS NP concentration inside the polymer matrix.

  12. Computer tailored nutrition education: Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Balzo, V; Vitiello, V; Dernini, S; Zicari, S; Giusti, A M; Donini, L M; Pinto, A; Cannella, C

    2012-01-01

    Goal of this work is to promote via on-line applications the knowledge of the Italian Weekly Pyramid, which is based on the concept of WI (Well Being Index) as a unit for a correct lifestyle. On the website www.piramideitaliana.it the user can verify his/her weekly lifestyle by participating in a "game" based on the introduction, for seven consecutive days, of food and beverages consumption and time assigned to physical activity. At the end of the seven days it is possible to access the page with an evaluation of dietary habits together with the possible suggestions for a correct lifestyle. On the basis of the data collected through this web game, a statistical analysis has been developed to evaluate the food habits and the level of physical activity. In the period between September 2005-January 2010 16,546 participants have completed the game. The data collected compare actual WI consumption for each food group with the one suggested by the Pyramid. The sample eating pattern appears almost varied; all the food groups were consumed daily, albeit in much lower quantities with regard to the suggested portions. It is pointed out that some differences in the nutritional habits are related to differences in age groups and in the school degree of the sample analyzed. This work highlights the importance of web-based tailored interventions on population food habits: many people can be reached to promote the knowledge of the guidelines leading to a healthy lifestyle.

  13. Does tailoring really make a difference? : the development and evaluation of tailored interventions aimed at benzodiazepine cessation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolde, Geeske Brecht ten

    2008-01-01

    Because of the problems associated with chronic benzodiazepine use, there is impetus to prevent and reduce chronic benzodiazepine use. The overall aim was to develop a 'tailor-made' intervention in order to reduce chronic use. Before developing tailored patient education, it is first of all importan

  14. Tailorable Surface Morphology of 3D Scaffolds by Combining Additive Manufacturing with Thermally Induced Phase Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luca, Andrea; de Wijn, Joost R; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    The functionalization of biomaterials substrates used for cell culture is gearing towards an increasing control over cell activity. Although a number of biomaterials have been successfully modified by different strategies to display tailored physical and chemical surface properties, it is still challenging to step from 2D substrates to 3D scaffolds with instructive surface properties for cell culture and tissue regeneration. In this study, additive manufacturing and thermally induced phase separation are combined to create 3D scaffolds with tunable surface morphology from polymer gels. Surface features vary depending on the gel concentration, the exchanging temperature, and the nonsolvent used. When preosteoblasts (MC-3T3 cells) are cultured on these scaffolds, a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity is measured for submicron surface topography, suggesting a potential role on early cell differentiation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Ceramic laminates with tailored residual stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudín, C.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe environments imposed by new technologies demand new materials with better properties and ensured reliability. The intrinsic brittleness of ceramics has forced scientists to look for new materials and processing routes to improve the mechanical behaviour of ceramics in order to allow their use under severe thermomechanical conditions. The laminate approach has allowed the fabrication of a new family of composite materials with strength and reliability superior to those of monolithic ceramics with microstructures similar to those of the constituent layers. The different ceramic laminates developed since the middle 1970´s can be divided in two large groups depending on whether the development of residual stresses between layers is the main design tool. This paper reviews the developments in the control and tailoring of residual stresses in ceramic laminates. The tailoring of the thickness and location of layers in compression can lead to extremely performing structures in terms of strength values and reliability. External layers in compression lead to the strengthening of the structure. When relatively thin and highly compressed layers are located inside the material, threshold strength, crack bifurcation and crack arrest during fracture occur.

    Las severas condiciones de trabajo de las nuevas aplicaciones tecnológicas exigen el uso de materiales con mejores propiedades y alta fiabilidad. La potencialidad de uso de materiales frágiles, como los cerámicos, en estas aplicaciones exige el desarrollo de nuevos materiales y métodos de procesamiento que mejoren su comportamiento mecánico. El concepto de material laminado ha permitido la fabricación de una nueva familia de materiales con tensiones de fractura y fiabilidad superiores a las de materiales monolíticos con microestructuras similares a las de las láminas que conforman el laminado. Los distintos materiales laminados desarrollados desde mediados de los años 70 se pueden

  16. Purification and genetic characterization of gassericin E, a novel co-culture inducible bacteriocin from Lactobacillus gasseri EV1461 isolated from the vagina of a healthy woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Barragán, Antonio; Caballero-Guerrero, Belén; Martín, Virginia; Ruiz-Barba, José Luis; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel

    2016-03-12

    Lactobacillus gasseri is one of the dominant Lactobacillus species in the vaginal ecosystem. Some strains of this species have a high potential for being used as probiotics in order to maintain vaginal homeostasis, since they may confer colonization resistance against pathogens in the vagina by direct inhibition through production of antimicrobial compounds, as bacteriocins. In this work we have studied bacteriocin production of gassericin E (GasE), a novel bacteriocin produced by L. gasseri EV1461, a strain isolated from the vagina of a healthy woman, and whose production was shown to be promoted by the presence of certain specific bacteria in co-culture. Biochemical and genetic characterization of this novel bacteriocin are addressed. We found that the inhibitory spectrum of L. gasseri EV1461 was broad, being directed to species both related and non-related to the producing strain. Interestingly, L. gasseri EV1461 inhibited the grown of pathogens usually associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV). The antimicrobial activity was due to the production of a novel bacteriocin, gassericin E (GasE). Production of this bacteriocin in broth medium only was achieved at high cell densities. At low cell densities, bacteriocin production ceased and only was restored after the addition of a supernatant from a previous bacteriocin-producing EV1461 culture (autoinduction), or through co-cultivation with several other Gram-positive strains (inducing bacteria). DNA sequence of the GasE locus revealed the presence of two putative operons which could be involved in biosynthesis and immunity of this bacteriocin (gaeAXI), and in regulation, transport and processing (gaePKRTC). The gaePKR encodes a putative three-component regulatory system, involving an autoinducer peptide (GaeP), a histidine protein kinase (GaeK) and a response regulator (GaeR), while the gaeTC encodes for an ABC transporter (GaeT) and their accessory protein (GaeC), involved in transport and processing of the

  17. Tailoring electronic structure of polyazomethines thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Weszka

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this work is to show how electronic properties of polyazomethine thin films deposited by chemical vapor deposition method (CVD can be tailored by manipulating technological parameters of pristine films preparation as well as modifying them while the as-prepared films put into iodine atmosphere.Design/methodology/approach: The recent achievements in the field of designing and preparation methods to be used while preparing polymer photovoltaic solar cells or optoelectronic devices.Findings: The method used allow for pure pristine polymer thin films to be prtepared without any unintentional doping taking place during prepoaration methods. This is a method based on polycondensation process, where polymer chain developing is running directly due to chemical reaction between molecules of bifunctional monomers. The method applied to prepare thin films of polyazomethines takes advantage of monomer transporting by mreans of neutral transport agent as pure argon is.Research limitations/implications: The main disadvantage of alternately conjugated polymers seems to be quite low mobility of charge carrier that is expected to be a consequence of their backbone being built up of sp2 hybridized carbon and nitrogen atoms. Varying technological conditions towards increasing reagents mass transport to the substrate is expected to give such polyazomethine thin films organization that phenylene rin stacking can result in special π electron systems rather than linear ones as it is the case.Originality/value: Our results supply with original possibilities which can be useful in ooking for good polymer materials for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications. These results have been gained on polyazomethine thin films but their being isoelectronic counterpart to widely used poly p-phenylene vinylene may be very convenient to develop high efficiency polymer solar cells

  18. Simultaneous comparison of cultural, genetic and morphological evolution among reed bunting Emberiza schoeniclus populations%芦鹀种群中的文化、遗传和形态进化的同时比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuliano MATESSI; Andrea PILASTRO; Guglielmo MARIN

    2004-01-01

    我们比较了芦鹀(Emberiza schoeniclus)两个亚种组,即北部的薄喙亚种组和南部的厚喙亚种组的10个种群中的文化、遗传和形态变异.使用了四个不同的变异标记物,其中两个用来测量文化分化,一个用来测量遗传分化,即微卫星等位基因的频次,一个用来测量种群的形态分化,即喙的高度.将遗传分化作为进化时间的尺度,我们计算了亚种组间和组内分化指标与所估计的进化率之间的相关性,发现只有文化定量指标和遗传分化与种群的形态分化相关,而两个文化分化指标之间没有关系,文化分化与遗传分化之间也没有关系.使用文化-定量分化指标,发现亚种组间的文化进化率高于亚种内的文化进化率,提示鸣唱在防止杂交方面只有微弱的、也许是次要的作用.鸣唱定量特征的变异与微卫星频次相同,实际上在自然界中更可能是遗传决定的,这可以解释由于分析两个文化变异指标所得出的结果的不一致性.鸣唱的声学特性可能由于栖息地的差异或形态上的限制而发生了演变,而文化传播单位(Meme)的特性可能由于学习鸣唱和文化传播而受到了影响[动物学报50(5):730-737,2004].%We compared cultural, genetic and morphological variation in a set of 10 reed bunting Emberiza schoeniclus populations of two subspecies groups, the northern thin billed and southern thick billed. We used four different markers of variation: two cultural divergence measures, quantitative characters and memetic frequencies; one measure of genetic divergence, i.e. microsatellite allele frequencies; and one measure of morphological divergence of populations, i.e. bill height. We calculated correlations among the divergence measures and estimated cultural evolutionary rates between and within subspecies groups using genetic divergence as the evolutionary time scale. We found that only cultural-quantitative and genetic divergence are

  19. Tailoring Magnetic Properties in Bulk Nanostructured Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jason Rolando

    Important magnetic properties and behaviors such as coercivity, remanence, susceptibility, energy product, and exchange coupling can be tailored by controlling the grain size, composition, and density of bulk magnetic materials. At nanometric length scales the grain size plays an increasingly important role since magnetic domain behavior and grain boundary concentration determine bulk magnetic behavior. This has spurred a significant amount of work devoted to developing magnetic materials with nanometric features (thickness, grain/crystallite size, inclusions or shells) in 0D (powder), 1D (wires), and 2D (thin films) materials. Large 3D nanocrystalline materials are more suitable for many applications such as permanent magnets, magneto-optical Faraday isolators etc. Yet there are relatively few successful demonstrations of 3D magnetic materials with nanoscale influenced properties available in the literature. Making dense 3D bulk materials with magnetic nanocrystalline microstructures is a challenge because many traditional densification techniques (HIP, pressureless sintering, etc.) move the microstructure out of the "nano" regime during densification. This dissertation shows that the Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) method, also known as spark plasma sintering, can be used to create dense, bulk, magnetic, nanocrystalline solids with varied compositions suited to fit many applications. The results of my research will first show important implications for the use of CAPAD for the production of exchange-coupled nanocomposite magnets. Decreases in grain size were shown to have a significant role in increasing the magnitude of exchange bias. Second, preferentially ordered bulk magnetic materials were produced with highly anisotropic material properties. The ordered microstructure resulted in changing magnetic property magnitudes (ex. change in coercivity by almost 10x) depending on the relative orientation (0° vs. 90°) of an externally

  20. Tailored Materials for High Efficiency CIDI Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, G.J.; Jana, S.

    2012-03-30

    The overall goal of the project, Tailored Materials for High Efficiency Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines, is to enable the implementation of new combustion strategies, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), that have the potential to significantly increase the energy efficiency of current diesel engines and decrease fuel consumption and environmental emissions. These strategies, however, are increasing the demands on conventional engine materials, either from increases in peak cylinder pressure (PCP) or from increases in the temperature of operation. The specific objective of this project is to investigate the application of a new material processing technology, friction stir processing (FSP), to improve the thermal and mechanical properties of engine components. The concept is to modify the surfaces of conventional, low-cost engine materials. The project focused primarily on FSP in aluminum materials that are compositional analogs to the typical piston and head alloys seen in small- to mid-sized CIDI engines. Investigations have been primarily of two types over the duration of this project: (1) FSP of a cast hypoeutectic Al-Si-Mg (A356/357) alloy with no introduction of any new components, and (2) FSP of Al-Cu-Ni alloys (Alloy 339) by physically stirring-in various quantities of carbon nanotubes/nanofibers or carbon fibers. Experimental work to date on aluminum systems has shown significant increases in fatigue lifetime and stress-level performance in aluminum-silicon alloys using friction processing alone, but work to demonstrate the addition of carbon nanotubes and fibers into aluminum substrates has shown mixed results due primarily to the difficulty in achieving porosity-free, homogeneous distributions of the particulate. A limited effort to understand the effects of FSP on steel materials was also undertaken during the course of this project. Processed regions were created in high-strength, low-alloyed steels up to 0.5 in

  1. Semiconductor quantum optics with tailored photonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laucht, Arne

    2011-06-15

    single photon emission into the waveguide. The results obtained during the course of this thesis contribute significantly to the understanding of coupling phenomena between excitons in self-assembled quantum dots and optical modes of tailored photonic nanostructures realized on the basis of two-dimensional photonic crystals. While we highlight the potential for advanced applications in the direction of quantum optics and quantum computation, we also identify some of the challenges which will need to be overcome on the way. (orig.)

  2. Comparing tailored and untailored text messages for smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Ettrup, Lise; Ringgaard, L W; Dalum, Peter

    2014-01-01

    the entire study population, as well as those opting for text messages (n = 1619). In intention-to-treat analysis with multiple imputation of missing data, the odds ratio for 30-day point abstinence was 1.28 (95% CI 0.91-2.08) for the tailored compared with untailored messages. When restricting the analysis...... to those who had chosen to receive text messages, the corresponding odds ratio was 1.45 (95% CI 1.01-2.08). The higher long-term quit rates in the group receiving the tailored text messages compared with untailored text messages in the restricted analysis indicated that tailoring and higher frequency......The aim was to compare the effectiveness of untailored text messages for smoking cessation to tailored text messages delivered at a higher frequency. From February 2007 to August 2009, 2030 users of an internet-based smoking cessation program with optional text message support aged 15-25 years were...

  3. Recent Results for the Ferritics Isotopic Tailoring (FIST) Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, David S.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ohnuki, Somei; Shiba, K.; Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, Akira; Robertson, J. P.

    2001-10-01

    The results of shear punch testing, microstructural examination, and hydrogen and helium analyses performed on irradiated isotopically tailored alloys are reported for specimens irradiated in the HFIR JP20 experiment.

  4. Structurally-Tailorable, Nonlinear, Snap-Through Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Farley, Gary L.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    Abrupt change in load/deflection response controllable and predictable. Structurally-tailorable, nonlinear, snap-through spring (STNSTS) exhibits controllable and predictable abrupt change in load/deflection response and based upon known phenomenon of snap-through structural response. Composed of pin-connected two-bar linkage which depicts combined tension/compression springs. As load applied to STNSTS, stiffness is function of internal spring and bending stiffness of pin-connected bars. As load increases, bars deform laterally until they collapse and snap through. Has application in passively-tailored rotor-blade flap, pitch, and lag response, to improve aerodynamic performance and stability characteristics of rotors; in aerodynamically- and aeroelastically-tailored wing spars and ribs, to produce tailored deformation state for improved effectiveness in maneuvering, aerodynamic performance, and stability characteristics; and in energy absorbers for automobile bumpers and aircraft land

  5. Past, present, and future of computer-tailored nutrition education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Brug (Hans); A. Oenema (Anke); M.K. Campbell (Marci)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractComputer-tailored nutrition education is an innovative and promising tool to motivate people to make healthy dietary changes. It provides respondents with individualized feedback about their dietary behaviors, motivations, attitudes, norms, and skills and mimics the pro

  6. Tailor-made TALEN system for highly efficient targeted gene replacement in the rice blast fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazoe, Takayuki; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Kennosuke; Yamato, Tohru; Ohsato, Shuichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Arie, Tsutomu; Kuwata, Shigeru

    2015-07-01

    Genetic manipulation is key to unraveling gene functions and creating genetically modified strains of microbial organisms. Recently, engineered nucleases that can generate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at a specific site in the desired locus within genome are utilized in a rapidly developing genome editing technology via DSBs repair. However, the use of engineered nucleases in filamentous fungi has not been validated. In this study, we demonstrated that tailor-made transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) system, Platinum-Fungal TALENs (PtFg TALENs), could improve the efficiency of homologous recombination-mediated targeted gene replacement by up to 100% in the rice blast fungus Pyricularia oryzae. This high-efficiency PtFg TALEN has great potential for basic and applied biological applications in filamentous fungi.

  7. Tailored Health Communication: Crafting the Patient Message for HIV TIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Jacqueline; Kukafka, Rita; Bakken, Suzanne; Ferat, Rachel; Agopian, Eliz; Messeri, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The HIV TIPS project will pilot and evaluate the use of web-based information technology on prescription errors and quality of care by providing tailored practice guidelines and patient education in ambulatory practice settings of the National AIDS Education and Training Centers (NAETC) network. In the first phase of the project, we tailored messages to guide patient adherence and self-care, using DHHS guidelines. We developed a method based on communication theory to ensure complete and effective messages. PMID:14728437

  8. Ethnicity, educational level and attitudes contribute to parental intentions about genetic testing for child obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocken, Paul L; Theunissen, Meinou H C; Schönbeck, Yvonne; Henneman, Lidewij; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Detmar, Symone B

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess parental beliefs and intentions about genetic testing for their children in a multi-ethnic population with the aim of acquiring information to guide interventions for obesity prevention and management. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in parents of native Dutch children and children from a large minority population (Turks) selected from Youth Health Care registries. The age range of the children was 5-11 years. Parents with lower levels of education and parents of non-native children were more convinced that overweight has a genetic cause and their intentions to test the genetic predisposition of their child to overweight were firmer. A firmer intention to test the child was associated with the parents' perceptions of their child's susceptibility to being overweight, a positive attitude towards genetic testing, and anticipated regret at not having the child tested while at risk for overweight. Interaction effects were found in ethnic and socio-economic groups. Ethnicity and educational level play a role in parental beliefs about child overweight and genetic testing. Education programmes about obesity risk, genetic testing and the importance of behaviour change should be tailored to the cultural and behavioural factors relevant to ethnic and socio-economic target groups.

  9. Tailor-made finance versus tailor-made care. Can the state strengthen consumer choice in healthcare by reforming the financial structure of long-term care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grit, K; de Bont, A

    2010-02-01

    Policy instruments based on the working of markets have been introduced to empower consumers of healthcare. However, it is still not easy to become a critical consumer of healthcare. The aim of this study is to analyse the possibilities of the state to strengthen the position of patients with the aid of a new financial regime, such as personal health budgets. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with executives, managers, professionals and client representatives of six long-term care institutions. With the introduction of individual budgets the responsibility for budgetary control has shifted from the organisational level to the individual level in the caregiver-client relationship. Having more luxurious care on offer necessitates a stronger demarcation of regular care because organisations cannot simultaneously offer extra care as part of the standard care package. New financial instruments have an impact on the culture of receiving and giving care. Distributive justice takes on new meaning with the introduction of financial market mechanisms in healthcare; the distributing principle of 'need' is transformed into the principle of 'economic demand'. Financial instruments not only act as a countervailing power against providers insufficiently client-oriented, but are also used by providers to reinforce their own positions vis-à-vis demanding clients. Tailor-made finance is not the same as tailor-made care.

  10. Glycosidases: a key to tailored carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarová, Pavla; Kren, Vladimír

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, carbohydrate-processing enzymes have become the enzymes of choice in many applications thanks to their stereoselectivity and efficiency. This review presents recent developments in glycosidase-catalyzed synthesis via two complementary approaches: the use of wild-type enzymes with engineered substrates, and mutant glycosidases. Genetic engineering has recently produced glucuronyl synthases, an inverting xylosynthase and the first mutant endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase. A thorough selection of enzyme strains and aptly modified substrates have resulted in rare glycostructures, such as N-acetyl-beta-galactosaminuronates, beta1,4-linked mannosides and alpha1,4-linked galactosides. The efficient selection of mutant enzymes is facilitated by high-throughput screening assays involving the co-expression of coupled enzymes or chemical complementation. Selective glycosidase inhibitors and highly specific glycosidases are finding attractive applications in biomedicine, biology and proteomics.

  11. Theranostics: A treasured tailor for tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jeelani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging as a targeted, safe, and efficient pharmacotherapy is the approach of theranostics, which focuses on patient-centered care. It is a combination of diagnosis and therapeutics. It provides a transition from conventional medicine to personalized medicine. It deals with the custom made treatment plan based on uniqueness of every individual thus resulting in right drug for the right patient at the right time. Genetics plays a significant role in theranostics. Theranostics provides a cost-effective specific successful treatment protocol. Pharmacogenetics, proteomics and biomarker profiling forms the backbone of theranostics. The role of theranostics is interestingly appreciated at multi levels with special consideration in oncology wherein nano formulations in the form of liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanoparticles, quantum dots and carbon nanotubes play a very important role. Thus, theranostics is a holistic transition from trial and error medicine to predictive, preventive and personalized medicine leading to improved quality care of pharmacotherapy.

  12. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schnyder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. Methods: The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. Results: As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. Conclusions: In summary

  13. High Performance Optical Coatings Utilizing Tailored Refractive Index Nanoporous Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poxson, David J.

    Refractive index is perhaps the most important quantity in optics. It is particularly relevant in the field of optical coatings, where the refractive index appears in virtually every optics equation as a figure of merit. Recently it has been demonstrated through control of the deposition angle during oblique-angle electron-beam deposition, nanoporous films of virtually any desired porosity may be accurately deposited. As the porosity of a nanoporous film directly relates to its effective refractive index, the refractive index value of a film may be tailored to any value between that of the bulk material and close to that of air. These two characteristics, namely; (i) tailored-refractive index and (ii) very low-refractive index values close to that of air, offer significant advantages in the design and optical performance in all optical coating applications. In this dissertation we explore optical coating applications whose performance can be greatly enhanced by utilization of a tailored- and low-refractive index nanoporous material system. One such important application is in the design and fabrication of broadband, omnidirectional antireflection (AR) coatings on solar cell devices. To harness the full spectrum of solar energy, Fresnel reflections at the surface of a photovoltaic cell must be reduced as much as possible over the relevant solar wavelength range and over a wide range of incident angles. However, the development of AR coatings embodying omni-directionality over a wide range of wavelengths is challenging. By utilizing the tailored- and low-refractive index properties of the nanoporous material system, in conjunction with a computational genetic algorithm and a predictive quantitative model for the porosity of such nanoporous films, truly optimized AR coatings can be designed and fabricated on solar cells. Here we show that these optimized AR structures demonstrate significant improvement to overall device efficiency. Traditionally, nanoporous films

  14. Intervention Tailoring for Chinese American Women: Comparing the Effects of Two Videos on Knowledge, Attitudes and Intentions to Obtain a Mammogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Judy Huei-yu; Schwartz, Marc D.; Luta, George; Maxwell, Annette E.; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized data from an ongoing randomized controlled trial to compare a culturally tailored video promoting positive attitudes toward mammography among Chinese immigrant women to a linguistically appropriate generic video and print media. Intervention development was guided by the Health Belief Model. Five hundred and ninety-two…

  15. Targeting and Tailoring Health Communications in Breast Screening Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mehra; Engelman, Kimberly K; Mbah, Olive; Shirazi, Aida; Robbins, Irma; Bowie, Janice; Popal, Rona; Wahwasuck, Arlene; Whalen-White, Denice; Greiner, Allen; Dobs, Adrian; Bloom, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Members of underrepresented minority (URM) groups are at higher risk of disproportionately experiencing greater breast cancer-related morbidity and mortality and thus, require effective interventions that both appropriately target and tailor to their unique characteristics. We sought to describe the targeting and tailoring practices used in the development and dissemination of three breast cancer screening interventions among URM groups. Three national Community Network Programs (CNPs) funded by the National Cancer Institute have focused on breast cancer screening interventions as their major research intervention. Each targeted different populations and used participatory research methods to design their intervention tailored to the needs of their respective audience. The Alameda County Network Program (ACNP) to Reduce Cancer Disparities partnered with community members to design and conduct 2-hour "Tea Party" education sessions for Afghan women. The Kansas Community Cancer Disparities Network co-developed and deployed with community members a computerized Healthy Living Kansas (HLK) Breast Health program for rural Latina and American Indian women. The Johns Hopkins Center to Reduce Cancer Disparities employed a train-the-trainer COACH approach to educate urban African-American women about breast cancer. Each CNP program targeted diverse URM women and, using participatory approaches, tailored a range of interventions to promote breast cancer screening. Although all projects shared the same goal outcome, each program tailored their varying interventions to match the target community needs, demonstrating the importance and value of these strategies in reducing breast cancer disparities.

  16. Shape-Tailored Features and their Application to Texture Segmentation

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Naeemullah

    2014-04-01

    Texture Segmentation is one of the most challenging areas of computer vision. One reason for this difficulty is the huge variety and variability of textures occurring in real world, making it very difficult to quantitatively study textures. One of the key tools used for texture segmentation is local invariant descriptors. Texture consists of textons, the basic building block of textures, that may vary by small nuisances like illumination variation, deformations, and noise. Local invariant descriptors are robust to these nuisances making them beneficial for texture segmentation. However, grouping dense descriptors directly for segmentation presents a problem: existing descriptors aggregate data from neighborhoods that may contain different textured regions, making descriptors from these neighborhoods difficult to group, leading to significant errors in segmentation. This work addresses this issue by proposing dense local descriptors, called Shape-Tailored Features, which are tailored to an arbitrarily shaped region, aggregating data only within the region of interest. Since the segmentation, i.e., the regions, are not known a-priori, we propose a joint problem for Shape-Tailored Features and the regions. We present a framework based on variational methods. Extensive experiments on a new large texture dataset, which we introduce, show that the joint approach with Shape-Tailored Features leads to better segmentations over the non-joint non Shape-Tailored approach, and the method out-performs existing state-of-the-art.

  17. Effects of tailoring health messages on physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Tamara; Brug, J; de Vries, H

    2008-06-01

    Computer-tailored printed education can be a promising way of promoting physical activity. The present study tested whether computer-tailored feedback on physical activity is effective and whether there are differences between respondents with low and high motivation to change. Respondents (n = 487) were randomly assigned to a tailored intervention group or a no information control group. Physical activity and determinants were measured at baseline and after 3 months. At post-test, the motivated respondents in the control group were more likely not to meet the recommendation for physical activity than to meet it, and motivated respondents in the experimental group were more likely to engage in transport-related activities and showed more improvement over time for the total activity score than respondents in the control group (beta = 0.24, P = 0.02). Both groups improved their behaviour over time. No group differences in physical activity were found for the unmotivated respondents. The results showed that the effects of the tailored feedback were restricted to respondents who had a positive motivation to change at baseline. Possible explanations could be that unmotivated respondents were unwilling to read and process the information because they felt 'no need to change'. Alternatively, one tailored feedback letter may not have been sufficient for this unmotivated group.

  18. Genetic Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Genetics Archive Regulation of Genetic Tests Genetic Discrimination Overview Many Americans fear that participating in research ... I) and employment (Title II). Read more Genetic Discrimination and Other Laws Genetic Discrimination and Other Laws ...

  19. Impact of human genome initiative-derived technology on genetic testing, screening and counseling: Cultural, ethical and legal issues. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trottier, R.W.; Hodgin, F.C.; Imara, M.; Phoenix, D.; Lybrook, S. [Morehouse Coll., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Medicine; Crandall, L.A.; Moseley, R.E.; Armotrading, D. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Coll. of Medicine

    1993-03-01

    Genetic medical services provided by the Georgia Division of Public Health in two northern and two central districts are compared to services provided in a district in which a tertiary care facility is located. Genetics outreach public health nurses play key roles in Georgia`s system of Children`s Health Services Genetics Program, including significant roles as counselors and information sources on special needs social services and support organizations. Unique features of individual health districts, (e.g., the changing face of some rural communities in ethnocultural diversity and socioeconomic character), present new challenges to current and future genetics services delivery. Preparedness as to educational needs of both health professionals and the lay population is of foremost concern in light of the ever expanding knowledge and technology in medical genetics. Perspectives on genetics and an overview of services offered by a local private sector counselor are included for comparison to state supported services. The nature of the interactions which transpire between private and public genetic services resources in Georgia will be described. A special focus of this research includes issues associated with sickle cell disease newborn screening service delivery process in Georgia, with particular attention paid to patient follow-up and transition to primary care. Of particular interest to this focus is the problem of loss to follow-up in the current system. Critical factors in education and counseling of sickle cell patients and the expectations of expanding roles of primary care physicians are discussed. The Florida approach to the delivery of genetic services contrasts to the Georgia model by placing more emphasis on a consultant-specialist team approach.

  20. Building Tailorable Hypermedia Systems: The embedded-interpreter approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Malhotra, Jawahar

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach for developing dynamically tailorable hypermedia systems in an object-oriented environment. The approach is aimed at making applications developed in compiled languages like Beta and C++ tailorable at run-time. The approach is based on use of: 1) a hypermedia...... application framework (DEVISE Hyper-media), and 2) an embeddable interpreter for the framework language. A specific hypermedia system is instantiated from the framework with the interpreter embedded in the executable. The specific hypermedia system has a number of “open points” which can be filled via......-type. The paper describes the framework and illustrates how the interpreter is integrated. It describes steps involved in tailoring a specific hypermedia system with a new drawing media-type, where graphical objects can be endpoints for links. Since the hypermedia framework uses a persistent object...

  1. Tailoring the energy distribution and loss of 2D plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Xiao; López, Josué J; Kaminer, Ido; Chen, Hongsheng; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to tailor the energy distribution of plasmons at the nanoscale has many applications in nanophotonics, such as designing plasmon lasers, spasers, and quantum emitters. To this end, we analytically study the energy distribution and the proper field quantization of 2D plasmons with specific examples for graphene plasmons. We find that the portion of the plasmon energy contained inside graphene (energy confinement factor) can exceed 50%, despite graphene being infinitely thin. In fact, this very high energy confinement can make it challenging to tailor the energy distribution of graphene plasmons just by modifying the surrounding dielectric environment or the geometry, such as changing the separation distance between two coupled graphene layers. However, by adopting concepts of parity-time symmetry breaking, we show that tuning the loss in one of the two coupled graphene layers can simultaneously tailor the energy confinement factor and propagation characteristics, causing the phenomenon of loss-indu...

  2. Goal Model Integration for Tailoring Product Line Development Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfan Mansoor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Many companies rely on the promised benefits of product lines, targeting systems between fully custom made software and mass products. Such customized mass products account for a large number of applications automatically derived from a product line. This results in the special importance of product lines for companies with a large part of their product portfolio based on their product line. The success of product line development efforts is highly dependent on tailoring the development process. This paper presents an integrative model of influence factors to tailor product line development processes according to different project needs, organizational goals, individual goals of the developers or constraints of the environment. This model integrates goal models, SPEM models and requirements to tailor development processes.

  3. Tailorable Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Nanoscale Silicon Waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Heedeuk; Jarecki, Robert; Cox, Jonathan A; Olsson, Roy H; Starbuck, Andrew; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T

    2013-01-01

    While nanoscale modal confinement radically enhances a variety of nonlinear light-matter interactions within silicon waveguides, traveling-wave stimulated Brillouin scattering nonlinearities have never been observed in silicon nanophotonics. Through a new class of hybrid photonic-phononic waveguides, we demonstrate tailorable traveling-wave forward stimulated Brillouin scattering in nanophotonic silicon waveguides for the first time, yielding 3000 times stronger forward SBS responses than any previous waveguide system. Simulations reveal that a coherent combination of electrostrictive forces and radiation pressures are responsible for greatly enhanced photon-phonon coupling at nano-scales. Highly tailorable Brillouin nonlinearities are produced by engineering the structure of a membrane-suspended waveguide to yield Brillouin resonances from 1 to 18 GHz through high quality-factor (>1000) phonon modes. Such wideband and tailorable stimulated Brillouin scattering in silicon photonics could enable practical real...

  4. Face Detection Based on Feature Tailoring and Skin Color Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is used to solve the time-consuming problem of training samples in Adaboost algorithm and propose an improved FTAdaboost algorithm based on feature tailoring. In the beginning, this paper is used to make all samples have the same weight, train them once and tailor the features before the first reflection point of the error rate curve which have high error rate and poor classification ability, then reduce the number of samples and save training time. According to the distribution of facial organs, the algorithm determines whether the specified area meets the characteristics of skin-color space, then eliminates the influence of wrong facial images. The experimental results show that the algorithm based on feature tailoring can shorten the training time significantly and the detection with the skin-color space can decrease the error rate to some extent.

  5. Tailoring the energy distribution and loss of 2D plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao; Rivera, Nicholas; López, Josué J.; Kaminer, Ido; Chen, Hongsheng; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-10-01

    The ability to tailor the energy distribution of plasmons at the nanoscale has many applications in nanophotonics, such as designing plasmon lasers, spasers, and quantum emitters. To this end, we analytically study the energy distribution and the proper field quantization of 2D plasmons with specific examples for graphene plasmons. We find that the portion of the plasmon energy contained inside graphene (energy confinement factor) can exceed 50%, despite graphene being infinitely thin. In fact, this very high energy confinement can make it challenging to tailor the energy distribution of graphene plasmons just by modifying the surrounding dielectric environment or the geometry, such as changing the separation distance between two coupled graphene layers. However, by adopting concepts of parity-time symmetry breaking, we show that tuning the loss in one of the two coupled graphene layers can simultaneously tailor the energy confinement factor and propagation characteristics, causing the phenomenon of loss-induced plasmonic transparency.

  6. Tailoring a Human Reliability Analysis to Your Industry Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Companies at risk of accidents caused by human error that result in catastrophic consequences include: airline industry mishaps, medical malpractice, medication mistakes, aerospace failures, major oil spills, transportation mishaps, power production failures and manufacturing facility incidents. Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) is used to analyze the inherent risk of human behavior or actions introducing errors into the operation of a system or process. These assessments can be used to identify where errors are most likely to arise and the potential risks involved if they do occur. Using the basic concepts of HRA, an evolving group of methodologies are used to meet various industry needs. Determining which methodology or combination of techniques will provide a quality human reliability assessment is a key element to developing effective strategies for understanding and dealing with risks caused by human errors. There are a number of concerns and difficulties in "tailoring" a Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) for different industries. Although a variety of HRA methodologies are available to analyze human error events, determining the most appropriate tools to provide the most useful results can depend on industry specific cultures and requirements. Methodology selection may be based on a variety of factors that include: 1) how people act and react in different industries, 2) expectations based on industry standards, 3) factors that influence how the human errors could occur such as tasks, tools, environment, workplace, support, training and procedure, 4) type and availability of data, 5) how the industry views risk & reliability, and 6) types of emergencies, contingencies and routine tasks. Other considerations for methodology selection should be based on what information is needed from the assessment. If the principal concern is determination of the primary risk factors contributing to the potential human error, a more detailed analysis method may be employed

  7. Sociocultural tailoring of a healthy lifestyle intervention to reduce cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk among Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd-Martin, Gia; Martinez, Maria C; Rayens, Mary Kay; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Meininger, Janet C

    2013-11-27

    Suboptimal lifestyle factors in combination with genetic susceptibility contribute to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk among Latinos. We describe a community-academic collaboration that developed and explored the feasibility of implementing a socioculturally tailored, healthy lifestyle intervention integrating genomics and family history education to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes among Latinos. The community-based participatory research was conducted with communities in Kentucky, which has a rapidly growing Latino population. This growth underscores the need for socioculturally appropriate health resources. Su Corazon, Su Vida (Your Heart, Your Life) is a Spanish-language, healthy lifestyle educational program to reduce cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk among Latinos. Twenty natural leaders from an urban Latino community in Kentucky participated in sociocultural tailoring of the program and development of a genomics and family history module. The tailored program was presented to 22 participants to explore implementation feasibility and assess appropriateness for community use. Preintervention and postintervention assessments of genomic knowledge and lifestyle behaviors and qualitative postintervention evaluations were conducted. Postintervention improvements in health-promoting lifestyle choices and genomic knowledge specific to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes suggested that the program may be effective in reducing risk. Feedback indicated the program was socioculturally acceptable and responsive to community needs. These findings indicated that a tailored healthy lifestyle program integrating genomics and family history education was socioculturally appropriate and may feasibly be implemented to reduce cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk in a Latino community with limited health care resources. The project highlights contributions of community-based processes in tailoring

  8. Tailored Granular Activated Carbon Treatment of Perchlorate in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Dekker, Inc, NY Seader , J. D. and E.J. Henley. 1998. Separation Process Principles . John Wiley and Sons, Inc. New York. Sheng, G., X. Wang, S. Wu...Properties of GAC and Tailoring Process 6  2.1.2  Schematic Diagram of the Technology 10  2.1.3  Chronological Summary of TGAC Technology Development to date...of Perchlorate in Drinking Water iii January 2010 5.4.4.1.4  Tailoring Process 58  5.4.4.1.5  Washing Process 59  5.4.4.2  38 GPM System 59  5.4.4.3

  9. Methotrexate in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: towards tailor-made treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćalasan, Maja Bulatović; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2014-07-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the key treatment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Nevertheless, MTX is not always sufficiently efficacious and can lead to adverse effects, which compromises complete disease control. In such cases, combination therapies with biologicals are given, even at MTX start, before knowing the patients' MTX response. Ideally, clinicians should be able to practice precision medicine by knowing before or early after MTX start, which patients will benefit from MTX only and which patients will not, thus requiring addition of biologicals. To make such tailor-made treatment decisions, clinicians require tools to optimize MTX treatment. In this review, we focus on tools for tailor-made MTX treatment in JIA.

  10. Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transport Wings Including Transonic Flutter Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2015-01-01

    Several minimum-mass optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic stress and panel buckling constraints are imposed across several trimmed static maneuver loads, in addition to a transonic flutter margin constraint, captured with aerodynamic influence coefficient-based tools. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, balanced or unbalanced composite laminates, curvilinear tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  11. Recent Advances in Genetic Engineering - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sobiah Rauf; Zubair Anwar; Hussain Mustatab Wahedi; Jabar Zaman Khan Khattak; Talal Jamil

    2012-01-01

    Humans have been doing genetic engineering, a technology which is transforming our world, for thousands of years on a wide range of plants, animals and micro organism and have applications in the field of medicine, research, industry and agriculture. The rapid developments in the field of genetic engineering have given a new impetus to biotechnology. This introduces the possibility of tailoring organisms in order to optimize the production of established or novel metabolites of commercial imp...

  12. Ethics, evolution and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; Danielson, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Recent work in the fields of evolutionary ethics and moral psychology appears to be converging on a single empirically- and evolutionary-based science of morality or ethics. To date, however, these fields have failed to provide an adequate conceptualisation of how culture affects the content and distribution of moral norms. This is particularly important for a large class of moral norms relating to rapidly changing technological or social environments, such as norms regarding the acceptability of genetically modified organisms. Here we suggest that a science of morality/ethics can benefit from adopting a cultural evolution or gene-culture coevolution approach, which treats culture as a second, separate evolutionary system that acts in parallel to biological/genetic evolution. This cultural evolution approach brings with it a set of established theoretical concepts (e.g. different cultural transmission mechanisms) and empirical methods (e.g. evolutionary game theory) that can significantly improve our understanding of human morality.

  13. Searching for metastases in ovarian tissue before autotransplantation: a tailor-made approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekman, Ellen J; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Fleming, Timothy P; Louwe, Leonie A; Fleuren, Gert Jan; Hilders, Carina G J M

    2015-02-01

    To exclude minimal residual disease in remaining ovarian tissue after harvesting the ovarian cortex for cryopreservation, by means of a tailor-made approach. Retrospective case series. Hospital laboratory. We evaluated the ovarian and tubal tissue from 47 cancer patients (breast cancer, [non-]Hodgkin lymphoma; osteo-, Ewing, myxoid lipo-, and oropharyngeal synovial sarcoma; cervical, rectal, and esophageal cancer), who had stored ovarian tissue for fertility preservation. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) with tumor-related antibodies and genetic mutation analysis were performed to detect micrometastases by multiple sectioning at three levels of the paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed material. Molecular assays were performed with the use of tissue between these three levels of sectioning. Detection of micrometastases in ovaries. We analyzed 847 ovarian slides to detect isolated tumor cells (ITCs) or micrometastases by IHC. In only one case (1/47) were ITCs detected in the fallopian tube. That patient had an intra-abdominal metastatic esophageal carcinoma. Additional DNA analyses of breast and rectal cancer, Ewing sarcoma, and human papilloma virus in cervical patients did not show evidence of micrometastases in the ovarian tissue. The tailor-made approach consisted of patient-specific tumor markers which were used to search for ovarian micrometastases. We found evidence of metastatic disease within the fallopian tube of a patient with intraperitoneal metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori and its effect on tailored and empiric eradication of the organism in Lower Silesia, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenc, Stanisław; Gnus, Jan; Kościelna, Magdalena; Kinda, Małgorzata; Yarka, Andriy; Stewart, Luke; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2017-04-01

    At present, the resistance to antibiotics is considered the most important reason for Helicobacter pylori (HP) eradication failure. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance of HP strains and to evaluate tailored and empiric therapeutic regimens in patients with peptic ulcer disease associated with infection of this microorganism. Between May 2011 and February 2013, 185 consecutive Polish patients with at least one positive Helicobacter pylori test (urease test, histopathologic examination, and/or culture) underwent eradication therapy. Those with positive culture were prescribed a tailored triple regimen, whereas those with no culture available received an empiric quadruple concomitant regimen or levofloxacin-containing triple therapy. There were no HP strains resistant to amoxicillin; however, 56.7% were resistant to metronidazole, 55.2% to clarithromycin, and 5.9% to levofloxacin. Dual resistance was detected in 32.8% of individuals. Tailored and empiric therapies achieve cure rates, respectively, 95.5% and 86.6% by intention-to-treat and 95.5% and 91.3% by per-protocol analysis (P > 0.05). Antibiotic resistance is notably high in Poland currently, but both tailored and empiric therapies can achieve acceptable cure rates equal to or higher than 90%. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Aeroelastic tailoring in wind-turbine blade applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veers, P.; Lobitz, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bir, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). National Wind Technology Center

    1998-04-01

    This paper reviews issues related to the use of aeroelastic tailoring as a cost-effective, passive means to shape the power curve and reduce loads. Wind turbine blades bend and twist during operation, effectively altering the angle of attack, which in turn affects loads and energy production. There are blades now in use that have significant aeroelastic couplings, either on purpose or because of flexible and light-weight designs. Since aeroelastic effects are almost unavoidable in flexible blade designs, it may be desirable to tailor these effects to the authors advantage. Efforts have been directed at adding flexible devices to a blade, or blade tip, to passively regulate power (or speed) in high winds. It is also possible to build a small amount of desirable twisting into the load response of a blade with proper asymmetric fiber lay up in the blade skin. (Such coupling is akin to distributed {delta}{sub 3} without mechanical hinges.) The tailored twisting can create an aeroelastic effect that has payoff in either better power production or in vibration alleviation, or both. Several research efforts have addressed different parts of this issue. Research and development in the use of aeroelastic tailoring on helicopter rotors is reviewed. Potential energy gains as a function of twist coupling are reviewed. The effects of such coupling on rotor stability have been studied and are presented here. The ability to design in twist coupling with either stretching or bending loads is examined also.

  16. LPWA using supersonic gas jet with tailored density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, O.; Bohlen, S.; Dale, J.; D'Arcy, R.; Dinter, M.; Erbe, J. H.; Indorf, G.; di Lucchio, L.; Goldberg, L.; Gruse, J. N.; Karstensen, S.; Libov, V.; Ludwig, K.; Martinez de La Ossa, A.; Marutzky, F.; Niroula, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Quast, M.; Schaper, L.; Schwinkendorf, J.-P.; Streeter, M.; Tauscher, G.; Weichert, S.; Palmer, C.; Horbatiuk, Taras

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven plasma wakefield accelerators have been explored as a potential compact, reproducible source of relativistic electron bunches, utilising an electric field of many GV/m. Control over injection of electrons into the wakefield is of crucial importance in producing stable, mono-energetic electron bunches. Density tailoring of the target, to control the acceleration process, can also be used to improve the quality of the bunch. By using gas jets to provide tailored targets it is possible to provide good access for plasma diagnostics while also producing sharp density gradients for density down-ramp injection. OpenFOAM hydrodynamic simulations were used to investigate the possibility of producing tailored density targets in a supersonic gas jet. Particle-in-cell simulations of the resulting density profiles modelled the effect of the tailored density on the properties of the accelerated electron bunch. Here, we present the simulation results together with preliminary experimental measurements of electron and x-ray properties from LPWA experiments using gas jet targets and a 25 TW, 25 fs Ti:Sa laser system at DESY.

  17. Genomic markers to tailor treatments: waiting or initiating?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Tajik; P.M. Bossuyt

    2011-01-01

    The decade since the publication of the Human Genome Project draft has ended with the discovery of hundreds of genomic markers related to diseases and phenotypes. However, the project has not yet delivered on its promise to tailor treatments for individuals. The number of genomic markers in clinical

  18. Towards tailored and targeted adherence assessment to optimise asthma management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boven, Job F. M.; Trappenburg, Jaap C. A.; van der Molen, Thys; Chavannes, Niels H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to emphasise the need for a more comprehensive and tailored approach to manage the broad nature of non-adherence, to personalise current asthma management. Although currently several methods are available to measure the extent of asthma patients' adherence, the vast majority do

  19. Towards tailored and targeted adherence assessment to optimise asthma management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boven, Job F. M.; Trappenburg, Jaap C. A.; van der Molen, Thys; Chavannes, Niels H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to emphasise the need for a more comprehensive and tailored approach to manage the broad nature of non-adherence, to personalise current asthma management. Although currently several methods are available to measure the extent of asthma patients' adherence, the vast majority do

  20. Tailor-Made Peer-Therapy Groups for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Paul W.

    A child's peers may influence his behavior for better or for worse. By involving a child's peers in his therapy, their influence can be made to be consistently positive. By establishing tailor-made peer-therapy groups, the child psychologist will increase his therapeutic impact. Among the possible formats for involving peers in a child's treatment…

  1. Tailoring the Surface Properties of Coatings Through Self-Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-13

    assessments include thermal analysis using DSC, dynamic mechanical analysis using the parallel DMT A, and toughness measurements using our in- house ...stratification," ANZPAC Workshop, Melbourne , Australia, May 6-9, 2013. • Dean C. Webster, "Towards tough fouling-release coatings with tailorable surface

  2. Tailor-made blanks for the aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zad Poor, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tailor-Made Blanks (TMBs) are hybrid assemblies made of sheet metals with different materials and/or thicknesses that are joined together prior to forming. Alternatively, a monolithic sheet can be machined to create required thickness variations (machined TMBs). The possibility of having several thi

  3. Tailoring Small IT Projects in the Project Planning Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhearn, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Project management (PM) and systems engineering (SE) are essential skills in information technology (IT). There is an abundance of information available detailing the comprehensive bodies of knowledge, standards, and best practices. Despite the volume of information, there is surprisingly little information about how to tailor PM and SE tasks for…

  4. Automated Finite Element Analysis of Elastically-Tailored Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor); Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for analyzing and designing elastically tailored composite laminates using the STAGS finite element solver has been presented. The methodology used to produce the elastic tailoring, namely computer-controlled steering of unidirectionally reinforced composite material tows, has been reduced to a handful of design parameters along with a selection of construction methods. The generality of the tow-steered ply definition provides the user a wide variety of options for laminate design, which can be automatically incorporated with any finite element model that is composed of STAGS shell elements. Furthermore, the variable stiffness parameterization is formulated so that manufacturability can be assessed during the design process, plus new ideas using tow steering concepts can be easily integrated within the general framework of the elastic tailoring definitions. Details for the necessary implementation of the tow-steering definitions within the STAGS hierarchy is provided, and the format of the ply definitions is discussed in detail to provide easy access to the elastic tailoring choices. Integration of the automated STAGS solver with laminate design software has been demonstrated, so that the large design space generated by the tow-steering options can be traversed effectively. Several design problems are presented which confirm the usefulness of the design tool as well as further establish the potential of tow-steered plies for laminate design.

  5. Tailoring Dispersion properties of photonic crystal waveguides by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stainko, Roman; Sigmund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a systematic method for the tailoring of dispersion properties of slab-based photonic crystal waveguides. The method is based on the topology optimization method which consists in repeated finite element frequency domain analyzes, analytical sensitivity analyzes and gradient...

  6. The potential of mixed culture of genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT, Oreochromis niloticus) and freshwater giant prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) in periphyton-based systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uddin, S.; Azim, M.E.; Wahab, M.A.; Verdegem, M.C.J.

    2006-01-01

    The production performance of genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT, Oreochromis niloticus) and freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) in periphyton-based systems were studied in farmers' ponds at Mymensingh, Bangladesh. Fifteen ponds (200-300 m2 area and 1.0-1.5 m in depth) were used to c

  7. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-04-08

    Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (Affitins). Here, we explored the potential of Affitins as ligand to design affinity columns. Affitins specific for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), bacterial PulD protein, and chicken egg lysozyme were immobilized on an agarose matrix. The columns obtained were functional and highly selective for their cognate target, even in the presence of exogenous proteins as found in cell culture media, ascites and bacterial lysates, which result in a high degree of purity (∼95%) and recovery (∼100%) in a single step. Anti-hIgG Affitin columns withstand repetitive cycles of purification and cleaning-in-place treatments with 0.25 M NaOH as well as Protein A does. High levels of Affitin productions in Escherichia coli makes it possible to produce these affinity columns at low cost. Our results validate Affitins as a new class of tailored ligands for the affinity chromatography purification of potentially any proteins of interest including biopharmaceuticals.

  8. Tailoring therapy for heart failure: the pharmacogenomics of adrenergic receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femminella GD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Grazia Daniela Femminella,1 Vincenzo Barrese,2,3 Nicola Ferrara,1,4 Giuseppe Rengo4 1Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Science and Odontostomatology, Federico II University, Naples, Italy; 3Division of Biomedical Sciences, St George’s University of London, London, UK; 4”Salvatore Maugeri” Foundation – IRCCS – Scientific Institute of Telese Terme, Telese Terme, Benevento, Italy Abstract: Heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality in Western countries, and β-blockers are a cornerstone of its treatment. However, the response to these drugs is variable among individuals, which might be explained, at least in part, by genetic differences. Pharmacogenomics is the study of genetic contributions to drug response variability in order to provide evidence for a tailored therapy in an individual patient. Several studies have investigated the pharmacogenomics of the adrenergic receptor system and its role in the context of the use of β-blockers in treating heart failure. In this review, we will focus on the most significant polymorphisms described in the literature involving adrenergic receptors and adrenergic receptor-related proteins, as well as genetic variations influencing β-blocker metabolism. Keywords: adrenergic system, polymorphisms, β-blockers, functional recovery

  9. Genetic structure of four socio-culturally diversified caste populations of southwest India and their affinity with related Indian and global groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Revathi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of microsatellites have been extensively used to comprehend the genetic diversity of different global groups. This paper entails polymorphism at 15 STR in four predominant and endogamous populations representing Karnataka, located on the southwest coast of India. The populations residing in this region are believed to have received gene flow from south Indian populations and world migrants, hence, we carried out a detailed study on populations inhabiting this region to understand their genetic structure, diversity related to geography and linguistic affiliation and relatedness to other Indian and global migrant populations. Results Various statistical analyses were performed on the microsatellite data to accomplish the objectives of the paper. The heretozygosity was moderately high and similar across the loci, with low average GST value. Iyengar and Lyngayat were placed above the regression line in the R-matrix analysis as opposed to the Gowda and Muslim. AMOVA indicated that majority of variation was confined to individuals within a population, with geographic grouping demonstrating lesser genetic differentiation as compared to linguistic clustering. DA distances show the genetic affinity among the southern populations, with Iyengar, Lyngayat and Vanniyar displaying some affinity with northern Brahmins and global migrant groups from East Asia and Europe. Conclusion The microsatellite study divulges a common ancestry for the four diverse populations of Karnataka, with the overall genetic differentiation among them being largely confined to intra-population variation. The practice of consanguineous marriages might have attributed to the relatively lower gene flow displayed by Gowda and Muslim as compared to Iyengar and Lyngayat. The various statistical analyses strongly suggest that the studied populations could not be differentiated on the basis of caste or spatial location, although, linguistic affinity was

  10. New Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  11. Influence of parental sample sizes on the estimating genetic parameters in cultured clamMeretrix meretrix based on factorial mating designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Bingbing; YUE Xin; WANG Hongxia; LIU Baozhong

    2016-01-01

    The precise and accurate knowledge of genetic parameters is a prerequisite for making efficient selection strategies in breeding programs. A number of estimators of heritability about important economic traits in many marine mollusks are available in the literature, however very few research have evaluated about the accuracy of genetic parameters estimated with different family structures. Thus, in the present study, the effect of parent sample size for estimating the precision of genetic parameters of four growth traits in clamM. meretrix by factorial designs were analyzed through restricted maximum likelihood (REML) and Bayesian. The results showed that the average estimated heritabilities of growth traits obtained from REML were 0.23–0.32 for 9 and 16 full-sib families and 0.19–0.22 for 25 full-sib families. When using Bayesian inference, the average estimated heritabilities were 0.11–0.12 for 9 and 16 full-sib families and 0.13–0.16 for 25 full-sib families. Compared with REML, Bayesian got lower heritabilities, but still remained at a medium level. When the number of parents increased from 6 to 10, the estimated heritabilities were more closed to 0.20 in REML and 0.12 in Bayesian inference. Genetic correlations among traits were positive and high and had no significant difference between different sizes of designs. The accuracies of estimated breeding values from the 9 and 16 families were less precise than those from 25 families. Our results provide a basic genetic evaluation for growth traits and should be useful for the design and operation of a practical selective breeding program in the clamM. meretrix.

  12. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Ulrich; Bryant, Richard A.; Ehlers, Anke; Foa, Edna B.; Hasan, Aram; Mwiti, Gladys; Kristensen, Christian H.; Neuner, Frank; Oe, Misari; Yule, William

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. Methods The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. Results As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-)stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. Conclusions In summary, culture

  13. Ceramic nanoparticle assemblies with tailored shapes and tailored chemistries via biosculpting and shape-preserving inorganic conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, M B; Naik, R R; Sarosi, P M; Agarwal, G; Stone, M O; Sandhage, K H

    2005-01-01

    A novel biosynthetic paradigm is introduced for fabricating three-dimensional (3-D) ceramic nanoparticle assemblies with tailored shapes and tailored chemistries: biosculpting and shape-preserving inorganic conversion (BaSIC). Biosculpting refers to the use of biomolecules that direct the precipitation of ceramic nanoparticles to form a continuous 3-D structure with a tailored shape. We used a peptide derived from a diatom (a type of unicellular algae) to biosculpt silica nanoparticle based assemblies that, in turn, were converted into a new (nonsilica) composition via a shape-preserving gas/silica displacement reaction. Interwoven, microfilamentary silica structures were prepared by exposing a peptide, derived from the silaffin-1A protein of the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis, to a tetramethylorthosilicate solution under a linear shear flow condition. Subsequent exposure of the silica microfilaments to magnesium gas at 900 degrees C resulted in conversion into nanocrystalline magnesium oxide microfilaments with a retention of fine (submicrometer) features. Fluid(gas or liquid)/silica displacement reactions leading to a variety of other oxides have also been identified. This hybrid (biogenic/synthetic) approach opens the door to biosculpted ceramic microcomponents with multifarious tailored shapes and compositions for a wide range of environmental, aerospace, biomedical, chemical, telecommunications, automotive, manufacturing, and defense applications.

  14. Multi-stage Continuous Culture Fermentation of Glucose-Xylose Mixtures to Fuel Ethanol using Genetically Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-stage continuous (chemostat) culture fermentation (MCCF) with variable fermentor volumes was carried out to study utilizing glucose and xylose for ethanol production by means of mixed sugar fermentation (MSF). Variable fermentor volumes were used to enable enhanced sugar u...

  15. Multi-stage Continuous Culture Fermentation of Glucose-Xylose Mixtures to Fuel Ethanol using Genetically Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-stage continuous (chemostat) culture fermentation (MCCF) with variable fermentor volumes was carried out to study utilizing glucose and xylose for ethanol production by means of mixed sugar fermentation (MSF). Variable fermentor volumes were used to enable enhanced sugar u...

  16. Use of a genetically enhanced, pediocin-producing starter culture, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM217, to control Listeria monocytogenes in cheddar cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buyong, N; Kok, J; Luchansky, JB

    1998-01-01

    Cheddar cheese was prepared with Lactococcus lactis subsp, lactis MM217, a starter culture which contains pMC117 coding for pediocin PA-1, About 75 liters of pasteurized milk (containing ca, 3.6% fat) was inoculated with strain MM217 (ca, 10(6) CFU per ml) and a mixture of three Listeria monocytogen

  17. Tailoring properties of porous Poly (vinylidene fluoride) scaffold through nano-sized 58s bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Cijun; Huang, Wei; Feng, Pei; Gao, Chengde; Shuai, Xiong; Xiao, Tao; Deng, Youwen; Peng, Shuping; Wu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The biological properties of porous poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) scaffolds fabricated by selective laser sintering were tailored through nano-sized 58s bioactive glass. The results showed that 58s bioactive glass distributed evenly in the PVDF matrix. There were some exposed particles on the surface which provided attachment sites for biological response. It was confirmed that the scaffolds had highly bioactivity by the formation of bone-like apatite in simulated body fluid. And the bone-like apatite became dense with the increase in 58s bioactive glass and culture time. Moreover, the scaffolds were suitable for cell adhesion and proliferation compared with the PVDF scaffolds without 58s bioactive glass. The research showed that the PVDF/58s bioactive glass scaffolds had latent application in bone tissue engineering.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of human breast cancer cells cultured under microgravity conditions revealed the key role of genetic gravity sensors previously detected in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Lavan, David; Diego Orihuela-Tacuri, M.; Sanabria, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Currently, studies in Drosophila melanogaster has shown emerging evidence that microgravity stimuli can be detected at the genetic level. Analysis of the transcriptome in the pupal stage of the fruit flies under microgravity conditions versus ground controls has suggested the presence of a few candidate genes as "gravity sensors" which are experimentally validated. Additionally, several studies have shown that microgravity causes inhibitory effects in different types of cancer cells, although the genes involved and responsible for these effects are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the genes suggested as the sensors of gravitational waves in Drosophila melanogaster and their human counterpart (orthologous genes) are highly involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation, anti-apoptotic signals, invasiveness, and metastatic potential of breast cancer cell tumors. The transcriptome analyses suggested that the observed inhibitory effect in cancer cells could be due to changes in the genetic expression of these candidates. These results encourage the possibility of new therapeutic targets managed together and not in isolation.

  19. [The EU law on genetically modified organisms: the European Commission changes the strategy in order to allow, restrict, or prohibit its culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Vaqué, Luis

    2010-01-01

    On July 13 2010, the European Commission adopted a series of measures which outline a new approach on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) cultivation in the Member States. This proposal, which still retains the basis of the existing science-based GMO authorisation system, will be implemented through: a Communication from the Commission, explaining the new approach on the freedom for Member States to decide on the cultivation of genetically modified crops; the "Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive 2001/18/EC as regards the possibility for the Member States to restrict or prohibit the cultivation of GMOs in their territory"; and a new "European Commission Recommendation (2010/C 200/01) of 13 July 2010 on guidelines for the development of national co-existence measures to avoid the unintended presence of GMOs in conventional and organic crops".

  20. Highly tailorable thiol-ene based emulsion-templated monoliths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, J. P.; Kutter, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    The attractive surface properties of thiol-ene polymers combined with their ease of processing make them ideal substrates in many bioanalytical applications. We report the synthesis of highly tailorable emulsion-templated porous polymers and beads in microfluidic devices based on off-stoichiometr......The attractive surface properties of thiol-ene polymers combined with their ease of processing make them ideal substrates in many bioanalytical applications. We report the synthesis of highly tailorable emulsion-templated porous polymers and beads in microfluidic devices based on off......-stoichiometry thiolene chemistry. The method allows monolith synthesis and anchoring inside thiol-ene microchannels in a single step. Variations in the monomer stoichiometric ratios and/or amount of porogen used allow for the creation of extremely varied polymer morphologies, from foam-like materials to dense networks...

  1. The effect of laser pulse tailored welding of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. Dwayne; Mccay, Mary Helen; Sharp, C. Michael; Womack, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    Pulse tailored laser welding has been applied to wrought, wrought grain grown, and cast Inconel 718 using a CO2 laser. Prior to welding, the material was characterized metallographically and the solid state transformation regions were identified using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and high temperature x-ray diffraction. Bead on plate welds (restrained and unrestrained) were then produced using a matrix of pulse duty cycles and pulsed average power. Subsequent characterization included heat affected zone width, penetration and underbead width, the presence of cracks, microfissures and porosity, fusion zone curvature, and precipitation and liquated region width. Pedigree welding on three selected processing conditions was shown by microstructural and dye penetrant analysis to produce no microfissures, a result which strongly indicates the viability of pulse tailored welding for microfissure free IN 718.

  2. Endometrial adenocarcinoma, adjuvant radiotherapy tailored to prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, J H; Hoekstra, C J; van Putten, W L; Tjokrowardojo, A J; Koper, P C

    1990-02-01

    The optimal adjuvant radiotherapy for surgically treated endometrial cancer has not yet been defined. We report on 389 patients treated between 1970 and 1985 with adjuvant radiotherapy. The treatment was tailored to the known prognostic factors: myometrial invasion and grade of differentiation of the tumor. Ten-year overall survival was 67%, 10-year relapse-free survival 77%; 23% relapse, of which 21% distant and 6% locoregional relapse. In a multivariate analysis, stage (pT), grade, and myometrial invasion were prognostic factors. The number of locoregional failures was very small (n = 23). This small number, the fact that radiation treatment was tailored to prognostic factors, and the absence of a nontreated control group precluded an analysis of the effect of the adjuvant irradiation. Large randomized studies with a control (no treatment) arm should be performed to determine the value of adjuvant radiotherapy.

  3. FSW of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks across Machine Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carlson, Blair; Szymanski, Robert; Luzanski, Tom; Marshall, Dustin

    2015-02-16

    Development and characterization of friction stir welded aluminum tailor welded blanks was successfully carried out on three separate machine platforms. Each was a commercially available, gantry style, multi-axis machine designed specifically for friction stir welding. Weld parameters were developed to support high volume production of dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor welded blanks at speeds of 3 m/min and greater. Parameters originally developed on an ultra-high stiffness servo driven machine where first transferred to a high stiffness servo-hydraulic friction stir welding machine, and subsequently transferred to a purpose built machine designed to accommodate thin sheet aluminum welding. The inherent beam stiffness, bearing compliance, and control system for each machine were distinctly unique, which posed specific challenges in transferring welding parameters across machine platforms. This work documents the challenges imposed by successfully transferring weld parameters from machine to machine, produced from different manufacturers and with unique control systems and interfaces.

  4. Cultural evolutionary theory: How culture evolves and why it matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanza, Nicole; Kolodny, Oren; Feldman, Marcus W

    2017-07-24

    Human cultural traits-behaviors, ideas, and technologies that can be learned from other individuals-can exhibit complex patterns of transmission and evolution, and researchers have developed theoretical models, both verbal and mathematical, to facilitate our understanding of these patterns. Many of the first quantitative models of cultural evolution were modified from existing concepts in theoretical population genetics because cultural evolution has many parallels with, as well as clear differences from, genetic evolution. Furthermore, cultural and genetic evolution can interact with one another and influence both transmission and selection. This interaction requires theoretical treatments of gene-culture coevolution and dual inheritance, in addition to purely cultural evolution. In addition, cultural evolutionary theory is a natural component of studies in demography, human ecology, and many other disciplines. Here, we review the core concepts in cultural evolutionary theory as they pertain to the extension of biology through culture, focusing on cultural evolutionary applications in population genetics, ecology, and demography. For each of these disciplines, we review the theoretical literature and highlight relevant empirical studies. We also discuss the societal implications of the study of cultural evolution and of the interactions of humans with one another and with their environment.

  5. Tailoring self-assembled monolayers at the electrochemical interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Varatharajan; Sheela Berchmans; V Yegnaraman

    2009-09-01

    The main focus of this review is to illustrate the amenability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for functionalisation with different receptors, catalytic materials, biomolecules, enzymes, antigen-antibody, etc for various applications. The review discusses initially about the preparation and characterization of SAMs and tailoring of SAMs by incorporation of suitable recognition elements. A description of how the molecular recognition is achieved through forces like electrostatic, covalent and host-guest interactions is included in the review.

  6. Information Tailoring Enhancements for Large-Scale Social Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Social Data Final Report Reporting Period: September 22, 2015 – September 16, 2016 Contract No. N00014-15-P-5138 Sponsored by ONR...Report September 22, 20 15 - September 16, 20 16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Information Tailoring Enhancements for Large-Scale Social ...goals of(i) further enhancing capability to analyze unstructured social media data at scale and rapidly, and (ii) improving IAI social media software

  7. Sputter-Coated Microparticle Additives for Tailored Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, Physical Electronics Versaprobe 2) depth profiling for elemental analysis, and spectrophotometry (Perkin Elmer UV /vis/NIR...spectrometer Lamda 1050) for reflectance of the coatings in the visible spectrum. Coating thickness, as measured by RBS, was used to calculate the...characterize sputtered coatings for tailored reflectance in the visible spectrum on flat substrates and fluidized beds of 105- to 125-µm glass

  8. The Use of Tailored Testing with Instructional Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    logistic models ( 3PL ). The first stage of the study used real data, while the second stage used simulated data. In the first stage, response data for 3000...developed during the project was for " the adaptive administration of the course tests. This program was based on *i the one-parameter logistic (Rasch... logistic tailored testing procedures for use with small item pools. (Research Report ONR 83-1). Iowa City, Iowa: The American College Testing Program. Z

  9. Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolate with a N. meningitidis porA gene and no prolyliminopeptidase activity, Sweden, 2011: danger of false-negative genetic and culture diagnostic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golparian, D; Johansson, E; Unemo, M

    2012-03-01

    We describe a Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain, found in Sweden in 2011, that harbours a N. meningitidis porA gene causing false-negative results in PCRs targeting the gonococcal porA pseudogene. Furthermore, the strain had no prolyliminopeptidase (PIP) activity that many commercial biochemical kits for species verification in culture rely on. Enhanced awareness of the spread of such strains and screening for them can be crucial.

  10. Noise tailoring for scalable quantum computation via randomized compiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallman, Joel J.; Emerson, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Quantum computers are poised to radically outperform their classical counterparts by manipulating coherent quantum systems. A realistic quantum computer will experience errors due to the environment and imperfect control. When these errors are even partially coherent, they present a major obstacle to performing robust computations. Here, we propose a method for introducing independent random single-qubit gates into the logical circuit in such a way that the effective logical circuit remains unchanged. We prove that this randomization tailors the noise into stochastic Pauli errors, which can dramatically reduce error rates while introducing little or no experimental overhead. Moreover, we prove that our technique is robust to the inevitable variation in errors over the randomizing gates and numerically illustrate the dramatic reductions in worst-case error that are achievable. Given such tailored noise, gates with significantly lower fidelity—comparable to fidelities realized in current experiments—are sufficient to achieve fault-tolerant quantum computation. Furthermore, the worst-case error rate of the tailored noise can be directly and efficiently measured through randomized benchmarking protocols, enabling a rigorous certification of the performance of a quantum computer.

  11. Tailor cutting of crystalline solar cells by laser micro jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckert, F.; Pilat, E.; Piron, P.; Torres, P.; Carron, B.; Richerzhagen, B.; Pirot, M.; Monna, R.

    2012-03-01

    Coupling a laser into a hair thin water micro jet (Laser Micro Jet, LMJ) for cutting applications offers a wide range of processes that are quite unique. As the laser beam is guided by internal reflections inside of a liquid cylinder, the cuts are naturally straight and do not reflect any divergence as otherwise occurs with an unguided laser beam. Furthermore, having a liquid media at the point of contact ensures a fast removal of heat and eventual debris ensuring clean cuts, which are free of any burrs. Many applications have indeed been developed for a large variety of materials, which are as different as e.g. diamond, silicon, aluminum, ceramic and hard metals. The photovoltaic industry has enjoyed in the last decades tremendous growth rates, which are still projected into the future. We focus here on the segment of Building Integrated PV (BIPV), which requests tailored solutions to actual buildings and not-one-fits-it-all standardized modules. Having the option to tailor cut solar cells opens a new field of BIPV applications. For the first time, finished crystalline solar cells have been LMJ cut into predetermined shapes. First results show that the cut is clean and neat. Preliminary solar performance measurements are positive. This opens a new avenue of tailored made modules instead of having to rely on the one-fits-alloy approach used so far.

  12. Genetic modification of condensed tannin biosynthesis in Lotus corniculatus. 1. Heterologous antisense dihydroflavonol reductase down-regulates tannin accumulation in "hairy root" cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, T R; Robbins, M P; Morris, P

    1994-03-01

    An antisense dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) gene-construct made using the cDNA for DFR from Antirrhinum majus was introduced into the genome of a series of clonal genotypes of Lotus corniculatus via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. After initial screening, 17 antisense and 11 control transformation events were analysed and tannin levels found to be reduced in antisense root cultures. The effect of this antisense construct, (pMAJ2), which consisted of the 5' half of the DFR cDNA sequence, was compared in three different recipient Lotus genotypes. This construct effectively down-regulated tannin biosynthesis in two of the recepient genotypes (s33 and s50); however, this construct was relatively ineffective in a third genotype (s41) which accumulated high levels of condensed tannins in derived transgenic root cultures. Four pMAJ2 antisense and three control lines derived from clonal genotypes s33 and s50 were selected and studied in greater detail. The antisense DFR construct was found to be integrated into the genome of the antisense "hairy root" cultures, and the antisense RNA was shown to be expressed. Tannin levels were much lower in antisense roots compared to the controls and this reduction in tannin levels was accompanied by a change in condensed tannin subunit composition.

  13. Evaluating Psychosocial and Behavioral Mechanisms of Change in a Tailored Communication Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, John P.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Slymen, Donald J.; Arredondo, Elva M.; Campbell, Nadia R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a tailored nutrition intervention at 3 and 6 months postintervention. In all, 357 Latinas were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (1) a control condition comprised of previously developed Spanish language targeted materials, (2) tailored print materials, or (3) tailored print materials accompanied by…

  14. Cuento Therapy: A Culturally Sensitive Modality for Puerto Rican Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Giuseppe; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of a modeling therapy designed to be sensitive to Hispanic culture using cuentos (folktales) from Puerto Rican culture to present models of adaptive behavior and folktales tailored to bridge Puerto Ricans' bicultural conflict. Cuento therapy significantly reduced children's trait anxiety relative to traditional…

  15. Tailor-made cell patterning using a near-infrared-responsive composite gel composed of agarose and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Haruka; Sada, Takao; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi; Nakazawa, Kohji

    2013-03-01

    Micropatterning is useful for regulating culture environments. We developed a highly efficient near-infrared-(NIR)-responsive gel and established a new technique that enables cell patterning by NIR irradiation. As a new culture substratum, we designed a tissue culture plate that was coated with a composite gel composed of agarose and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A culture plate coated with agarose only showed no response to NIR irradiation. In contrast, NIR laser irradiation induced heat generation by CNTs; this permitted local solation of the CNT/agarose gel, and consequently, selective cell-adhesive regions were exposed on the tissue culture plate. The solation area was controlled by the NIR intensity, magnification of the object lens and CNT concentration in the gel. Furthermore, we formed circular patterns of HeLa cells and linear patterns of 3T3 cells on the same culture plate through selective and stepwise NIR irradiation of the CNT/agarose gel, and we also demonstrated that individual 3T3 cells migrated along a linear path formed on the CNT/agarose gel by NIR irradiation. These results indicate that our technique is useful for tailor-made cell patterning of stepwise and/or complex cell patterns, which has various biological applications such as stepwise co-culture and the study of cell migration.

  16. Genetic therapy for the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, William J; Breakefield, Xandra O; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2011-04-15

    Genetic therapy is undergoing a renaissance with expansion of viral and synthetic vectors, use of oligonucleotides (RNA and DNA) and sequence-targeted regulatory molecules, as well as genetically modified cells, including induced pluripotent stem cells from the patients themselves. Several clinical trials for neurologic syndromes appear quite promising. This review covers genetic strategies to ameliorate neurologic syndromes of different etiologies, including lysosomal storage diseases, Alzheimer's disease and other amyloidopathies, Parkinson's disease, spinal muscular atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and brain tumors. This field has been propelled by genetic technologies, including identifying disease genes and disruptive mutations, design of genomic interacting elements to regulate transcription and splicing of specific precursor mRNAs and use of novel non-coding regulatory RNAs. These versatile new tools for manipulation of genetic elements provide the ability to tailor the mode of genetic intervention to specific aspects of a disease state.

  17. Genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  18. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers create ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human Genome ...

  19. Morphological and genetic differences between cultured and wild populations of Channa striata in Viet Nam and its phylogenetic relationship with other Channa species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc-Tran Thi Nguyen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Channa genus includes important species for aquaculture and interesting targets for phylogenetic studies. In the Mekong Delta, Viet Nam, four species of this genus (Channa striata, C. micropeltes, C. lucius, and C. gachua are naturally distributed and other phenotypes that look like C. striata have been observed in aquaculture conditions. The taxonomic status of newly-observed phenotypes including “triangle-head” snakehead (THS and square-head snakehead (SHS is still controversial. This study compared morphological characteristics and Cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI sequences of different C. striata-like phenotypes and investigated the phylogenetic relationship of Channa species based on COI. Morphological results show that THS, SHS, and wild C. striata have similar ranges for meristic traits but differ in morphometric ratios, especially the shape of their head and length of their gut. Kimura-2P genetic distances among three phenotypes (0.0017- 0.0062 are equivalent to those of C. striata samples from Mainland Southeast Asian countries. The results indicate that THS and SHS belong to C. striata, and this species exhibits within-species diversity in both morphology and COI sequences. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that C. striata individuals form a monophyletic group and are genetically distinct from other Channa species in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta. Congeneric distances of four species range from 0.1836 to 0.2436, indicating high divergence among Channa species.

  20. [Molecular-genetic polymorphism of cellular lines of wheat resistant to cultural filtrate Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and plant-regenerants from them].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavol, A V; Dubrovna, O V

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymorphism of wheat cellular lines resistant to culture filtrate of G. graminis var. tritici and regenerated plants has been investigated using ISSR-analysis. Specific changes in DNA sequence were revealed in resistant calluses. It was established, that all resistant cellular lines differed by the presence of specific amplicons of 2347 bp (primer 5'-TCTCTCTCTCTCTCTCG-3') and 1745 bp (primer 5'-AGAGAGAGAGAGAGAGTC-3'), as well as the absence of the amplicon of 1108 bp (primer 5'-ACACACACACACACACC-3') from the initial callus and the callus not exposed to the action of selective factor. These changes have been also revealed in R0 and R1 plants.

  1. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  2. Reactance to a tailored multimedia intervention encouraging teachers to promote cover-the-cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Prabu; Henry, Aletheia; Srivastava, Jatin; Orcena, Jason; Thrush, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Teachers were presented tailored multimedia messages encouraging them to offer cover-the-cough instruction to their students. Messages were tailored by grade level (elementary, higher grade) and stage of change (preaction, action). Among teachers in the action stages, message tailoring did not make a difference. Among teachers in the preaction stages, tailored messages were rated lower than were nontailored messages. The lower ratings of the tailored messages, seemingly a reactance response, did not carry over to postintervention self-efficacy. The intervention was effective in improving self-efficacy in elementary school teachers, particularly among those in the preaction stages.

  3. Cultural aspects of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharajh, Hari D; Abdool, Petal S

    2005-09-08

    Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  4. Tailor-made force fields for crystal-structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Marcus A

    2008-08-14

    A general procedure is presented to derive a complete set of force-field parameters for flexible molecules in the crystalline state on a case-by-case basis. The force-field parameters are fitted to the electrostatic potential as well as to accurate energies and forces generated by means of a hybrid method that combines solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an empirical van der Waals correction. All DFT calculations are carried out with the VASP program. The mathematical structure of the force field, the generation of reference data, the choice of the figure of merit, the optimization algorithm, and the parameter-refinement strategy are discussed in detail. The approach is applied to cyclohexane-1,4-dione, a small flexible ring. The tailor-made force field obtained for cyclohexane-1,4-dione is used to search for low-energy crystal packings in all 230 space groups with one molecule per asymmetric unit, and the most stable crystal structures are reoptimized in a second step with the hybrid method. The experimental crystal structure is found as the most stable predicted crystal structure both with the tailor-made force field and the hybrid method. The same methodology has also been applied successfully to the four compounds of the fourth CCDC blind test on crystal-structure prediction. For the five aforementioned compounds, the root-mean-square deviations between lattice energies calculated with the tailor-made force fields and the hybrid method range from 0.024 to 0.053 kcal/mol per atom around an average value of 0.034 kcal/mol per atom.

  5. Culture from the Perspective of Realistic Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Daszkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article underlines the moments that define the metaphysical understanding of culture. According to this conception, culture in its most basic meaning is rationalization (intellectualization of nature. The article is focused on the following areas: genetic-exemplarist analysis of cultural works and definition of culture from the perspective of realistic philosophy.

  6. Whakapapa, genealogy and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Donald

    2012-05-01

    This paper provides part of an analysis of the use of the Maori term whakapapa in a study designed to test the compatibility and commensurability of views of members of the indigenous culture of New Zealand with other views of genetic technologies extant in the country. It is concerned with the narrow sense of whakapapa as denoting biological ancestry, leaving the wider sense of whakapapa as denoting cultural identity for discussion elsewhere. The phenomenon of genetic curiosity is employed to facilitate this comparison. Four levels of curiosity are identified, in the Maori data, which penetrate more or less deeply into the psyche of individuals, affecting their health and wellbeing. These phenomena are compared with non-Maori experiences and considerable commonalities are discovered together with a point of marked difference. The results raise important questions for the ethical application of genetic technologies.

  7. Communicating about microbicides with women in mind: tailoring messages for specific audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekou Sidibe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Current HIV prevention options are unrealistic for most women; however, HIV prevention research has made important strides, including on-going development of antiretroviral-based vaginal microbicide gels. Nevertheless, social-behavioural research suggests that women's ability to access and use new HIV prevention technologies will be strongly influenced by a range of socio-cultural, gender and structural factors which should be addressed by communications and marketing strategies, so that these products can be positioned in ways that women can use them. Methods: Based on an extensive literature review and in-country policy consultation, consisting of approximately 43 stakeholders, we describe barriers and facilitators to HIV prevention, including potential microbicide use, for four priority audiences of Kenyan women (female sex workers [FSWs], women in stable and discordant relationships, and sexually active single young women. We then describe how messages that position microbicides might be tailored for each audience of women. Results: We reviewed 103 peer-reviewed articles and reports. In Kenya, structural factors and gender inequality greatly influence HIV prevention for women. HIV risk perception and the ability to consistently use condoms and other prevention products often vary by partner type. Women in stable relationships find condom use challenging because they connote a lack of trust. However, women in other contexts are often able to negotiate condom use, though they may face challenges with consistent use. These women include FSWs who regularly use condoms with their casual clients, young women in the initial stages of a sexual relationship and discordant couples. Thus, we consider two approaches to framing messages aimed at increasing general awareness of microbicides – messages that focus strictly on HIV prevention and ones that focus on other benefits of microbicides such as increased pleasure, intimacy or sexual

  8. Tailoring spin-orbit torque in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hang

    2013-05-16

    We study the spin orbit torque arising from an intrinsic linear Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling in a single layer III-V diluted magnetic semiconductor. We investigate the transport properties and spin torque using the linear response theory, and we report here: (1) a strong correlation exists between the angular dependence of the torque and the anisotropy of the Fermi surface; (2) the spin orbit torque depends nonlinearly on the exchange coupling. Our findings suggest the possibility to tailor the spin orbit torque magnitude and angular dependence by structural design.

  9. Interactive Multimedia Tailored to Improve Diabetes Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Felecia G; Alley, Elizabeth; Baer, Spencer; Johnson, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    A pilot program was initiated to improve self-management of type 2 diabetes by rural adults. Using an iOS-based, individually tailored pre-/postintervention to improve diabetes self-management, undergraduate students developed a native mobile application to help participants effectively manage their diabetes. Brief quizzes assessed diabetes knowledge. A diabetes dictionary and physical activity assessment provided additional support to users of the app. On completion of the pilot, data analysis indicated increased diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy, and ease of use of the technology. Native app technology permits ready access to important information for those living with type 2 diabetes.

  10. Design of an aeroelastically tailored 10 MW wind turbine rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahle, Frederik; Tibaldi, Carlo; Pavese, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an integrated multidisciplinary wind turbine optimization framework utilizing state-of-the-art aeroelastic and structural tools, capable of simultaneous design of the outer geometry and internal structure of the blade. The framework is utilized to design a 10 MW rotor constrained...... not to exceed the design loads of an existing reference wind turbine. The results show that through combined geometric tailoring of the internal structure and aerodynamic shape of the blade it is possible to achieve significant passive load alleviation that allows for a 9% longer blade with an increase in AEP...

  11. Higher-order polarization singularitites in tailored vector beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, E.; Alpmann, C.; Denz, C.

    2016-07-01

    Higher-order polarization singularities embedded in tailored vector beams are introduced and experimentally realized. As holographic modulation allows to define order and location of any vectorial singularity, the surrounding vector field can be dynamically shaped. We demonstrate light fields associated with flowers or spider webs due to regular and even irregular patterns of the orientation of polarization ellipses. Beyond that, not yet investigated hybrid structures are introduced that allow generating networks of flowers and webs in very close vicinity. Our results pave the way to applications of singular optics in spatially extended, optimized optical tweezing and high-resolution imaging.

  12. Design and Implementation of Company Tailored Automated Material Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Gilad; Bilberg, Arne

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the problems of analysing automation of material handling systems in order to develop an efficient automated solution that is specifically tailored to the company. The research has resulted in development of new methods for evaluating factory automation from design...... for their application with computer aided information processing tools. The framework is named the "Automated Material Handling (AMH) Preference GuideLine". The research has been carried out in close co-operation with Danish and European industry, where implementations of automation can be referred to. It is our...

  13. Tailored Optical Polarization in Nano-Structured Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, Bernardo S

    2016-01-01

    A very efficient method for the calculation of the effective optical response of nano-structured composite systems allows the design of metamaterials tailored for specific optical polarization properties. We use our method to design 2D periodic arrays of sub-wavelength dielectric inclusions within nanometric supported metallic thin films which behave as either an almost perfect linearly dichroic system, as a controllable source of circular polarized light, as a system with a large circular dichroism, or as a circular polarizer. All of these systems may be tuned over a wide energy range.

  14. Improving changeover time: a tailored SMED approach for welding cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guzmán, Ferradás P; Salonitis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Short changeover times have always been critical in manufacturing business. Set-up duration reduction initiatives have been associated with Shingós ‘Single Minute Exchange of Die' (SMED) method. Although a great number of companies have initiated SMED, some failed on implementation. The main reason is that strict application of Shingós SMED methodology is not the most efficient way to reduce set-up times in all situations. In the present study a tailored methodology is presented that has been...

  15. Reducing phase singularities in speckle interferometry by coherence tailoring

    CERN Document Server

    Mantel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Speckle interferometry is an established optical metrology tool for the characterization of rough objects. The raw phase, however, is impaired by the presence of phase singularities, making the unwrapping procedure ambiguous. In a Michelson setup, we tailor the spatial coherence of the light source, achieving a physical averaging of independent, mutually incoherent speckle fields. In the resulting raw phase, the systematic phase is preserved while the number of phase singularities is greatly reduced. Both interferometer arms are affected by the averaging. The reduction is sufficient to even allow the use of a standard unwrapping algorithm originally developed for smooth surfaces only.

  16. Microstructural gradients in thin hard coatings -- tailor-made

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Oettel, Heinrich

    1998-01-01

    ) alternating sputtering with and without substrate voltage and (c) pulsed bias voltage. On the basis of X-ray diffraction measurements, it is demonstrated that residual stress gradients and texture gradients can be designed tailor-made. Furthermore, results of microhardness measurements and scratch tests......Microstructural modifications resulting from time dependent variations of the bias voltage during the deposition of thin hard coatings are discussed. TiN-coatings are produced by reactive magnetron sputtering in several modes: (a) stepwise increase of the bias voltage during the deposition, (b...

  17. Genetic heterogeneity in Gaucher disease: physicokinetic and immunologic studies of the residual enzyme in cultured fibroblasts from non-neuronopathic and neuronopathic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, G A; Goldblatt, J; Dinur, T; Kruse, J; Svennerholm, L; Gatt, S; Desnick, R J

    1985-07-01

    To elucidate the genetic heterogeneity in the three major phenotypic subtypes of Gaucher disease, the residual acid beta-glucosidase in fibroblasts from patients with all three subtypes from different ethnic and demographic groups was investigated by comparative kinetic, thermostability, and immunotitration studies. The kinetic studies delineated three distinct groups (designated A, B, and C) of residual activities with characteristic responses to the enzyme modifiers, taurocholate (or phosphatidylserine), and glucosyl sphingosine (or N-hexyl glucosyl sphingosine); Group A residual enzymes responded normally to these modifiers. All neuronopathic patients (types 2 and 3) and most non-Jewish, non-neuronopathic patients (type 1) had group A residual activities and thus could not be distinguished by their kinetic properties. Group B residual enzymes had markedly abnormal responses to these modifiers. All Ashkenazi and only two non-Jewish type 1 patients had group B residual activities. Group C residual activity had an intermediate response to all modifiers and represented a single Afrikaner type 1 patient. Pedigree studies indicated that this patient was a genetic compound for the group A (type 2) and group B (type 1) mutations. Thermostability studies showed additional heterogeneity of the residual activities within the three kinetic groups. Group A (type 2) and group B (type 1) enzymes had similarly decreased thermostabilities. In contrast, group A (type 1) residual activities were heterogeneous; three classes of thermostabilities were found among these enzymes: normal, decreased, and increased. Immunotitration of equal amounts of the normal or Gaucher disease beta-glucosidase activities with monospecific IgG indicated that the enzyme proteins from most Gaucher disease patients were antigenically altered and/or that large amounts of catalytically abnormal or inactive antigen were present. A decreased amount of antigenically and catalytically normal enzyme was present

  18. Growth stage-based modulation in physiological and biochemical attributes of two genetically diverse wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars grown in salinized hydroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Muhammad Arslan; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Hydroponic experiment was conducted to appraise variation in the salt tolerance potential of two wheat cultivars (salt tolerant, S-24, and moderately salt sensitive, MH-97) at different growth stages. These two wheat cultivars are not genetically related as evident from randomized polymorphic DNA analysis (random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)) which revealed 28% genetic diversity. Salinity stress caused a marked reduction in grain yield of both wheat cultivars. However, cv. S-24 was superior to cv. MH-97 in maintaining grain yield under saline stress. Furthermore, salinity caused a significant variation in different physiological attributes measured at different growth stages. Salt stress caused considerable reduction in different water relation attributes of wheat plants. A significant reduction in leaf water, osmotic, and turgor potentials was recorded in both wheat cultivars at different growth stages. Maximal reduction in leaf water potential was recorded at the reproductive stage in both wheat cultivars. In contrast, maximal turgor potential was observed at the boot stage. Salt-induced adverse effects of salinity on different water relation attributes were more prominent in cv. MH-97 as compared to those in cv. S-24. Salt stress caused a substantial decrease in glycine betaine and alpha tocopherols. These biochemical attributes exhibited significant salt-induced variation at different growth stages in both wheat cultivars. For example, maximal accumulation of glycine betaine was evident at the early growth stages (vegetative and boot). However, cv. S-24 showed higher accumulation of this organic osmolyte, and this could be the reason for maintenance of higher turgor than that of cv. MH-97 under stress conditions. Salt stress significantly increased the endogenous levels of toxic ions (Na(+) and Cl(-)) and decreased essential cations (K(+) and Ca(2+)) in both wheat cultivars at different growth stages. Furthermore, K(+)/Na(+) and Ca(2+)/Na(+) ratios

  19. Multiple-antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection eradicated with a tailor-made quadruple therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shigemi; Inoue, Hisayuki; Inoue, Tetsuya; Maruoka, Yuri

    2012-04-01

    In 2008, a 44-year-old woman with mild epigastralgia diagnosed as having Helicobacter pylori-positive chronic gastritis without peptic ulcer underwent eradication therapy with lansoprazole (LPZ), amoxicillin (AMPC) and clarithromycin (CAM) for 7 days, but it failed, so treatment with rabeprazole, AMPC, and metronidazole (MNZ) for another 7 days was given, but it also failed. She was then prescribed a modified, 14-day sequential therapy of LPZ and AMPC with an increased dose of CAM followed by MNZ supplement, but the infection was still not eradicated. The H. pylori was cultured and examined for antibiotic susceptibility with the agar dilution method and was found to be resistant to CAM, MNZ, and levofloxacin, and non-sensitive to AMPC, namely multiple-antibiotic-resistant, although sensitive to minocycline. The CYP2C19 genotype of the patient was an extensive metabolizer (G681A: G/A, G636A: G/G). In 2010, she gave informed consent for a 14-day, tailor-made, modified classical (or modified high-dose PPI + AMPC) quadruple therapy comprising 30 mg LPZ, 500 mg AMPC and 500 mg bismuth subnitrate, qid, and 100 mg minocycline, bid. Two months later, her urea breath test was negative. Histology and bacterial culture were still negative 1 year after the therapy. She did not have any adverse events during or after the novel therapy, nor did she feel any further epigastralgia.

  20. Tailored, interactive soap operas for breast cancer education of high-risk Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibaja, M L; Kingery, P; Neff, N E; Smith, Q; Bowman, J; Holcomb, J D

    2000-01-01

    While Hispanic women have lower rates of breast cancer than do women of other ethnic groups, they are the least likely to undergo screening examinations. This study evaluated a culturally sensitive and linguistically appropriate, tailored, computer-based, educational program for early detection of breast cancer aimed at high-risk Hispanic women. Spanish-speaking Hispanic women from an inner-city community health clinic were recruited and randomly assigned either to a computer intervention with an interactive soap-opera format (n = 118) or to a comparison group (n = 60). Pre- and posttests were used to identify any change in breast-cancer-related knowledge and beliefs. Both younger (18-40 years old) and older (41-65 years old) women in the intervention group demonstrated significant increases in their breast cancer screening knowledge and beliefs as compared with the younger and older women in the comparison group (n soap operas that are linguistically and culturally appropriate are effective in increasing breast cancer screening knowledge and beliefs among underserved Spanish-speaking Hispanic women.

  1. Enzymatically-tailored pectins differentially influence the morphology, adhesion, cell cycle progression and survival of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Verhoef, René; Schols, Henk; Morra, Marco; Knox, J Paul; Ceccone, Giacomo; Della Volpe, Claudio; Vigneron, Pascale; Bussy, Cyrill; Gallet, Marlène; Velzenberger, Elodie; Vayssade, Muriel; Cascardo, Giovanna; Cassinelli, Clara; Haeger, Ash; Gilliland, Douglas; Liakos, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel; Siboni, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Improved biocompatibility and performance of biomedical devices can be achieved through the incorporation of bioactive molecules on device surfaces. Five structurally distinct pectic polysaccharides (modified hairy regions (MHRs)) were obtained by enzymatic liquefaction of apple (MHR-B, MHR-A and MHR-alpha), carrot (MHR-C) and potato (MHR-P) cells. Polystyrene (PS) Petri dishes, aminated by a plasma deposition process, were surface modified by the covalent linking of the MHRs. Results clearly demonstrate that MHR-B induces cell adhesion, proliferation and survival, in contrast to the other MHRs. Moreover, MHR-alpha causes cells to aggregate, decrease proliferation and enter into apoptosis. Cells cultured in standard conditions with 1% soluble MHR-B or MHR-alpha show the opposite behaviour to the one observed on MHR-B and -alpha-grafted PS. Fibronectin was similarly adsorbed onto MHR-B and tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) control, but poorly on MHR-alpha. The Fn cell binding site (RGD sequence) was more accessible on MHR-B than on TCPS control, but poorly on MHR-alpha. The disintegrin echistatin inhibited fibroblast adhesion and spreading on MHR-B-grafted PS, which suggests that MHRs control fibroblast behaviour via serum-adhesive proteins. This study provides a basis for the design of intelligently-tailored biomaterial coatings able to induce specific cell functions.

  2. Best practices for assessing ocean health in multiple contexts using tailorable frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia S. Stewart Lowndes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine policy is increasingly calling for maintaining or restoring healthy oceans while human activities continue to intensify. Thus, successful prioritization and management of competing objectives requires a comprehensive assessment of the current state of the ocean. Unfortunately, assessment frameworks to define and quantify current ocean state are often site-specific, limited to a few ocean components, and difficult to reproduce in different geographies or even through time, limiting spatial or temporal comparisons as well as the potential for shared learning. Ideally, frameworks should be tailorable to accommodate use in disparate locations and contexts, removing the need to develop frameworks de novo and allowing efforts to focus on the assessments themselves to advise action. Here, we present some of our experiences using the Ocean Health Index (OHI framework, a tailorable and repeatable approach that measures health of coupled human-ocean ecosystems in different contexts by accommodating differences in local environmental characteristics, cultural priorities, and information availability and quality. Since its development in 2012, eleven assessments using the OHI framework have been completed at global, national, and regional scales, four of which have been led by independent academic or government groups. We have found the following to be best practices for conducting assessments: Incorporate key characteristics and priorities into the assessment framework design before gathering information; Strategically define spatial boundaries to balance information availability and decision-making scales; Maintain the key characteristics and priorities of the assessment framework regardless of information limitations; and Document and share the assessment process, methods, and tools. These best practices are relevant to most ecosystem assessment processes, but also provide tangible guidance for assessments using the OHI framework. These

  3. Best practices for assessing ocean health in multiple contexts using tailorable frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowndes, Julia S Stewart; Pacheco, Erich J; Best, Benjamin D; Scarborough, Courtney; Longo, Catherine; Katona, Steven K; Halpern, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    Marine policy is increasingly calling for maintaining or restoring healthy oceans while human activities continue to intensify. Thus, successful prioritization and management of competing objectives requires a comprehensive assessment of the current state of the ocean. Unfortunately, assessment frameworks to define and quantify current ocean state are often site-specific, limited to a few ocean components, and difficult to reproduce in different geographies or even through time, limiting spatial or temporal comparisons as well as the potential for shared learning. Ideally, frameworks should be tailorable to accommodate use in disparate locations and contexts, removing the need to develop frameworks de novo and allowing efforts to focus on the assessments themselves to advise action. Here, we present some of our experiences using the Ocean Health Index (OHI) framework, a tailorable and repeatable approach that measures health of coupled human-ocean ecosystems in different contexts by accommodating differences in local environmental characteristics, cultural priorities, and information availability and quality. Since its development in 2012, eleven assessments using the OHI framework have been completed at global, national, and regional scales, four of which have been led by independent academic or government groups. We have found the following to be best practices for conducting assessments: Incorporate key characteristics and priorities into the assessment framework design before gathering information; Strategically define spatial boundaries to balance information availability and decision-making scales; Maintain the key characteristics and priorities of the assessment framework regardless of information limitations; and Document and share the assessment process, methods, and tools. These best practices are relevant to most ecosystem assessment processes, but also provide tangible guidance for assessments using the OHI framework. These recommendations also promote

  4. Best practices for assessing ocean health in multiple contexts using tailorable frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Erich J.; Best, Benjamin D.; Scarborough, Courtney; Longo, Catherine; Katona, Steven K.; Halpern, Benjamin S.

    2015-01-01

    Marine policy is increasingly calling for maintaining or restoring healthy oceans while human activities continue to intensify. Thus, successful prioritization and management of competing objectives requires a comprehensive assessment of the current state of the ocean. Unfortunately, assessment frameworks to define and quantify current ocean state are often site-specific, limited to a few ocean components, and difficult to reproduce in different geographies or even through time, limiting spatial or temporal comparisons as well as the potential for shared learning. Ideally, frameworks should be tailorable to accommodate use in disparate locations and contexts, removing the need to develop frameworks de novo and allowing efforts to focus on the assessments themselves to advise action. Here, we present some of our experiences using the Ocean Health Index (OHI) framework, a tailorable and repeatable approach that measures health of coupled human-ocean ecosystems in different contexts by accommodating differences in local environmental characteristics, cultural priorities, and information availability and quality. Since its development in 2012, eleven assessments using the OHI framework have been completed at global, national, and regional scales, four of which have been led by independent academic or government groups. We have found the following to be best practices for conducting assessments: Incorporate key characteristics and priorities into the assessment framework design before gathering information; Strategically define spatial boundaries to balance information availability and decision-making scales; Maintain the key characteristics and priorities of the assessment framework regardless of information limitations; and Document and share the assessment process, methods, and tools. These best practices are relevant to most ecosystem assessment processes, but also provide tangible guidance for assessments using the OHI framework. These recommendations also promote

  5. Cultural Neuroscience: Progress and Promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Joan Y; Cheon, Bobby K; Pornpattanangkul, Narun; Mrazek, Alissa J; Blizinsky, Katherine D

    2013-01-01

    The nature and origin of human diversity has been a source of intellectual curiosity since the beginning of human history. Contemporary advances in cultural and biological sciences provide unique opportunities for the emerging field of cultural neuroscience. Research in cultural neuroscience examines how cultural and genetic diversity shape the human mind, brain and behavior across multiple time scales: situation, ontogeny and phylogeny. Recent progress in cultural neuroscience provides novel theoretical frameworks for understanding the complex interaction of environmental, cultural and genetic factors in the production of adaptive human behavior. Here, we provide a brief history of cultural neuroscience, theoretical and methodological advances, as well as empirical evidence of the promise of and progress in the field. Implications of this research for population health disparities and public policy are discussed.

  6. The reduced insulin-mediated glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic subjects may be of genetic origin--evidence from cultured myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaster, Michael; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2004-09-06

    Several defects in response to insulin have been described in vivo and in vitro in type 2 diabetes: a decreased glucose transport, defective glucose oxidation and altered glycogen synthesis. At present, it is unknown whether glucose oxidation is primarily affected or secondarily affected by, e.g. increased free fatty acids (FFA). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects express a primarily or a FFA-induced reduced insulin-mediated glucose oxidation. We have therefore investigated glucose oxidation under basal, physiological conditions and during acute insulin stimulation with/without FFA. We found that myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects express a reduced insulin-stimulated increase in glucose oxidation. Moreover, an acute exposure to FFA reduces insulin-mediated glucose oxidation without alterations in glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Thus, we conclude that the diminished increase in insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation seen in type 2 diabetic subjects in vivo may be of genetic origin. Moreover, the glucose-fatty acid cycle seems not to be crucial for the pathophysiology of insulin resistance.

  7. Organizational leadership, health risk screening, individually tailored programs, and supportive workplace culture might reduce presenteeism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Aas; W. Randi; E. Baker; E. Steultjens

    2012-01-01

    To determine if Workplace Health Promotion programs (WHPs) are effective in improving presenteeism. The secondary objective was to identify characteristics of successful programmes and potential risk factors for presenteeism. The Cochrane Library, Medline and other electronic databases were searched

  8. Culturally tailored diabetes prevention in the workplace: focus group interviews with Hispanic employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sharon A; García, Alexandra A; Steinhardt, Mary A; Guevara, Henry; Moore, Claire; Brown, Adama; Winter, Mary A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose was to conduct focus groups with Hispanic employees to obtain input into adaptation of previous DSME interventions for use as a workplace diabetes prevention program. From a list of interested Hispanic employees who attended a local health fair (n = 68), 36 were randomly selected to participate in focus groups held during supper mealtime breaks. An experienced bilingual moderator directed the sessions, using interview guidelines developed by the research team. Participants' ages ranged from 22 to 65 years (mean = 50.4, n = 36, SD = 10.7), 7 males and 29 females attended, and 53% had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Employees expressed a keen interest in diabetes classes and recommended a focus on preparing healthier Hispanic foods. Primary barriers to promoting healthier lifestyles were work schedules; many employees worked 2 part-time or full-time jobs. Administrators and direct supervisors of the employees were highly supportive of a workplace diabetes prevention program. The consistent message was that a workplace program would be the ideal solution for Hispanic employees to learn about diabetes and healthy behaviors, given their busy schedules, family responsibilities, and limited resources. If found to be effective, such a workplace program would be generalizable to other service employees who have disproportionate diabetes rates. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Organizational leadership, health risk screening, individually tailored programs, and supportive workplace culture might reduce presenteeism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, Esther; Baker, E.; Aas, N.; Randi, W.

    2012-01-01

    To determine if Workplace Health Promotion programs (WHPs) are effective in improving presenteeism. The secondary objective was to identify characteristics of successful programmes and potential risk factors for presenteeism. The Cochrane Library, Medline and other electronic databases were searched

  10. Assessment of a Culturally-Tailored Sexual Health Education Program for African American Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Zellner Lawrence

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available African American youth are affected disproportionately by sexually transmitted infections (STIs, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, and teenage pregnancy when compared to other racial groups. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the To Help Young People Establish (2 HYPE Abstinence Club, a behavioral intervention designed to promote delayed sexual activity among African American youth ages 12–18 in Atlanta, Georgia. The intervention included 20 h of curriculum and creative arts instruction. Pre- and post-intervention survey data collected from 2008–2010 were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. Intervention (n = 651 and comparison (n = 112 groups were compared through analysis of variance and multivariate logistic regression models. There was a statistically significant increase in intervention youth who were thinking about being abstinent (p = 0.0005. Those who had not been engaged in sexual activity were two times more likely to plan abstinence compared to participants that had been previously sexually active previously (odds ratio 2.41; 95% confidence interval 1.62, 3.60. Significant results hold implications for subsequent community-based participatory research and practice that broadens the understanding of the relevance of marriage, as just one among other life success milestones that may hold more importance to African American youth in positioning the value of delayed and responsible sexual activity towards effective STIs, HIV/AIDS, and teen pregnancy risk reduction interventions.

  11. A "Common Factors" Approach to Developing Culturally Tailored HIV Prevention Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarzak, Jill; Phillips, Sarah D.; Filippova, Olga; Alpatova, Polina; Mazhnaya, Alyona; Zub, Tatyana; Aleksanyan, Ruzanna

    2016-01-01

    The current dominant model of HIV prevention intervention dissemination involves packaging interventions developed in one context, training providers to implement that specific intervention, and evaluating the extent to which providers implement it with fidelity. Research shows that providers rarely implement these programs with fidelity due to…

  12. Tailored Fitness: Culture Clash in the Quest for Combat-Fit Airmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    but is the property of the United States government. iii ABOUT THE AUTHOR Major David Stamps is currently a student at...deterrence within the J5. iv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the SAASS professors and students ...Air Force budgets are being spent on medical costs, lost productivity, and absenteeism . To make matters worse, this dilemma is occurring within the

  13. The contribution of cultural competence to evidence-based care for ethnically diverse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Stanley J; Tilley, Jacqueline Lee; Jones, Eduardo O; Smith, Caitlin A

    2014-01-01

    Despite compelling arguments for the dissemination of evidence-based treatments (EBTs), questions regarding their relevance to ethnically diverse populations remain. This review summarizes what is known about psychotherapy effects with ethnic minorities, with a particular focus on the role of cultural competence when implementing EBTs. Specifically, we address three questions: (a) does psychotherapy work with ethnic minorities, (b) do psychotherapy effects differ by ethnicity, and (c) does cultural tailoring enhance treatment effects? The evidence suggests that psychotherapy is generally effective with ethnic minorities, and treatment effects are fairly robust across cultural groups and problem areas. However, evidence for cultural competence is mixed. Ethnic minority-focused treatments frequently incorporate culturally tailored strategies, and these tailored treatments are mostly efficacious; yet support for cultural competence as a useful supplement to standard treatment remains equivocal at best. We also discuss research limitations, areas for future research, and clinical implications.

  14. Process Design of Aluminum Tailor Heat Treated Blanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrimanidis, Alexander; Lechner, Michael; Degner, Julia; Wortberg, Daniel; Merklein, Marion

    2015-12-09

    In many industrials field, especially in the automotive sector, there is a trend toward lightweight constructions in order to reduce the weight and thereby the CO₂ and NOx emissions of the products. An auspicious approach within this context is the substitution of conventional deep drawing steel by precipitation hardenable aluminum alloys. However, based on the low formability, the application for complex stamping parts is challenging. Therefore, at the Institute of Manufacturing Technology, an innovative technology to enhance the forming limit of these lightweight materials was invented. The key idea of the so-called Tailor Heat Treated Blanks (THTB) is optimization of the mechanical properties by local heat treatment before the forming operation. An accurate description of material properties is crucial to predict the forming behavior of tailor heat treated blanks by simulation. Therefore, within in this research project, a holistic approach for the design of the THTB process in dependency of the main influencing parameters is presented and discussed in detail. The capability of the approach for the process development of complex forming operations is demonstrated by a comparison of local blank thickness of a tailgate with the corresponding results from simulation.

  15. Polyvinylidenefluoride/carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membranes with tailored properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontananova, Enrica; Grosso, Valentina; Aljlil, Saad A.; Bahattab, Mohammed A.; Vuono, Danilo; Di Profio, Gianluca; Drioli, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Membrane operations are promising tools for efficient and environmentally friendly separations. However, the development of advanced membranes with tailored properties is a key issue to be addressed in order to better exploit the potentialities of membrane-based separations. An important approach toward this aim is the development of mixed matrix membranes in which an organic and an inorganic phase coexist in order to have synergic effects on membrane properties. The peculiar properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) such as high electrical and thermal conductivity, high strength and unique transport properties, has motivated a considerable effort to produce CNT-polymer composites in order to engineer membrane properties. In this work the roughness, wettability, morphology, crystalline phase and pore size of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) membranes were tailored working on the membrane preparation conditions, as well as, by blending the polymer with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A study on the effect of concentration of the polymer, use of pore forming additives, type and concentration of MWCNTs (pristine and functionalized), was carried out. The results highlighted interesting relationships between membrane microstructure and composition, as well as, MWCNTs distribution, on transport and wettability properties, in the perspectives of a more efficient application of PVDF membranes in liquid phase separations.

  16. Magnetic Field Tailored Annular Hall Thruster with Anode Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Holak; Kim, Junbum; Lim, Youbong; Choe, Wonho; Korea Institute of Materials Science Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Plasma propulsion system is one of the key components for advanced missions of satellites as well as deep space exploration. A typical plasma propulsion system is Hall effect thruster that uses crossed electric and magnetic fields to ionize a propellant gas and to accelerate the ionized gas to generate momentum. In Hall thruster plasmas, magnetic field configuration is important due to the fact that electron confinement in the electromagnetic fields affects both plasma and ion beam characteristics as well as thruster performance parameters including thrust, specific impulse, power efficiency, and life time. In this work, development of an anode layer Hall thruster (TAL) with magnetic field tailoring has been attempted. The TAL is possible to keep discharge in 1 to 2 kilovolts of anode voltage, which is useful to obtain high specific impulse. The magnetic field tailoring is used to minimize undesirable heat dissipation and secondary electron emission from the wall surrounding the plasma. We will report 3 W and 200 W thrusters performances measured by a pendulum thrust stand according to the magnetic field configuration. Also, the measured result will be compared with the plasma diagnostics conducted by an angular Faraday probe, a retarding potential analyzer, and a ExB probe.

  17. Tailoring the wettability of polypropylene surfaces with halloysite nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxian; Jia, Zhixin; Liu, Fang; Jia, Demin; Guo, Baochun

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution, halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), a kind of natural hydrophilic nanoclay, are incorporated into polypropylene (PP) for tailoring the surface microstructures of the composites prepared by solution casting. HNTs act as heterogeneous nuclei for PP, which leads to the change of phase separation process during drying of the composites and consequently the microstructures of composite surfaces. Micro-papilla like hybrid spherulites with nanostructures are formed on the PP/HNTs composite surfaces. The rough surfaces demonstrate superhydrophobicity with a maximum water contact angle as nearly 170 degrees and sliding angle of about 2 degrees. The spherulites size, surface roughness, and wetting property of PP can be tuned by HNTs. HNTs can significantly improve the thermal degradation behavior of the composites which is attributed to the well-dispersed HNTs and the improved interfacial interactions by the nucleation effect. The present work provides an alternative routine for preparing polymer superhydrophobic surfaces via tailoring the surface microstructures by adding nanoparticles in a solution process.

  18. Models to Tailor Brain Stimulation Therapies in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Plow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A great challenge facing stroke rehabilitation is the lack of information on how to derive targeted therapies. As such, techniques once considered promising, such as brain stimulation, have demonstrated mixed efficacy across heterogeneous samples in clinical studies. Here, we explain reasons, citing its one-type-suits-all approach as the primary cause of variable efficacy. We present evidence supporting the role of alternate substrates, which can be targeted instead in patients with greater damage and deficit. Building on this groundwork, this review will also discuss different frameworks on how to tailor brain stimulation therapies. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first instance that enumerates and compares across theoretical models from upper limb recovery and conditions like aphasia and depression. Here, we explain how different models capture heterogeneity across patients and how they can be used to predict which patients would best respond to what treatments to develop targeted, individualized brain stimulation therapies. Our intent is to weigh pros and cons of testing each type of model so brain stimulation is successfully tailored to maximize upper limb recovery in stroke.

  19. Tailoring material properties of a nanofibrous extracellular matrix derived hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd D.; Lin, Stephen Y.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-12-01

    In the native tissue, the interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, mechanical stability, and signaling. It has been shown that decellularized ECMs can be processed into injectable formulations, thereby allowing for minimally invasive delivery. Upon injection and increase in temperature, these materials self-assemble into porous gels forming a complex network of fibers with nanoscale structure. In this study we aimed to examine and tailor the material properties of a self-assembling ECM hydrogel derived from porcine myocardial tissue, which was developed as a tissue specific injectable scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The impact of gelation parameters on ECM hydrogels has not previously been explored. We examined how modulating pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration affected the nanoscale architecture, mechanical properties, and gelation kinetics. These material characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, rheometry, and spectrophotometry, respectively. Since the main component of the myocardial matrix is collagen, many similarities between the ECM hydrogel and collagen gels were observed in terms of the nanofibrous structure and modulation of properties by altering ionic strength. However, variation from collagen gels was noted for the gelation temperature along with varied times and rates of gelation. These discrepancies when compared to collagen are likely due to the presence of other ECM components in the decellularized ECM based hydrogel. These results demonstrate how the material properties of ECM hydrogels could be tailored for future in vitro and in vivo applications.

  20. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m-1·K-1, which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties.

  1. Supporting Multiple Cognitive Processing Styles Using Tailored Support Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan Q. Tran; Karen M. Feigh; Amy R. Pritchett

    2007-08-01

    According to theories of cognitive processing style or cognitive control mode, human performance is more effective when an individual’s cognitive state (e.g., intuition/scramble vs. deliberate/strategic) matches his/her ecological constraints or context (e.g., utilize intuition to strive for a "good-enough" response instead of deliberating for the "best" response under high time pressure). Ill-mapping between cognitive state and ecological constraints are believed to lead to degraded task performance. Consequently, incorporating support systems which are designed to specifically address multiple cognitive and functional states e.g., high workload, stress, boredom, and initiate appropriate mitigation strategies (e.g., reduce information load) is essential to reduce plant risk. Utilizing the concept of Cognitive Control Models, this paper will discuss the importance of tailoring support systems to match an operator's cognitive state, and will further discuss the importance of these ecological constraints in selecting and implementing mitigation strategies for safe and effective system performance. An example from the nuclear power plant industry illustrating how a support system might be tailored to support different cognitive states is included.

  2. Tailor-made polyamide membranes for water desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wansuk; Gu, Joung-Eun; Park, Sang-Hee; Kim, Seyong; Bang, Joona; Baek, Kyung-Youl; Park, Byoungnam; Lee, Jong Suk; Chan, Edwin P; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-27

    Independent control of the extrinsic and intrinsic properties of the polyamide (PA) selective layer is essential for designing thin-film composite (TFC) membranes with performance characteristics required for water purification applications besides seawater desalination. Current commercial TFC membranes fabricated via the well-established interfacial polymerization (IP) approach yield materials that are far from ideal because their layer thickness, surface roughness, polymer chemistry, and network structure cannot be separately tailored. In this work, tailor-made PA-based desalination membranes based on molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly are presented. The mLbL technique enables the construction of an ultrathin and highly cross-linked PA selective layer in a precisely and independently controlled manner. The mLbL-assembled TFC membranes exhibit significant enhancements in performance compared to their IP-assembled counterparts. A maximum sodium chloride rejection of 98.2% is achieved along with over 2.5 times higher water flux than the IP-assembled counterpart. More importantly, this work demonstrates the broad applicability of mLbL in fabricating a variety of PA-based TFC membranes with nanoscale control of the selective layer thickness and roughness independent of the specific polyamide chemistry.

  3. Process Design of Aluminum Tailor Heat Treated Blanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kahrimanidis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In many industrials field, especially in the automotive sector, there is a trend toward lightweight constructions in order to reduce the weight and thereby the CO2 and NOx emissions of the products. An auspicious approach within this context is the substitution of conventional deep drawing steel by precipitation hardenable aluminum alloys. However, based on the low formability, the application for complex stamping parts is challenging. Therefore, at the Institute of Manufacturing Technology, an innovative technology to enhance the forming limit of these lightweight materials was invented. The key idea of the so-called Tailor Heat Treated Blanks (THTB is optimization of the mechanical properties by local heat treatment before the forming operation. An accurate description of material properties is crucial to predict the forming behavior of tailor heat treated blanks by simulation. Therefore, within in this research project, a holistic approach for the design of the THTB process in dependency of the main influencing parameters is presented and discussed in detail. The capability of the approach for the process development of complex forming operations is demonstrated by a comparison of local blank thickness of a tailgate with the corresponding results from simulation.

  4. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-12-09

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m(-1)·K(-1), which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties.

  5. Porous alumina and zirconia ceramics with tailored thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorová, E.; Pabst, W.; Sofer, Z.; Jankovský, O.; Matějíček, J.

    2012-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of porous ceramics can be tailored by slip casting and uniaxial dry pressing, using either fugitive pore formers (saccharides) or partial sintering. Porous alumina and zirconia ceramics have been prepared using appropriate powder types (ungranulated for casting, granulated for pressing) and identical firing regimes (but different maximum temperatures in the case of partial sintering). Thermal diffusivities have been measured by the laser- and xenon-flash method and transformed into relative thermal conductivities, which enable a temperature-independent comparison between different materials. While the porosity can be controlled in a similar way for both materials when using pore formers, partial sintering exhibits characteristic differences between alumina and zirconia (for alumina porosities below 45 %, full density above 1600 °C, for zirconia porosities below 60 %, full density above 1300 °C). The different compaction behavior of alumina and zirconia (porosity after pressing 0.465 and 0.597, respectively) is reflected in the fact that for alumina the relative conductivity data of partially sintered materials are below the exponential prediction, while for zirconia they coincide with the latter. Notwithstanding these characteristic differences, for both alumina and zirconia it is possible to tailor the thermal conductivity from 100 % down to approx. 15 % of the solid phase value.

  6. Tailored interfacial rheology for gastric stable adsorption layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuble, N; Geue, T; Windhab, E J; Fischer, P

    2014-08-11

    Human lipid digestion begins at the interface of oil and water by interfacial adsorption of lipases. Tailoring the available surface area for lipase activity can lead to specific lipid sensing in the body, thus, tailored satiety hormone release. In this study we present biopolymer layers at the MCT-oil/water interface with different stabilities under human gastric environment (37 °C, pH 2, pepsin). Physicochemical changes and enzymatic degradation of interfacial layers were monitored online by interfacial shear rheology. We show the weakening of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) layers at body temperature and acidification and their hydrolysis by pepsin. If sufficient concentrations of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) are given to an existing β-lg layer, this weakening is buffered and the proteolysis delayed. A synergistic, composite layer is formed by adding methylated NCC to the β-lg layer. This layer thermogels at body temperature and resists hydrolysis by pepsin. Coexistence of these two emulsifiers at the air/water interface is evidenced by neutron reflectometry measurements, where morphological information are extracted. The utilized layers and their analysis provide knowledge of physicochemical changes during in vitro digestion of interfaces, which promote functional food formulations.

  7. Using tailored methodical approaches to achieve optimal science outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Lory M.

    2016-08-01

    The science community is actively engaged in research, development, and construction of instrumentation projects that they anticipate will lead to new science discoveries. There appears to be very strong link between the quality of the activities used to complete these projects, and having a fully functioning science instrument that will facilitate these investigations.[2] The combination of using internationally recognized standards within the disciplines of project management (PM) and systems engineering (SE) has been demonstrated to lead to achievement of positive net effects and optimal project outcomes. Conversely, unstructured, poorly managed projects will lead to unpredictable, suboptimal project outcomes ultimately affecting the quality of the science that can be done with the new instruments. The proposed application of these two specific methodical approaches, implemented as a tailorable suite of processes, are presented in this paper. Project management (PM) is accepted worldwide as an effective methodology used to control project cost, schedule, and scope. Systems engineering (SE) is an accepted method that is used to ensure that the outcomes of a project match the intent of the stakeholders, or if they diverge, that the changes are understood, captured, and controlled. An appropriate application, or tailoring, of these disciplines can be the foundation upon which success in projects that support science can be optimized.

  8. Rational and combinatorial tailoring of bioactive cyclic dipeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Wolfgang Giessen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Modified cyclic dipeptides represent a diverse family of microbial secondary metabolites. They display a broad variety of biological and pharmacological activities and have long been recognized as privileged structures with the ability to bind to a wide range of receptors. This is due to their conformationally constrained 2, 5-diketopiperazine (DKP scaffold and the diverse set of DKP tailoring enzymes present in nature. After initial DKP assembly through different biosynthetic systems modifying enzymes are responsible for installing functional groups crucial for the biological activities of the resulting modified DKPs. They represent a vast and largely untapped enzyme repository very useful for synthetic biology approaches aiming at introducing structural variations into DKP scaffolds. In this review we focus on these DKP modification enzymes found in various microbial secondary metabolite gene clusters. We will give a brief overview of their distribution and highlight a select number of characterized DKP tailoring enzymes before turning to their application potential in combinatorial biosynthesis with the aim of producing molecules with improved or entirely new biological and medicinally relevant properties.

  9. Directly tailoring photon-electron coupling for sensitive photoconductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Huang, Jingguo; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Qu, Yue; Chu, Junhao

    2016-03-01

    The coupling between photons and electrons is at the heart of many fundamental phenomena in nature. Despite tremendous advances in controlling electrons by photons in engineered energy-band systems, control over their coupling is still widely lacking. Here we demonstrate an unprecedented ability to couple photon-electron interactions in real space, in which the incident electromagnetic wave directly tailors energy bands of solid to generate carriers for sensitive photoconductance. By spatially coherent manipulation of metal-wrapped material system through anti-symmetric electric field of the irradiated electromagnetic wave, electrons in the metals are injected and accumulated in the induced potential well (EIW) produced in the solid. Respective positive and negative electric conductances are easily observed in n-type and p-type semiconductors into which electrons flow down from the two metallic sides under light irradiation. The photoconductivity is further confirmed by sweeping the injected electrons out of the semiconductor before recombination applied by sufficiently strong electric fields. Our work opens up new perspectives for tailoring energy bands of solids and is especially relevant to develop high effective photon detection, spin injection, and energy harvesting in optoelectronics and electronics.

  10. Genetic basis of stroke: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munshi Anjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke or "brain attack" is a complex disease caused by a combination of multiple risk factors. It has major social and economic consequences. Various epidemiological studies in families and twins have revealed that there is a genetic component to stroke risk. Stroke may be the outcome of single gene disorders or more commonly, a polygenic multifactorial disease. Mutations in several candidate genes have been found to be associated with stroke. However, association studies in population-based samples have failed to identify reliable disease markers. The publication of the "Human Genome Project" has indeed improved our knowledge about the potential role of genetics in complex disorders including stroke. Rapidly expanding field of genetics is in a state of transforming medicine into a new kind in future, the individualized medicine, using tailor made drugs according to the genetic makeup of the individuals. However, this involves integrating genome wide genetic information with medical information. The first genome wide association study on ischemic stroke has been published recently. Further studies will hopefully tell us how far the genetic information will assist us to tailor clinical and therapeutic decisions to an individual′s genotype.

  11. A controversial idea as a cultural resource: The Lysenko controversy and discussions of genetics as a 'democratic' science in postwar Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Kaori

    2015-08-01

    The Japanese discussion of the theory of Soviet agronomist Trofim D. Lysenko began in the postwar years under the American occupation. Leftists introduced Lysenko's theory immediately after the war as part of a postwar scientists' movement. Unlike many American geneticists, who sharply criticized the theory, Japanese geneticists initially participated in the discussion in an even-handed way; their scientific interests in the roles of cytoplasm and the environment in heredity shaped their initial sympathetic reaction. As the Cold War divide deepened, however, Japanese scientists began expressing sharp anti-Lysenko criticisms that resembled the American criticisms. Interestingly, throughout the period, Japanese geneticists' overall aim in the discussion remained largely unchanged: to effectively reconstruct their discipline and maintain its proper image and authority. However, the shift in their reaction occurred due to an evolving sociopolitical context, especially the shift in the meaning of 'democratic' science from a science that employed democratic processes to a science of a liberal-democratic state. Regarding Lysenko's idea as a cultural resource could help to explain how and why it was treated differently in different places, and why a controversy emerged in certain contexts but not in others.

  12. Bartonella melophagi in blood of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and sheep keds (Melophagus ovinus) from the southwestern US: Cultures, genetic characterization, and ecological connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoy, Michael; Bai, Ying; Enscore, Russell; Rizzo, Maria Rosales; Bender, Scott; Popov, Vsevolod; Albayrak, Levent; Fofanov, Yuriy; Chomel, Bruno

    2016-07-15

    Bartonella melophagi sp. nov. was isolated from domestic sheep blood and from sheep keds (Melophagus ovinus) from the southwestern United States. The sequence analyses of the reference strain performed by six molecular markers consistently demonstrated that B. melophagi relates to but differ from other Bartonella species isolated from domestic and wild ruminants. Presence of 183 genes specific for B. melophagi, being absent in genomes of other Bartonella species associated with ruminants also supports the separation of this bacterial species from species of other ruminants. Bartonella DNA was detected in all investigated sheep keds; however, culturing of these bacteria from sheep blood rejects a speculation that B. melophagi is an obligatory endosymbiont. Instead, the results support the hypothesis that the domestic sheep is a natural host reservoir for B. melophagi and the sheep ked its main vector. This bacterium was not isolated from the blood of bighorn sheep and domestic goats belonging to the same subfamily Caprinae. B. melophagi has also been shown to be zoonotic and needs to be investigated further.

  13. Genetic, metabolic and environmental factors involved in the development of liver cirrhosis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-11-07

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is a chronic illness caused by inflammatory responses and progressive fibrosis. Globally, the most common causes of chronic liver disease include persistent alcohol abuse, followed by viral hepatitis infections and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, regardless of the etiological factors, the susceptibility and degree of liver damage may be influenced by genetic polymorphisms that are associated with distinct ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Consequently, metabolic genes are influenced by variable environmental lifestyle factors, such as diet, physical inactivity, and emotional stress, which are associated with regional differences among populations. This Topic Highlight will focus on the genetic and environmental factors that may influence the metabolism of alcohol and nutrients in the setting of distinct etiologies of liver disease. The interaction between genes and environment in the current-day admixed population, Mestizo and Native Mexican, will be described. Additionally, genes involved in immune regulation, insulin sensitivity, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix deposition may modulate the degree of severity. In conclusion, LC is a complex disease. The onset, progression, and clinical outcome of LC among the Mexican population are influenced by specific genetic and environmental factors. Among these are an admixed genome with a heterogenic distribution of European, Amerindian and African ancestry; a high score of alcohol consumption; viral infections; a hepatopathogenic diet; and a high prevalence of obesity. The variance in risk factors among populations suggests that intervention strategies directed towards the prevention and management of LC should be tailored according to such population-based features.

  14. Designing quantum gates using the genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Karthikeyan S.; Paraoanu, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the usage of Genetic Algorithm (GA) to tailor the radio frequency pulses for producing unitary transformations in qubit systems. We find that the initial population converges to the optimal solution after 10 generations, for a one segment pulse corresponding to single qubit Hadamard gate. For a two qubit CNOT gate, we see the population convergence for a two segment pulse after 150 generations. This demonstrates that the method is suitable for designing quantum gates.

  15. Models of genetic counseling and their effects on multicultural genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Linwood J

    2002-06-01

    This theoretical paper examines challenges to multicultural genetic counseling, counseling between culturally different clients and counselors, in the context of Kessler's typology of models of genetic counseling (Kessler S (1997) J Genet Counsel 6:287-295). It is suggested that challenges such as resistance to multicultural genetic counseling education may be due to conceptions about genetic counseling as a biomedical field that transcends questions of culture as well as lack of multicultural training or prejudice. Directions for future research and recommendations for multicultural genetic counseling education are briefly explored.

  16. Culture and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gächter, Simon; Herrmann, Benedikt; Thöni, Christian

    2010-09-12

    Does the cultural background influence the success with which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate in social dilemma situations? In this paper, we provide an answer by analysing the data of Herrmann et al. (2008a), who studied cooperation and punishment in 16 subject pools from six different world cultures (as classified by Inglehart & Baker (2000)). We use analysis of variance to disentangle the importance of cultural background relative to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences in cooperation. We find that culture has a substantial influence on the extent of cooperation, in addition to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences identified by previous research. The significance of this result is that cultural background has a substantial influence on cooperation in otherwise identical environments. This is particularly true in the presence of punishment opportunities.

  17. 长期培养的黄瓜毛状根中外源基因遗传稳定性分析%Genetic Stability Analysis of Exogenous Gene in Long-term Cultured Cucumber Hairy Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹庆丰; 向太和; 孟莎莎; 王沙沙; 陆文怡

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it was investigated that the genetic stability ofgfp gene in the cucumber hairy roots that had been cultured on solid medium for 3 years. The analysis of PCR for gfp and rol (root loci) genes, qRT-PCR for gfp gene and Western blot for GFP protein were conducted, while green fluorescence was checked on hairy roots. The results showed that the expression of gfp driven by constitutive promoter 35S was relatively stable at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the morphology-related rol genes of the hairy roots after 3-year culturing can be amplified. Overall, this study provided important experimental supports for using hairy roots in the long-term industrial production of proteins and active ingredients of medicinal plants.%对在固体培养基上培养3年的黄瓜转gfp基因毛状根进行gfp和rol位点系列基因的PCR扩增、gfp的荧光定量PCR、Westernblot杂交以及荧光观察分析。结果显示,由组成型启动子35S驱动的g章在转录水平上能正常表达,而且能够翻译出编码蛋白;此外,培养3年后的毛状根,能扩增出与毛状根形态构成有关的rol系列基因。本研究结果表明长期培养的毛状根能保持其遗传稳定性,这为利用毛状根长期工厂化生产外源基因表达的蛋白产物和药用植物的活性成分提供了理论依据。

  18. Self-related neural response to tailored smoking-cessation messages predicts quitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Hannah Faye; Ho, S. Shaun; Jasinska, Agnes J.; Polk, Thad A.; Welsh, Robert C.; Liberzon, Israel; Strecher, Victor J.

    2011-01-01

    Although tailored health interventions can be more effective in eliciting positive behavior change then generic interventions, the underlying neural mechanisms are not yet understood. Ninety-one smokers participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session and a tailored smoking-cessation program. We found that increases in activations in self-related processing regions, particularly dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, to tailored messages predicted quitting during a 4-month follow-up. PMID:21358641

  19. Tailoring Carbon Nanostructure for High Frequency Supercapacitor Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritesh Hiralal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of enhancing the frequency performance of electrochemical capacitors by tailoring the nanostructure of the carbon electrode to increase electrolyte permeability is demonstrated. Highly porous, vertically oriented carbon electrodes which are in direct electrical contact with the metallic current collector are produced via MPECVD growth on metal foils. The resulting structure has a capacitance and frequency performance between that of an electrolytic capacitor and an electrochemical capacitor. Fully packaged devices are produced on Ni and Cu current collectors and performance compared to state-of-the-art electrochemical capacitors and electrolytic capacitors. The extension of capacitive behavior to the AC regime (~100 Hz opens up an avenue for a number of new applications where physical volume of the capacitor may be significantly reduced.

  20. Tailorable reflection of surface plasmons in defect engineered graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiwei; Cai, Wei; Wu, Wei; Xiang, Yinxiao; Ren, Mengxin; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-12-01

    The electrical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties of graphene can be significantly altered by defects, thus engineering the defects in graphene is promising for applications in functionalized materials and nanoscale devices. Here the propagations of surface plasmon waves near graphene defect boundaries created by ion beams are studied. Specifically, plasmon reflections are observed near the induced defect boundaries for the first time, which implies that ion-irradiation induced defects act as efficient scattering centers for the plasmonic waves, just like the native grain boundaries. Moreover, engineering the defects with varied ion doses results in tailorable plasmon reflection properties due to changed defect degrees. The controllable plasmon reflections near ion induced defect boundaries open up a new avenue for plasmon wave engineering.

  1. Spectrally tailored supercontinuum generation from single-mode-fiber amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Qiang; Guo, Zhengru; Zhang, Qingshan [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Optical System, Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System (Ministry of Education), School of Optical-Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 516 Jungong Road, Shanghai 200093 (China); Liu, Yang; Li, Wenxue [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, 3663 Zhongshan North Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Zeng, Heping, E-mail: hpzeng@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Optical System, Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System (Ministry of Education), School of Optical-Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 516 Jungong Road, Shanghai 200093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, 3663 Zhongshan North Road, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2014-05-19

    Spectral filtering of an all-normal-dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser was demonstrated effective for broadband supercontinuum generation in the picosecond time region. The picosecond pump pulses were tailored in spectrum with 1 nm band-pass filter installed between two single-mode fiber amplifiers. By tuning the spectral filter around 1028 nm, four-wave mixing was initiated in a photonic crystal fiber spliced with single-mode fiber, as manifested by the simultaneous generation of Stokes wave at 1076 nm and anti-Stokes wave at 984 nm. Four-wave mixing took place in cascade with the influence of stimulated Raman scattering and eventually extended the output spectrum more than 900 nm of 10 dB bandwidth. This technique allows smooth octave supercontinuum generation by using simple single-mode fiber amplifiers rather than complicated multistage large-mode-area fiber amplifiers.

  2. Tailoring Terahertz Propagation by Phase and Amplitude Control in Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingjing; Zhang, Xueqian; Liu, Lixiang; Li, Quan; Singh, Leena; Han, Jiaguang; Yan, Fengping; Zhang, Weili

    2017-09-01

    Metasurfaces have been very successful at demonstrating the ability to control the wave propagation over the broad electromagnetic spectrum in recent years. The output wavefronts can be controlled at will, by encoding specially designed abrupt changes of electromagnetic parameters into the metasurfaces, such as phase and amplitude. Constituted by a single- or few-layer of planar structures, metasurfaces are straightforward in design and fabrication, thus promising many credible applications. Moreover, such control concept can be further extended to the surface wave regime. In this review, we present our recent progress on metasurfaces capable of tailoring the propagation of both free-space and surface terahertz waves. Following an introduction of the basic concept and theory, a number of unique terahertz metasurfaces are presented, showing the ability to device ultra-thin and compact functional terahertz components.

  3. Personalized persuasion: tailoring persuasive appeals to recipients' personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Jacob B; Kang, Sonia K; Bodenhausen, Galen V

    2012-06-01

    Persuasive messages are more effective when they are custom-tailored to reflect the interests and concerns of the intended audience. Much of the message-framing literature has focused on the advantages of using either gain or loss frames, depending on the motivational orientation of the target group. In the current study, we extended this research to examine whether a persuasive appeal's effectiveness can be increased by aligning the message framing with the recipient's personality profile. For a single product, we constructed five advertisements, each designed to target one of the five major trait domains of human personality. In a sample of 324 survey respondents, advertisements were evaluated more positively the more they cohered with participants' dispositional motives. These results suggest that adapting persuasive messages to the personality traits of the target audience can be an effective way of increasing the messages' impact, and highlight the potential value of personality-based communication strategies.

  4. Tailoring exchange couplings in magnetic topological-insulator/antiferromagnet heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing Lin; Kou, Xufeng; Grutter, Alexander J.; Yin, Gen; Pan, Lei; Che, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yuxiang; Nie, Tianxiao; Zhang, Bin; Disseler, Steven M.; Kirby, Brian J.; Ratcliff, William, II; Shao, Qiming; Murata, Koichi; Zhu, Xiaodan; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Montazeri, Mohammad; Han, Xiaodong; Borchers, Julie A.; Wang, Kang L.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic topological insulators such as Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 provide a platform for the realization of versatile time-reversal symmetry-breaking physics. By constructing heterostructures exhibiting Néel order in an antiferromagnetic CrSb and ferromagnetic order in Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3, we realize emergent interfacial magnetic phenomena which can be tailored through artificial structural engineering. Through deliberate geometrical design of heterostructures and superlattices, we demonstrate the use of antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in manipulating the magnetic properties of magnetic topological insulators. Proximity effects are shown to induce an interfacial spin texture modulation and establish an effective long-range exchange coupling mediated by antiferromagnetism, which significantly enhances the magnetic ordering temperature in the superlattice. This work provides a new framework on integrating topological insulators with antiferromagnetic materials and unveils new avenues towards dissipationless topological antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  5. Hacking commercial quantum cryptography systems by tailored bright illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydersen, Lars; Wiechers, Carlos; Wittmann, Christoffer; Elser, Dominique; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim

    2010-10-01

    The peculiar properties of quantum mechanics allow two remote parties to communicate a private, secret key, which is protected from eavesdropping by the laws of physics. So-called quantum key distribution (QKD) implementations always rely on detectors to measure the relevant quantum property of single photons. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the detectors in two commercially available QKD systems can be fully remote-controlled using specially tailored bright illumination. This makes it possible to tracelessly acquire the full secret key; we propose an eavesdropping apparatus built from off-the-shelf components. The loophole is likely to be present in most QKD systems using avalanche photodiodes to detect single photons. We believe that our findings are crucial for strengthening the security of practical QKD, by identifying and patching technological deficiencies.

  6. Tailoring the properties of polymers via formation of a mesophase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Girolamo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.digirolamo@unina.it; Auriemma, Finizia; De Rosa, Claudio; Malafronte, Anna [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università Degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II,” Complesso Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia,80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    The combination of the control of the concentration of stereodefects in isotactic polypropylene using metallocene catalysts and the crystallization via the mesophase is a strategy to tailor the mechanical properties. Stiff materials, flexible materials, and thermoplastic elastomers can be produced depending only on the concentration of rr stereodefects. We show that in the case of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) the material properties can be finely tuned at molecular level via formation of a solid mesophase, characterized by an intermediate degree of order between amorphous and crystalline state. The effect of different degree of stereoregularity on the mesophase formation, thermal stability, morphology, is analyzed at different length scales, using different technique including wide angle X-ray scattering, atomic and optical microscopy. Different morphologies are observed depending on the stereoregularity and conditions of crystallization. In contrast to the lamellar morphology of crystals normally obtained from the melt, the solid mesophase show a nodular morphology.

  7. Unraveling Spurious Properties of Interaction Networks with Tailored Random Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bialonski, Stephan; Lehnertz, Klaus; 10.1371/journal.pone.0022826

    2012-01-01

    We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'{e}nyi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way i...

  8. Engineering a CTL-Tailored Replicon RNA Vaccine against PRRSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Werder, Simea; Nielsen, Morten

    The development of vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been hampered by the high mutation rate and the multiple immunoevasive strategies of the virus. With the overall aim of designing a broad coverage vaccine that induces an effective CTL response...... detection in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, a vaccination-challenge experiment using 18 SLA-matched pigs is currently being conducted until July 2016 in which a test group and a control group are being vaccinated twice with VRPs expressing PRRSV epitopes and non-sense control epitopes...... will be available for IVIS. This study exemplifies how bioinformatics epitope prediction, recombinant SLA molecules and RNA virus replicon design can be used to engineer a replicating non-propagating vaccine tailored to deliver conserved and immunogenic CTL epitopes....

  9. Tailoring the porosity of hierarchical zeolites by carbon-templating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Kake; Egeblad, Kresten; Christensen, Claus H.

    2008-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of hierarchical porous zeolite single crystal materials with a range of porosities made available by carbon-templating using differently-sized carbon particles as templates for the additional non-micropore porosity. The materials were...... prepared by adsorption of the required zeolite synthesis gel components onto various commercially available carbon black powders followed by crystallization of the zeolite crystals in the presence of the inert carbon matrix and subsequent removal of the carbon particles embedded in the zeolite crystals...... by combustion. It is shown that the additional porosity of the hierarchical zeolites can be tailored by encapsulation of the differently-sized carbon particles during crystallization....

  10. Site-Selective Acylations with Tailor-Made Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Florian; Kirsch, Stefan F

    2016-04-18

    The acylation of alcohols catalyzed by N,N-dimethylamino pyridine (DMAP) is, despite its widespread use, sometimes confronted with substrate-specific problems: For example, target compounds with multiple hydroxy groups may show insufficient selectivity for one hydroxyl, and the resulting product mixtures are hardly separable. Here we describe a concept that aims at tailor-made catalysts for the site-specific acylation. To this end, we introduce a catalyst library where each entry is constructed by connecting a variable and readily tuned peptide scaffold with a catalytically active unit based on DMAP. For selected examples, we demonstrate how library screening leads to the identification of optimized catalysts, and the substrates of interest can be converted with a markedly enhanced site-selectivity compared with only DMAP. Furthermore, substrate-optimized catalysts of this type can be used to selectively convert "their" substrate in the presence of structurally similar compounds, an important requisite for reactions with mixtures of substances.

  11. Aeroelastic Tailoring of a Plate Wing with Functionally Graded Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of functionally graded materials for the aeroelastic tailoring of a metallic cantilevered plate-like wing. Pareto trade-off curves between dynamic stability (flutter) and static aeroelastic stresses are obtained for a variety of grading strategies. A key comparison is between the effectiveness of material grading, geometric grading (i.e., plate thickness variations), and using both simultaneously. The introduction of material grading does, in some cases, improve the aeroelastic performance. This improvement, and the physical mechanism upon which it is based, depends on numerous factors: the two sets of metallic material parameters used for grading, the sweep of the plate, the aspect ratio of the plate, and whether the material is graded continuously or discretely.

  12. Targeting the Fanconi Anemia Pathway to Identify Tailored Anticancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Jenkins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi Anemia (FA pathway consists of proteins involved in repairing DNA damage, including interstrand cross-links (ICLs. The pathway contains an upstream multiprotein core complex that mediates the monoubiquitylation of the FANCD2 and FANCI heterodimer, and a downstream pathway that converges with a larger network of proteins with roles in homologous recombination and other DNA repair pathways. Selective killing of cancer cells with an intact FA pathway but deficient in certain other DNA repair pathways is an emerging approach to tailored cancer therapy. Inhibiting the FA pathway becomes selectively lethal when certain repair genes are defective, such as the checkpoint kinase ATM. Inhibiting the FA pathway in ATM deficient cells can be achieved with small molecule inhibitors, suggesting that new cancer therapeutics could be developed by identifying FA pathway inhibitors to treat cancers that contain defects that are synthetic lethal with FA.

  13. Multiscale-tailored bioelectrode surfaces for optimized catalytic conversion efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon Saint Côme, Yémima; Lalo, Hélène; Wang, Zhijie; Etienne, Mathieu; Gajdzik, Janine; Kohring, Gert-Wieland; Walcarius, Alain; Hempelmann, Rolf; Kuhn, Alexander

    2011-10-18

    We describe the elaboration of a multiscale-tailored bioelectrocatalytic system. The combination of two enzymes, D-sorbitol dehydrogenase and diaphorase, is studied with respect to the oxidation of D-sorbitol as a model system. The biomolecules are immobilized in an electrodeposited paint (EDP) layer. Reproducible and efficient catalysis of D-sorbitol oxidation is recorded when this system is immobilized on a gold electrode modified by a self-assembled monolayer of 4-carboxy-(2,5,7-trinitro-9-fluorenylidene)malonitrile used as a mediator. The insertion of mediator-modified gold nanoparticles into the EDP film increases significantly the active surface area for the catalytic reaction, which can be further enhanced when the whole system is immobilized in macroporous gold electrodes. This multiscale architecture finally leads to a catalytic device with optimized efficiency for potential use in biosensors, bioelectrosynthesis, and biofuel cells.

  14. Tailoring dielectric properties of ferroelectric-dielectric multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesim, M. T.; Zhang, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Cole, M. W. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Misirlioglu, I. B. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Orhanlı/Tuzla, 34956 Istanbul (Turkey); Alpay, S. P., E-mail: p.alpay@ims.uconn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)

    2014-01-13

    We develop a nonlinear thermodynamic model for multilayer ferroelectric heterostructures that takes into account electrostatic and electromechanical interactions between layers. We concentrate on the effect of relative layer fractions and in-plane thermal stresses on dielectric properties of Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3}-, BaTiO{sub 3}-, and PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PZT)-SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) multilayers on Si and c-sapphire. We show that dielectric properties of such multilayers can be significantly enhanced by tailoring the growth/processing temperature and the STO layer fraction. Our computations show that large tunabilities (∼90% at 400 kV/cm) are possible in carefully designed barium strontium titanate-STO and PZT-STO even on Si for which there exist substantially large in-plane strains.

  15. Tailoring the slow light behavior in terahertz metasurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Cong, Longqing; Singh, Ranjan, E-mail: ranjans@ntu.edu.sg [Center for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Chiam, Sher-Yi [NUS High School of Math and Science, 20 Clementi Avenue 1, Singapore, Singapore 129957 (Singapore); Bettiol, Andrew A. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Science Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Zhang, Weili [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Oklahoma State University, 202 Engineering South, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2015-05-04

    We experimentally study the effect of near field coupling on the transmission of light in terahertz metasurfaces. Our results show that tailoring the coupling between the resonators modulates the amplitude of resulting electromagnetically induced transmission, probed under different types of asymmetries in the coupled system. Observed change in the transmission amplitude is attributed to the change in the amount of destructive interference between the resonators in the vicinity of strong near field coupling. We employ a two-particle model to theoretically study the influence of the coupling between bright and quasi-dark modes on the transmission properties of the system and we find an excellent agreement with our observed results. Adding to the enhanced transmission characteristics, our results provide a deeper insight into the metamaterial analogues of atomic electromagnetically induced transparency and offer an approach to engineer slow light devices, broadband filters, and attenuators at terahertz frequencies.

  16. A SYSTEM DESIGN PROCESS TAILORED FOR REVERSE ENGINEERING AND REENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hun Yoon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a system design process using a reverse engineering. The Reverse Engineering Approach, if possible, is a cost-effective and easy approach to be used in a system design. All industries use this approach consciously or unconsciously to reduce system development risks. It can be a part of formal process, simple requirement reuse, or adoption of industry standards. The reverse engineering approach can be considered as an effective system design method in immature system engineering environments. This paper proposes a system design process using reverse engineering which can be tailored for large complex system development projects. The proposed process composed of two stages to produce system specification generation. The reverse engineering stage is performed to define functional and physical architecture of legacy system used as reference model when they are not available. The reengineering stage takes outputs of the reverse engineering stage to define the rest of logical and physical solutions.

  17. Microlattice Metamaterials for Tailoring Ultrasonic Transmission with Elastoacoustic Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krödel, Sebastian; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-12-01

    Materials with designed microscale architectures, like microlattices, can achieve extreme mechanical properties. Most studies of microlattices focus on their quasistatic response, but their structural dimensions naturally prime them for ultrasonic applications. Here we report that microlattices constitute a class of acoustic metamaterials that exploit elastoacoustic hybridization to tailor ultrasonic wave propagation. Selecting the microlattice geometry allows the formation of hybridization band gaps that effectively attenuate (by >2 orders of magnitude) acoustic signals. The hybridization gaps stem from the interaction of pressure waves in a surrounding medium (e.g., water) with localized bending modes of the trusses in the microlattice. Outside these band gaps, the microlattices are highly transmissive (>80 % ) because their acoustic impedance is close to that of water. Our work can have important implications in the design of acoustic metamaterial applications in biomedical imaging, cell-based assay technology, and acoustic isolators in microelectromechanical systems.

  18. Macroporous hydrogels with tailored morphology and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignotti, Fabio; Agnelli, Silvia; Baldi, Francesco; Sartore, Luciana; Peroni, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    In this work it is shown that hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) can be employed for preparing macroporous polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels with tailored morphology and mechanical properties. By changing the HEC content in the reaction mixture hydrogels with different pore sizes and degrees of interconnectivity can be synthesized. The equilibrium swelling ratio in 0.1 M NaCl increases with the amount of HEC employed. Tensile tests run on equilibrated hydrogels show that these materials behave as rubber-like materials. Their mechanical stiffness decreases regularly as the amount of HEC, and therefore their porosity, is increased. A more complex trend is observed for elongation and stress at break, which display a maximum at intermediate contents of HEC.

  19. Tailored quantum statistics from broadband states of light

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, S; Molitor, A; Reichert, M; Elsäßer, W; Walser, R

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the statistics of photons originating from amplified spontaneous emission generated by a quantum dot superluminescent diode. Experimentally detectable emission properties are taken into account by parametrizing the corresponding quantum state as a multi-mode phase-randomized Gaussian density operator. The validity of this model is proven in two subsequent experiments using fast two-photon-absorption detection observing second order equal-time- as well as second order fully time-resolved intensity correlations on femtosecond timescales. In the first experiment, we study the photon statistics when the number of contributing longitudinal modes is systematically reduced by applying well-controlled optical feedback. In a second experiment, we add coherent light from a single-mode laserdiode to quantum dot superluminescent diode broadband radiation. Tuning the power ratio, we realize tailored second order correlations ranging from Gaussian to Poissonian statistics. Both experiments are very well matched ...

  20. Generating arbitrary ultrasound fields with tailored optoacoustic surface profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. D.; Nikitichev, D. I.; Treeby, B. E.; Cox, B. T.

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic fields with multiple foci have many applications in physical acoustics ranging from particle manipulation to neural modulation. However, the generation of multiple foci at arbitrary locations in three-dimensional is challenging using conventional transducer technology. In this work, the optical generation of acoustic fields focused at multiple points using a single optical pulse is demonstrated. This is achieved using optically absorbing surface profiles designed to generate specific, user-defined, wavefields. An optimisation approach for the design of these tailored surface profiles is developed. This searches for a smoothly varying surface that will generate a high peak pressure at a set of target focal points. The designed surface profiles are then realised via a combination of additive manufacturing and absorber deposition techniques. Acoustic field measurements from a sample designed to generate the numeral "7" are used to demonstrate the design method.

  1. Patterned graphene edges for tailored reflection of plasmonic modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosolen, Gilles; Maes, Bjorn

    2015-06-15

    Combining graphene with plasmonics is expected to lead to new nanoscale applications such as sensors, photodetectors, and optical circuits, since graphene plasmons in the infrared have relatively low losses and are easily tunable. It was shown that the edges of a graphene sheet completely reflect these plasmons with negligible radiation losses. Here, however, we examine structured graphene edges, which provide the ability to tailor and even completely cancel the reflection. These properties depend on the suitable dimensions of the edge grating. We explain the reflection modulation via the appearance of longitudinal Fabry-Perot type modes. Interesting phase changes and resonances appear when the longitudinal modes interact with lateral modes mediated by edge plasmons.

  2. Tailoring the magnetization reversal of elliptical dots using exchange bias.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sort, J.; Buchanan, K. S.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Menendez, E.; Salazar-Alvarez, G.; Baro, M. D.; Miron, M.; Rodamcq, B.; Dieny, B.; ICREA; Univ. Autonoma of Barcelona; Insti. Catala de Nanotecnologia; SPINTEC

    2008-01-01

    Exchange bias effects have been studied in elliptical dots composed of ferromagnetic Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}-antiferromagnetic Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} bilayers. The magnetization reversal mechanisms and magnetic configurations have been investigated by magneto-optic Kerr effect and magnetic force microscopy. Although the obtained bias fields in these dots are relatively small, the magnetization reversal is found to be influenced by the ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic coupling. Namely, for some off-axis angles of measurement, the magnetization reversal mechanism of the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}-Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} ellipses depends on whether exchange bias is induced along the minor or major axis of the ellipses. Hence, exchange bias is shown to be an effective means for tailoring the magnetization reversal of elliptical dots after sample fabrication.

  3. Neural correlates of message tailoring and self-relatedness in smoking cessation programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Hannah Faye; Liberzon, Israel; Welsh, Robert C.; Strecher, Victor J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Smoking leads to illnesses including addiction, cancer, and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Different intervention programs have become available. In the past decade, providing tailored smoking cessation messages has been shown to be more effective in inducing smoking cessation than one-size-fits-all interventions. However, little is known about the brain responses of smokers when they receive tailored smoking cessation messages. METHODS A neuroimaging study using blocked and event-related designs examined neural activity in 24 smokers exposed to high-tailored and low-tailored smoking cessation messages. RESULTS: In both blocked and event-related conditions, rostral medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus/posterior cingulate were engaged more during the processing of high-tailored smoking cessation messages than low-tailored smoking cessation messages. CONCLUSION The activation patterns of smokers to tailored cessation messages show involvement of brain areas commonly implicated in self-related processing. Results seem to add support to the suggested role of self-relevance in tailored cessation programs, where previous studies have shown a potential mediating role of self-relevance on smoking abstinence. The findings are relevant to understanding the cognitive mechanisms underlying tailored message processing and may point to new directions for testing response to health communications programming. PMID:18926523

  4. A Tailorable Structural Composite for GCR and Albedo Neutron Protection on the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A tailorable structural composite that will provide protection from the lunar radiation environment, including GCR and albedo neutrons will be developed. This...

  5. Review on Formability of Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C. Patel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an overall review of the different parameter affecting on formability of tailor-welded blanks process is presented so that other researchers can concentrate on same to further critical investigations in this area. Tailor-welded blanks has been widely used in automobile and aerospace application now-a-days. It is the combination of more than or equal to two sheets having different material, thickness and coatings. Efforts have been put for determining the formability of TWB by various authors. Authors have been compared various test data for formability tests of TWB analytically with the help of various software. They have compared analytical data with practical data which were carried out in early 90’s for formability test when various software were not available. The testing of data and analyzing them by generating Forming Limit Diagram (FLD for various tests parameters carried out by Limit Dome Height (LDH test has been being much simpler analytically rather than conducting them practically. The efforts have also been put to conduct data and to verifying them analytically for deep drawing process of formability for TWB sheets with the help of various available software codes. Future scope may include to conduct data practically and to analyzed them by varying various test parameters for deep drawing process of a cylindrical cups on a new software HYPERWORKS which is now-a-days immerging as a powerful tool for software applications due to its some key features of being more efficient and accurate than other available software codes. The analyzing process is very fast, reliable and accurate compare to other finite element code available in the market.

  6. Candida bombicola as a platform organism for the production of tailor-made biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelants, Sophie L K W; Saerens, Karen M J; Derycke, Thibaut; Li, Bing; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Van de Peer, Yves; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Soetaert, Wim

    2013-09-01

    The yeast Candida bombicola is capable of producing high amounts (400 g/L) of the biosurfactant sophorolipids. The genetic makeup of this industrially important yeast has recently been uncovered and molecular manipulation techniques have been developed. Hence, all tools for the development of new bioprocesses with C. bombicola are now available. As a proof of concept, the production of two totally different molecules was aimed for: the bioplastic polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and a new-to-nature cellobioselipid-biosurfactant. Integration of the new functionalities at genomic loci necessary for sophorolipid production safeguards the new biomolecules from sophorolipid contamination, while taking advantage of the regulation of the sophorolipid gene cluster. A maximum yield of 2.0% wt/dwt PHA was obtained; furthermore, this is the first time cellobioselipid synthesis by a non-natural producer is reported. We here provided proof of concept that C. bombicola can be transformed into a platform organism for the production of tailor-made biomolecules.

  7. Personalized Medicine applied to Forensic Sciences: new advances and perspectives for a tailored forensic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santurro, Alessandro; Vullo, Anna Maria; Borro, Marina; Gentile, Giovanna; Russa, Raffaele La; Simmaco, Maurizio; Frati, Paola; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2017-02-07

    Personalized medicine (PM), included in P5 medicine (Personalized, Predictive, Preventive, Participative and Precision medicine) is an innovative approach to the patient, emerging from the need to tailor and to fit the profile of each individual. PM promises to dramatically impact also on forensic sciences and justice system in ways we are only beginning to understand. The application of omics (genomic, transcriptomics, epigenetics/imprintomics, proteomic and metabolomics) is ever more fundamental in the so called "molecular autopsy". Emerging fields of interest in forensic pathology are represented by diagnosis and detection of predisposing conditions to fatal thromboembolic and hypertensive events, determination of genetic variants related to sudden death, such as congenital long QT syndromes, demonstration of lesions vitality, identification of biological matrices and species diagnosis of a forensic trace on crime scenes without destruction of the DNA. The aim of this paper is to describe the state-of-art in the application of personalized medicine in forensic sciences, to understand the possibilities of integration in routine investigation of these procedures with classical post-mortem studies and to underline the importance of these new updates in medical examiners' armamentarium in determining cause of death or contributing factors to death.

  8. Pharmacogenomics of Drug Response in Type 2 Diabetes: Toward the Definition of Tailored Therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Pollastro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is one of the major causes of mortality with rapidly increasing prevalence. Pharmacological treatment is the first recommended approach after failure in lifestyle changes. However, a significant number of patients shows—or develops along time and disease progression—drug resistance. In addition, not all type 2 diabetic patients have the same responsiveness to drug treatment. Despite the presence of nongenetic factors (hepatic, renal, and intestinal, most of such variability is due to genetic causes. Pharmacogenomics studies have described association between single nucleotide variations and drug resistance, even though there are still conflicting results. To date, the most reliable approach to investigate allelic variants is Next-Generation Sequencing that allows the simultaneous analysis, on a genome-wide scale, of nucleotide variants and gene expression. Here, we review the relationship between drug responsiveness and polymorphisms in genes involved in drug metabolism (CYP2C9 and insulin signaling (ABCC8, KCNJ11, and PPARG. We also highlight the advancements in sequencing technologies that to date enable researchers to perform comprehensive pharmacogenomics studies. The identification of allelic variants associated with drug resistance will constitute a solid basis to establish tailored therapeutic approaches in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  9. Early cellular responses of BMSCs genetically modified with bFGF/BMP2 co-cultured with ligament fibroblasts in a three-dimensional model in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Jha, Ramesh Kumar; Qi, Yong-Jian; Ni, Qu-Bo; Wang, Hui; Chen, Biao; Chen, Liao-Bin

    2016-11-01

    Currently, a number of strategies including the implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and growth factors have been developed to regenerate the tendon-to-bone interface after performing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, the mechanisms behind the interactions of the implanted BMSCs and tendon cells remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early cellular responses of BMSCs genetically modified with basic growth factor growth factor (bFGF)/bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2) and ligament fibroblasts in a three-dimensional co-culture model. BMSCs and ligament fibroblasts were both isolated from male Wistar rats. The BMSCs were then transfected with an adenoviral vector carrying bFGF or BMP2. The transfected BMSCs and ligament fibroblasts both encapsulated in alginate beads were co-cultured for 6 days in three-dimensional model. On days 0, 3 and 6, cell proliferation was assayed. On day 6, the expression of several tendon-bone related markers was evaluated. In the co-culture system, bFGF and BMP2 were highly expressed at the mRNA and protein level. During the process, bFGF significantly promoted cell proliferation, as well as the expression of scleraxis (SCX) and collagen (COL) type Ⅰ (COL1) in the BMSCs; however, it markedly decreased the expression of phenotype markers in the ligament fibroblasts, including COL1 and COL3. BMP2 markedly increased the expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin in the BMSCs and ligament fibroblasts, whereas it had no obvious effect on cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in the ligament fibroblasts. The combination of bFGF and BMP2 resulted in the similarly enhanced proliferation of BMSCs and ligament fibroblasts as observed with bFGF alone; however, this combination more potently promoted osteogenic differentiation than did BMP2 alone. The findings of our study demonstrate the superiority of the combined use of growth factors in inducing

  10. Molecular Diagnostics of Gliomas Using Next Generation Sequencing of a Glioma-Tailored Gene Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Angela; Kaulich, Kerstin; Stepanow, Stefanie; Wolter, Marietta; Köhrer, Karl; Felsberg, Jörg; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Current classification of gliomas is based on histological criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Over the past years, characteristic genetic profiles have been identified in various glioma types. These can refine tumor diagnostics and provide important prognostic and predictive information. We report on the establishment and validation of gene panel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the molecular diagnostics of gliomas. We designed a glioma-tailored gene panel covering 660 amplicons derived from 20 genes frequently aberrant in different glioma types. Sensitivity and specificity of glioma gene panel NGS for detection of DNA sequence variants and copy number changes were validated by single gene analyses. NGS-based mutation detection was optimized for application on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens including small stereotactic biopsy samples. NGS data obtained in a retrospective analysis of 121 gliomas allowed for their molecular classification into distinct biological groups, including (i) isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) 1 or 2 mutant astrocytic gliomas with frequent α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene mutations, (ii) IDH mutant oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q codeletion, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation and frequent Drosophila homolog of capicua (CIC) gene mutation, as well as (iii) IDH wildtype glioblastomas with frequent TERT promoter mutation, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. Oligoastrocytic gliomas were genetically assigned to either of these groups. Our findings implicate gene panel NGS as a promising diagnostic technique that may facilitate integrated histological and molecular glioma classification.

  11. Glyoxyl-disulfide agarose: a tailor-made support for site-directed rigidification of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Cesar A; de las Rivas, Blanca; Grazú, Valeria; Montes, Tamara; Guisán, José Manuel; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2011-05-09

    A new strategy has been developed for site-directed immobilization/rigidification of genetically modified enzymes through multipoint covalent attachment on bifunctional disulfide-glyoxyl supports. Here the mechanism is described as a two-step immobilization/rigidification protocol where the enzyme is directly immobilized by thiol-disulfide exchange between the β-thiol of the single genetically introduced cysteine and the few disulfide groups presented on the support surface (3 μmol/g). Afterward, the enzyme is uniquely rigidified by multipoint covalent attachment (MCA) between the lysine residues in the vicinity of the introduced cysteine and the many glyoxyl groups (220 μmol/g) on the support surface. Both site-directed immobilization and rigidification have been possible only on these novel bifunctional supports. In fact, this technology has made possible to elucidate the protein regions where rigidification by MCA promoted higher protein stabilizations. Hence, rigidification of vicinity of position 333 from lipase 2 from Geobacillus thermocatenulatus (BTL2) promoted a stabilization factor of 33 regarding the unipunctual site-directed immobilized derivative. In the same context, rigidification of penicillin G acylase from E. coli (PGA) through position β201 resulted in a stabilization factor of 1069. Remarkably, when PGA was site-directed rigidified through that position, it presented a half-life time of 140 h under 60% (v/v) of dioxane and 4 °C, meaning a derivative eight times more stable than the PGA randomly immobilized on glyoxyl-disulfide agarose. Herein we have opened a new scenario to optimize the stabilization of proteins via multipoint covalent immobilization, which may represent a breakthrough in tailor-made tridimensional rigidification of proteins.

  12. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  13. Trial Protocol: Using genotype to tailor prescribing of nicotine replacement therapy: a randomised controlled trial assessing impact of communication upon adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prevost A Toby

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The behavioural impact of pharmacogenomics is untested; informing smokers of genetic test results for responsiveness to smoking cessation medication may increase adherence to this medication. The objective of this trial is to estimate the impact upon adherence to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT of informing smokers that their oral dose of NRT has been tailored to a DNA analysis. Hypotheses to be tested are as follows: IAdherence to NRT is greater among smokers informed that their oral dose of NRT is tailored to an analysis of DNA (genotype, compared to one tailored to nicotine dependence questionnaire score (phenotype. II Amongst smokers who fail to quit at six months, motivation to make another quit attempt is lower when informed that their oral dose of NRT was tailored to genotype rather than phenotype. Methods/Design An open label, parallel groups randomised trial in which 630 adult smokers (smoking 10 or more cigarettes daily using National Health Service (NHS stop smoking services in primary care are randomly allocated to one of two groups: i. NRT oral dose tailored by DNA analysis (OPRM1 gene (genotype, or ii. NRT oral dose tailored by nicotine dependence questionnaire score (phenotype The primary outcome is proportion of prescribed NRT consumed in the first 28 days following an initial quit attempt, with the secondary outcome being motivation to make another quit attempt, amongst smokers not abstinent at six months. Other outcomes include adherence to NRT in the first seven days and biochemically validated smoking abstinence at six months. The primary outcome will be collected on 630 smokers allowing sufficient power to detect a 7.5% difference in mean proportion of NRT consumed using a two-tailed test at the 5% level of significance between groups. The proportion of all NRT consumed in the first four weeks of quitting will be compared between arms using an independent samples t-test and by estimating the 95

  14. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  15. Benefits for me or risks for others: a cross-culture investigation of the effects of message frames and cultural appeals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Shen, Fuyuan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of message frames when they were culturally tailored. Focusing on one aspect of culture-individualism and collectivism-the study discovered some similar patterns across cultures: The effect of message framing in motivating preventive behaviors could be moderated by the cultural values embedded in the messages. Messages focusing on individualistic gains and collectivistic losses successfully increased people's intention to adopt preventive behaviors. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  16. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  17. Genetic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the basic principles of genetics, including the classification of genetic disorders and a consideration of the rules and mechanisms of inheritance. The most common pitfalls in clinical genetic diagnosis are described, with emphasis on the problem of the negative or misleading family history.

  18. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  19. The influence of genetics on contemporary art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelkin, Dorothy; Anker, Suzanne

    2002-12-01

    Contemporary visual artists are incorporating genetic concepts into their work, and this work has become prominently featured in numerous museum and gallery exhibitions. Such art uses visual images that represent the language of genomics, the values affected by genetic understanding of the body and the implications of bioengineering. Here, we present various examples of how artists depict aspects of genetics as cultural icons and symbols; in particular, their focus on DNA as information and on the commercialization of genetics research material.

  20. Effect of trehalose coating on basic fibroblast growth factor release from tailor-made bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungjin; Lee, Jongil; Igawa, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Shigeki; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Chung, Ung-il; Sasaki, Nobuo

    2011-12-01

    Artificial bone implants are often incorporated with osteoinductive factors to facilitate early bone regeneration. Calcium phosphate, the main component in artificial bone implants, strongly binds these factors, and in a few cases, the incorporated proteins are not released from the implant under conditions of physiological pH, thereby leading to reduction in their osteoinductivity. In this study, we coated tailor-made bone implants with trehalose to facilitate the release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In an in vitro study, mouse osteoblastic cells were separately cultured for 48 hr in a medium with a untreated implant (T-), trehalose-coated implant (T+), bFGF-incorporated implant (FT-), and bFGF-incorporated implant with trehalose coating (FT+). In the FT+ group, cell viability was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that trehalose effectively covered the surface of the artificial bone implant without affecting the crystallinity or the mechanical strength of the artificial bone implant. These results suggest that coating artificial bone implants with trehalose could limit the binding of bFGF to calcium phosphate.

  1. Tailored topography control of biopolymer surfaces by ultrafast lasers for cell–substrate studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusen, L. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Cazan, M. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Carol Davila” Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Mustaciosu, C. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering – IFIN HH, 30 Reactorului Street, PO Box MG-6, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Filipescu, M.; Sandel, S.; Zamfirescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Dinca, V., E-mail: dinali@nipne.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, the culture surfaces used for in vitro testing must be capable of possessing an improved interface for cell interactions and adhesion. For this reason, the materials used need to have an appropriate chemistry and architecture of its surface, resembling to the extracellular matrix. Within this context, in this work we combined the advantages of natural biopolymer characteristics (chitosan) with the flexibility in surface texturing by ultrafast laser for creating functional microstructured surfaces for cell–substrate in vitro studies. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser irradiation (λ = 775 nm and 387 nm) was used for tailoring surface morphological characteristics of chitosan based films (i.e. polymer “bubbles”, “fingertips” and “sponge-like” structures). These structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The morphology of the structures obtained was correlated with the response of oligodendrocytes cells line. In vitro tests on the patterned surface showed that early cell growth was conditioned by the microtopography and indicate possible uses of the structures in biomedical applications.

  2. Tailored topography control of biopolymer surfaces by ultrafast lasers for cell-substrate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusen, L.; Cazan, M.; Mustaciosu, C.; Filipescu, M.; Sandel, S.; Zamfirescu, M.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, the culture surfaces used for in vitro testing must be capable of possessing an improved interface for cell interactions and adhesion. For this reason, the materials used need to have an appropriate chemistry and architecture of its surface, resembling to the extracellular matrix. Within this context, in this work we combined the advantages of natural biopolymer characteristics (chitosan) with the flexibility in surface texturing by ultrafast laser for creating functional microstructured surfaces for cell-substrate in vitro studies. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser irradiation (λ = 775 nm and 387 nm) was used for tailoring surface morphological characteristics of chitosan based films (i.e. polymer “bubbles”, “fingertips” and “sponge-like” structures). These structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The morphology of the structures obtained was correlated with the response of oligodendrocytes cells line. In vitro tests on the patterned surface showed that early cell growth was conditioned by the microtopography and indicate possible uses of the structures in biomedical applications.

  3. Modulating in vitro bone cell and macrophage behavior by immobilized enzymatically tailored pectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy, Cyrill; Verhoef, René; Haeger, Ash; Morra, Marco; Duval, Jean-Luc; Vigneron, Pascale; Bensoussan, Anne; Velzenberger, Elodie; Cascardo, Giovanna; Cassinelli, Clara; Schols, Henk; Knox, J Paul; Nagel, Marie-Danielle

    2008-09-01

    Previous work has reported the results of a multidisciplinary effort producing a proof-of-concept on the use of pectic polysaccharides in the surface modification of medical devices. This study was designed to learn more about the capability of engineered rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) fractions of apple pectin to control bone cell and macrophage behavior. Thermanox or polystyrene Petri dishes were surface modified with two different modified hairy regions (MHRs) obtained by different enzymatic liquefaction processes of apples differing in relative amounts and lengths of their neutral side chains: (long-haired) MHR-alpha and (short-haired) MHR-B. Bone explants from 14-day-old chick embryos were cultured for 14 days on both pectic substrata. MHR-B promoted cell migration and differentiation, MHR-alpha did not. On MHR-alpha, J774.2 macrophages grew well, their percentage in G1 phase was decreased and in S phase increased, and they did not secrete either proinflammatory-cytokines or nitrites. Contrasting results were gained from macrophages on MHR-B, except for nitrite secretion. Thus, we conclude that coatings from tailored pectins show different biological activities in vitro and are potential innovative candidates for improving the biocompatibility of medical devices in various applications.

  4. Urine culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  5. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    OpenAIRE

    Vorhaus Daniel B; Resnik David B

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound....

  6. Safeguards Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  7. Tailoring recombinant protein quality by rational media design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brühlmann, David; Jordan, Martin; Hemberger, Jürgen; Sauer, Markus; Stettler, Matthieu; Broly, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Clinical efficacy and safety of recombinant proteins are closely associated with their structural characteristics. The major quality attributes comprise glycosylation, charge variants (oxidation, deamidation, and C- & N-terminal modifications), aggregates, low-molecular-weight species (LMW), and misincorporation of amino acids in the protein backbone. Cell culture media design has a great potential to modulate these quality attributes due to the vital role of medium in mammalian cell culture. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the way both classical cell culture medium components and novel supplements affect the quality attributes of recombinant therapeutic proteins expressed in mammalian hosts, allowing rational and high-throughput optimization of mammalian cell culture media. A selection of specific and/or potent inhibitors and activators of oligosaccharide processing as well as components affecting multiple quality attributes are presented. Extensive research efforts in this field show the feasibility of quality engineering through media design, allowing to significantly modulate the protein function.

  8. Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian HUDREA

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultural orientations of an organization can be its greatest strength, providing the basis for problem solving, cooperation, and communication. Culture, however, can also inhibit needed changes. Cultural changes typically happen slowly – but without cultural change, many other organizational changes are doomed to fail. The dominant culture of an organization is a major contributor to its success. But, of course, no organizational culture is purely one type or another. And the existence of secondary cultures can provide the basis for change. Therefore, organizations need to understand the cultural environments and values.

  9. Technical Knowledge and Skills Development in the Informal Sector in Kenya: The Case of Custom Tailors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apunda, Edwinah Amondi; de Klerk, Helena M.; Ogina, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Custom tailors working in the informal sector in Nairobi, Kenya, mainly acquire technical skills through undertaking traditional apprenticeships (TAs). However, most of these tailors are semi-skilled, produce low-quality products and are often poorer than their formally trained counterparts. This qualitative case study explores the aspects of…

  10. Developing Strategies for Waste Reduction by Means of Tailored Interventions in Santiago De Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Robert; Brugger, Adrian; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces an approach to tailoring behavior-change campaigns to target populations using the example of solid waste reduction in Santiago de Cuba. Tailoring is performed in the following steps: (1) Psychological constructs are selected to detect problems in performing the target behavior, and data are gathered on these constructs.…

  11. Tailoring of EIA-649-1: Definition of Major (Class I) Engineering Change Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER TAILORING TAILORING OF EIA-649-1: DEFINITION OF MAJOR (CLASS I) ENGINEERING CHANGE PROPOSAL APPROVED FOR...specified and approved requirements including safety, reliability supportability and quantitative requirements that result in product attributes that...delivered products (e.g., by product recall, modification kit installation, attrition, replacement during maintenance using modified spares ). 7

  12. Developing Strategies for Waste Reduction by Means of Tailored Interventions in Santiago De Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Robert; Brugger, Adrian; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces an approach to tailoring behavior-change campaigns to target populations using the example of solid waste reduction in Santiago de Cuba. Tailoring is performed in the following steps: (1) Psychological constructs are selected to detect problems in performing the target behavior, and data are gathered on these constructs.…

  13. A systematic methodology for design of tailor-made blended products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yunus, Nor Alafiza Binti; Gernaey, Krist; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    A systematic methodology for design of tailor-made blended products has been developed. In tailor-made blended products, one identifies the product needs and matches them by blending different chemicals. The systematic methodology has four main tasks. First, the design problem is defined: the pro......, the methodology is highlighted through two case studies involving gasoline blends and lubricant base oils....

  14. Technical knowledge and skills development in the informal sector in Kenya: The case of custom tailors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apunda, Edwinah Amondi; de Klerk, Helena M.; Ogina, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Custom tailors working in the informal sector in Nairobi, Kenya, mainly acquire technical skills through undertaking traditional apprenticeships (TAs). However, most of these tailors are semi-skilled, produce low-quality products and are often poorer than their formally trained counterparts. This qualitative case study explores the aspects of technical skills and knowledge which tailoring apprentices develop, and the factors which influence these outcomes. The findings show that apprentices do acquire basic technical skills for immediate application to ongoing tailoring activities (such as how to take body measurements, draft patterns, and cut, sew and finish constructed garments). However, apprentices do not acquire the technical knowledge that underpins the trade. Most master tailors who have completed TAs lack technical knowledge and have no access to technical skills upgrading. This perpetuates the cycle of basic and limited technical skills transfer to apprentices, poor performance and poverty among tailors. Both apprentices and master tailors expressed concern over knowledge limitations in TAs and a need to access further training to improve skills and acquire knowledge of the trade. The authors of this article argue that, technically and pedagogically, skilled master tailors are critical to improving training quality. Complementary training in theoretical knowledge is also important in improving apprentices' technical skills and understanding of the trade. Inclusion of TAs in government policy may help ensure sustainable improvement of skills.

  15. Tailored Interactive Multimedia Computer Programs to Reduce Health Disparities: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerant, Anthony; Sohler, Nancy; Fiscella, Kevin; Franks, Becca; Franks, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the theory and research evidence suggesting that tailored interactive multimedia computer programs (IMCPs) aimed at optimizing patient health behaviors could lessen socio-demographic health disparities. Methods Selective critical review of research regarding IMCPs tailored to psychological mediators of behavior and their effects on health behavior and outcomes among socio-demographically disadvantaged patients. Results Tailored IMCPs can address patient factors (e.g. language barriers, low self-efficacy) and buffer provider (e.g. cognitive bias) and health system (e.g. office visit time constraints) factors that contribute to poor provider-patient communication and, thereby, suboptimal health behaviors. Research indicates disadvantaged individuals' interactions with providers are disproportionately affected by such factors, and that their behaviors respond favorably to tailored information, thus suggesting tailored IMCPs could mitigate disparities. However, no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have examined this question. The optimal design and deployment of tailored IMCPs for disadvantaged patients also requires further study. Conclusion Preliminary research suggests tailored IMCPs have the potential to reduce health disparities. RCTs designed expressly to examine this issue are warranted. Practice Implications Many socio-demographic health disparities exist, and there is a dearth of proven disparity-reducing interventions. Thus, if tailored IMCPs were shown to lessen disparities, the public health implications would be considerable. PMID:21146950

  16. Single point incremental forming of tailored blanks produced by friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, M.B.; Skjødt, Martin; Vilaca, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is focused on the single point incremental forming (SPIF) of tailored welded blanks produced by friction stirwelding (FSW). Special emphasis is placed on the know-how for producing the tailored blanks and on the utilization of innovative forming strategies to protect thewelding joint...

  17. Tailored sequential drug release from bilayered calcium sulfate composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Puleo, David A., E-mail: puleo@uky.edu

    2014-10-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt.%) of metronidazole-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography showed the overall layered geometry as well as the uniform distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt.%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4%/d). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to those of mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable, layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline the multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. - Highlights: • Bilayered CS composites were fabricated as potential bone graft substitutes. • The shell

  18. Microstructurally tailored ceramics for advanced energy applications by thermoreversible gelcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanti, Noah Omar

    Thermoreversible gelcasting (TRG) is an advantageous technique for rapidly producing bulk, net-shape ceramics and laminates. In this method, ceramic powder is suspended in warm acrylate triblock copolymer/alcohol solutions that reversibly gel upon cooling by the formation of endblock aggregates, to produce slurries which are cast into molds. Gel properties can be tailored by controlling the endblock and midblock lengths of the copolymer network-former and selecting an appropriate alcohol solvent. This research focuses on expanding and improving TRG techniques, focusing specifically on advanced energy applications including the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Rapid drying of filled gels can lead to warping and cracking caused by high differential capillary stresses. A new drying technique using concentrated, alcohol-based solutions as liquid desiccants (LDs) to greatly reduce warping is introduced. The optimal LD is a poly(tert-butyl acrylate)/isopropyl alcohol solution with 5 mol% tert-butyl acrylate units. Alcohol emissions during drying are completely eliminated by combining initial drying in an LD with final stage drying in a vacuum oven having an in-line solvent trap. Porous ceramics are important structures for many applications, including SOFCs. Pore network geometries are tailored by the addition of fugitive fillers to TRG slurries. Uniform spherical, bimodal spherical and uniform fibrous fillers are used. Three-dimensional pore structures are visualized by X-ray computed tomography, allowing for direct measurements of physical parameters such as concentration and morphology as well as transport properties such as tortuosity. Tortuosity values as low as 1.52 are achieved when 60 vol% of solids are uniform spherical filler. Functionally graded laminates with layers ranging from 10 mum to > 1 mm thick are produced with a new technique that combines TRG with tape casting. Gels used for bulk casting are not suitable for use with tape casting, and appropriate base

  19. Why are Tailored Messages More Effective? A Multiple Mediation Analysis of a Breast Cancer Screening Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jakob D; King, Andy J; Carcioppolo, Nicholas; Davis, LaShara

    2012-10-01

    Past research has found that tailoring increases the persuasive effectiveness of a message. However, the observed effect has been small and the explanatory mechanism remains unknown. To address these shortcomings, a tailoring software program was created that personalized breast cancer screening pamphlets according to risk, health belief model constructs, and visual preference. Women aged 40 and older (N = 119) participated in a 2 (tailored vs. stock message) × 2 (charts/graphs vs. illustrated visuals) × 3 (nested replications of the visuals) experiment. Participants provided with tailored illustrated pamphlets expressed greater breast cancer screening intentions than those provided with other pamphlets. In a test of 10 different mediators, perceived message relevance was found to fully mediate the tailoring × visual interaction.

  20. Cultural Aspects of Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari D. Maharajh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  1. Multicultural education and genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, J

    2001-03-01

    The responsibility to provide accessible, useful genetic counseling to individuals from many cultures and ethnicities arises from the increasing ethnocultural diversity of the populations served, coupled with the ethical goal of providing equal access and quality of services for all individuals. The multicultural education, training, and practice of genetic counseling involves three major components: knowledge of relevant ethnocultural groups, ethnocultural self-awareness, and an understanding of institutional and social barriers to services. Despite the diversity of ethnocultural groups served and the critical role of direct experience and training for the genetic counselor, some general guidelines for multicultural genetic counseling can be identified. These include the importance of establishing and maintaining trust, the essential need to respect the counselee's healthcare beliefs and practices, and the necessity of understanding the impact of culture on the process of decision making and on counselee responses to nondirective counseling.

  2. Tailoring nanocrystalline diamond coated on titanium for osteoblast adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareta, Rajesh; Yang, Lei; Kothari, Abhishek; Sirinrath, Sirivisoot; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian W; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-10-01

    Diamond coatings with superior chemical stability, antiwear, and cytocompatibility properties have been considered for lengthening the lifetime of metallic orthopedic implants for over a decade. In this study, an attempt to tailor the surface properties of diamond films on titanium to promote osteoblast (bone forming cell) adhesion was reported. The surface properties investigated here included the size of diamond surface features, topography, wettability, and surface chemistry, all of which were controlled during microwave plasma enhanced chemical-vapor-deposition (MPCVD) processes using CH4-Ar-H2 gas mixtures. The hardness and elastic modulus of the diamond films were also determined. H2 concentration in the plasma was altered to control the crystallinity, grain size, and topography of the diamond coatings, and specific plasma gases (O2 and NH3) were introduced to change the surface chemistry of the diamond coatings. To understand the impact of the altered surface properties on osteoblast responses, cell adhesion tests were performed on the various diamond-coated titanium. The results revealed that nanocrystalline diamond (grain sizes applications.

  3. Tailoring optical forces for nanoparticle manipulation on layered substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salary, Mohammad M.; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    Optical forces can be used to manipulate small particles through various mechanisms. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of optical forces acting on the nanoparticles located over a substrate using different manipulation techniques, as well as the conditions of the optimization of these forces. In particular, we study optical trapping, acceleration, and binding. Calculations are carried out using the exact multipole expansion method combined with Maxwell stress tensor formalism, providing a general framework to study optical forces on particles for arbitrary incident fields using closed-form expressions. The method takes into account multiple scattering between the particles and substrate and allows clear predictive abilities well beyond the dipole model. We consider the interaction of dielectric and metallic nanoparticles with various substrates. The presence of substrate is shown to have a significant impact on the nanoparticles' resonances and provides an additional degree of freedom in tailoring the optical forces. We explore different physical processes contributing to the optical force and their interplay on the mobility of the particle. It is established that engineering layered substrates can broaden the scope of trapping and acceleration and enhance the binding forces. It can also provide a high tunability of the acceleration direction. The analysis presented in this paper provides key physical insights to identify optimum setup for nanoparticles manipulation in various applications.

  4. Tailoring properties of commercially pure titanium by gradation extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Markus; Rautenstrauch, Anja; Selbmann, René; de Oliveira, Raoni Barreto; Coelho, Rodrigo Santiago; Landgrebe, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) is of great importance in medical applications due to its attractive properties, such as high biocompatibility, excellent corrosion resistance and relatively low density and suitable stiffness. Compared to the commonly used Ti-6Al-4V alloy, its lower strength has to be increased. The most attractive approach is to subject CP Ti to severe plastic deformation (SPD) processes such as Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP). The resulting decreased grain size in CP Ti yields a significant increase in hardness and strength. Common SPD-processes typically provide a uniform modification of the material. Their material efficiency and productivity are critical and limiting factors. A new approach is to tailor the material properties by using Gradation Extrusion, which produces a distinct gradient in microstructure and strength. The forming process combines a regular impact extrusion process and severe plastic deformation in the lateral area of the material. This efficient process can be integrated easily into forming process chains, for instance for dental implants. This paper presents the forming process and the applied die geometry. The results of numerical simulations are used to illustrate the potential of the process to modify and strengthen the titanium material. Experiments show that the material is successfully processed by gradation extrusion. By characterizing the hardness and its distribution within the formed parts the effects of the process are investigated.

  5. Direct disposal of spent fuel: developing solutions tailored to Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hideki [Obayashi Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); McKinley, Ian G [McKinley Consulting, Baden (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    With the past Government policy of 100% reprocessing in Japan now open to discussion, options for direct disposal of spent fuel (SF) are now being considered in Japan. The need to move rapidly ahead in developing spent fuel management concepts is closely related to the ongoing debate on the future of nuclear power in Japan and the desire to understand the true costs of the entire life cycle of different options. Different scenarios for future nuclear power - and associated decisions on extent of reprocessing - will give rise to quite different inventories of SF with different disposal challenges. Although much work has been carried out spent fuel disposal within other national programmes, the potential for mining the international knowledge base is limited by the boundary conditions for disposal in Japan. Indeed, with a volunteer approach to siting, no major salt deposits and few undisturbed sediments, high tectonic activity, relatively corrosive groundwater and no deserts, it is evident that a tailored solution is needed. Nevertheless, valuable lessons can be learned from projects carried out worldwide, if focus is placed on basic principles rather than implementation details. (authors)

  6. Tailoring approach for obtaining molecular orbitals of large systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anuja P Rahalkar; Shridhar R Gadre

    2012-01-01

    Molecular orbitals (MO’s) within Hartree-Fock (HF) theory are of vital importance as they provide preliminary information of bonding and features such as electron localization and chemical reactivity. The contemporary literature treats the Kohn-Sham orbitals within density functional theory (DFT) equivalently to the MO's obtained within HF framework. The high scaling order of ab initio methods is the main hurdle in obtaining the MO's for large molecular systems. With this view, an attempt is made in the present work to employ molecular tailoring approach (MTA) for obtaining the complete set of MO's including occupied and virtual orbitals, for large molecules at HF and B3LYP levels of theory. The energies of highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and hence the band gaps, are accurately estimated by MTA for most of the test cases benchmarked in this study, which include -conjugated molecules. Typically, the root mean square errors of valence MO's are in range of 0.001 to 0.010 a.u. for all the test cases examined. MTA shows a time advantage factor of 2 to 3 over the corresponding actual calculation, for many of the systems reported.

  7. Tailored Antibiotic Combination Powders for Inhaled Rotational Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sie Huey; Teo, Jeanette; Heng, Desmond; Ng, Wai Kiong; Zhao, Yanli; Tan, Reginald B H

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory lung infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) superbugs are on a global upsurge and have very grim clinical outcomes. Their MDR profile makes therapeutic options extremely limited. Although a highly toxic antibiotic, colistin, is favored today as a "last-line" therapeutic against these hard-to-treat MDR pathogens, it is fast losing its effectiveness. This work therefore seeks to identify and tailor-make useful combination regimens (that are potentially rotatable and synergistic) as attractive alternative strategies to address the rising rates of drug resistance. Three potentially rotatable ternary dry powder inhaler constructs (each involving colistin and 2 other different-classed antibiotics chosen from rifampicin, meropenem, and tigecycline) were identified (with distinct complementary killing mechanisms), coformulated via spray drying, evaluated on their aerosol performance using a Next-Generation Impactor and tested for their efficacies against a number of MDR pathogens. The powder particles were of respirable size (d50, 3.1 ± 0.3 μm-3.4 ± 0.1 μm) and predominantly crumpled in morphology. When dispersed via a model dry powder inhaler (Aerolizer(®)) at 60 L/min, the powders showed concomitant in vitro deposition with fine particle fractions of ∼53%-70%. All formulations were successfully tested in the laboratory to be highly effective against the MDR pathogens. In addition, a favorable synergistic interaction was detected across all 3 formulations when tested against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  8. Status specific tailoring of sperm behavior in an external fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torvald Blikra Egeland

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Why dominant males experiencing intense sperm competition sometimes show low investments in sperm production is not always obvious. One well-documented example is that of the external fertilizing teleost, the Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus, where individuals becoming dominant reduce sperm production and sperm swimming speed in water compared to subordinates. Here we report how ovarian fluid differentially influences sperm velocity of dominant and subordinate male Arctic charr. That is, sperm from dominant males increase their velocity in water diluted ovarian fluid compared to that observed in water, while sperm from subordinates, on the other hand, decrease velocity in ovarian fluid compared to that observed in water. Thus, subordinates, who invest more resources in their sperm and usually show the highest sperm velocity in water, have lower gains from their investment than dominant males when sperm are swimming in ovarian fluid. In sum, our result suggests that ovarian fluid increase sperm velocity more in dominant males than in subordinate males. Although this finding could partly be caused by cryptic female choice exerted by the ovarian fluid for sperm from dominant males, an alternative and more parsimonious explanation is that sperm from dominant males may simply be better designed for swimming in ovarian fluid compared to sperm from subordinate males. Thus, sperm production in the two reproductive roles seems to be adaptively tailored to different external environments.

  9. Tailoring optical complex fields with nano-metallic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Guanghao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently there is an increasing interest in complex optical fields with spatially inhomogeneous state of polarizations and optical singularities. Novel effects and phenomena have been predicted and observed for light beams with these unconventional states. Nanostructured metallic thin film offers unique opportunities to generate, manipulate and detect these novel fields. Strong interactions between nano-metallic surfaces and complex optical fields enable the development of highly compact and versatile functional devices and systems. In this review, we first briefly summarize the recent developments in complex optical fields. Various nano-metallic surface designs that can produce and manipulate complex optical fields with tailored characteristics in the optical far field will be presented. Nano-metallic surfaces are also proven to be very effective for receiving and detection of complex optical fields in the near field. Advances made in this nascent field may enable the design of novel photonic devices and systems for a variety of applications such as quantum optical information processing and integrated photonic circuits.

  10. Tailoring Agility: Promiscuous Pair Story Authoring and Value Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendon, Steve

    This chapter describes how a multi-national software organization created a business plan involving business units from eight countries that followed an agile way, after two previously failed attempts with traditional approaches. The case is told by the consultant who initiated implementation of agility into requirements gathering, estimation and planning processes in an international setting. The agile approach was inspired by XP, but then tailored to meet the peculiar requirements. Two innovations were critical. The first innovation was promiscuous pair story authoring, where user stories were written by two people (similarly to pair programming), and the pairing changed very often (as frequently as every 15-20 minutes) to achieve promiscuity and cater for diverse point of views. The second innovation was an economic value evaluation (and not the cost) which was attributed to stories. Continuous recalculation of the financial value of the stories allowed to assess the projects financial return. In this case implementation of agility in the international context allowed the involved team members to reach consensus and unanimity of decisions, vision and purpose.

  11. Tailoring of Interventional Procedures for HCC Patients-Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ghanaati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the most frequent primary malignant tumors in the world is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC."nCurrently, the optimal treatment methods for HCC are hepatic resection and liver transplantation."nUnfortunately, surgical therapies are suitable for 20% of patients and those who are not eligible"nfor surgery should undergo interventional therapies. In the past decade, a variety of interventional"nprocedures have been employed for local control of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC including"ntranscatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE and many tumor ablation techniques, such as"npercutaneous ethanol injection (PEI, radio-frequency ablation (RFA, percutaneous microwave"ncoagulation therapy (PMC, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT, cryoablation, and"nacetic acid injection. By development of new technologies in imaging and drug delivery, it is likely"nthat in the future patients with HCC will be treated by combination therapies to improve patient"nsurvival. Computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have a crucial role in"ndiagnosis and also follow-up of HCC patients treated by interventional procedures, by which the"ntreatment efficacy, recurrence of disease and certain complications are evaluated."nIn this review article, we discuss the imaging modalities and also tailoring of interventional"nprocedures for HCC patients.

  12. Tailoring GaN semiconductor surfaces with biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, Elias; Larroque, Christian; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G; Bálint, Zoltán; Gergely, Csilla

    2008-07-24

    Functionalization of semiconductors constitutes a crucial step in using these materials for various electronic, photonic, biomedical, and sensing applications. Within the various possible approaches, selection of material-binding biomolecules from a random biological library, based on the natural recognition of proteins or peptides toward specific material, offers many advantages, most notably biocompatibility. Here we report on the selective functionalization of GaN, an important semiconductor that has found broad uses in the past decade due to its efficient electroluminescence and pronounced chemical stability. A 12-mer peptide ("GaN_probe") with specific recognition for GaN has evolved. The subtle interplay of mostly nonpolar hydrophobic and some polar amino acidic residues defines the high affinity adhesion properties of the peptide. The interaction forces between the peptide and GaN are quantified, and the hydrophobic domain of the GaN_probe is identified as primordial for the binding specificity. These nanosized binding blocks are further used for controlled placement of biotin-streptavidin complexes on the GaN surface. Thus, the controlled grow of a new, patterned inorganic-organic hybrid material is achieved. Tailoring of GaN by biological molecules can lead to a new class of nanostructured semiconductor-based devices.

  13. Tailor-made therapy for viral hepatitis: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    Combination therapy of pegylated interferon-α with ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV) is a standard of care for chronic hepatitis C (CHC). The majority of CHC patients are infected with HCV genotype I. The recent discovery revealed by a genome-wide association study technology provides the important role of interleukin-28B (IL28B) and inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) in HCV infection. In addition, response to PEG-IFN/RBV therapy is correlated with insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, and hepatic fibrosis in CHC patients. Double-filtration plasmapheresis together with IFN therapy has proved to be effective in the reduction of viral load during the early stage of treatment. In CHC patients, not only IL28B status, but also the treatment period of PEG-IFN/RBV is important. Even when new polymerase/protease inhibitors are introduced in the treatment of CHC, tailor-made treatment for CHC using IL28B, inosine triphosphatase testing or double-filtration plasmapheresis treatment prolonged treatment strategy is highly recommended. The relative etiologic role of prior hepatitis B virus infection in the development of non-B non-C hepatocellular carcinoma is also known in hepatitis B-endemic areas.

  14. Dynamic control of droplet jumping by tailoring nanoparticle concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chonglei; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Che, Lufeng; Chu, Baojin; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic impact behavior of droplets from solid surfaces has attracted increasing interest, especially propelled by the advances in the bio-inspired interfacial materials. In this work, we investigate the impact and bouncing dynamics of ethylene glycol droplets containing silica nanoparticles on superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS). We find that the rebounding of droplets from SHS is highly dependent on the impact velocity and suspension concentrations. By increasing the impact velocity or suspension concentrations, the probability of droplet bouncing from SHS is greatly reduced. The presence of nanoparticles can significantly increase the viscous energy dissipation inside the liquid droplets, therefore suppressing the jumping from surfaces. Based on the energy dissipation characterization, we also find the critical concentration to determine the manifestation of the viscous effect, above which the liquid suspensions exhibit non-Newtonian fluid properties. Our study provides an efficient approach to dynamically control the liquid jumping behaviors on SHS by tailoring the suspension concentrations. The insights learned from this study can be very useful in many industrial applications.

  15. Physician Response to Implementation of Genotype-Tailored Antiplatelet Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Josh F.; Field, Julie R.; Unertl, Kim; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Johnson, Daniel C.; Shi, Yaping; Danciu, Ioana; Cleator, John H.; Pulley, Jill M.; McPherson, John A.; Denny, Josh C.; Laposata, Michael; Roden, Dan M.; Johnson, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Physician responses to genomic information are vital to the success of precision medicine initiatives. We prospectively studied a pharmacogenomics implementation program for the propensity of clinicians to select antiplatelet therapy based on CYP2C19 loss-of-function (LOF) variants in stented patients. Among 2,676 patients, 514 (19.2%) were found to have a CYP2C19 variant affecting clopidogrel metabolism. For the majority (93.6%) of the cohort, cardiologists received active and direct notification of CYP2C19 status. Over 12 months, 57.6% of poor metabolizers and 33.2% of intermediate metabolizers received alternatives to clopidogrel. CYP2C19 variant status was the most influential factor impacting the prescribing decision [HR in poor metabolizers 8.1, 95% CI (5.4,12.2) and HR 5.0, 95% CI (4.0,6.3) in intermediate metabolizers], followed by patient age and type of stent implanted. We conclude that cardiologists tailored antiplatelet therapy for a minority of patients with a CYP2C19 variant and considered both genomic and non-genomic risks in their clinical decision-making. PMID:26693963

  16. Tailored quantum statistics from broadband states of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, S.; Friedrich, F.; Molitor, A.; Reichert, M.; Elsäßer, W.; Walser, R.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the statistics of photons originating from amplified spontaneous emission generated by a quantum dot superluminescent diode. Experimentally detectable emission properties are taken into account by parametrizing the corresponding quantum state as a multimode phase-randomized Gaussian density operator. The validity of this model is proven in two subsequent experiments using fast two-photon-absorption detection observing second-order equal-time and second-order fully time-resolved intensity correlations on femtosecond timescales. In the first experiment, we study the photon statistics when the number of contributing longitudinal modes is systematically reduced by applying well-controlled optical feedback. In a second experiment, we add coherent light from a single-mode laser diode to quantum dot superluminescent diode broadband radiation. Tuning the power ratio, we realize tailored second-order correlations ranging from Gaussian to Poissonian statistics. Both experiments are very well matched by theory, thus giving first insights into the quantum properties of radiation from quantum dot superluminescent diodes.

  17. Tailored work hardening descriptions in simulation of sheet metal forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegter, Henk; Mulder, Hans.; van Liempt, Peter; Heijne, Jan

    2013-12-01

    In the previous decades much attention has been given on an accurate material description, especially for simulations at the design stage of new models in the automotive industry. Improvements lead to shorter design times and a better tailored use of material. It also contributed to the design and optimization of new materials. The current description of plastic material behaviour in simulation models of sheet metal forming is covered by a hardening curve and a yield surface. In this paper the focus will be on modelling of work hardening for advanced high strength steels considering the requirements of present applications. Nowadays work hardening models need to include the effect of hard phases in a soft matrix and the effect of strain rate and temperature on work hardening. Most material tests to characterize work hardening are only applicable to low strains whereas many practical applications require hardening data at relatively high strains. Therefore, physically based hardening descriptions are needed allowing reliable extensions to high strain values.

  18. Vacuum template synthesis of multifunctional nanotubes with tailored nanostructured walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippin, A. Nicolas; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Saghi, Zineb; Idígoras, Jesús; Burdet, Pierre; Barranco, Angel; Midgley, Paul; Anta, Juan A.; Borras, Ana

    2016-02-01

    A three-step vacuum procedure for the fabrication of vertical TiO2 and ZnO nanotubes with three dimensional walls is presented. The method combines physical vapor deposition of small-molecules, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic functional thin films and layers and a post-annealing process in vacuum in order to remove the organic template. As a result, an ample variety of inorganic nanotubes are made with tunable length, hole dimensions and shapes and tailored wall composition, microstructure, porosity and structure. The fabrication of multishell nanotubes combining different semiconducting oxides and metal nanoparticles is as well explored. This method provides a feasible and reproducible route for the fabrication of high density arrays of vertically alligned nanotubes on processable substrates. The emptying mechanism and microstructure of the nanotubes have been elucidated through SEM, STEM, HAADF-STEM tomography and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In this article, as a proof of concept, it is presented the straightforward integration of ZnO nanotubes as photoanode in a photovoltaic cell and as a photonic oxygen gas sensor.

  19. Bioprinting of hybrid tissue constructs with tailorable mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuurman, W; Khristov, V; Pot, M W; Dhert, W J A; Malda, J [Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Weeren, P R, E-mail: j.malda@umcutrecht.nl [Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Department of Equine Sciences, Utrecht University (Netherlands)

    2011-06-15

    Tissue/organ printing aims to recapitulate the intrinsic complexity of native tissues. For a number of tissues, in particular those of musculoskeletal origin, adequate mechanical characteristics are an important prerequisite for their initial handling and stability, as well as long-lasting functioning. Hence, organized implants, possessing mechanical characteristics similar to the native tissue, may result in improved clinical outcomes of regenerative approaches. Using a bioprinter, grafts were constructed by alternate deposition of thermoplastic fibers and (cell-laden) hydrogels. Constructs of different shapes and sizes were manufactured and mechanical properties, as well as cell viability, were assessed. This approach yields novel organized viable hybrid constructs, which possess favorable mechanical characteristics, within the same range as those of native tissues. Moreover, the approach allows the use of multiple hydrogels and can thus produce constructs containing multiple cell types or bioactive factors. Furthermore, since the hydrogel is supported by the thermoplastic material, a broader range of hydrogel types can be used compared to bioprinting of hydrogels alone. In conclusion, we present an innovative and versatile approach for bioprinting, yielding constructs of which the mechanical stiffness provided by thermoplastic polymers can potentially be tailored, and combined specific cell placement patterns of multiple cell types embedded in a wide range of hydrogels. (communication)

  20. Tailored ramp wave generation in gas gun experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotton Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas guns are traditionally used as platforms to introduce a planar shock wave to a material using plate impact methods, generating states on the Hugoniot. The ability to deliver a ramp wave to a target during a gas gun experiment enables access to different regions of the equation-of-state surface, making it a valuable technique for characterising material behaviour. Previous techniques have relied on the use of multi-material impactors to generate a density gradient, which can be complex to manufacture. In this paper we describe the use of an additively manufactured steel component consisting of an array of tapered spikes which can deliver a ramp wave over ∼ 2 μs. The ability to tailor the input wave by varying the component design is discussed, an approach which makes use of the design freedom offered by additive manufacturing techniques to rapidly iterate the spike profile. Results from gas gun experiments are presented to evaluate the technique, and compared with 3D hydrodynamic simulations.