WorldWideScience

Sample records for culturally responsive practices

  1. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  2. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  3. Celebrating Difference: Best Practices in Culturally Responsive Teaching Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Xeturah; Hernandez, Cecilia; Parra, Julia; Negash, Beyan

    2017-01-01

    Culturally responsive teaching and design practices flip the online classroom by creating an environment that acknowledges, celebrates, and builds upon the cultural capital that learners and teachers bring to the online classroom. Challenges exist in all phases of online course design, including the ability to create online courses that reflect…

  4. Faculty Perspectives on Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices in Developmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the perspectives of developmental math faculty at a two-year technical college regarding culturally responsive beliefs and instructional practices. Thirteen faculty who taught the developmental class Elementary Algebra with Applications were surveyed. Nine of the 13 faculty responded. One section of Wisconsin's…

  5. Fostering Culturally and Developmentally Responsive Teaching through Improvisational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Elizabeth; Whyte, Kristin; Delaney, Kate Kresin

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore an effort to rethink curricular decision-making with a group of public pre-K teachers working in a context of curriculum escalation and commitment to play-based pedagogy. Through a professional development program designed to support developmentally and culturally responsive early mathematics, we examine how teachers…

  6. Performance-based competencies for culturally responsive interprofessional collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Valerie; Lackie, Kelly

    2009-11-01

    This paper will highlight how a literature review and stakeholder-expert feedback guided the creation of an interprofessional facilitator-collaborator competency tool, which was then used to design an interprofessional facilitator development program for the Partners for Interprofessional Cancer Education (PICE) Project. Cancer Care Nova Scotia (CCNS), one of the PICE Project partners, uses an Interprofessional Core Curriculum (ICC) to provide continuing education workshops to community-based practitioners, who as a portion of their practice, care for patients experiencing cancer. In order to deliver this curriculum, health professionals from a variety of disciplines required education that would enable them to become culturally sensitive interprofessional educators in promoting collaborative patient-centred practice. The Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre (RN-PDC), another PICE Project partner, has expertise in performance-based certification program design and utilizes a competency-based methodology in its education framework. This framework and methodology was used to develop the necessary interprofessional facilitator competencies that incorporate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for performance. Three main competency areas evolved, each with its own set of competencies, performance criteria and behavioural indicators.

  7. Enhancing Self-Awareness: A Practical Strategy to Train Culturally Responsive Social Work Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini J. Negi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A primary goal of social justice educators is to engage students in a process of self-discovery, with the goal of helping them recognize their own biases, develop empathy, and become better prepared for culturally responsive practice. While social work educators are mandated with the important task of training future social workers in culturally responsive practice with diverse populations, practical strategies on how to do so are scant. This article introduces a teaching exercise, the Ethnic Roots Assignment, which has been shown qualitatively to aid students in developing self-awareness, a key component of culturally competent social work practice. Practical suggestions for classroom utilization, common challenges, and past student responses to participating in the exercise are provided. The dissemination of such a teaching exercise can increase the field’s resources for addressing the important goal of cultural competence training.

  8. A Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices of Adult ESOL and EAP Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how frequently adult education English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers in Florida used specific culturally responsive teaching practices and how important they believed those practices were to their teaching. Using Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's…

  9. A Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices of Adult ESOL and EAP Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how frequently adult education English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers in Florida used specific culturally responsive teaching practices and how important they believed those practices were to their teaching. Using Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's…

  10. An Exploratory Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices for Students Who Are ELLs

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    Nagarkar, Sushama

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether teacher characteristics such as teacher quality, skills in teaching English language learners (ELLs), knowledge of second language acquisition, and attitudes towards ELLs impacted teachers' perceived importance and reported use of culturally responsive practices within their classrooms. The numbers…

  11. Culturally Responsive Pyramid Model Practices: Program-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rosemarie; Steed, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual article reviews current research on racial disparities in disciplinary practices in early childhood education and work to address these issues within a positive behavior support (PBS) framework. Building largely on the Pyramid Model, recommendations and a culturally responsive approach are suggested for use within a program-wide…

  12. Using critical race theory to analyze science teachers culturally responsive practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tamara; Brand, Brenda R.

    2012-06-01

    Culturally responsive science teaching is using knowledge about the culture and life experiences of students to structure learning that is conducive to their needs. Understanding what teachers need to prepare them to be culturally responsive is a matter of continuous debate. As the focus of multicultural education ventures farther away from its roots, advocating the civil rights of historically oppressed groups, concerns about the gravity of racial inequity on schooling continues. How will this shift in focus influence teachers' capacity to accommodate students' needs resulting from racial inequities in this society, particularly African American students? What knowledge is essential to their effectiveness? This qualitative study examined the instructional practices of two effective middle school science teachers deemed culturally responsive by their administrator on the basis of classroom observations, students' responses and standardized assessment results. Both teachers' classrooms consisted primarily of African American students. Grounded theory was used to analyze the teachers' beliefs and practices in order to identify existing commonalties. Critical race theory was used to identify whether there was any influence of the students' racial identities on the teachers' beliefs and practices. The analysis reveals that the teachers' beliefs and practices were informed by their critical awareness of social constraints imposed upon their African American students' identities. These findings communicate the significance of sociocultural awareness to informing the teachers' instruction, as well as their strategies for managing the varying dynamics occurring in their classrooms. It can be deduced from the findings that an understanding of racial inequities is crucial to the development of sociocultural awareness, and is the foundation for the culturally responsive dispositions and practices of these middle school science teachers.

  13. Children's Everyday Learning by Assuming Responsibility for Others: Indigenous Practices as a Cultural Heritage Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, David Lorente

    2015-01-01

    This chapter uses a comparative approach to examine the maintenance of Indigenous practices related with Learning by Observing and Pitching In in two generations--parent generation and current child generation--in a Central Mexican Nahua community. In spite of cultural changes and the increase of Western schooling experience, these practices persist, to different degrees, as a Nahua cultural heritage with close historical relations to the key value of cuidado (stewardship). The chapter explores how children learn the value of cuidado in a variety of everyday activities, which include assuming responsibility in many social situations, primarily in cultivating corn, raising and protecting domestic animals, health practices, and participating in family ceremonial life. The chapter focuses on three main points: (1) Cuidado (assuming responsibility for), in the Nahua socio-cultural context, refers to the concepts of protection and "raising" as well as fostering other beings, whether humans, plants, or animals, to reach their potential and fulfill their development. (2) Children learn cuidado by contributing to family endeavors: They develop attention and self-motivation; they are capable of responsible actions; and they are able to transform participation to achieve the status of a competent member of local society. (3) This collaborative participation allows children to continue the cultural tradition and to preserve a Nahua heritage at a deeper level in a community in which Nahuatl language and dress have disappeared, and people do not identify themselves as Indigenous.

  14. Converging Recommendations for Culturally Responsive Literacy Practices: Students with Learning Disabilities, English Language Learners, and Socioculturally Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Susan V.; Rao, Shaila; Protacio, Maria Selena

    2015-01-01

    This study examines culturally responsive pedagogy across the fields of special education, multicultural literacy education, and teaching English language learners. A systematic review of recommendations identified culturally responsive practices in five key areas: dialogue, collaboration, visual representation, explicit instruction, and inquiry.…

  15. Cultural Mapping as a Social Practice: A Response to "Mapping the Cultural Boundaries in Schools and Communities: Redefining Spaces Through Organizing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadeboncoeur, Jennifer A.; Hanif-Shahban, Shenaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by Gerald Wood and Elizabeth Lemley's (2015) article entitled "Mapping the Cultural Boundaries in Schools and Communities: Redefining Spaces Through Organizing," this response inquires further into cultural mapping as a social practice. From our perspective, cultural mapping has potential to contribute to place making, as well…

  16. Beginning to Think Critically about Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Practice: An Elementary Education Book Study in Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Charles J.; McCormick, Theresa M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study student teachers in an elementary education program took part in a book study, "From Rage to Hope", on culturally responsive teaching. Interns critically reflected on their practice and began making changes based on practical strategies from the book. Four themes of learning and change emerged in intern written reflections: Project…

  17. Culturally Responsive Differentiated Instruction: Narrowing Gaps between Best Pedagogical Practices Benefiting All Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Lorri J.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Because of its special education association, differentiated instruction (DI) is a topic of concern for many educators working with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners, whereby bilingual, multicultural, and culturally responsive teaching (CRT) is considered more appropriate for responding to cultural and…

  18. Culturally Responsive School Psychology Practice: A Study of Practitioners' Self-Reported Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Ronda S.; Keller-Margulis, Milena A.; Burridge, Andrea Backscheider

    2017-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) recognizes cultural competence as a defining feature of psychological practice, education, training, and research (Sue et al. "American Psychologist," 49, 792-796, 1999). The purpose of this study was to investigate the self-appraised cultural competence of school psychology practitioners…

  19. Counteracting Educational Injustice with Applied Critical Leadership: Culturally Responsive Practices Promoting Sustainable Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Lorri J.; Santamaría, Andrés P.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution considers educational leadership practice to promote and sustain diversity. Comparative case studies are presented featuring educational leaders in the United States and New Zealand who counter injustice in their practice. The leaders' leadership practices responsive to the diversity presented in their schools offer…

  20. Exploring the Relationship between Self-Awareness and Student Commitment and Understanding of Culturally Responsive Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kimberly; Negi, Nalini; Fowler, Dawnovise N.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between self-awareness and social work students' commitment and understanding of culturally responsive social work practice. Data consisted of assigned papers (N = 23), submitted by graduate social work students, which asked them to describe their ethnic/racial background and ancestors' process of assimilation,…

  1. Culturally Responsive Literacy Instruction: An Investigation of Primary Grade Teachers' Attitudes, Beliefs and Practices with African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Agren, Kathleen J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate primary grade teachers' attitudes, beliefs and practices concerning Culturally Responsive Literacy Instruction (CRLI) with African American students. Through a mixed methods research design, quantitative and qualitative data sources were collected and analyzed sequentially. The participant school…

  2. The extent to which Latina/o preservice teachers demonstrate culturally responsive teaching practices during science and mathematics instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Cecilia M.

    2011-12-01

    Complex social, racial, economic, and political issues involved in the practice of teaching today require beginning teachers to be informed, skilled, and culturally responsive when entering the classroom. Teacher educators must educate future teachers in ways that will help them teach all children regardless of language, cultural background, or prior knowledge. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) novice teachers described and demonstrated culturally responsive teaching strategies using their students' cultural and academic profiles to inform practice in science and mathematics instruction. This qualitative exploratory case study considered the culturally responsive teaching practices of 12, non-traditional, Latina/o students as they progressed through a distance-based collaborative teacher education program. Qualitative techniques used throughout this exploratory case study investigated cultural responsiveness of these student teachers as they demonstrated their abilities to: a) integrate content and facilitate knowledge construction; b) illustrate social justice and prejudice reduction; and c) develop students academically. In conclusion, student teachers participating in this study demonstrated their ability to integrate content by: (1) including content from other cultures, (2) building positive teacher-student relationships, and (3) holding high expectations for all students. They also demonstrated their ability to facilitate knowledge construction by building on what students knew. Since there is not sufficient data to support the student teachers' abilities to assist students in learning to be critical, independent thinkers who are open to other ways of knowing, no conclusions regarding this subcategory could be drawn. Student teachers in this study illustrated prejudice reduction by: (1) using native language support to assist students in learning and understanding science and math content

  3. "Because That's Who I Am": Extending Theories of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy to Consider Religious Identity, Belief, and Practice

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    Dallavis, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual article the author explores the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and religious school contexts. He extends theories of culturally responsive pedagogy to consider how religion, a dimension of student culture that has largely been overlooked in the literature surrounding culturally responsive pedagogy, can inflect…

  4. "Because That's Who I Am": Extending Theories of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy to Consider Religious Identity, Belief, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallavis, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual article the author explores the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and religious school contexts. He extends theories of culturally responsive pedagogy to consider how religion, a dimension of student culture that has largely been overlooked in the literature surrounding culturally responsive pedagogy, can inflect…

  5. Metonymic objects, cultural practices and narrative repair: Sri Lankan responses to the Indian Ocean tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Shemana; Stolte, Ottilie; Hodgetts, Darrin

    2015-07-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami resulted in a tragic loss of life and immense suffering. This article explores the ways in which a group of people from Sri Lanka worked to address the disruption to their life narratives caused by the loss of loved ones. We go beyond a focus on 'talk' in narrative research in health psychology to explore the importance of material objects in sustaining continued bonds with the deceased. This article provides an alternative to the tendency in mainstream psychology to pathologise grief and highlights the importance of culturally patterned responses to disaster. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Sociocultural factors of teenage pregnancy in Latino communities: preparing social workers for culturally responsive practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Elizabeth; Pecukonis, Edward V; Zhou, Kelly

    2014-11-01

    Despite gains in reducing teenage pregnancy during the past 20 years, disparities in teenage pregnancy rates persist: The teenage pregnancy rate in Latino communities is now nearly double the average rate of teenage pregnancy in the United States. Considering the significant risks teenage pregnancy and parenting pose to both the teenager and the child, and that social workers are already often working in communities with populations at risk, this is not only a major public health issue, but one that the field of social work is well positioned to actively address. This article synthesizes pertinent literature on some of the social and cultural influences important for understanding this phenomenon. Implications for social work practice are discussed.

  7. Yield response of Bere, a Scottish barley landrace, to cultural practices and agricultural inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Martin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There is very little documented about the response of cereal landraces to modern agricultural practices. Bere is a Scottish barley (Hordeum vulgare L. landrace which is grown in Orkney to supply meal for baking. A recent research programme has improved yields and the security of the Bere harvest, making it possible to supply a new market for grain to produce specialist whiskies. At the start of this research, a survey of Orkney farmers who had grown Bere since the 1980s showed that most had planted it at the traditional time in mid-May, used few inputs and considered the main constraints of the crop to be low yield (2.8 to 3.8 t/ha and susceptibility to lodging. Three years of trials in Orkney between 2003 and 2005 showed very significant increases in grain yield (17-76% and thousand grain weight from planting Bere earlier, in the second half of April. This also had the advantage of an earlier and more secure harvest. Yields showed smaller, but often significant, increases (5-11% from applying mineral fertiliser, growth regulator or fungicide, while combinations of growth regulator and fungicide increased yields from 10- 22%. In spite of usually increasing grain yield, growth regulator did not always control lodging. Although the use of inputs often increased the gross margins of growing Bere, a trial in 2005 showed that early planting was a more cost effective single intervention than either the use of fungicide or growth regulator. By increasing grower profits and reducing harvesting risks, these results have made it viable for more farmers to grow Bere in its region of origin, providing growers and end-users with additional income and contributing to the in situ conservation of this landrace.

  8. Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Practices in Psychoeducational Reports for English Language Learners

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    Harris, Bryn; Sullivan, Amanda L.; Oades-Sese, Geraldine V.; Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Past researchers suggested there are a number of shortcomings in the psychoeducational evaluation process and practices used with English language learners (ELLs). In the present exploratory study, the authors descriptively examined the assessment practices used in the special education eligibility determination process for ELLs as documented in…

  9. Research-Based, Culturally Responsive Reading Practice in Elementary Classrooms: A Yearlong Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Ellen; Hulan, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    In the field of elementary reading instruction, educators from varying theoretical perspectives have strived to promote instructional practices that "work" with diverse populations of students, with differing conclusions. In the present study, we examined elementary teachers' attempts at blending reading practices reflecting two philosophical…

  10. School Leadership Practice and Preparation: Comparative Perspectives on Organizational Learning (OL), Instructional Leadership (IL) and Culturally Responsive Practices (CRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylimaki, Rose; Jacobson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to utilize successful leadership practices drawn from seven nations to improve leadership preparation. Design/methodology/approach: This study used a case study approach to gain a contextualized understanding of successful leadership across seven nations. Data sources primarily featured interviews with principals,…

  11. Responsive Teaching, Informal Learning and Cultural Tools in Year Nine Ensemble Practice: A Lost Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstedt, Cecilia; Pramling, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we investigate what problems adolescents in year-nine compulsory school face when trying to learn to play a song together, how they take on these, and how their teacher responds to these problems. The studied practice, where students are to form a band and learn to play a song together in music class, is an example of…

  12. Supporting the Persuasive Writing Practices of English Language Learners through Culturally Responsive Systemic Functional Linguistic Pedagogy

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    Schulze, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the potential of Systemic Functional Linguistic (SFL) pedagogy to support English language learners (ELLs) in enhancing their meaning making potential as they engage in persuasive writing practices within academic contexts. The dissertation results from a teacher action research project in which the…

  13. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Understanding Disability Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2013-01-01

    To be culturally responsive teachers, we must first have an understanding of other cultures and how students from these cultures differ from one another. As we consider the many cultures represented in our classrooms, we might also consider students with disabilities as a cultural group. Within any main culture are subgroups differentiated by…

  14. Aligning Responsible Business Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weller, Angeli E.

    2017-01-01

    This article offers an in-depth case study of a global high tech manufacturer that aligned its ethics and compliance, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability practices. Few large companies organize their responsible business practices this way, despite conceptual relevance and calls...... and managers interested in understanding how responsible business practices may be collectively organized....

  15. Cultural Practices, Oppression, and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, Elliot

    1998-01-01

    Argues that contested meanings, multiple judgments, and conflicts are part of cultures and the individual's thoughts and actions. Contends that people make moral judgments that may affirm or contradict cultural norms and practices, and sometimes invoke concepts of welfare, justice, and rights. Notes that some key aspects of Baumrind's neo-Marxist…

  16. Cultural Practices, Oppression, and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, Elliot

    1998-01-01

    Argues that contested meanings, multiple judgments, and conflicts are part of cultures and the individual's thoughts and actions. Contends that people make moral judgments that may affirm or contradict cultural norms and practices, and sometimes invoke concepts of welfare, justice, and rights. Notes that some key aspects of Baumrind's neo-Marxist…

  17. Games culture and media practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Alsina

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this article is to explore the relationship between videogames and other practices related to audiovisual media in everyday life; we are specifically interested in examining how far videogames, as a cultural form that combines audiovisual narrative with the fun of a game, may be useful in understanding broader cultural transformations in relation to cultural production in the new media context opened up by information and communication technologies.

  18. Theory and Practice of Positive Feminist Therapy: A Culturally Responsive Approach to Divorce Therapy with Chinese Women

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    Tzou, Jean Yuh-Jin; Kim, Eunha; Waldheim, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Positive Feminist Therapy (PFT) is a strength-based culturally responsive therapy model specifically designed for helping Chinese women facing marital conflicts and divorce, integrating Empowerment Feminist Therapy, systems theory, and positive psychology. To help clients become change agents, PFT uses clients' existing strengths to develop…

  19. Assessing and changing medical practice culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Your medical practice has an existing culture that manifests itself daily in literally hundreds of ways. Some aspects of your culture likely support your practice's growth; others may be impeding your progress. This article describes the characteristics of medical practice culture and provides numerous examples of how culture influences behavior. It describes how culture is expressed in a medical practice through objects and artifacts, language, emotions, interactions, practice management systems, and daily work habits. It offers three techniques for assessing an existing medical practice culture and a checklist for conducting culture observations. This article also provides guidelines for identifying a desired medical practice culture and explores why changing culture is so difficult. It describes five reasons employees are likely to resist culture change and provides 12 fundamental changes that will enable a practice to improve its culture. Finally, this article explores how medical practice cultures are formed and perpetuated and provides more than a dozen questions to ask employees in a culture survey.

  20. Educational responses to unethical healthcare practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Catherine; Leng, Jane; Gallagher, Ann

    The aim of this article is to explore explanations for unethical healthcare practice and identify educational responses. The meaning of unethical practice is outlined and causes of it are suggested, primarily relating to individual perpetrators and organisational culture or climate. Empirical and theoretical literature is reviewed and research findings are discussed. Individual resilience and the ethical climate of healthcare organisations are considered as responses to unethical practice. Role modelling is explored, acknowledging the role of effective leadership.

  1. Miscommunication and Discourse Practices in Occupational Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlyk, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the contrasting discourse practices and occupational cultures of engineers and marketing representatives. The article argues that strong occupational cultures have different value systems and discourse practices. The article stresses the need for an interdisciplinary approach combining linguistic and cultural analyses to reduce…

  2. Using Consultee-Centered Consultation with Teachers in a Contemporary School Setting to Inform Culturally Responsive Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Villarreal, Felicia; Rodriguez, Billie Jo

    2017-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) describes consultation as a practice that permeates all aspects of school psychological service delivery, and school consultation is increasingly recognized as a central and essential feature of practice in school-based problem-solving paradigms. This research examined teachers' experiences…

  3. Culturally-Sensitive Learning Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2010-01-01

    In today's global world, to provide meaningful education, teacher-librarians and their students need to become culturally competent: open to learning about other cultures and sharing one's own culture, able to change personal perspectives, and able to communicate effectively across cultures. Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions provides a…

  4. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  5. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  6. Dealing with Difference: Building Culturally Responsive Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Burridge

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia continues to develop as a multicultural society with levels of immigration increasing significantly over recent years as a result of government policies. More recently, the new period of financial turmoil, continuing threats from terrorism and environmental concerns, have all exacerbated the challenges of dealing with difference in our society. In response, schools continue to face the challenges of the impact of a range of different cultures, languages and religions among their student and school communities. How effectively schools deal with difference and how well they are supported in their endeavours to build culturally response classrooms is a perennial issue for both teachers and educators. A major challenge for teachers is to at a minimum, understand cultural differences as they manifest in their particular school settings and to draw on approaches that support student learning in culturally appropriate ways so to assist them to better realise their full potential. In this paper we will consider cultural diversity in the context of recent school policies, highlight a number of frameworks for addressing cultural diversity in the classroom, in particular the approaches by Kalantzis and Cope’s (1999 and Hickling-Hudson (2003. We also draw on the findings from a recent qualitative study of representations of cultural diversity in a number of Sydney metropolitan schools to discuss the need for more greater resource and policy support for progressive teaching approaches that support the development of a more tolerant and inclusive multicultural society. Key words: cultural diversity, schools, teacher education, classroom practice, social inclusion

  7. Culturally Responsive Physics Teaching: Content or Conveyance?

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    Stewart, Taquan Seth

    2011-12-01

    This study, in response to the achievement gap in science and the lack of significant numbers of ethnic minorities in science fields, examined the effects of a Cultural Responsiveness Workshop and intervention on teacher practice, teacher discourse, and student perceptions and connectedness to physics. The sample was comprised of three high school physics teachers---2 teaching five 12th grade sections and one teaching five 9th grade sections of physics---in two separate urban schools in the same section of South Los Angeles. My research design was qualitative and examined eight culturally responsive indicators that, when applied, may increase student engagement and level of connectedness in urban high school physics classrooms: (1) proximity to students, (2) the ways in which they encouraged students, (3) positive reinforcement techniques, (4) modifications for individual learning types, (5) use of children's strengths, (6) scaffolding, (7) displaying an understanding of diverse cultures, and (8) displaying a personal regard for students of diverse cultures. When the study was completed and data was collected, I identified trends in the change in teacher discourse, behaviors, instructional practice, and perceptions of student engagement. My findings, discovered through classroom observations and focus groups, indicated a positive shift in each. Accompanying these shifts were positive shifts in level of student engagement and level of connectedness. There were also the unexpected findings of the need for teachers to receive feedback in a safe collaborative space and the use of culturally responsive teaching as a tool for behavioral management. My study found that there is a definite relationship between the use of the culturally responsive indicators observed, student engagement and student level of connectedness to physics when implemented in urban high school science classrooms.

  8. Cultural reflexivity in health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason; Tach, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This "misrecognition," which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice.

  9. Best practices in cell culture: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baust, John M; Buehring, Gertrude Case; Campbell, Lia; Elmore, Eugene; Harbell, John W; Nims, Raymond W; Price, Paul; Reid, Yvonne A; Simione, Frank

    2017-08-14

    This overview describes a series of articles to provide an unmet need for information on best practices in animal cell culture. The target audience primarily consists of entry-level scientists with minimal experience in cell culture. It also include scientists, journalists, and educators with some experience in cell culture, but in need of a refresher in best practices. The articles will be published in this journal over a six-month period and will emphasize best practices in: (1) media selection; (2) use and evaluation of animal serum as a component of cell culture medium; (3) receipt of new cells into the laboratory; (4) naming cell lines; (5) authenticating cell line identity; (6) detecting and mitigating risk of cell culture contamination; (7) cryopreservation and thawing of cells; and (8) storing and shipping viable cells.

  10. Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice | Nkurunziza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice. ... In 2012, Human Resources for Health (HRH) Rwanda brought together international nursing ... providers in a globalized world and requires intellectual, attitudinal and behavioral flexibility.

  11. Review of: Legal practice and cultural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Niels Valdemar

    2010-01-01

    that arose after the speech by the Archbishop: whether or to what extent cultural difference should be recognized by legal systems. Legal practice and cultural diversity, edited by Ralph Grillo, Roger Ballard, Alessandro Ferrari, Andre´ J. Hoekema, Marcel Maussen, and Prakash Shah, Farnham, UK, Ashgate, 2009......This anthology comprises contributions from a conference on legal practice and cultural diversity held in London in July 2007, but the editors take their cue from the speech made in February 2008 by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams. The questions central to the book are the same...

  12. Cultural awareness in veterinary practice: student perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jennifer N; Volet, Simone; Fozdar, Farida

    2011-01-01

    Australian veterinary classrooms are increasingly diverse and their growing internal diversity is a result of migration and large numbers of international students. Graduates interact with other students and increasingly with clients whose attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors differ from their own. An understanding and respect for these differences has an impact on client communication and health care outcomes. The present study explored how students understand and are likely to deal with issues of cultural diversity in veterinary professional practice as well as the educational needs that students feel should be met in regard to preparation to engage productively with diversity in professional practice. The present study also explored the extent to which the rich diversity of the undergraduate student population constitutes an educational resource. A class of final-year veterinary students was invited to participate in a workshop exploring intercultural confidence in veterinary consultation. Twelve groups of six to eight students discussed a fictitious scenario involving a challenging clinical encounter with a client from a different culture. Students were reticent to see the scenario in terms of cultural difference, although they generally recognized that awareness of cultural issues in veterinary practice was important. They also tended to not see their own ethnicity as relevant to their practice. While some felt that veterinary practice should be culture blind, most recognized a need to orient to cultural difference and to respond sensitively. Their suggestions for curricular improvements to address these issues are also included.

  13. Muslim American adolescents' explanations of changing religious practices: Cultural tools in cultural contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Kathleen M; Schiro, Isabella N; Gregory, Wesley E; Westberg, Lindsay M; Lee, Samantha R; Boyle, Colleen D

    2017-03-01

    To examine the culturally embedded nature of religious practices, we conducted a mixed-methods study in which Muslim American adolescents described how and why their religious practices had changed in recent years (see Etengoff & Daiute, 2013, J. Adolesc. Res., 28, 690). Participants included 201 Muslim adolescents (ages 13-19) from predominantly immigrant families; all were contestants in a Muslim Inter-Scholastic Tournament regional competition. Participants completed surveys including an item regarding whether their religious practices had changed, and for those who answered affirmatively, open-ended questions about the change. Additional measures assessed ethnic identity and perceived discrimination. As hypothesized, the 60% of participants who reported a change in religious practices described this shift as a response to new contexts, people, and religious knowledge. Those who reported a change also reported higher levels of ethnic identity exploration and perceived discrimination. Overall, Muslim American adolescents' descriptions portrayed religious practices as developing through reciprocal interactions with culture. More generally, participants' descriptions point to the viability of a model in which religious practices change and in turn are changed by cultural contexts. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Religious development is viewed as taking place in relational systems with reciprocity between individuals and surrounding contexts. Variations in contexts predict variations in religious development, but mechanisms of development are not well understood. Muslim Americans, including adolescents, show high levels of religious involvement and experience unique cultural and religious contexts. Muslim American emerging adults describe their religious practices as responsive to sociocultural contexts. What does the study add? This study focuses on Muslim American adolescents, a group that has received little research attention

  14. Common culture practices for cyprinids in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, T

    1997-01-01

    Cyprinids are the largest group of cultured freshwater fish and thus the most important from the aspect of fish-borne parasitic zoonoses. The common practices employed in the culture of this group are described to provide background information which may be used in the formulation of strategies for the control of these zoonoses. Only the common carp is cultured in monoculture: all the rest of the carp species are usually cultured in polyculture systems incorporating several species. Polyculture of cyprinids may be carried out in ponds, cages or in free range culture in natural or man-made water bodies, Polyculture of cyprinids is often integrated with agriculture, such as livestock, poultry or crop farming, utilizing byproducts of the agriculture activity, especially manure, as a source of nutrient for the fish pond. If precautions are not taken, this practice may provide an avenue for the transmission of fish borne parasites to man.

  15. Becoming Culturally Responsive: A Framework for Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagle, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for the development of culturally responsive practices in beginning teachers to meet the needs of diverse students in multicultural classrooms. The framework describes the trajectory beginning teachers undergo toward becoming culturally responsive and discusses how teacher educators in liberal arts colleges can…

  16. Persuasive argumentation as a cultural practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Gałkowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article author traces relation between argumentation and cultural practice. The first part focuses on definition of argumentation in informal logic tradition. In particular, it discusses argument in terms of verbal and social activity involving the use of everyday language. Author claims that there is no argumentation beyond language. The second part explains persuasive argumentation as a form of cultural practice. The persuasive arguments found in “social practice” can be understood as a social activity, analysable within the context of a given cultural system. Author refers to an approach taking the argumentative expression as a certain type of communicative practice, directed towards respecting, recognising or accepting specific actions. The inclusion of persuasive argumentation in the “circuit of cultural activities” to be studied makes it possible to compare this type of argumentation with other social practices, and to posit a clear historical dimension in the study of argumentation. It also makes it possible to view persuasive argumentation as one of many cultural activities aimed at changing or perpetuating behaviours, attitudes, thinking, etc. The third part of the paper concerns the problem of humanistic interpretation of persuasive argumentation. Author attempts to develop this intuition, at the same time demonstrating the problems that arise from this approach. In conclusion, author tries to analyze argumentation in terms of culture theory and humanistic interpretation.

  17. Responsibility and autonomous nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R J

    1991-04-01

    In this paper, the consequences were there greater autonomy in nursing practice, are considered. Autonomous practice implies accountability which entails both personal and professional responsibility: a personal responsibility to endorse ethical conduct consistent with professional practice; and a professional responsibility to exercise discretionary powers to the ultimate benefit of the patient. In this context, discretionary responsibility implies: recognizing a patient's wants may not be consistent with a patient's needs; abstaining from collusion with noncompliant patients; supporting the patient's right to refuse treatment only after full psychological exploration; understanding the psychological ramifications of informed consent from a practitioner and recipient point of view; maintaining appropriate personal and professional boundaries; and fostering collegiate relationships with the medical fraternity grounded on egalitarian principles. The author provides a philosophical and psychological analysis of responsibility in an effort to achieve a deeper understanding of the relationship this has with the concepts of 'freedom' and 'accountability'.

  18. Incorporating organisational safety culture within ergonomics practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Tim; Tappin, David

    2010-10-01

    This paper conceptualises organisational safety culture and considers its relevance to ergonomics practice. Issues discussed in the paper include the modest contribution that ergonomists and ergonomics as a discipline have made to this burgeoning field of study and the significance of safety culture to a systems approach. The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics work with regard to the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process, and implications for participatory ergonomics approaches, are also discussed. A potential user-friendly, qualitative approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented, based on a recently published conceptual framework that recognises the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of safety culture. The paper concludes by considering the use of such an approach, where an understanding of different aspects of safety culture within an organisation is seen as important to the success of ergonomics projects. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics practice is a key focus of this paper, including its relationship with the systems approach, participatory ergonomics and the ergonomics analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process. An approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented.

  19. Organizing Construction Practices in Different Cultural Contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Rasmussen, Christian K. S.

    2013-01-01

    participating in the construction management on site working for three different contractors in different cultural contexts: (1) Construir Futuro S.A. in Quito, Ecuador; (2) Anker Hansen & co. A/S in Copenhagen, Denmark; and (3) E. Pihl & Soen A/S in Stockholm, Sweden. Based on these explorative case studies......This paper presents in-depth case studies of construction practices with a specific focus on understanding the emergent and dynamic nature of construction management in different cultural contexts. The cases are based on actual working-experiences by the author as an assistant project manager...... a number of characteristics and challenges related to the cultural context have been identified highlighting a central issue in existing and future construction practices due to the globalization and thereby increasing importance of cultural understanding in project-based organizing. The empirical findings...

  20. Defining culturally responsive teaching: The case of mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni L. Harding-DeKam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Elementary classroom teachers in eight school districts across Colorado, United States, share the knowledge of their students’ home and community life, define culturally responsive mathematics based on the children they instruct, and give examples of how students learn math through culture in their classrooms. Findings from two interviews, classroom observations, and student artifacts reveal that teachers have an intimate cultural knowledge of the students in their classrooms, define culturally responsive mathematical practices consistent with research, use culturally responsive mathematics teaching for authentic learning, and express a need for additional professional development and curriculum support for culturally responsive mathematics instruction. Culturally responsive mathematics is important in elementary classrooms because it allows students to make personal connections to mathematics content.

  1. Exploring cultural tensions in cross-cultural social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Miu Chung

    2008-10-01

    Discussion of cultural tension in the social work literature is piecemeal. As part of a grounded theory study, this article reports some major findings on cultural tensions experienced by 30 frontline social workers. Cultural tensions caused by cultural similarities and differences among social workers, clients, organizations, and society are multifaceted. Social workers, however, are always at the center of the tensions. Findings indicate that the social work profession may need to consider the neutrality claim of the profession, the different experience of ethnic minority social workers, and the need of critical reflexivity for reflective practitioners. Implications for social work practice, social work education for ethnic minority social workers, and social work research are discussed.

  2. Pond Fish Culture Practices in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Akankali

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pond fish culture practices in Nigeria was reviewed to refresh the minds of fish and other interested stake holders on some basic principles involved in pond fish culture. Fish pond system is the commonest agricultural techniques in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. Profit making, job creation, provision of raw materials for several industries and increase in foreign exchange earnings are some benefits. However, loss of land and introduction some water borne diseases are some disadvantages in pond fish culture. This articles reviews the fish pond management processes, stocking of ponds, feeding of fish, types of culture, fish farming combined with other branches of agriculture, rearing of fish for purposes other than food, other fish culture, types of fish used for fish culture in central east Africa, general biology of the species of value in fish culture and suitable combinations of fish for stocking to reawaken the minds of individuals, companies and government on the need to develop pond fish culture in Nigeria.

  3. A Validation Study of the Culturally Responsive Teaching Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2017-01-01

    Amidst the ethnic and linguistic diversity in adult English language classes, there is heightened importance to using culturally responsive teaching practices. However, there are limited quantitative examinations of this approach in adult learning environments. The purpose of this investigation was to describe patterns of culturally responsive…

  4. Dimensions of patient safety culture in family practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; O'Beirne, Maeve; Sterling, Pam; Zwicker, Karen; Harding, Brianne K; Casebeer, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Safety culture has been shown to affect patient safety in healthcare. While the United States and United Kingdom have studied the dimensions that reflect patient safety culture in family practice settings, to date, this has not been done in Canada. Differences in the healthcare systems between these countries and Canada may affect the dimensions found to be relevant here. Thus, it is important to identify and compare the dimensions from the United States and the United Kingdom in a Canadian context. The objectives of this study were to explore the dimensions of patient safety culture that relate to family practice in Canada and to determine if differences and similarities exist between dimensions found in Canada and those found in previous studies undertaken in the United States and the United Kingdom. A qualitative study was undertaken applying thematic analysis using focus groups with family practice offices and supplementary key stakeholders. Analysis of the data indicated that most of the dimensions from the United States and United Kingdom are appropriate in our Canadian context. Exceptions included owner/managing partner/leadership support for patient safety, job satisfaction and overall perceptions of patient safety and quality. Two unique dimensions were identified in the Canadian context: disclosure and accepting responsibility for errors. Based on this early work, it is important to consider differences in care settings when understanding dimensions of patient safety culture. We suggest that additional research in family practice settings is critical to further understand the influence of context on patient safety culture.

  5. Harvest managements and cultural practices in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Gustavo Quassi de Castro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of trash from the mechanical harvest of green cane on sugarcane plantations promotes changes in the agricultural management, for example, in the mechanical cultural practices of ratoon cane in-between the rows and nitrogen (N fertilization. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of sugarcane in different harvest systems, associated to the mechanical cultural practices in interrows and N rates. The study was carried out on a sugarcane plantation in Sales Oliveira, São Paulo, Brazil, with the sugarcane variety SP81-3250, on soil classified as Acrudox, in a randomized block design with split-split plots and four replications. The main treatments consisted of harvest systems (harvesting green cane or burnt cane, the secondary treatment consisted of the mechanical cultural practices in the interrows and the tertiary treatments were N rates (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 160 kg ha-1, using ammonium nitrate (33 % N as N source. The harvest systems did not differ in sugarcane yield (tons of cane per hectare - TCH, but in burnt cane, the pol percent and total sugar recovery (TSR were higher. This could be explained by the higher quantity of plant impurities in the harvested raw material in the system without burning, which reduces the processing quality. Mechanical cultural practices in the interrows after harvest had no effect on cane yield and sugar quality, indicating that this operation can be omitted in areas with mechanical harvesting. The application of N fertilizer at rates of 88 and 144 kg ha-1 N, respectively, increased stalk height and TCH quadratically to the highest values for these variables. For the sugar yield per hectare (in pol %, N fertilization induced a linear increase.

  6. Dermatoses Due to Indian Cultural Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Divya Gupta; Devinder Mohan Thappa

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ′Henna′ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ′Kumkum′ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ′bindis′ and ′alta′ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing ...

  7. GENDER GENEALOGY OF READING AS CULTURAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Kryvda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to the cultural aspect of texts using in European culture. The paper found out methodological basis of correctly interpreting the term "practice" in the philosophical and sociological discourses. In the first case the concept reveals human nature; appealing to the field of ethics and intersubjective interactions. In sociological approach the term practice is contrasted to institutional life. It seems to be an organic; vital relevance of actions for contrast to the mechanically regulated community life. Methodology. The paper considered the typology of human intellectual conditions according to Kant’s divided into pure and practical reason. The last one directs action-willed individual efforts so as to meet the universal relevance and ethical coherence. Gottlieb Fichte interpreted practice reason as the way to combine intellectual intentions and material conditions of human being. G. W. F. Hegel enriched the concept with terms of "objectification" and "alienation” of labour. Karl Marx formulated the main features of activity approach to the human nature exploring. In sociological discourse the term practice is opposed to mechanically done actions (according to institutional normativity. Given the philosophical and sociological methodological contexts the reading is studied as activity that aimed emotional and volitional contact with sense. Originality. The paper analysed the genealogy of reading practices. There were selected two types of text perception – rapid "masculine" and prudent "women's" reading. Women salon environment of the XVIII-th century capitalistic Europe was the main condition for the forming of literary-aware public. The authors analysed the process of reading of the text-as-satisfaction and text-as-pleasure (R. Barthes. The work presents the overview of classical studies of sociocultural field: Thorstein Veblen; Vladimir Toporov; Rolan Barthes and contemporary researchers such as T. Markova

  8. Good cell culture practices &in vitro toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Chantra; Boström, Ann-Charlotte; Bowe, Gerhard; Coecke, Sandra; Hartung, Thomas; Hendriks, Giel; Pamies, David; Piton, Alain; Rovida, Costanza

    2017-04-25

    Good Cell Culture Practices (GCCP) is of high relevance to in vitro toxicology. The European Society of Toxicology In Vitro (ESTIV), the Center for Alternatives for Animal Testing (CAAT) and the In Vitro Toxicology Industrial Platform (IVTIP) joined forces to address by means of an ESTIV 2016 pre-congress session the different aspects and applications of GCCP. The covered aspects comprised the current status of the OECD guidance document on Good In Vitro Method Practices, the importance of quality assurance for new technological advances in in vitro toxicology including stem cells, and the optimized implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Laboratory Practices for regulatory testing purposes. General discussions raised the duality related to the difficulties in implementing GCCP in an academic innovative research framework on one hand, and on the other hand, the need for such GCCP principles in order to ensure reproducibility and robustness of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing. Indeed, if good cell culture principles are critical to take into consideration for all uses of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing, the level of application of such principles may depend on the stage of development of the test method as well as on the applications of the test methods, i.e., academic innovative research vs. regulatory standardized test method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. "Child Divorce": A Break from Parental Responsibilities and Rights Due to the Traditional Socio-Cultural Practices and Beliefs of the Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bekink

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In a recent ground-breaking case the South African courts were for the first time requested to use their discretion to interfere in the parent-child relationship due to the traditional socio-cultural beliefs of the parents. In what has been described as "every parent's nightmare; the fancy of many teenagers", a 16 year-old schoolgirl from Milerton in the Western Cape asked to be "freed" from her parents to live semi-independently from them because of her unhappiness with the conservative manner in which her parents treated her. After considering the matter the judge assigned to the case granted her request to live semi-independently with a school friend and her family (called by the judge the host family until she reaches the age of 18 (her majority. Her parents were accorded permission to have limited contact with her. This case represents an example of the difficulties involved when balancing the rights of a teenager against those of the parents in matters of socio-cultural practice and belief. In a multi-cultural society such as South Africa the case raises numerous serious questions for other families. For instance, what standards will a court use to determine if parents are too conservative in bringing up their children and what factors will be taken into account? How much freedom and autonomy should children be given? How will courts prevent children from misusing the system just to get what their friends have, and - the ultimate question - are the rights of children superior to the traditional rights of parents in matters of socio-cultural practice, with specific reference to their upbringing? In this context it is the aim of this contribution to focus primarily on the questions asked above. Possible solutions for striking a balance between the rights of children and their parents are explored. The submission is made that the best interests principle is still the most important factor to be taken into account when balancing or weighing

  10. Designing for culturally responsive science education through professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie C.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2016-02-01

    Educational stakeholders across the globe are demanding science education reform that attends simultaneously to culturally diverse students' needs and promotes academic excellence. Although professional development programs can foster science teachers' growth as culturally responsive educators, effective supports to this end are not well identified. This study examined associations between specific Science Teachers are Responsive to Students (STARTS) program activities and United States high school life science teachers' understanding and enactment of culturally responsive science teaching. Findings suggest: (a) critically examining their practices while learning of students' needs and experiences enabled teachers to identify responsive instructional strategies and relevant science topics for culturally responsive teaching; (b) evaluating culturally responsive exemplars while identifying classroom-based needs allowed teachers to identify contextually appropriate instruction, thereby yielding a robust understanding of the purpose and feasibility of culturally responsive science teaching; and (c) by justifying the use of responsive and reform-based instructional strategies for their classrooms, teachers made purposeful connections between students' experiences and science instruction. We propose a set of empirically based design conjectures and theoretical conjectures to generate adaptable knowledge about preparing culturally responsive science teachers through professional development.

  11. My Name Is Not Michael: Strategies for Promoting Cultural Responsiveness in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Lisa L.; Hurt, Kara; Lindo, Natalya

    2014-01-01

    With the changing cultural demographics in U.S. classrooms, school counselors must develop innovative approaches to promote culturally responsive school climates and organizational change. A vision is offered of systemic cultural responsiveness and culturally relevant teaching practices that nurture and engage all learners. The role of the school…

  12. Dermatoses due to Indian cultural practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. 'Henna' use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. 'Kumkum' application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker 'bindis' and 'alta' induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with 'Holi' colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. 'Mudichood' represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device "kangri" is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause.

  13. Dermatoses Due to Indian Cultural Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ‘Henna’ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ‘Kumkum’ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ‘bindis’ and ‘alta’ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with ‘Holi’ colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. ‘Mudichood’ represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device “kangri” is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause. PMID:25657390

  14. Dermatoses due to indian cultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ′Henna′ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ′Kumkum′ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ′bindis′ and ′alta′ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with ′Holi′ colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. ′Mudichood′ represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device "kangri" is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause.

  15. Greek Immigrants in Australia: Implications for Culturally Sensitive Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Savvas Daniel

    2015-10-01

    This exploratory research examined adjustment challenges, resiliencies, attitudes, emotional health, economic stability, criminal involvement, victimization and service experiences, and some cultural propensities of Greek Immigrants (GIs) in Australia using a convenient multi-generational sample (n = 123; response rate = .5). Data were collected via surveys, telephone, and personal-interviews in four major Australian cities. Among other things, the study revealed that Greek identity and cultural customs are often significant to first generation GIs. Adjustment challenges upon entry include primarily language, housing, and transportation difficulties, nostalgia for relatives and the motherland, unfamiliarity with socio-cultural systems, unemployment, money challenges, and lack of friendships. Christian faith, the extended family, family values and traditions, cultural pride for ancient Greek achievements, and a hard 'work ethic' are notable resiliencies that support GIs in their struggles and solidify their pursuit for happiness and success. Financial concerns, aging, and nostalgia for relatives and the motherland were the primary causes of socio-emotional instability. Attitudinal differences in the respondents based on age, gender, and socio-economic status, cross-cultural comparisons, and recommendations for culturally-sensitive practice with GIs are analyzed and methodological limitations illuminated. Future research needs in the field are also highlighted.

  16. The psychiatric cultural formulation: translating medical anthropology into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews proposed revisions to the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation for clinical practice. The author begins by exploring the theoretical development of and assumptions involved in the Cultural Formulation. A case presentation is then used to demonstrate shortcomings in the current implementation of the Cultural Formulation based on older definitions of culture. Finally, the author recommends practical questions based on the growing anthropological literature concerning the interpersonal elements of culture and the social course of illness. A simple clear format that clinically translates social science concepts has the potential to increase use of the Cultural Formulation by all psychiatrists, not just those specializing in cultural psychiatry.

  17. Culturally Responsive Evaluation Meets Systems-Oriented Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Veronica G.; Parsons, Beverly A.

    2017-01-01

    The authors of this article each bring a different theoretical background to their evaluation practice. The first author has a background of attention to culturally responsive evaluation (CRE), while the second author has a background of attention to systems theories and their application to evaluation. Both have had their own evolution of…

  18. Culturally and linguistically responsive teaching: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Diane M

    2015-02-01

    As increasing numbers of culturally and linguistically diverse learners are enrolled in nursing programs and employed in nursing service agencies, nurse educators must be aware of their own culture and how it influences their teaching and understand the learning needs of a diverse group of learners. This article offers strategies for nurse educators for being culturally and linguistically responsive while also establishing an inclusive learning environment.

  19. Assisting Preservice Teachers toward Becoming Culturally Responsive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starker, Tehia V.; Fitchett, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, researchers inquired about preservice teachers' (PST) experience in becoming culturally responsive in a graduate teacher-licensure social studies methods class (N = 20). Researchers examined PST lesson plans and reflections, and rated them based on Geneva Gay's (2002) framework for preparing culturally responsive…

  20. Towards a Culturally Situated Reader Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wanda; Browne, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a theory of how culture enables literary interpretations of texts. We begin with a brief overview of the reader response field. From there, we introduce the theory and provide illustrative participant data examples. These data examples illustrate the four cultural positions middle grade students in our research assumed when…

  1. Culture and Crisis Response in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Dean, Shelley; Henry, Geoff; McGhie, Desiree; Phillipson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    New Zealand is a bicultural nation, founded on the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi by the native Maori and the British Crown. It is also home to people from many countries, cultures and ethnicities. Therefore, culturally-relevant response to crisis events has become a significant aspect of the Ministry of Education's interdisciplinary Traumatic…

  2. Research Report: A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Practical Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Jane R.

    1987-01-01

    Questions the extent to which practical intelligence can be measured in a reliable and valid fashion cross-culturally. Differentiates between the internal validity of our measure of practical intelligence and its external validity. (LHW)

  3. Method and Practice of Cultural Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang; Hui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,translation theorists begin to take translation as an activity of cultural exchange,that is,it is not only a linguistic transformation,but essentially a cultural communication.Language and culture are interactive.Language,as the carrier of the culture,can break through the limitation of time and space and carry all the aspects of the culture information.As a main means of cross-cultural communication,translation is connected with the culture tightly.However,in cross-cultural translation,especially between those cultures with great difference like Chinese and English,many cultural elements surface from the confrontation of cultural deposits,making it impossible to capture the relationship of the source text to the source culture in the target text.Thus,problems in translating cultural elements arise.Different approaches shall be adopted to solve this culture barrier.They are omission,transliteration,alienation and domestication.Using what kind of solutions is determined by many complicated factors.Under the circumstance of cultural globalization,these solutions are supposed to complement each other.Thus the translation action can become more scientific.

  4. Method and Practice of Cultural Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,translation theorists begin to take translation as an activity of cultural exchange,that is,it is not only a linguistic transformation,but essentially a cultural communication.Language and culture are interactive.Language,as the carrier of the culture,can break through the limitation of time and space and carry all the aspects of the culture information. As a main meansof cross-cultural communication,translation is connected with the culture tightly.However,in cross-cultural translation,especially between those cultures with great difference like Chinese and English,many cultural elements surface from the confrontation of cultural deposits,making it impossible to capture the relationship of the source text to the source culture in the target text.Thus,problems in translating cultural elements arise. Different approaches shall be adopted to solve this culture barrier. They are omission,transliteration,alienation and domestication. Using what kind of solutions is determined by many complicated factors.Under the circumstance of cultural globalization,these solutions are supposed to complement each other.Thus the translation action can become more scientific.

  5. DIAGNOSING THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žana Prutina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary business environment places demands on companies to go beyond economic survival and self-interest and satisfy the needs of various stakeholders. Organizations embark on the path of responsibility and sustainability, but many argue that CSR becomes embedded in an organization when it permeates all aspects of organization, including the organizational culture. Existing organizational culture typologies only provide the framework for analysis within the traditional business paradigm, but they are of limited use in the context of corporate social responsibility. After the analysis of major scholarship in the field, this paper defines CSR culture and identifies four types of organizational cultures based on companies’ CSR orientations, namely CSR-related values and strategy. In order to fully embed CSR culture, CSR has to be both strategic and value driven. This paper explores different CSR orientations and makes recommendations needed in order to achieve the desired state. Furthermore, through exploratory factor analysis, it identifies two cultural elements, CSR values and employee engagement in CSR, which indicate the existence of CSR culture. Identification of these cultural elements is intended to help in analyzing the direct and indirect effect of CSR culture on organizational outcomes, especially employee attitudinal and behavioral outcomes.

  6. Impact on quality culture of total quality management practices factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faihan Mosaad Saud Alotaibi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated total quality management practices and quality culture of Saudi Arabian contractors. Improving the quality can be achieved through implementation of total quality management although studies and researches work regarding this improvement is still lacking. A quantitative approach using the survey method was employed. With assistance from the Saudi Arabia Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs, survey questionnaires were distributed to selected contractors in Saudi Arabia. The collected data were analysed using correlation, and multiple regression analyses. The key findings were the confirmation of significant relationships between all total quality management practices and quality culture and a positive relationship between quality management practices and quality culture. Furthermore, total quality management practices were found to be able to explain 68.1% of the variance in quality culture, while quality culture explained 12.5% of the variance in competitiveness. Quality culture was found to only partially mediate the relationship between total quality management practices and competitiveness.

  7. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  8. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  9. Gender in identification practices of mass culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Sinkevych

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of the images of masculinity and femininity in popular culture depends on shared cultural paradigm. However, these images not only reflect, but also construct social and cultural reality. Gender representation in popular culture activates the process of selecting, structuring and formation of values of a stereotype, its communicative refinement, giving it new meaning. It promotes innovative images, which play the role of landmarks gender identity.

  10. Cultural Connections in Leadership Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donmoyer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    "Culture Currents" presents the books, essays, poetry, performances, music, websites and other cultural media influencing educational leaders. "Culture Currents" is a snapshot, a peek behind the scenes. It reveals what people are reading or seeing that may not be normally mentioned or cited in their academic work. In this issue's contribution, two…

  11. Cultural safety and its importance for Australian midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiri, Jasten; Dietsch, Elaine; Bonner, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Cultural safety is an important concept in health care that originated in Aotearoa (New Zealand) to address Maori consumer dissatisfaction with health care. In Australia and internationally, midwives are now expected to provide culturally safe midwifery care to all women. Historically, Australia has received large numbers of immigrants from the United Kingdom, European countries and the Middle East. There have also been refugees and immigrants from South-East Asia, and most recently, from Africa. Australia continues to become more culturally diverse and yet to date no studies have explored the application of cultural safety in Australian midwifery practice. This paper explores how cultural safety has evolved from cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity. It examines the importance of cultural safety in nursing and midwifery practice. Finally, it explores the literature to determine how midwives can apply the concept of cultural safety to ensure safe and woman centred care.

  12. "Child Divorce": A Break from Parental Responsibilities and Rights Due to the Traditional Socio-Cultural Practices and Beliefs of the Parents

    OpenAIRE

    M Bekink

    2012-01-01

    In a recent ground-breaking case the South African courts were for the first time requested to use their discretion to interfere in the parent-child relationship due to the traditional socio-cultural beliefs of the parents. In what has been described as "every parent's nightmare; the fancy of many teenagers", a 16 year-old schoolgirl from Milerton in the Western Cape asked to be "freed" from her parents to live semi-independently from them because of her unhappiness with the conservative mann...

  13. Environmental social responsible practices of hospitality industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental social responsible practices of hospitality industry: The case of first level hotels and lodges in Gondar city, Ethiopia. ... positive and negative impact of tourism and hospitality industry, taking responsibility towards ... Article Metrics.

  14. Soil residual nitrogen under various crop rotations and cultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop rotation and cultural practice may influence soil residual N available for environmental loss due to crop N uptake and N immobilization. We evaluated the effects of stacked vs. alternate-year crop rotations and cultural practices on soil residual N (NH4-N and NO3-N contents) at the 0-125 cm dep...

  15. Managerial capacity and adoption of culturally competent practices in outpatient substance abuse treatment organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G

    2010-12-01

    The field of cultural competence is shifting its primary emphasis from enhancement of counselors' skills to management, organizational policy, and processes of care. This study examined managers' characteristics associated with adoption of culturally competent practices in the nation's outpatient substance abuse treatment field. Findings indicate that in 1995, supervisors' cultural sensitivity played the most significant role in adopting practices, such as matching counselors and clients based on race and offering bilingual services. Staff's exposure to cross-cultural training increased from 1995 to 2005. In this period, positive associations were found between managers' cultural sensitivity and connection with the community and staff receiving cross-cultural training and the number of training hours completed. However, exposure to and investment in this training were negatively correlated with managers' formal education. Health administration policy should consider the extent to which the decision makers' education, community involvement, and cultural sensitivity contribute to building culturally responsive systems of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancing Reflective Practice in Multicultural Counseling through Cultural Auditing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra; Arthur, Nancy; Wong-Wylie, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Counselors work in an increasingly complex cultural milieu where every encounter with a client must be considered multicultural in nature. Reflective practice is a central component of professional competence and necessarily involves attention to culture. The cultural auditing model provides an effective and flexible reflective process for…

  17. Culture moderates children's responses to ostracism situations

    OpenAIRE

    Over, Harriet; Uskul, Ayse K.

    2016-01-01

    Across a series of studies, we investigate cultural differences in children’s responses to ostracism situations. Working with the children of farmers and herders, we focus on how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 1a showed that that 3- to 8-year-old children from a socially interdependent farming community estimated ostracism to be less painful than did children from an independent herding community. Study 1b showed that this cultural difference was specific to social pain and ...

  18. Culture moderates children's responses to ostracism situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Harriet; Uskul, Ayse K

    2016-05-01

    Across a series of studies, we investigated cultural differences in children's responses to ostracism situations. Working with the children of farmers and herders, we focused on how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 1a showed that 4- to 8-year-old children from a socially interdependent farming community estimated ostracism to be less painful than did children from an independent herding community. Study 1b showed that this cultural difference was specific to social pain and did not apply to physical pain. Study 2 replicated the results of Study 1a and showed that individual differences in parents' level of social interdependence mediated the relationship between cultural group and how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 3 replicated this effect again and showed that children's tendency to recommend seeking social support following ostracism mediated the relationship between cultural group and the perceived pain of being excluded. Finally, Study 4 investigated cultural differences in moral responses to ostracism and showed that children from the farming community punished an individual who ostracized someone else less harshly than did children from the independent herding community. Thus different economic cultures are associated with striking differences in social interdependence and responses to ostracism from early in development. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Machinima Filmmaking as Culture in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    The topic of game and player culture is addressed herein as individual and socio-cultural processes of authorship in relation to machinima filmmaking. The terms machinima (from machine, cinema and anime) and machinimators (referring to filmmakers) were coined by gamers in the late 1990s. Machinima...

  20. Teaching French Culture. Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Ross; Suozzo, Andrew

    In today's global village, the choice of languages and cultures offered to the high school and college student in constantly increasing. Several reasons are offered for choosing the more traditional option of French/Francophone culture: internationalism, political contributions, intellectual achievements, France's role in Europe and in technology,…

  1. Practical Life: The Keystone of Life, Culture, and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Uma

    2013-01-01

    Uma Ramani's characterization of practical life is philosophical and anthropological, suggesting that "human history is the story of the evolution of our practical life activities." Practical life is a collaborative activity that creates community and culture. One's adaptation to life through the daily work of ordering our environment…

  2. The Challenge of Cultural Competency in the Multicultural 21st Century: A Conceptual Model to Guide Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesam Darawsheh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available bstract Background: Occupational therapists increasingly encounter clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and need to meet their professional obligation of delivering culturally competent practice. Yet the process of cultural competency is poorly understood in occupational therapy practice. There is a need for a clear understanding of the meaning and process of cultural competency as it is enacted in practice with a wide range of individuals from culturally diverse backgrounds. Aim: To investigate the process, stages, characteristics, and requirements of cultural competency as practiced by experienced occupational therapists. Method: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 13 community occupational therapists experienced in delivering occupational therapy services in clients’ homes in a culturally diverse area in London, England. Findings: Interview data were analyzed and ordered into the format of a conceptual process model where cultural competency formed the core concept. The model of cultural competency that emerged from this study comprised six stages: cultural awareness, cultural preparedness, a cultural picture of the person, cultural responsiveness, cultural readiness, and cultural competence. Conclusion: Cultural competency is a complex process that needs to be based on underpinning occupational theory and actualized at the level of practice. Further research is needed to test out the model and illuminate the process of cultural competency in different areas of occupational therapy practice.

  3. Preparing Science Teachers for Culturally Diverse Students: Developing Cultural Literacy Through Cultural Immersion, Cultural Translators and Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Pauline W. U.

    2006-09-01

    This three year study of P-12 professional development is grounded in sociocultural theories that hold that building knowledge and relationships among individuals from different cultural backgrounds entails joint activity toward common goals and cultural dialogues mediated by cultural translators. Sixty P-12 pre and in-service teachers in a year long interdisciplinary science curriculum course shared the goal of developing culturally relevant, standards-based science curricula for Native Hawai'ian students. Teachers and Native Hawai'ian instructors lived and worked together during a five day culture-science immersion in rural school and community sites and met several times at school, university, and community sites to build knowledge and share programs. Teachers were deeply moved by immersion experiences, learned to connect cultural understandings, e.g., a Hawai'ian sense of place and curriculum development, and highly valued collaborating with peers on curriculum development and implementation. The study finds that long term professional development providing situated learning through cultural immersion, cultural translators, and interdisciplinary instruction supports the establishment of communities of practice in which participants develop the cross-cultural knowledge and literacy needed for the development of locally relevant, place and standards-based curricula and pedagogy.

  4. Living the border: Social and cultural practices from the sidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Winikor Wagner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Migrants, while in a position of subordination and vulnerability in the host society, can be defined as subjects of analysis of cultural studies. It is from this theoretical framework, which will investigate the social and cultural practices of Brazilian migrants settled in the northeast of the province of Misiones, Argentina. We focus our attention on analyzing whether these practices are truly ways to resist the dominant culture or simply constitute forms of reproduction and naturalization of them. Through four concrete practices (portuñol, el brique, the buying and selling of improvements and spontaneous occupation of private land will reach the conclusion that the same evidence loans, grants, amalgams, conflicts, subordination and yet interstices creativity with the dominant culture. It shows the relational character that owns the popular culture with the dominant culture and its position of subordination and domination.

  5. Toward a More Culturally Responsive General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to characterize culturally responsive teaching; consider how it differs from other pedagogical approaches in music education informed by culture, such as multicultural music education; and offer ideas for making the general music classroom more culturally responsive.

  6. Toward a More Culturally Responsive General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to characterize culturally responsive teaching; consider how it differs from other pedagogical approaches in music education informed by culture, such as multicultural music education; and offer ideas for making the general music classroom more culturally responsive.

  7. Schools and Marketization: Cultural Challenges and Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foskett, Nicholas H.

    1998-01-01

    Develops an analytical methodology for service organizations by examining four key cultural and managerial developments: understandings of markets and marketing held within the school; organizational responses to the market; use of analytical tools; and development of appropriate marketing strategies. Shows variations in schools' development of a…

  8. Culturally Responsive Computing: A Theory Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kimberly A.; Sheridan, Kimberly M.; Clark, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Despite multiple efforts and considerable funding, historically marginalized groups (e.g., racial minorities and women) continue not to enter or persist in the most lucrative of fields--technology. Understanding the potency of culturally responsive teaching (CRT), some technology-enrichment programs modified CRP principles to establish a…

  9. Responsibility practices and unmanned military technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorman, Merel

    2014-09-01

    The prospect of increasingly autonomous military robots has raised concerns about the obfuscation of human responsibility. This papers argues that whether or not and to what extent human actors are and will be considered to be responsible for the behavior of robotic systems is and will be the outcome of ongoing negotiations between the various human actors involved. These negotiations are about what technologies should do and mean, but they are also about how responsibility should be interpreted and how it can be best assigned or ascribed. The notion of responsibility practices, as the paper shows, provides a conceptual tool to examine these negotiations as well as the interplay between technological development and the ascription of responsibility. To illustrate the dynamics of responsibility practices the paper explores how the introduction of unmanned aerial vehicles has led to (re)negotiations about responsibility practices, focusing particularly on negotiations within the US Armed Forces.

  10. Perceptions of Norwegian physiotherapy students: cultural diversity in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougner, Marit; Horntvedt, And Tone

    2012-01-01

    At the Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College there is a growing recognition of the need for cultural competency training among students at the bachelor programmes. At the Mensendieck-physiotherapy bachelor programme the students are engaged in leading physical activity groups for Muslim women. This qualitative study describes ethnically Norwegian students experiencing cultural diversity in practice. Twenty-two female physiotherapy students participated in the interviews; 6 students were interviewed individually by telephone, and 16 students were interviewed in person in 8 pairs. The students' framework for dealing with diversity is based on preconceived notions about Muslim women and is reflected in two particular ways. One is how the values and norms of Norwegian "ideology of sameness" are pursued by the students. The other is how the students constructed images of the women as "the others." The interview responses indicate difficulties in uniting the reality of diversity and the "need" for integration. The curriculum requires additional attention on cultural competency for health care professionals in a multicultural society.

  11. Cultural Competence in Child Psychiatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Michael S.; Henderson, Schuyler W.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. faces a changing demographic landscape that is increasingly multiracial. The application of a cultural competence model for assessing and treating the psychiatric disorders of minority youths in light of this demographic change is discussed.

  12. Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings: Initial Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Beth; Kear, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety culture has been studied in many practice settings, but there is a dearth of information on the culture of safety in nephrology nurse practice settings. This research study employed the use of an online survey to assess patient safety cultures in nephrology nurse practice settings. The survey was created using items from two Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) survey assessment tools--the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Select items from these tools were combined to address the safety of care delivered in hospital and outpatient nephrology nurse practice settings. Almost 1,000 nephrology nurses responded to the survey. Analysis of results and comparison with AHRQ comparative data found high ratings for teamwork, but indicted a continued needfor additional education and attention related to hand hygiene, medication administration safety, communication, and prioritization in nephrology practice settings. Nurses in all nephrology nurse practice settings need to routinely assess and positively contribute to the culture of patient safety in their practice settings, and lead and engage in efforts to ensure that patients are safe.

  13. Pharmacy students' perceptions of cultural competence encounters during practice experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Loren-Ashley; Vellurattil, Rosalyn Padiyara; Quiñones-Boex, Ana

    2014-03-12

    To determine pharmacy students' perceptions regarding cultural competence training, cross-cultural experiences during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), and perceived comfort levels with various cultural encounters. Fourth-year pharmacy (P4) students were asked to complete a questionnaire at the end of their fourth APPE. Fifty-two of 124 respondents (31.9%) reported having 1 or more cultural competence events during their APPEs, the most common of which was caring for a patient with limited English proficiency. Students reported high levels of comfort with specific types of cultural encounters (disabilities, sexuality, financial barriers, mental health), but reported to be less comfortable in other situations.

  14. Ethnic and Urban Intersections in the Classroom: Latino Students, Hybrid Identities, and Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Jason G.

    2007-01-01

    Drawing from data collected through classroom observations and in-depth interviews, this article describes and analyzes practices identified as culturally responsive by Latinos students in an urban, multiethnic/racial context. The findings suggest that culturally responsive pedagogy must be more broadly conceptualized to address the cultural…

  15. Student Culture and Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Tilia

    2012-01-01

    Constructivism maintains that instruction is more meaningful when it is relevant, social and interactive. Formative assessment has been empirically demonstrated as being an effective form of instruction and assessment for learners (Black & Wiliam, 1998a, 1998b). Since assessment orients instruction and learning, combining student culture with…

  16. Teaching Culture: Questioning Perspectives on Our Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Met, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Despite years of training, teaching experience, reading professional literature, attending conferences, and learning from expert colleagues, when it comes to the teaching of culture, the author wishes she knew more answers to many critical questions. Her questions are framed by the basic questions that all curricula seek to answer: WHAT is the…

  17. Critical Thinking as Cultural-Historical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panofsky, Carolyn P.

    1999-01-01

    Explores critical thinking as it has been constructed in schooling and in dominant traditions of psychological theory, presenting a dialectical view of critical thinking suggested in the social and philosophical writings of critical theorists (e.g., Theodor Adorno and Herbert Marcuse) and supported by the sociohistorical or cultural-historical…

  18. Perspectives of Early Intervention Professionals about Culturally-Appropriate Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Bennett, Tess; Fowler, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 123 early intervention professionals found they considered recommendations for providing culturally appropriate services important. However, multiple barriers often hindered implementation. Lack of time was the most common barrier to providing culturally appropriate practices, followed by lack of training and lack of materials.…

  19. School Culture: Teachers' Beliefs, Behaviors, and Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongboontri, Chantarath; Keawkhong, Natheeporn

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods research project documents the school culture of Hope University's Language Institute and reveals the reciprocal relationship between the school culture and the instructional practices of the English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers in this particular institute. Altogether, 62 EFL teachers agreed to complete a questionnaire.…

  20. Organizational Training across Cultures: Variations in Practices and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassi, Abderrahman; Storti, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a synthesis based on a review of the existing literature with respect to the variations in training practices and attitudes across national cultures. Design/methodology/approach: A content analysis technique was adopted with a comparative cross-cultural management perspective as a backdrop to…

  1. Popular Culture in Transglossic Language Practices of Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shaila; Dovchin, Sender

    2017-01-01

    Based on virtual conversations drawn from two separate intensive ethnographic studies in Bangladesh and Mongolia, we show that popular cultural texts play a significant role in young adults' heteroglossic language practices. On the one hand, they borrow voices from cultural texts and cross the boundaries of language, i.e., codes, modes, and…

  2. Individualism and the cultural roots of management practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, Andre

    2014-01-01

    We study the cultural foundations of management practices, which are increasingly recognized as important determinants of firm performance. This research closes the loop on two developing literatures, one seeking cultural explanations for economic development and the other seeking to account for dif

  3. Individualism and the cultural roots of management practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, André van

    2012-01-01

    We study the cultural foundations of management practices, which are increasingly recognized as important determinants of firm performance. This research closes the loop on two developing literatures, one seeking cultural explanations for economic development and the other seeking to account for dif

  4. Culturally Responsive Practices as Whole School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, V. M.; Garrison-Wade, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Despite our best efforts, black children still lag behind white children in academic performance on standardized academic measures. Unconscious racism and our lack of ability to confront it present the most salient reason for the indefatigable prevalence of inequitable opportunities for children of color which undeniably result in achievement…

  5. Machinima Filmmaking as Culture in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    is a practice whereby game worlds and game play are captured and edited, thereby transformed into a film. The chapter frames the phenomenon of machinima by looking at it from a view on topics of authorship, media ecology and remix practices. Two case studies are presented herein in order to leverage...... a discussion on machinima authorship as an example of evolving, dialogic processes circulating in media ecologies. This dialogic authorship involves remix (re-assemblage) and it occurs within the shifts in our current situation of media convergence. The aim in this chapter is to shed light on the dialogic...... practices of authorship such as machinima and is inspired by the dialogic theories of Russian literary philosopher M.M. Bakhtin. A three-part structure is used herein: (1) introduction to theoretical concepts, background on machinima and this study, and a review of methodology, (2) data and analysis, and (3...

  6. Practical strategies for providing culturally sensitive, ethical care in developing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigger, Nancy J; Holcomb, Lygia

    2007-01-01

    Providing health care in developing nations results in cultural and ethical challenges for health care professionals. The authors' intent is to raise readers' awareness of how to maintain an ethical and culturally sensitive approach to practice in developing nations. Four practical approaches to ethical decision-making, developed from the literature and praxis, in conjunction with traditional moral theory and guidelines from professional and international organizations are discussed. Ethical multiculturalism, a view that combines universalism and multiculturalism undergirds culturally appropriate and ethically responsive decisions.

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and c...

  8. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PRACTICES AT BRAZILIAN FIRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Galego-Álvarez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility practices have been on the rise in recent years in firms all over the world. Brazil, as one of the most important countries emerging on the international scene, is no exception to this, with more and more firms taking up these practices. The present study focuses on analyzing the corporate social responsibility practices that Brazilian companies engage into. The sample used is comprised of 500 firms grouped by geographical area; the theoretical framework is based on stakeholder and institutional theories; and the technique used for the analysis is the biplot, more specifically the HJ Biplot and cluster analysis. From the results obtained it is possible to infer that the CSR variables corresponding to environmental practices are more closely linked to companies located in the northern areas of Brazil. Social and community practices are related to companies primarily in the southern and northeastern regions of the country.

  9. The Match between Apache Indians' Culture and Educational Practices Used in Our Schools: From Problems to Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, Lawrence; Hammond, Helen

    2007-01-01

    This study examined cultural values and practices of Apache Indian families in regards to child rearing and how culturally responsive our schools' educational practices are with this population of individuals. Findings from this study revealed a potentially negative impact on these students' development and academic achievement. Solutions to…

  10. A meta-ethnography of organisational culture in primary care medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Suzanne; Guthrie, Bruce; Entwistle, Vikki; Williams, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been growing international interest in shaping local organisational cultures in primary healthcare. However, the contextual relevance of extant culture assessment instruments to the primary care context has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to derive a new contextually appropriate understanding of the key dimensions of primary care medical practice organisational culture and their inter-relationship through a synthesis of published qualitative research. A systematic search of six electronic databases followed by a synthesis using techniques of meta-ethnography involving translation and re-interpretation. A total of 16 papers were included in the meta-ethnography from the UK, the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand that fell into two related groups: those focused on practice organisational characteristics and narratives of practice individuality; and those focused on sub-practice variation across professional, managerial and administrative lines. It was found that primary care organisational culture was characterised by four key dimensions, i.e. responsiveness, team hierarchy, care philosophy and communication. These dimensions are multi-level and inter-professional in nature, spanning both practice and sub-practice levels. The research contributes to organisational culture theory development. The four new cultural dimensions provide a synthesized conceptual framework for researchers to evaluate and understand primary care cultural and sub-cultural levels. The synthesised cultural dimensions present a framework for practitioners to understand and change organisational culture in primary care teams. The research uses an innovative research methodology to synthesise the existing qualitative research and is one of the first to develop systematically a qualitative conceptual framing of primary care organisational culture.

  11. A culture of safety: a business strategy for medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, James W; Finkelstein, Maggie M; Marles, Adam F

    2012-01-01

    Physician practices can enhance their economics by taking patient safety to a new level within their practices. Patient safety has a lot to do with systems and processes that occur not only at the hospital but also within a physician's practice. Historically, patient safety measures have been hospital-focused and -driven, largely due to available resources; however, physician practices can impact patient safety, efficiently and effectively, with a methodical plan involving assessment, prioritization, and compliance. With the ever-increasing focus of reimbursement on quality and patient safety, physician practices that implement a true culture of safety now could see future economic benefits using this business strategy.

  12. Practical Issues of Conducting a Q Methodology Study: Lessons Learned From a Cross-cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Teresa Elizabeth; Maguire, Jane; Kang, Sook Jung; Cha, Chiyoung

    2016-12-06

    This article advances nursing research by presenting the methodological challenges experienced in conducting a multination Q-methodology study. This article critically analyzes the relevance of the methodology for cross-cultural and nursing research and the challenges that led to specific responses by the investigators. The use of focus groups with key stakeholders supplemented the Q-analysis results. The authors discuss practical issues and shared innovative approaches and provide best-practice suggestions on the use of this flexible methodology. Q methodology has the versatility to explore complexities of contemporary nursing practice and cross-cultural health research.

  13. Organizational Culture and ISD Practices: Comparative Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Päivi; Juvonen, Pasi

    This chapter reports results from a study that aims to analyze and compare the literature related to custom IS, packaged, and open source software organizational cultures, and their systems development practices. The comparative analysis is performed using a framework for organizational culture as lenses to the literature. Our study suggests that the beliefs and values of these three communities of practice differ remarkably and make their organizational culture and systems development practices different. The most important differences were found in business milieu, ISD team efforts, ISD approaches, and products and quality. Based on the study we can question the widely held wisdom of methods, techniques, and tools in systems development and managing its efforts. Our study has several implications for research and practice, which are discussed in this chapter.

  14. Forming Future Teachers’ Aesthetic Culture in Foreign Educational Practice

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    Sotska Galyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a theoretical analysis of foreign educational experience in solving scientific problems of forming future teachers’ aesthetic culture. Given the current socio-cultural situation, it has been noted that a teacher who developed his/her aesthetic culture can make a direct contribution to the social and cultural challenges of a changing world. Based on the study of scientific and pedagogical literature, normative and legal support and the content of practical courses, the author has revealed the peculiarities of forming future specialists’ aesthetic culture in foreign countries (Japan, Germany, Canada, the United States, England. Special attention has been paid to the aesthetic potential of fine arts in forming future teachers’ aesthetic culture, which ensures the harmony of intellectual and aesthetic development of personality, enriches the emotional and sensual sphere, develops cognitive and creative activities, aesthetic needs and tastes, stipulates for future teachers’ involving in the process of artistic and aesthetic culture of the nation. The performed analysis proves that the forming of future teachers’ aesthetic culture should be based on the intercultural approach; the ideas of interrelation between aesthetic and ecological in aesthetic education; integration relations between powerful potential of fine (visual arts, environmental science and aesthetic creativity. The experience of foreign educational practice may be adopted by domestic universities to form individual aesthetic culture of future teachers.

  15. Cultur(ally) Jammed: Culture Jams as a Form of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ulyssa

    2012-01-01

    Does the person become the name or does the name become the person? This question was asked by a participant of my culture jam entitled, "What's my name?" In this culture jam, I asked people to discern the name of a person based solely on their appearance and a list of possible names below their picture. This article aims to show how culture jams…

  16. Transforming nursing home culture: evidence for practice and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Shier, Victoria; Saliba, Debra

    2014-02-01

    The nursing home culture change movement aims to improve resident quality of life and quality of care by emphasizing the deinstitutionalization of nursing home culture and focusing on person-centered care. This article briefly reviews the history of culture change, discusses some of the challenges related to culture change in nursing homes, and overviews the conceptualization and select models of culture change. Building from this background, it critiques current understanding, identifies critical research questions, and notes key issues arising during a workshop that addressed existing and emerging evidence in the field. This review and analysis provide a context for how 9 accompanying papers in this supplemental issue of The Gerontologist fill identified evidence gaps and provide evidence for future practice and policies that aim to transform nursing home culture.

  17. Multiliteracies practices at school: for a responsive education to contemporaneity

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    Maria Bernadete Fernandes de Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sharing with Rojo the assumption that Bakhtin's Circle philosophy of language owns the necessary lightness of thought and plasticity for the comprehension and analysis of contemporary multiliteracies practices, this paper aims, from a Bakhtinian perspective, at reflecting about the meanings of educating as a responsible act. Parting from the idea that a responsible education should not only be responsive for the multiple uses of languages that (redesign performances in our contemporary world, but also lead to the critical positioning about these uses, we relate some of the Circle's constructs such as ideology, dialogism, genre, hybridism, responsiveness, responsible act, etc. with the notion of teacher's knowledge, views of language constructed in the dialogues between Applied Linguistics and Cultural Studies and the pedagogy of multiliteracies proposed by the New London Group so as to think of educational processes that are responsive to contemporaneity.

  18. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  19. The relationship between cultural competence education and increasing diversity in nursing schools and practice settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacquiao, Dula

    2007-01-01

    This article attempted to examine the relationship between cultural competence education and increasing diversity in nursing schools and practice settings. In addition to the review of the literature, a panel of experts was interviewed regarding institutional practices in response to the challenge of increasing diversity and cultural competence education. Evidence of positive outcomes of cultural competent care and impact of race and ethnic concordance between patients and providers are presented. The challenge of increasing underrepresented minorities in health care professions remains elusive. An ecological analysis is recommended to address the social and cultural barriers that transcend the micro system of the school and the macro system of the society. The challenge of increasing diversity and realizing outcomes of cultural competence education requires social and comprehensive remedies to level life inequities that perpetuate a history of disadvantages in some groups.

  20. Bamboozled: A Visual Culture Text for Looking at Cultural Practices of Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Nancy S.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade art educators have engaged in a dialogue about a reconceptualization of art education theory and practice. This reconceptualization has roots in cultural studies, anthropology, and critical theory. One focus has been on the notion of art as visual culture. This article is organized into four sections. The first section looks…

  1. Bamboozled: A Visual Culture Text for Looking at Cultural Practices of Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Nancy S.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade art educators have engaged in a dialogue about a reconceptualization of art education theory and practice. This reconceptualization has roots in cultural studies, anthropology, and critical theory. One focus has been on the notion of art as visual culture. This article is organized into four sections. The first section looks…

  2. "Shattering culture": perspectives on cultural competence and evidence-based practice in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio; Hannah, Seth Donal

    2015-04-01

    The concept of culture as an analytic concept has increasingly been questioned by social scientists, just as health care institutions and clinicians have increasingly routinized concepts and uses of culture as means for improving the quality of care for racial and ethnic minorities. This paper examines this tension, asking whether it is possible to use cultural categories to develop evidenced-based practice guidelines in mental health services when these categories are challenged by the increasing hyperdiversity of patient populations and newer theories of culture that question direct connection between group-based social identities and cultural characteristics. Anthropologists have grown concerned about essentializing societies, yet unequal treatment on the basis of cultural, racial, or ethnic group membership is present in medicine and mental health care today. We argue that discussions of culture-patients' culture and the "culture of medicine"-should be sensitive to the risk of improper stereotypes, but should also be sensitive to the continuing significance of group-based discrimination and the myriad ways culture shapes clinical presentation, doctor-patient interactions, the illness experience, and the communication of symptoms. We recommend that mental health professionals consider the local contexts, with greater appreciation for the diversity of lived experience found among individual patients. This suggests a nuanced reliance on broad cultural categories of racial, ethnic, and national identities in evidence-based practice guidelines. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

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    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and corporate ethics programs for CSR.

  4. Incorporating cultural issues in education for ethical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Susan; Klotz, Linda

    2007-07-01

    The population of most non-dominant ethnic groups in the USA is growing dramatically. Faculty members are challenged to develop curricula that adequately prepare our future nurses. An increased focus on clinical ethics has resulted from the use of sophisticated technology, changes in health care financing, an increasing elderly population and the shift of care from inpatient to outpatient settings. Nurses frequently face situations demanding resolution of ethical dilemmas involving cultural differences. Nursing curricula must include content on both ethics and cultural sensitivity. Active student participation is an important element providing a foundation for ethical practice. A proposed educational format was introduced with graduating baccalaureate students. In a pilot study, curricular content on cultural sensitivity and ethical practice was taught in separate modules. Students were then asked to identify and problem solve an ethical dilemma involving patients and professional caregivers from vastly different cultures. Course faculty members provided discussion questions to guide the students' thinking.

  5. Organizational culture during the accident response process

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    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of an organization to effectively move from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy may well depend on the organization having the ability to balance these two apparently dichotomous cultural styles. The organization which is most capable of making the necessary transition in an optimal manner may well exhibit some aspects of both cultural styles during normal operations. Data collected at one NPP does exhibit this pattern of results, with the organization exhibiting a clear hierarchical chain of command and perceived conventional behavioral expectations as well as exhibiting a more decentralized and collegial approach to decisionmaking, a team work orientation, and informal communications. Thus, it is expected that this organization possesses the capabilities to make a successful transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. Data collected at a second NPP more strongly exhibits the traditional style suggested as being important during the anticipatory strategy, with more formal communications and bureaucratically controlled decision-making. This organization may experience difficulty if faced with the need to make a transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. These conclusions are further validated based on observation of Emergency Preparedness Exercise Inspections, which suggest that the more anticipatory types of behaviors actually inhibit successful performance during an ad hoc response. The final validation of these hypotheses needs to be demonstrated with cultural data collected during emergency simulations. The mechanism to obtain such data during these types of situations is an area for future research.

  6. Organizational culture during the accident response process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1992-08-01

    The ability of an organization to effectively move from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy may well depend on the organization having the ability to balance these two apparently dichotomous cultural styles. The organization which is most capable of making the necessary transition in an optimal manner may well exhibit some aspects of both cultural styles during normal operations. Data collected at one NPP does exhibit this pattern of results, with the organization exhibiting a clear hierarchical chain of command and perceived conventional behavioral expectations as well as exhibiting a more decentralized and collegial approach to decisionmaking, a team work orientation, and informal communications. Thus, it is expected that this organization possesses the capabilities to make a successful transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. Data collected at a second NPP more strongly exhibits the traditional style suggested as being important during the anticipatory strategy, with more formal communications and bureaucratically controlled decision-making. This organization may experience difficulty if faced with the need to make a transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. These conclusions are further validated based on observation of Emergency Preparedness Exercise Inspections, which suggest that the more anticipatory types of behaviors actually inhibit successful performance during an ad hoc response. The final validation of these hypotheses needs to be demonstrated with cultural data collected during emergency simulations. The mechanism to obtain such data during these types of situations is an area for future research.

  7. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY VERSUS TAX AVOIDANCE PRACTICES

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    Stoian Ciprian-Dumitru

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide crisis has made multinational companies that are engaged in corporate social responsibility actions to manage their businesses through the lens of various tax avoidance practices. The content of this paper is important due to the fact that tries to identify the impact in case of companies active in corporate social responsibility actions versus their tax structures orientation. Corporate social responsibility literature did not paid enough attention on the impact of the tax avoidance practices of companies. Tax, as a concept, brings in itself an important corporate financial impact with subsequent effects for the life of multiple citizens in countries where private entities are operating. Even though companies are usually expressing their ethical and responsible conduct in respect of the social environment, there are many cases when the business practices were not aligned with the declared corporate behavior. This paper seeks firstly to examine whether companies engaged in tax avoidance practices (ex. offshore tax havens consider that continue to act socially responsible. Secondly, the paper examines the influence on attending the stakeholders’ goals for those companies practicing tax avoidance and its implications on corporate social responsibility actions. Moreover, the paper focuses also on the aspects described before from the perspective of the corporate entities operating in Romania. This paper’s intention is to use and to develop the results of previous research carried out by Lutz Preus (University of London and, subsequently, by Senators Levin, Coleman and Obama in their “Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill”. The implications and the objectives of this material are to highlight, to identify and to spot clearly the relations and the influences of the tax haven practices of corporations versus their undertaken social responsibility actions. Moreover, this paper brings a fresh perspective of this topic from the

  8. Trading Culture: Practical Background for Azerbaijani-English Poetry Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandaville A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Where translation theory often argues the difficulties of translation—whether or not and under what conditions translation is possible—the authors take a more practical approach. Examining the translation of poetry from Azerbaijani to English, two very different languages and poetic traditions, the authors discuss key linguistic, political, cultural considerations and demonstrate some effective practical strategies. They approach translation as a fundamentally human endeavor and the work of a translator as cultural and linguistic exchange and enrichment, even commerce.

  9. Organisational culture: an important concept for pharmacy practice research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Shane; Harrison, Jeff; Carswell, Peter; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2009-10-01

    Throughout the developed world, community pharmacy is under considerable pressure to play a greater part in delivering effective primary health care. The requirement to adopt new roles continues to challenge community pharmacy and drive change. The factors that determine the ability of community pharmacy to effectively deliver services for health gain are complex and include; policy, professional, financial and structural elements. There is also evidence to suggest that organisational culture may influence the effectiveness of an organisation. In order to address this there is a need to understand the dimensions of organisational culture that lead to successful implementation of the change necessary for community pharmacy to become a more effective primary health care organisation. In this commentary, we introduce the concept of organisational culture, outline two frameworks for studying culture, and argue the benefits of pursuing an organisational culture research agenda for the evolution of pharmacy practice and research.

  10. Pharmacy Students’ Perceptions of Cultural Competence Encounters During Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Loren-Ashley; Vellurattil, Rosalyn Padiyara; Quiñones-Boex, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine pharmacy students’ perceptions regarding cultural competence training, cross-cultural experiences during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), and perceived comfort levels with various cultural encounters. Methods. Fourth-year pharmacy (P4) students were asked to complete a questionnaire at the end of their fourth APPE. Results. Fifty-two of 124 respondents (31.9%) reported having 1 or more cultural competence events during their APPEs, the most common of which was caring for a patient with limited English proficiency. Conclusion. Students reported high levels of comfort with specific types of cultural encounters (disabilities, sexuality, financial barriers, mental health), but reported to be less comfortable in other situations. PMID:24672064

  11. The Problem of Cultural Identity in the Contemporary Archaeological Practice

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    Zorica Kuzmanović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The decades-long reconsideration of the concept of culture in archaeology has been aimed at overcoming the traditional culture-historical concept, assuming culture as a relatively stable and homogeneous system of values characteristic of a certain group or a community of people. The practice of cultural classification of artefacts, based upon the premise that people linked by the production and usage of stylistically homogeneous material culture form a group with the feeling of communal identity, has been criticized as a reflection of ethnocentric projection of the modern idea of cultural identity. In spite of numerous critics of this concept, developed under the influence of various theoretical strains from the beginning of the 1960s, it seems that the implicit assumption is still present of the communal cultural identity of a group linked by the communal material culture. Furthermore, an attempt to counteract the critique and offer a multicultural interpretation of the past brings in the danger to rehabilitate the very concept of culture which archaeology has been trying to abandon for decades.

  12. Practice parameter for cultural competence in child and adolescent psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumariega, Andrés J; Rothe, Eugenio; Mian, Ayesha; Carlisle, Lee; Toppelberg, Claudio; Harris, Toi; Gogineni, Rama Rao; Webb, Sala; Smith, Jacqueline

    2013-10-01

    The United States faces a rapidly changing demographic and cultural landscape, with its population becoming increasingly multiracial and multicultural. In consequence, cultural and racial factors relating to mental illness and emotional disturbances deserve closer attention and consideration. This Practice Parameter outlines clinical applications of the principle of cultural competence that will enable child and adolescent mental health clinicians to better serve diverse children, adolescents, and their families. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Culturally Responsive Teaching: The Harlem Renaissance in an Urban English Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, Andrea J.

    2007-01-01

    Andrea J. Stairs advocates culturally responsive teaching, a practice that explicitly highlights "issues of race, ethnicity, and culture as central to teaching, learning, and schooling," and emphasizes the necessity of interrogating the themes of race, power, and privilege in the urban classroom. Stairs observes two student teachers as they…

  14. Cultural Practices of Hispanics: Implications for the Prevention of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, James K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Among 190 Hispanic Americans in Nevada, condom use as an AIDS prevention measure appeared to be a male prerogative associated with "being the one who buys the condoms" (mostly males) and machismo practices such as protection of women. Adherence to Hispanic cultural traits was related to education and acculturation. (SV)

  15. Learning Culture, Line Manager and HR Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the role of line management and learning culture in the development of professional practice for the human resource (HR) practitioner. Design/methodology/approach: Three-year longitudinal, matched-pair study involving five participants and their line managers. Findings: Two of the five participants experienced…

  16. Socialization of Adolescents: Cultural Practices in Children's Summer Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demakova, Irina D.; Valeeva, Roza A.; Shipova, Alina V.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes the relevant aspects of the adolescents' cultural practices in children's summer camp, taking into account their specific characteristics. The summer camp is considered as an educational formation and holistic socio-pedagogical body, designed to create conditions for the development of the person. The criteria for inclusion…

  17. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  18. Cultural Practices of Hispanics: Implications for the Prevention of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, James K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Among 190 Hispanic Americans in Nevada, condom use as an AIDS prevention measure appeared to be a male prerogative associated with "being the one who buys the condoms" (mostly males) and machismo practices such as protection of women. Adherence to Hispanic cultural traits was related to education and acculturation. (SV)

  19. Learning Culture, Line Manager and HR Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the role of line management and learning culture in the development of professional practice for the human resource (HR) practitioner. Design/methodology/approach: Three-year longitudinal, matched-pair study involving five participants and their line managers. Findings: Two of the five participants experienced…

  20. Historical and Theoretical Development of Culturally Competent Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Hermeet K.; Huber, Ruth; Faul, Anna C.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a detailed review of the historical and theoretical context in which culturally competent practice has evolved in the social work profession and enables educators and practitioners to see holistic connections between the past and present. Historical review of the inclusion of diversity content is followed by definitions of…

  1. Beyond Tradition: Culture, Symbolism, and Practicality in American Indian Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous people have always created what colonial language labels art. Yet there is no Native word for "art" as defined in a Euro-American sense. Art, as the dominant culture envisions, is mostly ornamental. This is in sharp juxtaposition to a Native perspective, which sees art as integrative, inclusive, practical, and constantly…

  2. Social inclusion from visual culture: practices and technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Miranda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on the social inclusion in social and educational programmes since a visual culture perspective. Is considered the work with contemporary art resources and the educative possibilities including new practices in public space and the place of technologies.

  3. Success for All? The Role of the School Counselor in Creating and Sustaining Culturally Responsive Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betters-Bubon, Jennifer; Brunner, Todd; Kansteiner, Avery

    2016-01-01

    Successful implementation of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) programs should include culturally responsive practices to reduce disproportionality in school discipline referrals and create effective learning environments for all students. Sustaining culturally responsive PBIS programs requires attention to student demographics…

  4. Importance of including cultural practices in ecological restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehi, Priscilla M; Lord, Janice M

    2017-10-01

    Ecosystems worldwide have a long history of use and management by indigenous cultures. However, environmental degradation can reduce the availability of culturally important resources. Ecological restoration aims to repair damage to ecosystems caused by human activity, but it is unclear how often restoration projects incorporate the return of harvesting or traditional life patterns for indigenous communities. We examined the incorporation of cultural use of natural resources into ecological restoration in the context of a culturally important but protected New Zealand bird; among award-winning restoration projects in Australasia and worldwide; and in the peer-reviewed restoration ecology literature. Among New Zealand's culturally important bird species, differences in threat status and availability for hunting were large. These differences indicate the values of a colonizing culture can inhibit harvesting by indigenous people. In Australasia among award-winning ecological restoration projects, <17% involved human use of restored areas beyond aesthetic or recreational use, despite many projects encouraging community participation. Globally, restoration goals differed among regions. For example, in North America, projects were primarily conservation oriented, whereas in Asia and Africa projects frequently focused on restoring cultural harvesting. From 1995 to 2014, the restoration ecology literature contained few references to cultural values or use. We argue that restoration practitioners are missing a vital component for reassembling functional ecosystems. Inclusion of sustainably harvestable areas within restored landscapes may allow for the continuation of traditional practices that shaped ecosystems for millennia, and also aid project success by ensuring community support. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. GOOD PRACTICE UNDER THE UNIVERSITY SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

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    Myrna D. López-Noriega

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this document we analyzed the progress of the good practices of university social responsibility (USR in higher education, considering the case of the Universidad Autónoma del Carmen (UNACAR. We made an inventory of good practices at the institutional level and also about his Faculty of Administratives and Economics Sciences; these were classified according in a matrix based on the impacts on the environment. The analysis of institutional documents shows that in the UNACAR the RSU is linked to concepts such as sustainable development and regional development, as a result of its location within the National Protected Area of Flora and Fauna Laguna de Términos.

  6. Developing Culturally Responsive Leaders through Online Learning and Teaching Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Alisa

    2011-01-01

    The article will discuss culturally responsive leadership theory as a means to developing pre-service Master of School Administration (MSA) students as culturally responsive leaders who understand and are able to bridge differences that arise in diverse educational settings. The issues explored include those related to the cultural heritages and…

  7. Management Documentation: Indicators & Good Practice at Cultural Heritage Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppich, R.; Garcia Grinda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation for cultural heritage places usually refers to describing the physical attributes, surrounding context, condition or environment; most of the time with images, graphics, maps or digital 3D models in their various forms with supporting textural information. Just as important as this type of information is the documentation of managerial attributes. How do managers of cultural heritage places collect information related to financial or economic well-being? How are data collected over time measured, and what are significant indicators for improvement? What quality of indicator is good enough? Good management of cultural heritage places is essential for conservation longevity, preservation of values and enjoyment by the public. But how is management documented? The paper will describe the research methodology, selection and description of attributes or indicators related to good management practice. It will describe the criteria for indicator selection and why they are important, how and when they are collected, by whom, and the difficulties in obtaining this information. As importantly it will describe how this type of documentation directly contributes to improving conservation practice. Good practice summaries will be presented that highlight this type of documentation including Pamplona and Ávila, Spain and Valletta, Malta. Conclusions are drawn with preliminary recommendations for improvement of this important aspect of documentation. Documentation of this nature is not typical and presents a unique challenge to collect, measure and communicate easily. However, it is an essential category that is often ignored yet absolutely essential in order to conserve cultural heritage places.

  8. The Naming Practice in Akoose: Deviation from Cultural Stereotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ekanjume-Ilongo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bakossi names are generally inherited and are a strong bond for the cultural identity of the people. However, recent developments reveal that Bakossi names are losing their cultural values and identities which can make one to conclude that they are under threat. This is due to the fact that the so-called modern Bakossi people no longer follow the norms prescribed for naming by the traditionalists of old. The impact of the change from the traditionalists to so-call modernists, as seen in Bakossi naming practice nowadays, leads to the questioning of the Bakossi identity. Under this background, this paper looks at the function of names in constructing the Bakossi identity and especially how this is achieved following the historical and cultural background of the Bakossi naming practice. The paper demonstrates that the traditional naming practice has undergone some drastic change. It shows that the Bakossi names no longer stand for the cultural identity and succession of family members as once it was the case.

  9. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations.

  10. Cultures of simulations vs. cultures of calculations? The development of simulation practices in meteorology and astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Mikaela

    While the distinction between theory and experiment is often used to discuss the place of simulation from a philosophical viewpoint, other distinctions are possible from a sociological perspective. Turkle (1995) distinguishes between cultures of calculation and cultures of simulation and relates these cultures to the distinction between modernity and postmodernity, respectively. What can we understand about contemporary simulation practices in science by looking at them from the point of view of these two computer cultures? What new questions does such an analysis raise for further studies? On the basis of two case studies, the present paper compares and discusses simulation activities in astrophysics and meteorology. It argues that simulation practices manifest aspects of both of these cultures simultaneously, but in different situations. By employing the dichotomies surface/depth, play/seriousness, and extreme/reasonable to characterize and operationalize cultures of calculation and cultures of simulation as sensitizing concepts, the analysis shows how simulation code work shifts from development to use, the importance of but also resistance towards too much visualizations, and how simulation modelers play with extreme values, yet also try to achieve reasonable results compared to observations.

  11. Culturally Responsive Dispositions in Prospective Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Desha L.; Edwards, Belinda; Kuhel, Karen A.; Lim, Woong

    2016-01-01

    Sustaining teachers in culturally and linguistically diverse schools has been a prominent issue for years. This qualitative study focused on the impact of an enhanced preparation program on the cultural dispositions of five pre-service mathematics teachers. It is postulated that if positive cultural dispositions are developed in teacher…

  12. [Science, technique, and culture: relations between risk and health practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeresnia, Dina

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the cultural consequences of discourses and practices aimed at training subjects for a rational, informed choice in relation to risks, calculated on the basis of scientific knowledge. The epidemiological risk concept is a central element in this process, especially in the context of health practices. The article begins by briefly characterizing the epidemiological risk concept, emphasizing that as an abstract model, it reduces the complexity of the phenomena it studies. Grasping reality through this abstraction generates values and meanings. Canguilhem's reflection on the relations between science, technique, and life is further discussed from the perspective of deepening an understanding of the cultural consequences of this process, contributing to the transformation of classical concepts of individuality, autonomy, and sociability. Such vital themes as individuality, alterity, and the relationship with death are present (albeit disguised) in issues that involve the central nature of risk in the contemporary world.

  13. Culture, salience, and psychiatric diagnosis: exploring the concept of cultural congruence & its practical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, Mohammed Abouelleil

    2013-07-16

    Cultural congruence is the idea that to the extent a belief or experience is culturally shared it is not to feature in a diagnostic judgement, irrespective of its resemblance to psychiatric pathology. This rests on the argument that since deviation from norms is central to diagnosis, and since what counts as deviation is relative to context, assessing the degree of fit between mental states and cultural norms is crucial. Various problems beset the cultural congruence construct including impoverished definitions of culture as religious, national or ethnic group and of congruence as validation by that group. This article attempts to address these shortcomings to arrive at a cogent construct. The article distinguishes symbolic from phenomenological conceptions of culture, the latter expanded upon through two sources: Husserl's phenomenological analysis of background intentionality and neuropsychological literature on salience. It is argued that culture is not limited to symbolic presuppositions and shapes subjects' experiential dispositions. This conception is deployed to re-examine the meaning of (in)congruence. The main argument is that a significant, since foundational, deviation from culture is not from a value or belief but from culturally-instilled experiential dispositions, in what is salient to an individual in a particular context. Applying the concept of cultural congruence must not be limited to assessing violations of the symbolic order and must consider alignment with or deviations from culturally-instilled experiential dispositions. By virtue of being foundational to a shared experience of the world, such dispositions are more accurate indicators of potential vulnerability. Notwithstanding problems of access and expertise, clinical practice should aim to accommodate this richer meaning of cultural congruence.

  14. Impact on quality culture of total quality management practices factors

    OpenAIRE

    Faihan Mosaad Saud Alotaibi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated total quality management practices and quality culture of Saudi Arabian contractors. Improving the quality can be achieved through implementation of total quality management although studies and researches work regarding this improvement is still lacking. A quantitative approach using the survey method was employed. With assistance from the Saudi Arabia Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs, survey questionnaires were distributed to selected contractors i...

  15. The Kawa model: the power of culturally responsive occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, Michael K; Thomson, Nicole A; Macdonald, Rona M

    2009-01-01

    The Kawa (Japanese for river) model, developed by Japanese and Canadian rehabilitation professionals, presents an important and novel alternative to contemporary 'Western' models of rehabilitation. Rather than focussing primarily on the individual client, the Kawa model focusses on 'contexts' that shape and influence the realities and challenges of peoples' dayto-day lives. The first substantial model of rehabilitation practice developed outside of the West illuminates the transactional quality of human-environment dynamics and the importance of inter-relations of self and others through the metaphor of a river's flow. The model's reflection of Eastern thought and views of nature presents a useful point of comparison to familiar rational and mechanical explanations of occupation and well-being. In this article, the rationale for an alternative model in rehabilitation is presented, followed by an explanation of the structure and concepts of the Kawa model. Implications for culturally responsive practice as well as the model's significance to the advancement of culturally safe rehabilitation worldwide are discussed.

  16. Does the Gap Matter? A Study of IT and Business Culture Toward Customer Relationship Management Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Limsarun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Customer Relationship M anagement (CRM has become the important part of business due to the benefit of analyze sale opportunities, campaigns management, personalization to each individual customer, cross-selling and up-selling. Unfortunately, many research evidence shows that most of the companies fail to make their CRM effort to pay off. Thus success CRM is required co-operate from the management and end user buy-in from every department in the CRM installed companies. Therefore this study aims to highlight the different between Information Technology culture and Business culture. The finding has shown the significant of the culture gap toward CRM practice, while each part of the organization has to take care for their role and responsibility in order to success in CRM practice.

  17. Positioning Food Cultures: 'Alternative' Food as Distinctive Consumer Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    Many sociological studies to date have explored the role of food in marking distinctions between groups. Less well understood is how 'alternative' means of food consumption become figured in such relations. Drawing on accounts of food practice derived from 20 in-depth interviews and a two-year period of participant observation, this article considers the role of class culture in the practice of alternative food consumption. As participants speak their position, expressions of class arise through discussions of food practice. Having explored how food plays a part in marking boundaries of distinction between foods 'for us' and 'for them', we are reminded that in reproducing certain ideas about proper eating, we confine our imagining of alternative food futures to a limited politics of the possible. The article highlights implications for future development of equitable alternatives to conventional foodways.

  18. Culturally Responsive Social Skill Instruction for Latino Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Correa, Vivian I.; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural friendships and peer interactions are important skills for Latino students to become socially adjusted in U.S. schools. Culturally responsive social skill instruction allows educators to teach essential social skills while attending to the native culture and personal experiences of the students. The present study examined the…

  19. Going against the Grain in an Urban Arizona High School: Secondary Preservice Teachers Emerging as Culturally Responsive Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Boozer, April; Clark, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This one year study examines the journey of two preservice urban high-school teachers in Arizona as they enact Culturally Responsive Teaching in a year-long student teaching residency. Factors that influenced their Culturally Responsive Teaching practices are discussed along themes that emerged from interviews and classroom observations.…

  20. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  1. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  2. The Culturally Responsive Teacher Preparedness Scale: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the competencies of culturally responsive teaching and construct a Culturally Responsive Teacher Preparedness Scale (CRTPS) for the use of teacher preparation programs and preservice teachers. Competencies listed in the scale were identified through literature reviews and input from experts. The…

  3. Patient safety culture measurement in general practice. Clinimetric properties of 'SCOPE'

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    Zwart Dorien LM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A supportive patient safety culture is considered to be an essential condition for improving patient safety. Assessing the current safety culture in general practice may be a first step to target improvements. To that end, we studied internal consistency and construct validity of a safety culture questionnaire for general practice (SCOPE which was derived from a comparable questionnaire for hospitals (Dutch-HSOPS. Methods The survey was conducted among caregivers of Dutch general practice as part of an ongoing quality accreditation process using a 46 item questionnaire. We conducted factor analyses and studied validity by calculating correlations between the subscales and testing the hypothesis that respondents' patient safety grade of their practices correlated with their scores on the questionnaire. Results Of 72 practices 294 respondents completed the questionnaire. Eight factors were identified concerning handover and teamwork, support and fellowship, communication openness, feedback and learning from error, intention to report events, adequate procedures and staffing, overall perceptions of patient safety and expectations and actions of managers. Cronbach's alpha of the factors rated between 0.64 and 0.85. The subscales intercorrelated moderately, except for the factor about intention to report events. Respondents who graded patient safety highly scored significantly higher on the questionnaire than those who did not. Conclusions The SCOPE questionnaire seems an appropriate instrument to assess patient safety culture in general practice. The clinimetric properties of the SCOPE are promising, but future research should confirm the factor structure and construct of the SCOPE and delineate its responsiveness to changes in safety culture over time.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF CULTURE ON KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: A QUALITATIVE CASE STUDY OF MSC STATUS COMPANIES

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    Charmaine Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is recognised as being an important asset in organisations these days. Despite this, many organisations are not doing enough to effectively manage this important asset for its competitive advantage. In response to this, knowledge management which is defined as a process that effectively creates, captures, shares and uses organisation-wide knowledge to improve the organisation’s performance was conceived and has since gained widespread acceptance the world over. Despite its widespread acceptance, little is known about the current levels of knowledge management within the Malaysian context, in particular amongst the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC status companies in Malaysia. Furthermore, the extent to which cultural factors impact upon knowledge management practice in these companies is not known. This study investigated the various cultural factors (collaboration, mutual trust, leadership and incentives/rewards using a multiple case study approach operating within a critical realism research paradigm and found that these factors have impact on the level of knowledge management practice. The study also established that cultural factors do play an important role in facilitating knowledge management practice in these MSC status companies in Malaysia. It was found that collaboration, mutual trust, leadership, kiasu-ism and incentives/rewards have significant impact on the level of knowledge management practice. In view of the findings of this study, it is suggested that the relevant authorities pay adequate attention on these cultural factors to ensure that the knowledge management initiatives undertaken by Malaysian companies are effectively deployed.

  5. Assessing elemental mercury vapor exposure from cultural and religious practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D M; Newby, C A; Leal-Almeraz, T O; Thomas, V M

    2001-08-01

    Use of elemental mercury in certain cultural and religious practices can cause high exposures to mercury vapor. Uses include sprinkling mercury on the floor of a home or car, burning it in a candle, and mixing it with perfume. Some uses can produce indoor air mercury concentrations one or two orders of magnitude above occupational exposure limits. Exposures resulting from other uses, such as infrequent use of a small bead of mercury, could be well below currently recognized risk levels. Metallic mercury is available at almost all of the 15 botanicas visited in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, but botanica personnel often deny having mercury for sale when approached by outsiders to these religious and cultural traditions. Actions by public health authorities have driven the mercury trade underground in some locations. Interviews indicate that mercury users are aware that mercury is hazardous, but are not aware of the inhalation exposure risk. We argue against a crackdown by health authorities because it could drive the practices further underground, because high-risk practices may be rare, and because uninformed government intervention could have unfortunate political and civic side effects for some Caribbean and Latin American immigrant groups. We recommend an outreach and education program involving religious and community leaders, botanica personnel, and other mercury users.

  6. Cultural and Economic Motivation of Pig Raising Practices in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Nazmun; Uddin, Main; Gurley, Emily S; Jahangir Hossain, M; Sultana, Rebeca; Luby, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    The interactions that pig raisers in Bangladesh have with their pigs could increase the risk of zoonotic disease transmission. Since raising pigs is a cultural taboo to Muslims, we aimed at understanding the motivation for raising pigs and resulting practices that could pose the risk of transmitting disease from pigs to humans in Bangladesh, a predominantly Muslim country. These understandings could help identify acceptable strategies to reduce the risk of disease transmission from pigs to people. To achieve this objective, we conducted 34 in-depth interviews among pig herders and backyard pig raisers in eight districts of Bangladesh. Informants explained that pig raising is an old tradition, embedded in cultural and religious beliefs and practices, the primary livelihood of pig herders, and a supplemental income of backyard pig raisers. To secure additional income, pig raisers sell feces, liver, bile, and other pig parts often used as traditional medicine. Pig raisers have limited economic ability to change the current practices that may put them at risk of exposure to diseases from their pigs. An intervention that improves their financial situation and reduces the risk of zoonotic disease may be of interest to pig raisers.

  7. Developing and Testing the Short-Form Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument for Assessing Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvan, Gerard J; Garvan, Cynthia W; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2016-10-01

    The importance of educating dental students in cultural competence has been widely emphasized, but there is a need to assess cultural competence in a consistent and reliable way. The aims of this study were to determine latent constructs for the initial measure of cultural competence for oral health providers, the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument (KEPI), and to determine how well these factors related to previously identified latent constructs. Data were collected in surveys of dental students and from dental hygiene, dental assisting, and dental faculty members in 44 academic dental institutions from 2012 to 2015. There were a total of 1,786 respondents to the surveys; response rates to individual surveys ranged from 35% to 100%. There were 982 (55%) female and 804 (45%) male respondents, 286 (16%) underrepresented minority (URM) and 1,500 (84%) non-URM respondents, and 339 (19%) faculty and 1,447 (81%) student respondents. Three latent constructs were identified. Female respondents scored significantly higher on the culture-centered practice and efficacy of assessment factors, while URM respondents had significantly higher scores on all three of the KEPI factors. Measurements indicated that the long-form KEPI could be shortened by ten questions and still have three meaningful measurements. Continued research in assessing other health care providers' cultural competence is needed to expand the KEPI to measure providers' cultural competence with patients with minority sexual orientation and gender identity issues and those with physical disabilities, mental illness, and autism to advance patient-centric communication.

  8. Cross-Cultural Interactions and Changing Management Practices in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    2006-01-01

    African societies demand and deserve visible economic benefits taht good management and governance can provide. But available evidence suggests that neither Western management practices nor thoe inspired by African culture can adequately address the socio-economic and political challenges...... confronting Sub-Saharan African countries today. This paper argues in favour of an eclectic synthesis of ideas from multiple sources to provide African managers with novel perspectives of the realities facing them and approaches to address them. The term "hybrid" management" has been used to describe...... this approach to management development. This development of a learning culture and a network of centres of management research have been suggested as preconditions for the effective development of hybrid management in Africa...

  9. Cross-Cultural Interactions and Changing Management Practices in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    2006-01-01

    African societies demand and deserve visible economic benefits taht good management and governance can provide. But available evidence suggests that neither Western management practices nor thoe inspired by African culture can adequately address the socio-economic and political challenges...... confronting Sub-Saharan African countries today. This paper argues in favour of an eclectic synthesis of ideas from multiple sources to provide African managers with novel perspectives of the realities facing them and approaches to address them. The term "hybrid" management" has been used to describe...... this approach to management development. This development of a learning culture and a network of centres of management research have been suggested as preconditions for the effective development of hybrid management in Africa...

  10. Cultural Studies and the Subaltern: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Györke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available My article discusses the theoretical and practical implications of applying the methodology of cultural studies, as it is delineated by Stuart Hall, in the East-Central European context. Despite the celebrated “internationalization” of the discipline as well as “de-Eurocentrizing” initiatives, a number of scholars, such as G. C. Spivak and Hall himself, claim that research taking a cultural studies approach has offered little innovative intervention in recent years, and the discipline remains defined by a Western, (postmodern theoretical framework. I argue that scholars in Hungary (and Slovenia have an unprecedented opportunity to contribute to the field, yet in order to avoid falling into the trap of repeating obvious claims and conclusion, we need to take an approach that Spivak associates with the toleration of uncertainty and paradox, and Jessica Benjamin calls intersubjective interaction.

  11. Culture and Cultural Competence in Nursing Education and Practice: The State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkess, Linda; Kaddoura, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    The concept of cultural competency has developed a substantial presence in nursing education and practice since first attracting widespread attention in the 1990s. While several theories and corresponding measures of cultural competency have been advanced and tried, much work remains, as many nursing professionals continue to call for greater evidence-based research and attention to patient perspectives and outcomes. Using a method provided by Hawker et al. to appraise articles, this paper compares nine recent (2008-2013) studies (including two composite studies) related to cultural competency, undergraduate curricula, and teaching strategies in nursing to assess the state of the art in this important area of care. The studies applied phenomenological, study abroad, online, and service learning strategies, four of which relied on some version of Campinha-Bacote's IAPCC© model. These studies reported a general improvement in competency among students, though generally only to a level of cultural awareness, and admitted being constrained by several common limitations. Improved results and more realistic expectations in this area may require a closer understanding of the nature of the "culture" that underlies cultural competence. Harkess Kaddoura. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Spatial turn and animation practices inspired by cultural anthropology

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    Agnieszka Wieszaczewska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial turn is one of the cultural turns, which have recently occurred in the humanities. It stresses the importance of issues such as space and place and can be successfully used as a theoretical perspective gaining use in thought over issues such as globalisation, transnationality, mapping but also education. In the discourses of pedagogical science space and place are considered through their multidimensional impact on education and learning. As significant concepts rooting pedagogy or pedagogy of borderland. The pedagogical reflection on space could be also used in the field of animation practices, especially in activities, which are related to place somehow colonised.

  13. Culturally responsive instruction for english language learners with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Michael John; O'Connor, Rollanda

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes the culturally responsive instruction of one special education teacher with Latino English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities in an urban elementary school setting. This study was situated in a social constructivist research based framework. In investigating this instruction with ELLs, this study focused on how one teacher's knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy affected her special education instruction. Findings resulted in three major themes that were aligned with the current literature in this area: Cultural Aspects of Teaching Reading, Culturally Relevant Skills-Based Instruction, and Collaborative Agency Time. The results indicated that the success of special education with ELLs at the elementary education level might be dependent on how well the special education teacher integrates culturally responsive instruction with ELLs' cultural and linguistic needs. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  14. Cultural Practices and HIV in South Africa: A Legal Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mswela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has not escaped the rising prevalence and severe impact of HIV/AIDS in relation to women. From an economic and social vantage point, the HIV/AIDS epidemic effects women the hardest, with underprivileged black women the most susceptible to the virus. The theoretical framework of this paper focuses on the intersection between HIV/AIDS, gender inequality and gender violence, and more specifically on certain cultural practices and customs that contribute towards and exacerbate women’s subordination and inequality, which in turn increase women’s exposure to HIV infection. Relevant to this focus is inevitably an analysis of the perceived threats to specific fundamental human rights as a result of some of the entrenched practices that continue to reinforce women’s subordinate position in society, aggravated by the high incidence of gender violence.

  15. MODERN BUSINESS COMMUNICATION, SPEECH CULTURAL TRADITIONS AND INTERNATIONAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Butorina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal to simplify the Russian language for its practical use and the extension of Russian cultural influence was set in Peter the Great’s period. In his language policy Peter the Great preferred a functional criterion, insisting on the use of the Russian language variety, which would be understandable not by the elite only, so the Russian language regulation for business purposes has had a long-standing tradition. The article discusses the European practice of various languages standardization in modern business communication. To compare Russian business texts in Russia and abroad urban sites of Moscow, New York and Tallinn are analyzed. The data obtained suggest some hypotheses about peculiarities of business texts in modern Russian language space.

  16. Towards an Inclusive Pedagogical Culture: Experiences from University Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana María Fernández-Fernández

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with conceptual and methodological elements to develop the pedagogical inclusive competence of the professors of higher education in Ecuador. We analyze the current conceptions and the main drawbacks related to the inclusion process in the university environment nowadays. We support a theoretical procedural model, and from the practical standpoint, we implemented the methodological procedures structured in a map of processes to reach an inclusive formative process. The main results are given in the development of the pedagogical inclusive competence and the increase of the inclusion culture at the university, and revealed in the improvement of university curriculum from an inclusive approach, the betterment of the physical and technological infrastructure, the permanent upgrading of professors and putting into practice policies of affirmative action.

  17. American academic headache specialists in neurology: practice characteristics and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, A G

    2004-07-01

    Headache diagnosis and treatment is the most important focus or concentration area for practising neurologists in America. The American Headache Society, formerly the American Association for the Study of Headache, is made up predominantly of neurologists. Recognition of the importance of the teaching and practice of headache medicine, especially migraine, is still incomplete at many academic teaching institutions. Suggestions that this results from inadequate academic hierarchies and education at graduate and post-graduate levels have been made. We therefore undertook a survey of academic practitioners of headache medicine in departments of neurology with membership of the American Headache Society. Subjects and addresses were identified using the 1999-2000 membership directory of the American Headache Society. Practice characteristics and time distribution were assessed. Teaching in undergraduate and resident programmes was also assessed. Fifty-five surveys from 46 institutions in 25 states were judged as adequate for this report. Academic neurologists with interest in headache medicine spent most of their time in clinic, with less than 25% spent doing either research or teaching. Medical schools had an average of 1 h of preclinical and 2 h of clinical teaching in headache. Neurology residents received an average of 3 h of didactic instruction in headache. This report is the first of its kind to review the practice characteristics and culture of headache medicine in the setting of academic departments of neurology. It describes a clinical practice similar to those of other non-academic American neurologists.

  18. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation

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    OLESIA O. GRYGORIEVA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Grygorieva OO, Berezovsjka MA, Dacenko OI. 2015. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 38-42. Two cultures of Chlamydomonas actinochloris Deason et Bold in the lag-phase were exposed to the microwave irradiation. One of them (culture 1 was not treated beforehand, whereas the other (culture 2 was irradiated by microwaves 2 years earlier. The measurement of cell quantity as well as measurement of change of intensities and spectra of cultures photoluminescence (PL in the range of chlorophyll a emission was regularly conducted during the cell cultures development. Cell concentration of culture 1 exposed to the microwave irradiation for the first time has quickly restored while cell concentration of culture 2 which was irradiated repeatedly has fallen significantly. The following increasing of cell concentration of culture 2 is negligible. Cell concentration reaches the steady-state level that is about a half of the cell concentration of control culture. Initially the PL efficiency of cells of both cultures decreases noticeable as a result of irradiation. Then there is the monotonic increase to the values which are significantly higher than the corresponding values in the control cultures. The ratio of the intensities at the maxima of the main emission bands of chlorophyll for control samples of both cultures remained approximately at the same level. At the same time effect of irradiation on the cell PL spectrum appears as a temporary reduction of this magnitude.

  19. Innovative practice: exploring acculturation theory to advance rehabilitation from pediatric to adult "cultures" of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tram; Baptiste, Sue

    2015-01-01

    This perspective paper explores the application of acculturation and the inherent concepts and ideas associated with this theory in rehabilitation to provide a framework for interpreting patient circumstances, responses and behaviours as they move from one culture to the next. Traditionally acculturation theory has been use to examine changes in culture in an ethnic or country sense, however, this paper is among the first to apply acculturation theory to the rehabilitation service cultures from pediatric to adult care for youth with chronic health conditions. The objectives of this paper are threefold: (1) to critically appraise key literature in the development of acculturation theory, (2) to discuss how acculturation theory can be applied in rehabilitation practice through a clinical vignette, and finally (3) to discuss how acculturation theory can advance rehabilitation by enhancing client-centered practice. Acculturation theory can provide insight into how patients are experiencing a change in health care "cultures", in the context of their overarching life circumstances. This, coming from a broader societal perspective can in turn inform an optimal approach to client-centered practice, and the application of rehabilitation-specific team inputs. This theoretical framework can heighten practitioners' awareness of patients' unique worldviews related to their expectations for care and treatment thus reducing fear of diversity to establish positive partnerships between patients and clinicians. An understanding of patients' acculturation processes will add new insight into how we can best deliver services and supports to optimise health, opportunities and experiences for youth with chronic conditions.

  20. [Patient safety culture in Family practice residents of Galicia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela Romero, Manuel; Bugarín González, Rosendo; Rodríguez Calvo, María Sol

    To determine the views held by Family practice (FP) residents on the different dimensions of patient safety, in order to identify potential areas for improvement. A cross-sectional study. Seven FP of Galicia teaching units. 182 FP residents who completed the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. The Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was chosen because it is translated, validated, and adapted to the Spanish model of Primary Care. The results were grouped into 12 composites assessed by the mentioned questionnaire. The study variables were the socio-demographic dimensions of the questionnaire, as well as occupational/professional variables: age, gender, year of residence, and teaching unit of FP of Galicia. The "Organisational learning" and "Teamwork" items were considered strong areas. However, the "Patient safety and quality issues", "Information exchange with other settings", and "Work pressure and pace" items were considered areas with significant potential for improvement. First-year residents obtained the best results and the fourth-year ones the worst. The results may indicate the need to include basic knowledge on patient safety in the teaching process of FP residents in order to increase and consolidate the fragile patient safety culture described in this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of culture in the general practice consultation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nasreen; Atkin, Karl; Neal, Richard

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, we will examine the importance of culture and ethnicity in the general practice consultation process. Good communication is associated with positive health outcomes. We will, by presenting qualitative material from an empirical study, examine the way in which communication within the context of a general practitioner (GP) consultation may be affected by ethnicity and cultural factors. The aim of the study was to provide a detailed understanding of the ways in which white and South Asian patients communicate with white GPs and to explore any similarities and differences in communication. This paper reports on South Asian and white patients' explanations of recent videotaped consultations with their GP. We specifically focus on the ways in which issues of ethnic identity impacted upon the GP consultation process, by exploring how our sample of predominantly white GPs interacted with their South Asian patients and the extent to which the GP listened to the patients' needs, gave patients information, engaged in social conversation and showed friendliness. We then go on to examine patients' suggestions on improvements (if any) to the consultation. We conclude, by showing how a non-essentialist understanding of culture helps to comprehend the consultation process when the patients are from Great Britain's ethnicised communities. Our findings, however, raise generic issues of relevance to all multi-racial and multi-ethnic societies.

  2. "Making Her Community a Better Place to Live": Culturally Responsive Urban School Leadership in Historical Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lauri

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the notion of "culturally responsive leadership" through a historical case study of the life of Gertrude Elise MacDougald Ayer, the first African American woman principal in New York City. I begin by situating Ayer's leadership practice in light of the social and political context of Harlem in the 1930s and early 1940s. Then…

  3. Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Context of Mathematics: A Grounded Theory Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Emily P.; Adams, Thomasenia L.

    2012-01-01

    In this grounded theory case study, four interconnected, foundational cornerstones of culturally responsive mathematics teaching (CRMT), communication, knowledge, trust/relationships, and constant reflection/revision, were systematically unearthed to develop an initial working theory of CRMT that directly informs classroom practice. These…

  4. An Empirical Perspective on the Culture - Corporate Social Responsibility Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru ZAIȚ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Business competition and pressure of European directives put Romanian company in a position to find answers to issues related to long-term survival and development. In this context we believe it is necessary to analyze some of the most important components that should be taken into consideration at the strategic level: national and organizational culture. The results indicate that corporate social responsibility is supported by learning and change-oriented organizational culture, but also by a favorable cultural and national economic framework. Based on these theoretical considerations we intent to emphasize the relationships between national culture / corporate culture and corporate social responsibility (CSR, elaborating an empirical argument by analyzing the results provided by Global 100, an annual project initiated by Corporate Knights Inc. (Davos. Starting with 2005, it has the largest database in the world and an appropriate evaluation methodology that provides a ranking of the top 100 most responsible companies in the world.

  5. Climate Change, Individual Responsibilities and Cultural Frameworks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Heyd

    2010-01-01

    .... On the assumption that, in the light of accelerating climate change, individuals have both ethical and prudential responsibilities, the limited advances in mitigation and adaptation of international...

  6. Crisis and Man: Literary Responses Across Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnaswami, Mallika

    2012-01-01

    Myth of Sisyphus exemplifies the situation man finds himself in irrespective of his ethnic and geographical background. Art and cultural forms gave expression to this situation and the intensity of the expression depended upon the political and social dimensions. War or peace, man is always condemned to struggle with his problems, moral or otherwise. Post war English writers focused on the social problems the British society found itself in and its helplessness in dealing with them. It was th...

  7. Identity Affirmed, Agency Engaged: Culturally Responsive Performance-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Performance-based assessment is unquestionably superior to the instrumental rationality of high-stakes standardized testing and the audit culture that testing regimes inspire. It is more likely to engender opportunities to witness the un-measureable: vision, imagination, and compassion. Performance assessments must be culturally responsive in…

  8. Culturally Responsive Collegiate Mathematics Education: Implications for African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author utilizes the culturally congruent work of Gay (2010) and Ladson-Billings (2009) to highlight culturally responsive teaching as a viable option for African American students in higher education mathematics spaces. He offers translations of Gay and Ladson-Billings' work to Africana mathematics and argues that these…

  9. Culturally Responsive Dance Pedagogy in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dance has an important place in multicultural education and the development of culturally responsive pedagogy. Through dance, children can explore and express their own and others' cultures and share their stories in ways other than the spoken and written word. This paper presents a case study concerning a professional development programme in…

  10. Should we learn culture in chemistry classroom? Integration ethnochemistry in culturally responsive teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, Yuli; Ridwan, Achmad; Nurbaity

    2017-08-01

    The papers report the first year of two-year longitudinal study of ethnochemistry integration in culturally responsive teaching in chemistry classrooms. The teaching approach is focusing on exploring the culture and indigenous knowledge in Indonesia from chemistry perspectives. Ethnochemistry looks at the culture from chemistry perspectives integrated into culturally responsive teaching has developed students' cultural identity and students' engagement in chemistry learning. There are limited research and data in exploring Indonesia culture, which has around 300 ethics, from chemistry perspectives. Students come to the chemistry classrooms from a different background; however, their chemistry learning disconnected with their background which leads to students' disengagement in chemistry learning. Therefore this approach focused on students' engagement within their differences. This research was conducted with year 10 and 11 from four classrooms in two secondary schools through qualitative methodology with observation, interviews, and reflective journals as data collection. The results showed that the integration of ethnochemistry in culturally responsive teaching approach can be implemented by involving 5 principles which are content integration, facilitating knowledge construction, prejudice reduction, social justice, and academic development. The culturally responsive teaching has engaged students in their chemistry learning and developed their cultural identity and soft skills. Students found that the learning experiences has helped to develop their chemistry knowledge and understand the culture from chemistry perspectives. The students developed the ability to work together, responsibility, curiosity, social awareness, creativity, empathy communication, and self-confidence which categorized into collaboration skills, student engagement, social and cultural awareness, and high order thinking skills. The ethnochemistry has helped them to develop the critical self

  11. Cultured articular chondrocytes sheets for partial thickness cartilage defects utilizing temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kaneshiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of articular cartilage has several functions that are unique to joints. Although a technique for transplanting cultured chondrocytes has already been introduced, it is difficult to collect intact ECM when using enzymes to harvest samples. Temperature-responsive culture dishes have already been clinically applied in the fields of myocardial and corneal transplantation. Earlier studies have shown that a sheet of cultured cells with intact ECM and adhesive factors can be harvested using such culture dishes, which allow the surface properties of the dish to be reversibly altered by changing the temperature. Human chondrocytes were subjected to enzymatic digestion and then were seeded in temperature-responsive culture dishes. A sheet of chondrocytes was harvested by only reducing the temperature after the cultured cells reached confluency. A real-time PCR analysis of the chondrocyte sheets confirmed that type II collagen, aggrecan, and fibronectin were present. These results suggested that, although chondrocytes undergo dedifferentiation in a monolayer culture, multilayer chondrocyte sheets grown in a similar environment to that of three-dimensional culture may be able to maintain a normal phenotype. A histological examination suggested that multilayer chondrocyte sheets could thus prevent the loss of proteoglycans because the area covered by the sheets was well stained by safranin-O. The present experiments suggested that temperature-responsive culture dishes are useful for obtaining cultured chondrocytes, which may then be clinically employed as a substitute for periosteal patches because such sheets can be applied without a scaffold.

  12. Religious culture and health promotion: care, practice, object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Timm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At the margins of modern medical practice, pushing the very limits of science, and indefatigably rendering the precincts of public discourse, still functional remnants of Christian civilization continue to provide care for the hopeless, perform healing sacraments for the incurable, and curate objects of votive devotion for the suffering and needy. These public services go largely unaccounted for, though they secure an ordered world, structure perception, and serve as ontological anchors. Lost in the vague, scientifically unrarified notions of spirituality that brace a general, undifferentiated worldwide metaphysical experience and disregard immense cultural, functional, geographic and performative distinctness, Catholic sacramental practices aimed at alleviating suffering and promoting healthy lifestyles are receiving only marginal mention in scientific literature(1, despite the fact that they make up daily reality in large parts of contemporary Europe and Latin America. Writing this editorial from the Northeast of Brazil, where traditional religious practice has sustained generations through the calamities of severe droughts, slavery, extreme poverty, high child mortality, failed political orders, and a harsh global economic reality, it is difficult to underestimate the power of sacramental experience to sustain a cultural identity. It was defined the concept of care of the sick in the context of the religious experience of the Northeast of Brazil which is historically relevant to health promotion. Until the emergence of national health care in the late nineteenth century, it was largely the order of the Franciscan friars that was charged with promoting healthy lives in the region. The Catholic concept of care that guided their efforts structures three procedural reality principles: the psychological reality of the transference to the person in one’s charge (care/caritas, the performative practice of religious sacrament such as the anointment

  13. How Positive Practices Can Accelerate Transformation To a Lean Improvement Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Hansen, David; Lilja, Johan

    2016-01-01

    With increasing pressure on creating more value with fewer resources, many organizations pursue continuous improvement culture and practices in daily operations.In operations management Lean and the Toyota Way have been continuous improvement role models for describing tools and culture. However......, the cultural transformation has been reported difficult to achieve. This study investigates how practices in daily operations can be used to purposely support the cultural transformation. During an explorative case study 9 practices were identified and analysed. The study showed that positive practices based...... on appreciative inquiry andpositive psychology were particularly effective in accelerating cultural transformation....

  14. Empowerment in Context: Lessons from Hip-Hop Culture for Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Raphael, Jr.; Deepak, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Hip-hop culture can be used as a conduit to enhanced cultural competence and practice skills through the individual and community empowerment framework. This framework is introduced as a tool for direct practice that allows social workers to understand the competing messages within hip-hop culture and how they may impact youths by promoting or…

  15. Praising as bodily practice: the neocharismatic culture of celebration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija Hovi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic body movements and dancing, as well as singing, have been used as a means and inspiration for both individual and communal spiritual experience throughout the history of religions. This article takes a tentative look at the contemporary neocharismatic culture of celebration as a means of aiming at religious experience through collective bodily practice; namely praising, which is generally understood to take the form of singing but is, in fact, expressed also in bodily movements such as dancing. In the neocharismatic context, a celebration means a certain type of a meeting with a special focus on contemplative worship and prayer, accompanied with lively music of praise. First, the historical background of the neo­charismatic branch is outlined shortly. Secondly, the tradition of praise itself within this context is described – what are the insider definitions and what kinds of forms praise in the culture of celebration actually includes, especially in Finland. The description is basically based on internet material and the author's previous field experiences in the Word of Life congregational meetings and other charismatic Christian events. In conclusion, acts of praise as a source of religious experience are discussed.

  16. Practice to research: integrating evidence-based practices with culture and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisner, Thomas S; Hay, M Cameron

    2015-04-01

    There are ways to integrate culturally competent services (CCS) and evidence-based practices (EBP) which can improve the experiences of patients and their families and communities when faced with health problems, as well as the effectiveness and positive experiences of practitioners. CCS and EBP evidence should be jointly deployed for helping patients and clinicians. Partnership research models are useful for achieving the integration of CCS and EBP, since they involve close observation of and participation by clinicians and practitioners in the research process, and often use integrated qualitative and quantitative mixed methods. We illustrate this with 3 examples of work that can help integrate CCS and EBP: ongoing collection of information from patients, clinicians and staff, or "evidence farming"; close study and continuous improvement of activities and accommodations; and use of evidence of tacit, implicit cultural scripts and norms, such as being "productive," as well as explicit scripts. From a research practice point of view, collaborative partnerships will likely produce research with culture and context bracketed in, and will contribute stronger research models, methods, and units of analysis.

  17. National Cultures, Performance Appraisal Practices, and Organizational Absenteeism and Turnover: A Study across 21 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Hilla; Fried, Yitzhak

    2012-01-01

    Performance appraisal (PA) is a key human resource activity in organizations. However, in this global economy, we know little about how societal cultures affect PA practices. In this study, we address this gap by focusing on 2 complementary issues: (a) the influence of societal (national) cultural practices on PA practices adopted by organizations…

  18. Comparing Higher Education Practices and Cultural Competences in Kenya and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musamali, Kennedy; Martin, Barbara N.

    2016-01-01

    Examined within this paper are effective leadership practices across two cultures. Specifically, this study examined the relationship between cultural competency and effective leadership practices in higher education institutions. A quantitative design was used to investigate and compare effective practices of educational leaders in two distinct…

  19. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  20. An Introduction to Plum Blossom Boxing: History, Culture and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Meihuaquan (“Plum Blossom Fist [Boxing]” has traditionally been practiced as vernacular (folk art practiced among the Han ethnic group residing in the Shandong, Henan and Hebei Provinces of China. Historical documentation dates Plum Blossom Boxing to the seventeenth century. The classic Chinese novel, Shuǐhǔ Zhuàn (Marsh Chronicles recounts the martial exploits of Shandong’s twelfth century outlaw heroes who may have been Mei Boxers, also. Thus, for perhaps a millennium, the region has been noted for vernacular martial arts and social banditry. The region’s rampant lawlessness promoted highly-developed martial prowess among both lawbreakers and those who were required to protect themselves against the brigands. Cultural, economic, and environmental factors in the region gave rise to heterodox political and religious beliefs that frequently served as a catalyst for martial sects, most notably the “Boxers” who at the turn of the twentieth century, came into conflict with the imperial government. These factors laid the groundwork for the “character traits” of the art while Taoism, the Five Elements theory, and a concept of predictable change shaped Plum Boxing’s strategic and mechanical principles. In the past decade, there have been efforts to globalize this vernacular martial art. Rather than driving Plum Boxing to extinction it is likely that the folk and the “larger than local” will co-exist.

  1. The promotion of mental health through cultural values, institutions, and practices: a reflection on some aspects of botswana culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabone, Motshedisi B

    2009-12-01

    Botswana has seen rapid socioeconomic development since the 1970s that has contributed to the erosion of the values, institutions, and practices that are believed to be supportive of mental health. In this paper, the author argues that the aspects of culture that are supportive of mental health have been diluted by the process of urbanization and the interactions of Batswana (the indigenous people of Botswana) with other cultural groups, particularly those from the western hemisphere. The paper further highlights some of the values, institutions, and practices native to Botswana and describes how they promote mental health. Lastly, recommendations for reviving the cultural values, institutions, and practices of Botswana are discussed.

  2. Community-Based Financial Literacy Education in a Cultural Context: A Study of Teacher Beliefs and Pedagogical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Taylor, Edward W.; Forte, Karin Sprow

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the findings related to teaching beliefs and pedagogical practices of a study that examined how financial literacy educators educate adults from underserved population groups in community-based settings. The study is theoretically framed in the teaching beliefs and culturally responsive education literature. Findings reveal a…

  3. Cultural differences in responses to a Likert scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jerry W; Jones, Patricia S; Mineyama, Yoshimitsu; Zhang, Xinwei Esther

    2002-08-01

    Cultural differences in responses to a Likert scale were examined. Self-identified Chinese, Japanese, and Americans (N=136, 323, and 160, respectively) recruited at ethnic or general supermarkets in Southern California completed a 13-question Sense of Coherence scale with a choice of either four, five, or seven responses in either Chinese, Japanese, or English. The Japanese respondents more frequently reported difficulty with the scale, the Chinese more frequently skipped questions, and both these groups selected the midpoint more frequently on items that involved admitting to a positive emotion than did the Americans, who were more likely to indicate a positive emotion. Construct validity of the scale tended to be better for the Chinese and the Americans when there were four response choices and for the Japanese when there were seven. Although culture affected response patterns, the association of sense of coherence and health was positive in all three cultural groups. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  5. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  6. Collaborative Voices Exploring Culturally and Socially Responsive Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carmen L.; del Rocio Costa, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This piece shares preservice teachers and instructors reflections on their perceptions of a course on Spanish language arts methods in Puerto Rico. The course was redesigned to focus on interrelated curricular and pedagogical aspects such as literacies as situated social practice, funds of knowledge, popular culture and critical literacy. In…

  7. THE COLOMBIAN REALITY FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF BEHAIOVR ANALYSIS: PEACE AS A RESULT OF CULTURAL PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BLANCA PATRICIA BALLESTEROS DE VALDERRAMA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the advantage of applying behavior analysis to cultural practices comprehension, considering cultural practices as group behaviors, selected and maintained by social reinforcement contingencies and metacontingencies. The three types of contingencies formulated by Skinner are described, and the principal existing data related to aggressive behavior. A proposal to analyze some relevant aspects to Colombian reality is formulated, and finally, an intent to analyze peace as a result of cultural practices is presented, emphasizing positive reciprocal social processes. Mattaini's (1996 suggestion to graphical representation of cultural practices analysis is applied.

  8. Cultural citizenship as a normative notion for activist practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele van Hensbroek, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the possibility of a notion of cultural citizenship that can function as an activist tool for formulating claims against cultural exclusion. It claims to have captured such a notion in the definition of cultural citizenship as the ability to co-author the cultural context in whic

  9. Compliance Culture or Culture Change? The role of funders in improving data management and sharing practice amongst researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Neylon

    2017-06-01

    over extended periods beyond grants. However there are also important differences in implementation. There is essentially no information available on the uptake and success of different policies in terms of compliance rates, or degrees of data availability. Many policies require a Data Management Plan as part of grant submission. This requirement can be enforced but there is disagreement on the value of this. One view is that requirements such as DMPs are the only way to force researchers to pay attention to these issues. The other is that such requirements lead to a culture of compliance in which the minimal effort is made and planning is seen as a “tick-box” exercise that has no further value. In this view requirements such as DMPs may actually be damaging the effort to effect culture change towards improved community practice. One way to bring these two views together is to see DMPs as living documents that form the basis of collaboration between researchers, funders, and data managers throughout the life of a research project. This approach is reflected in guidance on policy development that emphasises the importance of clarifying responsibilities of various stakeholders and ensuring that researchers are both recognised for good practice and see tangible benefits. More broadly this points to the need for the program of improving RDM and RDS to be shared project with the incentives for funders and researchers aligned as far as is possible. In the interviews successful policy implementation was often seen to be dependent on funders providing the required support, both in the form of infrastructure and resourcing, and via the provision of internal expertise amongst program managers. Where resources are limited, leveraging other support, especially from institutional sources, was seen as important as was ensuring the scope of policy requirements were commensurate with the support available and readiness of research communities. Throughout the desk research and the

  10. "Nothing special, everything is maamuli": socio-cultural and family practices influencing the perinatal period in urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Shanti; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura; Razee, Husna; Ritchie, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Globally, India contributes the largest share in sheer numbers to the burden of maternal and infant under-nutrition, morbidity and mortality. A major gap in our knowledge is how socio-cultural practices and beliefs influence the perinatal period and thus perinatal outcomes, particularly in the rapidly growing urban setting. Using data from a qualitative study in urban south India, including in-depth interviews with 36 women who had recently been through childbirth as well as observations of family life and clinic encounters, we explored the territory of familial, cultural and traditional practices and beliefs influencing women and their families through pregnancy, childbirth and infancy. We found that while there were some similarities in cultural practices to those described before in studies from low resource village settings, there are changing practices and ideas. Fertility concerns dominate women's experience of married life; notions of gender preference and ideal family size are changing rapidly in response to the urban context; however inter-generational family pressures are still considerable. While a rich repertoire of cultural practices persists throughout the perinatal continuum, their existence is normalised and even underplayed. In terms of diet and nutrition, traditional messages including notions of 'hot' and 'cold' foods, are stronger than health messages; however breastfeeding is the cultural norm and the practice of delayed breastfeeding appears to be disappearing in this urban setting. Marriage, pregnancy and childbirth are so much part of the norm for women, that there is little expectation of individual choice in any of these major life events. A greater understanding is needed of the dynamic factors shaping the perinatal period in urban India, including an acknowledgment of the health promoting as well as potentially harmful cultural practices and the critical role of the family. This will help plan culturally appropriate integrated perinatal

  11. "Nothing special, everything is maamuli": socio-cultural and family practices influencing the perinatal period in urban India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti Raman

    Full Text Available Globally, India contributes the largest share in sheer numbers to the burden of maternal and infant under-nutrition, morbidity and mortality. A major gap in our knowledge is how socio-cultural practices and beliefs influence the perinatal period and thus perinatal outcomes, particularly in the rapidly growing urban setting.Using data from a qualitative study in urban south India, including in-depth interviews with 36 women who had recently been through childbirth as well as observations of family life and clinic encounters, we explored the territory of familial, cultural and traditional practices and beliefs influencing women and their families through pregnancy, childbirth and infancy. We found that while there were some similarities in cultural practices to those described before in studies from low resource village settings, there are changing practices and ideas. Fertility concerns dominate women's experience of married life; notions of gender preference and ideal family size are changing rapidly in response to the urban context; however inter-generational family pressures are still considerable. While a rich repertoire of cultural practices persists throughout the perinatal continuum, their existence is normalised and even underplayed. In terms of diet and nutrition, traditional messages including notions of 'hot' and 'cold' foods, are stronger than health messages; however breastfeeding is the cultural norm and the practice of delayed breastfeeding appears to be disappearing in this urban setting. Marriage, pregnancy and childbirth are so much part of the norm for women, that there is little expectation of individual choice in any of these major life events.A greater understanding is needed of the dynamic factors shaping the perinatal period in urban India, including an acknowledgment of the health promoting as well as potentially harmful cultural practices and the critical role of the family. This will help plan culturally appropriate

  12. Puerto Rican cultural beliefs: influence on infant feeding practices in western New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, B

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cultural beliefs and practices of Puerto Rican families that influence feeding practices and affect the nutritional status of infants and young children. The goal of the study was to outline strategies that would enable nurses to provide culturally congruent care for this population. Culture care theory guided the research, and an ethnonursing methodology was used. From interviews with 10 key and 5 general informants, 11 universal and 2 diverse themes were abstracted. The dimensions of kinship, cultural values, lifeways, and philosophical beliefs were found to influence Puerto Rican infant feeding practices. The cultural belief that big is healthy was found to be integrally related to cultural feeding practices. Strategies are suggested to facilitate provision of culturally congruent care for Puerto Rican infants and children in an ambulatory setting.

  13. Reader Response Theory and Classroom Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Harold K., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Presents annotations of nine journal articles, monographs, and "learning packages" (published between 1989 and 1993) that examine teaching approaches founded upon the insights of reader response theory. (RS)

  14. Exposure-response modeling methods and practical implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jixian

    2015-01-01

    Discover the Latest Statistical Approaches for Modeling Exposure-Response RelationshipsWritten by an applied statistician with extensive practical experience in drug development, Exposure-Response Modeling: Methods and Practical Implementation explores a wide range of topics in exposure-response modeling, from traditional pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling to other areas in drug development and beyond. It incorporates numerous examples and software programs for implementing novel methods.The book describes using measurement

  15. Culturally Responsive Pain Management for Black Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Lane, Sheria G; Booker, Staja Q

    2017-03-02

    pain for Black older adults has received inadequate attention by health care professionals despite evidence of greater pain intensity, depressive symptoms, and functional disability compared with White American older adults. Pain management for this population may be significantly improved with more careful attention to the provision of culturally responsive care. As professionals concerned with the optimization of health and reduction of suffering throughout the lifespan, nurses have an ethical, moral, and professional responsibility to provide culturally responsive care to the populations they serve-particularly when clear disparities in health exist. By considering how culture affects important health beliefs, values, preferences, and customs, and integrating this understanding into practice, quality of life is likely to be improved. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Impacts of Organizational Culture on the Practice of Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安然

    2013-01-01

      Organizational culture has received increasing attention in recent years both from academics and practioners. Many researchers have confirmed the influence of values on management theories. Barney regards organizational culture as a significant element in creating and implementing the best strategy for competitive advantage. Every thing has pros and cons, organization culture is no exception, and problems caused by organizational culture must be recognized as well, such as barriers to mergers and acquisitions.

  17. Investigation of urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements: Are urban science teachers culturally responsive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udokwu, Chukwudi John

    This study utilized mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative research approach to explore the current pedagogical engagements of twenty middle school urban science teachers in the Midwest region of the United States. It qualitatively examined twelve of these teachers' knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy. The study investigated the following questions: What are the current pedagogical practices of urban middle school science teachers? To what extent are middle school science teachers' pedagogical practices in urban schools culturally responsive? What are urban students' perspectives of their teachers' current pedagogical engagements? The design of the study was qualitative and quantitative methods in order to investigate these teachers' pedagogical practices. Data collections were drawn from multiple sources such as lesson plans, students' sample works, district curriculum, surveys, observational and interview notes. Analysis of collected data was a mixed methodology that involved qualitative and quantitative methods using descriptive, interpretative, pattern codes, and statistical procedures respectively. Purposeful sampling was selected for this study. Thus, demographically there were twenty participants who quantitatively took part in this study. Among them were seven (35%) males and thirteen (65%) females, three (15%) African Americans and seventeen (85%) Caucasians. In determining to what extent urban science teachers' pedagogical practices were culturally responsive, eight questions were analyzed based on four cluster themes: (a) teachers' social disposition, (b) culturally responsive curriculum, (c) classroom interactions, and (d) power pedagogy. Study result revealed that only five (25%) of the participants were engaged in culturally responsive pedagogy while fifteen (75%) were engaged in what Haberman (1991) called the pedagogy of poverty. The goal was to investigate urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements and to examine urban

  18. Improving patient safety culture in general practice: An interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verbakel (Natasha J.); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); T.J. Verheij; C. Wagner (Cordula); D.L.M. Zwart (Dorien Lyd Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground When improving patient safety a positive safety culture is key. As little is known about improving patient safety culture in primary care, this study examined whether administering a culture questionnaire with or without a complementary workshop could be used as an interventio

  19. Cross-Cultural Nongeneralizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1985-01-01

    This synthesis of the previous articles concludes that cultural considerations are important for effective evaluation practice. Culturally sensitive and situationally responsive evaluation practices can contribute to international understanding. (BS)

  20. Measuring Culture Effect size Differences in Slovenian and Portuguese Leadership Practices: Cross-Cultural Leadership Universality or Contigency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašković Matevž

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper measures the cultural effect size across five types of leadership practices by using the Leadership Practice Inventory (LPI instrument and drawing on the GLOBE research project framework. It tests cultural universality vs. contingency in five LPI leadership practices in an East-West EU comparison, both with an ex-socialist past. It employs four different effect size statistics. The paper contributes to the narrowing of the empirical gap in researching leadership practices in a small, East-West European country context. Only two of the five leadership practices show statistically significant effect sizes. Furthermore, the leadership practice Encouraging the heart is the only one to display a relatively moderate effect size. Thus, the evidence seems to support the universalist perspective over the contingency perspective.

  1. Organizational Culture as Determinant of Knowledge Sharing Practices of Teachers Working in Higher Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areekkuzhiyil, Santhosh

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims to explore the influence of organisational culture on the knowledge sharing practices of teachers working in higher education sector. The study hypothesized the impact of various aspects of organisational culture on the knowledge sharing practices of teachers working in higher education sector. The data required for the…

  2. Soil total carbon and crop yield affected by crop rotation and cultural practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacked crop rotation and improved cultural practice have been used to control pests, but their impact on soil organic C (SOC) and crop yield are lacking. We evaluated the effects of stacked vs. alternate-year rotations and cultural practices on SOC at the 0- to 125-cm depth and annualized crop yiel...

  3. Cultural variations in motivational responses to felt misunderstanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Janetta; Oishi, Shigehiro; Coan, James A; Akimoto, Sharon; Miao, Felicity F

    2010-07-01

    Three studies examined cultural variations in the motivational consequences of being misunderstood by others. Study 1 found that European American students who felt misunderstood by others performed progressively better academically, whereas Asian and Asian American students who felt misunderstood by others performed progressively worse. In Studies 2 and 3, felt misunderstanding was experimentally manipulated, and motivational responses were measured with a handgrip task (Study 2) and prefrontal electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry (Study 3). Across the two studies, Asians and Asian Americans showed more withdrawal-related responses but European Americans showed either no difference (Study 2) or more motivated responses (Study 3) after being misunderstood versus being understood. Together, these studies demonstrate systematic cultural variations in motivational responses to felt misunderstanding.

  4. The influence of culture on human resource management processes and practices: The propositions for Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogićević-Milikić Biljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to address the influence of national culture on HRM practices and processes in order to draw conclusions for Serbian HR practitioners, multinational corporations operating in Serbia, and any other country or organizational context that has similar cultural characteristics. To achieve this we first review the relevant literature to identify the interdependencies between Hofstede's cultural dimensions and HRM practices and processes. On the basis of recognized relationships we put forward 11 propositions about likely appropriate HRM practices (such as job analysis, recruitment and selection, human resource planning and career management for the Serbian cultural context, characterized by high Uncertainty Avoidance, high Power Distance, Collectivism and Femininity.

  5. New cultural writing practices, new perspectives of Textual Criticism: towards HyperEditing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrício Nunes Barreiros

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent of computer technology and its developments in the second half of the twentieth century was responsible for a new paradigm for the writing culture, enabling, for the first time, the existence of the text outside a physical surface. It is, therefore, a new condition of texts which has changed the cultural practices, production, circulation and appropriation of the text (Chartier, 2001. Philology is not oblivious to this new socio-cultural context and philologists have taken advantage of the potentialities that information technology and digital media provide for the editing of texts, especially of those that have been written and disseminated within the manuscript and/or printed culture. Jerome McGann (1997 used the term HyperEditing to name the editing that philologists are producing in digital media. This type of editing is a hypermedia which makes it possible to put image, sound and movement together in a same space, and other specific characteristics of computer language. In this article, I intend to discuss how textual criticism is being adapted to this paradigm shift through new editing models. This study is part of the theoretical and methodological framework developed for the pamphlets hyperediting of Eulalio Motta, www.eulaliliomotta.com.br (Barreiros, 2013.

  6. Creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship across cultures theory and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Carayannis, Elias

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this volume is to further develop the relationship between culture and manifold phenomena of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship in order to promote further and better understanding how, why, and when these phenomena are manifested themselves across different cultures.   Currently, cross-cultural research is one of the most dynamically and rapidly growing areas. At the same time, creativity, inventiveness, innovation, and entrepreneurship are championed in the literature as the critical element that is vital not just for companies, but also for the development of societies. A sizable body of research demonstrates that cultural differences may foster or inhibit creative, inventive, innovative and entrepreneurial activities; and each culture has its own strengths and weaknesses in these regards.  Better understanding of cultural diversity in these phenomena can help to build on strengths and overcome weaknesses.   Cross-cultural studies in this field represent a comparatively new class of ...

  7. A Comparison of the Policy Response to Cultural Diversity in China and India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丽娜

    2015-01-01

    This essay attempts to explore the current cultural diversity in China and India with the comparison of policy responses, especially the multiculturalism and language policies, as well as the policies on the workplace. Results show that India enriched and deepened its multiculturalism through the recognition of languages diversity, while China weakened its cultural diversity by popularizing one official language, Mandarin. However, both China and India should do more in practice to make different ethnic groups live and participant as equal partners in the social life.

  8. Addressing Cross-Cultural Teamwork Barriers: Implications for Industry Practice and Higher Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores cultural factors affecting international team dynamics and the implications for industry practice and higher education. Despite decades of studying and experience with cultural diversity, international work groups continue to be challenged by ethnocentrism and prejudices. Central to the context is that cultural differences in…

  9. What Teachers Say about Addressing Culture in Their EFL Teaching Practices: The Vietnamese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Long; Harvey, Sharon; Grant, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Vietnamese EFL teachers' beliefs about the role of culture in language teaching. It also considers how they address culture in their teaching practices in a Vietnamese university. Ethnographic data collected from semi-structured interviews indicated that opportunities for culture to find its way into EFL classroom activities…

  10. Cultural Safety Circles and Indigenous Peoples' Perspectives: Inclusive Practices for Participation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseron, Johnnie; Greymorning, S. Neyooxet; Miller, Adrian; Wilde, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous experiences, as found within traditional ways and cultural practices, are an acknowledgement of traditional methods for sharing, learning, and collective knowledge development and maintenance. The application of Cultural Safety Circles can help provide a collective space where definitions for cultural and educational exchange can take…

  11. Expressive Practices: The Local Enactment of Culture in the Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Karen; Milburn, Trudy; Wilkins, Richard

    2008-01-01

    As students participate in corporate communication classes, they may, on occasion, use the term culture to make sense of their experiences. The authors use Mino's idea of a learning paradigm to shift the emphasis away from teaching traditional theories of culture and use student-centered experiences to teach culture as an expressive practice.…

  12. What Teachers Say about Addressing Culture in Their EFL Teaching Practices: The Vietnamese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Long; Harvey, Sharon; Grant, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Vietnamese EFL teachers' beliefs about the role of culture in language teaching. It also considers how they address culture in their teaching practices in a Vietnamese university. Ethnographic data collected from semi-structured interviews indicated that opportunities for culture to find its way into EFL classroom activities…

  13. A Culturally Responsive Counter-Narrative of Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gist, Conra D.

    2014-01-01

    How do you recognize an effective teacher's sociocultural consciousness? Tamara Wallace's and Brenda Brand's argument that sociocultural consciousness is the "brain" of effective culturally responsive instruction for students of color comes at a time when the system of teacher evaluation is being overhauled nationwide.…

  14. Examining Preservice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Teaching Self-Efficacy Doubts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwatu, Kamau Oginga; Chesnut, Steven Randall; Alejandro, Angela Ybarra; Young, Haeni Alecia

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to add to the research on teachers' self-efficacy beliefs by examining preservice teachers' culturally responsive teaching self-efficacy doubts. We examined the tasks that preservice teachers felt least efficacious to successfully execute and explored the reasoning behind these self-efficacy doubts. Consequently, we were…

  15. German financial media's responsiveness to Deutsche Bank's cultural change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strauß, N.

    2015-01-01

    Based on first-order and second-order agenda building theory, this study analyzes the responsiveness of German financial media to frames of the "cultural change" proclaimed in the banking industry, exemplified by Deutsche Bank. Findings suggest a difference between the two major German financial med

  16. Preparing Special Educators for Culturally Responsive School-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Bridgie A.

    2004-01-01

    Today's increasingly multicultural student population requires that school-community partnerships operate from culturally responsive frameworks. Incorporating significant resources from multicultural communities is an essential component within school-community partnership. Although such a partnership is an essential strategy, it has not been…

  17. Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

  18. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  19. Culturally Responsive Online Design: Learning at Intercultural Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morong, Gail; DesBiens, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents evidence-based guidelines to inform culturally responsive online learning design in higher education. Intercultural understanding is now a recognised core learning outcome in a large majority of Canadian public universities; however, supporting design methodology is underdeveloped, especially in online contexts. Our search…

  20. Culturally Responsive Education in Music Education: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Vanessa L.

    2017-01-01

    Demographic shifts in public school enrollment within the United States necessitate preparing preservice teachers to teach students with backgrounds that differ from their own ethnically, linguistically, racially, and economically. Culturally responsive education (CRE) is a pedagogy used to validate students' varied experiences, and to teach to…

  1. Response to Cultures Continuum and the Development of Intercultural Responsiveness (IR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn; Mixon, Jason R.; Henry, Lula; Butcher, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study investigated the perceptions of pre-service teachers' intercultural responsiveness. Findings from this study affirmed that pre-service teachers believed that positive dispositions, being culturally aware, and responding by incorporating cultural differences is a key to achieving Intercultural…

  2. Practices at the Boundaries of Business Ethics & Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weller, Angeli

    In this dissertation, I explore the practices created to manage business ethics and corporate social responsibility in multinational corporations and the relationship between them across three separate but interrelated articles. The first article suggests that these practices are resident...... in distinct communities of practice, and therefore there are boundaries in both meaning and identity that make alignment between them problematic. The second article looks at the boundaries between these communities by exploring the history of the professional associations in the business ethics and corporate....... Practically, this work shows that boundaries exist between business ethics and corporate social responsibility practices, and calls on scholars and managers who seek alignment to both build intentional bridges between these communities and consider alternate trajectories for the evolution of these practices...

  3. Patterns of cultural consensus and intracultural diversity in Ghanaian complementary feeding practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Nikhila; Pelto, Gretel; Tawiah, Charlotte; Zobrist, Stephanie; Milani, Peiman; Manu, Grace; Laar, Amos; Parker, Megan

    2017-04-06

    Designing effective interventions to improve infant and young child (IYC) feeding requires knowledge about determinants of current practices, including cultural factors. Current approaches to obtaining and using research on culture tend to assume cultural homogeneity within a population. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent of cultural consensus (homogeneity) in communities where interventions to improve IYC feeding practices are needed to address undernutrition during the period of complementary feeding. A second, related objective was to identify the nature of intracultural variation, if such variation was evident. Selected protocols from the Focused Ethnographic Study for Infant and Young Child Feeding Manual were administered to samples of key informants and caregivers in a peri-urban and a rural area in Brong-Ahafo, Ghana. Cultural domain analysis techniques (free listing, caregiver assessment of culturally significant dimensions, and food ratings on these dimensions), as well as open-ended questions with exploratory probing, were used to obtain data on beliefs and related practices. Results reveal generally high cultural consensus on the 5 dimensions that were assessed (healthiness, appeal, child acceptance, convenience, and modernity) for caregiver decisions and on their ratings of individual foods. However, thematic analysis of caregiver narratives indicates that the meanings and content of the constructs connoted by the dimensions differed widely among individual mothers. These findings suggest that research on cultural factors that affect IYC practices, particularly cultural beliefs, should consider the nature and extent of cultural consensus and intracultural diversity, rather than assuming cultural homogeneity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Social Work Practice with LGBT Elders at End of Life: Developing Practice Evaluation and Clinical Skills Through a Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Darren P

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on culturally sensitive clinical issues related to best practices with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) elder patients at end-of-life (EOL) at key points in the therapeutic relationship. Vital concepts, including practice evaluation and clinical skills, are presented through a cultural and oncology lens. There is a paucity of LGBT research and literature as well as a shortfall of MSW graduate school education specific to social work palliative and end-of-life care (PELC) practice with LGBT elders. The content of this article is designed to be adapted and used as an educational tool for institutions, agencies, graduate programs, medical professions, social work, and students. Learning the unique elements of LGBT cultural history and their implications on EOL care can improve social work practice. This article provides an examination from assessment and engagement basics to advance care planning incorporating specific LGBT EOL issues.

  5. School Social Work Practice and Response to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael S.; Frey, Andy J.; Alvarez, Michelle; Berzin, Stephanie Cosner; Shaffer, Gary; O'Brien, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    School social workers have historically had a great deal of flexibility in the practices they use, yet few studies have systematically examined them. This study used data collected as part of the National School Social Work Survey to examine the practice of school social workers within the context of the principles of the response to intervention…

  6. Organizational Culture and Leadership Practices in the 75th Ranger Regiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    REPORT DATE 5 June 1998 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4 August 1997-5 June 1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Organizational Culture and...and believe in being proactive problem solvers. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 75th Ranger Regiment, Organizational Culture , Unit Culture, Leadership, Shared...Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 298-102 ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND LEADERSHIP PRACTICES IN THE 75TH RANGER REGIMENT A thesis presented

  7. Teaching as a cultural practice: managing diverse classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María RODRÍGUEZ IZQUIERDO

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching is a cultural process. Actions that take place in this process are influenced by some cultural assumptions which shape pre-defined objectives and affect content, educational treatment, assessments, and relationships among participants. It is, therefore, of utmost importance not only to make explicit the cultural reality of education, but also to think critically about it. In this paper, we focus on the issue of teaching and learning in the context of cultural diversity from a socio-cultural and socio-political theoretical framework. The keywords «classroom management» it generates over 6.5 million hits in google.com. However, when we type «managing diverse classrooms», there are only 200,000 hits. This divergence indicates that classroom management is a widely explored topic, while work about how to manage a cultural diverse classroom is still limited. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework for teachers to use and improve their cultural knowledge to manage classrooms more effectively. This article argues that growth in cultural awareness of the teaching process improves the quality of teaching and, therefore, students’ learning.

  8. Cultural Adaptation of Interventions in Real Practice Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Booth, Jamie M.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of some common challenges and opportunities related to cultural adaptation of behavioral interventions. Cultural adaptation is presented as a necessary action to ponder when considering the adoption of an evidence-based intervention with ethnic and other minority groups. It proposes a roadmap to choose existing…

  9. Crossing Cultures: Considering Ethnotheory in Teacher Thinking and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberly, Jody L.; Joshi, Arti; Konzal, Jean; Galen, Harlene

    2010-01-01

    Society is becoming more and more culturally diverse. Schools are no exception. This poses a unique set of challenges for establishing meaningful home-school relations. Given the fact that the home and the school may represent two different cultures, families and schools may not share the same vision with regard to how children should be educated…

  10. The Influence of Culture Difference in English Teaching Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨娜

    2012-01-01

    Because of different geographical environment, historical story, and psychic conditions, there exists distinct culture differences between china and western countries among varified nations. Therefore, we acknowledge that concrete understanding of the culture difference mkes the very basis of the acquisition of English language for students, and thus they are likely to have an enhancement in interpersonal ability.

  11. Cultural Adaptation of Interventions in Real Practice Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Booth, Jamie M.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of some common challenges and opportunities related to cultural adaptation of behavioral interventions. Cultural adaptation is presented as a necessary action to ponder when considering the adoption of an evidence-based intervention with ethnic and other minority groups. It proposes a roadmap to choose existing…

  12. Shared Values and Socio-Cultural Norms: E-Learning Technologies from a Social Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Patti; Velan, Gary M.; Shulruf, Boaz

    2017-01-01

    From a perspective of social practice, learning is a socially constituted practice that is imbued with socio-culturally significant meanings and shaped by the values and norms shared within a community of learners. This focus group study examines the role of e-learning technologies in mediating the social practice of learning among coursework…

  13. The role of cultural practices in the emergence of modern human intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    2008-06-12

    Innate cognitive capacities are orchestrated by cultural practices to produce high-level cognitive processes. In human activities, examples of this phenomenon range from everyday inferences about space and time to the most sophisticated reasoning in scientific laboratories. A case is examined in which chimpanzees enter into cultural practices with humans (in experiments) in ways that appear to enable them to engage in symbol-mediated thought. Combining the cultural practices perspective with the theories of embodied cognition and enactment suggests that the chimpanzees' behaviour is actually mediated by non-symbolic representations. The possibility that non-human primates can engage in cultural practices that give them the appearance of symbol-mediated thought opens new avenues for thinking about the coevolution of human culture and human brains.

  14. [Conflict as a reality and a cultural challenge in the practice of nurses' management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, Adelina Giacomelli; Leite, Joséte Luzia; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora

    2007-12-01

    The practice of nurses' management is permeated by conflicts that can be interpreted through culture references. The objective of this study is to denote cultural specificities, analyzed according to Geertz's Cultural Interpretative Theory, that are expressed as conflicts in the scope of nurses' management at a University Hospital. The results denoted the incorporation of ideological elements and mechanisms of control and power, whose origin can be seen in the way in which the work is organized. The application of policies based on the profession's very values was observed. Practices highlight a cultural construction that elucidates some understandings regarding cognitive, social and behavioral processes, because they organize the interpretations and the answers to the events of nurses' practices in management. The results of this study point out the importance of organizational culture in the practice of Nursing management in the face of labor uncertainties in the complexity of a hospital environment.

  15. 25 tips for working through language and cultural barriers in your medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2009-01-01

    The language and cultural barriers facing medical patients with limited English language proficiency pose tremendous challenges and risks. Moreover, medical practices today are more likely than ever to employ individuals whose first language is not English or who do not possess native-like knowledge of American culture. Knowing how to work through the language and cultural barriers you are likely to encounter in your medical practice has become increasingly more important. This article is written by a practice management consultant who has graduate-level linguistics training and second-language teaching credentials and experience. It offers 25 practical tips to help you communicate more effectively with individuals who are outside of your native culture and language. These include easy-to-implement tips about English language pronunciation, grammar, and word choice. This article also suggests what you can do personally to bridge the cultural divide with your patients and co-workers. Finally, this article includes a case study of one Virginia practice in which cultural differences interfered with the practice's smooth operation. It explains how the practice eventually worked through and overcame this cultural obstacle.

  16. Primary cell culture of human adenocarcinomas--practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerescu, Lucian; Tucureanu, Cătălin; Caraş, Iuliana; Neagu, Stefan; Melinceanu, Laura; Sălăgeanu, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture is one of the major tools for oncology research, being an excellent system in which to study the biochemistry and molecular biology associated with individual cancer types and to understand cancer cell physiology. Progress in understanding the biology of any type of carcinoma has been impeded by the inability to culture adequately malignant cells from most epithelial tissues. The ultimate in vitro tumor model would completely reflect the in vivo tumor microenvironment in function and mechanism. Unfortunately, such a model does not currently exist. Homogeneous cell lines that can be continuously propagated on plastic surfaces have been extensively used as a surrogate for tumor environment; however they are very different from the in vivo tumor cells. Model systems involving primary culture represent the situation most closely related to the original tissue although they have a number of disadvantages over cell lines, such as the limited ability to repeat studies with a well characterized culture system that can be used in multiple laboratories. The primary culture may contain many types of stromal and infiltrating cell types potentially complicating the interpretation of data. Yet, their properties better reflect the cellular interactions present in intact tissue. The present article reviews the critical steps in obtaining, routine maintenance and cryopreservation of primary tumor cell cultures, based on information from literature and personal experience on the subject. The article also includes an updated protocol for primary tumor cell isolation and culture.

  17. Developing a collective future: creating a culture specific nurse caring practice model for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, M R; Miller-Grolla, L

    1995-01-01

    Nurses continue to struggle with the knowledge that practice within a conceptual context is imperative, yet operationalizing theory-based practice has been fraught with challenges and frustrations. It is timely, given the current environment, for nurses to reflect personally and collectively on the processes and meanings of nursing. Caring theories have been examined with increasing frequency recently, as nurse leaders and theorists explore the profession using alternative frames of reference. The authors discuss the concepts central to development of a practice-based nurse caring model in a community hospital and review the process of nurse-caring model development. Concepts central to the development of the model include: individual;-collective experience as theory; cargiver-client congruence in perceptions of nurse caring; institutions as culture-specific environments. The ongoing process of theory development was initiated by data collection through focus group discussions on nurse-caring experiences and definitions. Twenty-four staff RNs and RNAs were interviewed by a trained facilitator. Audiotaped data were later transcribed and subjected to content analysis for initial theme and definition development. A parallel exercise was carried out with hospital patients using the same methodology. Subsequent analysis included validation of findings by both groups. Examinations of constructs as the theory development evolves will be expedited by both staff and in consultation with Dr. Madeleine Leininger and other external nurse-caring theorists. The Health Centre intends to operationalize and implement its nurse-caring model as an outcome of this long term project. Assumptions integral to the purpose of the project have been validated by staff response. Concepts and their relationships appear to achieve acceptance and be congruent with this nursing group's values and the way in which they practice. Observations to date indicate that collective development of a

  18. Federal disaster mental health response and compliance with best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Jody; Nelson Goff, Briana S

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the comprehensiveness of disaster mental health state plans and their adherence to published best practices in three states that experienced post-9/11 federally-declared disasters. There were 59 disaster mental health best practices used in this study to assess each state disaster mental plan's compliance with best practices; the states demonstrated a range of adherence to the best practices. This research may serve as a guide for those developing disaster mental health plans and encourage further considerations in disaster mental health response.

  19. Geoethics and geological culture: awareness, responsibility and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Peppoloni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The international debate in the field of geoethics focuses on some of the most important environmental emergencies, while highlighting the great responsibilities of geoscientists, whatever field they work in, and the important social, cultural and economic repercussions that their choices can have on society. The GeoItalia 2009 and 2011 conferences that were held in Rimini and Turin, respectively, and were organized by the Italian Federation of Earth Science, were two important moments for the promotion of geoethics in Italy. They were devoted to the highlighting of how, and with what tools and contents, can the geosciences contribute to the cultural renewal of society. They also covered the active roles of geoscientists in the dissemination of scientific information, contributing in this way to the correct construction of social knowledge. Geology is culture, and as such it can help to dispel misconceptions and cultural stereotypes that concern natural phenomena, disasters, resources, and land management. Geological culture consists of methods, goals, values, history, ways of thinking about nature, and specific sensitivity for approaching problems and their solutions. So geology has to fix referenced values, as indispensable prerequisites for geoethics. Together, geological culture and geoethics can strengthen the bond that joins people to their territory, and can help to find solutions and answers to some important challenges in the coming years regarding natural risks, resources, and climate change. Starting from these considerations, we stress the importance of establishing an ethical criterion for Earth scientists, to focus attention on the issue of the responsibility of geoscientists, and the need to more clearly define their scientific identity and the value of their specificities.

  20. Practices at the Boundaries of Business Ethics & Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weller, Angeli

    social responsibility field in the United States, as well as their current articulations of knowledge and competence in their respective fields. The third article is a single case study of a company that purposefully aligned ethics, compliance, corporate social responsibility and sustainability practices...

  1. Transnational Cultural Leadership as a Situated Practice : Dilemmas and Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolsteeg, Johan

    2017-01-01

    In a longitudinal transnational research project, a network of European research institutions and field organisations aims to understand how cultural managers mediate global and local pressures concerning creative autonomy, economy and ideology. Among the research questions are which variables

  2. SAFETY CULTURE ASSESSMENT – OPTIMIZATION OF EXISTING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Valenta Grebenšek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving aviation safety has always been a priority for the aviation industry. While in recent decades the reliability of machinery and computers dramatically improved the reliability of the people and the organizational aspect of safety did not change much. Many of air accident investigations have shown that one of the causal factors, which increase the probability and severity of accidents, is exactly poor safety culture. The purpose of this paper is to present the concept of safety culture assessment and the overview and review of different methods of measuring the safety culture in aviation. This research provides the suggestion that by use of different methods of assessment (evaluation of the results, more credible insight into the level of safety culture in the organization can be obtained. It also provides an understanding of how measurement systems in order to guide future performance can be used proactively.

  3. Exploring the Role of Cultural and Policy Context in Distributed Leadership Practices in the US and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Helle; Hornskov, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the Role of Cultural and Policy Context in Distributed Leadership Practices in the US and Denmark......Exploring the Role of Cultural and Policy Context in Distributed Leadership Practices in the US and Denmark...

  4. Symbolic Meanings of High and Low Impact Daily Consumption Practices in Different Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ger, Güliz; Wilhite, Harold; Halkier, Bente

    1998-01-01

    Daily consumption practices are not only practical doings. They also express symbolic meanings; social signals by which we shape our identity, confirm or challenge cultural conventions and construct images of the good life. The symbolic meanings are collectively shared and negotiated....... They influence our choices and practices whether it is by motivating or impeding them. In this study we will look at the symbolic meanings of high and low environmental impact consumption practices. In order to create desirable social markers for environmentally-friendly practices and/or to change high impact...... practices, we need to understand emergent practices and their existing cultural meanings. Thus we have chosen three fields of daily consumption practices - food consumption, transport and hygiene - and sorted out the relatively environmentally friendly (low impact) and the relatively environmentally...

  5. Cultural responsiveness in EFL teaching: reflections from native instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinarbas H. Ibrahim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many international students from different parts of the world have been studying at Turkish universities, which creates a multicultural educational setting. Due to the multicultural educational setting, English has become the most widely used language for exchanging and sharing knowledge, therefore many international universities in Turkey put a great emphasis on English language education and offer English preparatory courses to students. In order to succeed at better language education, universities employ native English instructors to provide a richer language experience with cultural components embedded in language content. In this qualitative case study, cultural reflections of native English instructors at a Turkish university were investigated. Individual and focus group interviews were data sources for the study. Findings indicated that cultural responsiveness was considered to be constructed through time, and a necessity of orientation process was emphasized. However, the native instructors’ presumptions cause intolerance and underestimation of the host culture. In addition, educational issues and students’ misbehaviors, such as cheating and calling their instructors by their first name, were attributed to cultural background of the students.

  6. Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Császi, Lajos

    2008-01-01

    In his paper "Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence" Lajos Császi argues that media violence is not a reification of social violence; rather, a popular ritual allowing contemporary societies to sublimate, to substitute, and to discuss aggression in the public sphere. Császi reviews the central questions of contemporary debates about television violence including Stuart Hall's thought on this topic and introduces the ideas of Elias, Geertz, Turner, Bettelhei...

  7. Understanding childbirth practices as an organizational cultural phenomenon: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behruzi, Roxana; Hatem, Marie; Goulet, Lise; Fraser, William; Misago, Chizuru

    2013-11-11

    Understanding the main values and beliefs that might promote humanized birth practices in the specialized hospitals requires articulating the theoretical knowledge of the social and cultural characteristics of the childbirth field and the relations between these and the institution. This paper aims to provide a conceptual framework allowing examination of childbirth practices through the lens of an organizational culture theory. A literature review performed to extrapolate the social and cultural factors contribute to birth practices and the factors likely overlap and mutually reinforce one another, instead of complying with the organizational culture of the birth place. The proposed conceptual framework in this paper examined childbirth patterns as an organizational cultural phenomenon in a highly specialized hospital, in Montreal, Canada. Allaire and Firsirotu's organizational culture theory served as a guide in the development of the framework. We discussed the application of our conceptual model in understanding the influences of organizational culture components in the humanization of birth practices in the highly specialized hospitals and explained how these components configure both the birth practice and women's choice in highly specialized hospitals. The proposed framework can be used as a tool for understanding the barriers and facilitating factors encountered birth practices in specialized hospitals.

  8. Educating Gerontologists for Cultural Proficiency in End-of-Life Care Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Gary L.; Sherman, Patricia A.; Bullock, Karen

    2009-01-01

    An educational program was developed to train practitioners to provide care for patients and families that are responsive to cultural concerns. The aim was to increase knowledge and improve attitudes toward providing culturally proficient and culturally sensitive care for patients and families facing life-threatening illnesses. The program…

  9. Cross-Cultural “Allies” in Immigrant Community Practice: Roles of foreign-trained former Montagnard health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Xin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This pilot case study describes foreign-trained former Montagnard refugee physicians’ practice experiences in Vietnam and their current community health worker and “ally” roles within the Montagnard refugee community. It highlights key features that facilitate cross-culturally responsive health care. We interviewed five Vietnam-trained former Montagnard refugee physicians using an open-ended interview format during March, 2012. We used content analysis procedures to identify key themes characterizing Montagnard physicians’ former and current practice experiences and emphasizing the roles they currently play in their new homeland. Montagnard physicians were fighting infectious diseases in homeland Vietnamese communities. Since coming to the U.S., Montagnard physicians have reoriented their competencies to fit within a community health workers model, and have shifted practice to fighting chronic disease in this refugee community. Tasks now include describing and contextualizing unique characteristics of the Montagnard languages and cultures to outside constituents. They become cross-cultural allies to the U.S. health care and facilitate individuals’ medical adherence with mainstream physicians’ orders. They ensure accuracy of interpretation of Montagnard patients’ medical complaints during a medical visit. Our findings reveal the potential roles that can be ascribed to a cross-cultural ally and can be built into practice to fulfill the Montagnard community’s unmet health needs: oral historian, mediator, facilitator/negotiator, quality assurer, psychosocial confidant, and health advocate. Normal 0 false false false EN-US ZH-CN X-NONE

  10. Bridging generic and professional care practices for Muslim patients through use of Leininger's culture care modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe-Alamah, Hiba

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide knowledge of traditional Muslim generic (folk) care beliefs, expressions and practices derived from research and descriptive sources, in order to assist nurses and other health care professionals to integrate generic (folk) into professional care practices. Muslim generic (folk) care beliefs and practices related to the caregiving process, health, illness, dietary needs, dress, privacy, modesty, touch, gender relations, eye contact, abortion, contraception, birth, death and bereavement were explored. A discussion involving the use of Leininger's culture care preservation and/or maintenance, culture care accommodation and/or negotiation and culture care repatterning and/or restructuring action modes to bridge the gap between generic (folk) and professional (etic) care practices and to consequently promote culturally congruent care is presented.

  11. Clinical accuracy of point-of-care urine culture in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anne; Cordoba, Gloria; Sørensen, Tina Møller

    2017-01-01

    in boric acid used for transportation for the reference standard. (4) Accuracy based on expert reading of photographs of POC urine cultures performed in general practice. Standard culture performed in the microbiological department was used as reference standard for all four measures. RESULTS: Twenty...... excluded was 0.82 (0.77-0.86) and agreement between expert readings of photographs and reference results was 0.81 (CI: 0.76-0.85). CONCLUSIONS: POC culture used in general practice has high SEN but low SPE. Low SPE could be due to both misinterpretation in general practice and an imperfect reference......OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical accuracy (sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive predictive value and negative predictive value) of two point-of-care (POC) urine culture tests for the identification of urinary tract infection (UTI) in general practice. DESIGN: Prospective diagnostic...

  12. Hermeneutics and inter-cultural dialog: linking theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Dallmayr, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Inter-cultural dialog is frequently treated as either unnecessary or else impossible. It is said to be unnecessary, because we all are the same or share the same ‘human nature'; it is claimed to be impossible because cultures seen as language games or forms or life are so different as to be radically incommensurable. The paper steers a course between absolute universalism and particularism by following the path of dialog and interrogation - where dialog does not mean empty chatter but the exp...

  13. The Language-Culture Connection in ELT : Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Paul; Paul, ROSS

    2004-01-01

    Defining the nature of the language-culture connection and proposing how that connection should be addressed in the language classroom have long been major issues in the ELT field, and these issues remain contested and largely unresolved to this day. This paper attempts to clarify some of the major ways that the language-culture connection is conceived of in the field, and it will also outline the influences that those conceptions may be having on both course content and language pedagogy. Th...

  14. A Cultural Understanding of Chinese Immigrant Mothers’ Feeding Practices: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Nan; Cheah, Charissa S.L.; Van Hook, Jennifer; Thompson, Darcy A.; Jones, Shelby S.

    2014-01-01

    Differences in parental feeding practices revealed across and within different ethnic/ cultural groups indicate that cultural examinations of feeding practices in understudied non-European-American populations require urgent attention. China ranks as the second largest source country for children in foreign-born U.S. households. Contrary to the stereotype of slender Asians, Chinese-American young children are at high risk for obesity but have not received sufficient attention from researchers...

  15. A careful balance: multinational perspectives on culture, gender, and power in marriage and family therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Margaret L; Piercy, Fred P

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we examined how marriage and family therapists from various countries and diverse cultural backgrounds address the intersection of gender, power, and culture in therapy. Twenty participants from 15 countries responded to an Internet survey that included several hypothetical, clinical vignettes not associated with any one particular culture or nationality. Participants selected a vignette based on its similarity to clinical situations they face in practice within their cultural contexts, and provided information about their conceptualizations of gender, culture, and power, along with treatment recommendations. We analyzed data using analytic induction and constant comparison methods. Results indicate the careful balance with which the participants work to engage clients in therapy, respect cultural values and practices, and promote equitable gender relationships.

  16. Culturally Sensitive Best Practices for Sex Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Santiago, Verenice; Hund, Alycia M.

    2012-01-01

    Learning about sexuality is a lifelong process that begins in childhood and continues through the lifespan. Through family and peer interactions and media sources, youth learn about sexuality and relationships, and develop their own values. The learning process and trajectory, however, may differ among youth from diverse cultures. In fact,…

  17. Cultural Shifts, Multimodal Representations, and Assessment Practices: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal texts involve the presence, absence, and co-occurrence of alphabetic text with visual, audio, tactile, gestural, and spatial representations. This article explores how teachers' evaluation of students' multimodal work can be understood in terms of cognition and culture. When teachers apply a paradigm of assessment rooted in print-based…

  18. Evaluation of Bacterial & Fungal Culture Practices in School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, J. Scott

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of activities may be undertaken in elementary and secondary school science laboratories as part of regular curricular activities or optional classroom activities, including science fair projects. Among these is the culturing of microorganisms such as bacteria or fungi. There are various potential educational opportunities associated…

  19. "Racialised" Pedagogic Practices Influencing Young Muslims' Physical Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagkas, Symeon; Hunter, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing concern surrounding the "racialised" body and the way young people develop dispositions towards physical activity (PA) and sports, and more broadly to physical culture. This paper draws on Bourdieu's social theory in an effort to explore the ways in which the intersectionality of various "fields"…

  20. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. DESIGN: Concept analysis. DATA SOURCES: Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. METHODS: Walker...

  1. Culturally Sensitive Dementia Caregiving Models and Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Andrew P.; Mitcham-Smith, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Family caregiving for individuals with dementia is an increasingly complex issue that affects the caregivers' and care recipients' physical, mental, and emotional health. This article presents 3 key culturally sensitive caregiver models along with clinical interventions relevant for mental health counseling professionals.

  2. Reconnecting Proficiency, Literacy, and Culture: From Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warford, Mark K.; White, William L.

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to capably communicate across languages? This article introduces two theoretical models and a lesson plan format designed to facilitate the integration of proficiency, literacy, and culture teaching in foreign language teaching. The Second Symbolic Competencies Model configures proficiency and literacy as subordinate clusters of…

  3. Popular music as cultural heritage: scoping out the field of practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.C. Brandellero (Amanda); M.S.S.E. Janssen (Susanne)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper sets out to deepen our understanding of the relationship between popular music and cultural heritage and to delineate the practices of popular music as cultural heritage. The paper illustrates how the term has been mobilised by a variety of actors, from the public to the

  4. "A'ole" Drugs! Cultural Practices and Drug Resistance of Rural Hawai'ian Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po'A-Kekuawela, Ka'Ohinani; Okamoto, Scott K.; Nebre, La Risa H.; Helm, Susana; Chin, Coralee I. H.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how Native Hawai'ian youths from rural communities utilized cultural practices to promote drug resistance and/or abstinence. Forty-seven students from five different middle schools participated in gender-specific focus groups that focused on the cultural and environmental contexts of drug use for Native Hawai'ian…

  5. Effects of a team-based assessment and intervention on patient safety culture in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, B; Müller, V; Rochon, J

    2014-01-01

    culture and decided on about 10 actions per practice to improve it. After 12 months, no significant differences were found between intervention and control groups in terms of error management (competing probability = 0.48, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.63, p = 0.823), 11 further patient safety culture indicators...

  6. Popular music as cultural heritage: scoping out the field of practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandellero, A.; Janssen, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper sets out to deepen our understanding of the relationship between popular music and cultural heritage and to delineate the practices of popular music as cultural heritage. The paper illustrates how the term has been mobilised by a variety of actors, from the public to the private sector, t

  7. Popular music as cultural heritage: scoping out the field of practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.C. Brandellero (Amanda); M.S.S.E. Janssen (Susanne)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper sets out to deepen our understanding of the relationship between popular music and cultural heritage and to delineate the practices of popular music as cultural heritage. The paper illustrates how the term has been mobilised by a variety of actors, from the public to the priva

  8. The Influence of Organizational Culture on Affinity for Knowledge Management Practices of Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problems of hospitals' duplicated effort and ad hoc knowledge management (KM) practices. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the focus and type of organizational culture in order to describe and predict the relationship between organizational culture and the affinity for KM of nurses working in health…

  9. Social Action in Practice: Shifting the Ethnocentric Lens in Cross-Cultural Art Therapy Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    With the advance of globalization and changing demographics, an intercultural perspective that is self-reflexively aware of ethnocentric bias is increasingly important for art therapists. This article draws from cross-cultural art therapy in the international service realm to consider the nature of art therapy as a distinctly cultural practice.…

  10. The Cultivation of Cross-Cultural Communication Competence in Oral English Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the main problems and difficulties in current college English oral English teaching practice, illustrates the relationship between oral English teaching and cross-cultural communication competence. On the one hand, cross-cultural communication plays an essential role in oral English teaching; besides, oral English teaching…

  11. Social Action in Practice: Shifting the Ethnocentric Lens in Cross-Cultural Art Therapy Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    With the advance of globalization and changing demographics, an intercultural perspective that is self-reflexively aware of ethnocentric bias is increasingly important for art therapists. This article draws from cross-cultural art therapy in the international service realm to consider the nature of art therapy as a distinctly cultural practice.…

  12. Topography of “Cronopaisajes” – Social Identities, Cultural Practices and Historical “Plots”

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Rivera

    2008-01-01

    Analyzing the concept of social representation and its distinctive connections with the ideological, mentalities, the imaginary and cultural practices, and based on defining urban space as a cultural text, this article proposes an analytical repository of historical interpretation, the “Cronopaisaje,” composed of the interaction of architectural-urban forms, a grammar of sociability and mechanisms of regulation and hierarchization, and “escenicas,” or interpolative repertoires of cultural pra...

  13. Cultures in orbit: Satellite technologies, global media and local practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Lisa Ann

    Since the launch of Sputnik in 1957, satellite technologies have had a profound impact upon cultures around the world. "Cultures in Orbit" examines these seemingly disembodied, distant relay machines in relation to situated social and cultural processes on earth. Drawing upon a range of materials including NASA and UNESCO documents, international satellite television broadcasts, satellite 'development' projects, documentary and science fiction films, remote sensing images, broadcast news footage, World Wide Web sites, and popular press articles I delineate and analyze a series of satellite mediascapes. "Cultures in Orbit" analyzes uses of satellites for live television relay, surveillance, archaeology and astronomy. The project examines such satellite media as the first live global satellite television program Our World, Elvis' Aloha from Hawaii concert, Aboriginal Australian satellite programs, and Star TV's Asian music videos. In addition, the project explores reconnaissance images of mass graves in Bosnia, archaeological satellite maps of Cleopatra's underwater palace in Egypt, and Hubble Space Telescope images. These case studies are linked by a theoretical discussion of the satellite's involvement in shifting definitions of time, space, vision, knowledge and history. The satellite fosters an aesthetic of global realism predicated on instantaneous transnational connections. It reorders linear chronologies by revealing traces of the ancient past on the earth's surface and by searching in deep space for the "edge of time." On earth, the satellite is used to modernize and develop "primitive" societies. Satellites have produced new electronic spaces of international exchange, but they also generate strategic maps that advance Western political and cultural hegemony. By technologizing human vision, the satellite also extends the epistemologies of the visible, the historical and the real. It allows us to see artifacts and activities on earth from new vantage points

  14. Bangladeshi parental ethnotheories in the United Kingdom: Towards cultural collaborations in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Ruma

    2016-07-01

    Parental meaning systems (ethnotheories) constitute a very important part of the context in which children live and develop. Parental ethnotheories are in turn shaped by implicit cultural ideals that organize parental beliefs and actions and frame child-rearing practices. The article presents a qualitative research into Bangladeshi parental ethnotheories in the United Kingdom, which illustrates both the rich cultural meanings that orientate parental action and also demonstrates how parents generate new meanings following migration and culture change. Professional understandings about children's developmental needs, of child rearing and parenting, are not culture free and an examination of the cultural frames of professional theories is important as parenting is often taught as a universal technique that takes little account of the cultural context and of what parents think. An engagement with other cultural theories about child development can enhance critical reflexivity in clinical practice by provoking reflection on the cultural constructions of professional theories. Creating a context for the expression of parental ethnotheories is necessary for developing cross-cultural collaborations in clinical practice as it empowers families and redresses the power relationship between the therapist and the parent.

  15. Developing cultural competence and social responsibility in preclinical dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W

    2004-04-01

    Dental student development of cultural competence and social responsibility is recognized by educators as an important element in the overall shaping of minds and attitudes of modem dental practitioners. Yet training modalities to achieve these competencies are not clearly defined, and outcome measurements are elusive. This article shows an effective method to meet these desired outcomes. Sixty-one freshmen (class of 2005) participated in forty hours of nondental community service, and reflective journals were completed by the end of second year. Competency outcomes were measured by selecting key words and phrases found in the individual journals. Key phrases were related to compassion, righteousness, propriety, and wisdom. Also, phrases had to be accompanied by written indications of direct program causation. The combination of active-learning (based upon service learning models) in public health settings outside of the dental realm, accompanied by reflective journaling, enhanced cultural understanding and community spirit in the majority of students.

  16. Perceived Cultural Responsiveness and Effectiveness of a Speech and Language Program for Indigenous Preschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Kent; Craft, Calli B.; MacKay, Leslie D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an increasing need for culturally relevant curricula, what is considered culturally responsive and how it is assessed is under-researched. The present study examined the perceived cultural responsiveness and effectiveness of an early intervention program designed to teach early language skills and expose students to Indigenous culture, the…

  17. The practicality of employee empowerment: supporting a psychologically safe culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadares, Kevin J

    2004-01-01

    In times of workforce shortages and increasing pressures to compete, health care organizations need to advance and ameliorate their resources to ensure organizational success. Other industries have maximized empowerment initiatives as a strategy to retain and develop employees as primary stakeholders of its mission. While the notion of employee empowerment is by itself noble, for it to succeed, health care organizations must promote a culture of psychological safety to ensure a genuine commitment exists in its mission and strategies.

  18. An Analysis Of National Culture And Leadership Practices In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodi Wirawan Irawanto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Managers around the world need ideas and support to meet many of the challenges of leading. Leadership requires actions and strategies as well as convictions and ideas. Leadership occurs in relation with followers. Leading Indonesian people is not the same as leading Westerners nor is it the same as leading other Asian people. A leadership strategy effective in one culture can be counter-productive in another. In this paper, the use findings of Hofstede’s and the GLOBE’s studies are used to identify important values of Indonesians, relating them to Indonesian culture and leadership style in an organization setting. Indonesians emphasis collective well being and show a strong humane orientation within their society. The culture is assertive, and pays attention to maintaining harmony. Effective leaders are expected to show compassion while using a more paternalistic than autocratic leadership style. It is advisable that expatriate managers need to avoid actions that are not suited to these values and expectations.

  19. Exploratory Practice: Work at the Cultural Inglesa, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwright, Dick; Lenzuen, Rosa

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the aim of the Cultural Inglesa, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, which is the development of a new, fully sustainable concept for classroom-based research--exploratory practice--and its assimilation into the normal working and professional-development practices of Rio Cultura teachers. (Author/VWL)

  20. Cultural Practices and the Conception of Individual Differences: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Terezinha

    1995-01-01

    Considers empirical evidence and theoretical issues that point out the need to reconceptualize individual differences in psychology. Studies use of arithmetic in everyday life and in the classrooms to explore consequences of cultural practices, the nature of individual differences in "ability," and links between practices and identity.…

  1. Evidence-Based Practice in Special Education and Cultural Adaptations: Challenges and Implications for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Lam, Yeana

    2017-01-01

    Many issues arise in the discussion of the evidence-based practice (EBP) movement and implementation science in special education and specific educational practices for students with severe disabilities. Yet cultural adaptations of EBPs, which have emerged as an area of research in other fields, are being left out as a focus of EBP discourse. The…

  2. Identifying Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Culturally Competent Practice for School Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasley, Martell; Gourdine, Ruby; Canfield, James

    2010-01-01

    This study presents descriptive findings from self-reported qualitative and quantitative data on barriers and facilitators to culturally competent school social work practice. The study highlights the need for the development of evaluative methods for the purpose of examining how elements within the practice environment affect school social work…

  3. VET Manager Identities: Culture, Philosophy and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Using a post-structural approach this article investigates the working lives of frontline managers in VET and how they negotiate change in their day to day practices and decision making. The article is organised around accounts made by managers from different types of Vocational Education and Training (VET) organisations, namely: Technical and…

  4. VET Manager Identities: Culture, Philosophy and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Using a post-structural approach this article investigates the working lives of frontline managers in VET and how they negotiate change in their day to day practices and decision making. The article is organised around accounts made by managers from different types of Vocational Education and Training (VET) organisations, namely: Technical and…

  5. Voices Off: Reconstructing Career Theory and Practice for Cultural Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Mark B.

    2006-01-01

    The most fundamental challenge that career psychology faces is the construction of a new identity that will challenge the career theories and counselling practices that have occupied centre stage in evolving forms for over a century. As part of that challenge, career practitioners and career educators need to address the critical question of what…

  6. Cultural Shifts: Putting Critical Information Literacy into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses the example of foreign languages to explore the integration of critical information literacy into the curriculum of various disciplines. By closely examining the practices and values inherent in the foreign language information environment, the paper suggests that a critical vision of information literacy provides the most…

  7. Beyond Authoritarianism: A Cultural Perspective on Asian American Parenting Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ruth K.

    A study was conducted to determine Asian American conceptualizations of parenting, focusing on socialization goals, parenting style, and parenting practices related to schooling, aspects of parental influences discussed by D. Darling and L. Steinberg (1993). It was suggested that the standard conceptualizations of parenting style, those of D.…

  8. Cross-Cultural Communities of Practice for College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jack

    2014-01-01

    College readiness is a social construct requiring both student and adult preparedness. This paper used a case study methodology to explore how teaching in an early college program might promote adult college readiness in the instructors. A community of practice, enhanced by a co-teaching model, in two separate high school settings under one early…

  9. Renegotiating cultural practices as a result of HIV in the eastern region of Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Felix; Kunkeyani, Thokozani E

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that HIV awareness is very high among Malawians and yet infection rates are rising. Local cultural practices have been identified as contributing to this contradictory situation. Using data from 12 focus-group discussions collected in Balaka, Zomba, Machinga and Mangochi, the paper explores the reformulation of nine cultural practices as a preventive measure against HIV. The study reveals that cultural practices that involve sexual acts for completion are mediated through condoms and HIV tests. The study also shows that traditional herbs known for healing ailments are repurposed to symbolise sexual acts. We conclude that the idea of repurposing offers an avenue in which initiation and cleansing rites that involve sexual acts are replaced by other semiotics such as a traditional medicine called mtela. We also conclude that the modifications to cultural practices do not indicate complete abandonment of associated traditions, rather, they constitute the renegotiation of cultural practices and meanings associated with particular rites of passage. Lastly, we propose that a comprehensive prevention programme needs to be part of a wider national HIV-prevention effort combining a women and child rights and empowerment agenda and, critically, lifestyle lessons in a process of cultural renegotiation.

  10. Organizational Culture and Climate and Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-02-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) are associated with organizational context and provider individual differences. Organizational culture and climate are contextual factors that can affect staff acceptance of innovation. This study examined the association of organizational culture and climate with attitudes toward adopting EBP. Participants were 301 public sector mental health service providers from 49 programs providing mental health services for youths and families. Correlation analyses and multilevel hierarchical regressions, controlling for effects of provider characteristics, showed that constructive culture was associated with more positive attitudes toward adoption of EBP and poor organizational climates with perceived divergence of usual practice and EBP. Behavioral health organizations may benefit from consideration of how culture and climate affect staff attitudes toward change in practice.

  11. Cultural Competence in the Treatment of Addictions: Theory, Practice and Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsbury, Sally M

    2017-07-01

    Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) populations often have high rates of addictive disorders, but lower rates of treatment seeking and completion than the mainstream population. A significant barrier to treatment is the lack of culturally relevant and appropriate treatment. A literature review was conducted to identify relevant literature related to cultural competence in mental health services delivery and specifically treatment for addictive disorders. Several theoretical models of cultural competence in therapy have been developed, but the lack of rigorous research limits the empirical evidence available. Research indicates that culturally competent treatment practices including providing therapy and materials in the client's language, knowledge, understanding and appreciation for cultural perspectives and nuances, involving the wider family and community and training therapists can enhance client engagement, retention and treatment outcomes for substance use and gambling. Further methodologically rigorous research is needed to isolate the impact of cultural competence for the treatment of addictions and guide research to determine treatment efficacy within specific CALD populations. Training therapists and recruiting therapists and researchers from CALD communities is important to ensure an ongoing focus and improved outcomes for CALD populations due to the importance of engaging these populations with addiction treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Key Practitioner Message: The treatment needs of culturally diverse individuals with addictions are often not met. Theoretical models can guide therapists in incorporating cultural competence. Culturally targeted treatments increase recruitment, retention and treatment outcomes. Cultural competence includes matching clinicians and clients on linguistic and cultural backgrounds as well as being mindful of the impact of culture on client's experience of addiction problems. Few methodologically

  12. Culturally Responsive Leadership: Best Practice in Integrating Immigrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Cathyrn; Schiff, Margo

    2010-01-01

    Immigration to the US has fluctuated with economic conditions and with American immigration policies. Historically, most immigrants settled in urban areas, while suburban towns and their schools remained almost completely homogeneous and overwhelmingly White. Today, roughly one in five children in the US comes from an immigrant home, altering the…

  13. Everyday practices of humanitarian aid: tsunami response in Sri Lanka

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernando, U.; Hilhorst, D.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article underlines the importance of grounding the analysis of humanitarian aid in an understanding of everyday practice. It presents ethnographic vignettes illustrating three aspects of aid response in Sri Lanka following the tsunami disaster in 2004. The first deals with the nature of humanit

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility: Practices of Ethics in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Marla S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and examine perceptions among public and private higher education leaders in Pennsylvania regarding their institutions Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) codes of conduct, ethics training programs, and practices of ethics. Highly publicized misconduct incidents warranted the need for scrutiny of the…

  15. Learning Social Responsibility in Schools: A Restorative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macready, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Vygotsky regarded the site of learning to be within a matrix of relational action. From this perspective, learning social responsibility will involve a focus on the learning environments that are made available in schools. Adapting the concept of restorative justice to a school context, restorative practice offers a range of relevant learning…

  16. Response to Marie Paz Morales' ``Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-12-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript.

  17. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  18. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  19. Cultural childbirth practices, beliefs, and traditions in postconflict Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, Jody R; Boyle, Joyceen S

    2011-06-01

    In this qualitative study we used an interpretive, critical ethnographic approach to provide an understanding of childbirth and maternal illness and death in Liberia through the lens of women, families, and communities. We identified three major themes from the data: (a) secrecy surrounding pregnancy and childbirth; (b) power and authority; and (c) distrust of the health care system. The interpretive theory, Behind the House, generated from data analysis provides an understanding of the larger social and cultural context of childbirth in Liberia. Our findings provide a more complete understanding of the contextual factors that impact on the intractable problem of maternal mortality.

  20. Global and cultural perinatal nursing research: improving clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Lynn Clark

    2011-01-01

    High-quality perinatal nursing care should be based on the best evidence including research findings, clinical expertise, and the preferences of women and their families. Principles of perinatal research initiatives are defined, with suggested research priorities designed to close current gaps in the micro and macro environments of perinatal nursing throughout the world. Nearly a decade ago, the following question was asked, "Where is the 'E' (evidence) in maternal child health?" Improving the quality and safety of perinatal nursing care for culturally diverse women globally is the primary goal of nurse researchers leading the future of perinatal healthcare.

  1. Religious culture and health promotion: care, practice, object

    OpenAIRE

    Viola Timm

    2015-01-01

    At the margins of modern medical practice, pushing the very limits of science, and indefatigably rendering the precincts of public discourse, still functional remnants of Christian civilization continue to provide care for the hopeless, perform healing sacraments for the incurable, and curate objects of votive devotion for the suffering and needy. These public services go largely unaccounted for, though they secure an ordered world, structure perception, and serve as ontological anchors. Lost...

  2. Cross-Cultural Practice in International Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chen (Chiu-Yi/Joy Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By means of the increasing global competition and internationalization of world markets, international expatriates assignments are more and more essential to successful worldwide development for many multinational corporations. Therefore, international expatriates are imperative to the survival of globe enterprises in the twenty-first century. Expatriates can become an important human resource to international enterprises or multinational operations. To facilitate business expatriates adjust to an overseas environment and work effectively, MNCs need to recognize the demographic factors those to affect cross-cultural adjustment. The main purpose of this study is utilizing Lee’s (2002 model to investigate the relationship among the demographic factors and cross-cultural adjustment of Taiwanese expatriates assigned to Mainland. Also, the empirical outcomes were compared between Taiwanese expatriates located in Mainland China and United States.In examining the significant degree of Taiwanese expatriates assigned to Mainland China, the instrument was a questionnaire survey conducted to this study. The variables of interest were measured using items Likert-type of questions, and those items are divided into seven categories. Data collected from 353 participants who have experience of post to Mainland China for international assignments. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA and T-test were employed to analyse data.The statistical results of this study were compared Lee’s (2002 research that associated with Taiwanese banking expatriates in United States. This thesis concludes with suggestions for both international enterprises or MNCs and individual expatriate who operate overseas journey in their normal path of business.

  3. Do responsible business practices contribute to poverty reduction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesenia Polanco Pantoja

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Today organizations are pressured by different types of audiences to show responsibility in their actions towards society. The goal of the company must be an end to reconcile economic social and environmental elements in order to avoidinequalities that globalization is generating. This paper presents a theoretical review that examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR and poverty in order to determine whether socially responsible practices can be a means to alleviate poverty in Latin America. It analyzes the successful experience of four companies in the region.

  4. Use of Safety Pin on Garments in Pregnancy: A Belief and Cultural Practice with Potential Harmful Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kola M Owonikoko; Aramide M Tijani; Olarewaju G Bajowa; Oluseyi O Atanda

    2017-01-01

    Background: Culture has been known to influence practices and beliefs of people world over. Several cultural practices have been noted among pregnant women who were passed from one generation to the next with its potential harmful and beneficial effect. The use of safety pin in is one of such cultural practices that are widely practiced by many pregnant Nigerian women. Objective: We sought to gain a deeper understanding of the source of knowledge and motivation behind the use of safety pin on...

  5. Creating a Culture of Ethical Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Cynda Hylton

    2016-09-01

    Undisputedly, the United States' health care system is in the midst of unprecedented complexity and transformation. In 2014 alone there were well over thirty-five million admissions to hospitals in the nation, indicating that there was an extraordinary number of very sick and frail people requiring highly skilled clinicians to manage and coordinate their complex care across multiple care settings. Medical advances give us the ability to send patients home more efficiently than ever before and simultaneously create ethical questions about the balance of benefits and burdens associated with these advances. Every day on every shift, nurses at the bedside feel an intense array of ethical issues. At the same time, administrators, policy-makers, and regulators struggle to balance commitments to patients, families, staff members, and governing boards. Ethical responsibilities and the fiduciary, regulatory, and community service goals of health care institutions are not mutually exclusive; they must go hand in hand. If they do not, our health care system will continue to lose valued professionals to moral distress, risk breaking the public's trust, and potentially undermine patient care. At this critical juncture in health care, we must look to new models, tools, and skills to confront contemporary ethical issues that impact clinical practice. The antidote to the current reality is to create a new health care paradigm grounded in compassion and sustained by a culture of ethical practice.

  6. Effectiveness of practices to reduce blood culture contamination: a Laboratory Medicine Best Practices systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Susan R; Favoretto, Alessandra M; Baetz, Rich Ann; Derzon, James H; Madison, Bereneice M; Mass, Diana; Shaw, Colleen S; Layfield, Christopher D; Christenson, Robert H; Liebow, Edward B

    2012-09-01

    This article is a systematic review of the effectiveness of three practices for reducing blood culture contamination rates: venipuncture, phlebotomy teams, and prepackaged preparation/collection (prep) kits. The CDC-funded Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative systematic review methods for quality improvement practices were used. Studies included as evidence were: 9 venipuncture (vs. versus intravenous catheter), 5 phlebotomy team; and 7 prep kit. All studies for venipuncture and phlebotomy teams favored these practices, with meta-analysis mean odds ratios for venipuncture of 2.69 and phlebotomy teams of 2.58. For prep kits 6 studies' effect sizes were not statistically significantly different from no effect (meta-analysis mean odds ratio 1.12). Venipuncture and the use of phlebotomy teams are effective practices for reducing blood culture contamination rates in diverse hospital settings and are recommended as evidence-based "best practices" with high overall strength of evidence and substantial effect size ratings. No recommendation is made for or against prep kits based on uncertain improvement. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. All rights reserved.

  7. Incorporating Disciplinary Practices Into Characterizations of Progress in Responsive Teaching

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Jennifer; Gupta, Ayush

    2015-01-01

    Responsive teaching, in which teachers adapt instruction based on close attention to the substance of students' ideas, is typically characterized along two dimensions: the level of detail at which teachers attend and respond to students' ideas, and the stance teachers take toward what they hear - evaluating for correctness vs. interpreting meaning. We propose that characterizations of progress in responsive teaching should also consider the disciplinary centrality of the practices teachers notice and respond to within student thinking. To illustrate what this kind of progress can look like, we present a case study of a middle school science teacher who implemented the "same" lesson on the motion of freely falling objects in two subsequent years. We argue that his primary shift in responsiveness stemmed from a shift in which disciplinary practices he preferentially noticed and foregrounded. He moved from a focus on causal factors or variables to a more scientifically productive focus on causal stories or expla...

  8. The Cultural Production of New Forms of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines 2 cases of businesses targeting consumer lifelong learning processes about ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR) from a macro-level socio-technical design perspective. In other words, the socio-technical interaction is at the social level, which can be considered...... a macro level, above the traditional organizational level framing for socio-technical design. The purpose of this analysis is to set out a model for understanding technology supported lifelong consumer learning about ethics as a counterpart to corporate social responsibility....

  9. The Cultural Production of New Forms of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines 2 cases of businesses targeting consumer lifelong learning processes about ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR) from a macro-level socio-technical design perspective. In other words, the socio-technical interaction is at the social level, which can be considered a ...

  10. Developing a social practice-based typology of British drinking culture in 2009-2011: implications for alcohol policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Abdallah K; Lovatt, Melanie; Meier, Petra S; Brennan, Alan; Holmes, John

    2016-09-01

    The concept of national drinking culture is well established in research and policy debate, but rarely features in contemporary alcohol policy analysis. We aim to demonstrate the value of the alternative concept of social practices for quantitatively operationalizing drinking culture. We discuss how a practice perspective addresses limitations in existing analytical approaches to health-related behaviour before demonstrating its empirical application by constructing a statistical typology of British drinking occasions. Cross-sectional latent class analysis of drinking occasions derived from retrospective 1-week drinking diaries obtained from quota samples of a market research panel. Occasions are periods of drinking with no more than 2 hours between drinks. Great Britain, 2009-11. A total of 187 878 occasions nested within 60 215 nationally representative adults (aged 18 + years). Beverage type and quantity per occasion; location, company and gender composition of company; motivation and reason for occasion; day, start-time and duration of occasion; and age, sex and social grade. Eight occasion types are derived based primarily on parsimony considerations rather than model fit statistics. These are mixed location heavy drinking (10.4% of occasions), heavy drinking at home with a partner (9.4%), going out with friends (11.1%), get-together at someone's house (14.4%), going out for a meal (8.6%), drinking at home alone (13.6%), light drinking at home with family (12.8%) and light drinking at home with a partner (19.6%). An empirical model of drinking culture, comprising a typology of drinking practices, reveals the dominance of moderate drinking practices in Great Britain. The model demonstrates the potential for a practice perspective to be used in evaluation of how and why drinking cultures change in response to public health interventions. © 2016 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Cultural health beliefs in a rural family practice: a Malaysian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariff, Kamil M; Beng, Khoo S

    2006-02-01

    Understanding the sociocultural dimension of a patient's health beliefs is critical to a successful clinical encounter. Malaysia with its multi-ethnic population of Malay, Chinese and Indian still uses many forms of traditional health care in spite of a remarkably modern rural health service. The objective of this paper is discuss traditional health care in the context of some of the cultural aspects of health beliefs, perceptions and practices in the different ethnic groups of the author's rural family practices. This helps to promote communication and cooperation between doctors and patients, improves clinical diagnosis and management, avoids cultural blind spots and unnecessary medical testing and leads to better adherence to treatment by patients. Includes traditional practices of 'hot and cold', notions of Yin-Yang and Ayurveda, cultural healing, alternative medicine, cultural perception of body structures and cultural practices in the context of women's health. Modern and traditional medical systems are potentially complementary rather than antagonistic. Ethnic and cultural considerations can be integrated further into the modern health delivery system to improve care and health outcomes.

  12. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice: addressing a conceptual problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-05-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice. Nursing research culture should be valued for its contribution to improving patient care and should be considered as a routine hospital activity. However, the demand for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. Concept analysis. Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. Walker and Avant's eight-step framework for concept analysis. Five defining attributes of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice were identified: strong monodisciplinary nursing professionalism, academic thinking and socialization, research use as a part of daily nursing practice, acceptance by colleagues and management and facilitation of resources from management and organization. Although the method of concept analysis has been criticized and heavily debated, the development of nursing research cultures based on the defining attributes and antecedents of the concept will be important to emphasize evidence-based clinical nursing care. Further research should support the development and the implementation of nursing research culture in clinical nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Corruption in Sub-Saharan Africa: A practical-theological response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petria M. Theron

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available On the 2012 Corruption Perceptions Index of Transparency International, 89.6%of Sub-Saharan African countries received scores below 50, where a score of zero signifies that the country is highly corrupt and a score of 100 declares a country free of corruption. From these results, it seems as if Sub-Saharan African countries are quite vulnerable to corruption. In this article, the question whether certain traits in the Sub-Saharan African culture such as communalism, gift giving and a shame culture could in some situations influence people’s perception of, and their possible openness towards, certain forms of corruption was investigated. The research showed that cultural traits do influence people’s behaviour and that there are certain traits in the Sub-Saharan African culture that might sanction corruption. In response to these findings, some preliminary suggestions were proposed as to how Christians living in Africa could evaluate their cultural practices in the light of God’s Word and from a reformed theological paradigm. Instead of succumbing to the pressure posed by their culture to participate in immoral or corrupt activities, they could contribute to a moral regeneration on the African continent.

  14. Plant response to heavy metals and organic pollutants in cell culture and at whole plant level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan-Goldhirsh, A.; Barazani, O. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of The Negev, The Jacob Blaustein Inst. for Desert Research, Albert Katz Dept. of Dryland Biotechnologies, Desert Plant Biotechnology Lab., Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Nepovim, A.; Soudek, P.; Vanek, T. [Inst. of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (Czech Republic); Smrcek, S.; Dufkova, L.; Krenkova, S. [Faculty of Natural Sciences, Charles Univ. (Czech Republic); Yrjala, K. [Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Biosciences, Div. of General Microbiology, Helsinki (Finland); Schroeder, P. [Inst. for Soil Ecology, GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Background. Increasing awareness in the last decade concerning environmental quality had prompted research into 'green solutions' for soil and water remediation, progressing from laboratory in vitro experiments to pot and field trials. In vitro cell culture experiments provide a convenient system to study basic biological processes, by which biochemical pathways, enzymatic activity and metabolites can be specifically studied. However, it is difficult to relate cell cultures, calli or even hydroponic experiments to the whole plant response to pollutant stress. In the field, plants are exposed to additional a-biotic and biotic factors, which complicate further plant response. Hence, we often see that in vitro selected species perform poorly under soil and field conditions. Soil physical and chemical properties, plant-mycorrhizal association and soil-microbial activity affect the process of contaminant degradation by plants and/or microorganisms, pointing to the importance of pot and field experiments. Objective. This paper is a joint effort of a group of scientists in COST action 837. It represents experimental work and an overview on plant response to environmental stress from in vitro tissue culture to whole plant experiments in soil. Results. Results obtained from in vitro plant tissue cultures and whole plant hydroponic experiments indicate the phytoremediation potential of different plant species and the biochemical mechanisms involved in plant tolerance. In pot experiments, several selected desert plant species, which accumulated heavy metal in hydroponic systems, succeeded in accumulating the heavy metal in soil conditions as well. Conclusions and recommendations. In vitro plant tissue cultures provide a useful experimental system for the study of the mechanisms involved in the detoxification of organic and heavy metal pollutants. However, whole plant experimental systems, as well as hydroponics followed by pot and field trials, are essential when

  15. Individual and culture-level components of survey response styles: A multi-level analysis using cultural models of selfhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter B; Vignoles, Vivian L; Becker, Maja; Owe, Ellinor; Easterbrook, Matthew J; Brown, Rupert; Bourguignon, David; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B; Kreuzbauer, Robert; Cendales Ayala, Boris; Yuki, Masaki; Zhang, Jianxin; Lv, Shaobo; Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit; Jaafar, Jas Laile; Fischer, Ronald; Milfont, Taciano L; Gavreliuc, Alin; Baguma, Peter; Bond, Michael Harris; Martin, Mariana; Gausel, Nicolay; Schwartz, Seth J; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Tatarko, Alexander; González, Roberto; Didier, Nicolas; Carrasco, Diego; Lay, Siugmin; Nizharadze, George; Torres, Ana; Camino, Leoncio; Abuhamdeh, Sami; Macapagal, Ma Elizabeth J; Koller, Silvia H; Herman, Ginette; Courtois, Marie; Fritsche, Immo; Espinosa, Agustín; Villamar, Juan A; Regalia, Camillo; Manzi, Claudia; Brambilla, Maria; Zinkeng, Martina; Jalal, Baland; Kusdil, Ersin; Amponsah, Benjamin; Çağlar, Selinay; Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu; Möller, Bettina; Zhang, Xiao; Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Prieto Gil, Paula; Lorente Clemares, Raquel; Campara, Gabriella; Aldhafri, Said; Fülöp, Márta; Pyszczynski, Tom; Kesebir, Pelin; Harb, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Variations in acquiescence and extremity pose substantial threats to the validity of cross-cultural research that relies on survey methods. Individual and cultural correlates of response styles when using 2 contrasting types of response mode were investigated, drawing on data from 55 cultural groups across 33 nations. Using 7 dimensions of self-other relatedness that have often been confounded within the broader distinction between independence and interdependence, our analysis yields more specific understandings of both individual- and culture-level variations in response style. When using a Likert-scale response format, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as similar to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour harmony, similarity with others and receptiveness to influence. However, when using Schwartz's (2007) portrait-comparison response procedure, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant but also connected to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour self-reliance and self-consistency. Extreme responding varies less between the two types of response modes, and is most prevalent among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant, and in cultures favouring self-reliance. As both types of response mode elicit distinctive styles of response, it remains important to estimate and control for style effects to ensure valid comparisons. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  16. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  17. Cultural Competence and Social Work Education: Moving toward Assessment of Practice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Jayshree S.; Osteen, Philip; Shipe, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Social work educators are responsible for ensuring that future practitioners are culturally competent and have the ability to work effectively with people from different backgrounds. The purpose of this article is to address the current limitations in measuring cultural competence and to report the results of a qualitative study examining…

  18. Mind the Gap: Integrating Science and Policy Cultures and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, S. M.; Simon, I.

    2015-12-01

    A 2014 survey conducted by the Pew Research Center asked members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science about their support for active engagement in public policy debates. The survey found that 87% of the respondents supported scientists taking an active role in public policy debates about science and technology (S&T), but most believed that regulations related to areas like land use and clean air and water are not guided by the best science. Despite the demand for actionable scientific information by policy makers, these survey results underscore the gap that exists between the scientific and the public policy communities. There are fundamental differences that exist between the perspectives of these two groups, even within Federal S&T agencies that are required to balance the perspectives of the science and policy communities in order to fulfill their agency mission. In support of an ongoing agency effort to strengthen communication and interaction among staff, we led a Federal S&T agency office through an examination and comparison of goals, processes, external drivers, decision making, and timelines within their organization. This workshop activity provided an opportunity to identify the interdependence of science and policy, as well as the challenges to developing effective science-based policy solutions. The workshop featured strategies for achieving balanced science policy outcomes using examples from a range of Federal S&T agencies. The examples presented during the workshop illustrated best practices for more effective communication and interaction to resolve complex science policy issues. The workshop culminated with a group activity designed to give participants the opportunity to identify the challenges and apply best practices to real world science policy problems. Workshop examples and outcomes will be presented along with lessons learned from this agency engagement activity.

  19. Evaluation of an intervention to improve blood culture practices: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavese, P; Maillet, M; Vitrat-Hincky, V; Recule, C; Vittoz, J-P; Guyomard, A; Seigneurin, A; François, P

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an intervention to improve blood culture practices. A cluster randomised trial in two parallel groups was performed at the Grenoble University Hospital, France. In October 2009, the results of a practices audit and the guidelines for the optimal use of blood cultures were disseminated to clinical departments. We compared two types of information dissemination: simple presentation or presentation associated with an infectious diseases (ID) specialist intervention. The principal endpoint was blood culture performance measured by the rate of patients having one positive blood culture and the rate of positive blood cultures. The cases of 130 patients in the "ID" group and 119 patients in the "simple presentation" group were audited during the second audit in April 2010. The rate of patients with one positive blood culture increased in both groups (13.62 % vs 9.89 % for the ID group, p = 0.002, 15.90 % vs 13.47 % for the simple presentation group, p = 0.009). The rate of positive blood cultures improved in both groups (6.68 % vs 5.96 % for the ID group, p = 0.003, 6.52 % vs 6.21 % for the simple presentation group, p = 0.017). The blood culture indication was significantly less often specified in the request form in the simple presentation group, while it remained stable in the ID group (p = 0.04). The rate of positive blood cultures and the rate of patients having one positive blood culture improved in both groups. The ID specialist intervention did not have more of an impact on practices than a simple presentation of audit feedback and guidelines.

  20. Managing the culturally diverse medical practice team: twenty-five strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A common misconception is that the phrase workplace diversity means meeting certain quotas in employee race or gender categories. In fact, diversity is much more than that. This article explores the unique benefits and challenges of managing a culturally diverse medical practice team and offers practice managers 25 practical strategies. It describes the two types of diversity training that are beneficial to practice managers and the kinds of policies, practices, and procedures that foster and promote diversity. This article also explores ethnocentrism, racism, ageism, sexism, stereotyping, and other potentially divisive issues among a diverse medical practice team. It provides an assessment instrument practice managers can use to evaluate their own diversity management skills. Finally, this article defines specifically what is meant by the term diversity and explores the top 10 diversity issues in workplaces today.

  1. Priority questions for the science, policy and practice of cultural landscapes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Morcillo, Monica; Bieling, Claudia; Bürgi, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Context: The design of effective responses to safeguard cultural landscape values in Europe needs collaborative action among the stakeholders involved. Despite considerable progress triggered by the European Landscape Convention (ELC) and other initiatives to link landscape science, policy and pr...

  2. Parents' participation in cultural practices with their preschoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudge Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we discuss cross-cultural similarities and variations in parents' engagement in the everyday activities in which their preschool-age children engage, focusing on mothers' and fathers' presence in the same setting as their children, the impact of their presence on the types of activities in which the children engaged, and the extent of mothers' and fathers' involvement with their children in those activities. The data were gathered from different societies - the United States, Korea, Russia, Estonia, and Kenya. They reveal that the children were involved primarily in play (more than in lessons, work, or conversation, and this was unaffected by the presence of either parent. However, parents were relatively less likely to be involved in their children's play than in the other activities. Mothers, not surprisingly, were more likely to be found in the same setting as their children and, even when taking account of their greater presence, were more likely to be involved with their children than were fathers.

  3. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed.

  4. Formation of positive motivation as the basis of students will qualities’ perfection in physical culture practicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudnyk I.O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to theoretically substantiate and test experimentally pedagogic conditions of positive motivation’s formation as the basis for students will and physical qualities’ perfection in physical culture practicing. Material: 244 first year students participated in experiment. At the beginning and at the end of experiment levels of manifestation of students’ will and physical qualities were assessed. Results: we have proved successfulness of will training if this process is naturally coincides with formation of positive motivation and perfection of motor fitness. It was found that motivation for physical culture practicing result from different demands: demand in motion, demand in fulfillment of student’s duties and demand in competition functioning. Conclusions: we have offered the following pedagogic conditions: application of game and competition methods: setting of appropriate for students tasks of training; usage of sufficient sport equipment and apparatuses; forcing of students for independent physical culture practicing through system of encouragement.

  5. A cultural understanding of Chinese immigrant mothers' feeding practices. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Cheah, Charissa S L; Van Hook, Jennifer; Thompson, Darcy A; Jones, Shelby S

    2015-04-01

    Differences in parental feeding practices revealed across and within different ethnic/cultural groups indicate that cultural examinations of feeding practices in understudied non-European-American populations require urgent attention. China ranks as the second largest source country for children in foreign-born U.S. households. Contrary to the stereotype of slender Asians, Chinese-American young children are at high risk for obesity but have not received sufficient attention from researchers and practitioners dealing with parental feeding practices and childhood obesity. The present study aimed to understand food-related parenting practices among Chinese immigrants in the U.S. using qualitative focus groups. Twenty-two mothers with preschool aged children participated in a discussion regarding parent-child food-related interactions and feeding practices. A thematic approach was adopted to analyze the focus group data following five stages of framework analysis. Thirteen key themes of feeding practices were identified, including 9 that are in existing feeding measures (pre-exiting practices) and 4 practices that have not been documented or emphasized in previous feeding measures (culturally-emphasized practices), including regulating healthy routines and food energy, spoon-feeding, using social comparison to pressure the child to eat, and making an effort to prepare/cook specific foods. Through the use of an emic approach and meaning-centered evidence, the complexities of parent-child interactions and unique nuances of parental feeding in this understudied population were revealed. Our findings can guide future development of culturally-appropriate measurement and inform intervention programs to promote the healthy development of Chinese-American children.

  6. Legal issues of extended practice: Where does the responsibility lie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttress, Susan J. [MSc Professional Development, School of Healthcare Professions, University of Salford, Frederick Road, Salford M6 6PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.buttress@salford.ac.uk; Marangon, Tim [Programme Leader MA Healthcare Law/LLB Health Law, Salford Law School, Lady Hale Building, University of Salford, M5 4WT (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    The development of new roles in healthcare has been developing rapidly since even before the publication of the NHS Plan in 2000. The driving forces have encouraged the blurring of traditional professional role boundaries and the development of extended roles in practice in which health professionals have adopted tasks out of their normal scope of practice. This paper examines the legal implications of such actions and highlights the importance of recognising the legal responsibility of taking on tasks beyond their recognised role. The case law applicable to this area is discussed and applied to clinical negligence cases that could arise from practice that is beyond the scope of professionals within their field and appropriate conclusions are drawn.

  7. SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE HUMAN RESOURCE POLICIES AND PRACTICES: ACADEMICAND PROFESSIONAL VALIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrena-Martínez, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the measurement and validation of socially responsible human resource policiesfrom academic and professional points of view. Corporate Social responsibility (CSR has made greatprogress in recent years in the theoretical realm, showing its importance through different perspectivessuch as the institutional theory, the stakeholder approach, the theory of legitimacy, and the process ofshared value. However, from an empirical standpoint, more research is needed to provide new indicatorsand evidence of testing socially responsible policies on business performance. This paper aims to devise aset of socially responsible human resource policies, demonstrate the validation of their content throughseveral practices, and review the analysis of their relative weights thanks to the contribution of a panelof academic experts and a professional pretest, conducted in large Spanish companies.

  8. Contextual Utility and Practicality: Cultural Research for the School Community in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Keung Hui

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As an intellectual project, is cultural studies actually ‘useless’ in dealing with issues closely tied to students’ everyday practices? In this article, the authors examine the problem through the case of teacher training and curriculum development in the context of educational reform in Hong Kong—in particular, through a community-interface project we are engaged in as cultural researchers at the moment.

  9. Room for improvement? Leadership, innovation culture and uptake of quality improvement methods in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apekey, Tanefa A; McSorley, Gerry; Tilling, Michelle; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2011-04-01

    Leadership and innovation are currently seen as essential elements for the development and maintenance of high-quality care. Little is known about the relationship between leadership and culture of innovation and the extent to which quality improvement methods are used in general practice. This study aimed to assess the relationship between leadership behaviour, culture of innovation and adoption of quality improvement methods in general practice. Self-administered postal questionnaires were sent to general practitioner quality improvement leads in one county in the UK between June and December 2007. The questionnaire consisted of background information, a 12-item scale to assess leadership behaviour, a seven-dimension self-rating scale for culture of innovation and questions on current use of quality improvement tools and techniques. Sixty-three completed questionnaires (62%) were returned. Leadership behaviours were not commonly reported. Most practices reported a positive culture of innovation, featuring relationship most strongly, followed by targets and information but rated lower on other dimensions of rewards, risk and resources. There was a significant positive correlation between leadership behaviour and the culture of innovation (r = 0.57; P quality improvement methods were not adopted by most participating practices. Leadership behaviours were infrequently reported and this was associated with a limited culture of innovation in participating general practices. There was little use of quality improvement methods beyond clinical and significant event audit. Practices need support to enhance leadership skills, encourage innovation and develop quality improvement skills if improvements in health care are to accelerate. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Consumer Culture, Sustainability and Business Practice: How Companies can Promote the Symbolic Value of Sustainability in Consumption Activities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Macário de Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Discussions on sustainability began recently to focus on the consumption patterns of contemporary society as a major causative factors of social and environmental problems. Thus, the aim of this paper is to discuss some opportunities that companies have to influence these changes consumption patterns towards sustainability, taking as a basis the view discussed in studies of Rindova and Ravasi (2008 who consider firms as producers of culture. To this end, we performed a theoretical essay. The results show that companies can influence the formation of specific cultures with the symbolic construction of sustainable practices, contributing to the formation of a culture of sustainable consumption. This occurs from innovation in their ways of working, considering that evoke meanings that products appear to be influenced by strategic choices of producers, such as the concepts and philosophies of design (Ravasi; Rindova, 2008, which includes the development new technologies and practices (Michaelis, 2003 based on the principles of eco-efficiency (Barber, 2008; Clark, 2008, as well as changes in values and discourses that shape the cultures of business, government, media and civil society (Michaelis, 2003, also aligned with the ethical principles and shared environmental responsibility (Tukkeret al, 2008.

  11. Response to intravenous midazolam sedation in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S

    1996-06-08

    The object of this study was to grade the response of patients undergoing a variety of dental procedures with the aid of intravenous midazolam sedation in general dental practice and to explore any relationships between the patients preoperative anxiety assessment and the clinician's assessment of co-operation whilst under sedation. One hundred consecutive patients aged between 18 and 58 years (mean 32 years; sd 10 years) and in ASA Class I or II were prospectively studied. Results showed that despite attempts to grade patient's behaviour it was not possible to reliably predict patient's responses under intravenous sedation. In addition to these findings, the great individual variation in sensitivity to midazolam was confirmed.

  12. "We Wanted to See if You Were the Real Deal": Teaching as a Cultural Practice in a Challenging Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Katrina; Edwards, Frances

    2017-01-01

    Teaching can be viewed as a cultural practice in which teaching is embedded in the culture of the teacher and informed by the culture of the students (Bell, 2011). In this paper, a narrative is presented detailing an authentic example of teaching in New Zealand in which culture is prioritised. It describes the challenges faced by a young female…

  13. Good Cell Culture Practice for stem cells and stem-cell-derived models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamies, David; Bal-Price, Anna; Simeonov, Anton; Tagle, Danilo; Allen, Dave; Gerhold, David; Yin, Dezhong; Pistollato, Francesca; Inutsuka, Takashi; Sullivan, Kristie; Stacey, Glyn; Salem, Harry; Leist, Marcel; Daneshian, Mardas; Vemuri, Mohan C; McFarland, Richard; Coecke, Sandra; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne C; Lakshmipathy, Uma; Mack, Amanda; Wang, Wen Bo; Yamazaki, Daiju; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari; Smirnova, Lena; Hartung, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The first guidance on Good Cell Culture Practice (GCCP) dates back to 2005. This document expands this to include aspects of quality assurance for in vitro cell culture focusing on the increasingly diverse cell types and culture formats used in research, product development, testing and manufacture of biotechnology products and cell-based medicines. It provides a set of basic principles of best practice that can be used in training new personnel, reviewing and improving local procedures, and helping to assure standard practices and conditions for the comparison of data between laboratories and experimentation performed at different times. This includes recommendations for the documentation and reporting of culture conditions. It is intended as guidance to facilitate the generation of reliable data from cell culture systems, and is not intended to conflict with local or higher level legislation or regulatory requirements. It may not be possible to meet all recommendations in this guidance for practical, legal or other reasons. However, when it is necessary to divert from the principles of GCCP, the risk of decreasing the quality of work and the safety of laboratory staff should be addressed and any conclusions or alternative approaches justified. This workshop report is considered a first step toward a revised GCCP 2.0.

  14. Forms of Corporate Social Responsibility Practices of Companies in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Neoh, Sher Lyn

    2015-01-01

    This management project seeks to explore the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of companies in Malaysia. To do this, the first part of the study looks into the general views of CSR along with its drivers and enablers before going into the collaboration patterns and drivers of companies and non-governmental organisation. In addition, some findings of multi-national corporations and CSR in Malaysia is also brought forward in this study. The companies selected for this study will t...

  15. Organizational Culture in Budgeting Practices: A Study in an Agroindustrial Cooperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele Wrubel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the relationship between organizational culture and budgeting practices of an organization. Developed a qualitative, descriptive research through a case study. The company's study was selected for accessibility and intentionally, since it uses corporate budget management. For data collection was designed a semi structured interview guide with questions adapted from the study of Van der Stede (2000 applied to the agricultural industry of Paraná budget manager. Was also including questions about the cultural aspects and for this was used the dimensions of organizational culture of Hofstede (1991. The organizational culture focused on results orientation contributes to the company to carry out the budget with emphasis on goals, because in this orientation the managers tend to devote efforts on tasks and is facilitated implementation of budgets that are premised on achieving planning undertaken by senior management. The organizational culture of agribusiness presents evidence to positively influence the existence of rigid control related to the budget, in which notes that people are concerned about cost control in the workplace. Some budgeting practices carried out by agribusiness are consolidated, involving the participation of managers and are influenced by cultural aspects of organizational environment that encourage such practices.

  16. [Role of bodily practices with newborn in the development of cultural identity. Examples of bodily practices in Africa and India].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoni, C

    2001-08-01

    Bodily practices on newborns are the indicators of communication between the child and his/her surroundings. The culture has to introduce individuals into a specific group by using particular practices that have applied to the past generations. The techniques are different according to the ethnic group and allow the child to reach a social birth. To emphasize the relation between the identity and the culture, four cultural examples are presented. In Bambara country, the grandmothers massage and stretch the newborn in order to let him feel the limits of his body and get into the Bambara identity. For the Wolof, the psychomotor development will be made with specific movements on the body of the child according to initiation rituals. In Kabylie, the child will be protected from the outside world before he gets his proper name. In Tamil country, the way the foetus and the child are helped emphasize his coming into the living world and his reincarnated identity. The psychic structuring and the culture are tightly connected and the body is the first mediator of that representation.

  17. The Utility of Empathy for White Female Teachers' Culturally Responsive Interactions with Black Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Chezare A.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers aiming to become culturally responsive must be concerned with negotiating professional interactions that produce favorable outcomes for the culturally diverse students under their charge. Very few studies offer empirical evidence of empathy's utility in the culturally responsive classroom, especially when the teacher is culturally…

  18. A Blueprint for Developing Culturally Proficient/Responsive School Administrators in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Jeffrey P.; Smith, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the important topic of culturally proficient/responsive school administrators for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students with learning disabilities (LD). Culturally proficient/responsive school administrators with knowledge and strong leadership skills in multicultural education are essential to impact school…

  19. [The cultural aspects of the practice of Community Health Agents in rural areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Maristela Oliveira; Brito, Maria José Menezes; Rezende, Lilian Cristina

    2012-06-01

    The daily practice of Community Health Agents (CHAs) is permeated with educational interventions aimed at preventive care and health promotion. The sociocultural universe of these professionals can affect the dynamics of their practice within the community, particularly in rural areas, where there is evidence that the population expects to obtain information relative to their health and/or disease by means of cultural rites. Based on a case study, we sought to analyze the influence of the cultural practices of the agents working in a rural area in the interior of the state of Minas Gerais. The analysis revealed the presence of a strong connection between the culture and their activities. Religious beliefs and knowledge developed from the fusion of biomedical information and values based on family tradition regarding the health-disease process have a direct effect on their practices. It is emphasized that they have an important role as facilitators in the practice of health care, with a positive effect stemming from the similarity of their life experiences and inherited cultures with those of the clients, thus making it possible to develop effective interventions.

  20. Does the introduction of nursing home culture change practices improve quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Lepore, Michael; Lima, Julie C; Shield, Renee; Tyler, Denise A

    2014-09-01

    To understand whether nursing home (NH) introduction of culture change practices is associated with improved quality. NH-level panel study using multivariate fixed-effects statistical modeling to estimate the effect of culture change introduction on quality outcomes. Eight hundred twenty-four U.S. NHs with culture change practice involvement beginning between 2005 and 2010. Directors of nursing and nursing home administrators. A culture change practice score (derived from a 2009/10 national NH survey) was used to stratify NHs according to practice implementation (high (scores in the top quartile; n = 217) vs other (n = 607)). NH-level outcomes included prevalence of seven care practices and three resident outcomes, health-related and quality-of-life weighted survey deficiencies, and average number of hospitalizations per resident year. For NHs with high practice implementation, introduction of culture change was associated with a significant decrease in prevalence of restraints, tube feeding, and pressure ulcers; an increase in the proportion of residents on bladder training programs; and a small decrease in the average number of hospitalizations per resident year (coefficient -0.04, standard error (SE) 0.02, P = .06). For NHs with lower practice implementation (practice scores in lower three quartiles), introduction was associated with fewer health-related (coefficient -5.26, SE 3.05; P = .09) and quality-of-life (coefficient -0.10, SE 0.05; P = .04) survey deficiencies, although these NHs also had small statistically significant increases in the prevalence of residents with urinary tract infections and in average hospitalizations per resident year (coefficient 0.03, SE 0.01, P = .02). The introduction of NH culture change appears to result in significant improvements in some care processes and outcomes in NHs with high practice implementation. For other NHs, culture change introduction results in fewer survey deficiencies. © 2014, Copyright the

  1. Literacy of deaf people: language social practices between two languages/cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Balieiro Lodi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper, written in the light of Bakhtin's work, aims to discuss some specificities of literacy practices for deaf people, since they are constituted on the basis of social practices involving the two languages - Brazilian Sign Language (LIBRAS and Portuguese. These languages share the same space/time in different spheres of activities and have asymmetric social-cultural and ideological forces. This linguistic-discursive feature relates literacy practices in both languages by establishing, within them, a dialogue (not always peaceful between languages/cultures. Based on these assumptions, an educational proposal will be presented in which students have developed literacy practices in both languages using their experience in Libras in its discursive/generic dimension. Although still in an early stage, this process might (resignify and change the historical relationship that has been constituting the dialogue that deaf communities have established with Portuguese.

  2. Impact of organizational change on organizational culture: implications for introducing evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Michael J; Claassen, Jennette

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) seeks to integrate the expertise of individual practitioners with the best available evidence within the context of the values and expectations of clients. Prior to implementing EBP, it is important to understand the significance that organizational change and organizational culture play. This article seeks to explore the literature associated with both organizational change and organizational culture. The analysis of organizational culture and change draw upon findings from both the private, for-profit sector, and the public, non-profit field. It is divided into four sections: organizational change and innovation, organizational culture, managing organizational culture and change, and finally, applying the findings to the implementation of EBP. While the audience for this analysis is managers in public and nonprofit human service organizations who are considering implementing EBP into their work environment, it is not intended to provide a "how to" guide, but rather a framework for critical thinking.

  3. Trans-Cultural, Trans-Language Practices: Potentialities for Rethinking Doctoral Education Pedagogies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarojni Choy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in doctoral enrolments of Asian international students in Australian universities. While policies have been developed to meet the needs of these students, there seems to be some confusion around the terms internationalisation, globalisation, bi-cultural, inter-cultural, multi-cultural, and trans-cultural within these policies. In this paper, we define these terms and advocate for a policy position which orients to a futurist definition of culture. We then review the work of Michael Singh and his research team at Western Sydney University who have responded to this rapid increase in Asian international student doctoral enrolments in Australian universities by developing pedagogic principles around notions of trans-language and trans-cultural practices. In the final section of the paper, we then draw on our own experiences of doctoral supervision in Australian universities to reflect on our positioning within the pedagogic principles around trans-language and trans-cultural practices.

  4. Socio-cultural aspect of sexual practices and sexual offences - an Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastia, Binaya Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Ignorance of the law of the land is no defence. Furthermore, it is a legal dictum that one should not be held criminally liable unless possessing a guilty mind. But during trials of some sexual offences in India it is often observed that the accused did not know that he had committed an offence because the crime in question was a part of his socio-cultural milieu. India is a vast country with great socio-cultural diversity and many different ethnic groups, each with its own distinct cultures. However, the entire Indian culture is religion based and finds its root from the ancient Holy Scriptures. The sexual culture of Indian society stems from the Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana, an epic on sex. This text is considered holy and is accepted culturally, even though many practices contained therein are offences under modern law. Child marriages and arranged marriages are an integral part of Indian society and in some tribes, even prostitution is socially sanctioned. However, all of these are also against the law. Many of the conflicts observed between the sexual practices that are accepted in Indian culture but not by the law can be explained on the basis that the Indian legal system is borrowed from that of the British.

  5. Organizational culture, team climate and diabetes care in small office-based practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Weijden Trudy

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Redesigning care has been proposed as a lever for improving chronic illness care. Within primary care, diabetes care is the most widespread example of restructured integrated care. Our goal was to assess to what extent important aspects of restructured care such as multidisciplinary teamwork and different types of organizational culture are associated with high quality diabetes care in small office-based general practices. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analyses of data from 83 health care professionals involved in diabetes care from 30 primary care practices in the Netherlands, with a total of 752 diabetes mellitus type II patients participating in an improvement study. We used self-reported measures of team climate (Team Climate Inventory and organizational culture (Competing Values Framework, and measures of quality of diabetes care and clinical patient characteristics from medical records and self-report. We conducted multivariate analyses of the relationship between culture, climate and HbA1c, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and a sum score on process indicators for the quality of diabetes care, adjusting for potential patient- and practice level confounders and practice-level clustering. Results A strong group culture was negatively associated to the quality of diabetes care provided to patients (β = -0.04; p = 0.04, whereas a more 'balanced culture' was positively associated to diabetes care quality (β = 5.97; p = 0.03. No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate and clinical patient outcomes. Conclusion Although some significant associations were found between high quality diabetes care in general practice and different organizational cultures, relations were rather marginal. Variation in clinical patient outcomes could not be attributed to organizational culture or teamwork. This study therefore contributes to the discussion about the legitimacy of the widespread idea

  6. PHILOSOPHICAL-CULTURAL CONCEPTION OF TELEVISION AS A VISUAL PRACTICES OF XX-XXI CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Tormakhova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article is to analyze the philosophical and cultural ideas about television, which is a leading visual practice of XX century. It does not lose its relevance in the beginning of the XXI. The role of television lies in visual presentation and formation of the basic norms of taste and traditions of different social groups. Television is the leading communicative practice, which consideration is represented differently in modern science. Research methodology involves an appeal to the philosophical and cultural concepts, representing different approaches to the understanding of television. The paper considers the views of Western scholars, such as R. Arnheim, M. Wolff, A. Kroker, G. Lipovetsky, M. McLuhan, D. Mulvin, J. Mittell, N. Postman, L. Saffhil, J. Sterne, E. Thompson, J. Fiske, S. Shapiro. During analysis of the issue of the specific nature of television content the works of Russian scientists – T. Savitskaya, N. Samutina and Polish contemporary author – R. Sapenko were used. Originality lies in the depiction of the main approaches to the study of television as a visual communicative practice. Deployment of the author's position within the designated issues is presented as a historical digression – from the first attempts at understanding the phenomenon of television to the newest scientific theories that have found expression in contemporary American philosophical and cultural thought. Results of the study can be used in the training course "Visual communication and practices." Conclusions indicated that the majority of contemporary visual practices based on certain patterns, embedded TV. Despite the emergence of new media practices, TV does not lose relevance, everywhere present in the culture, which means that his research will allow a better understanding of the specificity of cultural creativity process.

  7. SOIL AGGREGATE AND ITS RESPONSE TO LAND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaofu Wei; Ming Gao; Jingan Shao; Deti Xie; Genxing Pan

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a broad review of the existing study on soil aggregate and its responses to land management practices. Soil aggregate is used for structural unit, which is a group of primary soil particles that cohere to each other more strongly than other surrounding particles. The mechanism of soil particle aggregation may be expressed by a hierarchical model, which is based upon the hypothesis that macroaggregates (>250 μm) are collections of smaller microaggregates (<250 μm) held together with organic binding agents. Primary particles form microaggregates and then macroaggregates. Carbon (C)-rich young plant residues form and stabilize macroaggregates, whereas old organic C is occluded in the microaggregates. The interaction of aggregate dynamics with soil organic carbon (SOC) is complex and embraces a range of spatial and temporal processes within macroaggregates and microaggregates. The nature and properties of aggregates are determined by the quantity and quality of coarse residues and humic compounds and by the degree of their interaction with soil particles. The mechanisms resulting in the binding of primary soil particles into stable aggregates vary with soil parent material, climate, vegetation, and land management practices. Land management practices, including tillage methods, residue management, amendments, and soil fertility management, enhance soil aggregation. However, there is still much uncertainty in the dynamics of organic matter in macroaggregation and microaggregation, and research is still needed to understand further the mechanisms of aggregate formation and its responses to human activities.

  8. Mobile phones as cultural resources for learning – an analysis of mobile expertise, structures and emerging cultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Bachmair

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available If it is the case that mobile devices, with their specific social and technological structures and attendant cultural practices, have become an integral part of everyday life, then the educational field has to react. But how and who? Fact is that mobile devices have reached and become fully integrated in everyday life, worldwide and across social milieus. This development is «ubiquitous» (e.g. Haythornthwaite, 2008, Beale 2007, Nyiri 2002 and is accompanied by an increase in individualisation enabled and necessitated by a variety of mobile devices characterised by media convergence. Education must ask questions about the impact of these irreversible trends on the personal development of young people and about its role in mediating them as well as about their impact on individual agency of young people in the context of emerging socio-cultural structures (see Stald 2007.

  9. Responding to Literature through Storytelling, Artifacts and Multigenre Writing Practices: Explorations of Cultures and Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga-Dobai, Kinga

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript describes how innovative literacy practices such as multigenre writing and artifactual critical literacy have been used to tap into pre-service teachers' cultural identities while responding to literature. In the process of responding to literature, personal experience is crucial; therefore, in this study, I focused on the…

  10. Variations in Beliefs and Practices: Teaching English in Cross-Cultural Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing

    2010-01-01

    This article examines variations in beliefs and practices between British English language teaching (ELT) specialists and their Chinese colleagues in a cross-cultural educational development project which used interviews and a questionnaire survey to gather the perceptions and retrospective experiences of Chinese tertiary teachers and expatriate…

  11. Educating students to cross boundaries between disciplines and cultures and between theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortuin, K.P.J.; Bush, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and analyse the didactic model of a university course, which concerns an applied academic consultancy project and which focuses on skills related to crossing boundaries between disciplines and cultures, and between theory and practice. The

  12. Creating a Climate for Innovation in Education: Reframing Structure, Culture, and Leadership Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Kam, JoAnn C. W. N.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was on creating a climate for innovation in schools to lead to improvements in student achievement. Bolman and Deal's (2008) four frame model of organizational thinking was used as a framework for the study. The study examined the influence of leadership practices, structure, and school culture in the context of a K-12…

  13. Machismo in two cultures: relation to punitive child-rearing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyoung, Y; Zigler, E F

    1994-07-01

    The relationship of culture, personality traits, and punitive child-rearing practices to machismo was examined in 40 Guyanese and 40 Caucasian parents with children aged four to 12 years. Guyanese parents were found to adhere more strongly to machista attitudes and beliefs and to employ controlling, authoritarian, and punitive child-rearing techniques more often than did Caucasian parents.

  14. Policies on and Practices of Cultural Inclusivity in Learning Management Systems: Perspectives of Indigenous Holistic Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreamson, Neal; Thomas, Gary; Lee Hong, Anita; Kim, Soyoung

    2017-01-01

    Online learning has become a conventional term and practice in Australian higher education, yet cultural inclusivity for Indigenous (Indigenous for the purposes of this paper refers to Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples) students is insufficiently reflected in learning management system (LMS) policies and design. This study…

  15. Imagining Pedagogy in Public Space: Visions of Cultural Policies and Practices in a City in Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemeersch, Danny

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project completed with graduate students of the adult-education programme at the Leuven University in Flanders, Belgium. The research focused on cultural policies and practices in urban contexts that try to facilitate the learning of democratic citizenship in non-formal settings. In the first part we introduce some…

  16. Maternal Cultural Values and Parenting Practices: Longitudinal Associations with Chinese Adolescents' Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Michael M.; Li, Yan; Shi, Junqi

    2012-01-01

    Interrelations among cultural values, parenting practices, and adolescent aggression were examined using longitudinal data collected from Chinese adolescents and their mothers. Adolescents' overt and relational aggression were assessed using peer nominations at Time 1 (7th grade) and Time 2 (9th grade). Mothers reported endorsement of cultural…

  17. Promoting Cultural Competence, Health Behaviors, and Professional Practice in Undergraduate Education through Peer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; FitzPatrick, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competence (CC) has been identified as an important skill for all healthcare and public health professionals, and it must be integrated into all aspects of health practice. However, few university and college health education programs in North America have included CC education in their curriculums. This article describes an…

  18. Maternal Cultural Values and Parenting Practices: Longitudinal Associations with Chinese Adolescents' Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Michael M.; Li, Yan; Shi, Junqi

    2012-01-01

    Interrelations among cultural values, parenting practices, and adolescent aggression were examined using longitudinal data collected from Chinese adolescents and their mothers. Adolescents' overt and relational aggression were assessed using peer nominations at Time 1 (7th grade) and Time 2 (9th grade). Mothers reported endorsement of cultural…

  19. Building Connections between a Cultural Practice and Modeling in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schademan, Alfred R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the kinds of reasoning that African American young men learn and develop when playing Spades, a common cultural practice in African American communities. The qualitative study found that the Spades players routinely consider multiple variables and their mathematical relationships when making decisions. The…

  20. Formative Assessment in Confucian Heritage Culture Classrooms: Activity Theory Analysis of Tensions, Contradictions and Hybrid Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Pham, Thi Hong; Renshaw, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Formative assessment has recently become a preferred assessment strategy in educational institutions worldwide. However, it is not easy to implement in Asian classrooms, because local cultures and institutional constraints potentially hinder the practice. This one-semester study aimed to use the "third space", as the core of the third…

  1. Exploring Links between Empowerment and Community-Based Arts and Cultural Practices: Perspectives from Barcelona Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Ruben David Fernández; Monferrer, Moisés Carmona; Tarditi, Andrés Di Masso

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on the development of community-based arts and cultural (CBAC) practices to promote psychosocial, group/organisational and community changes from the perspective of empowerment. We draw on findings from an initial exploratory phase of an ongoing action-research project in Spain about creative tools that empower artists…

  2. Promoting Cultural Competence, Health Behaviors, and Professional Practice in Undergraduate Education through Peer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; FitzPatrick, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competence (CC) has been identified as an important skill for all healthcare and public health professionals, and it must be integrated into all aspects of health practice. However, few university and college health education programs in North America have included CC education in their curriculums. This article describes an…

  3. National Culture in Practice: Its Impact on Knowledge Sharing in Global Virtual Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kangning

    2009-01-01

    Issues concerning global virtual collaboration have received considerable attention in both the academic and practical world; however, little research has been conducted on knowledge-sharing activities in global virtual collaboration, which is a key process to achieve collaboration effectiveness. Due to national culture having been seen as one of…

  4. Cultural landscapes as heritage in Malaysia: Potentials, threats, and current practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, R.

    2013-01-01

    The rural cultural landscape in Malaysia is relatively under-researched. The current heritage practices focus on built heritage as national heritage, which implies the everyday landscapes of the rural areas have been neglected as potential heritage and have received little attention from politicians

  5. Imagining Pedagogy in Public Space: Visions of Cultural Policies and Practices in a City in Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemeersch, Danny

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project completed with graduate students of the adult-education programme at the Leuven University in Flanders, Belgium. The research focused on cultural policies and practices in urban contexts that try to facilitate the learning of democratic citizenship in non-formal settings. In the first part we introduce some…

  6. Culture, Leadership, and Activism: Translating Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning into Pedagogical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Toby S.

    2016-01-01

    Through the article, I share the theoretical foundations, structure, knowledge acquisition, and outcomes of a cultural leadership course. The process for course development integrates several theories and research methods into practice: L. Dee Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning, Feminist Theory, Critical Race Theory, and…

  7. Cultural landscapes as heritage in Malaysia: Potentials, threats, and current practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, R.

    2013-01-01

    The rural cultural landscape in Malaysia is relatively under-researched. The current heritage practices focus on built heritage as national heritage, which implies the everyday landscapes of the rural areas have been neglected as potential heritage and have received little attention from politicians

  8. Educating students to cross boundaries between disciplines and cultures and between theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortuin, K.P.J.; Bush, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and analyse the didactic model of a university course, which concerns an applied academic consultancy project and which focuses on skills related to crossing boundaries between disciplines and cultures, and between theory and practice.

  9. Daisaku Ikeda's Philosophy of Soka Education in Practice: A Narrative Analysis of Culturally Specific Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Julie T.

    2012-01-01

    The author analyzes two teachers' narratives of their understanding and practice of Daisaku Ikeda's (1928-) philosophy of Soka (value-creating) education in relation to narratives of their experiences as students at the Soka schools he founded. These narratives both triangulate an implicit though culturally specific language used to articulate…

  10. Enabling "new" practices of renewable energy sharing: A cross-cultural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, A.; Van Dijk, H.W.; Romero Herrera, N.A.; Keyson, D.V.

    2015-01-01

    Local generation, distribution and consumption of renewable energy within neighborhood is an emerging application context for the concept of `sharing'. This position paper introduces a cross-cultural approach to enable `new' social practices of renewable energy sharing in neighborhoods. The approach

  11. Creating a Climate for Innovation in Education: Reframing Structure, Culture, and Leadership Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Kam, JoAnn C. W. N.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was on creating a climate for innovation in schools to lead to improvements in student achievement. Bolman and Deal's (2008) four frame model of organizational thinking was used as a framework for the study. The study examined the influence of leadership practices, structure, and school culture in the context of a K-12…

  12. Nursery cultural practices to achieve targets: A case study in western larch irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony S. Davis; Robert F. Keefe

    2011-01-01

    Nursery cultural practices are used to help growers achieve pre-determined size and physiological targets for seedlings. In that regard, irrigation is used to accelerate or slow growth and as a trigger for changing growth phase. In a case study highlighting the effects of irrigation on seedling development, western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.) seedlings were grown...

  13. Educating Students to Cross Boundaries between Disciplines and Cultures and between Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuin, Ir. Karen P. J.; Bush, Simon R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and analyse the didactic model of a university course, which concerns an applied academic consultancy project and which focuses on skills related to crossing boundaries between disciplines and cultures, and between theory and practice. These boundary crossing skills are needed to develop…

  14. Daisaku Ikeda's Philosophy of Soka Education in Practice: A Narrative Analysis of Culturally Specific Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Julie T.

    2012-01-01

    The author analyzes two teachers' narratives of their understanding and practice of Daisaku Ikeda's (1928-) philosophy of Soka (value-creating) education in relation to narratives of their experiences as students at the Soka schools he founded. These narratives both triangulate an implicit though culturally specific language used to articulate…

  15. Effect of Cultural Practices in Night on Weed Density and Weed Dry Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Rashed Mohasel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to evaluate the response of weed seeds to light, two experiments, at two different locations were conducted at Ferdowsi university of Mashhad in 2009. At the first experiment, field was ploughed in day and night. Weed density was evaluated 70 d after plough, with 1×1 quadrate. At the second experiment, at night treatment, ploughing, potato planting and weeding with cultivator were done at night. Weed sampling was done twice at 43 and 130 days after planting with 1×1 quadrate and weeds were identified and counted. Result showed pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L., sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus L., crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis (L. scop, jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L. and mallow (Hibiscus trionum L. did not observed at night plough, in contrast, night plough has no significance influence on common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L., and black nightshade (Solanum nigrum L.. Only common lambsquarters had similar appearance in two treatments, indicating insusceptibility of this weed to time of plough. Interestingly, at the second experiment, result was very similar. Potato yield was higher at night treatment, but not significant. This research showed that some cultural practice like plough, planting and weeding with cultivator in night can reduce weed density and weed dry matter. Keywords: Germination, Time of plough, Sustainable weeds management, Light

  16. A Critical Analysis of Social Responsibility Practices in Alcohol Advertising Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-Ann Best

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Culture plays a role in creating young alcoholics and has been at the center of debates about the impact of alcohol advertising on patterns of consumption. This research addressed the impact of alcohol advertising on local culture and its social implications in a developing economy. Stakeholders, including young people and marketing representatives from an alcohol producer in Country X, were examined to determine their perspectives of the use of alcohol advertising strategies. The findings were consistent with previous academic research and expectancy theory that indicate alcohol advertising can influence the normative behavior of young persons and their attitudes toward the use of alcohol. That is, alcohol producers can only claim to be socially responsible if their marketing strategies considers the concerns of the wider community. The Country X alcohol producer in this study, this claim requires organizational change to make the company more closely aligned to industry best practices.

  17. Formative assessment as a vehicle for changing classroom practice in a specific cultural context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingping

    2015-09-01

    In this commentary, I interpret Xinying Yin and Gayle Ann Buck's collaborative action research from a social-cultural perspective. Classroom implementation of formative assessment is viewed as interaction between this assessment method and the local learning culture. I first identify Yin and Buck's definition of the formative assessment, and then analyze the role of formative assessment in the change of local learning culture. Based on the practice of Yin and Buck I emphasize the significance of their "bottom up" strategy to the teachers' epistemological change. I believe that this strategy may provide practicable solutions to current Chinese educational problems as well as a means for science educators to shift toward systematic professional development.

  18. Cultural practices and spiritual development for women in a Native American alcohol and drug treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jenny; Fortier, Yvonne; Morris, Traci L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an instrument that can be used to identify clients' readiness for spiritual development and its relationship with their participation in American Indian/Alaskan Native practices. Female clients and staff from Guiding Star, the female residential substance abuse program at Native American Connections in Phoenix, Arizona, participated in the study. Two focus groups (8 Native and 5 non-Native clients) were conducted to determine the clients' attitudes toward cultural practices. A Native cultural practitioner was interviewed regarding the clients' spiritual needs and development. Finally, a survey on attitudes toward issues related to spirituality was conducted with 51 female clients. Readiness for spiritual development was found to be positively related to a positive outlook on life, being religious, or participating in American Indian/Alaska Native cultural activities.

  19. Topography of “Cronopaisajes” – Social Identities, Cultural Practices and Historical “Plots”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rivera

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the concept of social representation and its distinctive connections with the ideological, mentalities, the imaginary and cultural practices, and based on defining urban space as a cultural text, this article proposes an analytical repository of historical interpretation, the “Cronopaisaje,” composed of the interaction of architectural-urban forms, a grammar of sociability and mechanisms of regulation and hierarchization, and “escenicas,” or interpolative repertoires of cultural practices and social representations which at the very least correspond to levels of autopresentation and identity reference, as well as collective evaluation and qualification. The “Cronopaisaje,” then, serves as a configured dynamic for the construction of social identities.

  20. 75 FR 76997 - Public Consultation on Personnel Reliability and Culture of Responsibility Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Responsibility Issues AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Public Consultation on Guidance for Enhancing Personnel Reliability and Strengthening the Culture of Responsibility at the Local... culture of responsibility at facilities that conduct research with dangerous pathogens. The discussion...

  1. The Culturally Responsive Teacher in Class-teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢桂梅

    2008-01-01

    <正>Successfully teaching students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds requires a new way of looking at teaching that is grounded in an understanding of the role of culture and language in learning.Teachers need to be familiar with constructivist views of learning,develop socio-cultural consciousnessuse instructional strategies.

  2. ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND QUALITY CULTURE WITH COMPETITIVENESS OF SAUDI CONTRACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faihan Alotaibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Total quality management practices in construction industries can be described as the processes or that aligns the business performance strategy to the business processes in the hopes of achieving customer satisfaction and product and services quality. Quality culture conditions are strongly linked with project outcomes and hence, initiatives undertaken should be incorporated to the organizational cultural changes. The aim of the study is to determine the impact of total quality management practices, quality culture and their relationship with the competitiveness of Saudi Arabia contractors. A quantitative research design was adopted to collect data and test hypotheses. A cross-sectional survey method was used to conduct this study. The findings of the study will contribute to both theory and practice. Through the present study, the researcher expects the findings to indicate that total quality management practices meaningfully contributed and related to competitiveness and developing cooperative relationship with customers; practices that are related to the achievement of continuous improvement and in turn, continuous improvement affects quality outcomes.

  3. Response rate, response time, and economic costs of survey research: A randomized trial of practicing pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardigan, Patrick C; Popovici, Ioana; Carvajal, Manuel J

    2016-01-01

    There is a gap between increasing demands from pharmacy journals, publishers, and reviewers for high survey response rates and the actual responses often obtained in the field by survey researchers. Presumably demands have been set high because response rates, times, and costs affect the validity and reliability of survey results. Explore the extent to which survey response rates, average response times, and economic costs are affected by conditions under which pharmacist workforce surveys are administered. A random sample of 7200 U.S. practicing pharmacists was selected. The sample was stratified by delivery method, questionnaire length, item placement, and gender of respondent for a total of 300 observations within each subgroup. A job satisfaction survey was administered during March-April 2012. Delivery method was the only classification showing significant differences in response rates and average response times. The postal mail procedure accounted for the highest response rates of completed surveys, but the email method exhibited the quickest turnaround. A hybrid approach, consisting of a combination of postal and electronic means, showed the least favorable results. Postal mail was 2.9 times more cost effective than the email approach and 4.6 times more cost effective than the hybrid approach. Researchers seeking to increase practicing pharmacists' survey participation and reduce response time and related costs can benefit from the analytical procedures tested here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Teaching and training for global engineering perspectives on culture and professional communication practices

    CERN Document Server

    Flammia, Madelyn

    2016-01-01

    Provides a foundation for understanding a range of linguistic, cultural, and technological factors to effectively practice international communication in a variety of professional communication arenas This book presents a range of perspectives, examples, and concepts for teaching international professional communication in different settings. Industry professionals and academic researchers alike have written entries for Teaching and Training for Global Engineering: Perspectives on Culture and Professional Communication Practices, which have been organized into four cohesive, context-based sections that examine central issues associated with offering effective instruction on communication in global settings. The first section presents approaches for teaching issues of language and visual design related to international communication. The second section reviews aspects of software use and ethical practices associated with communicating globally. The third ection discusses how educators can use information a...

  5. An Assessment of risk response strategies practiced in software projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita Bhoola

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Risk management and success in projects are highly intertwined – better approaches to project risk management tend to increase chances of project success in terms of achieving scope & quality, schedule and cost targets. The process of responding to risk factors during a project’s life cycle is a crucial aspect of risk management referred to as risk response strategies, in this paper. The current research explores the status of risk response strategies applied in the software development projects in India. India provides a young IT-savvy English-speaking population, which is also cost effective. Other than the workforce, the environment for implementation of software projects in India is different from the matured economies. Risk management process is a commonly discussed theme, though its implementation in practice has a huge scope for improvement in India. The paper talks about four fundamental treatments to risk response – Avoidance, Transference, Mitigation and Acceptance (ATMA. From a primary data of 302 project managers, the paper attempts to address the risk response factors that lead to successful achievement of project scope & quality, schedule and cost targets, by using a series of regressions followed with Seemingly Unrelated Regression Equations (SURE modelling. Mitigation emerged as the most significant risk response strategy to achieve project targets. Acceptance, transference, and avoidance of risk were mostly manifested in the forms of transparency in communication across stakeholders, careful study of the nature of risks and close coordination between project team, customers/end-users and top management.

  6. Creating a Culture of Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangho; Park, Jungsun; Park, Mijin

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of occupational injuries and diseases associated with industrialization has declined markedly following developments in science and technology, such as engineering controls, protective equipment, safer machinery and processes, and greater adherence to regulations and labor inspections. Although the introduction of health and safety management systems has further decreased the incidence of occupational injuries and diseases, these systems are not effective unless accompanied by a positive safety culture in the workplace. The characteristics of work in the 21(st) century have given rise to new issues related to workers' health, such as new types of work-related disorders, noncommunicable diseases, and inequality in the availability of occupational health services. Overcoming these new and emerging issues requires a culture of prevention at the national level. The present paper addresses: (1) how to change safety cultures in both theory and practice at the level of the workplace; and (2) the role of prevention culture at the national level.

  7. A look at Mayan artificial cranial deformation practices: morphological and cultural aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Vargas, Samuel; Ruiz-Sandoval, José Luis; Sotomayor-González, Arturo; Revuelta-Gutiérrez, Rogelio; Celis-López, Miguel Angel; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis; García-González, Ulises; López-Serna, Raul; García-Navarro, Victor; Mendez-Rosito, Diego; Correa-Correa, Victor; Gómez-Llata, Sergio

    2010-12-01

    Induced deformation of the cranial vault is one form of permanent alteration of the body that has been performed by human beings from the beginning of history as a way of differentiating from others. These procedures have been observed in different cultures, but were particularly widespread in Mesoamerica. The authors examined and reviewed the historical and anthropological literature of intentional deformation practices in Mayan culture. The Mayans performed different types of cranial deformations and used different techniques and instruments to deform children's heads. The most remarkable morphological alteration is seen in the flattening of the frontal bone. Some archeological investigations link deformation types with specific periods. This article provides a glance at the cultural environment of the Mayans and demonstrates the heterogeneity of this interesting cultural phenomenon, which has changed over time.

  8. Creating a Culture of Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangho Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of occupational injuries and diseases associated with industrialization has declined markedly following developments in science and technology, such as engineering controls, protective equipment, safer machinery and processes, and greater adherence to regulations and labor inspections. Although the introduction of health and safety management systems has further decreased the incidence of occupational injuries and diseases, these systems are not effective unless accompanied by a positive safety culture in the workplace. The characteristics of work in the 21st century have given rise to new issues related to workers' health, such as new types of work-related disorders, noncommunicable diseases, and inequality in the availability of occupational health services. Overcoming these new and emerging issues requires a culture of prevention at the national level. The present paper addresses: (1 how to change safety cultures in both theory and practice at the level of the workplace; and (2 the role of prevention culture at the national level.

  9. Strategy and Culture: Hidden Secrets and Soft Skills in Supply Chain Best Practices from Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Kibuka-Sebitosi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper identifies strategy and cultural hidden secrets and soft skills pertaining to supply chain management in African contexts that are pertinent to supply chain and operations management. Africa is increasingly becoming attractive for not only multi-nationals but supply chain businesses that either want to diversify or expand their foot print. The market is complex, turbulent and highly competitive (Porter, 1986 and requires significant knowledge and understanding of the local context but also culture (Johnson, 1987; 1992; 2000, diversity and institutional dynamics (Ogbonna et al., 2002. Due to the complex nature of the emerging markets, the paper draws from multiple-disciplines (Sociology, Business, Management and theoretical approaches namely: culture and strategy; Ubuntu, stakeholder theory and systems thinking, to elicit best practices. Utilizing qualitative methods comprising case study, interviews, focus group discussions and extensive document analysis, the study covers a variety of management practices ranging from strategy, culture to hyper market management. This paper highlights lessons from successful supermarket chains in Africa particularly the hidden secrets and soft skills that are often ignored in mainstream operations and supply chain management or strategy research. Findings underscore the lessons of understanding strategy and culture implementation through practicing cultural values, treating the customer as a queen/king, knowing political skills, being a learning organisation and implementing continuous improvement. It contributes to management theory for academics, researchers & managers through strategy and culture, proposing inclusion of the cultural diversity into strategy implementation as a critical force affecting the behaviour of people inside the organization. Managers should take into account the cultural context and use it to promote organizational business excellence. These lessons for business excellence

  10. Responsible innovation among academic spin-offs: how responsible practices help developing absorptive capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Duin, P.A.; Scholten, V.E.

    2015-01-01

    Responsible innovation (RI) among technology-based start-ups has received little attention, while these firms are known to operate on the edges of what is socially desirable or ethically acceptable. In this paper we develop a conceptual model that captures the RI practices among 61 academic spin-off

  11. Intimate partner violence - identification and response in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Kelsey; O'Doherty, Lorna

    2011-11-01

    Intimate partner violence is a common problem among women attending general practice, with around one in 10 women currently experiencing physical, sexual or emotional abuse by a partner. Abused women frequently present with physical and psychosocial issues. Yet intimate partner violence often remains concealed and addressing it poses challenges for the clinician and patient alike. Although some of the general recommendations in this review may also apply to same-sex relationships and to women who abuse men, this article discusses identifying intimate partner violence in women who present to general practice. Identifying intimate partner violence is important in clinical practice as it underlies many common physical and mental health presentations. Facilitating disclosure and responding effectively requires good communication skills. Safety assessment of women and their families, pinpointing level of readiness to contemplate action, and providing appropriate referral options and ongoing nonjudgmental support are elements of an effective response. General practitioners have the potential to identify women and support them safely on a pathway to recovery, thereby avoiding the long term impacts of intimate partner violence.

  12. Culture Communication Practice of LU Xun and Its Practical Significance%鲁迅的文化传播实践及其现实意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林荣松

    2016-01-01

    鲁迅作为一个文学家的崇高地位,与其文化传播实践是同步发展的。有所为、有所不为构成鲁迅文化传播实践的显著表征,那种面向大众、勇于担当、韧性战斗、恪守诚信的精神,和渗透于字里行间的正能量,奠定了他在现代文化传播史的重要地位。当前,面对日益复杂的生存环境,文化传播面临一场深刻的变革。如何实现传播角色与文化身份、传媒担当与历史责任的统一,可以从鲁迅身上获得有益启示。%Lu Xun,as a writer of the lofty position of literature,is synchronously developing with his cultural dissemination of prac-tice.Refraining from doing something in order to be able to do other things constitutes a significant characteristic of Lu Xun cultural communication practice,the positive energy such as for the general public,the courage to play,tough fight,honesty and penetration in between the lines,laid his important position on the modern history of culture communication.At present,in the face of the increasing-ly complex living environment,cultural communication is facing a profound reform.How to realize the unification of the role of commu-nication and cultural identity,the role of the media and the historical responsibility can be enlightened from Lu Xun.

  13. Clopidogrel Response Variability: Review of the Literature and Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, Carrie S; Trevarrow, Brian J; Dobesh, Paul P

    2016-02-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor is standard therapy following acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite the use of potent antiplatelet agents, vascular events continue to occur. Lack of response to clopidogrel therapy has been widely investigated using various methods of platelet function testing. These studies have consistently found an association between poor clopidogrel response and an increased risk of vascular events. Strategies to overcome this problem include higher clopidogrel doses or the use of an alternative P2Y12 agent. To date, the majority of studies investigating tailored antiplatelet therapy have failed to show any reduction in clinical events likely due to the low-risk population studied. Despite this lack of benefit from altering therapy, platelet function testing may be done in certain patient populations. Patients at high risk of deleterious outcomes from stent thrombosis may be an appropriate patient population for platelet function testing to ensure adequate response to therapy. In addition, emerging data suggests a potential role for platelet function testing to assess for bleeding risk. The purpose of this article is to review the key studies demonstrating response variability to clopidogrel therapy, strategies to overcome variability, and practical considerations for the clinician.

  14. Cultural differences affecting euthanasia practice in Belgium: one law but different attitudes and practices in Flanders and Wallonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joachim; Van Wesemael, Yanna; Smets, Tinne; Bilsen, Johan; Deliens, Luc

    2012-09-01

    Since 2002, Belgium has had a national law legalising euthanasia. The law prescribes several substantive due care requirements and two procedural due care requirements, i.e. consultation with an independent physician and reporting of euthanasia to a Federal Control Committee. A large discrepancy in reporting rates between the Dutch-speaking (Flanders) and the French-speaking (Wallonia) parts of Belgium has led to speculation about cultural differences affecting the practice of euthanasia in both regions. Using Belgian data from the European Values Study conducted in 2008 among a representative sample of the general public and data from a large-scale mail questionnaire survey on euthanasia of 480 physicians from Flanders and 305 from Wallonia (conducted in 2009), this study presents empirical evidence of differences between both regions in attitudes towards and practice of euthanasia. Acceptance of euthanasia by the general population was found to be slightly higher in Flanders than in Wallonia. Compared with their Flemish counterparts, Walloon physicians held more negative attitudes towards performing euthanasia and towards the reporting obligation, less often labelled hypothetical cases correctly as euthanasia, and less often defined a case of euthanasia having to be reported. A higher proportion of Flemish physicians had received a euthanasia request since the introduction of the law. In cases of a euthanasia request, Walloon physicians consulted less often with an independent physician. Requests were more often granted in Flanders than in Wallonia (51% vs 38%), and performed euthanasia cases were more often reported (73% vs 58%). The study points out some significant differences between Flanders and Wallonia in practice, knowledge and attitudes regarding euthanasia and its legal requirements which are likely to explain the discrepancy between Wallonia and Flanders in the number of euthanasia cases reported. Cultural factors seem to play an important role in the

  15. Transformation of a nursing culture through actualization of a nursing professional practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Sandra G; Rich, Victoria L

    2010-01-01

    Leading and effecting meaningful change in a nursing division culture, such as the type required to achieve Magnet designation, entails senior nurse executives to be well-acquainted not only with the facts and figures of their business but also with the nuances, myths, and cultures that either enable or block a change from occurring. Expert nurse leaders embrace the story being told by data on dashboards and the quality outcomes achieved and look beyond those points of information out to the edges of their division. These nurse executives also seek to understand the pivotal, perhaps seemingly inconsequential things (notions, beliefs, cultural beliefs, and stories) that will block or tip a culture to change and achieve success. At the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), a Magnet-designated organization, the road to Magnet was not straightforward. Instead, the path was a winding, learning journey. Through authentic leadership and the conception and actualization of a professional practice model, the HUP Nursing Excellence in Professional Practice (HUP NEPP) model, Magnet designation was achieved and a nursing culture was transformed.

  16. Teaching culture in Colombia Bilingüe: From theory to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamith José Fandiño Parra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of this paper is concerned with the incorporation of culture into foreign language learning (EFL classes within the context of “Colombia Bilingüe”. More specifically, some consideration will be given to what culture is, how it can be taught and what Colombian authors have maintained in terms of its practicality and implementation. It will be suggested that teaching culture is not tantamount to promoting an English sociocultural domination or adapting ethnocentric practices, but mainly approaching and reflecting on one’s and others’ beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors, which are intertwined with language itself. Furthermore, an attempt will be made to point out both the difficulties and complexities that Colombian EFL teachers need to be able to cope with when working with culture in their classes. The main premise of the paper is that effective teaching of culture can be achieved if the Colombian EFL community strives to construct a coherent discourse that allows developing teaching models and learning experiences within the theoretical framework of the postmethod condition, world Englishes, and critical multiculturalism.

  17. Culturally Diverse Students in Higher Education: Challenges and Possibilities within Academic Literacy Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tkachenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With growing diversity in the population, higher education faces a new situation with increasing student diversity. In our paper, we will explore questions concerning the consequences student diversity has for higher-education institutions. Based on our experience from three different R&D projects, the differences in culture and academic literacy practices give culturally diverse students challenges that have often been ignored in academia. Some other studies also document that this group of students has a much higher risk of dropping out and underachieving than majority students (Andersen & Skaarer- Kreutz, 2007; Støren, 2009. In our paper, we are going to discuss the students’ challenges and discourse of remediation that is often associated with their challenges and suggest how higher-education institutions can adjust their practices to be more oriented to intercultural communication. Intercultural communication as a dialogic approach may create dynamics in academic tutoring and lead to mutual change/transformation instead of a one-way adaptation of existing academic literacy norms. We argue that all teachers should be aware of cultural differences in literacy practices in the education systems and strive to adjust their teaching practices to the diversity in the classroom. This approach, we believe, can contribute to a better learning environment for all students, independently of their backgrounds. 

  18. Cultural differences in interpersonal responses to depressives' nonverbal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanger, P; Summerfield, A B; Rosen, B K; Watson, J P

    1991-01-01

    The Social Impression and Interpersonal Attraction of British depressed patients was rated by British and German subjects on the basis of the patients' video-recorded nonverbal behaviour. Depressives were rated negatively by all subjects. Males in both cultural groups agreed in their ratings of depressives but German females expressed a more negative attitude than British females. This is attributed to cultural differences in sex-appropriate interactive behaviour. The importance of studying the expression of depression and its meaning within a particular cultural context is indicated and the role of cultural differences in interactive behaviour is discussed with respect to intercultural assessment and treatment of depression.

  19. Building a Unit-Level Mentored Program to Sustain a Culture of Inquiry for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-24

    experiencing significant change . It also demonstrates that a unit-level mentored EBP program is sustainable despite changes in organizational structure...culture, readiness, beliefs, and implementation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Evidence-based practice, culture, mentor, organizational change 16. SECURITY...Medical Command; her areas of interest include staffing, acuity, nursing workload, change management, organizational culture and empowering junior

  20. Habitus and Flow in Primary School Musical Practice: Relations between Family Musical Cultural Capital, Optimal Experience and Music Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Rafael; Codina, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    Based on Bourdieu's idea that cultural capital is strongly related to family context, we describe the relations between family musical cultural capital and optimal experience during compulsory primary school musical practice. We analyse whether children from families with higher levels of musical cultural capital, and specifically with regard to…

  1. A Mirror of Voices: A Collaborative Learning Community of Culturally Responsive Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kim Diann

    2013-01-01

    This action research study acknowledged the possibilities of culturally responsive pedagogy by examining digital storytelling via online workshops that were facilitated for a group of educators and educational leaders. The presence of cultural biases and cultural discontinuities in Pre-K-12 education has the propensity to contribute to the…

  2. Three Curriculum and Organisational Responses to Cultural Pluralism in New Zealand Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, David

    1990-01-01

    Examines three educational responses to cultural diversity operating in New Zealand schools: incorporation of Maori culture programs in mainstream curriculums, organizational modification to accommodate Maori students, and the development of Maori culture and language immersion programs in primary schools. Application of similar programs to…

  3. An examination of acquiescent response styles in cross-cultural research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Fischer; J.R.J. Fontaine; F.J.R. van de Vijver; D.A. van Hemert

    2006-01-01

    Response styles constitute a formidable challenge for cross-cultural research. In this article, three different response styles are discussed (acquiescence, extremity scoring, and social desirability). Acquiescence responding (ARS) is then integrated into a larger classical test theoretical framewor

  4. School Nurse Cultural Competence Needs Assessment: Results and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matza, Maria; Maughan, Erin; Barrows, Beth M

    2015-11-01

    NASN conducted a needs assessment to learn about the cultural competence skills needed by school nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the results of the needs assessment and describe actions taken to address cultural competency needs for the U.S. school nurse workforce.

  5. Teachers' instructional goals for science practice: Identifying knowledge gaps using cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Cynthia Hamen

    In AP Biology, the course goal, with respect to scientific acts and reasoning, has recently shifted toward a reform goal of science practice, where the goal is for students to have a scientific perspective that views science as a practice of a community rather than a body of knowledge. Given this recent shift, this study is interested in the gaps that may exist between an individual teacher's instructional goal and the goals of the AP Biology course. A Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) methodology and perspective is used to analyze four teachers' knowledge, practice, and learning. Teachers have content knowledge for teaching, a form of knowledge that is unique for teaching called specialized content knowledge. This specialized content knowledge (SCK) defines their instructional goals, the student outcomes they ultimately aim to achieve with their students. The study employs a cultural-historical continuum of scientific acts and reasoning, which represents the development of the AP Biology goal over time, to study gaps in their instructional goal. The study also analyzes the contradictions within their teaching practice and how teachers address those contradictions to shift their instructional practice and learn. The findings suggest that teachers have different interpretations of the AP Biology goals of science practice, placing their instructional goal at different points along the continuum. Based on the location of their instructional goal, different micro-communities of teachers exist along the continuum, comprised of teachers with a shared goal, language, and culture of their AP Biology teaching. The in-depth study of one teacher's AP Biology teaching, using a CHAT perspective, provides a means for studying the mechanisms that connect SCK to classroom actions and ultimately to instructional practice. CHAT also reveals the nature and importance of contradictions or cognitive dissonance in teacher learning and the types of support teachers need to

  6. Culturable bacteria in Himalayan ice in response to atmospheric circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Only recently has specific attention been given to culturable bacteria in Tibetan glaciers, but their relation to atmospheric circulation is less understood yet. Here we investigate the seasonal variation of culturable bacteria preserved in a Himalayan ice core. High concentration of culturable bacteria in glacial ice deposited during the pre-monsoon season is attributed to the transportation of continental dust stirred up by the frequent dust storms in Northwest China during spring. This is also confirmed by the spatial distribution of culturable bacteria in Tibetan glaciers. Culturable bacteria deposited during monsoon season are more diverse than other seasons because they derive from both marine air masses and local or regional continental sources. We suggest that microorganisms in Himalayan ice can be used to reconstruct atmospheric circulation.

  7. Cross-cultural pragmatics: compliments and compliment responses in English and Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张苏

    2012-01-01

    Language and culture are distinctly interdependent;one reflects the other.In cross-cultural communications,it is critical for language users to use and understand the language appropriately in a certain socio-cultural context.This paper aims to compare the similarities and differences of compliments and compliment responses in English and Chinese from the cross-cultural pragmatic perspective.The implications for teaching are also discussed so as to bridge the gap caused by cultural differences and minimize the occurrence of potential cross-cultural pragmatic failures.

  8. Organisational Culture and the Adoption of New Public-Management Practices = Povzetki Abstracts novega javnega managementa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Hookana

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study provides insights into the levels of adoption and success of New Public Management practices, reflected in the degree of innovative accounting practices and cultures. The analysis draws upon two in-depth empirical investigations. The results provide empirical evidence to support a two-way interaction between management orientation to adopting the new accounting methods and organisational innovative changes. The success and failure could be characterised as a fragile construction that turns on the strength of diverse ties connecting many heterogeneous elements. The meaning of the subcultures and the externally driven change process are discussed in the context of Scandinavian public management.

  9. Going above and beyond: How sustainability culture and entrepreneurial orientation drive social sustainability supply chain practice adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Donna; McCarthy, Lucy; McGrath, Paul; Claudy, Marius C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - This paper examines what drives the adoption of different social sustainability supply chain practices. Research has shown certain factors drive the adoption of environmental sustainability practices but few focus on social supply chain practices; delineate which practices are adopted ; or what drives their adoption . We examine the facilitative role of sustainability culture to explain the adoption basic social sustainability supply chain practices, consisting of monitoring and man...

  10. Transformation of organic N newly added to red soil treated with different cultural practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangQin-Zheng; YeQing-Fu; 等

    1998-01-01

    By using 15N tracer method,transformation of organic N,which wqas newly added to red soil treated with different cultural practices,was studied under thelaboratory incubation condition.The experimental results showed that the transformation of N from newly added organic matter and soil native pool during incubation was influenced by cultural practice treatment beforeincubation.Fallow was favorable to the mineralization of newly added organic N and soil N compared with the planting wheat treatment.Planting wheat greatly increased the loss of soil N.Application of fertilizers stimulated the mineralization of newly added organic N and application of organic matter reduced the mineralization,but stimulated microbialtransformation of newly adde4d organic N.

  11. Considering Culturally Responsive Teaching, Children, and Place in the Music Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kimberly Friesen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author explores how culturally responsive teaching and the concept of children and place relate in the music room. The article begins with a brief explanation of both culturally responsive teaching and children and place. Through the use of anecdotes and ideas to consider, this article provides elementary music teachers with…

  12. Considering Culturally Responsive Teaching, Children, and Place in the Music Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kimberly Friesen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author explores how culturally responsive teaching and the concept of children and place relate in the music room. The article begins with a brief explanation of both culturally responsive teaching and children and place. Through the use of anecdotes and ideas to consider, this article provides elementary music teachers with…

  13. Using Culturally Competent Responsive Services to Improve Student Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Rita; Grothaus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates standards blending, the integration of core academic and school counseling standards, as a culturally alert responsive services strategy to assist in closing the achievement gap while also enhancing employability skills and culturally salient career competencies. The responsive services intervention described in this…

  14. Using Culturally Competent Responsive Services to Improve Student Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Rita; Grothaus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates standards blending, the integration of core academic and school counseling standards, as a culturally alert responsive services strategy to assist in closing the achievement gap while also enhancing employability skills and culturally salient career competencies. The responsive services intervention described in this…

  15. Hip-Hop(e): The Cultural Practice and Critical Pedagogy of International Hip-Hop. Adolescent Cultures, School, and Society. Volume 56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfilio, Brad J., Ed.; Viola, Michael J., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Illuminating hip-hop as an important cultural practice and a global social movement, this collaborative project highlights the emancipatory messages and cultural work generated by the organic intellectuals of global hip-hop. Contributors describe the social realities--globalization, migration, poverty, criminalization, and racism--youth are…

  16. The cross-culture impact on managing business: an evidence from culture, performance evaluation practices, and trust in a Western Multinational Company’s subsidiary in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Purwohedi, Unggul

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study is to investigate the cross-cultural influence on organizational practices, performance evaluation process and trust on supervisors in a Multinational Company (MNC) in Indonesia. Amongst studies of national culture and MNCs there appears to have been no studies investigating the interaction between cross-culture, performance evaluation, and trust. Therefore, I conducted a case study research in one French MNC in Indonesia to understand this process. I int...

  17. A socio-cultural approach to learning in the practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ciara

    2010-11-01

    Practice learning is an essential part of the curriculum and accounts for approximately 60% of the current pre-registration nursing programmes in the Republic of Ireland. The nature and quality of the clinical learning environment and the student nurses' experience of their practice placements is recognised as being influential in promoting the integration of theory and practice. However, the problem experienced by many learners is how to relate their theoretical knowledge to the situation-at-hand within the practice setting. Socio-cultural or activity theories of learning seek to explain the social nature of learning and propose that knowledge and learning are considered to be contextually situated. Lave and Wenger (1991) argue that learning is integrated with practice and through engagement with a community of practice, by means of sponsorship; students become increasingly competent in their identity as practitioners. This paper examines the changes which have occurred within the pre-registration nursing curriculum in the Republic of Ireland with the transition from the apprenticeship system to the graduate programme, and the resulting reduction in clinical learning hours. It also examines the potential impact on the development of student learning with the implementation of the concepts proposed by Lave and Wenger to learning in the practice setting.

  18. A socio-cultural approach to learning in the practice setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Ciara

    2010-11-01

    Practice learning is an essential part of the curriculum and accounts for approximately 60% of the current pre-registration nursing programmes in the Republic of Ireland. The nature and quality of the clinical learning environment and the student nurses\\' experience of their practice placements is recognised as being influential in promoting the integration of theory and practice. However, the problem experienced by many learners is how to relate their theoretical knowledge to the situation-at-hand within the practice setting. Socio-cultural or activity theories of learning seek to explain the social nature of learning and propose that knowledge and learning are considered to be contextually situated. Lave and Wenger (1991) argue that learning is integrated with practice and through engagement with a community of practice, by means of sponsorship; students become increasingly competent in their identity as practitioners. This paper examines the changes which have occurred within the pre-registration nursing curriculum in the Republic of Ireland with the transition from the apprenticeship system to the graduate programme, and the resulting reduction in clinical learning hours. It also examines the potential impact on the development of student learning with the implementation of the concepts proposed by Lave and Wenger to learning in the practice setting.

  19. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter…

  20. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter…

  1. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter alia"…

  2. "Reading across Communities" in Biliteracy Practices: Examining Translocal Discourses and Cultural Flows in Literature Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    The engagement of immigrant children in literature discussion groups in an elementary school classroom in the United States is studied in this article. The analysis shows how the students' responses are embedded in translocal movements across places, time, and people that can be characterized as constructing dynamic cultural flows. The findings…

  3. China’s Peaceful Development Road: Cultural Foundation, Strategic Orientation and Practical Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Xi

    2015-01-01

    Unswervingly pursuing the peaceful development road is the strategic choice made by the Government and people of China based on a development trend of the times and the national fundamental interests. As the traditional cultural origin of China’s peaceful development road, "harmony" is one constant principle permeated through China’s culture, and is true life for China humanistic spirit. "valuable harmony", "harmony without blind following", "harmony between heaven and man" are three important aspects of "harmony"-- thinking ideological connotation of China’s culture. The practice has proved that as the national long-term development strategy, the peaceful development road is the development road adapted to China’s conditions and era features, and has made outstanding contributions to peace and development of China and the world at large.

  4. Cultural differences define diagnosis and genomic medicine practice: implications for undiagnosed diseases program in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaohong; Markello, Thomas; Adams, David; Toro, Camilo; Tifft, Cynthia; Gahl, William A; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2013-09-01

    Despite the current acceleration and increasing leadership of Chinese genetics research, genetics and its clinical application have largely been imported to China from the Occident. Neither genetics nor the scientific reductionism underpinning its clinical application is integral to the traditional Chinese worldview. Given that disease concepts and their incumbent diagnoses are historically derived and culturally meaningful, we hypothesize that the cultural expectations of genetic diagnoses and medical genetics practice differ between the Occident and China. Specifically, we suggest that an undiagnosed diseases program in China will differ from the recently established Undiagnosed Diseases Program at the United States National Institutes of Health; a culturally sensitive concept will integrate traditional Chinese understanding of disease with the scientific reductionism of Occidental medicine.

  5. Elder abuse and neglect in African American families: informing practice based on ecological and cultural frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsford, Sheena R; Parra-Cardona, José Rubén; Schiamberg, Larry; Post, Lori A

    2011-01-01

    Despite the rapid growth of the elderly African American population in the U.S., elder abuse and neglect in African American families continue to be underdeveloped areas of study. This article presents an ecological and culturally informed framework for the study of elder abuse in African American populations. The model was developed based on Bronfenbrenner's Human Ecological Theory. The model identifies risk factors associated with different systems that have an influence on the lives of African American families. Cultural protective factors also are identified in the model. The model is intended to provide an understanding of elder abuse and neglect in African American families by considering the influence of contextual factors such as the legacy of slavery, social exclusion, and structural segregation and racism. Specific suggestions for practice are proposed according to cultural strengths of African American communities as well as the ecological premises of the model.

  6. Trends and Ontology of Artistic Practices of the Dorset Culture 800 BC - 1300 AD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardenberg, Mari

    with the material world is presented. This framework is employed as a lens into the social role and meaning the carvings played in the Dorset society. The examined assemblages were recovered from a series of Dorset settlement sites, mainly in house, midden, and burial contexts, providing a substantive case study...... behavioral situations and subject matter suggesting carvings operated as material symbols that played a role in communicating aspects of Dorset ideology. This research suggests that a clear change occurred in the subject matter chosen to depict in the carvings throughout the Dorset culture temporally divided...... are integrated with analogies based on observations of other cultures from across the circumpolar region to assist with parallel perspectives. The different forms of artistic carvings reflect dynamic daily activities among agents. The analyses of which suggest that socially constructed practices are culturally...

  7. Comparison of practice based research network based quality improvement technical assistance and evaluation to other ongoing quality improvement efforts for changes in agency culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingood, William C; Peden, Angela H; Shah, Gulzar H; Marshall, Nandi A; Gonzalez, Ketty M; Toal, Russell B; Alexander, Dayna S; Wright, Alesha R; Woodhouse, Lynn D

    2015-07-31

    Public health agencies in the USA are increasingly challenged to adopt Quality Improvement (QI) strategies to enhance performance. Many of the functional and structural barriers to effective use of QI can be found in the organizational culture of public health agencies. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of public health practice based research network (PBRN) evaluation and technical assistance for QI interventions on the organizational culture of public health agencies in Georgia, USA. An online survey of key informants in Georgia's districts and county health departments was used to compare perceptions of characteristics of organizational QI culture between PBRN supported QI districts and non-PBRN supported districts before and after the QI interventions. The primary outcomes of concern were number and percentage of reported increases in characteristics of QI culture as measured by key informant responses to items assessing organizational QI practices from a validated instrument on QI Collaboratives. Survey results were analyzed using Multi-level Mixed Effects Logistic Model, which accounts for clustering/nesting. Increases in QI organizational culture were consistent for all 10- items on a QI organizational culture survey related to: leadership support, use of data, on-going QI, and team collaboration. Statistically significant odds ratios were calculated for differences in increased QI organizational culture between PBRN-QI supported districts compared to Non-PBRN supported districts for 5 of the 10 items, after adjusting for District clustering of county health departments. Agency culture, considered by many QI experts as the main goal of QI, is different than use of specific QI methods, such as Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles or root-cause analyses. The specific use of a QI method does not necessarily reflect culture change. Attempts to measure QI culture are newly emerging. This study documented significant improvements in characteristics of

  8. Breast feeding practices as cultural interventions for early childhood caries in Cree communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidro, Jaime; Zahayko, Lynelle; Lawrence, Herenia P; Folster, Samantha; McGregor, Margaret; McKay, Kristen

    2015-04-09

    Breastfeeding is a gift from mother to child and has a wide range of positive health, social and cultural impacts on infants. The link between bottle feeding and the prevalence of early childhood caries (ECC) is well documented. In Aboriginal communities, the higher rates of ECC are linked with low rates of breast feeding and inappropriate infant feeding of high sugar content liquids. The Baby Teeth Talk Study (BTT) is one project that is exploring the use of four interventions (motivational interviewing, anticipatory guidance, fluoride varnish and dental care to expectant mothers) for reducing the prevalence of ECC in infants within Aboriginal communities. This research explored cultural based practices through individual interviews and focus groups with older First Nations women in the community. Participants in a First Nations community identified cultural based practices that have also been used to promote healthy infant feeding and good oral health. A wide range of themes related to oral health and infant feeding emerged. However, this paper focuses on three themes including: breastfeeding attitudes, social support for mothers and birthing and supporting healthy infant feeding through community programs. The importance of understanding cultural health traditions is essential for those working in oral public health capacities to ensure there is community acceptance of the interventions.

  9. A Model for Translating Ethnography and Theory into Culturally Constructed Clinical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schensul, Jean J.; Schensul, Stephen L.; Mekki-Berrada, Abelwahed; Pelto, Pertti J.; Maitra, Shubhada; Verma, Ravi; Saggurti, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development of a dynamic culturally constructed clinical practice model for HIV/STI prevention, the Narrative Intervention Model (NIM), and illustrates its application in practice, within the context of a 6-year transdisciplinary research program in Mumbai, India. Theory and research from anthropology, psychology, and public health, and mixed-method ethnographic research with practitioners, patients, and community members, contributed to the articulation of the NIM for HIV/STI risk reduction and prevention among married men living in low-income communities. The NIM involves a process of negotiation of patient narratives regarding their sexual health problems and related risk factors to facilitate risk reduction. The goal of the NIM is to facilitate cognitive-behavioral change through a three-stage process of co-construction (eliciting patient narrative), deconstruction (articulating discrepancies between current and desired narrative), and reconstruction (proposing alternative narratives that facilitate risk reduction). The NIM process extends the traditional clinical approach through the integration of biological, psychological, interpersonal, and cultural factors as depicted in the patient narrative. Our work demonstrates the use of a recursive integration of research and practice to address limitations of current evidence-based intervention approaches that fail to address the diversity of cultural constructions across populations and contexts. PMID:25292448

  10. A model for translating ethnography and theory into culturally constructed clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Bonnie Kaul; Schensul, Jean J; Schensul, Stephen L; Mekki-Berrada, Abelwahed; Pelto, Pertti J; Maitra, Shubhada; Verma, Ravi; Saggurti, Niranjan

    2015-03-01

    This article describes the development of a dynamic culturally constructed clinical practice model for HIV/STI prevention, the Narrative Intervention Model (NIM), and illustrates its application in practice, within the context of a 6-year transdisciplinary research program in Mumbai, India. Theory and research from anthropology, psychology, and public health, and mixed-method ethnographic research with practitioners, patients, and community members, contributed to the articulation of the NIM for HIV/STI risk reduction and prevention among married men living in low-income communities. The NIM involves a process of negotiation of patient narratives regarding their sexual health problems and related risk factors to facilitate risk reduction. The goal of the NIM is to facilitate cognitive-behavioral change through a three-stage process of co-construction (eliciting patient narrative), deconstruction (articulating discrepancies between current and desired narrative), and reconstruction (proposing alternative narratives that facilitate risk reduction). The NIM process extends the traditional clinical approach through the integration of biological, psychological, interpersonal, and cultural factors as depicted in the patient narrative. Our work demonstrates the use of a recursive integration of research and practice to address limitations of current evidence-based intervention approaches that fail to address the diversity of cultural constructions across populations and contexts.

  11. Some empirical insights into cultural differences and management practices: the case of Denmark and Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprila Cotič

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents field research on differences in managers’ practices and behaviour in two EU countries: Denmark and Slovenia. The theoretical foundation of the research is based on cultural dimensions proposed by Hofstede and Hall. We combined the quantitative part of the research, which was based on surveys between Danish and Slovenian managers with semi-structured interviews. We confirmed many significant differences between Danish and Slovenian management practices and values that were predominantly consequence of two of Hofstede’s cultural dimensions: Power Distance and Uncertainty Avoidance. The emphasis of the research was on the presumption that these differences are even more articulated in extreme situations, such as the current economic crises. We also implicitly sought the answer to the question of what can Slovenian managers learn from the Danish experience. The main scientific contribution of the research is the methodological platform for further research on the effects of cultural characteristics on management practices and business efficiency within the main clusters of the EU countries.

  12. Corporate social responsibility in the Ukrainian business practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla Petrashko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available "In the article there was outlined the role of the corporate social responsibility (CSR in the formation of a new approach to the companies’ activity assessment in the Ukrainian business environment. There has been given qualitative and quantitative analysis, determined the principle developments of the present period of formation, establishment and development of the domestic CSR model in Ukraine. There was made an evolutional research analysis in the sphere of CSR in Ukraine and laid out the results of the author’s research of domestic business practice of CSR which allow to specify the main tendencies of its development and application in the formation of the framework constituent structure of the national CSR model."

  13. Maternal presence, childrearing practices, and children's response to an injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, M E; Endsley, R C

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of maternal presence or absence and childrearing practices on young children's response to an injection. One hundred thirty-eight mothers and their children, who were attending health screening clinic, were assigned to one of four groups in which mothers were either present or absent during an interview and an immunization. Mothers were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their childrearing practices. Child behavior was observed during both the interview and the immunization. Results indicated that while maternal presence was associated with the children behaving more distressed during the interview, maternal presence had no effect on child behavior during the immunization. Children whose mothers reported high levels of both control and warmth in their relationship (authoritative parents) were found to be significantly less distressed during the immunization than children of either the low-control, high-warmth (permissive), high-control, low-warmth (authoritarian) or low-control, low-warmth (nonresponsive) parent groups.

  14. Introduction to ba-yu culture in the animation creation practice--“who sent lfowers to animation, for example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张弟龙

    2014-01-01

    Cultural Creative Industries Cultural and Creative Industries, is a kind of economic globalization under the background of the creativity as the core of the emerging Industries, emphasis on a subject or Cultural factors depend on personal (team) through the industrialization of technology, Creative, and ways of industry development, marketing, intellectual property rights. With the high-speed development of creative cultural industry. As a cultural creative industries in the animation industry began to rise rapidly across the country. Based on the creation of animation who sent flowers as an example, analyzes how the ba-yu culture in the animation creation practice. Hope to be able to achieve this effect.

  15. Is motivation enough? Responsiveness, patient-centredness, medicalization and cost in family practice and conventional care settings in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Lerberghe Wim

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Thailand, family practice was developed primarily through a small number of self-styled family practitioners, who were dedicated to this professional field without having benefited from formal training in the specific techniques of family practice. In the context of a predominantly hospital-based health care system, much depends on their personal motivation and commitment to this area of medicine. The purpose of this paper is to compare the responsiveness, degree of patient-centredness, adequacy of therapeutic decisions and the cost of care in 37 such self-styled family practices, i.e. practices run by doctors who call themselves family practitioners, but have not been formally trained, and in 37 conventional public hospital outpatient departments (OPDs, 37 private clinics and 37 private hospital OPDs. Method Analysis of the characteristics of 148 taped consultations with simulated patients. Results The family practices performed better than public hospital OPDs with regard to responsiveness, patient-centredness and cost of technical investigations (M-W U: p Conclusion In Thailand self-styled family practices, even without specific training, provide a service that is more responsive and patient-centred than conventional care, with less overmedicalization and at a lower cost. Changes in prescription practices may require deeper changes in the medical culture.

  16. The relationship between organizational culture and implementation of clinical practice guidelines: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodek, Peter; Cahill, Naomi E; Heyland, Daren K

    2010-01-01

    The context in which critical care providers work has been shown to be associated with adherence to recommendations of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Consideration of contextual factors such as organizational culture may therefore be important when implementing guidelines. Organizational culture has been defined simply as "how things are around here" and encompasses leadership, communication, teamwork, conflict resolution, and other domains. This narrative review highlights the results of recent quantitative and qualitative studies, including studies on adherence to nutrition guidelines in the critical care setting, which demonstrate that elements of organizational culture, such as leadership support, interprofessional collaboration, and shared beliefs about the utility of guidelines, influence adherence to guideline recommendations. Outside nutrition therapy, there is emerging evidence that strategies focusing on organizational change (eg, revision of professional roles, interdisciplinary teams, integrated care delivery, computer systems, and continuous quality improvement) can favorably influence professional performance and patient outcomes. Consequently, future interventions aimed at implementing nutrition guidelines should aim to measure and take into account organizational culture, in addition to considering the characteristics of the patient, provider, and guideline. Further high quality, multimethod studies are required to improve our understanding of how culture influences guideline implementation, and which organizational change strategies might be most effective in optimizing nutrition therapy.

  17. Relation between creative teaching and sustainable practices in cultural heritage tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašperić Ružica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is primarily concerned with alternative teaching methodologies. Creative teaching methodologies place the student at the center of the learning process. This paper is a case study of 'Orion - promotion of the Vučedol culture' project as a self-sustainable cultural product. The primary goal of the project is the promotion of heritage through cultural tourism. The 'Orion' project was launched in cooperation with third year undergraduate students at the Department of Tourism of VERN University of Applied Sciences from Zagreb, as part of the Event Management and Marketing course (March to June 2014. Inspired by the Vučedol archaeological site, historical data and lectures on the Vučedol culture and the oldest Indo-European calendar called 'Orion' the students have developed a plan for a two-day festival that would take place in Vinkovci, Croatia and world include a scientific conference, cultural and artistic program, presentation of local cuisine, creative workshops, and promotion of local crafts. This paper reinforces the need for imaginative thinking in education for tourism. The variety of ways in which creative teaching practices can be used is infinite and this case study presents only a small contribution.

  18. Safety Culture And Best Practices At Japan's Fusion Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States); King, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Takase, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Oshima, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Sukegawa, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    The Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) is one of the magnetic fusion research collaborations between the US Department of Energy and the government of Japan. Visits by occupational safety personnel are made to participating institutions on a biennial basis. In the 2013 JWG visit of US representatives to Japan, the JWG members noted a number of good safety practices in the safety walkthroughs. These good practices and safety culture topics are discussed in this paper. The JWG hopes that these practices for worker safety can be adopted at other facilities. It is a well-known, but unquantified, safety principle that well run, safe facilities are more productive and efficient than other facilities (Rule, 2009). Worker safety, worker productivity, and high quality in facility operation all complement each other (Mottel, 1995).

  19. Safety Culture and Best Practices at Japan's Fusion Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, Keith [PPPL

    2014-05-01

    The Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) is one of the magnetic fusion research collaborations between the US Department of Energy and the government of Japan. Visits by occupational safety personnel are made to participating institutions on a biennial basis. In the 2013 JWG visit of US representatives to Japan, the JWG members noted a number of good safety practices in the safety walkthroughs. These good practices and safety culture topics are discussed in this paper. The JWG hopes that these practices for worker safety can be adopted at other facilities. It is a well-known, but unquantified, safety principle that well run, safe facilities are more productive and efficient than other facilities (Rule, 2009). Worker safety, worker productivity, and high quality in facility operation all complement each other (Mottel, 1995).

  20. Improving Medical Decision Making and Health Promotion through Culture-Sensitive Health Communication: An Agenda for Science and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsch, Cornelia; Böhm, Robert; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Butler, Robb; Chapman, Gretchen B; Haase, Niels; Herrmann, Benedikt; Igarashi, Tasuku; Kitayama, Shinobu; Korn, Lars; Nurm, Ülla-Karin; Rohrmann, Bernd; Rothman, Alexander J; Shavitt, Sharon; Updegraff, John A; Uskul, Ayse K

    2016-10-01

    This review introduces the concept of culture-sensitive health communication. The basic premise is that congruency between the recipient's cultural characteristics and the respective message will increase the communication's effectiveness. Culture-sensitive health communication is therefore defined as the deliberate and evidence-informed adaptation of health communication to the recipients' cultural background in order to increase knowledge and improve preparation for medical decision making and to enhance the persuasiveness of messages in health promotion. To achieve effective health communication in varying cultural contexts, an empirically and theoretically based understanding of culture will be indispensable. We therefore define culture, discuss which evolutionary and structural factors contribute to the development of cultural diversity, and examine how differences are conceptualized as scientific constructs in current models of cultural differences. In addition, we will explicate the implications of cultural differences for psychological theorizing, because common constructs of health behavior theories and decision making, such as attitudes or risk perception, are subject to cultural variation. In terms of communication, we will review both communication strategies and channels that are used to disseminate health messages, and we will discuss the implications of cultural differences for their effectiveness. Finally, we propose an agenda both for science and for practice to advance and apply the evidence base for culture-sensitive health communication. This calls for more interdisciplinary research between science and practice but also between scientific disciplines and between basic and applied research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Preparing towards Preventing and Containing an Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak: What Socio-cultural Practices May Affect Containment Efforts in Ghana?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Baba Adongo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebola Virus Disease (EVD is a condition with high fatality. Though the disease is deadly, taking precautions to reduce contact with infected people and their secretions can prevent cross- infection. In the 2014 EVD outbreak, socio-cultural factors were identified to be responsible for the spread of the disease in the three most affected countries in West Africa. In this light, we undertook this study to identify socio-cultural factors that may influence the prevention and containment of EVD in Ghana and ways to address such practices.We conducted a descriptive qualitative study in five regions in Ghana. Twenty-five focus group discussions (5 in each region with community members (4 in each region and nurses (1 in each region were conducted. In addition, forty (40 in-depth interviews were conducted with various stakeholders and opinion leaders; eight in each region. All interviews were recorded using a digital voice recorder and transcribed. With the aid of Nvivo 10 for windows, we analyzed the data using framework analysis.We found that socio-cultural practices, such as care of the body of dead and burial practices, widowhood rites and anointing children with water used to rinse the dead, were common. These practices require individuals coming into direct contact with either the dead or items used to take care of the dead. Social norms also require frequent handshakes in all social gatherings such as funeral, and religious congregations. We also found that self-medication (using herbs and orthodox medications was a common practice. People use both biomedical and non-orthodox health outlets either simultaneously or in sequence in times of ill-health.The study concludes that high risk socio-cultural practices were common among Ghanaians and generally perceived as indispensable. These high risk practices may hinder containment efforts in the event of an outbreak. Community leaders should be engaged in any social mobilization to modify these

  2. The Polyacetylenes Falcarinol and Falcarindiol Affect Stress Responses in Myotube Cultures in a Biphasic Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Jette F; Christensen, Lars P.; Theil, Peter K.; Oksbjerg, Niels

    2008-01-01

    The effects of the bioactive polyacetylenes, falcarinol and falcarindiol, present in carrots, celery, celeriac and other umbelliferous vegetables, on the stress responses in primary myotube cultures, were studied. Biphasic responses on cellular stress responses in myotube cultures were investigated by exposing them to various concentrations of falcarinol and falcarindiol for 24 h before testing effects of 100 μM H2O2 on the intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), transcripti...

  3. The ideas of Frantz Fanon and culturally safe practices for aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Luke; Grootjans, John

    2014-03-01

    Mainstream mental health services in Australia have failed to provide culturally appropriate care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people despite several national reports and policies that have attempted to promote positive service development in response to the calls for change from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. In light of this situation, this article considers the ideas of Frantz Fanon and their potential for promoting cultural safety (Ramsden, 2002) in mainstream mental health services. This article argues that Fanon's ideas provide a conceptual strategy for nurses that prompts reflection and establishes a critical theoretical perspective linking power imbalance and inequitable social relationships in health care, thus complementing the aims of cultural safety. The purpose of this critical reflection is to guide nurses' understanding of the relationship between colonization and health status in order to change their attitudes from those that continue to support current hegemonic practices and systems of health care to those that support the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

  4. Self-reported teamwork in family health team practices in Ontario: organizational and cultural predictors of team climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michelle; Brazil, Kevin; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Agarwal, Gina

    2011-05-01

    To determine the organizational predictors of higher scores on team climate measures as an indicator of the functioning of a family health team (FHT). Cross-sectional study using a mailed survey. Family health teams in Ontario. Twenty-one of 144 consecutively approached FHTs; 628 team members were surveyed. Scores on the team climate inventory, which assessed organizational culture type (group, developmental, rational, or hierarchical); leadership perceptions; and organizational factors, such as use of electronic medical records (EMRs), team composition, governance of the FHT, location, meetings, and time since FHT initiation. All analyses were adjusted for clustering of respondents within the FHT using a mixed random-intercepts model. The response rate was 65.8% (413 of 628); 2 were excluded from analysis, for a total of 411 participants. At the time of survey completion, there was a median of 4 physicians, 11 other health professionals, and 4 management and clerical staff per FHT. The average team climate score was 3.8 out of a possible 5. In multivariable regression analysis, leadership score, group and developmental culture types, and use of more EMR capabilities were associated with higher team climate scores. Other organizational factors, such as number of sites and size of group, were not associated with the team climate score. Culture, leadership, and EMR functionality, rather than organizational composition of the teams (eg, number of professionals on staff, practice size), were the most important factors in predicting climate in primary care teams.

  5. Responsiveness of culture-based segmentation of organizational buyers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Jadczaková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much published work over the four decades has acknowledged market segmentation in business-to-business settings yet primarily focusing on observable segmentation bases such as firmographics or geographics. However, such bases were proved to have a weak predictive validity with respect to industrial buying behavior. Therefore, this paper attempts to add a debate to this topic by introducing new (unobservable segmentation base incorporating several facets of business culture, denoted as psychographics. The justification for this approach is that the business culture captures the collective mindset of an organization and thus enables marketers to target the organization as a whole. Given the hypothesis that culture has a merit for micro-segmentation a sample of 278 manufacturing firms was first subjected to principal component analysis and Varimax to reveal underlying cultural traits. In next step, cluster analysis was performed on retained factors to construct business profiles. Finally, non-parametric one-way analysis of variance confirmed discriminative power between profiles based on psychographics in terms of industrial buying behavior. Owing to this, business culture may assist marketers when targeting more effectively than some traditional approaches.

  6. Oviposition Attractancy of Bacterial Culture Filtrates: response of Culex quinquefasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Poonam

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Oviposition attractants could be used for monitoring as well as controlling mosquitoes by attracting them to lay eggs at chosen sites. In the present study, culture filtrates of seven bacterial species were tested for their attractancy against gravid females of Culex quinquefasciatus. When their oviposition active indices (OAI were studied, the culture filtrates of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens exhibited oviposition attractancy (OAI = >0.3 at 100 ppm and the OAI were respectively 0.70 and 0.47. Culture filtrates of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis (wild type, B. t. var. israelensis (mutant and B. sphaericus showed attractancy at 2000 ppm with OAI of respectively 0.71, 0.59 and 0.68. However, the OAI of B. megaterium as well as Azospirillum brasilense was 0.13 (at 2000 ppm, which was less than 0.3 required to be considered them as attractants. When the oviposition attractancy of the bacterial culture filtrates were compared with that of a known oviposition attractant, p-cresol (at 10 ppm, the culture filtrates of B. t. var. israelensis (wild type and B. cereus were found to be more active than p-cresol, respectively with 64.2 and 54.3% oviposition.

  7. Making sense of climate change risks and responses at the community level: A cultural-political lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainka A. Granderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to better assess, communicate and respond to risks from climate change at the community level have emerged as key questions within climate risk management. Recent research to address these questions centres largely on psychological factors, exploring how cognition and emotion lead to biases in risk assessment. Yet, making sense of climate change and its responses at the community level demands attention to the cultural and political processes that shape how risk is conceived, prioritized and managed. I review the emergent literature on risk perceptions and responses to climate change using a cultural-political lens. This lens highlights how knowledge, meaning and power are produced and negotiated across multiple stakeholders at the community level. It draws attention to the different ways of constructing climate change risks and suggests an array of responses at the community level. It further illustrates how different constructions of risk intersect with agency and power to shape the capacity for response and collective action. What matters are whose constructions of risk, and whose responses, count in decision-making. I argue for greater engagement with the interpretive social sciences in research, practice and policy. The interpretive social sciences offer theories and tools for capturing and problematising the ways of knowing, sense-making and mobilising around risks from climate change. I also highlight the importance of participatory approaches in incorporating the multiplicity of interests at the community level into climate risk management in fair, transparent and culturally appropriate ways.

  8. Common identity framework of cultural knowledge and practices of Javanese Islam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistiyono Susilo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous literatures apparently argued that Javanese Islam is characterized by orthodox thought and practice which is still mixed with pre-Islamic traditions. By using approach of the sociology of religion, this article tries to explain contextualization of Islamic universal values in local space. The results showed that synthesis of orthodox thought and practice with pre-Islamic traditions is doubtless as a result of interaction between Islam and pre-Islamic traditions during the Islamization of Java. In addition, this study found the intersection of Islam and Javanese culture in the terms of genealogy of culture, Islamic mysticism, orientation of traditional Islamic teachings, and the conception of the power in Javanese kingdom. Since kejawen practices accordance with Islamic mysticism can be justified by the practice of the Muslims. Thus the typology of the relationship between Islam and Javanese culture are not contradictory but dialectical. Finally, a number of implications and suggestions are discussed Berbagai literatur sebelumnya mengenai studi Islam di Jawa umumnya berpendapat bahwa Islam Jawa ditandai dengan pemikiran dan praktek yang masih tercampur dengan tradisi pra-Islam. Dengan menggunakan pendekatan sosiologi agama, artikel ini mencoba untuk menjelaskan makna dari kontekstualisasi nilai-nilai universal Islam pada lingkup lokal. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sintesis pemikiran dan praktek dengan tradisi pra-Islam merupakan hal yang lumrah sebagai hasil interaksi antara Islam dan tradisi praIslam selama periode Islamisasi. Penelitian ini menemukan persamaan identitas antara Islam dan budaya Jawa dalam hal genealogi budaya, mistisisme Islam, orientasi pengajaran Islam tradisional, dan konsepsi kekuasaan di keratonkeraton Jawa. Karena praktek kejawen dapat dijustifikasi sesuai dengan praktek mistisisme Islam, maka tipologi hubungan antara Islam dan budaya Jawa tidak bertentangan tetapi bersifat dialektis.

  9. Tissue Culture Responses from Different Explants of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiu-hong; SHI Xiang-yuan; WU Xian-jun

    2005-01-01

    Different culture explants, including anther, young panicle, young embryo, and mature embryo, from 19 rice varieties were used for callus induction and green plantlet differentiation. The culture efficiency differed significantly among the four types of explants, and varied from genotype to genotype. Callus induction frequency presented significantly positive correlation each between anther and young panicle, anther and mature embryo, and young panicle and young embryo. Green plantlet differentiation showed no relationship between different types of explants. In addition, no relationship was found between callus induction frequency and green plantlet differentiation frequency.

  10. Forensic Signature Detection of Yersinia Pestis Culturing Practices Across Institutions Using a Bayesian Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Corley, Courtney D.; McCue, Lee Ann; Clowers, Brian H.; Dowling, Chase P.; Wahl, Karen L.; Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2014-03-21

    The field of bioforensics is focused on the analysis of evidence from a biocrime. Existing laboratory analyses can identify the specific strain of an organism in the evidence, as well signatures of the specific culture batch of organisms, such as low-frequency contaminants or indicators of growth and processing methods. To link these disparate types of physical data to potential suspects, investigators may need to identify institutions or individuals whose access to strains and culturing practices match those identified from the evidence. In this work we present a Bayesian statistical network to fuse different types of analytical measurements that predict the production environment of a Yersinia pestis sample under investigation with automated test processing of scientific publications to identify institutions with a history of growing Y. pestis under similar conditions. Furthermore, the textual and experimental signatures were evaluated recursively to determine the overall sensitivity of the network across all levels of false positives. We illustrate that institutions associated with several specific culturing practices can be accurately selected based on the experimental signature from only a few analytical measurements. These findings demonstrate that similar Bayesian networks can be generated generically for many organisms of interest and their deployment is not prohibitive due to either computational or experimental factors.

  11. Cultivating a Culture of Awareness: Nurturing Reflective Practices in the NICU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Zina; Kraemer, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the challenges to nurturing reflective practices in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)--an environment in which life and death hang in fragile balance and where the need to defend against unbearable realities is natural, even an adaptive response. Working as consultants to this acute setting, the authors describe how they…

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine practices, traditional healing practices, and cultural competency in pediatric oncology in Hawai' i

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asad Ghiasuddin; Joyce Wong; Andrea M Siu

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hawai’i is an ethnicaly diverse island state with a high rate of both traditional healing (TH) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use. The aim of this project was to assess TH and CAM use within the pediatric oncology population in Honolulu and improve the delivery of culturaly competent care. METHODS: A 9-item survey was distributed to al pediatric oncology patients at Kapi’olani Medical Center for Women and Children for 3 months. The survey inquired about patient ethnicity, TH practices, CAM practices and perception of cultural competence of the care received. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the survey items. Qualitative analysis was done with participant comments to identify themes. RESULTS:Sixty-two surveys were completed. TH was used by 39% of the respondents in the home, and 10% in the hospital (top method was traditional foods). CAM was used by 27% of the respondents in the home, and 68% in the hospital (top method was healing touch). Ninety-seven percent of the respondents reported receiving culturaly competent care. Areas for improvement included language services and dietary choices. CONCLUSION: CAM and TH are used frequently by pediatric oncology patients in Hawai’i, and the vast majority of patients and families felt that the care they received was culturaly competent.

  13. Cultural differences in survey responding: Issues and insights in the study of response biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmelmeier, Markus

    2016-12-01

    This paper introduces the special section "Cultural differences in questionnaire responding" and discusses central topics in the research on response biases in cross-cultural survey research. Based on current conceptions of acquiescent, extreme, and socially desirable responding, the author considers current data on the correlated nature of response biases and the conditions under which different response styles they emerge. Based on evidence relating different response styles to the cultural dimension of individualism-collectivism, the paper explores how research presented as part of this special section might help resolves some tensions in this literature. The paper concludes by arguing that response styles should not be treated merely as measurement error, but as cultural behaviors in themselves.

  14. Culturally Responsive L2 Education: An Awareness-Raising Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Melina

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of multilingual, multiethnic, and multicultural classrooms in varied educational contexts worldwide points to the importance of cultural factors in language education and education in general. In the EFL/ESL classroom of this century, ELT is seen as including much more than purely linguistic aspects as it focuses also on…

  15. Development of a Culturally Responsive Nutrition Promotion Course for Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Gail C.; Beaudoin, Jessica; Rascon, Mayra; Garcia-Vega, Melawhy; Rios-Ellis, Britt

    2013-01-01

    The health of Hispanics is greatly influenced by level of education, socioeconomic status, and access to healthcare (United States Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2011). To address this issue and to reduce health disparities among all ethnic groups, community based interventions with culturally appropriate and linguistically…

  16. Socio-Cultural Norms for Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    Abstract – This paper considers the cultural resources for corporate action tied into stakeholder models, criticizes current stakeholder models, and develops a perspective based in ethics and the political model of the stakeholder. The purpose of this analysis is to lay out models which recognize...

  17. Socio-Cultural Norms for Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    Abstract – This paper considers the cultural resources for corporate action tied into stakeholder models, criticizes current stakeholder models, and develops a perspective based in ethics and the political model of the stakeholder. The purpose of this analysis is to lay out models which recognize...

  18. Development of a Culturally Responsive Nutrition Promotion Course for Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Gail C.; Beaudoin, Jessica; Rascon, Mayra; Garcia-Vega, Melawhy; Rios-Ellis, Britt

    2013-01-01

    The health of Hispanics is greatly influenced by level of education, socioeconomic status, and access to healthcare (United States Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2011). To address this issue and to reduce health disparities among all ethnic groups, community based interventions with culturally appropriate and linguistically…

  19. Cultural orientations, parental beliefs and practices, and latino adolescents' autonomy and independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Kathleen M; Caughy, Margaret O; Schuster, Mark A; Bogart, Laura M; Dittus, Patricia J; Franzini, Luisa

    2014-08-01

    Despite the salience of behavioral autonomy and independence to parent-child interactions during middle adolescence, little is known about parenting processes pertinent to youth autonomy development for Latino families. Among a diverse sample of 684 Latino-origin parent-adolescent dyads in Houston, Texas, this study examines how parents' cultural orientations are associated directly and indirectly, through parental beliefs, with parenting practices giving youth behavioral autonomy and independence. Informed by social domain theory, the study's parenting constructs pertain to youth behaviors in an "ambiguously personal" domain-activities that adolescents believe are up to youth to decide, but which parents might argue require parents' supervision, knowledge, and/or decision-making. Results for latent profile analyses of parents' cultural identity across various facets of acculturation indicate considerable cultural heterogeneity among Latino parents. Although 43% of parents have a Latino cultural orientation, others represent Spanish-speaking/bicultural (21%), bilingual/bicultural (15%), English-speaking/bicultural (15%), or US (6%) cultural orientations. Structural equation modeling results indicate that bilingual/bicultural, English-speaking/bicultural, and US-oriented parents report less emphasis on the legitimacy of parental authority and younger age expectations for youth to engage in independent behaviors than do Latino-oriented parents. Parental beliefs endorsing youth's behavioral independence and autonomy, in turn, are associated with less stringent parental rules (parental report), less parental supervision (parental and youth report), and more youth autonomy in decision-making (parental and youth report). Evidence thus supports the idea that the diverse cultural orientations of Latino parents in the US may result in considerable variations in parenting processes pertinent to Latino adolescents' development.

  20. Workplace learning from a socio-cultural perspective: creating developmental space during the general practice clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwet, J; Zwietering, P J; Teunissen, P W; van der Vleuten, C P M; Scherpbier, A J J A

    2011-08-01

    Workplace learning in undergraduate medical education has predominantly been studied from a cognitive perspective, despite its complex contextual characteristics, which influence medical students' learning experiences in such a way that explanation in terms of knowledge, skills, attitudes and single determinants of instructiveness is unlikely to suffice. There is also a paucity of research which, from a perspective other than the cognitive or descriptive one, investigates student learning in general practice settings, which are often characterised as powerful learning environments. In this study we took a socio-cultural perspective to clarify how students learn during a general practice clerkship and to construct a conceptual framework that captures this type of learning. Our analysis of group interviews with 44 fifth-year undergraduate medical students about their learning experiences in general practice showed that students needed developmental space to be able to learn and develop their professional identity. This space results from the intertwinement of workplace context, personal and professional interactions and emotions such as feeling respected and self-confident. These forces framed students' participation in patient consultations, conversations with supervisors about consultations and students' observation of supervisors, thereby determining the opportunities afforded to students to mind their learning. These findings resonate with other conceptual frameworks and learning theories. In order to refine our interpretation, we recommend that further research from a socio-cultural perspective should also explore other aspects of workplace learning in medical education.