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Sample records for culturally responsive mathematics

  1. Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Context of Mathematics: A Grounded Theory Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Emily P.; Adams, Thomasenia L.

    2012-01-01

    In this grounded theory case study, four interconnected, foundational cornerstones of culturally responsive mathematics teaching (CRMT), communication, knowledge, trust/relationships, and constant reflection/revision, were systematically unearthed to develop an initial working theory of CRMT that directly informs classroom practice. These…

  2. Cultural horizons for mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Kay; Paraides, Patricia; Jannok Nutti, Ylva; Johansson, Gunilla; Bennet, Maria; Doolan, Pat; Peckham, Ray; Hill, John; Doolan, Frank; O'Sullivan, Dominic; Murray, Libbey; Logan, Patricia; McNair, Melissa; Sunnari, Vappu; Murray, Beatrice; Miller, Alissa; Nolan, John; Simpson, Alca; Ohrin, Christine; Doolan, Terry; Doolan, Michelle; Taylor, Paul

    2011-06-01

    As a result of a number of government reports, there have been numerous systemic changes in Indigenous education in Australia revolving around the importance of partnerships with the community. A forum with our local Dubbo community established the importance of working together and developed a model which placed the child in an ecological perspective that particularly noted the role of Elders and the place of the child in the family. However, there was also the issue of curriculum and mathematics education to be addressed. It was recognised that a colonised curriculum reduces the vision of what might be the potential for Indigenous mathematics education. This paper reports on the sharing that developed between our local community and some researchers and teachers from Sweden, Papua New Guinea and New Zealand. It has implications for recognising the impact of testing regimes, the teaching space, understanding the ways children learn, the curriculum, and teacher education. As a result of these discussions, a critical pedagogy that considers culture and place is presented as an ecocultural perspective on mathematics education. This perspective was seen as critical for the curriculum and learning experiences of Indigenous children.

  3. The extent to which Latina/o preservice teachers demonstrate culturally responsive teaching practices during science and mathematics instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Cecilia M.

    2011-12-01

    Complex social, racial, economic, and political issues involved in the practice of teaching today require beginning teachers to be informed, skilled, and culturally responsive when entering the classroom. Teacher educators must educate future teachers in ways that will help them teach all children regardless of language, cultural background, or prior knowledge. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) novice teachers described and demonstrated culturally responsive teaching strategies using their students' cultural and academic profiles to inform practice in science and mathematics instruction. This qualitative exploratory case study considered the culturally responsive teaching practices of 12, non-traditional, Latina/o students as they progressed through a distance-based collaborative teacher education program. Qualitative techniques used throughout this exploratory case study investigated cultural responsiveness of these student teachers as they demonstrated their abilities to: a) integrate content and facilitate knowledge construction; b) illustrate social justice and prejudice reduction; and c) develop students academically. In conclusion, student teachers participating in this study demonstrated their ability to integrate content by: (1) including content from other cultures, (2) building positive teacher-student relationships, and (3) holding high expectations for all students. They also demonstrated their ability to facilitate knowledge construction by building on what students knew. Since there is not sufficient data to support the student teachers' abilities to assist students in learning to be critical, independent thinkers who are open to other ways of knowing, no conclusions regarding this subcategory could be drawn. Student teachers in this study illustrated prejudice reduction by: (1) using native language support to assist students in learning and understanding science and math content

  4. Mathematics across cultures the history of non-Western mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Mathematics Across Cultures: A History of Non-Western Mathematics consists of essays dealing with the mathematical knowledge and beliefs of cultures outside the United States and Europe. In addition to articles surveying Islamic, Chinese, Native American, Aboriginal Australian, Inca, Egyptian, and African mathematics, among others, the book includes essays on Rationality, Logic and Mathematics, and the transfer of knowledge from East to West. The essays address the connections between science and culture and relate the mathematical practices to the cultures which produced them. Each essay is well illustrated and contains an extensive bibliography. Because the geographic range is global, the book fills a gap in both the history of science and in cultural studies. It should find a place on the bookshelves of advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and scholars, as well as in libraries serving those groups.

  5. Conference Cultures of Mathematics and Logic

    CERN Document Server

    Löwe, Benedikt; Müller, Thomas; Xie, Yun

    2016-01-01

    This book gathers the proceedings of the conference "Cultures of Mathematics and Logic," held in Guangzhou, China. The event was the third in a series of interdisciplinary, international conferences emphasizing the cultural components of philosophy of mathematics and logic. It brought together researchers from many disciplines whose work sheds new light on the diversity of mathematical and logical cultures and practices. In this context, the cultural diversity can be diachronical (different cultures in different historical periods), geographical (different cultures in different regions), or sociological in nature.

  6. Mathematical Cultures : the London Meetings 2012-2014

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This collection presents significant contributions from an international network project on mathematical cultures, including essays from leading scholars in the history and philosophy of mathematics and mathematics education. Mathematics has universal standards of validity. Nevertheless, there are local styles in mathematical research and teaching, and great variation in the place of mathematics in the larger cultures that mathematical practitioners belong to. The reflections on mathematical cultures collected in this book are of interest to mathematicians, philosophers, historians, sociologists, cognitive scientists and mathematics educators.

  7. Mathematics and culture II visual perfection : mathematics and creativity

    CERN Document Server

    Emmer, Michele

    2005-01-01

    This volume stresses the strong links between mathematics, culture and creativity in architecture, contemporary art, geometry, computer graphics, literature, theatre and cinema. It is designed not only for mathematicians but for anyone interested in culture, with a special emphasis on the visual aspects.

  8. Mathematics and art a cultural history

    CERN Document Server

    Gamwell, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This is a cultural history of mathematics and art, from antiquity to the present. Mathematicians and artists have long been on a quest to understand the physical world they see before them and the abstract objects they know by thought alone. Taking readers on a tour of the practice of mathematics and the philosophical ideas that drive the discipline, Lynn Gamwell points out the important ways mathematical concepts have been expressed by artists. Sumptuous illustrations of artworks and cogent math diagrams are featured in Gamwell’s comprehensive exploration. Gamwell begins by describing mathematics from antiquity to the Enlightenment, including Greek, Islamic, and Asian mathematics. Then focusing on modern culture, Gamwell traces mathematicians’ search for the foundations of their science, such as David Hilbert’s conception of mathematics as an arrangement of meaning-free signs, as well as artists’ search for the essence of their craft, such as Aleksandr Rodchenko’s monochrome paintings. She shows t...

  9. Teaching Mathematics Education with Cultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornoo, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Students learn through connections when understanding is enhanced by a more holistic view of the content. When mathematics is presented from diverse perspectives, students with diverse backgrounds, expectations, histories, and experiences benefit greatly. In this article the author addresses the need to teach mathematics with cultural competency…

  10. Gender, culture, and mathematics performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Janet S; Mertz, Janet E

    2009-06-02

    Using contemporary data from the U.S. and other nations, we address 3 questions: Do gender differences in mathematics performance exist in the general population? Do gender differences exist among the mathematically talented? Do females exist who possess profound mathematical talent? In regard to the first question, contemporary data indicate that girls in the U.S. have reached parity with boys in mathematics performance, a pattern that is found in some other nations as well. Focusing on the second question, studies find more males than females scoring above the 95th or 99th percentile, but this gender gap has significantly narrowed over time in the U.S. and is not found among some ethnic groups and in some nations. Furthermore, data from several studies indicate that greater male variability with respect to mathematics is not ubiquitous. Rather, its presence correlates with several measures of gender inequality. Thus, it is largely an artifact of changeable sociocultural factors, not immutable, innate biological differences between the sexes. Responding to the third question, we document the existence of females who possess profound mathematical talent. Finally, we review mounting evidence that both the magnitude of mean math gender differences and the frequency of identification of gifted and profoundly gifted females significantly correlate with sociocultural factors, including measures of gender equality across nations.

  11. Imagine math 3 between culture and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Imagine mathematics, imagine with the help of mathematics, imagine new worlds, new geometries, new forms. This volume in the series “Imagine Math” casts light on what is new and interesting in the relationships between mathematics, imagination, and culture. The book opens by examining the connections between modern and contemporary art and mathematics, including Linda D. Henderson’s contribution. Several further papers are devoted to mathematical models and their influence on modern and contemporary art, including the work of Henry Moore and Hiroshi Sugimoto. Among the many other interesting contributions are an homage to Benoît Mandelbrot with reference to the exhibition held in New York in 2013 and the thoughts of Jean-Pierre Bourguignon on the art and math exhibition at the Fondation Cartier in Paris. An interesting part is dedicated to the connections between math, computer science and theatre with the papers by C. Bardainne and A. Mondot.  The topics are treated in a way that is rigorous but capt...

  12. Mathematical Creativity and Giftedness: Perspectives in Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Gerald A.

    2017-01-01

    The investigations described in the ten fascinating research studies contained in the current volume of "ZDM Mathematics Education" evoke some perspectives in response. I consider the articles thematically in relation to a suggested set of important or pressing questions about creativity and giftedness in mathematics education, grouped…

  13. Investigation of Mathematics Teachers Conceptualisation of the Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Role of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agashi, Pius P.; Enemali, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to investigate mathematics teachers' conceptualization of the spiritual, moral social and cultural (SMSC) role of mathematics in Ankpa Education Zone of Kogi State. It used a purposive sample of all the 82 mathematics teachers in the zone comprising of 64 male and 18 female. The instrument used for the study was SMSC Role of…

  14. Culture and Mathematics in School: Boundaries between "Cultural" and "Domain" Knowledge in the Mathematics Classroom and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Na'ilah Suad; Hand, Victoria; Taylor, Edd V.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter is about culture and mathematics teaching and learning. The authors' goal is to offer a thoughtful treatment of the role of culture in the teaching and learning of mathematics and to synthesize literature that is relevant to this concern from multiple subdisciplines in education, including math education, educational anthropology,…

  15. Mathematics of students’ culture: A goal of localized ethnomathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Shirley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ethnomathematics is the mathematics of cultural groups, but often those cultural groups are “others” and “elsewhere”. However, it is also valuable to look inward to see the interaction of mathematics and one’s own culture. An assignment in a graduate course offers this opportunity to students. The assignment is to find an area of the student’s personal “culture” (sometimes defined rather broadly and find its use of mathematics. Students are asked to write about (a the cultural area; (b how they are personally tied to it; and (c how and where it uses mathematics. In addition to the paper, students make an oral presentation. Thus, all students learn (often surprising aspects of their classmates’ non-professional life, and the presenter digs into areas of family and heritage that may not have been reviewed before. Since all students are classroom mathematics teachers, finding their own cultural mathematics is not only enlightening for themselves, but also offers opportunities to include new mathematics applications in their teaching. This paper includes much personal background that led to this assignment and is a report on more than a decade of using it, including brief student examples.

  16. 師生共構文化回應數學教學之個案研究 Co-construction of Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching: The Case Study of a Junior High School Class in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    陳玟樺 Wen-Hua Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available 在多元文化教育潮流下,課室層級被期許能實踐文化回應教學,以促進整體學生的學習增能。本研究旨在探討現階段臺灣課程改革脈絡中,課室師生共同建構文化回應數學教學模式的歷程,採質性個案研究,以參與觀察、訪談、文件分析等方法進行資料蒐集,研究時間為二年。研究發現,師生在設定「邁向公平與正義」為課室專屬之「新」數學教學目標後,為實踐協助課室中新移民子女以「母文化」為橋梁來學習數學,嘗試以「文化差異」,如族群、語言、社會階級、生活經驗等不同文化脈絡與社會建構論為基礎,連結「批判識讀」於數學課程與教學的轉化處理,在協助新移民子女搭建學習鷹架的同時,泛漢族學生也同步展現了不同層次主體性。個案師生透過持續反思與實踐,逐步構築起課室文化 回應數學教學模式之雛形。With the trend on multicultural education, learners’ empowerment is expected to be promoted by culturally responsive teaching at the classroom level. This research focuses on the understanding of operating culturally responsive mathematics teaching in a multi-ethnic junior-high-school classroom in northern Taiwan. This two-year case study used multiple methods to collect research data, including participant observation, interviews and document analysis. The author links the research findings with the following questions. After setting “towards fairness and justice” for the classroom exclusive “new” mathematics teaching objectives, the teacher and students strived to support new immigrant children to learn mathematics using their “mother culture” as a bridge. All of them strived on the basis of “cultural differences” such as ethnicity, languages, social classes, life experiences under different cultural contexts and social constructivism with “critical literacy” to deal

  17. Cultural Issues in the Communication of Research on Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini Bussi, Maria G.; Martignone, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    It might be trite to observe that every research study is framed within a cultural background. In this paper we argue that the description of the cultural background is important for discussing, evaluating and exploiting internationally the findings of local educational studies. This issue is fundamental in every study in mathematics education…

  18. Pretend play and the cultural foundations of mathematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worthington, M.; van Oers, B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to uncover the emergence of cultural mathematical understandings and communications in young children's spontaneous pretend play. It is based on Vygotskian cultural-historical perspectives and social-semiotic theory, informed by research into ‘funds of knowledge' and

  19. Cultural Diversity in Mathematics (Education): CIEAEM 51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Afzal; Williams, Honor; Kraemer, Jean Marie

    The 51st meeting of the Commission Internationale pour L'Etude et L'Amelioration de L'Ensignment des Mathematiques (CIEAEM) was held July, 1999 at Chichester, UK and facilitated the collaboration of delegates from over 30 countries providing a variety of perspectives on the theme OCultural Diversity in Mathematics Education'. The papers in this…

  20. Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Response-Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    A few years ago, in a tutorial in an advanced level undergraduate subject that she teaches--"Emotions, Culture and Community"--the author was a witness and participant in a pedagogical event that moved and provoked the class: It incited response-ability. This article is about that event, the meaning of response-ability, and the window…

  1. 5000 years of geometry mathematics in history and culture

    CERN Document Server

    Scriba, Christoph J

    2015-01-01

    The present volume provides a fascinating overview of geometrical ideas and perceptions from the earliest cultures to the mathematical and artistic concepts of the 20th century. It is the English translation of the 3rd edition of the well-received German book “5000 Jahre Geometrie,” in which geometry is presented as a chain of developments in cultural history and their interaction with architecture, the visual arts, philosophy, science, and engineering. Geometry originated in the ancient cultures along the Indus and Nile Rivers and in Mesopotamia, experiencing its first “Golden Age” in Ancient Greece. Inspired by the Greek mathematics, a new germ of geometry blossomed in the Islamic civilizations. Through the Oriental influence on Spain, this knowledge later spread to Western Europe. Here, as part of the medieval Quadrivium, the understanding of geometry was deepened, leading to a revival during the Renaissance. Together with parallel achievements in India, China, Japan and the ancient American cultur...

  2. Epistemological bases OF THE RELATIONSHIP between culture and mathematics education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neivaldo Oliveira Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our main intention with this theoretical construct is to understand the mathematics education embedded in the social context to which it belongs and where different groups are present with their beliefs, knowledge, practices that, in turn, are the result of a historical process, in which changes occur and affect most of the different fields ofIcnowledge.In the theoretical construction, we start from a more general picture of the world and society, focusing on the historical and social changes and, at the same time, in changes in the scope of mathematical knowledge. We do this through a historical analysis and, along the way, we seek to understand culture, Mathematics and Mathematics Education, as fields or dimensions present in this broader context of historical changes, and seek to establish relationships between thesefields or areas of knowledge, in the context of their productions. ln seeking to understand "culture", we try not to lose sight of the social dynamics that are established in the contacts between different groups, each with characteristics that involve traditions, artistic manifestations, culinary language, but surrounded by a society that results from a globalization process getting stronger. It is in this broader context that we seek to understand mathematics, as a field of knowledge, making an analysis that goes from its origin as well as its implications with reality and society, so that to the end, we present and discuss the Ethnomathematics as a possible alternative to do or to understand the articulation pointed out. Finally, we extend the discussion to understand the mathematics education, in view of its social integration, and the socialization perspective of the mathematical knowledge. We realized that mathematics education, seen as a field of knowledge and considering the need for socialization of this knowledge, is also the result of practices developed and a comprehensive process of change that has been occurring in

  3. Learning mathematics concepts in a traditional socio-culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper argues that each culture has its unique applications of mathematical concepts. It presents this argument by showing how the Great Zimbabwe Monument that was built between the 12th and 14th century applied some geometrical concepts that some secondary school students in Zimbabwe find difficult to ...

  4. Leadership in Mathematics Education: Roles and Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posamentier, Alfred S.

    2013-01-01

    This article partitions leadership in mathematics education into two categories: leadership in defining and maintaining important principles in teaching mathematics, and leadership in informing the public about the importance of mathematics today and in the future. Examples of both types of leadership are given in the article. Teacher leaders in…

  5. Meaning making in a college mathematics lecture format : the intersection of mathematics, language, and cultural meaning systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kailikole, Kathryn Leimomi

    2009-01-01

    Students and teachers use language to communicate mathematical knowledge and understanding. This communication is compounded by the underlying requirement for students to acquire language with specialized meaning and to have facility with this meaning as a member of a mathematics discourse community. The lecture format is a long-standing means of communicating knowledge in the university mathematics classroom. Instructors and students approach the mathematics classroom with cultural meaning s...

  6. A Mathematical Model of Cardiovascular Response to Dynamic Exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magosso, E

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model of cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented, The model includes the pulsating heart, the systemic and pulmonary, circulation, a functional description of muscle...

  7. Unlocking the black box: teaching mathematical modeling with popular culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgren, Eric T

    2016-10-01

    Mathematical modeling is an important tool in biological research, allowing for the synthesis of results from many studies into an understanding of a system. Despite this, the need for extensive subject matter knowledge and complex mathematics often leaves modeling as an esoteric subspecialty. A 2-fold approach can be used to make modeling more approachable for students and those interested in obtaining a functional knowledge of modeling. The first is the use of a popular culture disease system-a zombie epidemic-to allow for exploration of the concepts of modeling using a flexible framework. The second is the use of available interactive and non-calculus-based tools to allow students to work with and implement models to cement their understanding. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Fostering Culturally and Developmentally Responsive Teaching through Improvisational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Elizabeth; Whyte, Kristin; Delaney, Kate Kresin

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore an effort to rethink curricular decision-making with a group of public pre-K teachers working in a context of curriculum escalation and commitment to play-based pedagogy. Through a professional development program designed to support developmentally and culturally responsive early mathematics, we examine how teachers…

  9. The effect of trauma on Neanderthal culture: A mathematical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahashi, W

    2017-03-01

    Traumatic lesions are often observed in ancient skeletal remains. Since ancient medical technology was immature, severely traumatized individuals may have frequently lost the physical ability for cultural skills that demand complex body movements. I develop a mathematical model to analyze the effect of trauma on cultural transmission and apply it to Neanderthal culture using Neanderthal fossil data. I estimate from the data that the proportion of adult individuals who suffered traumatic injuries before death was approximately 0.79-0.94, in which 0.37-0.52 were injured severely and 0.13-0.19 were injured before adulthood. Assuming that every severely traumatized individual and a quarter to a half of the other traumatized individuals lost the capacity for a cultural skill that demands complex control of the traumatized body part, I estimate that if an upper limb is associated with a cultural skill, each individual had to communicate closely with at least 1.5-2.6 individuals during adulthood to maintain the skill in Neanderthal society, and if a whole body is associated, at least 3.1-11.5 individuals were necessary. If cultural transmissions between experts and novices were inaccurate, or if low frequency skills easily disappeared from the population due to random drift, more communicable individuals were necessary. Since the community size of Neanderthals was very small, their high risk of injury may have inhibited the spread of technically difficult cultural skills in their society. It may be important to take this inhibition into consideration when we study Neanderthal culture and the replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Developing PISA-"Like" Mathematics Task with Indonesia Natural and Cultural Heritage as Context to Assess Students Mathematical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktiningrum, Wuli; Zulkardi; Hartono, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is produce a set of PISA-like mathematics task with Indonesia natural and cultural heritage as context which are valid, practical, to assess students' mathematics literacy. This is design research using type of development research with formative evaluation. A total of 20 students of SMP Negeri 1 Palembang. Beside, 10…

  11. Students' Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character: Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinussa, Anderson L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-test-post-test design and control group that aims to assess students' critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realistic mathematics education (RME) culture-based. Subjects of this study were 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in…

  12. Creating a Culture of Inquiry in Mathematics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Jill

    2013-01-01

    We argue that student research skills in mathematics should be honed throughout the curriculum just as such skills are built over time in the natural and physical sciences. Examples used in the mathematics program at St. Olaf College are given.

  13. Establishing a mathematical Lesson Study culture in Danish teacher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skott, Charlotte Krog; Østergaard, Camilla Hellsten

    Bridging theory and practice is a general challenge in mathematics teacher education. Research shows that Lesson Study (LS) is an effective way for prospective mathematics teachers to build relations between course work and field experiences......Bridging theory and practice is a general challenge in mathematics teacher education. Research shows that Lesson Study (LS) is an effective way for prospective mathematics teachers to build relations between course work and field experiences...

  14. History of Mathematics in Korean Mathematics Textbooks: Implication for Using Ethnomathematics in Culturally Diverse School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Mi-Kyung; Moon, Jong-Eun; Song, Ryoon-Jin

    2016-01-01

    From a multicultural perspective, this research investigated to what extent Korean mathematics textbooks use history of mathematics. The results show even though educational use of history presented in Korean mathematics textbooks may provide a rich outlook, it does not encourage a fundamental change in the educational practice of school…

  15. The shanai, the pseudosphere and other imaginings: envisioning culturally contextualised mathematics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luitel, Bal Chandra; Taylor, Peter Charles

    2007-07-01

    Adopting a self-conscious form of co-generative writing and employing a bricolage of visual images and literary genres we draw on a recent critical auto/ethnographic inquiry to engage our readers in pedagogical thoughtfulness about the problem of culturally decontextualised mathematics education in Nepal, a country rich in cultural and linguistic diversity. Combining transformative, critical mathematics and ethnomathematical perspectives we develop a critical cultural perspective on the need for a culturally contextualized mathematics education that enables Nepalese students to develop (rather than abandon) their cultural capital. We illustrate this perspective by means of an ethnodrama which portrays a pre-service teacher's point of view of the universalist pedagogy of Dr. Euclid, a semi-fictive professor of undergraduate mathematics. We deconstruct the naivety of this conventional Western mathematics pedagogy arguing that it fails to incorporate salient aspects of Nepali culture. Subsequently we employ metaphorical imagining to envision a culturally inclusive mathematics education for enabling Nepalese teachers to (i) excavate multiple mathematical knowledge systems embedded in the daily practices of rural and remote villages across the country, and (ii) develop contextualized pedagogical perspectives to serve the diverse interests and aspirations of Nepali school children.

  16. Constructions of Mathematicians in Popular Culture and Learners' Narratives: A Study of Mathematical and Non-Mathematical Subjectivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Marie-Pierre; Mendick, Heather; Epstein, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, based on a project funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council considering how people position themselves in relation to popular representations of mathematics and mathematicians, we explore constructions of mathematicians in popular culture and the ways learners make meanings from these. Drawing on an analysis of popular…

  17. DIAGNOSING THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CULTURE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zana Prutina

    2015-01-01

    .... Existing organizational culture typologies only provide the framework for analysis within the traditional business paradigm, but they are of limited use in the context of corporate social responsibility...

  18. Qualitative mathematics for the social sciences mathematical models for research on cultural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, Lee

    2012-01-01

    In this book Lee Rudolph brings together international contributors who combine psychological and mathematical perspectives to analyse how qualitative mathematics can be used to create models of social and psychological processes. Bridging the gap between the fields with an imaginative and stimulating collection of contributed chapters, the volume updates the current research on the subject, which until now has been rather limited, focussing largely on the use of statistics. Qualitative Mathematics for the Social Sciences contains a variety of useful illustrative figures, in

  19. Parental Cultural Capital and Student School Performance in Mathematics and Science across Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haigen; Liang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    The authors' purpose was to examine the relationship between three forms of cultural capital--the embodied, the objectified, and the institutionalized--and student performance in mathematics and science. Their analysis of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study 2011 data from 32 countries and regions revealed that parental…

  20. Urban and Rural High School Students' Perspectives of Productive Peer Culture for Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Melva R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine students' perspectives about productive peer culture (PPC) in general and for mathematics learning. The urban and rural high school students in this study have participated for at least one year in either an Algebra Project Cohort Model (APCM) for daily mathematics instruction and/or worked as mathematics…

  1. The experience of cross-cultural peer teaching for a group of mathematics learners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vos, Natasha B; Geldenhuys, Johanna L; Fox, Tracey D

    2007-01-01

    .... The aim of the project was to explore the possible advantages of cross-cultural peer tutoring of certain sections of the new Mathematics curriculum for both the tutors and tutees, especially to see...

  2. Students’ Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character: Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson L. Palinussa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-testpost-test design and control group that aims to assess students’ critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realisticmathematics education (RME culture-based. Subjects of this studywere 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in Ambon. The instruments of the study are: students’ early math skills test, critical thinking skills mathematical test and perception scale of students’character. Data was analyzed by using t test and Anova. The study found that: 1 Achievements and enhancement of students’ critical mathematical thinking skills who were treated with by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ skills were treated by conventional mathematics education. The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level; 2 Quality of students’ characterwho were treated by realistic mathematics education is better thenstudents’ character who were treated by conventional mathematicseducation The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level

  3. DEVELOPING PISA-LIKE MATHEMATICS TASK WITH INDONESIA NATURAL AND CULTURAL HERITAGE AS CONTEXT TO ASSESS STUDENTS MATHEMATICAL LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuli Oktiningrum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is produce a set of PISA-like mathematics task with Indonesia natural and cultural heritage as context which are valid, practical, to assess students’ mathematics literacy. This is design research using type of development research with formative evaluation. A total of 20 students of SMP Negeri 1 Palembang. Beside, 10 experts were involved in this research to assess the feasibility of prototyping in terms of content, context and language. Walk through, documentation, questionnaire, test result, and interviews are way to collect the data. This research produced a PISA-like math task is as many 12 category of content, context, and process valid, practical and has potential effect. The validity came empirical evaluation of validation and reliability testing during small group. From the field test, we conclude that the tasks also potentially effect to the students’ mathematical literacy in activating the indicators of each Fundamental Mathematical Capabilities.Keywords: development research, PISA task, mathematics literacy, fundamental mathematical capabilities DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.7.1.2812.1-8

  4. Culturally Responsive Leadership in School Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Laura L.

    2010-01-01

    Students need culturally responsive teacher-librarians who focus on 21st century skills for all students. Basic principles for culturally responsive leadership in school libraries are articulated by multicultural educators who know that social equity is more important than ever, as the number of diverse and underserved students increase each year.…

  5. Culturally Responsive Pedagogy for Teachers of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gist, Conra D.

    2017-01-01

    This study utilizes the conceptual framework of culturally responsive pedagogy and theoretical suppositions about the culturally responsive teacher educator to examine the learning experiences of teacher candidates of color. Findings from the case study of a teacher educator's and teacher candidates' of color teaching and learning experiences in a…

  6. The development of mathematics throughout the centuries a brief history in a cultural context

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the book, readers take a journey throughout time and observe how people around the world have understood these patterns of quantity, structure, and dimension around them. The Development of Mathematics Throughout the Centuries: A Brief History in a Cultural Contex provides a brief overview of the history of mathematics in a very straightforward and understandable manner and also addresses major findings that influenced the development of mathematics as a coherent discipline. This book: Highlights the contributions made by various world cultures including African, Egyptian, Babyloni

  7. The Impact of a Teacher Education Culture-Based Project on Identity as a Mathematically Thinking Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Identity as a mathematics teacher is enhanced when a teacher explores the cultural setting of their mathematics. The reports of projects that link culture and mathematics were analysed to explore the impact of sociocultural situations together with affective and cognitive aspects of self-regulation on identity. The reports were written by…

  8. Nature, Nurture, and the Mathematics of Culture in the Light of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The noun "culture" and the verb "cultivate" were frequently used in 18th century French literature in a very special way. Drawing inspiration from this special usage, this paper examines culture as the art or science of shaping, polishing, sifting and enhancing raw nature by borrowing and using the most basic mathematical ...

  9. Using Culturally Relevant Teaching in a Co-Educational Mathematics Class of a Patriarchal Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogari, David

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports on the use of culturally relevant teaching in a class located in a patriarchal community. The paper is conceptualised around the notion that learners' familiar context provided by the socio-cultural activities can facilitate mathematics learning and make it fun to learn. Data were derived from a lesson activity using…

  10. Collective Pedagogical Teacher Culture and Mathematics Achievement: Differences by Race, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Stephanie; Mickelson, Roslyn Arlin; Stearns, Elizabeth; Banerjee, Neena; Bottia, Martha Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Scholars have not adequately assessed how organizational cultures in schools differentially influence students' mathematics achievement by race and socioeconomic status (SES). We focus on what we term "collective pedagogical teacher culture", highlighting the role of professional communities and teacher collaboration in influencing…

  11. Experience the Full Spectrum of Social Studies. World Cultures: Science, Reading, Mathematics, Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nancy J.

    This collection of 20 classroom activities, games, and problem sets has been revised over several years to fit the changing needs of students. They are designed to introduce students to world cultures through activity participation in the areas of science, reading, mathematics and art. The various cultures explored include: ancient Egypt, ancient…

  12. Network Culture, Performance & Corporate Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Brondoni, Silvio M

    2003-01-01

    The growth and sustainability of free market economies highlights the need to define rules more suited to the current condition of market globalisation and also encourages firms to adopt more transparent and accountable corporate responsibility (and corporate social responsibility, namely the relationship between the company, environment and social setting). From a managerial perspective, corporate responsibility is linked to ensure the lasting pursuit of the company mission, seeking increasi...

  13. "Survivor" Math: Using Pop Culture to Enhance Learning Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a modification of the popular TV game show, "Survivor," as conducted in an undergraduate first semester mathematics precalculus course. The objective of this game is a group-based competitive drill and practice activity to help students prepare and review for the fundamental concepts exam. The results of this activity…

  14. Culture and Crisis Response in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Dean, Shelley; Henry, Geoff; McGhie, Desiree; Phillipson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    New Zealand is a bicultural nation, founded on the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi by the native Maori and the British Crown. It is also home to people from many countries, cultures and ethnicities. Therefore, culturally-relevant response to crisis events has become a significant aspect of the Ministry of Education's interdisciplinary Traumatic…

  15. Towards a Culturally Situated Reader Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wanda; Browne, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a theory of how culture enables literary interpretations of texts. We begin with a brief overview of the reader response field. From there, we introduce the theory and provide illustrative participant data examples. These data examples illustrate the four cultural positions middle grade students in our research assumed when…

  16. Increasing Mathematics and Science Achievement for Culturally Diverse Students through Teaching Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Lee

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this proposal was to field test and evaluate a Teacher Training program that would prepare teachers to increase the motivation and achievement of culturally diverse students in the areas of science and mathematics. Designed as a three year program, this report covers the first two years of the training program at the Ronald McNair School in the Ravenswood School district, using the resources of the NASA Ames Research Center and the California Framework for Mathematics and Science.

  17. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  18. Dealing with Difference: Building Culturally Responsive Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Burridge

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia continues to develop as a multicultural society with levels of immigration increasing significantly over recent years as a result of government policies. More recently, the new period of financial turmoil, continuing threats from terrorism and environmental concerns, have all exacerbated the challenges of dealing with difference in our society. In response, schools continue to face the challenges of the impact of a range of different cultures, languages and religions among their student and school communities. How effectively schools deal with difference and how well they are supported in their endeavours to build culturally response classrooms is a perennial issue for both teachers and educators. A major challenge for teachers is to at a minimum, understand cultural differences as they manifest in their particular school settings and to draw on approaches that support student learning in culturally appropriate ways so to assist them to better realise their full potential. In this paper we will consider cultural diversity in the context of recent school policies, highlight a number of frameworks for addressing cultural diversity in the classroom, in particular the approaches by Kalantzis and Cope’s (1999 and Hickling-Hudson (2003. We also draw on the findings from a recent qualitative study of representations of cultural diversity in a number of Sydney metropolitan schools to discuss the need for more greater resource and policy support for progressive teaching approaches that support the development of a more tolerant and inclusive multicultural society. Key words: cultural diversity, schools, teacher education, classroom practice, social inclusion

  19. A trend study of self-concept and mathematics achievement in a cross-cultural context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun

    2007-12-01

    The TIMSS 1995, 1999, and 2003 data have been gathered from Hong Kong before and after its sovereignty switch from the United Kingdom to China in 1997. Built on a reciprocal relation theory from the research literature, this investigation is designed to examine models of student self-concept and mathematics achievement during the political transition. Along with a perceived `brain drain' from the population migration, there was a non-monotonic change in the reciprocal relationship between self-concept and mathematics achievement. In addition, indicators of mathematics achievement and self-concept have demonstrated different linkages to the permanent emigration of Hong Kong residents with valued or desirable skills and qualifications. Interpretation of these empirical findings entails a need of enhancing cross-cultural understanding in mathematics education.

  20. Response Strategies and Response Styles in Cross-Cultural Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.H.; Gelissen, J.P.T.M.; Vermunt, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the following research questions: Do respondents participating in cross-cultural surveys differ in their response style when responding to attitude statements? If so, are characteristics of the response process associated with their ethnicity and generation of immigration? To

  1. School Socio-Cultural Identity and Perceived Parental Involvement about Mathematics Learning in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutsios-Rentzos, Andreas; Chaviaris, Petros; Kafoussi, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    In this quantitative study we investigated the primary school students' perceived parental involvement in mathematics with respect to different school socio-cultural identity as identified by the students' ethnicity. 493 students attending the two last grades of three primary schools participated in the study. The role of the students' grade and…

  2. The Contribution of Cultural Capital to Students' Mathematics Achievement in Medium and High Socioeconomic Gradient Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cheng Yong

    2015-01-01

    The present study addresses the issue of how different forms of cultural capital may influence children's mathematics achievement in economies with different socioeconomic gradients. Data from 73,178 parent-child dyads from 10 economies with different socioeconomic gradients who participated in the Programme for International Student Assessment…

  3. Culturally Responsive Physics Teaching: Content or Conveyance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Taquan Seth

    2011-12-01

    This study, in response to the achievement gap in science and the lack of significant numbers of ethnic minorities in science fields, examined the effects of a Cultural Responsiveness Workshop and intervention on teacher practice, teacher discourse, and student perceptions and connectedness to physics. The sample was comprised of three high school physics teachers---2 teaching five 12th grade sections and one teaching five 9th grade sections of physics---in two separate urban schools in the same section of South Los Angeles. My research design was qualitative and examined eight culturally responsive indicators that, when applied, may increase student engagement and level of connectedness in urban high school physics classrooms: (1) proximity to students, (2) the ways in which they encouraged students, (3) positive reinforcement techniques, (4) modifications for individual learning types, (5) use of children's strengths, (6) scaffolding, (7) displaying an understanding of diverse cultures, and (8) displaying a personal regard for students of diverse cultures. When the study was completed and data was collected, I identified trends in the change in teacher discourse, behaviors, instructional practice, and perceptions of student engagement. My findings, discovered through classroom observations and focus groups, indicated a positive shift in each. Accompanying these shifts were positive shifts in level of student engagement and level of connectedness. There were also the unexpected findings of the need for teachers to receive feedback in a safe collaborative space and the use of culturally responsive teaching as a tool for behavioral management. My study found that there is a definite relationship between the use of the culturally responsive indicators observed, student engagement and student level of connectedness to physics when implemented in urban high school science classrooms.

  4. Latina/o Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Language and Culture while Assisting Children in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomvoridi-Ivanovic, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Guided by symbolic interactionism and cultural historical activity theory this study investigated how four bilingual Latina/o pre-service teachers use language (Spanish and English) and culture, defined as social practices, as instructional resources in mathematics. The setting of the study was an after-school bilingual mathematics program, namely…

  5. Culturally divergent responses to mortality salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma-Kellams, Christine; Blascovich, Jim

    2011-08-01

    Two experiments compared the effects of death thoughts, or mortality salience, on European and Asian Americans. Research on terror management theory has demonstrated that in Western cultural groups, individuals typically employ self-protective strategies in the face of death-related thoughts. Given fundamental East-West differences in self-construal (i.e., the independent vs. interdependent self), we predicted that members of Eastern cultural groups would affirm other people, rather than defend and affirm the self, after encountering conditions of mortality salience. We primed European Americans and Asian Americans with either a death or a control prime and examined the effect of this manipulation on attitudes about a person who violates cultural norms (Study 1) and on attributions about the plight of an innocent victim (Study 2). Mortality salience promoted culturally divergent responses, leading European Americans to defend the self and Asian Americans to defend other people.

  6. Toward a More Culturally Responsive General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to characterize culturally responsive teaching; consider how it differs from other pedagogical approaches in music education informed by culture, such as multicultural music education; and offer ideas for making the general music classroom more culturally responsive.

  7. Schools and Marketization: Cultural Challenges and Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foskett, Nicholas H.

    1998-01-01

    Develops an analytical methodology for service organizations by examining four key cultural and managerial developments: understandings of markets and marketing held within the school; organizational responses to the market; use of analytical tools; and development of appropriate marketing strategies. Shows variations in schools' development of a…

  8. Students’ Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character:Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson L. Palinussa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-test-post-test design and control group that aims to assess students’ critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realistic mathematics education (RME culture-based. Subjects of this study were 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in Ambon. The instruments of the study are: students’ early math skills test, critical thinking skills mathematical test and perception scale of students’character. Data was analyzed by using t-test and Anova. The study found that: 1 Achievements and enhancement of students’ critical mathematical thinking skills who were treated with by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ skills were treated by conventional mathematics education. The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level; 2 Quality of students’ character who were treated by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ character who were treated by conventional mathematics education The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level  Keywords: Critical Thinking, Students’ Character, Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.4.1.566.75-94

  9. Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Eringen, A Cemal

    2013-01-01

    Continuum Physics: Volume 1 - Mathematics is a collection of papers that discusses certain selected mathematical methods used in the study of continuum physics. Papers in this collection deal with developments in mathematics in continuum physics and its applications such as, group theory functional analysis, theory of invariants, and stochastic processes. Part I explains tensor analysis, including the geometry of subspaces and the geometry of Finsler. Part II discusses group theory, which also covers lattices, morphisms, and crystallographic groups. Part III reviews the theory of invariants th

  10. Mathematics of students’ culture: A goal of localized ethnomathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Shirley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La etnomatemática es la matemática de grupos culturales, pero a menudo los grupos culturales son "otros" y están en "otros lugares". Sin embargo, también es valioso para mirar hacia adentro para ver la interacción de las matemáticas y la cultura de uno mismo. Una tarea en una clase de postgrado ofrece esta oportunidad a los estudiantes. La asignación es encontrar un área de "cultura" personal del alumno (a veces definida más bien en términos generales y encontrar su uso de las matemáticas. Se les pide a los estudiantes a escribir sobre (a el área cultural; (B la forma en que están personalmente vinculados a ella; y (c cómo y dónde se utiliza la matemática. Además del papel, los estudiantes hacen una presentación oral. Por lo tanto, todos los estudiantes aprenden aspectos (a menudo sorprendentes de la vida no profesional de los compañeros, y el presentador indaga en las áreas de la familia y el patrimonio que pueden no haber sido consideradas antes. Dado que todos los alumnos son profesores de matemáticas del aula, la búsqueda de sus propias matemáticas culturales no sólo es esclarecedor para sí mismos, sino que también ofrece oportunidades para incluir nuevas aplicaciones matemáticas en su enseñanza. Este trabajo incluye los antecedentes personales que llevaron a esta tarea y es un informe sobre más de una década de uso de esta, incluyendo breves ejemplos de los estudiantes.

  11. Indigenous teachers' experiences of the implementation of culture-based mathematics activities in Sámi school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutti, Ylva Jannok

    2013-03-01

    The goal of Indigenous education is that it should be approached on the basis of the Indigenous language and culture; this is also the case with Sámi education. The Sámi School Board has stated that all teaching in Sámi schools should be culturally based, despite the fact that Sámi culture-based teaching is not specifically defined. Therefore, teachers themselves must adapt the teaching and as a result, usually no Sámi culture-based mathematics teaching takes place. The aim of this article is to discuss Indigenous teachers' experiences with designing and implementing culture-based mathematics activities in Sámi preschool and primary school. The teachers' work with culture-based mathematics activities took the form of Sámi cultural thematic work with ethnomathematical content, Multicultural school mathematics with Sámi cultural elements, and Sámi intercultural mathematics teaching. Culture-based mathematics activities took place within an action research study in the Swedish part of Sápmi. Sápmi comprises northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland, as well as the Kola Peninsula in Russia. In the action research study, six teachers conducted culture-based mathematics activities in preschool and primary school on the basis of the action research loop "plan-act-observe-reflect." During the study the teachers changed from a problem-focused perspective to a possibility-focused culture-based teaching perspective characterised by a self-empowered Indigenous teacher role, as a result of which they started to act as agents for Indigenous school change. The concept of "decolonisation" was visible in the teachers' narratives. The teachers' newly developed knowledge about the ethnomathematical research field seemed to enhance their work with Indigenous culture-based mathematics teaching.

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and c...

  13. Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Sherman K

    2010-01-01

    Anyone can appreciate the beauty, depth, and vitality of mathematics with the help of this highly readable text, specially developed from a college course designed to appeal to students in a variety of fields. Readers with little mathematical background are exposed to a broad range of subjects chosen from number theory, topology, set theory, geometry, algebra, and analysis. Starting with a survey of questions on weight, the text discusses the primes, the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, rationals and irrationals, tiling, tiling and electricity, probability, infinite sets, and many other topi

  14. The Secondary-Tertiary Transition Viewed as a Change in Mathematical Cultures: An Exploration Concerning Symbolism and Its Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriveau, Claudia; Bednarz, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Secondary-tertiary transition issues are explored from the perspective of ways of doing mathematics that are constituted in the implicit aspects of teachers' action. Theories of culture (Hall, 1959) and ethnomethodology (Garfinkel, 1967) provide us with a basis for describing and explicating the ways of doing mathematics specific to each teaching…

  15. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  16. Inquiry and Cultural Responsive Teaching in General Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Christine Cozzens

    2013-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning is shown as an effective methodology to reach diverse student populations. It aligns with the National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems and their methodology of culturally responsive teaching. (Contains 2 resources.)

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and corporate ethics programs for CSR.

  18. Cultural-historical activity theory: Vygotsky's forgotten and suppressed legacy and its implication for mathematics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-03-01

    Cultural-historical activity theory—with historical roots in dialectical materialism and the social psychology to which it has given rise—has experienced exponential growth in its acceptance by scholars interested in understanding knowing and learning writ large. In education, this theory has constituted something like a well kept secret that is only in the process of gaining larger levels of acceptance. Mathematics educators are only beginning to realise the tremendous advantages that the theory provides over other theories. In this review essay, I articulate the theory as it may relate to the issues that concern mathematics education and educators with a particular focus on the way in which it addresses logical contradictions in existing theories.

  19. The experience of cross-cultural peer teaching for a group of mathematics learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey D Fox

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the post-1994 government’s efforts to put the necessary legislation in place and to work hard to reform the  education system in South Africa and improve standards, inequalities still  exist in many schools. Instead of focusing on the barriers to learning in schools, this paper, within the framework of the asset-based approach, describes the experiences of  learners involved in a cross-cultural peer teaching initiative between a privileged private  school and a township school in Port Elizabeth. The aim of the project was to explore the possible advantages of cross-cultural peer tutoring of certain sections of the new Mathematics curriculum  for both the tutors and tutees, especially to see whether the township learners’ understanding  of the learning content could be improved. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were used to collect the data. The results showed that the township learners’understanding of the mathematic topics dealt with during the peer teaching session was enhanced and that both groups gained from the cross-cultural peer teaching interaction.

  20. Assisting students struggling with mathematics: Response to intervention (RtI) for elementary and middle schools.

    OpenAIRE

    Gersten, Russell; Beckmann, Sybilla; Clarke, Benjamin; Foegen, Anne; Marsh, Laurel; Star, Jon R; Witzel, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Taking early action may be key to helping students struggling with mathematics. The eight recommendations in this guide are designed to help teachers, principals, and administrators use Response to Intervention for the early detection, prevention, and support of students struggling with mathematics.

  1. The Students' Procedural Fluency and Written-Mathematical Explanation on Constructed Response Tasks in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Romiro G.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze the procedural fluency and written-mathematical explanation to select constructed response tasks of students in Thermodynamics problems. The study made use of 2 sections, composed of 26 students, in University Physics 1 to conclude on the research problem. It made use of the assumption that mathematical and…

  2. The Complexities of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: A Case Study of Two Secondary Mathematics Teachers and Their ESOL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jacqueline; Napp, Carolina; Adeleke, Shade

    2009-01-01

    Culturally relevant pedagogy is not well understood as an instructional strategy in the mathematics classroom. This study reveals the challenges two teachers faced when they implemented a pilot project with ninth and tenth grade ESOL students. The task they envisioned as culturally relevant did not capture their ESOL student's interests; rather,…

  3. Do Authors of Online Electronic Materials for Teaching Mathematics Use Their Potential to Use Non-Stereotypical Cultural Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraová, Hana

    2017-01-01

    The paper focuses on the cultural content of online electronic materials developed primarily by Czech in-service teachers of mathematics for smartboards. The author presents an analysis of these materials with a focus on the cultural settings of word problems they contain. The paper builds on a poster presented on ECEL 2015 conference and a paper…

  4. Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Reflections on Mentoring by Educational Leadership Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genao, Soribel

    2016-01-01

    Authentic field experience is an important component in educational leadership programs. This article revisits the literature examining the cultural gap that exists in public education, while taking a closer look at what it means to be a culturally responsive leader and teacher. The need to integrate culturally responsive practices to connect and…

  5. CULTURAL DIVERSITY AS REPRESENTED IN INDONESIAN FOLKLORES: CASE STUDY IN MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Arief Budiman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to know how far the Mathematics students in 2013/2014 have ability to know the concept of cultural diversity as represented in Indonesian folklores. The method of this research is descriptive analysis. While the approach that we use is culture‘s approach. Focus group discussion in this research is to find the result of analysis from the students. The result shows three things. Firstly the students are able to understand about the culture from the short stories that is given. Secondly almost all of the students can describe the moral value delivered in the story. Thirdly all of the students agree that Focus Group Discussion is a good technique to help the students understand the literary works

  6. Heavenly Mathematics & Cultural Astronomy: A Course at the National University of Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    2010-10-01

    I have introduced a general education course called Heavenly Mathematics and Cultural Astronomy [2] at the National University of Singapore. The goal of this course is to study astronomy in a cultural context with a tropical emphasis. Most astronomy books are written from a high northern latitude point of view, but Singapore is almost on the equator, so I aim to be ``hemispherically-correct''. Singapore is also a multi-racial society, where public holidays are determined using the Gregorian, Chinese, Islamic and Indian calendars. The course starts with an introduction to observational astronomy with an emphasis on the appearance of the Sun and the Moon from different parts of the world. I then give a fairly detailed description of the Gregorian, Chinese, Islamic and Indian calendars [1, 4, 5], and finish with a thorough discussion of the analemma, equation of time and navigation [3]. Being a mathematician, my approach is quite mathematical, but my emphasis is on geometrical reasoning. Formulas and computations may scare some students away, but they are surprisingly willing to struggle with complicated spatial visualization.

  7. DIAGNOSING THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CULTURE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zana Prutina

    2015-01-01

    .... After the analysis of major scholarship in the field, this paper defines CSR culture and identifies four types of organizational cultures based on companies' CSR orientations, namely CSR-related values...

  8. Hua Loo-Keng's Popularization of Mathematics and the Cultural Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudeček, Jiří

    2017-09-01

    Before 1966, Chinese mathematician Hua Loo-Keng had singled out "Two Methods" as a way to truly applied and useful mathematics. The Overall Planning Method, based on the Critical Path Method widely used in USA, mostly appealed to middle and upper management. This limited its spread during the Cultural Revolution. The Optimum Selection Method, also of US origin, was more mass-oriented and ready for popularization. Nevertheless, Hua met resistance from leftist radicals, whose ideological objections sprang from an underlying power struggle. Hua built popularization teams, mostly from talented younger people whose careers were disrupted by the Cultural Revolution, and thus opened a path for many of them to important roles in China's scientific infrastructure after 1976. Hua Loo-Keng's efforts, while interrupted during the Cultural Revolution and the subsequent political campaigns, were also helped by the populist ethos of the movement, and by the lack of other non-political endeavors at that time. In this sense, the Cultural Revolution gave Hua Loo-Keng's popularization its importance and long-term impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cultural villages as contexts for mediating culture and mathematics education in the South African curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Madusise

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Algunas políticas de reforma educativa de matemáticas indican que la educación matemática debe estar conectada a las culturas de los alumnos. Sin embargo, la enseñanza en las escuelas rara vez hace la conexión entre las matemáticas y la cultura de manera pedagógicamente informadas. Las conexiones se hacen a menudo superficialmente; el plan de estudios en las escuelas carece de estrategias de contenido y estrategias específicas que permitan la realización de las conexiones explícitas en la enseñanza. El estudio cualitativo del cual este trabajo surge trabajó con tres profesores de matemáticas en un intento de enseñar esta disciplina en formas que conectan los conceptos clave de la cultura. A través de las actividades culturales realizadas en una aldea cultural3, dos cursos del noveno grado del currículo sudafricano fueron indigenizados. Una unidad didáctica sobre los temas indigenizados fue diseñada e implementada en cinco clases de noveno grado en la misma escuela. El trabajo demuestra que la experiencia en el diseño, implementación, y reflexión sobre el estudio de intervención tuvo alguna contribución positiva al repertorio pedagógico de los profesores participantes. Los maestros vieron la posibilidad de utilizar las aldeas culturales como recursos didácticos para la conexión de la educación matemática a las culturas de los alumnos en el plan de estudios de Sudáfrica. Sostengo que las aldeas culturales pueden ser utilizadas como contextos para la mediación de la cultura y la educación matemática.

  10. Relationships between school support, school facilities, ICT culture and mathematics teachers' attitudes towards ICT in teaching and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Bakar, Kamariah Abu; Ismail, Rohayati

    2012-05-01

    Information communication Technology (ICT) has been a major influence in the Malaysian Education System, especially in the teaching of mathematics. Since 2003, the Malaysian Ministry of Education has provided incentives to mathematics teacher to motivate them to use ICT using English as the medium of instruction, during the teaching and learning process. However, there are barriers that prevented mathematics teachers from using ICT in the classrooms. This study is to determine factors that influenced the attitudes of Malaysian Mathematic Teachers in integrating ICT in their teaching and learning. One hundred ninety one mathematics teachers were randomly selected for the purpose of this study. The three factors investigated were school support, school facilities and school culture which had been selected to be correlated with teachers' attitudes towards integrating ICT in the teaching and learning of mathematics. Findings showed that significant positive relationships existed between teachers' attitudes toward integrating ICT in the teaching and learning and school support, school facilities and ICT culture and This finding indicated that, in order to develop teachers' attitudes in using ICT during their teaching and learning process, they needed support from the school principals and also their colleagues. Apart from that, school facilities and also ICT culture were also found to be essential.

  11. Geometry optimization of a fibrous scaffold based on mathematical modelling and CFD simulation of a dynamic cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tajsoleiman, Tannaz; J. Abdekhodaie, Mohammad; Gernaey, Krist

    2016-01-01

    are the main bottlenecks in this type of processes. In this regard, mathematical modelling and computational fluid dynamics simulation (CFD) are powerful tools to identify an efficient and optimized design by providing reliable insights of the process. This study presents a mathematical model and CFD...... simulation of cartilage cell culture under a perfusion flow, which allows not only to characterize the supply of nutrients and metabolic products inside a fibrous scaffold, but also to assess the overall culture condition and predict the cell growth rate. Afterwards, the simulation results supported finding...

  12. Mathematical literacy examination items and student errors: An analysis of English Second Language students’ responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Vale

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical literacy is a real-world practical attribute yet students write a high-stakes examination in order to pass the subject Mathematical Literacy in the National Certificates (Vocational (NC(V. In these examinations, all sources of information are contextualised in language. It can be effortful for English second language students to decode text. The deliberate processing that is required saturates working memory and prevents these students from optimally engaging in problem solving. In this study, 15 items from an NC(V Level 4 Mathematical Literacy examination are selected, as well as 15 student responses to each of these questions. From these responses, those which are incorrect are analysed to determine whether the error is due to insufficient mathematical literacy or a lack of English language proficiency. These results are used as an indication as to whether the examination is fair and valid for this group of students.

  13. Culturally Responsive Social Skill Instruction for Latino Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Correa, Vivian I.; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural friendships and peer interactions are important skills for Latino students to become socially adjusted in U.S. schools. Culturally responsive social skill instruction allows educators to teach essential social skills while attending to the native culture and personal experiences of the students. The present study examined the…

  14. Mathematical models, rational choice, and the search for Cold War culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Paul

    2010-06-01

    A key feature of the social, behavioral, and biological sciences after World War II has been the widespread adoption of new mathematical techniques drawn from cybernetics, information theory, and theories of rational choice. Historians of science have typically sought to explain this adoption either by reference to military patronage, or to a characteristic Cold War culture or discursive framework strongly shaped by the concerns of national security. This essay explores several episodes in the history of game theory--a mathematical theory of rational choice--that demonstrate the limits of such explanations. Military funding was indeed critical to game theory's early development in the 1940s. However, the theory's subsequent spread across disciplines ranging from political science to evolutionary biology was the result of a diverse collection of debates about the nature of "rationality" and "choice" that marked the Cold War era. These debates are not easily reduced to the national security imperatives that have been the focus of much historiography to date.

  15. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  16. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  17. Experimental and mathematical model of the interactions in the mixed culture of links in the "producer-consumer" cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisman, T. I.; Galayda, Ya. V.

    The paper presents experimental and mathematical model of interactions between invertebrates the ciliates Paramecium caudatum and the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and algae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus quadricauda in the producer -- consumer aquatic biotic cycle with spatially separated components The model describes the dynamics of the mixed culture of ciliates and rotifers in the consumer component feeding on the mixed algal culture of the producer component It has been found that metabolites of the algae Scenedesmus produce an adverse effect on the reproduction of the ciliates P caudatum Taking into account this effect the results of investigation of the mathematical model were in qualitative agreement with the experimental results In the producer -- consumer biotic cycle it was shown that coexistence is impossible in the mixed algal culture of the producer component and in the mixed culture of invertebrates of the consumer component The ciliates P caudatum are driven out by the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis

  18. Patterns and Impacts of Short-Term Cross-Cultural Experience in Science and Mathematics Teaching: Benefits, Value, and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyaprasith, Kamonwan; Finley, Fred N.; Phonphok, Nason

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates a cross-cultural experience in science and mathematics teaching in Thailand--an internship program. In this study, qualitative data sources including semi-structured interviews, classroom observations, and pre-post questionnaire were collected from five groups of participants, which were: (a) administrators; (b) Thai…

  19. Instrument Adaptation in Cross-Cultural Studies of Students' Mathematics-Related Beliefs: Learning from Healthcare Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Paul; Diego-Mantecón, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Much comparative research into education-related beliefs has exploited questionnaires developed in one culture for use in another. This has been particularly the case in mathematics education, the focus of this paper. In so doing, researchers have tended to assume that translation alone is sufficient to warrant a reliable and valid instrument for…

  20. Motivational, Parental, and Cultural Influences on Achievement and Persistence in Basic Skills Mathematics at the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, Donna E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to address the gap in the current literature on community college students in basic math courses by examining motivational, parental and cultural factors as predictors of achievement and persistence of students enrolled in basic skills mathematics courses at a community college. More specifically, this study…

  1. The Effectiveness of Local Culture-Based Mathematical Heuristic-KR Learning towards Enhancing Student's Creative Thinking Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandiseru, Selvi Rajuaty

    2015-01-01

    The problem in this research is the lack of creative thinking skills of students. One of the learning models that is expected to enhance student's creative thinking skill is the local culture-based mathematical heuristic-KR learning model (LC-BMHLM). Heuristic-KR is a learning model which was introduced by Krulik and Rudnick (1995) that is the…

  2. Sociedade, cultura, matemática e seu ensino Society, culture, mathematics and its teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubiratan D’Ambrósio

    2005-03-01

    strong pressure from international studies and evaluations, inevitably comparative, and sadly competitive. As a result, one observes the gradual elimination of cultural components in the definition of education systems. The constitution of new social imaginaries becomes clear; imaginaries empty of historical, geographical and temporal referents, characterized by a strong presence of the culture of the image. The criteria of classification establish an inappropriate reference that has as its consequence the definition of practices and even of education systems. On the other hand, resistance mechanisms, often unconscious, are activated seeking to safeguard and recover the identifying features of a culture, such as its traditions, cuisine, languages, artistic manifestations in general, and, in doing so, to contribute to cultural diversity, an essential factor to encourage creativity. In this article, the sociocultural basis of mathematics and of its teaching are examined, and also the consequences of globalization and its effects on multicultural education. The concept of culture is discussed, as well as issues related to culture dynamics, resulting in the proposition of a theory of transdisciplinar and transcultural knowledge. Upon such basis the Ethnomathematics Program is presented. A critique is also made of the curriculum presently used, which is in its conception and detailing, obsolete, uninteresting and of little use. A different concept of curriculum is proposed, based on the communicative (literacy, analytical (matheracy, and material (technoracy instruments.

  3. Olympism, physical education and culturally responsive pedagogies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ubiquitous forces of the globalisation of sport and other social constructs, such as economic and political, create cultural necessities for physical education (PE) to connect and celebrate diversity, yet at the same time, commit to contextualised educative and social purposes. The commitment is the need for an inclusive ...

  4. Experimental and mathematical model of the interactions in the mixed culture of links in the “producer-consumer” cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisman, T. I.

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents a experimental and mathematical model of interactions between invertebrates (the ciliates Paramecium caudatum and the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis) in the "producer-consumer" aquatic biotic cycle with spatially separated components. The model describes the dynamics of the mixed culture of ciliates and rotifers in the "consumer" component, feeding on the mixed algal culture of the "producer" component. It has been found that metabolites of the algae Scenedesmus produce an adverse effect on the reproduction of the ciliates P. caudatum. Taking into account this effect, the results of investigation of the mathematical model were in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. In the "producer-consumer" biotic cycle it was shown that coexistence is impossible in the mixed culture of invertebrates of the "consumer" component. The ciliates P. caudatum are driven out by the rotifers B. plicatilis.

  5. The Structure and Culture of Developing a Mathematics Tutoring Collaborative in an Urban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Erica N.

    2007-01-01

    This conceptual article describes a model of a school-based, student-led initiative that uses peer tutoring to address underachievement in mathematics. The model is three pronged: a) it suggests a site-based approach to building on existing student excellence in mathematics to drive improved student mathematics achievement; b) it seeks to address…

  6. When Liu Hui Meets Archimedes: Students' Epistemological and Cultural Interpretations of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Po-Hung

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate in what way and to what extent Taiwanese college students' epistemological views of mathematics had evolved during a history-based liberal arts mathematics course titled: "When Liu Hui Meets Archimedes--Development of Eastern and Western Mathematics." The course was designed to help college students…

  7. Tier 2 Response to Intervention in Secondary Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.; Cosby, Missy D.

    2017-01-01

    Response to intervention (RtI) is increasingly being used in elementary and secondary schools both to provide early intervention and support to struggling students and to identify students who may benefit from special education. Although research exists to guide and support the implementation of RtI in elementary schools, much less information…

  8. An Empirical Perspective on the Culture - Corporate Social Responsibility Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru ZAIȚ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Business competition and pressure of European directives put Romanian company in a position to find answers to issues related to long-term survival and development. In this context we believe it is necessary to analyze some of the most important components that should be taken into consideration at the strategic level: national and organizational culture. The results indicate that corporate social responsibility is supported by learning and change-oriented organizational culture, but also by a favorable cultural and national economic framework. Based on these theoretical considerations we intent to emphasize the relationships between national culture / corporate culture and corporate social responsibility (CSR, elaborating an empirical argument by analyzing the results provided by Global 100, an annual project initiated by Corporate Knights Inc. (Davos. Starting with 2005, it has the largest database in the world and an appropriate evaluation methodology that provides a ranking of the top 100 most responsible companies in the world.

  9. Addressing Cultural Responsiveness in Consultation: An Empirical Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Elizabeth L. W.; Mann, Kacee A.; Brown, Danice L.; Jewell, Jeremy D.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored whether and to what extent consultation practices specifically focused on culturally responsive instruction provided additive benefit, after establishing strong classroom management. Three teachers leading culturally diverse classrooms participated in two phases of consultation. The first was a traditional, classroom-management…

  10. Culturally Responsive Dance Pedagogy in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dance has an important place in multicultural education and the development of culturally responsive pedagogy. Through dance, children can explore and express their own and others' cultures and share their stories in ways other than the spoken and written word. This paper presents a case study concerning a professional development programme in…

  11. Diallel analysis of anther culture response in wheat ( Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The four wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes differing in their ability to produce embryogenic callus from anther culture were reciprocally crossed and inheritance of anther culture response [callus induction frequency (CIF, %), embryogenic callus induction frequency (ECIF, %), regeneration capacity of callus (RCC, %) ...

  12. "Universal Responsiveness" or "Splendid Isolation?" Episodes from the History of Mathematics Education in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates the prevalent attitudes toward foreign influences and methodologies in Russian mathematics education at different periods in Russian history. The words "universal responsiveness" belong to Dostoevsky, who, in his famous speech on Pushkin, used them to characterize Pushkin's openness to the genius of all other…

  13. A mathematical model representing cellular immune development and response to Salmonella of chicken intestinal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, D.; Bannink, A.; Smits, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to create a dynamic mathematical model of the development of the cellular branch of the intestinal immune system of poultry during the first 42 days of life and of its response towards an oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The system elements were

  14. Mathematical Modeling of the Heat-Shock Response in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Guisbert, E., D. M. Czyz, ., R. I. Morimoto. 2013. Identification of a tissue-selective heat shock response regulatory network. PLoS Genet . 9...Med. Sci. Sports . 21:742–748. 46. Rakesh, V., J. D. Stallings, ., J. Reifman. 2013. A 3-D mathematical model to identify organ-specific risks in rats

  15. Should we learn culture in chemistry classroom? Integration ethnochemistry in culturally responsive teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, Yuli; Ridwan, Achmad; Nurbaity

    2017-08-01

    The papers report the first year of two-year longitudinal study of ethnochemistry integration in culturally responsive teaching in chemistry classrooms. The teaching approach is focusing on exploring the culture and indigenous knowledge in Indonesia from chemistry perspectives. Ethnochemistry looks at the culture from chemistry perspectives integrated into culturally responsive teaching has developed students' cultural identity and students' engagement in chemistry learning. There are limited research and data in exploring Indonesia culture, which has around 300 ethics, from chemistry perspectives. Students come to the chemistry classrooms from a different background; however, their chemistry learning disconnected with their background which leads to students' disengagement in chemistry learning. Therefore this approach focused on students' engagement within their differences. This research was conducted with year 10 and 11 from four classrooms in two secondary schools through qualitative methodology with observation, interviews, and reflective journals as data collection. The results showed that the integration of ethnochemistry in culturally responsive teaching approach can be implemented by involving 5 principles which are content integration, facilitating knowledge construction, prejudice reduction, social justice, and academic development. The culturally responsive teaching has engaged students in their chemistry learning and developed their cultural identity and soft skills. Students found that the learning experiences has helped to develop their chemistry knowledge and understand the culture from chemistry perspectives. The students developed the ability to work together, responsibility, curiosity, social awareness, creativity, empathy communication, and self-confidence which categorized into collaboration skills, student engagement, social and cultural awareness, and high order thinking skills. The ethnochemistry has helped them to develop the critical self

  16. [Mathematics, natural sciences and technology--parts of the encyclopedia Die Kultur der Gegenwart (The culture of today)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobies, Renate

    2008-03-01

    The paper explores the trend of the early 20th century to consolidate mathematics, natural sciences, medicine and technology under the umbrella of one integrative culture--a tendency which contrasts with the increasing mainstream trend of separating the humanities from the natural sciences. The unifying umbrella was framed by the great encyclopedia Die Kultur der Gegenwart which was published by B. G. Teubner from 1905 to 1925 and was planned to run up to 62 volumes. We analyze the quantitative rate of the parts devoted to the humanities, the natural sciences and technology, respectively, the degree to which these parts were completed in this encyclopedia. In particular, we investigate the role of mathematicians and their reasons to find a classification for the mathematical, natural scientific and engineering parts of culture as well as their reasons, to win Nobel prize winners and other famous scientists to become co-editors and authors. We examine the published volumes in the fields of mathematics, chemistry, physics, astronomy and technology in order to show what type of publication--professional or popular--was intended. Furthermore, we illuminate how the educational reform of mathematics, natural sciences and technology of this period--which included a reform of girls' and women's education--was reflected in the encyclopedia Die Kultur der Gegenwart.

  17. A mathematical function for the description of nutrient-response curve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Ahmadi

    Full Text Available Several mathematical equations have been proposed to modeling nutrient-response curve for animal and human justified on the goodness of fit and/or on the biological mechanism. In this paper, a functional form of a generalized quantitative model based on Rayleigh distribution principle for description of nutrient-response phenomena is derived. The three parameters governing the curve a has biological interpretation, b may be used to calculate reliable estimates of nutrient response relationships, and c provide the basis for deriving relationships between nutrient and physiological responses. The new function was successfully applied to fit the nutritional data obtained from 6 experiments including a wide range of nutrients and responses. An evaluation and comparison were also done based simulated data sets to check the suitability of new model and four-parameter logistic model for describing nutrient responses. This study indicates the usefulness and wide applicability of the new introduced, simple and flexible model when applied as a quantitative approach to characterizing nutrient-response curve. This new mathematical way to describe nutritional-response data, with some useful biological interpretations, has potential to be used as an alternative approach in modeling nutritional responses curve to estimate nutrient efficiency and requirements.

  18. A mathematical function for the description of nutrient-response curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Several mathematical equations have been proposed to modeling nutrient-response curve for animal and human justified on the goodness of fit and/or on the biological mechanism. In this paper, a functional form of a generalized quantitative model based on Rayleigh distribution principle for description of nutrient-response phenomena is derived. The three parameters governing the curve a) has biological interpretation, b) may be used to calculate reliable estimates of nutrient response relationships, and c) provide the basis for deriving relationships between nutrient and physiological responses. The new function was successfully applied to fit the nutritional data obtained from 6 experiments including a wide range of nutrients and responses. An evaluation and comparison were also done based simulated data sets to check the suitability of new model and four-parameter logistic model for describing nutrient responses. This study indicates the usefulness and wide applicability of the new introduced, simple and flexible model when applied as a quantitative approach to characterizing nutrient-response curve. This new mathematical way to describe nutritional-response data, with some useful biological interpretations, has potential to be used as an alternative approach in modeling nutritional responses curve to estimate nutrient efficiency and requirements.

  19. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Belinda; Kronbichler, Martin; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN) activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret. Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs) and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs) matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection). During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval.

  20. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda ePletzer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret.Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection. During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval.

  1. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Belinda; Kronbichler, Martin; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Kerschbaum, Hubert H.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN) activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret. Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs) and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs) matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection). During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval. PMID:25954179

  2. Mathematics Teaching in Hong Kong Pre-Schools: Mirroring the Chinese Cultural Aspiration towards Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sharon Sui Ngan

    2014-01-01

    Chinese pre-school children perform well in learning mathematics compared with English-speaking children. This study investigates the scenes behind Chinese preschool children's mathematics performance using teacher questionnaires and interviews. Results indicated that the Chinese number system appeared to afford advantages to Chinese children in…

  3. Mathematical modeling provides kinetic details of the human immune response to vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin eLe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With major advances in experimental techniques to track antigen-specific immune responses many basic questions on the kinetics of virus-specific immunity in humans remain unanswered. To gain insights into kinetics of T and B cell responses in human volunteers we combine mathematical models and experimental data from recent studies employing vaccines against yellow fever and smallpox. Yellow fever virus-specific CD8 T cell population expanded slowly with the average doubling time of 2 days peaking 2.5 weeks post immunization. Interestingly, we found that the peak of the yellow fever-specific CD8 T cell response is determined by the rate of T cell proliferation and not by the precursor frequency of antigen-specific cells as has been suggested in several studies in mice. We also found that while the frequency of virus-specific T cells increases slowly, the slow increase can still accurately explain clearance of yellow fever virus in the blood. Our additional mathematical model describes well the kinetics of virus-specific antibody-secreting cell and antibody response to vaccinia virus in vaccinated individuals suggesting that most of antibodies in 3 months post immunization are derived from the population of circulating antibody-secreting cells. Taken together, our analysis provides novel insights into mechanisms by which live vaccines induce immunity to viral infections and highlight challenges of applying methods of mathematical modeling to the current, state-of-the-art yet limited immunological data.

  4. Mathematical modeling provides kinetic details of the human immune response to vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Dustin; Miller, Joseph D; Ganusov, Vitaly V

    2014-01-01

    With major advances in experimental techniques to track antigen-specific immune responses many basic questions on the kinetics of virus-specific immunity in humans remain unanswered. To gain insights into kinetics of T and B cell responses in human volunteers we combined mathematical models and experimental data from recent studies employing vaccines against yellow fever and smallpox. Yellow fever virus-specific CD8 T cell population expanded slowly with the average doubling time of 2 days peaking 2.5 weeks post immunization. Interestingly, we found that the peak of the yellow fever-specific CD8 T cell response was determined by the rate of T cell proliferation and not by the precursor frequency of antigen-specific cells as has been suggested in several studies in mice. We also found that while the frequency of virus-specific T cells increased slowly, the slow increase could still accurately explain clearance of yellow fever virus in the blood. Our additional mathematical model described well the kinetics of virus-specific antibody-secreting cell and antibody response to vaccinia virus in vaccinated individuals suggesting that most of antibodies in 3 months post immunization were derived from the population of circulating antibody-secreting cells. Taken together, our analysis provided novel insights into mechanisms by which live vaccines induce immunity to viral infections and highlighted challenges of applying methods of mathematical modeling to the current, state-of-the-art yet limited immunological data.

  5. Using Culture as a Resource in Mathematics: The Case of Four Mexican-American Prospective Teachers in a Bilingual After-School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomvoridi-Ivanovic, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores Mexican-American prospective teachers' use of culture--defined as social practices and shared experiences--as an instructional resource in mathematics. The setting is an after-school mathematics program for the children of Mexican heritage. Qualitative analysis of the prospective teachers' and children's interactions reveals…

  6. A mathematical theory of ability measure based on partial credit item responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Nan L

    2015-01-01

    This paper defines a measure of examinees' abilities using additivity, the fundamental property of a measure, based on the partially-credited item responses. The fundamental properties of this newly-defined ability measure are demonstrated using mathematical proofs. This paper also shows that interactive ability and conditional ability are measurable with additivity. Finally, the paper looks at the ability measures associated with subscales and their decompositions.

  7. A mathematical and Physical Model Improves Accuracy in Simulating Solid Material Relaxation Modulus and Viscoelastic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qinwu; Engquist, Bjorn

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new material viscoelastic model and mathematical solution to simulate relaxation modulus and viscoelastic response. The model formula of relaxation modulus is extended from sigmoidal function considering nonlinear strain hardening and softening. Its physical mechanism can be interpreted by a spring network viscous medium model with only five parameters in a simpler format than the molecular-chain based polymer models to represent general materials. We also developed a three-dimen...

  8. Mathematical modeling improves EC50 estimations from classical dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Elin; Lindgren, Isa; Lövfors, William; Lundengård, Karin; Cervin, Ida; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Altimiras, Jordi; Cedersund, Gunnar

    2015-03-01

    The β-adrenergic response is impaired in failing hearts. When studying β-adrenergic function in vitro, the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50 ) is an important measure of ligand response. We previously measured the in vitro contraction force response of chicken heart tissue to increasing concentrations of adrenaline, and observed a decreasing response at high concentrations. The classical interpretation of such data is to assume a maximal response before the decrease, and to fit a sigmoid curve to the remaining data to determine EC50 . Instead, we have applied a mathematical modeling approach to interpret the full dose-response curve in a new way. The developed model predicts a non-steady-state caused by a short resting time between increased concentrations of agonist, which affect the dose-response characterization. Therefore, an improved estimate of EC50 may be calculated using steady-state simulations of the model. The model-based estimation of EC50 is further refined using additional time-resolved data to decrease the uncertainty of the prediction. The resulting model-based EC50 (180-525 nm) is higher than the classically interpreted EC50 (46-191 nm). Mathematical modeling thus makes it possible to re-interpret previously obtained datasets, and to make accurate estimates of EC50 even when steady-state measurements are not experimentally feasible. The mathematical models described here have been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database, and may be accessed at http://jjj.bio.vu.nl/database/nyman. © 2015 FEBS.

  9. Culture shapes empathic responses to physical and social pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, David; Uskul, Ayse K; Cooper, Nicholas R

    2016-08-01

    The present research investigates the extent to which cultural background moderates empathy in response to observing someone undergoing physical or social pain. In 3 studies, we demonstrate that East Asian and White British participants differ in both affective and cognitive components of their empathic reactions in response to someone else's pain. Compared with East Asian participants, British participants report greater empathic concern and show lower empathic accuracy. More important, findings cannot be explained by an in-group advantage effect. Potential reasons for observed cultural differences are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. A culturally responsive counter-narrative of effective teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gist, Conra D.

    2014-12-01

    How do you recognize an effective teacher's sociocultural consciousness? Tamara Wallace's and Brenda Brand's argument that sociocultural consciousness is the "brain" of effective culturally responsive instruction for students of color comes at a time when the system of teacher evaluation is being overhauled nationwide. Teacher observation tools are being piloted to develop a common language of effective instruction but often there is little attention given to sociocultural consciousness in these frameworks. This article develops a culturally responsive counter-narrative to explore the complexity of a teacher's racial consciousness during a teaching episode.

  11. Culturally responsive integrated health care: Key issues for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Rose Anne C; Grace, Aaron J; Niño, José R; Ring, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Primary care providers are increasingly responsible for providing mental health care in the United States. For those patients who do receive specialty mental health services, the primary care provider functions as the main entry point into the mental health system. Given the persistent racial and ethnic health disparities in the United States, it is not surprising that mental health disparities also present a difficult challenge for both the U.S. health system and for frontline practitioners. Physicians-in-training require tools for rapid psychiatric assessment that will quickly identify pertinent symptom clusters and distinguish between major psychological disorders. It is incumbent on residency faculty to teach resident physicians how to provide culturally responsive mental health assessment and intervention/referral knowledge and skills toward the elimination of these disparities and toward patient-centered care. This article begins with an overview of health disparities and barriers to health and mental health care access, followed by a discussion of culturally responsive care including an example of a culturally responsive educational program in the United States that is directly targeting the problem of access in that geographic region. It concludes with a review of educational strategies for enhancing culturally responsive behavioral and mental health care by physicians in training. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. The research of 4th grade mathematical curriculum electronic picture book construction and development in integrating indigenous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen Ting; Hsin Wang, Juei

    2017-02-01

    This research aimed at integrating Seediq culture and mathematical course design for fourth-grade elementary school, and then transforming this mathematical course into an electronic picture book. During the process of electronic book development, the researchers collected videos of six participants engaged in discussion, reflection minutes after the meeting written by the attendants, the researchers' observation and review journals, and conversations with the participants. Then, researchers utilized Content Analysis to explore, try, review and retry steps of electronic book making process. The main findings: There are four periods of electronic book making process, research occurrence period, curriculum design period, electronic book transformation period, and result evaluation period. The picture book included the White Stone Legend born from Seediq seniors, historical battle for hunting field between tribes, and concepts of approximation, angle, triangle, and quadrangle features. At last, with the research result, this article presents the corroboration of related works, and then proposes suggestions of electronic book teaching and follow-up studies.

  13. Preparing teachers for ambitious and culturally responsive science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Gale

    2013-03-01

    Communities, schools and classrooms across North America are becoming more ethnically, racially, and linguistically diverse, particularly in urban areas. Against this backdrop, underrepresentation of certain groups in science continues. Much attention has been devoted to multicultural education and the preparation of teachers for student diversity. In science education, much research has focused on classrooms as cultural spaces and the need for teachers to value and build upon students' everyday science knowledge and ways of sense-making. However it remains unclear how best to prepare science teachers for this kind of culturally responsive teaching. In attempting to envision how to prepare science teachers with cross-cultural competency, we can draw from a parallel line of research on preparing teachers for ambitious science instruction. In ambitious science instruction, students solve authentic problems and generate evidence and models to develop explanations of scientific phenomenon, an approach that necessitates great attention to students' thinking and sense-making, thus making it applicable to cultural relevance aims. In addition, this line of research on teacher preparation has developed specific tools and engages teachers in cycles of reflection and rehearsal as they develop instructional skills. While not addressing cross-cultural teaching specifically, this research provides insights into specific ways through which to prepare teachers for culturally responsive practices. In my presentation, I will report on efforts to join these two areas of research, that is, to combine ideas about multicultural science teacher preparation with what has been learned about how to develop ambitious science instruction. This research suggests a new model for urban science teacher preparation--one that focuses on developing specific teaching practices that elicit and build on student thinking, and doing so through cycles of individual and collective planning, rehearsal

  14. A Systemic Approach to Culturally Responsive Assessment Practices and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slee, June

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier paper, Slee and Keenan demonstrated that it was possible for tertiary education institutions to design culturally responsive assessment procedures that complied with standardised assessment policy. The authors' paper described "Growing Our Own," an initiative between Charles Darwin University and Northern Territory Catholic…

  15. Designing Culturally Responsive and Relevant Individualized Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Brenda L.; Miller, Darcy; Hsiao, Yun-Ju; Dunn, Michael; Petersen, Sara; Hollingshead, Aleksandra; Banks, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Developing culturally responsive and relevant individualized educational programs (IEP) is becoming increasingly more important as the student population becomes more diverse. Current supports available for IEP teams primarily address the technical aspects of the IEP (e.g., writing goals that are measurable) but offer little assistance in…

  16. Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

  17. Culturally Responsive Online Design: Learning at Intercultural Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morong, Gail; DesBiens, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents evidence-based guidelines to inform culturally responsive online learning design in higher education. Intercultural understanding is now a recognised core learning outcome in a large majority of Canadian public universities; however, supporting design methodology is underdeveloped, especially in online contexts. Our search…

  18. Evaluation of the shoot regeneration response in tissue culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seven varieties of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan [L.] Millsp.) of varying growth durations and adapted to a wide range of environments across eastern and southern Africa were evaluated for their shoot regeneration response in tissue culture. On a standardized shoot regeneration medium, the short duration varieties (ICPV ...

  19. Cultural Differences in Emotional Responses to Success and Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael; Takai-Kawakami, Kiyoko; Kawakami, Kiyobumi; Sullivan, Margaret Wolan

    2010-01-01

    The emotional responses to achievement contexts of 149 preschool children from three cultural groups were observed. The children were Japanese (N = 32), African American (N = 63) and White American of mixed European ancestry (N = 54). The results showed that Japanese children differed from American children in expressing less shame, pride, and…

  20. Culturally Responsive Evaluation Meets Systems-Oriented Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Veronica G.; Parsons, Beverly A.

    2017-01-01

    The authors of this article each bring a different theoretical background to their evaluation practice. The first author has a background of attention to culturally responsive evaluation (CRE), while the second author has a background of attention to systems theories and their application to evaluation. Both have had their own evolution of…

  1. Culturally Responsive Education in Music Education: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Vanessa L.

    2017-01-01

    Demographic shifts in public school enrollment within the United States necessitate preparing preservice teachers to teach students with backgrounds that differ from their own ethnically, linguistically, racially, and economically. Culturally responsive education (CRE) is a pedagogy used to validate students' varied experiences, and to teach to…

  2. Anther culture response in indica rice and variations in major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of organic adjuvants, synthetic plant hormones and diverse carbon sources in influencing anther culture response in five indica rice genotypes (IR 72, Mansarovar, Tarori Basmati, Pusa Basmati and Karnal local 95) were assessed. Androgenic callus induction as well as green plantlet regeneration was more when ...

  3. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  4. Response to Cultures Continuum and the Development of Intercultural Responsiveness (IR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn; Mixon, Jason R.; Henry, Lula; Butcher, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study investigated the perceptions of pre-service teachers' intercultural responsiveness. Findings from this study affirmed that pre-service teachers believed that positive dispositions, being culturally aware, and responding by incorporating cultural differences is a key to achieving Intercultural…

  5. Orexinergic neurotransmission in temperature responses to methamphetamine and stress: mathematical modeling as a data assimilation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouzvaziri, Abolhassan; Fu, Daniel; Tan, Patrick; Yoo, Yeonjoo; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Rusyniak, Daniel E; Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zaretsky, Dmitry V

    2015-01-01

    Orexinergic neurotransmission is involved in mediating temperature responses to methamphetamine (Meth). In experiments in rats, SB-334867 (SB), an antagonist of orexin receptors (OX1R), at a dose of 10 mg/kg decreases late temperature responses (t > 60 min) to an intermediate dose of Meth (5 mg/kg). A higher dose of SB (30 mg/kg) attenuates temperature responses to low dose (1 mg/kg) of Meth and to stress. In contrast, it significantly exaggerates early responses (t high doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) of Meth. As pretreatment with SB also inhibits temperature response to the stress of injection, traditional statistical analysis of temperature responses is difficult. We have developed a mathematical model that explains the complexity of temperature responses to Meth as the interplay between excitatory and inhibitory nodes. We have extended the developed model to include the stress of manipulations and the effects of SB. Stress is synergistic with Meth on the action on excitatory node. Orexin receptors mediate an activation of on both excitatory and inhibitory nodes by low doses of Meth, but not on the node activated by high doses (HD). Exaggeration of early responses to high doses of Meth involves disinhibition: low dose of SB decreases tonic inhibition of HD and lowers the activation threshold, while the higher dose suppresses the inhibitory component. Using a modeling approach to data assimilation appears efficient in separating individual components of complex response with statistical analysis unachievable by traditional data processing methods.

  6. Generating Cultures for Mathematical Microworld Development in a Multi-Organizational Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynigos, Chronis

    2002-01-01

    Discusses methodological issues of mathematical microworld development integrated with generating innovation in school settings. Includes experiences in developing a component architecture for educational software based on Logo as a scripting language and discusses problems of collaboration between organizations and people of differing expertise…

  7. The Experiment Check of the Efficiency of the Historical Component Formation in Teacher's Mathematical Methodological Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmullin, Mansur Fajzrahmanovich

    2015-01-01

    When teachers do not know the history of science well, when they misunderstand and underestimate its educational importance, it becomes a serious obstacle for the improvement of their methodological skills. This paper has a goal to describe author's method how to teach the history of mathematics. This method is aimed at training math teacher's…

  8. Investigating Chinese Preschool Teachers' Beliefs in Mathematics Teaching from a Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Liu, Song; DeBey, Mary; McFadden, Karen; Pan, Yue-Juan

    2018-01-01

    In China, preschool curriculum has undergone reform and profound changes. Much remains unknown, however, regarding preschool teachers' teaching beliefs after 30 years of curriculum reform and adaptation. This study aimed to address the issue and investigate teachers' beliefs concerning teaching mathematics. Twelve preschool teachers in China…

  9. Taking an Internet Field Trip: Promoting Cultural and Historical Diversity through Mayan Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furner, Joseph; Holbein, Marie F. Doan; Scullion, Karin Jackson

    2000-01-01

    Introduces Internet field trips as a means of instruction for diverse student populations; explores the Mayan mathematics system in an interdisciplinary fourth grade math lesson; suggests strategies for students with limited English proficiency base on TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages); and includes a sample lesson plan.…

  10. BCG-mediated bladder cancer immunotherapy: identifying determinants of treatment response using a calibrated mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill A Rentsch

    Full Text Available Intravesical Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG immunotherapy is considered the standard of care for treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however the treatment parameters were established empirically. In order to evaluate potential optimization of clinical parameters of BCG induction therapy, we constructed and queried a new mathematical model. Specifically, we assessed the impact of (1 duration between resection and the first instillation; (2 BCG dose; (3 indwelling time; and (4 treatment interval of induction therapy - using cure rate as the primary endpoint. Based on available clinical and in vitro experimental data, we constructed and parameterized a stochastic mathematical model describing the interactions between BCG, the immune system, the bladder mucosa and tumor cells. The primary endpoint of the model was the probability of tumor extinction following BCG induction therapy in patients with high risk for tumor recurrence. We theoretically demonstrate that extending the duration between the resection and the first BCG instillation negatively influences treatment outcome. Simulations of higher BCG doses and longer indwelling times both improved the probability of tumor extinction. A remarkable finding was that an inter-instillation interval two times longer than the seven-day interval used in the current standard of care would substantially improve treatment outcome. We provide insight into relevant clinical questions using a novel mathematical model of BCG immunotherapy. Our model predicts an altered regimen that may decrease side effects of treatment while improving response to therapy.

  11. A systems analysis of the erythropoietic responses to weightlessness. Volume 1: Mathematical model simulations of the erythropoietic responses to weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical responses to weightlessness are summarized. The studies include development and validation of a model of erythropoiesis regulation, analysis of the behavior of erythropoiesis under a variety of conditions, simulations of bed rest and space flight, and an evaluation of ground-based animal studies which were conducted as analogs of zero-g. A review of all relevant space flight findings and a set of testable hypotheses which attempt to explain how red cell mass decreases in space flight are presented. An additional document describes details of the mathematical model used in these studies.

  12. TRPM8-Dependent Dynamic Response in a Mathematical Model of Cold Thermoreceptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Olivares

    Full Text Available Cold-sensitive nerve terminals (CSNTs encode steady temperatures with regular, rhythmic temperature-dependent firing patterns that range from irregular tonic firing to regular bursting (static response. During abrupt temperature changes, CSNTs show a dynamic response, transiently increasing their firing frequency as temperature decreases and silencing when the temperature increases (dynamic response. To date, mathematical models that simulate the static response are based on two depolarizing/repolarizing pairs of membrane ionic conductance (slow and fast kinetics. However, these models fail to reproduce the dynamic response of CSNTs to rapid changes in temperature and notoriously they lack a specific cold-activated conductance such as the TRPM8 channel. We developed a model that includes TRPM8 as a temperature-dependent conductance with a calcium-dependent desensitization. We show by computer simulations that it appropriately reproduces the dynamic response of CSNTs from mouse cornea, while preserving their static response behavior. In this model, the TRPM8 conductance is essential to display a dynamic response. In agreement with experimental results, TRPM8 is also needed for the ongoing activity in the absence of stimulus (i.e. neutral skin temperature. Free parameters of the model were adjusted by an evolutionary optimization algorithm, allowing us to find different solutions. We present a family of possible parameters that reproduce the behavior of CSNTs under different temperature protocols. The detection of temperature gradients is associated to a homeostatic mechanism supported by the calcium-dependent desensitization.

  13. TRPM8-Dependent Dynamic Response in a Mathematical Model of Cold Thermoreceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Erick; Salgado, Simón; Maidana, Jean Paul; Herrera, Gaspar; Campos, Matías; Madrid, Rodolfo; Orio, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Cold-sensitive nerve terminals (CSNTs) encode steady temperatures with regular, rhythmic temperature-dependent firing patterns that range from irregular tonic firing to regular bursting (static response). During abrupt temperature changes, CSNTs show a dynamic response, transiently increasing their firing frequency as temperature decreases and silencing when the temperature increases (dynamic response). To date, mathematical models that simulate the static response are based on two depolarizing/repolarizing pairs of membrane ionic conductance (slow and fast kinetics). However, these models fail to reproduce the dynamic response of CSNTs to rapid changes in temperature and notoriously they lack a specific cold-activated conductance such as the TRPM8 channel. We developed a model that includes TRPM8 as a temperature-dependent conductance with a calcium-dependent desensitization. We show by computer simulations that it appropriately reproduces the dynamic response of CSNTs from mouse cornea, while preserving their static response behavior. In this model, the TRPM8 conductance is essential to display a dynamic response. In agreement with experimental results, TRPM8 is also needed for the ongoing activity in the absence of stimulus (i.e. neutral skin temperature). Free parameters of the model were adjusted by an evolutionary optimization algorithm, allowing us to find different solutions. We present a family of possible parameters that reproduce the behavior of CSNTs under different temperature protocols. The detection of temperature gradients is associated to a homeostatic mechanism supported by the calcium-dependent desensitization. PMID:26426259

  14. ERP responses to cross-cultural melodic expectancy violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Steven M; Osterhout, Lee

    2012-04-01

    In this preliminary study, we measured event-related potentials (ERPs) to melodic expectancy violations in a cross-cultural context. Subjects (n= 10) were college-age students born and raised in the United States. Subjects heard 30 short melodies based in the Western folk tradition and 30 from North Indian classical music. Each melody was presented in its original and deviation form, and subjects were asked to judge the congruence of the melody. Results indicated that subjects found the Indian melodies less congruous overall and were less sensitive to deviations in the Indian melody condition. ERP data were partly consistent with the behavioral data with significant P600 responses to deviations in both cultural conditions, but less robust in the Indian context. Results are interpreted in light of previous research on listeners' abilities to generate expectancies in unfamiliar cultures and the possibility of overlap in the scale systems influencing the findings. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Geoethics and geological culture: awareness, responsibility and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Peppoloni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The international debate in the field of geoethics focuses on some of the most important environmental emergencies, while highlighting the great responsibilities of geoscientists, whatever field they work in, and the important social, cultural and economic repercussions that their choices can have on society. The GeoItalia 2009 and 2011 conferences that were held in Rimini and Turin, respectively, and were organized by the Italian Federation of Earth Science, were two important moments for the promotion of geoethics in Italy. They were devoted to the highlighting of how, and with what tools and contents, can the geosciences contribute to the cultural renewal of society. They also covered the active roles of geoscientists in the dissemination of scientific information, contributing in this way to the correct construction of social knowledge. Geology is culture, and as such it can help to dispel misconceptions and cultural stereotypes that concern natural phenomena, disasters, resources, and land management. Geological culture consists of methods, goals, values, history, ways of thinking about nature, and specific sensitivity for approaching problems and their solutions. So geology has to fix referenced values, as indispensable prerequisites for geoethics. Together, geological culture and geoethics can strengthen the bond that joins people to their territory, and can help to find solutions and answers to some important challenges in the coming years regarding natural risks, resources, and climate change. Starting from these considerations, we stress the importance of establishing an ethical criterion for Earth scientists, to focus attention on the issue of the responsibility of geoscientists, and the need to more clearly define their scientific identity and the value of their specificities.

  16. Mathematics everywhere

    CERN Document Server

    Aigner, Martin; Spain, Philip G

    2010-01-01

    Mathematics is all around us. Often we do not realize it, though. Mathematics Everywhere is a collection of presentations on the role of mathematics in everyday life, through science, technology, and culture. The common theme is the unique position of mathematics as the art of pure thought and at the same time as a universally applicable science. The authors are renowned mathematicians; their presentations cover a wide range of topics. From compact discs to the stock exchange, from computer tomography to traffic routing, from electronic money to climate change, they make the "math inside" unde

  17. Knowledge Building and Mathematics: Shifting the Responsibility for Knowledge Advancement and Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Moss

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Three classrooms of Grade 4 students from different schools and diverse backgrounds collaborated in early algebra research to solve a series of linear and quadratic generalizing problems. Results revealed that high- and low-achieving students were able to solve problems of recognized difficulty. We discuss Knowledge Building principles and practices that fostered deep understanding and broad participation. Students used the online Knowledge Building environment Knowledge Forum® to conduct their work and we illustrate how Knowledge Forum supported a Knowledge Building culture for mathematical learning and problem solving. Analyses of participation patterns and note content revealed practices consistent with Knowledge Building principles, specifically democratization of knowledge, with students at all achievement levels participating, and epistemic agency, with students providing evidence and justification for conjectures and generating multiple solutions to challenging problems.

  18. Cultural responsiveness in EFL teaching: reflections from native instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinarbas H. Ibrahim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many international students from different parts of the world have been studying at Turkish universities, which creates a multicultural educational setting. Due to the multicultural educational setting, English has become the most widely used language for exchanging and sharing knowledge, therefore many international universities in Turkey put a great emphasis on English language education and offer English preparatory courses to students. In order to succeed at better language education, universities employ native English instructors to provide a richer language experience with cultural components embedded in language content. In this qualitative case study, cultural reflections of native English instructors at a Turkish university were investigated. Individual and focus group interviews were data sources for the study. Findings indicated that cultural responsiveness was considered to be constructed through time, and a necessity of orientation process was emphasized. However, the native instructors’ presumptions cause intolerance and underestimation of the host culture. In addition, educational issues and students’ misbehaviors, such as cheating and calling their instructors by their first name, were attributed to cultural background of the students.

  19. Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Császi, Lajos

    2008-01-01

    In his paper "Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence" Lajos Császi argues that media violence is not a reification of social violence; rather, a popular ritual allowing contemporary societies to sublimate, to substitute, and to discuss aggression in the public sphere. Császi reviews the central questions of contemporary debates about television violence including Stuart Hall's thought on this topic and introduces the ideas of Elias, Geertz, Turner, Bettelhei...

  20. Integrating Universal Design and Response to Intervention in Methods Courses for General Education Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheister, Kelley; Jackson, Christa; Taylor, Cynthia E.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, teacher education programs have placed little emphasis on preparing mathematics teachers to work with students who struggle in mathematics. Therefore, it is crucial that mathematics teacher educators explicitly prepare prospective teachers to instruct students who struggle with mathematics by providing strategies and practices that…

  1. Use of a mathematical model to estimate the impact of shrimp pen culture at Patos Lagoon estuary, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poersch, Luís H; Milach, Angela M; Cavalli, Ronaldo O; Wasielesky, Wilson; Möller, Osmar; Castello, Jorge P

    2014-09-01

    Ecological modeling has been used as a tool to estimate potential impacts caused by aquaculture to the surrounding environment. In this work, a mathematical model was applied to estimate the maximum amount of pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus paulensis) culture units (3,100m2 pen enclosures) that could be installed at two shallow estuarine bays of Patos Lagoon (known as Coreia and Porto do Rei) with no significant effects on either water quality or viability of the culture system. To calibrate the model, information about the culture of Litopenaeus vannamei and F. paulensis as well as field data (influence of netting material, water current speed and nitrogen concentrations) were used. Under a bad scenario (water current velocity of 0.01m s-1 and a mesh clogging effect of 40%), it would be possible to install up to 29 pens at the Coreia bay, and 39 pens at the Porto do Rei bay. Results indicate that the model was useful in determining the maximum number of culture units that could be installed at these bays, and thus have the potential to become an important tool in the definition of environmental management strategies in relation to aquaculture development.

  2. Orexinergic neurotransmission in temperature responses to methamphetamine and stress: mathematical modeling as a data assimilation approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassan Behrouzvaziri

    Full Text Available Orexinergic neurotransmission is involved in mediating temperature responses to methamphetamine (Meth. In experiments in rats, SB-334867 (SB, an antagonist of orexin receptors (OX1R, at a dose of 10 mg/kg decreases late temperature responses (t > 60 min to an intermediate dose of Meth (5 mg/kg. A higher dose of SB (30 mg/kg attenuates temperature responses to low dose (1 mg/kg of Meth and to stress. In contrast, it significantly exaggerates early responses (t < 60 min to intermediate and high doses (5 and 10 mg/kg of Meth. As pretreatment with SB also inhibits temperature response to the stress of injection, traditional statistical analysis of temperature responses is difficult.We have developed a mathematical model that explains the complexity of temperature responses to Meth as the interplay between excitatory and inhibitory nodes. We have extended the developed model to include the stress of manipulations and the effects of SB. Stress is synergistic with Meth on the action on excitatory node. Orexin receptors mediate an activation of on both excitatory and inhibitory nodes by low doses of Meth, but not on the node activated by high doses (HD. Exaggeration of early responses to high doses of Meth involves disinhibition: low dose of SB decreases tonic inhibition of HD and lowers the activation threshold, while the higher dose suppresses the inhibitory component. Using a modeling approach to data assimilation appears efficient in separating individual components of complex response with statistical analysis unachievable by traditional data processing methods.

  3. Crimes against cultural values as a basis of international criminal responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudovochkin Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problem of international criminal responsibility for crimes against cultural property. The authors consider three offenses against cultural values: smuggling of cultural values, destruction of cultural property, and theft of cultural property. The research of crimes against cultural values includes a number of issues: the nature of crimes against cultural values; the benefits of international or national character of responsibility for crimes against cultural values; the circumstances of commission of crimes against cultural property (e.g. the existence of an armed conflict; the objectives of the commission of crimes against cultural values (to export them as a treasure, to destroy the cultural heritage; to intimidate; the potential consequences of crimes against cultural values. On the basis of this program, the authors identify a number of models of crimes against cultural property. Each of these models is considered from the point of view of the possibility of international responsibility.

  4. Genetic analysis of anther culture response in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petolino, J F; Thompson, S A

    1987-06-01

    Response frequencies in maize (Zea mays L.) anthers cultured in vitro were examined in a diallel set of crosses among four commercial inbred lines. Significant differences among the genotypes were observed, with the crosses H99xFR16 and Pa91xFR16 displaying the highest responses. General (GCA) and specific (SCA) combining ability mean squares were calculated and determined to be highly significant. GCA effects among the parental lines were highest for FR16 and lowest for LH38. Nongenotypic, plant-toplant differences were also found to make a significant contribution to the overall variation observed. The results from this study indicate that parents which give rise to highly responsive hybrids can be identified and that genetic improvement is possible through selection.

  5. Paternalistic Leadership and Employee Responses in Javanese Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodi W. Irawanto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available While much has been written about leadership research, little effort has been made to identify what constitutes effective leadership in an Indonesian cultural context. Paternalistic leadership is an emerging body of research that has been adapted to the Indonesian context. Javanese cultural values provide a foundation for an Indonesian form of Paternalistic Leadership (PLI. In this study, 178 civil servants in the province of Yogyakarta Special Region, where surveyed in order to examine their responses to the dimensions of PLI. Results suggested that effective PLI emphasises a leader’s visibility, benevolence and courage. Authority and impartiality need to be expressed in ways that align with traditional Javanese values. Suggestions of the direction for further study are presented.

  6. Dose- and time-dependence of the host-mediated response to paclitaxel therapy: a mathematical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benguigui, Madeleine; Alishekevitz, Dror; Timaner, Michael; Shechter, Dvir; Raviv, Ziv; Benzekry, Sebastien; Shaked, Yuval

    2018-01-05

    It has recently been suggested that pro-tumorigenic host-mediated processes induced in response to chemotherapy counteract the anti-tumor activity of therapy, and thereby decrease net therapeutic outcome. Here we use experimental data to formulate a mathematical model describing the host response to different doses of paclitaxel (PTX) chemotherapy as well as the duration of the response. Three previously described host-mediated effects are used as readouts for the host response to therapy. These include the levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood and the effect of plasma derived from PTX-treated mice on migratory and invasive properties of tumor cells in vitro . A first set of mathematical models, based on basic principles of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, did not appropriately describe the dose-dependence and duration of the host response regarding the effects on invasion. We therefore provide an alternative mathematical model with a dose-dependent threshold, instead of a concentration-dependent one, that describes better the data. This model is integrated into a global model defining all three host-mediated effects. It not only precisely describes the data, but also correctly predicts host-mediated effects at different doses as well as the duration of the host response. This mathematical model may serve as a tool to predict the host response to chemotherapy in cancer patients, and therefore may be used to design chemotherapy regimens with improved therapeutic outcome by minimizing host mediated effects.

  7. Mathematical Models for Controlled Drug Release Through pH-Responsive Polymeric Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Ramya D; Jha, Prateek K

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels consisting of weakly charged acidic/basic groups are ideal candidates for carriers in oral delivery, as they swell in response to pH changes in the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in drug entrapment at low pH conditions of the stomach and drug release at high pH conditions of the intestine. We have developed 1-dimensional mathematical models to study the drug release behavior through pH-responsive hydrogels. Models are developed for 3 different cases that vary in the level of rigor, which together can be applied to predict both in vitro (drug release from carrier) and in vivo (drug concentration in the plasma) behavior of hydrogel-drug formulations. A detailed study of the effect of hydrogel and drug characteristics and physiological conditions is performed to gain a fundamental insight into the drug release behavior, which may be useful in the design of pH-responsive drug carriers. Finally, we describe a successful application of these models to predict both in vitro and in vivo behavior of docetaxel-loaded micelle in a pH-responsive hydrogel, as reported in a recent experimental study. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A mathematical model approach quantifying patients' response to changes in mechanical ventilation: evaluation in volume support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraza, S; Dey, N; Karbing, D S; Jensen, J B; Nygaard, M; Winding, R; Rees, S E

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model-approach to describe and quantify patient-response to changes in ventilator support. The approach accounts for changes in metabolism (V̇O2, V̇CO2) and serial dead space (VD), and integrates six physiological models of: pulmonary gas-exchange; acid-base chemistry of blood, and cerebrospinal fluid; chemoreflex respiratory-drive; ventilation; and degree of patients' respiratory muscle-response. The approach was evaluated with data from 12 patients on volume support ventilation mode. The models were tuned to baseline measurements of respiratory gases, ventilation, arterial acid-base status, and metabolism. Clinical measurements and model simulated values were compared at five ventilator support levels. The models were shown to adequately describe data in all patients (χ(2), p > 0.2) accounting for changes in V̇CO2, VD and inadequate respiratory muscle-response. F-ratio tests showed that this approach provides a significantly better (p ventilation. The approach may help predict patients' response to changes in ventilator support at the bedside. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory: Vygotsky's Forgotten and Suppressed Legacy and Its Implication for Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Cultural-historical activity theory--with historical roots in dialectical materialism and the social psychology to which it has given rise--has experienced exponential growth in its acceptance by scholars interested in understanding knowing and learning writ large. In education, this theory has constituted something like a well kept secret that is…

  10. A Conceptual Framework for the Cultural Integration of Cooperative Learning: A Thai Primary Mathematics Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yong; Nuntrakune, Tippawan

    2013-01-01

    The Thailand education reform adopted cooperative learning to improve the quality of education. However, it has been reported that the introduction and maintenance of cooperative learning has been difficult and uncertain because of the cultural differences. The study proposed a conceptual framework developed based on making a connection between…

  11. Cultural Perspectives on Social Responsibility in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris M Yob

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The writers of the UNESCO document, Rethinking education: Towards a global common good? challenge educators to address their efforts to meet the current threats to sustainable life for all who share this planet. One way that higher education has been attempting to do this is through campus-community partnerships working to solve social problems locally or further afield. In this exploratory study, answers were sought to the question of why faculty members and administrators participate in these service partnerships, both in terms of what motivates them to do so and what they hope to accomplish, and how cultural context may influence their answers. Answers to these questions may have implications for faculty recruitment and support and for curriculum design and student preparation for serving the common good as well as for the larger vision of how institutions might fulfill their social responsibility. Using one-on-one semi-structured interviews in a number of different countries, some trends could be identified. Responding to a sense of duty was found across all cultural contexts as a primary motivator for faculty members and administrators, but how duty was interpreted and legitimized depended on their various religious and political grounds. Cultural context also influenced whether participants saw their impact as empowering their service partners or establishing social justice.

  12. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  13. Response to Marie Paz Morales' ``Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-12-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript.

  14. Creating a Model of Acceptance: Preservice Teachers Interact with Non-English-Speaking Latino Parents Using Culturally Relevant Mathematics and Science Activities at Family Learning Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Olga; McCollough, Cherie A.; Diaz, Zulmaris

    2016-01-01

    The following describes a culturally relevant mathematics and science content program implemented by preservice teachers (PSTs) at Family Math/Science Learning Events (FM/SLEs) conducted through two different university programs in south Texas. These experiences are required course activities designed to inform PSTs of the importance of…

  15. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  16. Check Yo'self before You Wreck Yo'self and Our Kids: Counterstories from Culturally Responsive White Teachers? . . . To Culturally Responsive White Teachers!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Cheryl E.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies show the effectiveness of culturally responsive teaching with urban students of color. Yet few articulate the dynamics of how whiteness impacts the delivery of culturally responsive teaching. Using critical "whiteness" studies, critical race theory, and Black feminist concepts, this article interrogates the effectiveness…

  17. A mathematical model approach quantifying patients' response to changes in mechanical ventilation: Evaluation in pressure support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraza, S; Dey, N; Karbing, D S; Jensen, J B; Nygaard, M; Winding, R; Rees, S E

    2015-10-01

    This article evaluates how mathematical models of gas exchange, blood acid-base status, chemical respiratory drive, and muscle function can describe the respiratory response of spontaneously breathing patients to different levels of pressure support. The models were evaluated with data from 12 patients ventilated in pressure support ventilation. Models were tuned with clinical data (arterial blood gas measurement, ventilation, and respiratory gas fractions of O2 and CO2) to describe each patient at the clinical level of pressure support. Patients were ventilated up to 5 different pressure support levels, for 15 minutes at each level to achieve steady-state conditions. Model-simulated values of respiratory frequency (fR), arterial pH (pHa), and end-tidal CO2 (FeCO2) were compared to measured values at each pressure support level. Model simulations compared well to measured data with Bland-Altman bias and limits of agreement of fR of 0.7 ± 2.2 per minute, pHa of -0.0007 ± 0.019, and FeCO2 of -0.001 ± 0.003. The models describe patients' fR, pHa, and FeCO2 response to changes in pressure support with low bias and narrow limits of agreement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Extreme response style as a cultural response to climato-economic deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia; Van de Vliert, Evert; Van de Vijver, Fons J R

    2016-06-03

    We investigated the effects of climato-economic harshness on extreme response style. Climato-economic theorising postulates that a more threatening climate in poorer countries, in contrast to countries with a more comforting climate and richer countries with a more challenging climate, triggers intolerance of ambiguity and uncertainty avoidance inherent to conservatism, in-group favouritism and autocracy. Scores of extreme response style at country level, a proxy of this cluster of cultural characteristics, were extracted from students' responses in the Programme for International Student Assessment to test the hypothesis. In a series of hierarchical regression analysis across 64 countries, cold demands, heat demands and GDP per capita showed a highly significant interaction effect on extreme response style, predicting in total 30.7% of the variance. Extreme response style was highest in poorer countries with higher climatic demands, and lowest in richer countries with lower climate demands. Implications are discussed. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  19. Infusing Culturally Responsive Science Curriculum into Early Childhood Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jiyoon; Martin, Leisa A.

    2017-08-01

    Previous research studies in early childhood teacher education have indicated that teacher candidates are not adequately prepared to demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to teach science to all children including culturally and linguistically diverse students. To address this issue, the researchers provided 31 early childhood teacher candidates with instructions through a culturally responsive science education curriculum that integrates American and Korean science curriculum corresponding to the American and Korean standards for teacher education. The results showed a statistically significant increase in their Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PSTE). In addition, the teacher candidates were able to create a multicultural/diverse lesson in the developing and proficiency levels based on Ambrosio's lesson matrix. This study provides teacher candidates' knowledge as well as an additional resource for developing their self-efficacy and understanding the role of multicultural/diverse lesson planning for science instruction. Also, teacher candidates could be better prepared by understanding how other countries approach science education and integrating this knowledge to enrich their own science instruction.

  20. Connected and Culturally Embedded Beliefs: Chinese and US Teachers Talk about How Their Students Best Learn Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Christopher A.; Perry, Michelle; Sims, Linda M.; Miller, Kevin F.; Fang, Ge

    2008-01-01

    This study compares US and Chinese elementary mathematics teachers' beliefs about how students learn mathematics. Interviews with teachers in each country revealed that Chinese and US teachers have distinct ways of thinking about how mathematics should be taught and how students learn. Many Chinese teachers talked about developing students'…

  1. A Blueprint for Developing Culturally Proficient/Responsive School Administrators in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Jeffrey P.; Smith, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the important topic of culturally proficient/responsive school administrators for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students with learning disabilities (LD). Culturally proficient/responsive school administrators with knowledge and strong leadership skills in multicultural education are essential to impact school…

  2. The Initial Response of Secondary Mathematics Teachers to a One-to-One Laptop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Edward Nordin; Anderson, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Studies of one-to-one programs consistently report lower use of laptops in mathematics classrooms compared to other subjects but do not elaborate reasons for these observations. This mixed-method study investigated the experiences and beliefs of 28 mathematics teachers at five secondary schools during the second year of the New South Wales Digital…

  3. Evaluating the Mathematics Interest Inventory Using Item Response Theory: Differential Item Functioning across Gender and Ethnicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tianlan; Chesnut, Steven R.; Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Stevens, Tara; Olivárez, Arturo, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    As the United States has begun to lag behind other developed countries in performance on mathematics and science, researchers have sought to explain this with theories of teaching, knowledge, and motivation. We expand this examination by further analyzing a measure of interest that has been linked to student performance in mathematics and…

  4. Formation in Citizen Culture, Space for the Social Responsibility of Business Organizations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elita Marina Méndez Jiménez

    2017-01-01

    ... and other binding issues, in short, citizen culture. It is the purpose of this essay to generate reflections around the citizen's culture, for it mentions some roles, that as managerial actions of social co-responsibility, can realize the private...

  5. Mathematical modeling of RDX and HMX metabolism in poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra, DN34) tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzari, Melissa P; Van Aken, Benoit; Yoon, Jong M; Just, Craig L; Schnoor, Jerald L

    2004-01-01

    Three mathematical models were developed based on a fate study as an approach to define transformation pathways of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) within plant cells. [U-14C]RDX and [U-14C]HMX were added in Murashige and Skoog (MS) liquid media containing Populus deltoides x P. nigra (DN34) tissue cultures. Radioactivity of samples was analyzed using HPLC, a bio-oxidizer and liquid scintillation counter. Based on information collected, transformation pathways of nitramine compounds were fitted with the raw data obtained and using a modified "green liver" model. Ordinary differential equations were developed and simulations were performed with MicroMath Scientist version 2.0 (MicroMath Inc., St. Louis, MO, USA). The three models, with different sequential transformation processes, were tested in order to support the raw data (model I) and the assumptions of the modified "green liver" model (models II and III). The results showed a high correlation between the collected data and the simulated concentrations for all models. Thus, the simplest model developed (model I) is the best model description of these particular results. The results obtained suggest that the principle of parsimony should be applied. The "green liver"-based models also demonstrated a reliable approach for the investigation of degradation pathways of nitramines within plant cells.

  6. Culturally Responsive Pain Management for Black Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Lane, Sheria G; Booker, Staja Q

    2017-03-02

    pain for Black older adults has received inadequate attention by health care professionals despite evidence of greater pain intensity, depressive symptoms, and functional disability compared with White American older adults. Pain management for this population may be significantly improved with more careful attention to the provision of culturally responsive care. As professionals concerned with the optimization of health and reduction of suffering throughout the lifespan, nurses have an ethical, moral, and professional responsibility to provide culturally responsive care to the populations they serve-particularly when clear disparities in health exist. By considering how culture affects important health beliefs, values, preferences, and customs, and integrating this understanding into practice, quality of life is likely to be improved. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. A radical-local approach to bringing cultural practices into mathematics teaching in Ghanaian primary schools, exemplified in the case of measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Ernest Kofi; Chaiklin, Seth

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to put forward the idea of the general value of the radical-local approach to teaching and learning for the development of mathematics teaching in Ghana, both in relation to classroom teaching and for teacher training. To illustrate this idea, this article reports...... are described. Each of the teaching sessions drew on the social and cultural practices of the children to help them form an idea of what measurement is and which physical properties could be measured from given objects. Qualitative analysis of the teaching sessions revealed that the teaching approach enabled......-local approach can be used to teach measurement meaningfully to pupils, and has potential to be used for mathematics teaching more generally. Implications for mathematics teacher education in Ghana and similar sub-Saharan African countries are discussed....

  8. Culturally Responsive Beliefs and Practices of General and Special Education Teachers within a Response to Intervention Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gretchen G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which diverse schools engage in culturally responsive beliefs and practices within response to intervention (RTI). Eight diverse elementary schools participated, and 200 general and special education teachers in grades K-5 completed surveys. Areas surveyed included culturally responsive…

  9. Mathematics and mysticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Ralph

    2015-12-01

    Is there a world of mathematics above and beyond ordinary reality, as Plato proposed? Or is mathematics a cultural construct? In this short article we speculate on the place of mathematical reality from the perspective of the mystical cosmologies of the ancient traditions of meditation, psychedelics, and divination. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. MANAGEMENT CULTURE AS PART OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN THE CONTEXT OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IMPLEMENTATION

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jolita Vveinhardt; Regina Andriukaitiene

    2017-01-01

    .... The article presents passages of an interview with the top managers of the six companies, revealing management culture as part of the formal organizational culture expression aiming to implement...

  11. A mathematical/physiological model of parathyroid hormone secretion in response to blood-ionized calcium lowering in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, G; Schwarz, P

    1997-01-01

    increased, probably due to the larger amount of parathyroid tissue in these patients. These observations reveal a striking functional similarity between abnormal and normal parathyroid tissue. Furthermore, an apparently linear relationship between the rate of parathyroid hormone elimination from the blood......The aim of the present study was to test a mathematical model of the biochemical processes in the parathyroid glands responsible for the secretion of parathyroid hormone resulting from extracellular calcium reduction. A double exponential curve described the parathyroid hormone secretion induced...... by rapid lowering of blood-ionized calcium in humans with normal as well as abnormal parathyroid tissue. Our data show that it was possible to establish a simple mathematical model of the parathyroid hormone response to blood-ionized calcium lowering, sufficient to fit experimental data obtained from...

  12. Mathematical Lives

    CERN Document Server

    Bartocci, Claudio; Guerraggio, Angelo; Lucchetti, Roberto; Williams, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Steps forward in mathematics often reverberate in other scientific disciplines, and give rise to innovative conceptual developments or find surprising technological applications. This volume brings to the forefront some of the proponents of the mathematics of the twentieth century, who have put at our disposal new and powerful instruments for investigating the reality around us. The portraits present people who have impressive charisma and wide-ranging cultural interests, who are passionate about defending the importance of their own research, are sensitive to beauty, and attentive to the soci

  13. Connecting Teacher Professional Development and Student Mathematics Achievement: Mediating Belonging With Multimodal Explorations in Language, Identity, and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutaka, Traci Shizu; Smith, Wendy M.; Albano, Anthony D.; Edwards, Carolyn Pope; Ren, Lixin; Beattie, Heidi Lynn; Lewis, W. James; Heaton, Ruth M.; Stroup, Walter W.

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of "Primarily Math", an inservice elementary mathematics specialist program. "Primarily Math" sought to augment the mathematical knowledge for teaching of kindergarten through third-grade teachers using a longitudinal multiple cohort design. Two sets of analyses were conducted. The…

  14. The "Simmie" Side of Life: Old Order Amish Youths' Affective Response to Culturally Prescribed Deviance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiling, Denise M.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzed the counterintuitive affective response Old Order Amish youth make to unique cultural prescriptions for adolescent deviance (constructed by adult Amish culture). Interview data supported the basic principles of Terror Management Theory in an unexpected, indirect fashion. Rather than functioning as a specialized cultural-anxiety buffer…

  15. An examination of acquiescent response styles in cross-cultural research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, R.; Fontaine, J.R.J.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; van Hemert, D.A.; Gari, A.; Mylonas, K.

    2009-01-01

    Response styles constitute a formidable challenge for cross-cultural research. In this article, three different response styles are discussed (acquiescence, extremity scoring, and social desirability). Acquiescence responding (ARS) is then integrated into a larger classical test theoretical

  16. Statistical optimization of cultural conditions by response surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... its cultural conditions using statistical designs for maximal phenol degradation. MATERIALS AND ... Analytical methods. The residual phenol concentration in the culture medium was esti- mated colorimetrically using ..... Australian and New Zealand Environment and. Conservation Council, Australian water ...

  17. Applying Culturally Responsive Pedagogy to the Vocational Training of Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Training and learning are the personal process in which individuals interact with social and cultural contexts. Immigrant trainees bring their early educational and life experiences into training classrooms, and their learning is strongly affected by their prior socialization and socio-cultural experiences. Therefore, it is necessary to provide…

  18. The initial response of secondary mathematics teachers to a one-to-one laptop program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Edward Nordin; Anderson, Judy

    2013-06-01

    Studies of one-to-one programs consistently report lower use of laptops in mathematics classrooms compared to other subjects but do not elaborate reasons for these observations. This mixed-method study investigated the experiences and beliefs of 28 mathematics teachers at five secondary schools during the second year of the New South Wales Digital Education Revolution laptop program. While some mathematics teachers planned for students to use their laptops up to once a week, most reported less frequent use in the classroom. Teachers were grouped into categories "Non Adopters," "Cautious Adopters," and "Early Adopters" according to reported classroom use of laptops, then analysed for differences in confidence, knowledge, and beliefs relating to technology for teaching and learning mathematics. A prevalent belief limiting laptop use is that students authentically learn mathematics only using pen and paper. Cautious Adopters and Non Adopters expressed beliefs that laptops exacerbate classroom management problems, especially for lower-achieving students. In the context of ability-streamed classes these beliefs effectively ruled out use of laptops for entire classrooms.

  19. Culturally Responsive Teaching as an Ethics- and Care-Based Approach to Urban Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevalier, Rae; McKenzie, Barbara Ann

    2012-01-01

    Research shows culturally responsive teaching affects urban students positively. Current literature is an excellent resource for urban teacher preparation and provides definitions, models, and examples to help preservice teachers recognize the "how" and "what" of culturally responsive teaching. Missing, however, is an accessible, in-depth…

  20. Examining Perceptions of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Teacher Preparation and Teacher Leadership Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Amy J.; Samuels, Gregory L.; Cook, Tammy M.

    2017-01-01

    The study examined a multi-tiered approach for facilitating learning and examining perceptions about culturally responsive pedagogy in teacher preparation and teacher leadership programs. The study aligned with a learning unit we designed to (1) increase understanding of culturally responsive pedagogy and (2) investigate perceptions of cultural…

  1. "Because That's Who I Am": Extending Theories of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy to Consider Religious Identity, Belief, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallavis, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual article the author explores the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and religious school contexts. He extends theories of culturally responsive pedagogy to consider how religion, a dimension of student culture that has largely been overlooked in the literature surrounding culturally responsive pedagogy, can inflect…

  2. Response of arum lily calli to culture filtrate of Pectobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    . Kumar JV, Kumari BDR, Sujatha G, Castan E (2008). Production of plants resistant to Alternaria carthami via organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis of safflower cv. NARI-6 treated with fungal culture filtrates. Plant Cell ...

  3. Response to Richard Widdess: Music, Meaning and Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Lewis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary discusses the anthropological implications of Richard Widess’ paper by summarizing some anthropological approaches to music, especially focusing on the way musical participation inculcates and transmits an aesthetic orientation that guides action across cultural domains such as politics, economics and religion. The paper ends by suggesting that the heart of human culture is more likely to be an aesthetic orientation than a script or set of rules, and traces out some reasons why music does this so well.

  4. Mathematical Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, J.

    2009-10-14

    Progress for the past decade or so has been extraordinary. The solution of Fermat's Last Theorem [11] and of the Poincare Conjecture [1] have resolved two of the most outstanding challenges to mathematics. For both cases, deep and advanced theories and whole subfields of mathematics came into play and were developed further as part of the solutions. And still the future is wide open. Six of the original seven problems from the Clay Foundation challenge remain open, the 23 DARPA challenge problems are open. Entire new branches of mathematics have been developed, including financial mathematics and the connection between geometry and string theory, proposed to solve the problems of quantized gravity. New solutions of the Einstein equations, inspired by shock wave theory, suggest a cosmology model which fits accelerating expansion of the universe possibly eliminating assumptions of 'dark matter'. Intellectual challenges and opportunities for mathematics are greater than ever. The role of mathematics in society continues to grow; with this growth comes new opportunities and some growing pains; each will be analyzed here. We see a broadening of the intellectual and professional opportunities and responsibilities for mathematicians. These trends are also occuring across all of science. The response can be at the level of the professional societies, which can work to deepen their interactions, not only within the mathematical sciences, but also with other scientific societies. At a deeper level, the choices to be made will come from individual mathematicians. Here, of course, the individual choices will be varied, and we argue for respect and support for this diversity of responses. In such a manner, we hope to preserve the best of the present while welcoming the best of the new.

  5. The Effects of Teacher Collective Responsibility on the Mathematics Achievement of Students Who Repeat Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Chicas, Jessica; Agger, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors use the national High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) dataset to explore (a) if repeating algebra in the eighth grade was associated with overall mathematics grades and course-taking patterns by twelfth grade, (b) if repeating algebra in the eighth grade was associated with students' final grade in algebra,…

  6. Bringing Bourdieu to Mathematics Education: A Response to Williams and Choudry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    For those engaged in educational "improvement," it is important to pause from time to time to ask the question: what is improving? If Bourdieu's thesis is correct, namely that education is a key site of social reproduction, does school improvement, and/or improvement of mathematics education, also enhance that capacity for the social…

  7. Response to Specific Training for Students with Different Levels of Mathematical Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Anna Maria; Pedron, Martina; Tressoldi, Patrizio Emanuele; Lucangeli, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of specific, individualized training for students with different levels of mathematical difficulties. Fifty-four students, with either severe or mild math difficulties, were assigned to individualized training or to a control condition. Ten students with severe math difficulties…

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Early Cellular Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses to Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Solid Organ Allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Judy D; Metes, Diana M; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of the early inflammatory response in transplantation is formulated with ordinary differential equations. We first consider the inflammatory events associated only with the initial surgical procedure and the subsequent ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) events that cause tissue damage to the host as well as the donor graft. These events release damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), thereby initiating an acute inflammatory response. In simulations of this model, resolution of inflammation depends on the severity of the tissue damage caused by these events and the patient's (co)-morbidities. We augment a portion of a previously published mathematical model of acute inflammation with the inflammatory effects of T cells in the absence of antigenic allograft mismatch (but with DAMP release proportional to the degree of graft damage prior to transplant). Finally, we include the antigenic mismatch of the graft, which leads to the stimulation of potent memory T cell responses, leading to further DAMP release from the graft and concomitant increase in allograft damage. Regulatory mechanisms are also included at the final stage. Our simulations suggest that surgical injury and I/R-induced graft damage can be well-tolerated by the recipient when each is present alone, but that their combination (along with antigenic mismatch) may lead to acute rejection, as seen clinically in a subset of patients. An emergent phenomenon from our simulations is that low-level DAMP release can tolerize the recipient to a mismatched allograft, whereas different restimulation regimens resulted in an exaggerated rejection response, in agreement with published studies. We suggest that mechanistic mathematical models might serve as an adjunct for patient- or sub-group-specific predictions, simulated clinical studies, and rational design of immunosuppression.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Early Cellular Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses to Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Solid Organ Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Judy D.; Metes, Diana M.; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of the early inflammatory response in transplantation is formulated with ordinary differential equations. We first consider the inflammatory events associated only with the initial surgical procedure and the subsequent ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) events that cause tissue damage to the host as well as the donor graft. These events release damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), thereby initiating an acute inflammatory response. In simulations of this model, resolution of inflammation depends on the severity of the tissue damage caused by these events and the patient’s (co)-morbidities. We augment a portion of a previously published mathematical model of acute inflammation with the inflammatory effects of T cells in the absence of antigenic allograft mismatch (but with DAMP release proportional to the degree of graft damage prior to transplant). Finally, we include the antigenic mismatch of the graft, which leads to the stimulation of potent memory T cell responses, leading to further DAMP release from the graft and concomitant increase in allograft damage. Regulatory mechanisms are also included at the final stage. Our simulations suggest that surgical injury and I/R-induced graft damage can be well-tolerated by the recipient when each is present alone, but that their combination (along with antigenic mismatch) may lead to acute rejection, as seen clinically in a subset of patients. An emergent phenomenon from our simulations is that low-level DAMP release can tolerize the recipient to a mismatched allograft, whereas different restimulation regimens resulted in an exaggerated rejection response, in agreement with published studies. We suggest that mechanistic mathematical models might serve as an adjunct for patient- or sub-group-specific predictions, simulated clinical studies, and rational design of immunosuppression. PMID:26441988

  10. Oviposition Attractancy of Bacterial Culture Filtrates: response of Culex quinquefasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Poonam

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Oviposition attractants could be used for monitoring as well as controlling mosquitoes by attracting them to lay eggs at chosen sites. In the present study, culture filtrates of seven bacterial species were tested for their attractancy against gravid females of Culex quinquefasciatus. When their oviposition active indices (OAI were studied, the culture filtrates of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens exhibited oviposition attractancy (OAI = >0.3 at 100 ppm and the OAI were respectively 0.70 and 0.47. Culture filtrates of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis (wild type, B. t. var. israelensis (mutant and B. sphaericus showed attractancy at 2000 ppm with OAI of respectively 0.71, 0.59 and 0.68. However, the OAI of B. megaterium as well as Azospirillum brasilense was 0.13 (at 2000 ppm, which was less than 0.3 required to be considered them as attractants. When the oviposition attractancy of the bacterial culture filtrates were compared with that of a known oviposition attractant, p-cresol (at 10 ppm, the culture filtrates of B. t. var. israelensis (wild type and B. cereus were found to be more active than p-cresol, respectively with 64.2 and 54.3% oviposition.

  11. Responsiveness of culture-based segmentation of organizational buyers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Jadczaková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much published work over the four decades has acknowledged market segmentation in business-to-business settings yet primarily focusing on observable segmentation bases such as firmographics or geographics. However, such bases were proved to have a weak predictive validity with respect to industrial buying behavior. Therefore, this paper attempts to add a debate to this topic by introducing new (unobservable segmentation base incorporating several facets of business culture, denoted as psychographics. The justification for this approach is that the business culture captures the collective mindset of an organization and thus enables marketers to target the organization as a whole. Given the hypothesis that culture has a merit for micro-segmentation a sample of 278 manufacturing firms was first subjected to principal component analysis and Varimax to reveal underlying cultural traits. In next step, cluster analysis was performed on retained factors to construct business profiles. Finally, non-parametric one-way analysis of variance confirmed discriminative power between profiles based on psychographics in terms of industrial buying behavior. Owing to this, business culture may assist marketers when targeting more effectively than some traditional approaches.

  12. Culturally Responsive, Transformative Pedagogy in the Transnational Era: Critical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Slapac, Alina

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses challenges of multicultural education in the context of increasing transnational mobility and growing diversity in schools, and suggests ways to convert these challenges into new resources in education. We start with a brief overview of the contemporary transnationalism and new understanding of space and culture (Levitt…

  13. Culturally Responsive Reading Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourea, Lefki; Gibson, Lenwood; Werunga, Robai

    2018-01-01

    As student populations are becoming more diverse in ability and ethnicity across American classrooms, teachers are faced with instructional challenges in meeting their students' learning needs. Challenges are heightened for general and special education teachers who teach students with learning disabilities (LD) and have a culturally and…

  14. Confronting Coyote: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in an Era of Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The trickster, a crucial character in many cultural histories, often slips into people's lives without warning. In the western United States, the trickster frequently manifests himself as Coyote, and he is central in the oral traditions of tribal people, ranching families, and outdoor adventurers alike. Coyote is a complex character that teaches…

  15. Models and Frameworks for Culturally Responsive Adaptations of Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa S.; Villarreal, Victor; Castro, Maria J.

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) youths are underserved by mental health systems; CLD youths are less likely to receive mental health services and more likely to receive services that are inappropriate or inadequate. The lack of well-established treatments for CLD youths has been cited as one contributing factor…

  16. Socio-Cultural Norms for Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    Abstract – This paper considers the cultural resources for corporate action tied into stakeholder models, criticizes current stakeholder models, and develops a perspective based in ethics and the political model of the stakeholder. The purpose of this analysis is to lay out models which recognize...

  17. Development of a Culturally Responsive Nutrition Promotion Course for Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Gail C.; Beaudoin, Jessica; Rascon, Mayra; Garcia-Vega, Melawhy; Rios-Ellis, Britt

    2013-01-01

    The health of Hispanics is greatly influenced by level of education, socioeconomic status, and access to healthcare (United States Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2011). To address this issue and to reduce health disparities among all ethnic groups, community based interventions with culturally appropriate and linguistically…

  18. The hydrological response to precipitations of a layered shallow sloping deposit: physical experiments and mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Emilia; Greco, Roberto; Guida, Andrea; Olivares, Lucio; Picarelli, Luciano

    2016-04-01

    shallow landslides are sometimes triggered by intense and long-lasting precipitations. Several studies have already pointed out that layering may play a crucial role in the development of the infiltration process, as the coarse-grained pumice layers may behave as capillary barriers, leading to the formation of perched saturated zones. The hydrological behavior of such kind of layered slopes is investigated by means of small-scale infiltration experiments carried out in an instrumented flume in the laboratory. The interpretation of the experimental results is made with the help of a mathematical model of 2-D Richards equation, which allows shedding some light in the hydraulic properties of the pumices, which are hardly measurable with standard laboratory techniques. The obtained results show how, depending on initial moisture conditions, slope inclination angle and applied rainfall intensity, the response of the slope may be very different, and that the formation of a capillary barrier is not always observed.

  19. Cultural differences in survey responding: Issues and insights in the study of response biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmelmeier, Markus

    2016-12-01

    This paper introduces the special section "Cultural differences in questionnaire responding" and discusses central topics in the research on response biases in cross-cultural survey research. Based on current conceptions of acquiescent, extreme, and socially desirable responding, the author considers current data on the correlated nature of response biases and the conditions under which different response styles they emerge. Based on evidence relating different response styles to the cultural dimension of individualism-collectivism, the paper explores how research presented as part of this special section might help resolves some tensions in this literature. The paper concludes by arguing that response styles should not be treated merely as measurement error, but as cultural behaviors in themselves. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  20. The response rate in postal epidemiological studies in the context of national cultural behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelova, Radostina A.; Naydenov, Kiril; Hägerhed-Engman, Linda

    2012-01-01

    , but the obtained response rate was different: 78.8% in DBH and 34.5% in ALLHOME. The differences in the obtained response rate and the reasons for these differences were analyzed on the basis of the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions’ indexes, which clearly show the distinction in the national cultural behaviour...... of people in Sweden and Bulgaria. It was found that national culture could strongly influence the response behaviour of people in epidemiological studies and Hofstede’s indexes can be useful tool when designing and performing epidemiological studies, and in particular – questionnaire surveys....

  1. The Only Absolute Truth in Mathematics is the Myth of Mathematics as Universal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, M. Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Culture and national origin can affect thinking about mathematics and mathematics learning. The myth that mathematics is objective and culture free becomes a barrier to adults learning mathematics. Adult educators must reflect upon culture's influence on learning and recognize the implications of universality myths on students' learning in…

  2. Culturally and linguistically diverse students in speech-language pathology courses: A platform for culturally responsive services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Stacie; Lincoln, Michelle; McAllister, Sue

    2017-06-01

    Increasing the proportion of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students and providing intercultural learning opportunities for all students are two strategies identified to facilitate greater access to culturally responsive speech-language pathology services. To enact these strategies, more information is needed about student diversity. This study collected descriptive information about CALD speech-language pathology students in Australia. Cultural and linguistic background information was collected through surveying 854 domestic and international speech-language pathology students from three Australian universities. Students were categorised according to defined or perceived CALD status, international student status, speaking English as an Additional Language (EAL), or speaking a Language Other than English at Home (LOTEH). Overall, 32.1% of students were either defined or perceived CALD. A total of 14.9% spoke EAL and 25.7% identified speaking a LOTEH. CALD students were more likely to speak EAL or a LOTEH than non-CALD students, were prominently from Southern and South-Eastern Asian backgrounds and spoke related languages. Many students reported direct or indirect connections with their cultural heritage and/or contributed linguistic diversity. These students may represent broader acculturative experiences in communities. The sociocultural knowledge and experience of these students may provide intercultural learning opportunities for all students and promote culturally responsive practices.

  3. Standardization and Whiteness: One and the Same? A Response to "There Is No Culturally Responsive Teaching Spoken Here"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilbacher, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The article "There Is No Culturally Responsive Teaching Spoken Here: A Critical Race Perspective" by Cleveland Hayes and Brenda C. Juarez suggests that the current focus on meeting standards incorporates limited thoughtful discussions related to complex notions of diversity. Our response suggests a strong link between standardization and White…

  4. Empowerment and responsibility of the culture of peace through education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Inés Sánchez Cardona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to highlight the possibilities of empowering the culture of peace in the society in general, so it is necessary a joint work of different actors and social institutions. In this perspective each individual must transcend commitment to the peace of the personal to the social, also the State specifically in the case of Colombia must be monitored for compliance with the legislation in story to the compulsory education for educational institutions peace through public policies. Similarly, we emphasize that when they achieve consistently develop the principles and methodologies of education for peace, in institutions both family, school and University, this facilitates the strengthening of the culture for peace in the country.

  5. Temperature and photoperiod responses of soybean embryos cultured in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Patterson, R. P.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and photoperiod each have direct effects on growth rate of excised embryos of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill). To determine if the effects of photoperiod are altered by temperature, embryos of 'Ransom II' were cultured in vitro at 18, 24, and 30 degrees C under photoperiod durations of 12 and 18 h at an irradiance of 9 W m-2 (700 to 850 nm) and a photosynthetic photon flux density of 58 micromoles m-2 s-1 (400 to 700 nm). Accumulation rates of fresh and dry weight were greater under 18-h than 12-h photoperiods over the entire range of temperature. Water content of the culture embryos was not affected by photoperiod but was greater at 18 and 30 than 24 degrees C. The accumulation rate of dry weight increased from 18 to 26 but declined at 30 degrees C.

  6. Responsiveness of culture-based segmentation of organizational buyers

    OpenAIRE

    Veronika Jadczaková

    2013-01-01

    Much published work over the four decades has acknowledged market segmentation in business-to-business settings yet primarily focusing on observable segmentation bases such as firmographics or geographics. However, such bases were proved to have a weak predictive validity with respect to industrial buying behavior. Therefore, this paper attempts to add a debate to this topic by introducing new (unobservable) segmentation base incorporating several facets of business culture, denoted as psycho...

  7. Who Is Responsible for Successful Communication?: Investigating Compliment Responses in Cross-Cultural Communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moalla, Asma

    2013-01-01

    ...’ respective cultural backgrounds. In addition, the data collected emphasize the fact that cross-cultural communication is a transactional mutual process and that both native and nonnative speakers of English are equally required...

  8. Mathematics Teaching as Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootenboer, Peter; Edwards-Groves, Christine

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we argue that mathematics teaching can be conceptualised as a form of praxis. Viewing mathematics teaching as praxis foregrounds the moral nature of teaching and the educational practices that are developed in response to the educational needs in particular sites. The case for praxis in mathematics education is then made by drawing…

  9. Mathematical impairment associated with high-contrast abnormalities in change detection and magnocellular visual evoked response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebski, Nicola R; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2015-10-01

    The cause of developmental dyscalculia, a specific deficit in acquisition of arithmetic skills, particularly of enumeration, has never been investigated with respect to the patency of the visual magnocellular system. Here, the question of dysfunction of the afferent magnocellular cortical input and its dorsal stream projections was tested directly using nonlinear analysis of the visual evoked potential (VEP) and through the psychophysical ability to rapidly detect visual change. A group of young adults with self-reported deficiencies of arithmetical ability, showed marked impairment in magnitude estimation and enumeration performance-though not in lexical decision reaction times when compared with an arithmetically capable group controlled for age and handedness. Multifocal nonlinear VEPs were recorded at low (24 %) and high (96 %) contrast. First- and second-order VEP kernels were comparable between groups at low contrast, but not at high contrast. The mathematically impaired group showed an abnormal lack of contrast saturation in the shortest latency first-order peak (N60) and a delayed P100 positivity in the first slice of the second-order kernel. Both features have previously been argued to be physiological markers of magnocellular function. Mathematically impaired participants also performed worse on a gap paradigm change detection for digit task showing increased reaction times for high-contrast stimuli but not for low-contrast stimuli compared with controls. The VEP results give direct evidence of abnormality in the occipital processing of magnocellular information in those with mathematical impairment. The anomalous high visual contrast physiological and psychophysical performance suggests an abnormality in the inhibitory processes that normally result in saturation of contrast gain in the magnocellular system.

  10. Cross-Cultural Homestays: An Analysis of College Students' Responses After Living in an Unfamiliar Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roger M.; Dold, Eugene

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a study designed to investigate the effects of a cross-cultural homestay program on students' attitudes and health. Available from: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Transaction Periodicals Consortium, Rutgers-The State University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903. (MH)

  11. The Impact of an In-Service Workshop on Cooperating Teachers' Perceptions of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKoy, Constance L.; MacLeod, Rebecca B.; Walter, Jennifer S.; Nolker, D. Brett

    2017-01-01

    Culturally responsive teaching values students' identities, backgrounds, and cultural references as key tools for building meaningful learning environments. It has been adopted by many educators globally, but has not been incorporated consistently by music educators. Few researchers in music education have investigated the impact of culturally…

  12. Special Education Disproportionality: A Review of Response to Intervention and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Gwendolyn; Kea, Cathy D.; Watson, Martreece; Oif, Alana

    2016-01-01

    Special education disproportionality for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students persists as a controversial and intractable problem in our educational systems. Response to intervention (RtI) and culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP), both independently and collectively are considered to offer promise for mitigating conditions of…

  13. The Relationship between Organizational Culture and the Implementation of Response to Intervention in One Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methner, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between organizational culture and the implementation of Response to Intervention in one elementary school. It examined issues corresponding to change within a system, with particular attention to those relating to school culture. An ethnographic approach was used to gather data, including the collection of…

  14. Developing Culturally Responsive Surveys: Lessons in Development, Implementation, and Analysis from Brazil's African Descent Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Merle L.; Tillman, Ayesha S.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable empirical research, along with a growing body of conceptual and theoretical literature, exists on the role of culture and context in evaluation. Less scholarship has examined culturally responsive surveys in the context of international evaluation. In this article, the authors present lessons learned from the development,…

  15. 75 FR 76997 - Public Consultation on Personnel Reliability and Culture of Responsibility Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Guidance for Enhancing Personnel Reliability and Strengthening the Culture of Responsibility at the Local... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Public Consultation on Personnel Reliability and Culture of... the Federal Government, is hosting a public consultation to obtain input from the scientific community...

  16. Cultural Responsiveness and Routines: When Center and Home Don't Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses cultural responsiveness and routines of child care centers that do not match what families are accustomed to at home. It can be difficult to discuss cultural differences in some routine caregiving activities because of the standards, rules, regulations, best practices, and health concerns that those trained in early…

  17. Culturally Responsive Peace Education: A Case Study at One Urban Latino K-8 Catholic School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of a yearlong research-based peace education program at one urban K-8 private Catholic school situated in a community plagued by structural violence in an enclave of a large Midwestern city. To frame the analysis, the author employs concepts central to culturally responsive pedagogy (including cultural competence,…

  18. Autobiographies in Preservice Teacher Education: A Snapshot Tool for Building a Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, AnnMarie Alberton; Bennett, Susan V.; Evans, Linda Shuford; Peterson, Barbara J.; Welsh, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Many scholars have made the call for teacher educators to provide experiences that can lead preservice teachers to embrace a culturally responsive pedagogy. We investigated the use of brief autobiographies during an internship as a tool (a) for preservice teachers to examine their multidimensional culture; and (b) for teacher educators to assess…

  19. The Benefits and Challenges of Culturally Responsive EFL Critical Literature Circles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredricks, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Though some research has shown what applying a culturally relevant framework entails in an American context, and occasionally in an EFL setting, there is still too little research on how students respond to critical, culturally responsive pedagogy. More insight is needed into the specific challenges and benefits of critical approaches in diverse…

  20. Culturally Responsive Teaching: The Harlem Renaissance in an Urban English Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, Andrea J.

    2007-01-01

    Andrea J. Stairs advocates culturally responsive teaching, a practice that explicitly highlights "issues of race, ethnicity, and culture as central to teaching, learning, and schooling," and emphasizes the necessity of interrogating the themes of race, power, and privilege in the urban classroom. Stairs observes two student teachers as…

  1. The What, Why, and How of Culturally Responsive Teaching: International Mandates, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Geneva

    2015-01-01

    This discussion acknowledges that culturally responsive teaching is relevant for international contexts. However, it needs to be nuanced to fit the specific characteristics and needs of these different settings, relative to societal dynamics, and student ethnic, cultural, racial, immigration/migration, economic, and linguistic demographics.…

  2. The Cultural Responsiveness of Teacher Candidates Towards Roma Pupils in Serbia and Slovenia--Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecek, Mojca; Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Vujisic-Živkovic, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, there is a growing need for teacher awareness and sensitivity to cultural differences, what is often called culturally responsive teaching. This is why teacher education institutions are making significant efforts to require student teachers to enrol in courses that focus on understanding, tolerance and acceptance of differences…

  3. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Parental Expectations for the Mathematics Achievement of Their Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Daya; Panizzon, Debra

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results from a survey of 80 parents and 120 secondary school students in Australia. Many parents report that their children put in all their effort into mathematics education but they believe that their children can do better if they try harder. This paradox is more evident among parents from Asian-Australian backgrounds…

  4. Secondary English Learners: Strengthening Their Literacy Skills through Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    In high school English classrooms where English language learners may be at risk of academic failure, Culturally Responsive Teaching can help educators build an inclusive community in which all students can improve their literacy skills.

  5. Corporate Social Responsability - Integral Part of Modern Organizational Culture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicoleta Camelia Cicioc; Ramona Gabrea

    2014-01-01

    ... they belong and where they operate. Many national and international organizations invest considerable amounts of money in actions of corporate social responsibility because they are aware that the result is not in vain, the result will obtain...

  6. Consumers’ responses to CSR in a cross-cultural setting

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Karaosman; Gustavo Morales-Alonso; Mercedes Grijalvo

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to clarify the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and consumer behaviour in an international setting. Consumers’ responses to CSR activities and the impact on the purchase decision are limited discourses. CSR-based studies in the fashion and apparel industry are also scarce. Therefore, this study attempts to enlighten the subject of how consumers from different countries respond to CSR adopted in the fashion and apparel industry. This study is based on a...

  7. Culturally Responsive Focus Groups: Reframing the Research Experience to Focus on Participants

    OpenAIRE

    Katrina L. Rodriguez PhD; Jana L. Schwartz PhD; Maria K. E. Lahman PhD; Monica R. Geist PhD

    2011-01-01

    Focus groups are a frequently employed and valued method of data collection in the Social Sciences. This article specifically addresses maximizing the benefits of focus groups through the framework of culturally responsive research practice. Discussion of authors' research projects which utilized focus groups are presented in order to illuminate the advantages of using culturally responsive focus groups (CRFGs) in data collection. Three types of focus groups are discussed: traditional focus g...

  8. Utility and translatability of mathematical modeling, cell culture and small and large animal models in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Pearce, John A.; Ryan, Thomas P.

    2015-03-01

    For more than 50 years, hyperthermia-based cancer researchers have utilized mathematical models, cell culture studies and animal models to better understand, develop and validate potential new treatments. It has been, and remains, unclear how and to what degree these research techniques depend on, complement and, ultimately, translate accurately to a successful clinical treatment. In the past, when mathematical models have not proven accurate in a clinical treatment situation, the initiating quantitative scientists (engineers, mathematicians and physicists) have tended to believe the biomedical parameters provided to them were inaccurately determined or reported. In a similar manner, experienced biomedical scientists often tend to question the value of mathematical models and cell culture results since those data typically lack the level of biologic and medical variability and complexity that are essential to accurately study and predict complex diseases and subsequent treatments. Such quantitative and biomedical interdependence, variability, diversity and promise have never been greater than they are within magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment. The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and, recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. The goal of this paper is to use proven concepts and current research to address the potential pathobiology, modeling and quantification of the effects of treatment as pertaining to the similarities and differences in energy delivered by known external delivery techniques and iron oxide nanoparticles.

  9. Survey Response Styles, Acculturation, and Culture Among a Sample of Mexican American Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel E; Resnicow, Ken; Couper, Mick P

    2011-10-01

    A number of studies have investigated use of extreme (ERS) and acquiescent (ARS) response styles across cultural groups. However, due to within-group heterogeneity, it is important to also examine use of response styles, acculturation, and endorsement of cultural variables at the individual level. This study explores relationships between acculturation, six Mexican cultural factors, ERS, and ARS among a sample of 288 Mexican American telephone survey respondents. Three aspects of acculturation were assessed: Spanish use, the importance of preserving Mexican culture, and interaction with Mexican Americans versus Anglos. These variables were hypothesized to positively associate with ERS and ARS. Participants with higher Spanish use did utilize more ERS and ARS; however, value for preserving Mexican culture and interaction with Mexican Americans were not associated with response style use. In analyses of cultural factors, endorsement of familismo and simpatia were related to more frequent ERS and ARS, machismo was associated with lower ERS among men, and la mujer was related to higher ERS among women. Caballerismo was marginally associated with utilization of ERS among men. No association was found between la mujer abnegada and ERS among women. Relationships between male gender roles and ARS were nonsignificant. Relationships between female gender roles and ARS were mixed but trended in the positive direction. Overall, these findings suggest that Mexican American respondents vary in their use of response styles by acculturation and cultural factors. This usage may be specifically influenced by participants' valuing of and engagement with constructs directly associated with social behavior.

  10. Digital Citizenship: Developing an Ethical and Responsible Online Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Responsible and ethical use of the Internet is not something that teenagers, in particular, consider to be important, and serious consequences are beginning to emerge as a result of careless and offensive online behaviour. Teachers and teacher-librarians have a duty of care to make students aware of the potentially devastating effects of…

  11. Supervising Research in Maori Cultural Contexts: A Decolonizing, Relational Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Mere; Glynn, Ted; Woller, Paul

    2017-01-01

    We have collaborated for 25 years as indigenous Maori and non-Maori researchers undertaking research with Maori families, their schools and communities. We have endeavored to meet our responsibilities to the Maori people (indigenous inhabitants of New Zealand) and communities with whom we have researched, as well as meet the requirements and…

  12. Mathematical Competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphael, Henning; Mogensen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    In this article we present the notion of Mathematical competences as a tool to describe the mathematically gifted students.......In this article we present the notion of Mathematical competences as a tool to describe the mathematically gifted students....

  13. Enhancing Self-Awareness: A Practical Strategy to Train Culturally Responsive Social Work Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini J. Negi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A primary goal of social justice educators is to engage students in a process of self-discovery, with the goal of helping them recognize their own biases, develop empathy, and become better prepared for culturally responsive practice. While social work educators are mandated with the important task of training future social workers in culturally responsive practice with diverse populations, practical strategies on how to do so are scant. This article introduces a teaching exercise, the Ethnic Roots Assignment, which has been shown qualitatively to aid students in developing self-awareness, a key component of culturally competent social work practice. Practical suggestions for classroom utilization, common challenges, and past student responses to participating in the exercise are provided. The dissemination of such a teaching exercise can increase the field’s resources for addressing the important goal of cultural competence training.

  14. A Hormone-responsive 3D Culture Model of the Human Mammary Gland Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speroni, Lucia; Sweeney, Michael F; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2016-02-07

    The process of mammary epithelial morphogenesis is influenced by hormones. The study of hormone action on the breast epithelium using 2D cultures is limited to cell proliferation and gene expression endpoints. However, in the organism, mammary morphogenesis occurs in a 3D environment. 3D culture systems help bridge the gap between monolayer cell culture (2D) and the complexity of the organism. Herein, we describe a 3D culture model of the human breast epithelium that is suitable to study hormone action. It uses the commercially available hormone-responsive human breast epithelial cell line, T47D, and rat tail collagen type 1 as a matrix. This 3D culture model responds to the main mammotropic hormones: estradiol, progestins and prolactin. The influence of these hormones on epithelial morphogenesis can be observed after 1- or 2-week treatment according to the endpoint. The 3D cultures can be harvested for analysis of epithelial morphogenesis, cell proliferation and gene expression.

  15. Snow snakes and science agency: Empowering American Indian students through a culturally-based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brant Gregory

    Mainstream curricula have struggled to provide American Indian students with meaningful learning experiences. This research project studied a novel approach to engaging students with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) content through a culturally-based context. The traditional American Indian game of Snow Snakes (shushumeg in Ojibwe) presented a highly engaging context for delivering STEM content. Through the engaging context of snow snakes, the designed STEM curriculum explicitly applied mathematics (scaling and data), and science (force and motion) to an engineering prototype iteration that used available materials and tools (technology) for success. It was hypothesized that by engaging students through the carefully integrated STEM curriculum, driven by the culturally based context of snow snakes, students would exhibit an increase in science agency and achievement. The overarching research question explored for this study was: How does a culturally-based and integrated STEM curriculum impact student's science agency? Associated sub-questions were: (1) What does science agency look like for 6th grade students? (2) What key experiences are involved in the development of science agency through a culturally-based STEM curriculum context? And (3) What are the impacts on the community associated with the implementation of a culturally-based STEM curriculum? A case study research design was implemented for this research. Yin (2003) defines a case study as investigating a phenomenon (e.g. science agency) which occurs within authentic contexts (e.g. snow snakes, Adventure Learning, and Eagle Soaring School) especially when the boundaries between phenomenon and context are unclear. For this case study Eagle Soaring School acted as the bounded case with students from the 6th grade class representing the embedded units. Science agency was the theoretical framework for data analysis. Major findings were categorized as science and STEM learning, agency

  16. An experimental strategy validated to design cost-effective culture media based on response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Bolaños, J L; Téllez-Martínez, M G; Miranda-López, R; Jiménez-Islas, H

    2017-07-03

    For any fermentation process, the production cost depends on several factors, such as the genetics of the microorganism, the process condition, and the culture medium composition. In this work, a guideline for the design of cost-efficient culture media using a sequential approach based on response surface methodology is described. The procedure was applied to analyze and optimize a culture medium of registered trademark and a base culture medium obtained as a result of the screening analysis from different culture media used to grow the same strain according to the literature. During the experiments, the procedure quantitatively identified an appropriate array of micronutrients to obtain a significant yield and find a minimum number of culture medium ingredients without limiting the process efficiency. The resultant culture medium showed an efficiency that compares favorably with the registered trademark medium at a 95% lower cost as well as reduced the number of ingredients in the base culture medium by 60% without limiting the process efficiency. These results demonstrated that, aside from satisfying the qualitative requirements, an optimum quantity of each constituent is needed to obtain a cost-effective culture medium. Study process variables for optimized culture medium and scaling-up production for the optimal values are desirable.

  17. The relationship among mathematics anxiety, beliefs about mathematics, mathematics self-efficacy, and mathematics performance in associate degree nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kathleen A

    2008-01-01

    This research explored nursing students' mathematics anxiety, beliefs about mathematics, and mathematics self-efficacy in relation to performance on a medication mathematics test. Results revealed that the participants experienced some mathematics anxiety and had positive beliefs about mathematics and mathematics self-efficacy. Qualitative responses indicated that participants worried about the consequences of failing the medication mathematics test and that practice helped reduce this anxiety. In addition, participants acknowledged the importance of correct dosage calculations for nursing practice. Implications for nursing education are discussed.

  18. Collateral Learning in Science: Students' Responses to a Cross-Cultural Unit of Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of students' responses to a cross-cultural science unit entitled "Maintaining health." The unit was designed to help students to build bridges between their traditional practices and beliefs and western science concepts. This paper reports students' responses to a pre-test and…

  19. The Culture of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the Academic Framework: Some Literary Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya Rao

    2011-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is swiftly emerging as an integral part of corporate culture and discourse. Associated with notions of responsibility, accountability and community involvement, it remains privileged with concerns that increasingly define the new millennium. Less developed, however, is the relevance of CSR ideas to academic…

  20. The Impact of Learning Culture on Worker Response to New Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to provide a framework to measure the response of blue-collar workers to new technology in manufacturing and to establish the relationship between learning culture and that response. Design/methodology/approach: The data were collected with a survey questionnaire from 12 manufacturing sites that were implementing…

  1. Effects of cell type and culture media on Interleukin-6 secretion in response to environmental particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veranth, J.M.; Cutler, N.S.; Kaser, E.G.; Reilly, C.A.; Yost, G.S. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Cultured lung cells provide an alternative to animal exposures for comparing the effects of different types of air pollution particles. Studies of particulate matter in vitro have reported proinflammatory cytokine signaling in response to many types of environmental particles, but there have been few studies comparing identical treatments in multiple cell types or identical cells with alternative cell culture protocols. We compared soil-derived, diesel, coal fly ash, titanium dioxide, and kaolin particles along with soluble vanadium and lipopolysaccharide, applied to airway-derived cells grown in submerged culture. Cell types included A549, BEAS-2B, RAW 264.7, and primary macrophages. The cell culture models (specific combinations of cell types and culture conditions) were reproducibly different in the cytokine signaling responses to the suite of treatments. Further, Interleukin-6 (IL-6) response to the treatments changed when the same cells, BEAS-2B, were grown in KGM versus LHC-9 media or in media containing bovine serum. The effect of changing media composition was reversible over multiple changes of media type. Other variables tested included culture well size and degree of confluence. The observation that sensitivity of a cell type to environmental agonists can be manipulated by modifying culture conditions suggests a novel approach for studying biochemical mechanisms of particle toxicity.

  2. A mathematical model for LH release in response to continuous and pulsatile exposure of gonadotrophs to GnRH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Michael C

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a previous study, a model was developed to investigate the release of luteinizing hormone (LH from pituitary cells in response to a short pulse of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH. The model included: binding of GnRH to its receptor (R, dimerization and internalization of the hormone receptor complex, interaction with a G protein, production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3, release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, entrance of calcium into the cytosol via voltage gated membrane channels, pumping of calcium out of the cytosol via membrane and ER pumps, and release of LH. The extended model, presented in this paper, also includes the following physiologically important phenomena: desensitization of calcium channels; internalization of the dimerized receptors and recycling of some of the internalized receptors; an increase in Gq concentration near the plasma membrane in response to receptor dimerization; and basal rates of synthesis and degradation of the receptors. With suitable choices of the parameters, good agreement with a variety of experimental data of the LH release pattern in response to pulses of various durations, repetition rates, and concentrations of GnRH were obtained. The mathematical model allows us to assess the effects of internalization and desensitization on the shapes and time courses of LH response curves.

  3. Violence Against Women in Cambodia: Towards a Culturally Responsive Theory of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbruch, Maurice

    2018-01-17

    Almost one in four women in Cambodia is a victim of physical, emotional or sexual violence. This article brings together two seldom connected fields: Theory of Change (ToC) and cultural responsiveness in international development. It applies these approaches to a priority in global health, which is to prevent violence against women (VAW) and, drawing on my research on the epigenesis of VAW in Cambodia, develops an argument on the need for interventions to work with tradition and culture rather than only highlight it in problematic terms. The research draws on an ethnographic study carried out in Cambodia with 102 perpetrators and survivors of emotional, physical and sexual VAW and 228 key informants from the Buddhist and healing sectors. The eight 'cultural attractors' identified in the author's prior research highlight the cultural barriers to acceptance of the current Theory of Change. ToC for VAW prevention in Cambodia seems to assume that local culture promotes VAW and that men and women must be educated to eradicate the traditional gender norms. There is a need for interventions to work with tradition and culture rather than only highlight it in problematic terms. The cultural epigenesis of VAW in Cambodia is an insight which can be used to build culturally responsive interventions and strengthen the primary prevention of VAW.

  4. Consumers’ responses to CSR in a cross-cultural setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Karaosman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to clarify the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR and consumer behaviour in an international setting. Consumers’ responses to CSR activities and the impact on the purchase decision are limited discourses. CSR-based studies in the fashion and apparel industry are also scarce. Therefore, this study attempts to enlighten the subject of how consumers from different countries respond to CSR adopted in the fashion and apparel industry. This study is based on an exploratory qualitative research for which focus group interviews, including six group discussions with Spanish and Turkish consumers, have been used. The fundamental dimension for sampling was consumers’ interest and knowledge of CSR-related issues. The data were examined by constant comparison analysis. The paper provides empirical insights that suggest that these consumers, regardless of their country of origin, perceive CSR actions as part of companies’ marketing strategies, while overall consumer awareness to CSR is low. Moreover, the criteria, which determine the purchase decision is to be governed by self-interest. A difference between participants from both countries has been found with regard to their demand for more regulation towards CSR. An identified research need in international marketing discipline, is fulfilled in this study.

  5. Ethical control and cultural change (in cultural dreams begin organizational responsibilities)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Magala (Slawomir)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractEthical control is based on transparent access to the accounts of responsible behaviour on the part of individual and organizational actors. It is usually linked to the idea of a checkpoint: where celibate rules, no sexual interaction can be allowed. However, organizing and managing

  6. A Call for Mathematics Education Colleagues and Stakeholders to Collaboratively Engage with NCTM: In Response to Martin's Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briars, Diane J.; Larson, Matt; Strutchens, Marilyn E.; Barnes, David

    2015-01-01

    In his commentary "The Collective Black and 'Principles to Actions,'" Martin (2015) offers a thought-provoking critique of "Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All" (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics [NCTM], 2014). Martin (2015) states that the mathematics education community, in general, and the…

  7. The effects of corporate social responsibility on employees' affective commitment: a cross-cultural investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Hattrup, Kate; Spiess, Sven-Oliver; Lin-Hi, Nick

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the moderating effects of several Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) cultural value dimensions on the relationship between employees' perceptions of their organization's social responsibility and their affective organizational commitment. Based on data from a sample of 1,084 employees from 17 countries, results showed that perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) was positively related to employees' affective commitment (AC), after controlling for individual job satisfaction and gender as well as for nation-level differences in unemployment rates. In addition, several GLOBE value dimensions moderated the effects of CSR on AC. In particular, perceptions of CSR were more positively related to AC in cultures higher in humane orientation, institutional collectivism, ingroup collectivism, and future orientation and in cultures lower in power distance. Implications for future CSR research and cross-cultural human resources management are discussed. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Mathematical modeling of interleukin-27 induction of anti-tumor T cells response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Ling Liao

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which promotes Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities, such as Interferon-[Formula: see text] secretion. For this reason Interleukin-12 could be a powerful therapeutic agent for cancer treatment. However, Interleukin-12 is also excessively toxic. Interleukin-27 is an immunoregulatory cytokine from the Interleukin-12 family, but it is not as toxic as Interleukin-12. In recent years, Interleukin-27 has been considered as a potential anti-tumor agent. Recent experiments in vitro and in vivo have shown that cancer cells transfected with IL-27 activate CD8+ T cells to promote the secretion of anti-tumor cytokines Interleukin-10, although, at the same time, IL-27 inhibits the secretion of Interferon-[Formula: see text] by CD8+ T cells. In the present paper we develop a mathematical model based on these experimental results. The model involves a dynamic network which includes tumor cells, CD8+ T cells and cytokines Interleukin-27, Interleukin-10 and Interferon-[Formula: see text]. Simulations of the model show how Interleukin-27 promotes CD8+ T cells to secrete Interleukin-10 to inhibit tumor growth. On the other hand Interleukin-27 inhibits the secretion of Interferon-[Formula: see text] by CD8+ T cells which somewhat diminishes the inhibition of tumor growth. Our numerical results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. We use the model to design protocols of IL-27 injections for the treatment of cancer and find that, for some special types of cancer, with a fixed total amount of drug, within a certain range, continuous injection has better efficacy than intermittent injections in reducing the tumor load while the treatment is ongoing, although the decrease in tumor load is only temporary.

  9. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pil Soo Sung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130–170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  10. Children’s altruistic behavior in context: The role of emotional responsiveness and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajhans, Purva; Altvater-Mackensen, Nicole; Vaish, Amrisha; Grossmann, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Altruistic behavior in humans is thought to have deep biological roots. Nonetheless, there is also evidence for considerable variation in altruistic behaviors among individuals and across cultures. Variability in altruistic behavior in adults has recently been related to individual differences in emotional responsiveness to fear in others. The current study examined the relation between emotional responsiveness (using eye-tracking) and altruistic behavior (using the Dictator Game) in 4 to 5-year-old children (N = 96) across cultures (India and Germany). The results revealed that increased altruistic behavior was associated with a greater responsiveness to fear faces (faster fixation), but not happy faces, in both cultures. This suggests that altruistic behavior is linked to our responsiveness to others in distress across cultures. Additionally, only among Indian children greater altruistic behavior was associated with greater sensitivity to context when responding to fearful faces. These findings further our understanding of the origins of altruism in humans by highlighting the importance of emotional processes and cultural context in the development of altruism. PMID:27137754

  11. Children's altruistic behavior in context: The role of emotional responsiveness and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajhans, Purva; Altvater-Mackensen, Nicole; Vaish, Amrisha; Grossmann, Tobias

    2016-05-03

    Altruistic behavior in humans is thought to have deep biological roots. Nonetheless, there is also evidence for considerable variation in altruistic behaviors among individuals and across cultures. Variability in altruistic behavior in adults has recently been related to individual differences in emotional responsiveness to fear in others. The current study examined the relation between emotional responsiveness (using eye-tracking) and altruistic behavior (using the Dictator Game) in 4 to 5-year-old children (N = 96) across cultures (India and Germany). The results revealed that increased altruistic behavior was associated with a greater responsiveness to fear faces (faster fixation), but not happy faces, in both cultures. This suggests that altruistic behavior is linked to our responsiveness to others in distress across cultures. Additionally, only among Indian children greater altruistic behavior was associated with greater sensitivity to context when responding to fearful faces. These findings further our understanding of the origins of altruism in humans by highlighting the importance of emotional processes and cultural context in the development of altruism.

  12. Individual Differences in Mathematical Competence Modulate Brain Responses to Arithmetic Errors: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Daniel; Grabner, Roland H.; Koschutnig, Karl; Reishofer, Gernot; Ebner, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Data from both neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have implicated the left inferior parietal cortex in calculation. Comparatively less attention has been paid to the neural responses associated with the commission of calculation errors and how the processing of arithmetic errors is modulated by individual differences in mathematical…

  13. Use of Native Language and Culture (NLC) in Elementary and Middle School Instruction as a Predictor of Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Vincent, Claudia G.

    2017-01-01

    Because students from American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) backgrounds tend to lag behind their peers in academic achievement, researchers have recommended integrating Native Language and Culture (NLC) into instruction. However, existing evidence from large-scale studies finds a "negative" effect of the use of NLC on achievement,…

  14. Examination of the TIMSS 2011 Fourth Grade Mathematics Test in Terms of Cross-Cultural Measurement Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoc Alatli, Betul; Ayan, Cansu; Polat Demir, Betul; Uzun, Gulcin

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Student achievement is considered an indicator of the quality of education, and achievement tests are applied to assess student achievement. International tests are adapted into different languages and cultures with the aim of assessing student achievement on an international level and comparing the achievements of different…

  15. Materializing Culture - Culturizing Material. On the Status, Responsibilities and Function of Cultural Property Repositories within the Framework of a "Transformative Scholarship"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hilgert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Certain theoretical streams in the cultural and social sciences that are occasionally subsumed under the term “New Materialism” 2 (see Witzgall, as well as recent social, political, cultural and media technology developments require a theoretical and research-political repositioning of academic object repositories. For it is obvious that under the influence of these multi-layered, partly interwoven processes, the status, responsibilities, as well as the function and spheres of activity of these object or cultural property repositories with research commitment (on the term see section 2 below are currently undergoing long-lasting change. For the respective institutions, these changes not only result in complex challenges regarding contents and structure, but also present extraordinary opportunities for the fulfillment of their academic, social and political responsibilities. The appropriate handling of these challenges and opportunities can substantially contribute to the sharpening of the academic and social profile of these institutions and increase their visibility on both a national and international level.

  16. Exploring the influence of cultural familiarity and expertise on neurological responses to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Steven M; Morrison, Steven J

    2003-11-01

    Contemporary music education in many countries has begun to incorporate not only the dominant music of the culture, but also a variety of music from around the world. Although the desirability of such a broadened curriculum is virtually unquestioned, the specific function of these musical encounters and their potential role in children's cognitive development remain unclear. We do not know if studying a variety of world music traditions involves the acquisition of new skills or an extension and refinement of traditional skills long addressed by music teachers. Is a student's familiarity with a variety of musical traditions a manifestation of a single overarching "musicianship" or is knowledge of these various musical styles more similar to a collection of discrete skills much like learning a second language? Research on the comprehension of spoken language has disclosed a neurologically distinct response among subjects listening to their native language rather than an unfamiliar language. In a recent study comparing Western subjects' responses to music of their native culture and music of an unfamiliar culture, we found that subjects' activation did not differ on the basis of the cultural familiarity of the music, but on the basis of musical expertise. We discuss possible interpretations of these findings in relation to the concept of musical universals, cross-cultural stimulus characteristics, cross-cultural judgment tasks, and the influence of musical expertise. We conclude with suggestions for future research.

  17. Mathematics Connection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MATHEMATICS CONNECTION aims at providing a forum topromote the development of Mathematics Education in Ghana. Articles that seekto enhance the teaching and/or learning of mathematics at all levels of theeducational system are welcome.

  18. 3D culture broadly regulates tumor cell hypoxia response and angiogenesis via pro-inflammatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelNero, Peter; Lane, Maureen; Verbridge, Scott S; Kwee, Brian; Kermani, Pouneh; Hempstead, Barbara; Stroock, Abraham; Fischbach, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen status and tissue dimensionality are critical determinants of tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer and an enduring target for therapeutic intervention. However, it is unclear how these microenvironmental conditions interact to promote neovascularization, due in part to a lack of comprehensive, unbiased data sets describing tumor cell gene expression as a function of oxygen levels within three-dimensional (3D) culture. Here, we utilized alginate-based, oxygen-controlled 3D tumor models to study the interdependence of culture context and the hypoxia response. Microarray gene expression analysis of tumor cells cultured in 2D versus 3D under ambient or hypoxic conditions revealed striking interdependence between culture dimensionality and hypoxia response, which was mediated in part by pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. In particular, interleukin-8 (IL-8) emerged as a major player in the microenvironmental regulation of the hypoxia program. Notably, this interaction between dimensionality and oxygen status via IL-8 increased angiogenic sprouting in a 3D endothelial invasion assay. Taken together, our data suggest that pro-inflammatory pathways are critical regulators of tumor hypoxia response within 3D environments that ultimately impact tumor angiogenesis, potentially providing important therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of pathologically relevant tissue culture models to study the complex physical and chemical processes by which the cancer microenvironment mediates new vessel formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxic responses to defined chemical mixtures: mathematical models and experimental designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, J P; Gandolfi, A J; Brendel, K

    1994-01-01

    The problem and relevance of assessing biological responses to chemical mixtures is presented with reference to the literature on this problem and its possible solutions. This review is intended for a general audience as an introduction to, and comment on, assessing the interactions of defined mixtures of xenobiotics. The focus is on experimental toxicology, however, the methods are also applicable to pharmacology. Much of the literature on this topic is quite specialized in statistics, theory, or specific applications. This may deter a significant portion of the growing number of investigators in this field from using this literature, and may partially account for the persistent use of methods which have been shown to permit precarious conclusions. References are given for some of the most comprehensive and recent work and reviews on the subject. The reader is given some familiarity with this topic's basic problems and ideas, and the controversy on terminology. One example is presented of a popular experimental design and data analysis method which while applicable in some situations, has been shown to lead to precarious and even erroneous conclusions. Eight other methods of data analysis are briefly presented and some of their advantages, disadvantages, assumptions, and limitations are discussed. These methods were selected to illustrate similarities and differences in the various approaches taken in addressing this problem. Three basic types of experimental design appropriate to these kinds of studies are outlined. General considerations, suggested guidelines, and possible pitfalls in experimental design, and data analysis of biological responses to chemical mixtures are discussed.

  20. Children’s altruistic behavior in context: The role of emotional responsiveness and culture

    OpenAIRE

    Purva Rajhans; Nicole Altvater-Mackensen; Amrisha Vaish; Tobias Grossmann

    2016-01-01

    Altruistic behavior in humans is thought to have deep biological roots. Nonetheless, there is also evidence for considerable variation in altruistic behaviors among individuals and across cultures. Variability in altruistic behavior in adults has recently been related to individual differences in emotional responsiveness to fear in others. The current study examined the relation between emotional responsiveness (using eye-tracking) and altruistic behavior (using the Dictator Game) in 4 to 5-y...

  1. Cultural and intergenerational narratives: understanding responses to elderly family members in declining health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spira, Marcia; Wall, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Culture exerts powerful influences on each generations' responses to older members in declining health. Narratives, the stories people tell about their lives, depict the different the ways that the elderly and their children experience their world. Their personal narratives chronicle their connections to culture the past. They also illustrate the ways that the cultural values are transformed to accommodate the present and future. The stories are influenced by immigration, assimilation, development, interpersonal relationships, and life events. These differences between the cultural narratives of the elderly and the following generation are particularly apparent during times of chronic stress. One such situation occurs during chronic illness when the younger generation is called upon to provide for the elderly and chronically ill.

  2. Development of Learning Devices through Problem Based Learning Model Based on the Context of Aceh Cultural to Improve Mathematical Communication Skills and Social Skills of SMPN 1 Muara Batu Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufa, Mahrani; Saragih, Sahat; Minarni, Ani

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were:1) Developed problem-based on learning tools in the cultural context of Aceh (PBM-BKBA) who meet the criteria are valid, practical and effective; 2) Described the improvement of communication capabilities mathematics and social skills of students using the PBM-BKBA developed; and 3) Described the process of student…

  3. Phenotypic responses of differentiated asthmatic human airway epithelial cultures to rhinovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jianwu; Smock, Steven L; Jackson, George R; MacIsaac, Kenzie D; Huang, Yongsheng; Mankus, Courtney; Oldach, Jonathan; Roberts, Brian; Ma, Yu-Lu; Klappenbach, Joel A; Crackower, Michael A; Alves, Stephen E; Hayden, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Human airway epithelial cells are the principal target of human rhinovirus (HRV), a common cold pathogen that triggers the majority of asthma exacerbations. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate an in vitro air liquid interface cultured human airway epithelial cell model for HRV infection, and 2) to identify gene expression patterns associated with asthma intrinsically and/or after HRV infection using this model. Air-liquid interface (ALI) human airway epithelial cell cultures were prepared from 6 asthmatic and 6 non-asthmatic donors. The effects of rhinovirus RV-A16 on ALI cultures were compared. Genome-wide gene expression changes in ALI cultures following HRV infection at 24 hours post exposure were further analyzed using RNA-seq technology. Cellular gene expression and cytokine/chemokine secretion were further evaluated by qPCR and a Luminex-based protein assay, respectively. ALI cultures were readily infected by HRV. RNA-seq analysis of HRV infected ALI cultures identified sets of genes associated with asthma specific viral responses. These genes are related to inflammatory pathways, epithelial structure and remodeling and cilium assembly and function, including those described previously (e.g. CCL5, CXCL10 and CX3CL1, MUC5AC, CDHR3), and novel ones that were identified for the first time in this study (e.g. CCRL1). ALI-cultured human airway epithelial cells challenged with HRV are a useful translational model for the study of HRV-induced responses in airway epithelial cells, given that gene expression profile using this model largely recapitulates some important patterns of gene responses in patients during clinical HRV infection. Furthermore, our data emphasize that both abnormal airway epithelial structure and inflammatory signaling are two important asthma signatures, which can be further exacerbated by HRV infection.

  4. Phenotypic responses of differentiated asthmatic human airway epithelial cultures to rhinovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwu Bai

    Full Text Available Human airway epithelial cells are the principal target of human rhinovirus (HRV, a common cold pathogen that triggers the majority of asthma exacerbations. The objectives of this study were 1 to evaluate an in vitro air liquid interface cultured human airway epithelial cell model for HRV infection, and 2 to identify gene expression patterns associated with asthma intrinsically and/or after HRV infection using this model.Air-liquid interface (ALI human airway epithelial cell cultures were prepared from 6 asthmatic and 6 non-asthmatic donors. The effects of rhinovirus RV-A16 on ALI cultures were compared. Genome-wide gene expression changes in ALI cultures following HRV infection at 24 hours post exposure were further analyzed using RNA-seq technology. Cellular gene expression and cytokine/chemokine secretion were further evaluated by qPCR and a Luminex-based protein assay, respectively.ALI cultures were readily infected by HRV. RNA-seq analysis of HRV infected ALI cultures identified sets of genes associated with asthma specific viral responses. These genes are related to inflammatory pathways, epithelial structure and remodeling and cilium assembly and function, including those described previously (e.g. CCL5, CXCL10 and CX3CL1, MUC5AC, CDHR3, and novel ones that were identified for the first time in this study (e.g. CCRL1.ALI-cultured human airway epithelial cells challenged with HRV are a useful translational model for the study of HRV-induced responses in airway epithelial cells, given that gene expression profile using this model largely recapitulates some important patterns of gene responses in patients during clinical HRV infection. Furthermore, our data emphasize that both abnormal airway epithelial structure and inflammatory signaling are two important asthma signatures, which can be further exacerbated by HRV infection.

  5. The Influence Of Implementation Brain-Friendly Learning Through The Whole Brain Teaching To Students’ Response and Creative Character In Learning Mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Winarso, Widodo; Karimah, Siti Asri

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether the application of brain-friendly learning through whole brain teaching gives a positive effect on the creative character of students, to know the response of the students against the application of brain-friendly learning through whole brain teaching, and to find out if the student response against the application of brain-friendly learning through whole brain teaching correlates positively with the creative character of students in learning mathematics. ...

  6. Teaching Third Grade African American Children in Culturally Responsive Ways: Is Anybody Listening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Annetra Patrece

    2016-01-01

    African American and other students of color have continued to score lower than White students in many classrooms and on achievement tests in every subject, especially in reading. The purpose of this study was to explore if there is a relationship between a teacher's cultural responsiveness and their third grade African American students'…

  7. Using Learning Labs for Culturally Responsive Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Aydin; Schrader, Elizabeth M.; Afacan, Kemal; Mawene, Dian

    2016-01-01

    Culturally responsive positive behavioral interventions and supports (CRPBIS) is a statewide research project designed to renovate behavioral support systems to become more inclusive, adaptive, and supportive for all. The CRPBIS methodology, called "learning lab," provides a research-based process to bring together local stakeholders and…

  8. Culturally Responsive Education: Developing Lesson Plans for Vietnamese Students in the American Diaspora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the application of the philosophical principles of John Dewey and Culturally Responsive Education in the creation of lesson plans for Vietnamese students in the American Diaspora. Through a Fulbright-Hayes Program a group of teachers from the New York City Public School System and Long Island spent six weeks in Vietnam…

  9. A Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices of Adult ESOL and EAP Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how frequently adult education English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers in Florida used specific culturally responsive teaching practices and how important they believed those practices were to their teaching. Using Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's…

  10. A Cross-Cultural Examination of Preschool Teacher Cognitions and Responses to Child Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochtar, Randi; Del Vecchio, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The associations among preschool teachers' attributions about child responsibility, intentionality, knowledge, and the seriousness of hypothetical displays of children's aggressive behavior are examined in United States ("N"?=?82) and Vietnamese ("N"?=?91) preschool teachers. The results suggest cross-cultural differences as…

  11. Culturally Responsive Instructional Leadership: A Conceptual Exploration with Principals of Three New Zealand Mainstream Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisha, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Principals of many New Zealand (NZ) mainstream schools navigate a complex intercultural educational policy environment to address the academic challenges of Maori and Pasifika students. This inquiry sought to explore the concept of "culturally responsive instructional leadership" by studying the knowledge, actions, motives, perceptions,…

  12. Making String Education Culturally Responsive: The Musical Lives of African American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Ebru Tuncer

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the violin experiences of African American students at an Elementary School in northern Florida to consider the potential for culturally-responsive string education. The hermeneutical approach was used to answer the research questions: (1) What are the personal musical worlds of these African American…

  13. Writing the Male Abuser in Cultural Responses to Domestic Violence in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsland, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    The article analyzes the portrayal of the male perpetrator of heterosexual domestic violence in a selection of contemporary Spanish texts (novel, drama, and autobiography) that form part of a clearly discernible cultural response to the issue of intimate partner violence in Spain today. It reads the figure of the abuser in conjunction with a range…

  14. Using Parental Input from Black Families to Increase Cultural Responsiveness for Teaching SWPBS Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourea, Lefki; Lo, Ya-yu; Owens, Tosha L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the positive effects of school-wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) on school discipline, the overrepresentation of Black students in discipline data in SWPBS schools has alerted researchers and educators to initiate discussion about the need to blend culturally responsive pedagogy and the SWPBS approach. This qualitative research study…

  15. Teaching about Refugees: Developing Culturally Responsive Educators in Contexts of Politicised Transnationalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, Antoinette; Schmidt, Clea; Markus, Paula

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses issues of teaching about refugees in initial teacher education and professional development for practicing teachers. We respond to the who, what, where, when, why and how of teaching about refugees and developing culturally responsive pedagogy in contexts of politicised transnationalism, where the wider politics around…

  16. Immigrant Children Promoting Environmental Care: Enhancing Learning, Agency and Integration through Culturally-Responsive Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet-Cohen, Natasha; Reilly, Rosemary C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the potential of culturally-responsive environmental education to engage immigrant early adolescents. Our study suggests that environmental involvement can become a means and an end for children to bridge their school and home in agential ways. Drawing from a multi-phase study involving focus groups with children, parents, and…

  17. Synthesizing Middle Grades Research on Cultural Responsiveness: The Importance of a Shared Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Brianna L.; Brinegar, Kathleen; Hurd, Ellis; Harrison, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    In conducting a literature review of 133 articles on cultural responsiveness in middle level education, we identified a lack of shared definitions, theoretical frameworks, methodological approaches, and foci, which made it difficult to synthesize across articles. Using a conceptual framework that required: a) clear definitions of terms; b) a…

  18. Non-native english speaking elementary ell teachers’ culturally responsive leadership profile in an ESL context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Ekiaka Nzai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Culturally responsive instruction has been suggested as quality education (Edwards, 2003 for minority students in subtractive and additivebilingualism settings. However, analytical curriculum development of several official English programs revealed that the gender-centric (malecentricand Ethno-centric (Euro/Western-centric approaches were deeply embedded in most English textbooks of curriculum development.The intent of partial mixed methods paper consisted of exploring some non-native English speaking teachers English teachers’ culturallyresponsive leadership profile in order to further the discussion on not only how to promote English curriculum transformation in English assecond language (ESL and English as foreign language (EFL settings, but also to effectively train culturally responsive non-native Englishspeaking (NNES English pre-service teachers. Comparative data analysis suggested that there were no causal relationship between NNESEnglish teachers’ culturally responsive leadership styles and their abilities to perform multicultural transformation of English curriculums. To behighly effective in transforming English curriculum, NNES English teachers needed to be systematically trained on how to do so. Implicationsfor NNES English pre-service teacher education are framed from the culturally responsive and anti-oppressive education approaches.

  19. Embryotoxicant-specific transcriptomic responses in rat postimplantation whole-embryo culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, J.F.; van Beelen, V.A.; Verhoef, A.; Renkens, M.F.J.; Luijten, M.; van Herwijnen, M.; Westerman, A.; Pennings, J.L.; Piersma, A.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071276947

    2010-01-01

    Rat postimplantation whole-embryo culture (WEC) is a promising alternative test for the assessment of developmental toxicity. Toxicogenomic-based approaches may improve the predictive ability of the WEC model by providing a means to identify compound-specific mechanistic responses associated with

  20. Culturally Responsive Pyramid Model Practices: Program-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rosemarie; Steed, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual article reviews current research on racial disparities in disciplinary practices in early childhood education and work to address these issues within a positive behavior support (PBS) framework. Building largely on the Pyramid Model, recommendations and a culturally responsive approach are suggested for use within a program-wide…

  1. The Intersectionality of Culturally Responsive Teaching and Performance Poetry: Validating Secondary Latino Youth and Their Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors draw from culturally responsive teaching and multicultural education to describe performance poetry as an effective strategy for validating secondary aged Latino youths' lived experiences. Supported by teacher modeling and the incorporation of community poets, students created and shared their own powerful poems that…

  2. Wheat ( Triticum aestivum L) response to manganese in a sand culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L) response to manganese in a sand culture. JS Tenywa, DJ Eckert. Abstract. No Abstract Available E. Afr. Agric. For. J Vol.68(2) 2002: 51-58. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eaafj.v68i2.1776.

  3. Reconsidering Critical Response: Student Judgments of Purpose, Interpretation, and Relationships in Visual Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kerry; Wood, John

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on ways in which a group of high school students responded to fine art and other forms of visual culture, such as advertising images, cartoons, and propaganda posters. Discusses three emergent themes in student responses: (1) purposes of imagery; (2) interpretation of images; and (3) relationships among images. (DSK)

  4. Long-term fertilizer field trials: comparison of three mathematical response models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.T. BÄCKMAN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Accession to the European Union caused a drop of nearly 60 per cent from 1994 to 1995 in prices of wheat, barley and oats in Finland. The economic use of fertilizer therefore decreased accordingly. To calculate the effect of the price changes on the economic optima, the physical production function must be known. Three physical production functions, the quadratic, the linear response and plateau (LRP and the exponential function were estimated for this purpose. The models differed little in respect of the R 2 adj value (0.82-0.90 but the calculated optimum varied, depending on the production function. Data on a long-term field trial (21 years were analysed. The field trial was established in 1973 to demonstrate the effect of mineral fertilizer in crop production. The crops grown in the trial were barley, wheat and oats. Different varieties were included in the models.

  5. Using critical race theory to analyze science teachers culturally responsive practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tamara; Brand, Brenda R.

    2012-06-01

    Culturally responsive science teaching is using knowledge about the culture and life experiences of students to structure learning that is conducive to their needs. Understanding what teachers need to prepare them to be culturally responsive is a matter of continuous debate. As the focus of multicultural education ventures farther away from its roots, advocating the civil rights of historically oppressed groups, concerns about the gravity of racial inequity on schooling continues. How will this shift in focus influence teachers' capacity to accommodate students' needs resulting from racial inequities in this society, particularly African American students? What knowledge is essential to their effectiveness? This qualitative study examined the instructional practices of two effective middle school science teachers deemed culturally responsive by their administrator on the basis of classroom observations, students' responses and standardized assessment results. Both teachers' classrooms consisted primarily of African American students. Grounded theory was used to analyze the teachers' beliefs and practices in order to identify existing commonalties. Critical race theory was used to identify whether there was any influence of the students' racial identities on the teachers' beliefs and practices. The analysis reveals that the teachers' beliefs and practices were informed by their critical awareness of social constraints imposed upon their African American students' identities. These findings communicate the significance of sociocultural awareness to informing the teachers' instruction, as well as their strategies for managing the varying dynamics occurring in their classrooms. It can be deduced from the findings that an understanding of racial inequities is crucial to the development of sociocultural awareness, and is the foundation for the culturally responsive dispositions and practices of these middle school science teachers.

  6. Culturally responsive middle school science: A case study of needs, demands, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Kelli Ellen

    2007-12-01

    Culturally responsive programming has been proposed as a remedy for the well-documented disconnect between schools and the ethnically and culturally diverse students who attend them. These programs often focus on creating instructional materials and pedagogical practices that are aligned with the knowledges, perspectives and practices of these students. This study builds on that literature and examines the needs, demands, and challenges of developing a culturally responsive health science program for ethnically and culturally diverse urban middle school students. I approached this problem through a content analysis of the intended curriculum and a microethnography of the enacted curriculum. In my analysis of the intended curriculum, I adapted a science textbook analysis instrument created by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to include criteria related to identified features of culturally responsive education. Using these modified analytic criteria, I found that the pilot drafts of the curricular materials excelled in the areas of engaging students in relevant phenomenon but lacked many of these specifically culturally responsive elements. Recommendations were made to redress these deficiencies. In my analysis of the enacted curriculum, I observed in five eighth grade classrooms where the program was being implemented. I used participant observation, audio and video tape recordings, artifacts, and interviews over a six-month period to investigate teacher/student interactions, the social organization of the classrooms, and students' culturally distinctive knowledge resources---or what is sometimes referred to as their "funds of knowledge." I found that the affective interactions between teachers and students were precursors to any reform, and that students and teachers similarly defined these interactions as "teacher care." In addition, I found that the social organization of the classroom often privileged official content and ways of

  7. Equity within Mathematics Education Research as a Political Act: Moving from Choice to Intentional Collective Professional Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia; Herbel-Eisenmann, Beth; Celedón-Pattichis, Sylvia; Civil, Marta; Wilkerson, Trena; Stephan, Michelle; Pape, Stephen; Clements, Douglas H.

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, the authors explore how mathematics education research and the decisions mathematics education researchers (MERs) make to include (or not) an equity lens are not just choices; rather, they are political acts. MERs must take a hard look at themselves as human beings shaped by the political landscape of their different histories…

  8. The Use of Item Response Theory (IRT) to Investigate the Hierarchical Nature of a College Mathematics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shermis, Mark D.; Chang, Shu-Hui

    1997-01-01

    The degree to which an undergraduate mathematics curriculum matched the item difficulty levels of representative mathematics problems based on that sequence was studied with 62 items and 423 undergraduates and 937 high school seniors. Results suggest congruence between curriculum sequence and item difficulty levels. (SLD)

  9. Mathematical Footprints Discovering Mathematics Everywhere

    CERN Document Server

    Pappas, Theoni

    1999-01-01

    MATHEMATICAL FOOTPRINTS takes a creative look at the role mathematics has played since prehistoric times, and will play in the future, and uncovers mathematics where you least expect to find it from its many uses in medicine, the sciences, and its appearance in art to its patterns in nature and its central role in the development of computers. Pappas presents mathematical ideas in a readable non-threatening manner. MATHEMATICAL FOOTPRINTS is another gem by the creator of THE MATHEMATICS CALENDAR and author of THE JOY OF MATHEMATICS. "Pappas's books have been gold mines of mathematical ent

  10. Ren and Yuan: a cultural interpretation of Chinese women's responses to battering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A; Wong, M; Ip, H

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine women's responses to battering within the context of Chinese culture. The stories of 11 Chinese women living in Hong Kong formed the basis of the inquiry. Analysis of the women's accounts revealed Chinese values in their responses to battering: they adopted ren, or endurance, as a coping mechanism and used Yuan, or predestination, as an explanation for their failed relationship. The resilience and resourcefulness of the women are clearly demonstrated in the strategies they employed to cope with the abuse. Their responses to battering were purposeful and varied according to the status of their relationship.

  11. Theoretical Considerations and a Mathematical Model for the Analysis of the Biomechanical Response of Human Keratinized Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Tsaira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Removable complete and partial dentures are supported by the residual alveolar ridges consisting of mucosa, submucosa, periosteum and bone. An understanding of the biomechanical behavior of the oral mucosa is essential in order to improve the denture-bearing foundations for complete and partially edentulous patients. The purpose of this paper was to examine the biomechanical behavior of the soft tissues supporting a removable denture and develop a model for that reason. Keratinized oral mucosa blocks with their underlying bone were harvested from the maxillary palatal area adjacent to the edentulous ridges of a cadaver. The compressive response of the oral mucosa was tested by using atomic force microscopy. The specimens were first scanned in order their topography to be obtained. The mechanical properties of the specimens were tested using a single crystal silicon pyramidal tip, which traversed towards the keratinized oral mucosa specimens. Loading-unloading cycles were registered and four mathematical models were tested using MATLAB to note which one approximates the force-displacement curve as close as possible: a. spherical, b. conical, c. third order polynomial, d. Murphy (fourth order polynomial, non-linear Hertzian based. The third order polynomial model showed the best accuracy in representing the force-displacement data of the tested specimens. A model was developed in order to analyze the biomechanical behavior of the human oral keratinized mucosa and obtain information about its mechanical properties.

  12. Creating Spaces for Urban Youth: The Emergence of Culturally Responsive (Hip-Hop) School Leadership and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Ladson-Billings, Gay and among others have demonstrated the strong need for educational curriculum and practice to respond to the specific academic, cultural, and social needs of culturally unique, minoritized students. This article focuses on culturally responsive leadership practices for students with Hip-Hop identity performatives. This…

  13. Children's Everyday Learning by Assuming Responsibility for Others: Indigenous Practices as a Cultural Heritage Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, David Lorente

    2015-01-01

    This chapter uses a comparative approach to examine the maintenance of Indigenous practices related with Learning by Observing and Pitching In in two generations--parent generation and current child generation--in a Central Mexican Nahua community. In spite of cultural changes and the increase of Western schooling experience, these practices persist, to different degrees, as a Nahua cultural heritage with close historical relations to the key value of cuidado (stewardship). The chapter explores how children learn the value of cuidado in a variety of everyday activities, which include assuming responsibility in many social situations, primarily in cultivating corn, raising and protecting domestic animals, health practices, and participating in family ceremonial life. The chapter focuses on three main points: (1) Cuidado (assuming responsibility for), in the Nahua socio-cultural context, refers to the concepts of protection and "raising" as well as fostering other beings, whether humans, plants, or animals, to reach their potential and fulfill their development. (2) Children learn cuidado by contributing to family endeavors: They develop attention and self-motivation; they are capable of responsible actions; and they are able to transform participation to achieve the status of a competent member of local society. (3) This collaborative participation allows children to continue the cultural tradition and to preserve a Nahua heritage at a deeper level in a community in which Nahuatl language and dress have disappeared, and people do not identify themselves as Indigenous. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Generic and specific transcriptional responses to different weak organic acids in anaerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, D.A.; Knijnenburg, T.A.; De Poorter, L.M.; Reinders, M.J.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional responses to four weak organic acids (benzoate, sorbate, acetate and propionate) were investigated in anaerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To enable quantitative comparison of the responses to the acids, their concentrations were chosen such that

  15. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Timothy B.; Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele...

  16. QMRA for Drinking Water: 1. Revisiting the Mathematical Structure of Single-Hit Dose-Response Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Vegard; Wyller, John

    2016-01-01

    Dose-response models are essential to quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA), providing a link between levels of human exposure to pathogens and the probability of negative health outcomes. In drinking water studies, the class of semi-mechanistic models known as single-hit models, such as the exponential and the exact beta-Poisson, has seen widespread use. In this work, an attempt is made to carefully develop the general mathematical single-hit framework while explicitly accounting for variation in (1) host susceptibility and (2) pathogen infectivity. This allows a precise interpretation of the so-called single-hit probability and precise identification of a set of statistical independence assumptions that are sufficient to arrive at single-hit models. Further analysis of the model framework is facilitated by formulating the single-hit models compactly using probability generating and moment generating functions. Among the more practically relevant conclusions drawn are: (1) for any dose distribution, variation in host susceptibility always reduces the single-hit risk compared to a constant host susceptibility (assuming equal mean susceptibilities), (2) the model-consistent representation of complete host immunity is formally demonstrated to be a simple scaling of the response, (3) the model-consistent expression for the total risk from repeated exposures deviates (gives lower risk) from the conventional expression used in applications, and (4) a model-consistent expression for the mean per-exposure dose that produces the correct total risk from repeated exposures is developed. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. Rethinking the mathematics curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyles, Celia; Woodhouse, Geoffrey

    1998-01-01

    At a time when political interest in mathematics education is at its highest, this book demonstrates that the issues are far from straightforward. A wide range of international contributors address such questions as: What is mathematics, and what is it for? What skills does mathematics education need to provide as technology advances? What are the implications for teacher education? What can we learn from past attempts to change the mathematics curriculum? Rethinking the Mathematics Curriculum offers stimulating discussions, showing much is to be learnt from the differences in culture, national expectations, and political restraints revealed in the book. This accessible book will be of particular interest to policy makers, curriculum developers, educators, researchers and employers as well as the general reader.

  18. New Teachers of Color and Culturally Responsive Teaching in an Era of Educational Accountability: Caught in a Double Bind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achinstein, Betty; Ogawa, Rodney T.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine how and to what extent schools' responses to accountability policies in the United States influence the ability of new teachers of color to draw on their own and their students' cultural resources to engage in culturally responsive teaching. A 5-year study of 17 new teachers of color reveals that these…

  19. Converging Recommendations for Culturally Responsive Literacy Practices: Students with Learning Disabilities, English Language Learners, and Socioculturally Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Susan V.; Rao, Shaila; Protacio, Maria Selena

    2015-01-01

    This study examines culturally responsive pedagogy across the fields of special education, multicultural literacy education, and teaching English language learners. A systematic review of recommendations identified culturally responsive practices in five key areas: dialogue, collaboration, visual representation, explicit instruction, and inquiry.…

  20. Participation of rural Zimbabwean female students in mathematics: The influence of perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gudyanga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was premised on the influence of perceptions on the participation of Ordinary Level rural African Zimbabwean female students in mathematics. Qualitative research design grounded in the interpretive paradigm was employed. Eighteen Ordinary Level female students and six teachers purposively selected from three rural co-educational secondary schools participated in the study. Data were generated through lesson observations and semi-structured question type interview guide. Findings revealed that rural female students perceived mathematics as a difficult subject, masculine and irrelevant to their future aspirations. Participants outlined that their perceptions were rooted in the prevailing cultural belief that mathematics is a masculine subject and negative stereotypes about girls’ maths abilities. Further findings indicate that female students’ participation in mathematics was highly influenced by their perception towards the subject. These perceptions result in the development of a general negative attitude to the subject that caused fewer female students to participate in mathematics in large numbers. We recommended parents and teachers to work hard to eliminate the negative gender and cultural stereotypes in order to enhance female students’ confidence in mathematics abilities. Schools should employ female mathematics teachers and expose female students to female role models who have succeeded in life in order to encourage more participation of female students in mathematics. Schools are made responsible for smoothing out difficulties generated by the prevailing culture. There is a gap in knowledge base pertaining to the Zimbabwean rural girls’ participation in Mathematics.

  1. The response of mineralizing culture systems to microtextured and polished titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacking, S Adam; Harvey, Edward; Roughley, Peter; Tanzer, Michael; Bobyn, John

    2008-10-01

    The surface texture of titanium has a predictable effect on peri-implant tissue formation in vivo. When implanted in an osseous environment, smooth surfaces (R(a) 1.0 mm) are generally apposed by osseous tissue. Thus in vitro study assessed the mineralization and proliferation response of TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal cells and canine stromal cells to tissue culture plastic (R(a) = 0.001 mm), polished (R(a) = 0.01 mm) and irregularly textured (R(a) = 3.26 mm) titanium surfaces. Amongst all culture systems, proliferation was significantly decreased on textured vs. smooth surfaces. Midway through the culture of the canine marrow cells, the cell layer detached from the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces. The TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal cell systems formed a mineralized matrix on the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces which was not observed with the canine stromal cell system. Compared to the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces, matrix mineralization was significantly reduced on the textured titanium surfaces for the TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal systems, a result which was differed significantly in comparison to the canine stromal system. These results were surprising given the large number of reports concerning the in vivo response to titanium in clinical and pre-clinical studies. Further work is required to determine if the TF274, MC3T3-E1 and murine femoral stromal systems are suitable for the in vitro investigation of the effects of titanium surface texture on osteoblast activity. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  2. Plant response to heavy metals and organic pollutants in cell culture and at whole plant level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan-Goldhirsh, A.; Barazani, O. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of The Negev, The Jacob Blaustein Inst. for Desert Research, Albert Katz Dept. of Dryland Biotechnologies, Desert Plant Biotechnology Lab., Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Nepovim, A.; Soudek, P.; Vanek, T. [Inst. of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (Czech Republic); Smrcek, S.; Dufkova, L.; Krenkova, S. [Faculty of Natural Sciences, Charles Univ. (Czech Republic); Yrjala, K. [Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Biosciences, Div. of General Microbiology, Helsinki (Finland); Schroeder, P. [Inst. for Soil Ecology, GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Background. Increasing awareness in the last decade concerning environmental quality had prompted research into 'green solutions' for soil and water remediation, progressing from laboratory in vitro experiments to pot and field trials. In vitro cell culture experiments provide a convenient system to study basic biological processes, by which biochemical pathways, enzymatic activity and metabolites can be specifically studied. However, it is difficult to relate cell cultures, calli or even hydroponic experiments to the whole plant response to pollutant stress. In the field, plants are exposed to additional a-biotic and biotic factors, which complicate further plant response. Hence, we often see that in vitro selected species perform poorly under soil and field conditions. Soil physical and chemical properties, plant-mycorrhizal association and soil-microbial activity affect the process of contaminant degradation by plants and/or microorganisms, pointing to the importance of pot and field experiments. Objective. This paper is a joint effort of a group of scientists in COST action 837. It represents experimental work and an overview on plant response to environmental stress from in vitro tissue culture to whole plant experiments in soil. Results. Results obtained from in vitro plant tissue cultures and whole plant hydroponic experiments indicate the phytoremediation potential of different plant species and the biochemical mechanisms involved in plant tolerance. In pot experiments, several selected desert plant species, which accumulated heavy metal in hydroponic systems, succeeded in accumulating the heavy metal in soil conditions as well. Conclusions and recommendations. In vitro plant tissue cultures provide a useful experimental system for the study of the mechanisms involved in the detoxification of organic and heavy metal pollutants. However, whole plant experimental systems, as well as hydroponics followed by pot and field trials, are essential when

  3. Drinking pattern and socio-cultural aspects on immune response: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Javier; Wärnberg, Julia; Marcos, Ascensión

    2010-08-01

    Social acceptance of drinking involves social and cultural roles and has important implications for public health. Since extensive evidence indicates that alcohol possesses immunomodulatory properties, scientists have recently debated the influence of alcohol consumption on the immune response, particularly in countries where drinking in a social setting is a part of cultural identity. Experimental and clinical data support the conclusion that alcohol is a potent immunomodulator. While high alcohol consumption suppresses a wide range of immune responses, leading to an increased incidence of a number of infectious diseases, moderate alcohol consumption may have a beneficial impact on the immune system, compared to alcohol abuse or abstinence, most likely due to the multiple components of polyphenol-rich alcoholic contributing to the protective effect seen for moderate alcohol consumption on CVD and the immune system. Despite this, the scientific literature appears to be concerned about the diseases associated with excessive drinking in some societies and cultures. Thus, the present review recognizes the importance to consider social and cultural aspects of drinking when examining the whole dimension of alcohol consumption (amount, beverage type, frequency and variability), in order to estimate global risk of consequences on host defence to better understand alcohol-related harm or benefit.

  4. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Coulangeon, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Il n’est sans doute pas de notion aussi vaste et aussi polysémique en sciences sociales que la notion de culture, qui renvoie alternativement à l’ensemble des symboles, des significations, des valeurs et des manières de faire propres à un groupe et au domaine spécialisé des activités expressives, savantes et populaires. La notion de culture est ainsi tout autant mobilisée dans l’exploration des grandes thématiques de la sociologie (stratification, inégalités, institutions, mouvements sociaux)...

  5. Mathematical bridges

    CERN Document Server

    Andreescu, Titu; Tetiva, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Building bridges between classical results and contemporary nonstandard problems, Mathematical Bridges embraces important topics in analysis and algebra from a problem-solving perspective. Blending old and new techniques, tactics and strategies used in solving challenging mathematical problems, readers will discover numerous genuine mathematical gems throughout that will heighten their appreciation of the inherent beauty of mathematics. Most of the problems are original to the authors and are intertwined in a well-motivated exposition driven by representative examples. The book is structured to assist the reader in formulating and proving conjectures, as well as devising solutions to important mathematical problems by making connections between various concepts and ideas from different areas of mathematics. Instructors and educators teaching problem-solving courses or organizing mathematics clubs, as well as motivated mathematics students from high school juniors to college seniors, will find Mathematical Bri...

  6. Growth and hormonal responsiveness of human endometrial stromal cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinka, C F

    1988-06-01

    The present review describes and discusses published results on growth and hormonal responsiveness of human endometrial stromal cells in culture. The proliferative potential of serially subcultured cells, that is, the number of cell doublings before cells enter mitotic senescence and cease to divide, was unusually high in stromal cells from several endometrial specimens, a property that may reflect the unique proliferative capacity of human endometrium when compared to other adult tissues. Fluorescent visualization of microfilaments revealed distinct age-related changes in the distribution of cytoskeletal fibers. Addition of ovarian steroids to the culture medium of stromal cells resulted in significant morphologic changes. From comparative studies using different culture media it became evident that medium components remarkably influenced cell morphology during early culture periods in an irreversible manner. Cultured stromal cells yielded interesting results in experiments designed to define the role of polyamines in growth regulation. Proliferation was greatly inhibited when polyamine levels were reduced by specific inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase, the first and rate limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis which produces putrescine by catalytic conversion from ornithine. The antiproliferative effects were reversed by addition of putrescine to the culture medium. These results clearly establish a causal link between polyamine depletion and growth deficiencies and reveal an essential function of polyamines in stromal cell proliferation. Hormonally regulated parameters in cultured stromal cells include aromatase activity, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, 51K secreted protein, prolactin and laminin. The hormonally regulated production of prolactin and laminin, both considered markers of decidualization, together with morphologic changes of stromal cells to decidual-like cells, strongly suggest that human endometrial stromal cells, when subjected to

  7. Broadening the role of theory in mathematics education research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pais, Alexandre; Stentoft, Diana; Valero, Paola

    2010-01-01

    In C. Bergsten, E. Jablonka and T. Wedege (Eds), Mathematics and mathematics education: Cultural and social dimensions. Proceedings of MADIF7, The Seventh Mathematics Education Research Seminar, Stockholm, January 26-27, 2010. Linköping: SMDF.......In C. Bergsten, E. Jablonka and T. Wedege (Eds), Mathematics and mathematics education: Cultural and social dimensions. Proceedings of MADIF7, The Seventh Mathematics Education Research Seminar, Stockholm, January 26-27, 2010. Linköping: SMDF....

  8. Cultural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur F. LaPage

    1971-01-01

    A critical look at outdoor recreation research and some underlying premises. The author focuses on the concept of culture as communication and how it influences our perception of problems and our search for solutions. Both outdoor recreation and science are viewed as subcultures that have their own bodies of mythology, making recreation problems more difficult to...

  9. Mathematical Astronomy in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plofker, Kim

    Astronomy in South Asia's Sanskrit tradition, apparently originating in simple calendric computations regulating the timing of ancient ritual practices, expanded over the course of two or three millennia to include detailed spherical models, an endless variety of astrological systems, and academic mathematics in general. Assimilating various technical models, methods, and genres from the astronomy of neighboring cultures, Indian astronomers created new forms that were in turn borrowed by their foreign counterparts. Always recognizably related to the main themes of Eurasian geocentric mathematical astronomy, Indian astral science nonetheless maintained its culturally distinct character until Keplerian heliocentrism and Newtonian mechanics replaced it in colonial South Asia's academic mainstream.

  10. Physiological Response of In Vitro Cultured MAGNOLIA SP. to Nutrient Medium Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sokolov Rossen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the regeneration response of in vitro cultured Magnolia × soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’ and Magnolia liliiflora ‘Nigra’ to nutrient medium composition. In the primary culture (initiated from dormant axillary buds combinations of Murashige and Skoog (MS basal salts with 6-benzylaminopurine and α-naphthaleneacetic acid were tested. The primary explants of cv. ‘Alexandrina’ expressed higher regeneration rate than cv. ‘Nigra’. For both species, the regen eration was most strongly potentiated at addition of 0.25 mg dm−3 of the cytokinin alone. The auxin exerted undesir–able effects. Several basal salts media were applied in proliferation stage and their physiological effects were evaluated in reference to traditionally used MS. At culturing on Chée & Pool C2d Vitis Medium (VM that is for the first time introduced to magnolia and on MS, M. liliiflora formed more but less elongated shoots than M. soulangeana. However, on VM, substantial increase (25-30% of the number of axillary shoots and leaves, shoot length and fresh and dry weights over MS was established for both species. This suggested VM as promising composition of nutrients in multiplication stage. Microshoots obtained on MS, VM, Rugini Olive Medium and DKW Juglans Medium were successfully rooted in vitro and subsequently established ex vitro. The findings expand the information on magnolia response to culture conditions and contribute to elaboration of innovative elements of protocols for establishing tissue cultures with high regeneration capacity.

  11. RPE in perfusion tissue culture and its response to laser application. Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Framme, Carsten; Kobuch, Karin; Eckert, Elfriede; Monzer, Jan; Roider, Johann

    2002-01-01

    To study the effects of conventional laser application on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in a perfusion tissue culture model of porcine retinal pigment epithelium without overlying neurosensory retina. RPE with underlying choroid was prepared from enucleated porcine eyes and fixed in a holding ring (Minusheet). Specimens were then placed in two-compartment tissue culture containers (MinuCell & Minutissue, Bad Abbach, Germany) and were cultured during continuous perfusion with culture medium at both sides of the entire specimen, the upper RPE and the lower choroid (12 specimens out of 6 eyes). Cultures were kept for 1, 3, 7 and 14 days and were examined histologically. Laser treatment was performed on each tissue ring by application of 3 x 3 laser burns one day after culture began (argon ion laser, wavelength: 514 nm, pulse duration: 100 ms; spot size: 200 microm) using different energy levels (400-1,000 mW); (16 specimens out of 8 eyes). During laser treatment a marked lightening of the RPE with centrifugal spreading was observed. Using higher levels of energy, a contraction of the RPE towards the center of the laser spot was noticed. One day after laser photocoagulation histology revealed destruction of RPE; within 3-7 days of culture, migration and proliferation of neighboring cells was observed in several lesions. After 7 days the initial defect of the irradiated area was covered with dome shaped RPE cells and after 14 days multilayered RPE cells were showing ongoing proliferation. However, there were also cases without proliferation after laser treatment. The non-treated, continuously perfused RPE showed regular appearance in histological sections: during the first 7 days of culture, light microscopy revealed a normal matrix with a well-differentiated RPE monolayer. Subsequently proliferation even without treatment was observed and after 14 days the RPE became multilayered. It was possible to study the early healing response to the effect of laser

  12. A responsive evaluation of mental health treatment in Cambodia: Intentionally addressing poverty to increase cultural responsiveness in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seponski, Desiree M; Lewis, Denise C; Megginson, Maegan C

    2014-01-01

    Mental health issues are significant contributors to the global burden of disease with the highest incidence in resource poor countries; 90% of those in need of mental health treatment reside in low resource countries but receive only 10% of the world's resources. Cambodia, the eighth least developed country in the world, serves as one example of the need to address mental health concerns in low-income, resource poor countries. The current study utilises responsive evaluation methodology to explore how poverty-stricken Cambodian clients, therapists and supervisors experience Western models of therapy as culturally responsive to their unique needs. Quantitative and qualitative data were triangulated across multiple stakeholders using numerous methods including a focus group, interviews, surveys, case illustrations and live supervision observation and analysed using constant comparative analysis. Emerging findings suggest that poverty, material needs, therapy location and financial situations greatly impact the daily lives and mental health conditions of Cambodians and hinder clients' therapeutic progress. The local community needs and context of poverty greatly hinder clients' therapeutic progress in therapy treatment and when therapy does not directly address the culture of poverty, clients did not experience therapy as valuable despite some temporary decreases in mental health symptoms.

  13. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  14. Mathematic Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanh, Vu Duc, Ed.

    This document gives a listing of mathematical terminology in both the English and Vietnamese languages. Vocabulary used in algebra and geometry is included along with a translation of mathematical symbols. (DT)

  15. Mathematics disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001534.htm Mathematics disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mathematics disorder is a condition in which a child's ...

  16. Mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Brian F.; Wither (Post.), David P.

    2003-09-01

    This paper is a distillation of the major result from the 1998 Ph.D. thesis of the late David Wither. It details a longitudinal study over five years of the relationship between mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement. It starts from the already well documented negative correlation between the two, and seeks to establish one of the three hypotheses—that mathematics anxiety causes an impairment of mathematics achievement; that lack of mathematics achievement causes mathematics anxiety; or that there is a third underlying cause of the two.

  17. The nature of culturally responsive pedagogy in two urban African American middle school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondima, Michelle Harris

    This ethnographic in nature study explores how two middle school science teachers who have classes populated by urban African Americans teach their students and how their students perceive their teaching. Since urban African American students continue to perform lower than desired on measures of science achievement, there is an urgent need to understand what pedagogical methodologies assist and hinder urban African American students in achieving higher levels of success in science. A pedagogical methodology that theorists posit assists subordinated school populations is culturally responsive pedagogy. Culturally responsive pedagogy is defined as a teaching methodology concerned with preparing students to question inequality, racism, and injustice. Teachers who use culturally responsive pedagogy respect the culture students bring to the class, and require that the teachers willingly do whatever is necessary to educate students (Nieto, 2000). The teacher participants were two female African Americans who were identified by their school supervisors as being highly effective with urban African American students. The researcher presented the teachers in separate case studies conducted over a data collection period of nine months. Data were collected by participant observation, interviews, and artifact collection. Data were analyzed by application of grounded theory techniques. Findings of the teachers' (and the students') beliefs about pedagogy that both assisted and hindered the students' performance in science were reported in a rich and nuanced storytelling manner based on multiple perspectives (teachers', students', and the researcher's). Pedagogical methodologies that the teachers used that assisted their students were the use of cultural metaphors and images in science and applications of motivational techniques that encouraged a nurturing relationship between the teacher and her students. Pedagogical methodologies that hindered students varied by teacher

  18. Research ethics in global mental health: advancing culturally responsive mental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Casares, Mónica

    2014-12-01

    Global mental health research is needed to inform effective and efficient services and policy interventions within and between countries. Ethical reflection should accompany all GMHR and human resource capacity endeavors to ensure high standards of respect for participants and communities and to raise public debate leading to changes in policies and regulations. The views and circumstances of ethno-cultural and disadvantaged communities in the Majority and Minority world need to be considered to enhance scientific merit, public awareness, and social justice. The same applies to people with vulnerabilities yet who are simultaneously capable, such as children and youth. The ethical principles of respect for persons or autonomy, beneficence/non-maleficence, justice, and relationality require careful contextualization for research involving human beings. Building on the work of Fisher and colleagues (2002), this article highlights some strategies to stimulate the ethical conduct of global mental health research and to guide decision-making for culturally responsible research, such as developing culturally sensitive informed consent and disclosure policies and procedures; paying special attention to socioeconomic, cultural, and environmental risks and benefits; and ensuring meaningful community and individual participation. Research and capacity-building partnerships, political will, and access to resources are needed to stimulate global mental health research and consolidate ethical practice. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Counter-storying the grand narrative of science (teacher) education: towards culturally responsive teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter Charles

    2011-12-01

    John Settlage's article— Counterstories from White Mainstream Preservice Teachers: Resisting the Master Narrative of Deficit by Default—outlines his endeavour to enable pre-service teachers to develop culturally responsive science teaching identities for resisting the master narrative of deficit thinking when confronted by the culturally different `other.' Case study results are presented of the role of counterstories in enabling five pre-service teachers to overcome deficit thinking. In this forum, Philip Moore, a cultural anthropologist and university professor, deepens our understanding of the power and significance of counterstories as an educational tool for enabling students to deconstruct oppressive master narratives. Jill Slay, dean of a science faculty, examines her own master narrative about the compatibility of culturally similar academics and graduate students, and finds it lacking. But first, I introduce this scholarship with background notes on the critical paradigm and its adversary, the grand narrative of science education, following which I give an appreciative understanding of John's pedagogical use of counterstories as a transformative strategy for multi-worldview science teacher education.

  20. Raising Public Awareness of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Behrends, Ehrhard; Rodrigues, José Francisco

    2012-01-01

    This collective book aims to encourage and inspire actions directed towards raising public awareness of the importance of mathematical sciences for our contemporary society in a cultural and historical perspective. Mathematical societies, in Europe and around the world, can find ideas, blueprints and suggestions for activities - including concerted actions with other international organizations - directed towards raising public awareness of science, technology and other fields where mathematics plays a strong role. The material is divided into four parts: * National experiences * Exhibitions /

  1. Rainforest Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the contested way that ethnomathematics has sometimes been received by mathematicians and others and what that disagreement might suggest about issues in mathematics education; namely, (a) the relation of ethnomathematics to academic mathematics; (b) recent efforts to reform secondary school mathematics so that it prepares…

  2. Mathematics ... Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, Snorre H.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a definition of mathematics as the art of thinking in terms of formalized systems, and the science of relations, structures and algorithms. We also touch upon the relation of mathematics to other sciences, in particular through modelling and scientific computing. We discuss mathematics as a martial art and a key to paradigm changes.

  3. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Pratsinis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD’s extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF, basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF, and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration.

  4. Low-Dose UVA Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultured Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongrong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the mechanism of the adaptive response induced by low-dose ultraviolet A (UVA radiation. Methods. Cultured dermal fibroblasts were irradiated by a lethal dose of UVA (86.4 J/cm2 with preirradiation of single or repetitive low dose of UVA (7.2 J/cm2. Alterations of cellular morphology were observed by light microscope and electron microscope. Cell cycle and cellular apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometer. The extent of DNA damage was determined by single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE. Results. The cultured dermal fibroblasts, with pretreatment of single or repetitive irradiation of 7.2 J/cm2 UVA relieved toxic reaction of cellular morphology and arrest of cell cycle, decreased apoptosis ratio, reduced DNA chain breakage, and accelerated DNA repair caused by subsequent 86.4 J/cm2 UVA irradiation. Compared with nonpretreatment groups, all those differences were significant (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Conclusions. The adaptation reaction might depend on the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA irradiation. Low-dose UVA radiation might induce adaptive response that may protect cultured dermal fibroblasts from the subsequent challenged dose of UVA damage. The duration and protective capability of the adaptive reaction might be related to the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA Irradiation.

  5. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2015-06-30

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  6. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Le découpage des spécialités sociologiques hésite habituellement entre une répartition thématique par domaines empiriquement distingués et un partage conceptuel reposant sur des orientations de recherche. La sociologie de la culture n'échappe pas à cette oscillation. De prime abord, elle couvre un secteur plus ou moins clairement délimité, qui englobe la sociologie de l'art et ce qui est socialement désigné comme relevant de la « vie culturelle ». Elle regroupe alors un ensemble de subdivisio...

  7. Responsiveness of fetal rat brain cells to glia maturation factor during neoplastic transformation in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, A; Laerum, O D; Bock, E

    1981-01-01

    The effect of partially purified extracts from adult pig brains containing a glia maturation protein factor (BE) has been investigated on neural cells during carcinogenesis. Pregnant BD IX-rats were given a single transplacental dose of the carcinogen ethylnitrosourea (EtNU) on the 18th day...... of gestation. The brains of the treated fetuses were transferred to cell culture and underwent neoplastic transformation with a characteristic sequence of phenotypic alterations which could be divided into five different stages. During the first 40 days after explantation (stage I & II) BE induced...... on GFA-content was seen any longer, although some few weakly GFA positive cells could be observed in all permanent cell lines. Fetal rat brain cells therefore seem to become less responsive to this differentiation inducer during neoplastic transformation in cell culture....

  8. Response Surface Modelling of Noradrenaline Production in Hairy Root Culture of Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghorbani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Common purslane (Portulaca oleracea L. is an annual plant as one of the natural sources for noradrenaline hormone. In this research, hairy root culture of purslane was established by using Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain ATCC 15834. In the following, Box-Behnken model of response surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize B5 medium for the growth of P. oleracea L. hairy root line. According to the results, modelling and optimization conditions, including sucrose, CaCl2.H2O, H2PO4 and NO3-/NH4+ concentrations on maximum dry weight (0.155 g and noradrenaline content (0.36 mg.g-1 DW was predicted. These optimal conditions predicted by RSM were confirmed the enhancement of noradrenaline production as an application potential for production by hairy root cultures.

  9. Responsive hydrogels produced via organic sol-gel chemistry for cell culture applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Smruti; Chaudhury, Pulkit; Clarizia, Lisa; McDonald, Melisenda; Reynaud, Emmanuelle; Gaines, Peter; Schmidt, Daniel F

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis of novel environmentally responsive polyurea hydrogel networks prepared via organic sol-gel chemistry and demonstrate that the networks can stabilize pH while releasing glucose both in simple aqueous media and in mammalian cell culture settings. Hydrogel formulations have been developed based on the combination of an aliphatic triisocyanate with pH-insensitive amine functional polyether and pH-sensitive poly(ethyleneimine) segments in a minimally toxic solvent suitable for the sol-gel reaction. The polyether component of the polyurea network is sufficiently hydrophilic to give rise to some level of swelling independent of environmental pH, while the poly(ethyleneimine) component contains tertiary amine groups providing pH sensitivity to the network in the form of enhanced swelling and release under acidic conditions. The reaction of these materials to form a network is rapid and requires no catalyst. The resultant material exhibits the desired pH-responsive swelling behavior and demonstrates its ability to simultaneously neutralize lactic acid and release glucose in both cell-free culture media and mammalian cell culture, with no detectable evidence of cytotoxicity or changes in cell behavior, in the case of either SA-13 human hybridomas or mouse embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, pH is observed to have a clear effect on the rate at which glucose is released from the hydrogel network. Such characteristics promise to maintain a favorable cell culture environment in the absence of human intervention. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation of vascular smooth muscle cell cultures with altered responsiveness to the antiproliferative effect of heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleb, B L; Hardenbrook, M; Cherington, V; Castellot, J J

    1996-05-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia in the arterial wall is an important component of both atherogenesis and post-vascular surgical restenosis. One naturally-occurring group of molecules which can suppress SMC proliferation in animal models and in cell culture systems are the complex carbohydrates of the heparan sulfate class, including heparin. In this communication, we have used retrovirus vectors to introduce several oncogenes into SMC: SV40 Large T antigen (SVLT), polyoma virus Large T antigen (PyLT), v-myc, and adenovirus E1a. We analyzed a total of 11 cultures. A combination of Western blot analysis, immunoprecipitation, and indirect immunofluorescence confirmed the expression of the infected oncogenic protein in each culture we isolated. All four oncogenes permitted the maintenance of a normal SMC phenotype, as assessed by the general morphology of cells in the light microscope and the presence of SMC-specific alpha-actin in an immunofluorescence assay. Doubling times in infected cells ranged from 20 to 33 hr, and final cell densities in infected cultures ranged from 4 x 10(4) to 5 x 10(5) cells per cm2. By comparison, the parent line had a doubling time of 30 hr and reached a final cell density of 1 x 10(5) cells per cm2. Despite the differences sometimes observed in these proliferation parameters, neither one was strongly correlated with heparin responsiveness. PyLT, v-myc, and E1a all produced SMC cultures or lines which retained sensitivity to the antiproliferative activity of heparin (ED50 = 50 micrograms/ml). In contrast, SVLT expression yielded SMC lines which were highly resistant to heparin (ED50 > 300 micrograms/ml). These results suggest that altered responsiveness to heparin is dependent upon which oncogenic protein is being expressed in the cells. The availability of cloned, immortal SMC lines with a wide range of heparin responsiveness should aid in the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism of action of this potentially

  11. Discrete Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    2011-01-01

    ; construct a finite state machine for a given application. Apply these concepts to new problems. The teaching in Discrete Mathematics is a combination of sessions with lectures and students solving problems, either manually or by using Matlab. Furthermore a selection of projects must be solved and handed......The objectives of Discrete Mathematics (IDISM2) are: The introduction of the mathematics needed for analysis, design and verification of discrete systems, including the application within programming languages for computer systems. Having passed the IDISM2 course, the student will be able...... to accomplish the following: -Understand and apply formal representations in discrete mathematics. -Understand and apply formal representations in problems within discrete mathematics. -Understand methods for solving problems in discrete mathematics. -Apply methods for solving problems in discrete mathematics...

  12. Discrete Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of Discrete Mathematics (IDISM2) are: The introduction of the mathematics needed for analysis, design and verification of discrete systems, including the application within programming languages for computer systems. Having passed the IDISM2 course, the student will be able...... to accomplish the following: -Understand and apply formal representations in discrete mathematics. -Understand and apply formal representations in problems within discrete mathematics. -Understand methods for solving problems in discrete mathematics. -Apply methods for solving problems in discrete mathematics......; construct a finite state machine for a given application. Apply these concepts to new problems. The teaching in Discrete Mathematics is a combination of sessions with lectures and students solving problems, either manually or by using Matlab. Furthermore a selection of projects must be solved and handed...

  13. Mathematical Modeling and Pure Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usiskin, Zalman

    2015-01-01

    Common situations, like planning air travel, can become grist for mathematical modeling and can promote the mathematical ideas of variables, formulas, algebraic expressions, functions, and statistics. The purpose of this article is to illustrate how the mathematical modeling that is present in everyday situations can be naturally embedded in…

  14. 3D culture of Her2+ breast cancer cells promotes AKT to MAPK switching and a loss of therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadhara, Sharath; Smith, Chris; Barrett-Lee, Peter; Hiscox, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The Her2 receptor is overexpressed in up to 25 % of breast cancers and is associated with a poor prognosis. Around half of Her2+ breast cancers also express the estrogen receptor and treatment for such tumours can involve both endocrine and Her2-targeted therapies. However, despite preclinical data supporting the effectiveness of these agents, responses can vary widely in the clinical setting. In light of the increasing evidence pointing to the interplay between the tumour and its extracellular microenvironment as a significant determinant of therapeutic sensitivity and response here we investigated the impact of 3D matrix culture of breast cancer cells on their therapeutic sensitivity. A 3D Matrigel-based culture system was established and optimized for the growth of ER+/Her2+ breast cancer cell models. Growth of cells in response to trastuzumab and endocrine agents in 3D culture versus routine monolayer culture were assessed using cell counting and Ki67 staining. Endogenous and trastuzumab-modulated signalling pathway activity in 2D and 3D cultures were assessed using Western blotting. Breast cancer cells in 3D culture displayed an attenuated response to both endocrine agents and trastuzumab compared with cells cultured in traditional 2D monolayers. Underlying this phenomenon was an apparent matrix-induced shift from AKT to MAPK signalling; consequently, suppression of MAPK in 3D cultures restores therapeutic response. These data suggest that breast cancer cells in 3D culture display a reduced sensitivity to therapeutic agents which may be mediated by internal MAPK-mediated signalling. Targeting of adaptive pathways that maintain growth in 3D culture may represent an effective strategy to improve therapeutic response clinically.

  15. Determination of loblolly pine response to cultural treatments based on soil class, base productivity, and competition level

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Garrett; Michael Kane; Daniel Markewitz; Dehai Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to better understand what factors drive loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) growth response to intensive culture in the University of Georgia Plantation Management Research Cooperative’s Culture x Density study in the Piedmont and Upper Coastal Plain. Twenty study sites were established ranging from southern Alabama to South Carolina in...

  16. Dedifferentiation of intrinsic response properties of motoneurons in organotypic cultures of the spinal cord of the adult turtle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, J F; Noraberg, J; Simon, M

    2000-01-01

    Explant cultures from the spinal cord of adult turtles were established and used to study the sensitivity of the intrinsic response properties of motoneurons to the changes in connectivity and milieu imposed by isolation in culture. Transverse sections 700 microm thick were explanted on cover sli...

  17. Practitioners' Perceptions of Culturally Responsive School-Based Mental Health Services for Low-Income African American Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Erin; Kruger, Ann Cale; Hamilton, Chela; Meyers, Joel; Truscott, Stephen D.; Varjas, Kris

    2016-01-01

    School-based mental health practitioners are positioned to address low-income urban African American girls' mental health needs through culturally responsive services. Despite the importance of culturally reflective practice, it is understudied. We asked school-based mental health practitioners (N = 7) to reflect on barriers and facilitators to…

  18. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Boas, Franz

    2003-01-01

    L’un des objets de l’enquête anthropologique, pour laquelle des éléments peuvent être obtenus par l’étude des sociétés existantes, est l’inter-dépendance des phénomènes culturels. Alors que dans l’étude des processus de diffusion et de développement parallèle les caractères et la distribution de traits singuliers sont communément les objets de l’analyse, nous sommes conduits, ici, à considérer la culture, dans toutes ses manifestations, comme un tout. Les inventions, la vie économique, la str...

  19. Metonymic objects, cultural practices and narrative repair: Sri Lankan responses to the Indian Ocean tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Shemana; Stolte, Ottilie; Hodgetts, Darrin

    2015-07-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami resulted in a tragic loss of life and immense suffering. This article explores the ways in which a group of people from Sri Lanka worked to address the disruption to their life narratives caused by the loss of loved ones. We go beyond a focus on 'talk' in narrative research in health psychology to explore the importance of material objects in sustaining continued bonds with the deceased. This article provides an alternative to the tendency in mainstream psychology to pathologise grief and highlights the importance of culturally patterned responses to disaster. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. [Analysis of genetic control of maize response in anther culture within a diallelic set].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satarova, T N

    2002-01-01

    The androgenic ability in anther culture in vitro was examined within a diallel set of five maize lines. The complex analysis of genetic variation components, Hayman's diagram, and genetic parameters showed that the anther response is under the control of an additive-dominant genetic system. The examined lines possessed the different correlation of dominant and recessive alleles controlling androgenesis. And 44 was the line with the biggest number of recessive genes, which determined the increase in the trait. The level of dominance varied in different loci, though in the whole the degree of dominance approached to the complete one.

  1. A Diffusion Model Analysis of Magnitude Comparison in Children with and without Dyscalculia: Care of Response and Ability Are Related to Both Mathematical Achievement and Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Szardenings

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The respective roles of the approximate number system (ANS and an access deficit (AD in developmental dyscalculia (DD are not well-known. Most studies rely on response times (RTs or accuracy (error rates separately. We analyzed the results of two samples of elementary school children in symbolic magnitude comparison (MC and non-symbolic MC using a diffusion model. This approach uses the joint distribution of both RTs and accuracy in order to synthesize measures closer to ability and response caution or response conservatism. The latter can be understood in the context of the speed-accuracy tradeoff: It expresses how much a subject trades in speed for improved accuracy. We found significant effects of DD on both ability (negative and response caution (positive in MC tasks and a negative interaction of DD with symbolic task material on ability. These results support that DD subjects suffer from both an impaired ANS and an AD and in particular support that slower RTs of children with DD are indeed related to impaired processing of numerical information. An interaction effect of symbolic task material and DD (low mathematical ability on response caution could not be refuted. However, in a sample more representative of the general population we found a negative association of mathematical ability and response caution in symbolic but not in non-symbolic task material. The observed differences in response behavior highlight the importance of accounting for response caution in the analysis of MC tasks. The results as a whole present a good example of the benefits of a diffusion model analysis.

  2. A Diffusion Model Analysis of Magnitude Comparison in Children with and without Dyscalculia: Care of Response and Ability Are Related to Both Mathematical Achievement and Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szardenings, Carsten; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias; Ranger, Jochen; Holling, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    The respective roles of the approximate number system (ANS) and an access deficit (AD) in developmental dyscalculia (DD) are not well-known. Most studies rely on response times (RTs) or accuracy (error rates) separately. We analyzed the results of two samples of elementary school children in symbolic magnitude comparison (MC) and non-symbolic MC using a diffusion model. This approach uses the joint distribution of both RTs and accuracy in order to synthesize measures closer to ability and response caution or response conservatism. The latter can be understood in the context of the speed-accuracy tradeoff: It expresses how much a subject trades in speed for improved accuracy. We found significant effects of DD on both ability (negative) and response caution (positive) in MC tasks and a negative interaction of DD with symbolic task material on ability. These results support that DD subjects suffer from both an impaired ANS and an AD and in particular support that slower RTs of children with DD are indeed related to impaired processing of numerical information. An interaction effect of symbolic task material and DD (low mathematical ability) on response caution could not be refuted. However, in a sample more representative of the general population we found a negative association of mathematical ability and response caution in symbolic but not in non-symbolic task material. The observed differences in response behavior highlight the importance of accounting for response caution in the analysis of MC tasks. The results as a whole present a good example of the benefits of a diffusion model analysis.

  3. Response of sago pondweed, a submerged aquatic macrophyte, to herbicides in three laboratory culture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Ailstock, M.S.; Momot, J.J.; Norman, C.M.; Gorsuch, Joseph W.; Lower, William R.; Wang, Wun-cheng; Lewis, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The phytotoxicity of atrazine, paraquat, glyphosate, and alachlor to sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus), a submerged aquatic macrophyte, was tested under three types of laboratory culture conditions. In each case, tests were conducted in static systems, the test period was four weeks, and herbicide exposure was chronic, resulting from a single addition of herbicide to the test vessels at the beginning of the test period. The three sets of test conditions employed were(1) axenic cultures in 125-mL flasks containing a nutrient media and sucrose; (2) a microcosm system employing 18.9-L buckets containing a sand, shell, and peat substrate; and (3) an algae-free system employing O.95-L jars containing reconstituted freshwater and a nutrient agar substrate. The primary variable measured was biomass production. Plants grew well in all three test systems, with biomass of untreated plants increasing by a factor of about 5 to 6.5 during the four-week test period. Biomass production in response to herbicide exposure differed significantly among culture systems, which demonstrates the need for a standardized testing protocol for evaluating the effects of toxics on submerged aquatic plants.

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of neurofibromin level in cultured human melanocytes in response to growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesser, J; Kaufmann, D; Maier, B; Mailhammer, R; Kuehl, P; Krone, W

    1997-03-01

    Among the symptoms that characterize neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are pigmentation anomalies such as cafe au lait spots. It has been suggested that the reduction of the neurofibromin level in the epidermis of NF1 patients is responsible for the observed signs such as altered melanogenesis and altered density of melanocytes. Our studies show that in cultured normal human melanocytes, the neurofibromin level can be varied in vitro over a wide range by using different culture conditions. The influence of factors that control differentiation and proliferation of melanocytes on neurofibromin levels was studied. Immunoprecipitation followed by western blotting showed a 3- to 4-fold increase of neurofibromin after stimulation by PMA or bFGF, respectively, and a 1.5-fold increase in cells stimulated with steel factor. The increase of neurofibromin was not paralleled by a higher NF1 mRNA level as proved by northern blotting. Pulse-chase experiments with 35S-labeled melanocytes revealed an approximately 3-fold increase in the half-life of neurofibromin in bFGF- or PMA-stimulated cells compared to controls. These results indicate that the neurofibromin level of cultured melanocytes can be regulated by a mechanism independent of NF1 gene transcription and translation, which might influence the degradation rate of the protein.

  5. Microfluidic synthesis of microfibers for magnetic-responsive controlled drug release and cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    Full Text Available This study demonstrated the fabrication of alginate microfibers using a modular microfluidic system for magnetic-responsive controlled drug release and cell culture. A novel two-dimensional fluid-focusing technique with multi-inlets and junctions was used to spatiotemporally control the continuous laminar flow of alginate solutions. The diameter of the manufactured microfibers, which ranged from 211 µm to 364 µm, could be well controlled by changing the flow rate of the continuous phase. While the model drug, diclofenac, was encapsulated into microfibers, the drug release profile exhibited the characteristic of a proper and steady release. Furthermore, the diclofenac release kinetics from the magnetic iron oxide-loaded microfibers could be controlled externally, allowing for a rapid drug release by applying a magnetic force. In addition, the successful culture of glioblastoma multiforme cells in the microfibers demonstrated a good structural integrity and environment to grow cells that could be applied in drug screening for targeting cancer cells. The proposed microfluidic system has the advantages of ease of fabrication, simplicity, and a fast and low-cost process that is capable of generating functional microfibers with the potential for biomedical applications, such as drug controlled release and cell culture.

  6. Induction of defensive responses and production of secondary metabolites in Linum album cell culture by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armaghan Abedzadeh Neyshabouri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US with low intensity is considered as a physical tool to stimulate living systems in medicine and biotechnology. This study aim to survey the US effects on some physiological parameters and podophyllotoxin production in Linum album cell culture. The cell cultures were treated with US waves with a frequency of 40 kHz and the power 5 Wcm-3, in a time dependent experiment with 3 replicates and the cells were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after the treatment. Evaluated parameters were cell growth, contents of total protein, MDA, hydrogen peroxide, phenolics, flavonoids, activity of peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and podophyllotoxin. The results showed that cell growth was significantly decreased by the US, but there was no significant change in protein content. The amount of hydrogen peroxide, membrane lipid peroxidation and activity of peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase enzymes were increased in cells under the effect of US, compared to control. Also US increased the production of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and podophyllotoxin in treated cells. Maximum amount of podophyllotoxin was obtained in treated cultures after 72 hours which was the 268.9 µg/g DW (2.7 times that of the control. It seems that US by stimulating cells and induction of defensive responses and secondary metabolism increased the amount of podophyllotoxin in cells of Linum album plant.

  7. Microfluidic synthesis of microfibers for magnetic-responsive controlled drug release and cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Wang, Chih-Yu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong; Hsu, Hsiang-Chen; Liao, Yu-Ju; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrated the fabrication of alginate microfibers using a modular microfluidic system for magnetic-responsive controlled drug release and cell culture. A novel two-dimensional fluid-focusing technique with multi-inlets and junctions was used to spatiotemporally control the continuous laminar flow of alginate solutions. The diameter of the manufactured microfibers, which ranged from 211 µm to 364 µm, could be well controlled by changing the flow rate of the continuous phase. While the model drug, diclofenac, was encapsulated into microfibers, the drug release profile exhibited the characteristic of a proper and steady release. Furthermore, the diclofenac release kinetics from the magnetic iron oxide-loaded microfibers could be controlled externally, allowing for a rapid drug release by applying a magnetic force. In addition, the successful culture of glioblastoma multiforme cells in the microfibers demonstrated a good structural integrity and environment to grow cells that could be applied in drug screening for targeting cancer cells. The proposed microfluidic system has the advantages of ease of fabrication, simplicity, and a fast and low-cost process that is capable of generating functional microfibers with the potential for biomedical applications, such as drug controlled release and cell culture.

  8. Submerged culture mycelium and broth of Grifola frondosa improve glycemic responses in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Tai-Hao; Chen, Ching-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Grifola frondosa, an edible fungus with a large fruiting body and overlapping caps, has been demonstrated to be a natural source of health-promoting substances, mainly due to its polysaccharides beta-glucan. By using male Wistar rats injected with saline (normal rats) or nicotinamide plus streptozotocin (diabetic rats), we investigated the effects of an orally ingested placebo (CON and STZ groups), culture mycelium (CGM and SGM groups), broth (CGB and SGB groups), and mycelium plus broth (CGX and SGX groups) of Grifola frondosa on glycemic responses. During the experimental period (from day 0 to day 15), the STZ group had significantly lower body weight compared to the CON group (one-way ANOVA, pGrifola frondosa have bioactivities for improving glycemic responses.

  9. Emotional response to virtual reality exposure across different cultures: the role of the attribution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, Alessandra; Mosso, José Luis; Mosso, Dejanira; Pineda, Erika; Ruíz, Norma Leticia; Ramíez, Miriam; Morales, José Luis; Riva, Giuseppe

    2009-12-01

    Many studies have shown the ability of media--television, movies, and virtual reality (VR) experiences--to elicit emotions. Nevertheless, it is still unclear how the different factors involved--user related and medium related--play a role in producing an emotional response during a VR experience. We investigate this issue, analyzing the role played by the cultural and technological backgrounds of the users in the emotional responses to VR. Specifically, we use the "core affect" model of emotions developed by Russell (2003) to explore how these factors influence the way in which participants experience virtual worlds. Our sample includes 20 Mexican participants: 8 living in El Tepeyac, a small rural and isolated Mexican village characterized by a very primitive culture, and 12 high civilized inhabitants of Mexico City. The "Green Valley," a noninteractive, relaxing immersive environment showing a mountain landscape around a calm lake, was used to induce relaxation in the two groups during an ambulatory surgical operation. To investigate the effects of VR on the relaxation process, we measured participants' physiological (heart rate) and emotional (VAS-A) responses before, during, and after the operation. The results show that VR significantly modified the core affect (reduced arousal) in all participants but that the final emotional response produced by this change was influenced by the attribution process: the civilized inhabitants of Mexico City, who were able to attribute the reduced arousal to the VR experience, reported a significant reduction in the self-reported level of anxiety, while people from El Tepeyac showed a reduction in their physiological reactions but not in their perceived anxiety.

  10. A novel 3D human glioblastoma cell culture system for modeling drug and radiation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Roman, Natividad; Stevenson, Katrina; Gilmour, Lesley; Hamilton, Graham; Chalmers, Anthony J

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor, with dismal prognosis. The failure of drug-radiation combinations with promising preclinical data to translate into effective clinical treatments may relate to the use of simplified 2-dimensional in vitro GBM cultures. We developed a customized 3D GBM culture system based on a polystyrene scaffold (Alvetex) that recapitulates key histological features of GBM and compared it with conventional 2D cultures with respect to their response to radiation and to molecular targeted agents for which clinical data are available. In 3 patient-derived GBM lines, no difference in radiation sensitivity was observed between 2D and 3D cultures, as measured by clonogenic survival. Three different molecular targeted agents, for which robust clinical data are available were evaluated in 2D and 3D conditions: (i) temozolomide, which improves overall survival and is standard of care for GBM, exhibited statistically significant effects on clonogenic survival in both patient-derived cell lines when evaluated in the 3D model compared with only one cell line in 2D cells; (ii) bevacizumab, which has been shown to increase progression-free survival when added to standard chemoradiation in phase III clinical trials, exhibited marked radiosensitizing activity in our 3D model but had no effect on 2D cells; and (iii) erlotinib, which had no efficacy in clinical trials, displayed no activity in our 3D GBM model, but radiosensitized 2D cells. Our 3D model reliably predicted clinical efficacy, strongly supporting its clinical relevance and potential value in preclinical evaluation of drug-radiation combinations for GBM.

  11. Timescale of silver nanoparticle transformation in neural cell cultures impacts measured cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Rice, Katherine P.; Schwindt, Rani K.; MacCuspie, Robert I.; Jeerage, Kavita M.

    2015-07-01

    Both serum protein concentration and ionic strength are important factors in nanoparticle transformation within cell culture environments. However, silver nanoparticles are not routinely tracked at their working concentration in the specific medium used for in vitro toxicology studies. Here we evaluated the transformation of electrostatically stabilized citrate nanoparticles (C-AgNPs) and sterically stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) in a low-serum ( 0.2 mg/mL bovine serum albumin) culture medium, while measuring the response of rat cortex neural progenitor cells, which differentiate in this culture environment. After 24 h, silver nanoparticles at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL did not affect adenosine triphosphate levels, whereas silver ions decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1.1 µg/mL or higher. After 240 h, both silver nanoparticles, as well as silver ion, unambiguously decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1 and 1.1 µg/mL, respectively, suggesting particle dissolution. Particle transformation was investigated in 1:10 diluted, 1:2 diluted, or undiluted differentiation medium, all having an identical protein concentration, to separate the effect of serum protein stabilization from ionic strength destabilization. Transmission electron microscopy images indicated that particles in 1:10 medium were not surrounded by proteins, whereas particles became clustered within a non-crystalline protein matrix after 24 h in 1:2 medium and at 0 h in undiluted medium. Despite evidence for a protein corona, particles were rapidly destabilized by high ionic strength media. Polyvinylpyrrolidone increased the stability of singly dispersed particles compared to citrate ligands; however, differences were negligible after 4 h in 1:2 medium or after 1 h in undiluted medium. Thus low-serum culture environments do not provide sufficient colloidal stability for long-term toxicology studies with citrate- or

  12. Timescale of silver nanoparticle transformation in neural cell cultures impacts measured cell response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Rice, Katherine P.; Schwindt, Rani K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States); MacCuspie, Robert I. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Materials Measurement Science Division (United States); Jeerage, Kavita M., E-mail: jeerage@boulder.nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Both serum protein concentration and ionic strength are important factors in nanoparticle transformation within cell culture environments. However, silver nanoparticles are not routinely tracked at their working concentration in the specific medium used for in vitro toxicology studies. Here we evaluated the transformation of electrostatically stabilized citrate nanoparticles (C-AgNPs) and sterically stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) in a low-serum (∼ 0.2 mg/mL bovine serum albumin) culture medium, while measuring the response of rat cortex neural progenitor cells, which differentiate in this culture environment. After 24 h, silver nanoparticles at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL did not affect adenosine triphosphate levels, whereas silver ions decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1.1 µg/mL or higher. After 240 h, both silver nanoparticles, as well as silver ion, unambiguously decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1 and 1.1 µg/mL, respectively, suggesting particle dissolution. Particle transformation was investigated in 1:10 diluted, 1:2 diluted, or undiluted differentiation medium, all having an identical protein concentration, to separate the effect of serum protein stabilization from ionic strength destabilization. Transmission electron microscopy images indicated that particles in 1:10 medium were not surrounded by proteins, whereas particles became clustered within a non-crystalline protein matrix after 24 h in 1:2 medium and at 0 h in undiluted medium. Despite evidence for a protein corona, particles were rapidly destabilized by high ionic strength media. Polyvinylpyrrolidone increased the stability of singly dispersed particles compared to citrate ligands; however, differences were negligible after 4 h in 1:2 medium or after 1 h in undiluted medium. Thus low-serum culture environments do not provide sufficient colloidal stability for long-term toxicology studies with citrate

  13. The Problem of Certainty in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Two questions about certainty in mathematics are asked. First, is mathematical knowledge known with certainty? Second, why is the belief in the certainty of mathematical knowledge so widespread and where does it come from? This question is little addressed in the literature. In explaining the reasons for these beliefs, both cultural-historical and…

  14. A culturally and linguistically responsive vocabulary approach for young Latino dual language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Lucía I; Crais, Elizabeth R; Castro, Dina C; Kainz, Kirsten

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the role of the language of vocabulary instruction in promoting English vocabulary in preschool Latino dual language learners (DLLs). The authors compared the effectiveness of delivering a single evidence-informed vocabulary approach using English as the language of vocabulary instruction (English culturally responsive [ECR]) versus using a bilingual modality that strategically combined Spanish and English (culturally and linguistically responsive [CLR]). Forty-two DLL Spanish-speaking preschoolers were randomly assigned to the ECR group (n=22) or CLR group (n=20). Thirty English words were presented during small-group shared readings in their preschools 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Multilevel models were used to examine group differences in postinstruction scores on 2 Spanish and 2 English vocabulary assessments at instruction end and follow-up. Children receiving instruction in the CLR bilingual modality had significantly higher posttest scores (than those receiving the ECR English-only instruction) on Spanish and English vocabulary assessments at instruction end and on the Spanish vocabulary assessment at follow-up, even after controlling for preinstruction scores. The results provide additional evidence of the benefits of strategically combining the first and second language to promote English and Spanish vocabulary development in this population. Future directions for research and clinical applications are discussed.

  15. The implications of extreme response style (ERS for cross-cultural and comparative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Watkins

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Cross-cultural research in which fivepoint, Likert-type and semantic-differential scales are utilized, is a popular research practice. Extreme response style (ERS may contaminate the validity of research results, however this possibility is often ignored in behavioural science research. In this study, the influence of biographical variables on extreme response style and the contaminating effect thereof on the validity of research results is investigated. The results of the study reveal that culture separately, and interaction with age and gender has a meaningful influence on ERS when five-point scales are utilized. The underlying causes of the phenomenon can however not exclusively be ascribed to biographical variables. Opsomming Kruiskulturele navorsing waarin vyfpunt, Likerttipe- en semanties-differensiale skale benut word, is 'n bekende navorsingspraktyk. Ekstreme responsiestyl is egter daartoe in staat om die geldigheid van sondanige navorsingsresultate te kontamineer, maar hierdie moontlikheid word dikwels in die gedragswetenskaplike navorsingspraktyk geignoreer. In hierdie studie word ondersoek ingestel na die invloed van biografiese faktore op ekstreme responsiestyl en die kontaminerende effek daarvan op die geldigheid van navorsingsresultate. Daar is gevind dat kultuur in interaksie met ouderdom en geslag, ERS betekenisvol beinvloed wanneer vyfpuntskale gebruik word. Die onderliggende oorsake van die verskynsel kan egter nie uitsluitlik aan biografiese veranderlikes toegeskryf word nie.

  16. The effect of genotype on anther culture response of cultivated and wild oats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. KIVIHARJU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Anther culture ability was tested for 44 oat (Avena sativa L., six naked oat (A. sativa L., naked type and 15 wild oat (Avena sterilis L. genotypes, in addition to progeny of five intraspecific crosses of A. sativa and two interspecific crosses of A. sativa x A. sterilis. Anther culture response was affected considerably by genotype. Thirty one oat genotypes responded by callus growth on induction medium and seven of them produced embryo structures, two of the lines consistently. All naked oat genotypes produced embryo structures. Embryo production rates for the wild oat lines were comparable with those for the naked oat genotypes, and higher than for oat: 13 of the 15 genotypes tested produced embryo structures. Plant regeneration was possible only from wild oat. The regeneration ability was inherited in the progeny of the A. sativa x A. sterilis cross cv. Puhti x CAV 2648. The response of anthers of oat genotypes was inhibited by auxin on the induction medium, while naked oat, wild oat and A. sativa x A. sterilis crosses responded better on a medium containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid .;

  17. "Because They Want to Teach You about Their Culture": Analyzing Effective Mentoring Conversations between Culturally Responsible Mentors and Secondary Science Teachers of Indigenous Students in Mainstream Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Te Kotahitanga is an educational reform project in Aotearoa/New Zealand demonstrated to have significantly impacted the participation, achievement, and retention of indigenous Maori students in secondary schools. In this paper, I share results from a study of culturally responsible mentoring at 4 different schools participating in the Te…

  18. Consortia modulation of the stress response: proteomic analysis of single strain versus mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla Fazzini, Roberto A; Preto, Maria J; Quintas, Ana C Poucas; Bielecka, Agata; Dos Santos, Vitor A P Martins

    2010-09-01

    The high complexity of naturally occurring microbial communities is the major drawback limiting the study of these important biological systems. In this study, a comparison between pure cultures of Pseudomonas reinekei sp. strain MT1 and stable community cultures composed of MT1 plus the addition of Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain MT3 (in a steady-state proportion 9:1) was used as a model system to study bacterial interactions that take place under simultaneous chemical and oxidative stress. Both are members of a real community isolated from a polluted sediment by enrichment in 4-chlorosalicylate (4CS). The analysis of dynamic states was carried out at the proteome, metabolic profile and population dynamic level. Differential protein expression was evaluated under exposure to 4CS and high concentrations of toxic intermediates (4-chlorocatechol and protoanemonin), including proteins from several functional groups and particularly enzymes of aromatic degradation pathways and outer membrane proteins. Remarkably, 4CS addition generated a strong oxidative stress response in pure strain MT1 culture led by alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, while the community showed an enhanced central metabolism response, where A. xylosoxidans MT3 helped to prevent toxic intermediate accumulation. A significant change in the outer membrane composition of P. reinekei MT1 was observed during the chemical stress caused by 4CS and in the presence of A. xylosoxidans MT3, highlighting the expression of the major outer membrane protein OprF, tightly correlated to 4CC concentration profile and its potential detoxification role. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Can a Mathematical Model Predict an Individual’s Trait-like Response to Both Total and Partial Sleep Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    the same as that individual’s relative rank on other neurocognitive tasks (e.g. mathematical processing, running memory , and visual analogue scale of...countermea- sures [e.g. models of the restorative power of caffeine (Ramakrishnan et al., 2013, 2014)] into a computational tool to optimize...2013, 331: 66–77. Ramakrishnan, S., Rajaraman, S., Laxminarayan, S. et al. A biomathematical model of the restoring effects of caffeine on cognitive

  20. Variability of affective responses to odors: culture, gender, and olfactory knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdenzi, Camille; Roberts, S Craig; Schirmer, Annett; Delplanque, Sylvain; Cekic, Sezen; Porcherot, Christelle; Cayeux, Isabelle; Sander, David; Grandjean, Didier

    2013-02-01

    Emotion and odor scales (EOS) measuring odor-related affective feelings were recently developed for three different countries (Switzerland, United Kingdom, and Singapore). The first aim of this study was to investigate gender and cultural differences in verbal affective response to odors, measured with EOS and the usual pleasantness scale. To better understand this variability, the second aim was to investigate the link between affective reports and olfactory knowledge (familiarity and identification). Responses of 772 participants smelling 56-59 odors were collected in the three countries. Women rated odors as more intense and identified them better in all countries, but no reliable sex differences were found for verbal affective responses to odors. Disgust-related feelings revealed odor-dependent sex differences, due to sex differences in identification and categorization. Further, increased odor knowledge was related to more positive affects as reported with pleasantness and odor-related feeling evaluations, which can be related to top-down influences on odor representation. These top-down influences were thought, for example, to relate to beliefs about odor properties or to categorization (edible vs. nonedible). Finally, the link between odor knowledge and olfactory affect was generally asymmetrical and significant only for pleasant odors, not for unpleasant ones that seemed to be more resistant to cognitive influences. This study, for the first time using emotional scales that are appropriate to the olfactory domain, brings new insights into the variability of affective responses to odors and its relationship to odor knowledge.

  1. Comparison of toxicogenomic responses to phthalate ester exposure in an organotypic testis co-culture model and responses observed in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, S.; Hermsen, S.A.B.; Yu, X.; Hong, S.W.; Faustman, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional testicular co-culture system (3D-TCS) which mimics in vivo testes. In this study, transcriptomic responses to phthalate esters (PE's) were compared in the 3D-TCS with responses in rat testes in vivo. Microarray data from the 3D-TCS and from in vivo testes were

  2. Mathematical scandals

    CERN Document Server

    Pappas, Theoni

    1997-01-01

    In this highly readable volume of vignettes of mathematical scandals and gossip, Theoni Pappas assembles 29 fascinating stories of intrigue and the bizarre ? in short, the human background of the history of mathematics. Might a haberdasher have changed Einstein's life? Why was the first woman mathematician murdered? How come there's no Nobel Prize in mathematics?Mathematics is principally about numbers, equations, and solutions, all of them precise and timeless. But, behind this arcane matter lies the sometimes sordid world of real people, whose rivalries and deceptions

  3. Financial mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Jothi, A Lenin

    2009-01-01

    Financial services, particularly banking and insurance services is the prominent sector for the development of a nation. After the liberalisation of financial sector in India, the scope of getting career opportunities has been widened. It is heartening to note that various universities in India have introduced professional courses on banking and insurance. A new field of applied mathematics has come into prominence under the name of Financial Mathematics. Financial mathematics has attained much importance in the recent years because of the role played by mathematical concepts in decision - m

  4. Mathematical tapas

    CERN Document Server

    Hiriart-Urruty, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents a collection of interesting and sometimes original exercises for motivated students in mathematics. Written in the same spirit as Volume 1, this second volume of Mathematical Tapas includes carefully selected problems at the intersection between undergraduate and graduate level. Hints, answers and (sometimes) comments are presented alongside the 222 “tapas” as well as 8 conjectures or open problems. Topics covered include metric, normed, Banach, inner-product and Hilbert spaces; differential calculus; integration; matrices; convexity; and optimization or variational problems. Suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics, this book aims to sharpen the reader’s mathematical problem solving abilities.

  5. Assessing the Impact of the National Cultural Framework on Responsible Corporate Behaviour towards Consumers: an Application of Geert Hofstede`s Cultural Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gănescu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to define and measure responsible corporate behaviour towards consumers in EU countries by defining an index of responsible corporate behaviour towards consumers and to establish the impact of Geert Hofstede's cultural dimensions on the responsible behaviour of organisations towards consumers. The index uses a specific measurement methodology based on three major components of responsible corporate behaviour towards customers and on content analysis of the Eurostat databases, the RAPEX 2012 Annual Report, the 2012-2013 Global Competitiveness Report and the Global Reporting Initiative database. We used the multifactorial regression and the Wald significance test to demonstrate that organisations operating in countries characterised by low power distance, individualism, femininity, tolerance of unknown and long-term orientation pay more attention to responsible corporate behaviour towards customers. The study highlights theoretical considerations that support the influence of the national cultural framework on responsible corporate behaviour towards consumers. The methodology for calculating the index of responsible corporate behaviour towards consumers can become a basis of analysis of responsible corporate behaviour towards local consumers or other stakeholders.

  6. Molecular analysis of chondrocytes cultured in agarose in response to dynamic compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallein-Gerin Frédéric

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage is exposed to high mechanical loads under normal physiological conditions and articular chondrocytes regulate the composition of cartilaginous matrix, in response to mechanical signals. However, the intracellular pathways involved in mechanotransduction are still being defined. Using the well-characterized chondrocyte/agarose model system and dynamic compression, we report protocols for preparing and characterizing constructs of murine chondrocytes and agarose, and analyzing the effect of compression on steady-state level of mRNA by RT-PCR, gene transcription by gene reporter assay, and phosphorylation state of signalling molecules by Western-blotting. The mouse model is of particular interest because of the availability of a large choice of bio-molecular tools suitable to study it, as well as genetically modified mice. Results Chondrocytes cultured in agarose for one week were surrounded by a newly synthesized pericellular matrix, as revealed by immunohistochemistry prior to compression experiments. This observation indicates that this model system is suitable to study the role of matrix molecules and trans-membrane receptors in cellular responsiveness to mechanical stress. The chondrocyte/agarose constructs were then submitted to dynamic compression with FX-4000C™ Flexercell® Compression Plus™ System (Flexcell. After clearing proteins off agarose, Western-blotting analysis showed transient activation of Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK in response to dynamic compression. After assessment by capillary electrophoresis of the quality of RNA extracted from agarose, steady-state levels of mRNA expression was measured by real time PCR. We observed an up-regulation of cFos and cJun mRNA levels as a response to compression, in accordance with the mechanosensitive character observed for these two genes in other studies using cartilage explants submitted to compression. To explore further the

  7. Experimental Mathematics and Mathematical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Broadhurst, David; Zudilin, Wadim

    2009-06-26

    One of the most effective techniques of experimental mathematics is to compute mathematical entities such as integrals, series or limits to high precision, then attempt to recognize the resulting numerical values. Recently these techniques have been applied with great success to problems in mathematical physics. Notable among these applications are the identification of some key multi-dimensional integrals that arise in Ising theory, quantum field theory and in magnetic spin theory.

  8. A Letter of Apology Nearly 50 Years in the Making: How We've Failed to Solve the Cultural Bind of the American Male. Response to "The Cultural Bind of the American Male"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandless, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's letter of apology as a response to "The Cultural Bind of the American Male". In the letter, the author offers his apologies because educators have failed to solve the cultural bind of the American male.

  9. Introduction of Hypermatrix and Operator Notation into a Discrete Mathematics Simulation Model of Malignant Tumour Response to Therapeutic Schemes In Vivo. Some Operator Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S. Stamatakos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous rate of accumulation of experimental and clinical knowledge pertaining to cancer dictates the development of a theoretical framework for the meaningful integration of such knowledge at all levels of biocomplexity. In this context our research group has developed and partly validated a number of spatiotemporal simulation models of in vivo tumour growth and in particular tumour response to several therapeutic schemes. Most of the modeling modules have been based on discrete mathematics and therefore have been formulated in terms of rather complex algorithms (e.g. in pseudocode and actual computer code. However, such lengthy algorithmic descriptions, although sufficient from the mathematical point of view, may render it difficult for an interested reader to readily identify the sequence of the very basic simulation operations that lie at the heart of the entire model. In order to both alleviate this problem and at the same time provide a bridge to symbolic mathematics, we propose the introduction of the notion of hypermatrix in conjunction with that of a discrete operator into the already developed models. Using a radiotherapy response simulation example we demonstrate how the entire model can be considered as the sequential application of a number of discrete operators to a hypermatrix corresponding to the dynamics of the anatomic area of interest. Subsequently, we investigate the operators’ commutativity and outline the “summarize and jump” strategy aiming at efficiently and realistically address multilevel biological problems such as cancer. In order to clarify the actual effect of the composite discrete operator we present further simulation results which are in agreement with the outcome of the clinical study RTOG 83–02, thus strengthening the reliability of the model developed.

  10. Introduction of hypermatrix and operator notation into a discrete mathematics simulation model of malignant tumour response to therapeutic schemes in vivo. Some operator properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakos, Georgios S; Dionysiou, Dimitra D

    2009-10-21

    The tremendous rate of accumulation of experimental and clinical knowledge pertaining to cancer dictates the development of a theoretical framework for the meaningful integration of such knowledge at all levels of biocomplexity. In this context our research group has developed and partly validated a number of spatiotemporal simulation models of in vivo tumour growth and in particular tumour response to several therapeutic schemes. Most of the modeling modules have been based on discrete mathematics and therefore have been formulated in terms of rather complex algorithms (e.g. in pseudocode and actual computer code). However, such lengthy algorithmic descriptions, although sufficient from the mathematical point of view, may render it difficult for an interested reader to readily identify the sequence of the very basic simulation operations that lie at the heart of the entire model. In order to both alleviate this problem and at the same time provide a bridge to symbolic mathematics, we propose the introduction of the notion of hypermatrix in conjunction with that of a discrete operator into the already developed models. Using a radiotherapy response simulation example we demonstrate how the entire model can be considered as the sequential application of a number of discrete operators to a hypermatrix corresponding to the dynamics of the anatomic area of interest. Subsequently, we investigate the operators' commutativity and outline the "summarize and jump" strategy aiming at efficiently and realistically address multilevel biological problems such as cancer. In order to clarify the actual effect of the composite discrete operator we present further simulation results which are in agreement with the outcome of the clinical study RTOG 83-02, thus strengthening the reliability of the model developed.

  11. Mathematics 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kodaira, Kunihiko

    1996-01-01

    This is the translation from the Japanese textbook for the grade 11 course, "General Mathematics". It is part of the easier of the three elective courses in mathematics offered at this level and is taken by about 40% of students. The book covers basic notions of probability and statistics, vectors, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, and an introduction to differentiation and integration.

  12. Mathematical logic

    CERN Document Server

    Kleene, Stephen Cole

    1967-01-01

    Undergraduate students with no prior instruction in mathematical logic will benefit from this multi-part text. Part I offers an elementary but thorough overview of mathematical logic of 1st order. Part II introduces some of the newer ideas and the more profound results of logical research in the 20th century. 1967 edition.

  13. Mathematics Tables

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Version 2.6 Initial typesetting: Carroll Wilde Graphics: David Canright Editing: Elle Zimmerman||Contributed for inclusion in Calhoun by Prof. Charles Therrien This booklet provides convenient access to formulas and other data that are frequently used in mathematics courses. If a more comprehensive reference is needed, see, for example, the STANDARD MATHEMATICAL TABLES published by the Chemical Rubber Company, Cleveland, Ohio.

  14. A sociocultural analysis of Latino high school students' funds of knowledge and implications for culturally responsive engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Joel Alejandro

    Previous studies have suggested that, when funds of knowledge are incorporated into science and mathematics curricula, students are more engaged and often develop richer understandings of scientific concepts. While there has been a growing body of research addressing how teachers may integrate students' linguistic, social, and cultural practices with science and mathematics instruction, very little research has been conducted on how the same can be accomplished with Latino and Latina students in engineering. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature by investigating how fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents used their funds of knowledge to address engineering design challenges. This project was intended to enhance the educational experience of underrepresented minorities whose social and cultural practices have been traditionally undervalued in schools. This ethnographic study investigated the funds of knowledge of fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents and how they used these funds of knowledge in engineering design. Participant observation, bi-monthly group discussion, retrospective and concurrent protocols, and monthly one-on-one interviews were conducted during the study. A constant comparative analysis suggested that Latino and Latina adolescents, although profoundly underrepresented in engineering, bring a wealth of knowledge and experiences that are relevant to engineering design thinking and practice.

  15. Physiological and Transcriptional Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Zinc Limitation in Chemostat Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Raffaele; Hazelwood, Lucie A.; De Hulster, Erik A. F.; Walsh, Michael C.; Knijnenburg, Theo A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Walker, Graeme M.; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional responses of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Zn availability were investigated at a fixed specific growth rate under limiting and abundant Zn concentrations in chemostat culture. To investigate the context dependency of this transcriptional response and eliminate growth rate-dependent variations in transcription, yeast was grown under several chemostat regimens, resulting in various carbon (glucose), nitrogen (ammonium), zinc, and oxygen supplies. A robust set of genes that responded consistently to Zn limitation was identified, and the set enabled the definition of the Zn-specific Zap1p regulon, comprised of 26 genes and characterized by a broader zinc-responsive element consensus (MHHAACCBYNMRGGT) than so far described. Most surprising was the Zn-dependent regulation of genes involved in storage carbohydrate metabolism. Their concerted down-regulation was physiologically relevant as revealed by a substantial decrease in glycogen and trehalose cellular content under Zn limitation. An unexpectedly large number of genes were synergistically or antagonistically regulated by oxygen and Zn availability. This combinatorial regulation suggested a more prominent involvement of Zn in mitochondrial biogenesis and function than hitherto identified. PMID:17933919

  16. Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma marginale Elicit Different Gene Expression Responses in Cultured Tick Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Zivkovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Anaplasma (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae includes obligate tick-transmitted intracellular organisms, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma marginale that multiply in both vertebrate and tick host cells. Recently, we showed that A. marginale affects the expression of tick genes that are involved in tick survival and pathogen infection and multiplication. However, the gene expression profile in A. phagocytophilum-infected tick cells is currently poorly characterized. The objectives of this study were to characterize tick gene expression profile in Ixodes scapularis ticks and cultured ISE6 cells in response to infection with A. phagocypthilum and to compare tick gene expression responses in A. phagocytophilum- and A. marginale-infected tick cells by microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses. The results of these studies demonstrated modulation of tick gene expression by A. phagocytophilum and provided evidence of different gene expression responses in tick cells infected with A. phagocytophilum and A. marginale. These differences in Anaplasma-tick interactions may reflect differences in pathogen life cycle in the tick cells.

  17. Mathematics unbound

    CERN Document Server

    Parshall, Karen Hunger

    2002-01-01

    Although today's mathematical research community takes its international character very much for granted, this "global nature" is relatively recent, having evolved over a period of roughly 150 years-from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century. During this time, the practice of mathematics changed from being centered on a collection of disparate national communities to being characterized by an international group of scholars for whom the goal of mathematical research and cooperation transcended national boundaries. Yet, the development of an international community was far from smooth and involved obstacles such as war, political upheaval, and national rivalries. Until now, this evolution has been largely overlooked by historians and mathematicians alike. This book addresses the issue by bringing together essays by twenty experts in the history of mathematics who have investigated the genesis of today's international mathematical community. This includes not only develo...

  18. Mathematical biology

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, James D

    1993-01-01

    The book is a textbook (with many exercises) giving an in-depth account of the practical use of mathematical modelling in the biomedical sciences. The mathematical level required is generally not high and the emphasis is on what is required to solve the real biological problem. The subject matter is drawn, e.g. from population biology, reaction kinetics, biological oscillators and switches, Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction, reaction-diffusion theory, biological wave phenomena, central pattern generators, neural models, spread of epidemics, mechanochemical theory of biological pattern formation and importance in evolution. Most of the models are based on real biological problems and the predictions and explanations offered as a direct result of mathematical analysis of the models are important aspects of the book. The aim is to provide a thorough training in practical mathematical biology and to show how exciting and novel mathematical challenges arise from a genuine interdisciplinary involvement with the biosci...

  19. Primary cilia expression in bone marrow in response to mechanical stimulation in explant bioreactor culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, T R; Schiavi, J; Alyssa Varsanik, M; Voisin, M; Birmingham, E; Haugh, M G; McNamara, L M; Niebur, G L

    2016-07-19

    Bone marrow contains a multitude of mechanically sensitive cells that may participate in mechanotransduction. Primary cilia are sensory organelles expressed on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblasts, osteocytes, and other cell types that sense fluid flow in monolayer culture. In marrow, cilia could similarly facilitate the sensation of relative motion between adjacent cells or interstitial fluid. The goal of this study was to determine the response of cilia to mechanical stimulation of the marrow. Bioreactors were used to supply trabecular bone explants with low magnitude mechanical stimulation (LMMS) of 0.3 ×g at 30 Hz for 1 h/d, 5 d/week, inducing shear stresses in the marrow. Four groups were studied: unstimulated (UNSTIM), stimulated (LMMS), and with and without chloral hydrate (UNSTIM+CH and LMMS+CH, respectively), which was used to disrupt cilia. After 19 days of culture, immunohistochemistry for acetylated α-tubulin revealed that more cells expressed cilia in culture compared to in vivo controls. Stimulation decreased the number of cells expressing cilia in untreated explants, but not in CH-treated explants. MSCs represented a greater fraction of marrow cells in the untreated explants than CH-treated explants. MSCs harvested from the stimulated groups were more proliferative than in the unstimulated explants, but this effect was absent from CH treated explants. In contrast to the marrow, neither LMMS nor CH treatment affected bone formation as measured by mineralising surface. Computational models indicated that LMMS does not induce bone strain, and the reported effects were thus attributed to shear stress in the marrow. From a clinical perspective, genetic or pharmaceutical alterations of cilia expression may affect marrow health and function.

  20. Analytical and Mathematical Modeling and Optimization of Fiber Metal Laminates (FMLs subjected to low-velocity impact via combined response surface regression and zero-One programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Ashenai Ghasemi

    Full Text Available This paper presents analytical and mathematical modeling and optimization of the dynamic behavior of the fiber metal laminates (FMLs subjected to low-velocity impact. The deflection to thickness (w/h ratio has been identified through the governing equations of the plate that are solved using the first-order shear deformation theory as well as the Fourier series method. With the help of a two degrees-of-freedom system, consisting of springs-masses, and the Choi's linearized Hertzian contact model the interaction between the impactor and the plate is modeled. Thirty-one experiments are conducted on samples of different layer sequences and volume fractions of Al plies in the composite Structures. A reliable fitness function in the form of a strict linear mathematical function constructed. Using an ordinary least square method, response regression coefficients estimated and a zero-one programming technique proposed to optimize the FML plate behavior subjected to any technological or cost restrictions. The results indicated that FML plate behavior is highly affected by layer sequences and volume fractions of Al plies. The results also showed that, embedding Al plies at outer layers of the structure significantly results in a better response of the structure under low-velocity impact, instead of embedding them in the middle or middle and outer layers of the structure.

  1. Responses of Cultured Tobacco Cells to Cryptogein, a Proteinaceous Elicitor from Phytophthora cryptogea1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, Jean-Pierre; Milat, Marie-Louise; Ricci, Pierre

    1991-01-01

    In culture, the phytopathogenic fungus Phytophthora cryptogea secretes a protein which elicits hypersensitive-like necroses and protects tobacco plants against invasion by the pathogen Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae. This protein, named cryptogein, has been purified and its amino acid sequence determined. In this work, we studied the effect of cryptogein on tobacco cell suspension cultures. Cryptogein was lethal at about 0.10 micromolar. When added at sublethal doses, it elicited the production of ethylene and phytoalexins. It also induced a rapid increase in pH and conductivity of the extracellular medium without affecting the integrity of the plasma membrane. Cryptogein reduced the fusicoccin-induced acidification of the extracellular medium. The concentration which inhibited the fusicoccin response by 50% was 0.8 nanomolar, while 1 micromolar erythrosine B, an ATPase inhibitor, was needed to produce the same inhibition. However, cryptogein did not inhibit the activity of a purified plasma membrane ATPase. Results of binding studies with whole cells suggested the presence of elicitor-binding sites with a high affinity for cryptogein. The involvement of the plasma membrane during the initial interaction between elicitor and cells is discussed. PMID:16668010

  2. Commensal Bacteria Modulate Innate Immune Responses of Vaginal Epithelial Cell Multilayer Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, William A.; McGowin, Chris L.; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Pyles, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome plays a critical but poorly defined role in reproductive health. Vaginal microbiome alterations are associated with increased susceptibility to sexually-transmitted infections (STI) possibly due to related changes in innate defense responses from epithelial cells. Study of the impact of commensal bacteria on the vaginal mucosal surface has been hindered by current vaginal epithelial cell (VEC) culture systems that lack an appropriate interface between the apical surface of stratified squamous epithelium and the air-filled vaginal lumen. Therefore we developed a reproducible multilayer VEC culture system with an apical (luminal) air-interface that supported colonization with selected commensal bacteria. Multilayer VEC developed tight-junctions and other hallmarks of the vaginal mucosa including predictable proinflammatory cytokine secretion following TLR stimulation. Colonization of multilayers by common vaginal commensals including Lactobacillus crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. rhamnosus led to intimate associations with the VEC exclusively on the apical surface. Vaginal commensals did not trigger cytokine secretion but Staphylococcus epidermidis, a skin commensal, was inflammatory. Lactobacilli reduced cytokine secretion in an isolate-specific fashion following TLR stimulation. This tempering of inflammation offers a potential explanation for increased susceptibility to STI in the absence of common commensals and has implications for testing of potential STI preventatives. PMID:22412914

  3. Commensal bacteria modulate innate immune responses of vaginal epithelial cell multilayer cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Rose

    Full Text Available The human vaginal microbiome plays a critical but poorly defined role in reproductive health. Vaginal microbiome alterations are associated with increased susceptibility to sexually-transmitted infections (STI possibly due to related changes in innate defense responses from epithelial cells. Study of the impact of commensal bacteria on the vaginal mucosal surface has been hindered by current vaginal epithelial cell (VEC culture systems that lack an appropriate interface between the apical surface of stratified squamous epithelium and the air-filled vaginal lumen. Therefore we developed a reproducible multilayer VEC culture system with an apical (luminal air-interface that supported colonization with selected commensal bacteria. Multilayer VEC developed tight-junctions and other hallmarks of the vaginal mucosa including predictable proinflammatory cytokine secretion following TLR stimulation. Colonization of multilayers by common vaginal commensals including Lactobacillus crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. rhamnosus led to intimate associations with the VEC exclusively on the apical surface. Vaginal commensals did not trigger cytokine secretion but Staphylococcus epidermidis, a skin commensal, was inflammatory. Lactobacilli reduced cytokine secretion in an isolate-specific fashion following TLR stimulation. This tempering of inflammation offers a potential explanation for increased susceptibility to STI in the absence of common commensals and has implications for testing of potential STI preventatives.

  4. The Australian Racism, Acceptance, and Cultural-Ethnocentrism Scale (RACES): item response theory findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Kaine; Manderson, Lenore

    2016-03-17

    Racism and associated discrimination are pervasive and persistent challenges with multiple cumulative deleterious effects contributing to inequities in various health outcomes. Globally, research over the past decade has shown consistent associations between racism and negative health concerns. Such research confirms that race endures as one of the strongest predictors of poor health. Due to the lack of validated Australian measures of racist attitudes, RACES (Racism, Acceptance, and Cultural-Ethnocentrism Scale) was developed. Here, we examine RACES' psychometric properties, including the latent structure, utilising Item Response Theory (IRT). Unidimensional and Multidimensional Rating Scale Model (RSM) Rasch analyses were utilised with 296 Victorian primary school students and 182 adolescents and 220 adults from the Australian community. RACES was demonstrated to be a robust 24-item three-dimensional scale of Accepting Attitudes (12 items), Racist Attitudes (8 items), and Ethnocentric Attitudes (4 items). RSM Rasch analyses provide strong support for the instrument as a robust measure of racist attitudes in the Australian context, and for the overall factorial and construct validity of RACES across primary school children, adolescents, and adults. RACES provides a reliable and valid measure that can be utilised across the lifespan to evaluate attitudes towards all racial, ethnic, cultural, and religious groups. A core function of RACES is to assess the effectiveness of interventions to reduce community levels of racism and in turn inequities in health outcomes within Australia.

  5. Perspectives on Sami Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte; Eira, Ellen J. Sara; Sriraman, Bharath

    2011-01-01

    The Sami are an indigenous people of the Arctic, and through a resolution of the United Nations, Norway is bound to take care of the Sami culture and language. Since 1987 the Sami have had their own curriculum, but they have no mathematics syllabus. In this paper we summarize the legal acts that take care of the Sami culture within the Norwegian…

  6. Mixed culture optimization for marigold flower ensilage via experimental design and response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Bolaños, José Luis; Jiménez-Islas, Hugo; Botello-Alvarez, Enrique; Rico-Martínez, Ramiro

    2003-04-09

    Endogenous microorganisms isolated from the marigold flower (Tagetes erecta) were studied to understand the events taking place during its ensilage. Studies of the cellulase enzymatic activity and the ensilage process were undertaken. In both studies, the use of approximate second-order models and multiple lineal regression, within the context of an experimental mixture design using the response surface methodology as optimization strategy, determined that the microorganisms Flavobacterium IIb, Acinetobacter anitratus, and Rhizopus nigricans are the most significant in marigold flower ensilage and exhibit high cellulase activity. A mixed culture comprised of 9.8% Flavobacterium IIb, 41% A. anitratus, and 49.2% R. nigricans used during ensilage resulted in an increased yield of total xanthophylls extracted of 24.94 g/kg of dry weight compared with 12.92 for the uninoculated control ensilage.

  7. Introduction to "coping with environmental risk and uncertainty: individual and cultural responses".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ember, Carol R

    2013-03-01

    The papers in this special issue of Human Nature collectively consider societal and individual responses to a wide variety of environmental and social risks. The first paper considers societal level effects of pathogen risk on collectivism and conformity, avoidance of outsiders, and in-group loyalty in a worldwide cross-cultural sample. The second deals with societal-level effects of resource unpredictability on the nature and conduct of warfare in eastern Africa. The third deals with effects of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes and mediating factors on individual perceptions of risk in Mexico and Ecuador. The final paper deals with effects of various types of father absence on women's reproductive life histories in Bangladesh.

  8. The specificity and genetic background of the rye (Secale cereale L.) tissue culture response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targońska, Małgorzata; Hromada-Judycka, Aneta; Bolibok-Brągoszewska, Hanna; Rakoczy-Trojanowska, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Rye is one of the most important crops in Eastern and Northern Europe. Despite the numerous beneficial features of rye, its annual production decreases successively which correlates with the lack of progress in its breeding compared with other cereals. Biotechnological methods could effectively improve the breeding of rye. However, their application is highly limited by the absence of an efficient procedure for plant regeneration in vitro, since rye is one of the most recalcitrant cereals with regard to the tissue culture response (TCR), and successful regeneration is highly dependent on genotype. Efforts to understand the genetic mechanisms controlling TCR of rye have elucidated some basic aspects, and several genes and genome regions controlling this trait have been identified. The aim of this review is to summarize the limited current knowledge of this topic.

  9. Bitter reproach or sweet revenge: cultural differences in response to racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elizabeth A; Soto, José A; Swim, Janet K; Bernstein, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Culture has been shown to influence response styles. The authors conducted two studies to test the notion that African Americans would be more likely to respond to racism directly, whereas Asian Americans would be more likely to respond indirectly and therefore more subtly. Study 1 showed that Black women subjected to a racist comment from a confederate during an online interaction were more likely than Asian women to verbally reproach the perpetrator. These group differences were not present when the outcome measure was indirect responding--administration of good/bad jellybeans. Study 2 used an online format to demonstrate that Asian women were more likely than Black women to say they would not respond directly to a racist comment. This group difference in unwillingness to confront was significantly mediated by a goal of maintaining peace with their interaction partner. Implications of these findings for the study of discrimination, coping, and well-being are discussed.

  10. Using Ambient Noise for Investigating Cultural Heritage Sites and Evaluating Seismic Site Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, S.; Farrugia, D.; Galea, P. M.; Ruben, B. P., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    Recordings of ambient noise as well as use of the HVSR technique represent a common tool for evaluating seismic site response. In this study we applied such techniques to several cultural heritage sites located on the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean). In particular, two of the Maltese watchtowers, built by the Knights of St. John between 1637 and 1659, were investigated together with the megalithic temple site of Mnajdra. Array data were acquired using the Micromed SoilSpy Rosina™ equipped with 4.5 Hz vertical geophones, setting the array in an L-shaped configuration. The Extended Spatial Autocorrelation (ESAC) technique was used to extract Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves. Moreover, single-station data close to the array was collected using a Tromino 3-component seismograph (www.tromino.eu), and the H/V curves were extracted. The dispersion curves and the H/V curves were jointly inverted using the Genetic Algorithm (GA) to obtain the shear-wave velocity profile. A fixed number of layers was used in the inversion and ranges for the layer thickness, P-wave and S-wave velocity, and density were specified. The obtained velocity profiles were used to compute the amplification function for the site based on the square root of the effective seismic impedance, also known as the quarter-wavelength approximation. This was used in the simulation of ground motion parameters at the site for various earthquakes using the stochastic one-dimensional site response analysis algorithm, Extended Source Simulation (EXSIM). In addition, the fundamental period and the damping ratio of the watchtowers was obtained by recording ambient vibrations. In the megalithic temples we were also able to evaluate the coverage of the soil deposits within the structure, comparing our results with previous study that used different geophysical techniques. In conclusion, this study enables us to map the seismic amplification hazard and provides primary data on the seismic risk assessment of

  11. Conduct and Correctness in Mathematical Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Stoimenow, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    "We risk sliding down toward the standards where the validity of action is decided by whether one can get away with it." (P. Doty) "We do not 'risk' sliding down toward such standards; we have reached them." (S. Lang) This is an essay in which I try to express my fear about the establishment of a culture of publishing, where no one is willing to take responsibility for the correctness of mathematics, and readers finding mistakes in published proofs are stamped as outcasts, because they are de...

  12. The presence of a culturally similar or dissimilar social partner affects neural responses to emotional stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate A. Woodcock

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional responding is sensitive to social context; however, little emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms by which social context effects changes in emotional responding. Objective: We aimed to investigate the effects of social context on neural responses to emotional stimuli to inform on the mechanisms underpinning context-linked changes in emotional responding. Design: We measured event-related potential (ERP components known to index specific emotion processes and self-reports of explicit emotion regulation strategies and emotional arousal. Female Chinese university students observed positive, negative, and neutral photographs, whilst alone or accompanied by a culturally similar (Chinese or dissimilar researcher (British. Results: There was a reduction in the positive versus neutral differential N1 amplitude (indexing attentional capture by positive stimuli in the dissimilar relative to alone context. In this context, there was also a corresponding increase in amplitude of a frontal late positive potential (LPP component (indexing engagement of cognitive control resources. In the similar relative to alone context, these effects on differential N1 and frontal LPP amplitudes were less pronounced, but there was an additional decrease in the amplitude of a parietal LPP component (indexing motivational relevance in response to positive stimuli. In response to negative stimuli, the differential N1 component was increased in the similar relative to dissimilar and alone (trend context. Conclusion: These data suggest that neural processes engaged in response to emotional stimuli are modulated by social context. Possible mechanisms for the social-context-linked changes in attentional capture by emotional stimuli include a context-directed modulation of the focus of attention, or an altered interpretation of the emotional stimuli based on additional information proportioned by the context.

  13. Response of Vitis vinifera cell cultures to Eutypa lata and Trichoderma atroviride culture filtrates: expression of defence-related genes and phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutawila, C; Stander, C; Halleen, F; Vivier, M A; Mostert, L

    2017-03-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Vitis vinifera cv. Dauphine berries were used to study the response to the vascular pathogen, Eutypa lata, in comparison with a biological control agent, Trichoderma atroviride, that was previously shown to be effective in pruning wound protection. The expression of genes coding for enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins was profiled over a 48-h period using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. The cell cultures responded to elicitors of both fungi with a hypersensitive-like response that lead to a decrease in cell viability. Similar genes were triggered by both the pathogen and biocontrol agent, but the timing patterns and magnitude of expression was dependent on the specific fungal elicitor. Culture filtrates of both fungi caused upregulation of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), 4-coumaroyl Co-A ligase (CCo-A) and stilbene synthase (STS), and a downregulation of chalcone synthase (CHS) genes. The pathogen filtrate caused a biphasic pattern in the upregulation of PAL and STS genes which was not observed in cells treated with filtrates of the biocontrol agent. Analytical assays showed significantly higher total phenolic content and chitinolytic enzyme activity in the cell cultures treated with the T. atroviride filtrate compared to the pathogen filtrate. These results corresponded well to the higher expression of PAL and chitinase class IV genes. The response of the cell cultures to T. atroviride filtrate provides support for the notion that the wound protection by the biocontrol agent at least partially relies on the induction of grapevine resistance mechanisms.

  14. Mathematization in introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmia, Suzanne M.

    Mathematization is central to STEM disciplines as a cornerstone of the quantitative reasoning that characterizes these fields. Introductory physics is required for most STEM majors in part so that students develop expert-like mathematization. This dissertation describes coordinated research and curriculum development for strengthening mathematization in introductory physics; it blends scholarship in physics and mathematics education in the form of three papers. The first paper explores mathematization in the context of physics, and makes an original contribution to the measurement of physics students' struggle to mathematize. Instructors naturally assume students have a conceptual mastery of algebra before embarking on a college physics course because these students are enrolled in math courses beyond algebra. This paper provides evidence that refutes the validity of this assumption and categorizes some of the barriers students commonly encounter with quantification and representing ideas symbolically. The second paper develops a model of instruction that can help students progress from their starting points to their instructor's desired endpoints. Instructors recognize that the introductory physics course introduces new ideas at an astonishing rate. More than most physicists realize, however, the way that mathematics is used in the course is foreign to a large portion of class. This paper puts forth an instructional model that can move all students toward better quantitative and physical reasoning, despite the substantial variability of those students' initial states. The third paper describes the design and testing of curricular materials that foster mathematical creativity to prepare students to better understand physics reasoning. Few students enter introductory physics with experience generating equations in response to specific challenges involving unfamiliar quantities and units, yet this generative use of mathematics is typical of the thinking involved in

  15. Speed mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Handley, Bill

    2012-01-01

    This new, revised edition of the bestselling Speed Mathematics features new chapters on memorising numbers and general information, calculating statistics and compound interest, square roots, logarithms and easy trig calculations. Written so anyone can understand, this book teaches simple strategies that will enable readers to make lightning-quick calculations. People who excel at mathematics use better strategies than the rest of us; they are not necessarily more intelligent. With Speed Mathematics you'll discover methods to make maths easy and fun. This book is perfect for stud

  16. Mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Geroch, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical Physics is an introduction to such basic mathematical structures as groups, vector spaces, topological spaces, measure spaces, and Hilbert space. Geroch uses category theory to emphasize both the interrelationships among different structures and the unity of mathematics. Perhaps the most valuable feature of the book is the illuminating intuitive discussion of the ""whys"" of proofs and of axioms and definitions. This book, based on Geroch's University of Chicago course, will be especially helpful to those working in theoretical physics, including such areas as relativity, particle

  17. Engineering mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, John

    2014-01-01

    A practical introduction to the core mathematics required for engineering study and practiceNow in its seventh edition, Engineering Mathematics is an established textbook that has helped thousands of students to succeed in their exams.John Bird's approach is based on worked examples and interactive problems. This makes it ideal for students from a wide range of academic backgrounds as the student can work through the material at their own pace. Mathematical theories are explained in a straightforward manner, being supported by practical engineering examples and applications in order to ensure

  18. Culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of potentially functional biphenyl-degrading bacterial community in response to extracellular organic matter from Micrococcus luteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Yin-Dong; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Ding, Lin-Xian; Shen, Chao-Feng

    2015-05-01

    Biphenyl (BP)-degrading bacteria were identified to degrade various polychlorinated BP (PCB) congers in long-term PCB-contaminated sites. Exploring BP-degrading capability of potentially useful bacteria was performed for enhancing PCB bioremediation. In the present study, the bacterial composition of the PCB-contaminated sediment sample was first investigated. Then extracellular organic matter (EOM) from Micrococcus luteus was used to enhance BP biodegradation. The effect of the EOM on the composition of bacterial community was investigated by combining with culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The obtained results indicate that Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were predominant community in the PCB-contaminated sediment. EOM from M. luteus could stimulate the activity of some potentially difficult-to-culture BP degraders, which contribute to significant enhancement of BP biodegradation. The potentially difficult-to-culture bacteria in response to EOM addition were mainly Rhodococcus and Pseudomonas belonging to Gammaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria respectively. This study provides new insights into exploration of functional difficult-to-culture bacteria with EOM addition and points out broader BP/PCB degrading, which could be employed for enhancing PCB-bioremediation processes. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Effects of dexamethasone and insulin on the acute phase response of Morris hepatoma cells and of rat hepatocytes in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magielska-Zero, D; Guzdek, A; Bereta, J; Kurdowska, A; Cieszka, K; Koj, A

    1988-01-01

    Dexamethasone and insulin stimulate production of several plasma proteins in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes but inhibit their production in primary cultures of Morris hepatoma cell line 7777W. The acute phase response elicited in cultured cells by crude cytokines from activated rat peritoneal macrophages is considerably higher in hepatocytes in the presence of hormones, and especially of dexamethasone. In hepatoma cells the hormones enhance the cytokine-induced formation of fibrinogen and cysteine proteinase inhibitor but are without significant effect on suppression of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein synthesis by macrophage supernatants.

  20. Freedom in mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Cartier, Pierre; Heinzmann, Gerhard; Villani, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    This book challenges the views put forward by Pierre Cartier, one of the anchors of the famous Bourbaki group, and Cédric Villani, one of the most brilliant mathematicians of his generation, who received the Fields Medal in 2010. Jean Dhombres, mathematician and science historian, and Gerhard Heinzmann, philosopher of science and also a specialist in mathematics engage in a fruitful dialogue with the two mathematicians, prompting readers to reflect on mathematical activity and its social consequences in history as well as in the modern world. Cédric Villani’s popular success proves once again that a common awareness has developed, albeit in a very confused way, of the major role of mathematics in the construction and efficiency of natural sciences, which are at the origin of our technologies. Despite this, the idea that mathematics cannot be shared remains firmly entrenched, a perceived failing that has even been branded a lack of culture by vocal forces in the media as well as cultural and political esta...

  1. Optimization of the Culture Medium Composition to Improve the Production of Hyoscyamine in Elicited Datura stramonium L. Hairy Roots Using the Response Surface Methodology (RSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Gontier

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, optimization in biological analyses has been carried out by monitoring the influence of one factor at a time; this technique is called one‑variable‑at‑a‑time. The disadvantage of this technique is that it does not include any interactive effects among the variables studied and requires a large number of experiments. Therefore, in recent years, the Response Surface Methodology (RSM has become the most popular optimization method. It is an effective mathematical and statistical technique which has been widely used in optimization studies with minimal experimental trials where interactive factors may be involved. This present study follows on from our previous work, where RSM was used to optimize the B5 medium composition in [NO3−], [Ca2+] and sucrose to attain the best production of hyoscyamine (HS from the hairy roots (HRs of Datura stramonium elicited by Jasmonic Acid (JA. The present paper focuses on the use of the RSM in biological studies, such as plant material, to establish a predictive model with the planning of experiments, analysis of the model, diagnostics and adjustment for the accuracy of the model. With the RSM, only 20 experiments were necessary to determine optimal concentrations. The model could be employed to carry out interpolations and predict the response to elicitation. Applying this model, the optimization of the HS level was 212.7% for the elicited HRs of Datura stramonium, cultured in B5-OP medium (optimized, in comparison with elicited HRs cultured in B5 medium (control. The optimal concentrations, under experimental conditions, were determined to be: 79.1 mM [NO3−], 11.4 mM [Ca2+] and 42.9 mg/L of sucrose.

  2. Optimization of the culture medium composition to improve the production of hyoscyamine in elicited Datura stramonium L. hairy roots using the Response Surface Methodology (RSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryad, Amdoun; Lakhdar, Khelifi; Majda, Khelifi-Slaoui; Samia, Amroune; Mark, Asch; Corinne, Assaf-Ducrocq; Eric, Gontier

    2010-11-18

    Traditionally, optimization in biological analyses has been carried out by monitoring the influence of one factor at a time; this technique is called one-variable-at-a-time. The disadvantage of this technique is that it does not include any interactive effects among the variables studied and requires a large number of experiments. Therefore, in recent years, the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has become the most popular optimization method. It is an effective mathematical and statistical technique which has been widely used in optimization studies with minimal experimental trials where interactive factors may be involved. This present study follows on from our previous work, where RSM was used to optimize the B5 medium composition in [NO(3-)], [Ca(2+)] and sucrose to attain the best production of hyoscyamine (HS) from the hairy roots (HRs) of Datura stramonium elicited by Jasmonic Acid (JA). The present paper focuses on the use of the RSM in biological studies, such as plant material, to establish a predictive model with the planning of experiments, analysis of the model, diagnostics and adjustment for the accuracy of the model. With the RSM, only 20 experiments were necessary to determine optimal concentrations. The model could be employed to carry out interpolations and predict the response to elicitation. Applying this model, the optimization of the HS level was 212.7% for the elicited HRs of Datura stramonium, cultured in B5-OP medium (optimized), in comparison with elicited HRs cultured in B5 medium (control). The optimal concentrations, under experimental conditions, were determined to be: 79.1 mM [NO(3-)], 11.4 mM [Ca(2+)] and 42.9 mg/L of sucrose.

  3. Developing Complex Understandings: On the Relation of Mathematics Education Research to Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    This article explores some of the intellectual bases of the apparent cultural divide between the fields of mathematics and mathematics education research. The chasm is in part attributable to epistemologies or theoretical "paradigms", fashionable in education, that dismiss or deny the integrity of fundamental aspects of mathematical and scientific…

  4. An Investigation of a Culturally Responsive Approach to Science Education in a Summer Program for Marginalized Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Brittany A.

    There have been numerous calls and efforts made to provide states, school districts, and communities needed financial support to increase and enhance access to and opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) related disciplines for marginalized populations (Tyson, Lee, & Hanson, 2007; Caldwell & Siwatu, 2003). As the challenge to better educate students of color and poor students intensifies, the need to provide equitable science learning experiences for all students aimed at scientific literacy and STEM also becomes critical. Thus the need to provide summer science enrichment programs where students engage in scientific experimentation, investigation, and critical thinking are vital to helping students who have been traditionally marginalized achieve success in school science and enter the science career pipeline. This mixed methods study examined the impact of a culturally responsive approach on student attitudes, interests in science education and STEM careers, and basic science content knowledge before and after participation in an upward bound summer program. Quantitative results indicated using a culturally responsive approach to teach science in an informal learning space significantly increases student achievement. Students receiving culturally responsive science instruction exhibited statistically significant increases in their posttest science scores compared to pretest science scores, M = 0.376, 95% CI [0.266, 0.487], t (10) = 7.610, p learn science utilizing a culturally responsive approach was much more beneficial to their overall science knowledge, as it allowed students to experience, understand, and connect to and through their science learning. Likewise, culturally responsive science instruction helped students to foster a more positive interest in science and STEM careers as it provided students the opportunity to do science in a meaningful and relevant way. Moreover, results revealed students receiving culturally responsive

  5. Mathematical Ideas In Some Cooperative Work Activities Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interface between Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS), cultural practices and mathematics is currently generating a great deal of interest among mathematics education researchers and practitioners alike. This article uses mathematical lenses to examine the cultural practice of dhava (cooperative work) among the ...

  6. Learning to Enact Social Justice Pedagogy in Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jacqueline; Moore, Cara M.

    2014-01-01

    Some mathematics educators assert that P-12 students respond better to mathematics when it is taught for cultural relevance and social justice. Providing teachers with examples of how to use culturally relevant pedagogy and social justice pedagogy (SJP) is critical to enacting these strategies in mathematics classrooms. The results of this…

  7. Mathematical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomhøj, Morten

    2004-01-01

    modelling, however, can be seen as a practice of teaching that place the relation between real life and mathematics into the centre of teaching and learning mathematics, and this is relevant at all levels. Modelling activities may motivate the learning process and help the learner to establish cognitive...... roots for the construction of important mathematical concepts. In addition competences for setting up, analysing and criticising modelling processes and the possible use of models is a formative aim in this own right for mathematics teaching in general education. The paper presents a theoretical...... framework, which has been used for designing modelling courses, analysing students’ modelling activities, identifying learning obstacles in the modelling process and to guide the teachers interaction with the students during their work. This will be illustrated with an example from a developmental project...

  8. Mathematical modelling

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a thorough introduction to the challenge of applying mathematics in real-world scenarios. Modelling tasks rarely involve well-defined categories, and they often require multidisciplinary input from mathematics, physics, computer sciences, or engineering. In keeping with this spirit of modelling, the book includes a wealth of cross-references between the chapters and frequently points to the real-world context. The book combines classical approaches to modelling with novel areas such as soft computing methods, inverse problems, and model uncertainty. Attention is also paid to the interaction between models, data and the use of mathematical software. The reader will find a broad selection of theoretical tools for practicing industrial mathematics, including the analysis of continuum models, probabilistic and discrete phenomena, and asymptotic and sensitivity analysis.

  9. Algorithmic mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Hougardy, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Algorithms play an increasingly important role in nearly all fields of mathematics. This book allows readers to develop basic mathematical abilities, in particular those concerning the design and analysis of algorithms as well as their implementation. It presents not only fundamental algorithms like the sieve of Eratosthenes, the Euclidean algorithm, sorting algorithms, algorithms on graphs, and Gaussian elimination, but also discusses elementary data structures, basic graph theory, and numerical questions. In addition, it provides an introduction to programming and demonstrates in detail how to implement algorithms in C++. This textbook is suitable for students who are new to the subject and covers a basic mathematical lecture course, complementing traditional courses on analysis and linear algebra. Both authors have given this "Algorithmic Mathematics" course at the University of Bonn several times in recent years.

  10. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  11. Mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Eck, Christof; Knabner, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Mathematical models are the decisive tool to explain and predict phenomena in the natural and engineering sciences. With this book readers will learn to derive mathematical models which help to understand real world phenomena. At the same time a wealth of important examples for the abstract concepts treated in the curriculum of mathematics degrees are given. An essential feature of this book is that mathematical structures are used as an ordering principle and not the fields of application. Methods from linear algebra, analysis and the theory of ordinary and partial differential equations are thoroughly introduced and applied in the modeling process. Examples of applications in the fields electrical networks, chemical reaction dynamics, population dynamics, fluid dynamics, elasticity theory and crystal growth are treated comprehensively.

  12. Inflammatory responses in primary muscle cell cultures in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, Nicholas J; Tacchi, Luca; Secombes, Christopher J; Martin, Samuel A M

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between fish health and muscle growth is critical for continued expansion of the aquaculture industry. The effect of immune stimulation on the expression of genes related to the energy balance of fish is poorly understood. In mammals immune stimulation results in major transcriptional changes in muscle, potentially to allow a reallocation of amino acids for use in the immune response and energy homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of immune stimulation on fish muscle gene expression. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) primary muscle cell cultures were stimulated with recombinant (r)IL-1β, a major proinflammatory cytokine, for 24 h in order to simulate an acute immune response. The transcriptomic response was determined by RNA hybridization to a 4 × 44 K Agilent Atlantic salmon microarray platform. The rIL-1β stimulation induced the expression of genes related to both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In addition there were highly significant changes in the expression of genes related to regulation of the cell cycle, growth/structural proteins, proteolysis and lipid metabolism. Of interest were a number of IGF binding proteins that were differentially expressed, which may demonstrate cross talk between the growth and immune systems. We show rIL-1β modulates the expression of not only immune related genes, but also that of genes involved in processes related to growth and metabolism. Co-stimulation of muscle cells with both rIGF-I and rIL-1β demonstrates cross talk between these pathways providing potential avenues for further research. This study highlights the potential negative effects of inflammation on muscle protein deposition and growth in fish and extends our understanding of energy allocation in ectothermic animals.

  13. Cross-cultural adaptation, evaluation and validation of the Spouse Response Inventory: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ulrike; Steinmetz, Dorit; Scharnagel, Rüdiger; Jensen, Mark P; Balck, Friedrich; Sabatowski, Rainer

    2014-10-14

    Since the response of spouses has been proven to be an important reinforcement of pain behaviour and disability it has been addressed in research and therapy. Fordyce suggested pain behaviour and well behaviour be considered in explaining suffering in chronic pain patients. Among existing instruments concerning spouse's responses the aspect of well behaviour has not been examined so far. The SRI (Spouse Response Inventory) tries to consider pain behaviour and well behaviour and appears to be acceptable because of its brevity and close proximity to daily language. The aim of the study is the translation into German, followed by evaluation and validation, of the SRI on a German sample of patients with chronic pain. The study is comprehensively designed: initially, the focus will lie on the translation of the instrument following the guidelines for cross-cultural translation and adaptation and evaluation of the German version according to the source study. Subsequently, a validation referring to predictive, incremental and construct validation will be conducted using instruments based on similar or close but different constructs. Evaluation of the resulting SRI-G (SRI-German) will be conducted on a sample of at least 30 patients with chronic pain attending a comprehensive pain centre. For validation at least 120 patients with chronic headache, back pain, cancer related pain and somatoform pain disorder shall be included, for a total of 480 patients. Separate analyses according to specific pain diagnoses will be performed to ensure psychometric property, interpretability and control of diagnosis of specific limitations. Analyses will include comprehensive investigation of psychometric property of the scale by hierarchical regression analyses, correlation analyses, multivariate analysis of variance and exploratory factor analyses (SPSS). The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the University of Dresden (EK 335 122008) based on the Helsinki declaration

  14. Discrete Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of the mathematics needed for analysis, design and verification of discrete systems, including applications within programming languages for computer systems. Course sessions and project work. Semester: Autumn 2010 Ectent: 5 ects Class size: 15......The introduction of the mathematics needed for analysis, design and verification of discrete systems, including applications within programming languages for computer systems. Course sessions and project work. Semester: Autumn 2010 Ectent: 5 ects Class size: 15...

  15. Discrete Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of the mathematics needed for analysis, design and verification of discrete systems, including applications within programming languages for computer systems. Course sessions and project work. Semester: Spring 2010 Ectent: 5 ects Class size: 18......The introduction of the mathematics needed for analysis, design and verification of discrete systems, including applications within programming languages for computer systems. Course sessions and project work. Semester: Spring 2010 Ectent: 5 ects Class size: 18...

  16. 9th International Congress on Mathematical Education

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Yoshihiko; Hodgson, Bernard; Lee, Peng; Lerman, Stephen; Sawada, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    Mathematics as a discipline has a long history, emerging from many cultures, with a truly universal character. Mathematicians throughout the world have a fundamentally common understanding of the nature of mathematics and of its central problems and methods. Research mathematicians in any part of the world are part of a cohesive intellectual community that communicates fluently. Mathematics education in contrast has a variable and culturally based character, and this is certainly true of educational organization and practice. Educational research is both an applied social science and a multidisciplinary domain of theoretical scholarship. Among organizations devoted to mathematics education, The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction (ICMI) is distinctive because of its close ties to the mathematics community. The great challenges now facing mathematics education around the world demand a deeper and more sensitive involvement of disciplinary mathematicians than we now have, both in the work of ed...

  17. Creation of Culturally Responsive Classrooms: Teachers' Conceptualization of a New Rationale for Cultural Responsiveness and Management of Diversity in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Ming-Tak; Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, there are a growing number of ethnic minority students in Hong Kong schools. This article examines teachers' views of the cross-cultural experience of ethnic minority students, their influence on the performance of these students, and how the diverse learning needs of these students are being addressed. Qualitative data were collected…

  18. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Nakanishi, Hidekazu Nakayama, Kazuo Yamaguchi, Andres J Garcia and Yasuhiro Horiike

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods for the off–on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of three disulfide compounds containing (i a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (PEG, (ii nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA and (iii hepta(ethylene glycol (EG7. Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag sequences in its Ni2+-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII7–10 to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin—a major serum protein—was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  19. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenta, Tanaka; Edwards, Jessica E M; Butlin, Roger K; Burke, Terry; Quick, W Paul; Urwin, Peter; Davey, Matthew P

    2016-12-07

    While genotype-environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates-a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and "somaclonal" variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system). We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype-environment interaction related to adaptively-relevant phenotypes, such as cold response, in

  20. Learning to Be a Culturally Responsive Teacher through International Study Trips: Transformation or Tourism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Ninetta; Major, Jae

    2012-01-01

    Recent rapid changes in the ethnic and cultural make-up of school communities have highlighted the need for teacher education to prepare teachers for culturally diverse contexts. International study trips provide direct experience and interaction with culturally diverse "others" as a way to extend pre-service teachers' understandings of…

  1. Societal Culture and Teachers' Responses to Curriculum Reform: Experiences from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong-biao

    2013-01-01

    Educational change is intrinsically bound to the cultural characteristics of the society. However, the relationship between educational change and societal culture is rarely explored, especially in the context of mainland China. Following a 3-year qualitative research project, the present study explored the influence of societal culture on…

  2. Difference, inclusion, and mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueiras, Lourdes; Healy, Lulu; Skovsmose, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The round-table discussion on Difference, Inclusion and Mathematics Education was in included in the scientific programme of VI SIPEM in recognition and celebration of the emerging body of research into the challenges of building a culture of mathematics education which values and respects...... the diversity of learners in different educational contexts – in Brazil and beyond. This paper presents the contributions to the discussion, which focus on the problematisation of the term “inclusion”, explorations of how the practices of previously marginalized students can bring new resources to the teaching...... and learning of mathematics and reflections upon the potentially discriminatory nature of the structures which currently mould school mathematics. The paper aims to serve as material for the developing research agenda of the thirteenth working group of the Brazilian Society of Mathematics Education, which met...

  3. Difference, inclusion, and mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueiras, Lourdes; Healy, Lulu; Skovsmose, Ole

    2016-01-01

    the diversity of learners in different educational contexts – in Brazil and beyond. This paper presents the contributions to the discussion, which focus on the problematisation of the term “inclusion”, explorations of how the practices of previously marginalized students can bring new resources to the teaching......The round-table discussion on Difference, Inclusion and Mathematics Education was in included in the scientific programme of VI SIPEM in recognition and celebration of the emerging body of research into the challenges of building a culture of mathematics education which values and respects...... and learning of mathematics and reflections upon the potentially discriminatory nature of the structures which currently mould school mathematics. The paper aims to serve as material for the developing research agenda of the thirteenth working group of the Brazilian Society of Mathematics Education, which met...

  4. Predicting the Role of IL-10 in the Regulation of the Adaptive Immune Responses in Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis Infections Using Mathematical Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesham Magombedze

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes Johne's disease (JD in cattle and other animals. The hallmark of MAP infection in the early stages is a strong protective cell-mediated immune response (Th1-type, characterized by antigen-specific γ-interferon (IFN-γ. The Th1 response wanes with disease progression and is supplanted by a non-protective humoral immune response (Th2-type. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is believed to play a critical role in the regulation of host immune responses to MAP infection and potentially orchestrate the reversal of Th1/Th2 immune dominance during disease progression. However, how its role correlates with MAP infection remains to be completely deciphered. We developed mathematical models to explain probable mechanisms for IL-10 involvement in MAP infection. We tested our models with IL-4, IL-10, IFN-γ, and MAP fecal shedding data collected from calves that were experimentally infected and followed over a period of 360 days in the study of Stabel and Robbe-Austerman (2011. Our models predicted that IL-10 can have different roles during MAP infection, (i it can suppress the Th1 expression, (ii can enhance Th2 (IL-4 expression, and (iii can suppress the Th1 expression in synergy with IL-4. In these predicted roles, suppression of Th1 responses was correlated with increased number of MAP. We also predicted that Th1-mediated responses (IFN-γ can lead to high expression of IL-10 and that infection burden regulates Th2 suppression by the Th1 response. Our models highlight areas where more experimental data is required to refine our model assumptions, and further test and investigate the role of IL-10 in MAP infection.

  5. Fabrication of thermo-responsive PNIPAAm-g-ETFE for cell culture dishes by pre-irradiation grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamahara, Yumi; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Oshima, Akihiro; Washio, Masakazu

    2018-01-01

    Thermo-responsive templates for the cell cultivation based on Poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-ethylene) (ETFE) were fabricated by pre-irradiation grafting of N-isoproplyacrylamide (NIPAAm) monomer by electron beam (EB) irradiation under nitrogen gas atmosphere at room temperature, and their characteristic properties were studied. The detachment of cultured HeLa cells from fabricated thermo-responsive templates were attempted. Furthermore, the reaction mechanism is proposed using ESR spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy. It is confirmed that the cultured HeLa cells were detached from fabricated thermo-responsive templates at 20 °C. Water contact angle analysis indicated that obtained templates had thermo-response around 30 °C. It is suggested that the grafted polymer chains would mainly react with peroxy radicals (-CF2-CF(OO・)-) on tetrafluoroethylene unit in ETFE.

  6. Mathematical Modelling and Optimization of Cutting Force, Tool Wear and Surface Roughness by Using Artificial Neural Network and Response Surface Methodology in Milling of Ti-6242S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Kilickap

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental study was conducted to determine the effect of different cutting parameters such as cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut on cutting force, surface roughness, and tool wear in the milling of Ti-6242S alloy using the cemented carbide (WC end mills with a 10 mm diameter. Data obtained from experiments were defined both Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Response Surface Methodology (RSM. ANN trained network using Levenberg-Marquardt (LM and weights were trained. On the other hand, the mathematical models in RSM were created applying Box Behnken design. Values obtained from the ANN and the RSM was found to be very close to the data obtained from experimental studies. The lowest cutting force and surface roughness were obtained at high cutting speeds and low feed rate and depth of cut. The minimum tool wear was obtained at low cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut.

  7. Third international handbook of mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Alan; Keitel, Christine; Kilpatrick, Jeremy; Leung, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    This entirely new Third International Handbook of Mathematics Education comprises 31 chapters which have been written by a total of 84 different authors representing 26 nations, each a recognized expert in the field.   Comprised of four sections: Social, Political and Cultural Dimensions in Mathematics Education; Mathematics Education as a Field of Study; Technology in the Mathematics Curriculum; and International Perspectives on Mathematics Education, this Third Handbook offers essential reading for all persons interested in the future of mathematics education. The authors present challenging international perspectives on the history of mathematics education, current issues, and future directions.   What makes this Handbook unique is its structure. Each section covers past, present and future aspects of mathematics education.   The first chapter in each section identifies and analyzes historical antecedents The “middle” chapters draw attention to present-day key issues and themes The final chapter in ...

  8. The role of gesture in cross-cultural and cross-linguistic learning contexts : the effect of gesture on the learning of mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M.A. (Anthropology) This study explores the role of four teachers’ communicative styles in a multilingual and multicultural classroom focusing on the role of gesture when teaching. To compare their gestural behaviour under similar conditions, I filmed four grade one teachers (two Setswana mother tongue and two Afrikaans mother tongue) teaching the mathematical concept of halving. I classified the gestures and their sematic relation to speech on ELAN using an adapted version of Colletta et ...

  9. Numbering questionnaires had no impact on the response rate and only a slight influence on the response content of a patient safety culture survey: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundig, François; Staines, Anthony; Kinge, Thompson; Perneger, Thomas V

    2011-11-01

    In self-completed surveys, anonymous questionnaires are sometimes numbered so as to avoid sending reminders to initial nonrespondents. This number may be perceived as a threat to confidentiality by some respondents, which may reduce the response rate, or cause social desirability bias. In this study, we evaluated whether using nonnumbered vs. numbered questionnaires influenced the response rate and the response content. During a patient safety culture survey, we randomized participants into two groups: one received an anonymous nonnumbered questionnaire and the other a numbered questionnaire. We compared the survey response rates and distributions of the responses for the 42-questionnaire items across the two groups. Response rates were similar in the two groups (nonnumbered, 75.2%; numbered, 72.8%; difference, 2.4%; P=0.28). Five of the 42 questions had statistically significant differences in distributions, but these differences were small. Unexpectedly, in all five instances, the patient safety culture ratings were more favorable in the nonnumbered group. Numbering of mailed questionnaires had no impact on the response rate. Numbering influenced significantly the response content of several items, but these differences were small and ran against the hypothesis of social desirability bias. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A new in vitro model to study cellular responses after thermomechanical damage in monolayer cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Alice; Werner, Simon; Eick, Stefan; Laufer, Stefan; Weise, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Although electrosurgical instruments are widely used in surgery to cut tissue layers or to achieve hemostasis by coagulation (electrocautery), only little information is available concerning the inflammatory or immune response towards the debris generated. Given the elevated local temperatures required for successful electrocautery, the remaining debris is likely to contain a plethora of compounds entirely novel to the intracorporal setting. A very common in vitro method to study cell migration after mechanical damage is the scratch assay, however, there is no established model for thermomechanical damage to characterise cellular reactions. In this study, we established a new in vitro model to investigate exposure to high temperature in a carefully controlled cell culture system. Heatable thermostat-controlled aluminium stamps were developed to induce local damage in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The thermomechanical damage invoked is reproducibly locally confined, therefore allowing studies, under the same experimental conditions, of cells affected to various degrees as well as of unaffected cells. We show that the unaffected cells surrounding the thermomechanical damage zone are able to migrate into the damaged area, resulting in a complete closure of the 'wound' within 48 h. Initial studies have shown that there are significant morphological and biological differences in endothelial cells after thermomechanical damage compared to the mechanical damage inflicted by using the unheated stamp as a control. Accordingly, after thermomechanical damage, cell death as well as cell protection programs were activated. Mononuclear cells adhered in the area adjacent to thermomechanical damage, but not to the zone of mechanical damage. Therefore, our model can help to understand the differences in wound healing during the early phase of regeneration after thermomechanical vs. mechanical damage. Furthermore, this model lends itself to study the

  11. A new in vitro model to study cellular responses after thermomechanical damage in monolayer cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Hettler

    Full Text Available Although electrosurgical instruments are widely used in surgery to cut tissue layers or to achieve hemostasis by coagulation (electrocautery, only little information is available concerning the inflammatory or immune response towards the debris generated. Given the elevated local temperatures required for successful electrocautery, the remaining debris is likely to contain a plethora of compounds entirely novel to the intracorporal setting. A very common in vitro method to study cell migration after mechanical damage is the scratch assay, however, there is no established model for thermomechanical damage to characterise cellular reactions. In this study, we established a new in vitro model to investigate exposure to high temperature in a carefully controlled cell culture system. Heatable thermostat-controlled aluminium stamps were developed to induce local damage in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. The thermomechanical damage invoked is reproducibly locally confined, therefore allowing studies, under the same experimental conditions, of cells affected to various degrees as well as of unaffected cells. We show that the unaffected cells surrounding the thermomechanical damage zone are able to migrate into the damaged area, resulting in a complete closure of the 'wound' within 48 h. Initial studies have shown that there are significant morphological and biological differences in endothelial cells after thermomechanical damage compared to the mechanical damage inflicted by using the unheated stamp as a control. Accordingly, after thermomechanical damage, cell death as well as cell protection programs were activated. Mononuclear cells adhered in the area adjacent to thermomechanical damage, but not to the zone of mechanical damage. Therefore, our model can help to understand the differences in wound healing during the early phase of regeneration after thermomechanical vs. mechanical damage. Furthermore, this model lends itself

  12. Sharpening the lens of culturally responsive science teaching: a call for liberatory education for oppressed student groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codrington, Jamila

    2014-12-01

    Wallace and Brand's framing of culturally responsive science teaching through the lens of critical race theory honors the role of social justice in science education. In this article, I extend the discussion through reflections on the particular learning needs of students from oppressed cultural groups, specifically African Americans. Understanding the political nature of education, I explore the importance of transforming science education so that it has the capacity to provide African American students with tools for their own liberation. I discuss Wallace and Brand's research findings in relation to the goal of liberatory education, and offer ideas for how science educators might push forward this agenda as they strive for culturally responsive teaching with oppressed student groups.

  13. Culturally Responsive Computing in Urban, After-School Contexts: Two Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglash, Ron; Gilbert, Juan E.; Taylor, Valerie; Geier, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    The academic performance and engagement of youth from under-represented ethnic groups (African American, Latino, and Indigenous) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) show statistically large gaps in comparison with their White and Asian peers. Some of these differences can be attributed to the direct impact of economic…

  14. Phenotypic responses to interspecies competition and commensalism in a naturally-derived microbial co-culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Nymul; Maezato, Yukari; McClure, Ryan S.; Brislawn, Colin J.; Mobberley, Jennifer M.; Isern, Nancy; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Barney, Brett M.; Song, Hyun-Seob; Nelson, William C.; Bernstein, Hans C.

    2018-01-10

    The fundamental question of whether different microbial species will co-exist or compete in a given environment depends on context, composition and environmental constraints. Model microbial systems can yield some general principles related to this question. In this study we employed a naturally occurring co-culture composed of heterotrophic bacteria, Halomonas sp. HL-48 and Marinobacter sp. HL-58, to ask two fundamental scientific questions: 1) how do the phenotypes of two naturally co-existing species respond to partnership as compared to axenic growth? and 2) how do growth and molecular phenotypes of these species change with respect to competitive and commensal interactions? We hypothesized – and confirmed – that co-cultivation under glucose as the sole carbon source would result in a competitive interactions. Similarly, when glucose was swapped with xylose, the interactions became commensal because Marinobacter HL-58 was supported by metabolites derived from Halomonas HL-48. Each species responded to partnership by changing both its growth and molecular phenotype as assayed via batch growth kinetics and global transcriptomics. These phenotypic responses depended nutrient availability and so the environment ultimately controlled how they responded to each other. This simplified model community revealed that microbial interactions are context-specific and different environmental conditions dictate how interspecies partnerships will unfold.

  15. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Filial Responsibility protocol for use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marines Aires

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To carry out a cross-cultural adaptation of the Filial Responsibility protocol for use in Brazil with adult child caregivers for elderly parents. Method: A methodological study that included the steps of initial translation, synthesis of translations, back-translation, committee of experts, pre-test, evaluation of psychometric measures and submission to authors. The protocol comprises a qualitative step, closed questions and seven scales: Filial Expectation, Subsidiary Compassion, Caregiver burden, Life Satisfaction, Personal Well-being and Quality of Relationships. Results: The final version in Portuguese was applied, through a pre-test, to a sample of 30 caregivers for elderly parents. In order to verify internal consistency, we used Cronbach’s alpha coefficient: Filial Expectation (α = 0.64, Filial Duty (α = 0.65, Satisfaction with Life (α = 0.75, Personal Wellbeing (α = 0.87. Final considerations: The Brazilian version presented good conceptual and face equivalence. The results demonstrate that the concepts used in the Canadian protocol are applicable in the Brazilian context.

  16. Thinking on luxury or pragmatic brand products: Brain responses to different categories of culturally based brands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Rotte, Michael

    2007-08-24

    Culturally based brands have a high impact on people's economic actions. Here we aimed to examine whether socioeconomic information conveyed by certain classes of brands (prestigious versus pragmatic classes) differentially evoke brain response. We presented icons of brands while recording subject's brain activity during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session. After the experiment, we asked subjects to assess the brands according to different characteristics. Results revealed an active network of bilateral superior frontal gyri, hippocampus and posterior cingulate related to familiar brands in general. Brands of the category sports and luxury activated regions in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and precuneus. In contrast, brands rated as value products activated the left superior frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The results suggest an active cortical network related to cognitive control for value brands and a network known to be associated with self-relevant processing for prestigious brands. We discuss the results as differential engagement of the prefrontal cortex depending on the attributed characteristic of a brand.

  17. Mathematical concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Jost, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The main intention of this book is to describe and develop the conceptual, structural and abstract thinking of mathematics. Specific mathematical structures are used to illustrate the conceptual approach; providing a deeper insight into mutual relationships and abstract common features. These ideas are carefully motivated, explained and illustrated by examples so that many of the more technical proofs can be omitted. The book can therefore be used: ·         simply as an overview of the panorama of mathematical structures and the relations between them, to be supplemented by more detailed texts whenever you want to acquire a working knowledge of some structure ·         by itself as a first introduction to abstract mathematics ·         together with existing textbooks, to put their results into a more general perspective ·         to gain a new and hopefully deeper perspective after having studied such textbooks Mathematical Concepts has a broader scope and is less detaile...

  18. Boys II Men: A Culturally-Responsive School Counseling Group for Urban High School Boys of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gualdrón, Leyla; Yeh, Christine; Russell, LyRyan

    2016-01-01

    Using a participatory and collaborative approach, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a culturally responsive school counseling group, "Boys II Men," for 11 low-income diverse male students of color at an urban public school. The content of the group focused on five areas: social connections and support, exploring gender roles,…

  19. Scuba diving & underwater cultural resources: differences in environmental beliefs, ascriptions of responsibility, and management preferences based on level of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon L. Todd; Tiffany Cooper; Alan R. Graefe

    2001-01-01

    This study examined SCUBA divers' level of development in relationship to environmental beliefs, ascriptions of responsibility, and management preferences concerning the use and management of New York's Great Lakes' underwater cultural resources. More than 850 New York State divers were surveyed during the fall of 1999, ranging from novices to experts...

  20. Naming Their World in a Culturally Responsive Space: Experiences of Hmong Adolescents in an After-School Theatre Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Bic

    2017-01-01

    This article draws on ethnographic research of a youth theatre program within a Hmong arts organization to explore the ways in which a culturally responsive program nurtured critical consciousness among Hmong immigrant youth. Hmong youth "named" struggles with stereotypes and acculturation expectations, and constructed positive ethnic…

  1. Theory and Practice of Positive Feminist Therapy: A Culturally Responsive Approach to Divorce Therapy with Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzou, Jean Yuh-Jin; Kim, Eunha; Waldheim, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Positive Feminist Therapy (PFT) is a strength-based culturally responsive therapy model specifically designed for helping Chinese women facing marital conflicts and divorce, integrating Empowerment Feminist Therapy, systems theory, and positive psychology. To help clients become change agents, PFT uses clients' existing strengths to develop…

  2. Teachers' Perceptions of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy and the Impact on Leadership Preparation: Lessons for Future Reform Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mette, Ian M.; Nieuwenhuizen, Lisa; Hvidston, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of one school's teacher-driven professional development effort to address culturally responsive teaching practices in a large district in a Midwestern state. During the 2011-2012 school year, a team of teachers and principals began a three-year long effort to provide job-embedded professional…

  3. Implementation and Acceptability of an Adapted Classroom Check-Up Coaching Model to Promote Culturally Responsive Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Elise T.; Larson, Kristine E.; Reinke, Wendy M.; Herman, Keith C.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Literature suggests that improving teacher use of culturally responsive classroom management strategies may reduce the disproportionate number of racial and ethnic minority students who receive exclusionary discipline actions and are identified as needing special education, particularly for emotional and behavioral disorders. Coaching teachers is…

  4. Effects of Science Interest and Environmental Responsibility on Science Aspiration and Achievement: Gender Differences and Cultural Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mei-Shiu

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is twofold: (1) to investigate gender differences in the effects of science interest and environmental responsibility on science aspiration and achievement and (2) to explore the relations between cultural supports (macroeconomic and gender equality) and both boys' and girls' tendencies to integrate the aforementioned…

  5. Early Adolescents' Responses upon Witnessing Peer Victimization: A Cross-Culture Comparison between Students in Taiwan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting-Lan; Bellmore, Amy

    2016-01-01

    To examine cross-cultural differences in behavior upon witnessing peer victimization and the reasons behind the behavior, this study evaluated the responses of early adolescents from both the United States and Taiwan. Two questions were addressed: (1) Do adolescents in Taiwan and in the United States differ in their willingness to help peer…

  6. Becoming Technosocial Change Agents: Intersectionality and Culturally Responsive Pedagogies as Vital Resources for Increasing Girls' Participation in Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Catherine; Eger, Elizabeth K.; Scott, Kimberly A.

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from our two-year ethnography, we juxtapose the experiences of two cohorts in one culturally responsive computing program, examining how the program fostered girls' emerging identities as technosocial change agents. In presenting this in-depth and up-close exploration, we simultaneously identify conditions that both facilitated and limited…

  7. Social Skills Instruction for Urban Learners with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Culturally Responsive and Computer-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Ervin, Porsha; Cartledge, Gwendolyn; Musti-Rao, Shobana; Gibson, Lenwood, Jr.; Keyes, Starr E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of culturally relevant/responsive, computer-based social skills instruction on the social skill acquisition and generalization of 6 urban African American sixth graders with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A multiple-probe across participants design was used to evaluate the effects of the social skills…

  8. Exploring the Relationship between Self-Awareness and Student Commitment and Understanding of Culturally Responsive Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kimberly; Negi, Nalini; Fowler, Dawnovise N.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between self-awareness and social work students' commitment and understanding of culturally responsive social work practice. Data consisted of assigned papers (N = 23), submitted by graduate social work students, which asked them to describe their ethnic/racial background and ancestors' process of assimilation,…

  9. Analysis of sensitive questions across cultures : An application of multigroup item randomized response theory to sexual attitudes and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.G.; Pieters, R.; Stremersch, S.

    2012-01-01

    Answers to sensitive questions are prone to social desirability bias. If not properly addressed, the validity of the research can be suspect. This article presents multigroup item randomized response theory (MIRRT) to measure self-reported sensitive topics across cultures. The method was

  10. Perspectives and Insights from Preservice Teachers of Color on Developing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy at Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tambra O.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings from the first phase of a longitudinal study that explored the influence of teacher education at a predominantly White institution (PWI) on the development of preservice teachers' of Color culturally responsive pedagogy. Despite the overwhelming presence of White preservice teachers enrolled in teacher preparation…

  11. Identification of an easy to use 3D culture model to investigate invasion and anticancer drug response in chondrosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhuissier, Eva; Bazille, Céline; Aury-Landas, Juliette; Girard, Nicolas; Pontin, Julien; Boittin, Martine; Boumediene, Karim; Baugé, Catherine

    2017-07-18

    Cytotoxic efficacy of anticancer drugs has been widely studied with monolayer-cultured cancer cells. However, the efficacy of drugs under two-dimensional (2D) culture condition usually differs from that of three-dimensional (3D) one. In the present study, an in vitro tumor tissue model was constructed using alginate hydrogel, and in vitro cytotoxic efficacy of two anticancer drugs (cisplatin and DZNep) was investigated in chondrosarcomas, and compared to in vivo response. Three cell lines derived from human chondrosarcomas, CH2879, JJ012 and SW1353, were embedded in alginate hydrogel. Proliferation and survival were assayed by ATP measurement using Cell Titer-Glo luminescent cell viability assay kit, and by counting viable cells in beads. Collagen and COMP expression was determined by RT-PCR. Invasion/migration was estimated by counting cells leaving alginate beads and adhering to culture dish. Then, chondrosarcoma response to cisplatin and DZNep was compared between cells cultured in monolayer or embedded in alginate, and using chondrosarcoma xenografts in nude mice. Chondrosarcomas survived at least for 8 weeks, after embedment in alginate. However, only CH2879 cells could proliferate. Also, this cell line is more invasive than SW1353 and JJ012, which was coherent with the grade of their respective primary tumors. Furthermore, the expression of type II collagen was higher in chondrosarcomas cultured in 3D than in 2D. Interestingly, this 3D culture system allows to validate the absence of response of chondrosarcomas to cisplatin, and to predict the efficiency of DZNep to reduce chondrosarcoma growth in vivo. This study validates alginate beads as a relevant 3D model to study cancer biology and tumor responses to biological treatments.

  12. Mathematical modelling of morphogenesis in fungi: spatial organization of the gravitropic response in the mushroom stem of Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskauskas, A; Moore, D; Novak Frazer, L

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish how the distribution of local curvatures changed during the mushroom stem gravitropic reaction and to suggest a suitable mathematical model based on these new data. The gravitropic bending of base- and apex-pinned Coprinus cinereus (Fries) S. F. Gray stems was recorded on videotapes. The images were captured from the tapes after each 10 min, rotated by 45 degrees and transformed into tables of changing co-ordinates of points for each stem. The non-linear regression of these points was performed using Legendre polynomials. From the resulting equations the patterns of changing local curvature for 50 subsections per stem during 400 min of gravitropic reaction were calculated. It was observed that base-pinned stems first bent from the apex, but later the curvature of this part decreased, and in the late stages the apex became nearly completely straight again. Subsections, located about one third of stem length from the base determined the main part of the final curvature. The free basal part of the apex-pinned stems bent upward and after a certain bending time also began to straighten. However, this process started significantly later and was weaker. Bending of the subsections close to the pinned apex did not stop when they reached the vertical position, and the final angle of gravitropic curvature could exceed 180 degrees. Plotting various functions of local bending speed and its derivatives against each other and against local angle indicated that, if the hypothetical signal about reorientation arises in the apex, its propagation towards the base did not follow simple wave or simple diffusion laws. The importance of the local angle of all subsections both for signal origin and transmission was established and a signal transmission equation, involving local angle of each subsection, was derived. After creating a suitable program this partial differential equation was solved numerically. The generated shapes of the bending stem

  13. Mathematical biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This book presents concise descriptions and analysis of the classical and modern models used in mathematical biophysics. The authors ask the question "what new information can be provided by the models that cannot be obtained directly from experimental data?" Actively developing fields such as regulatory mechanisms in cells and subcellular systems and electron transport and energy transport in membranes are addressed together with more classical topics such as metabolic processes, nerve conduction and heart activity, chemical kinetics, population dynamics, and photosynthesis. The main approach is to describe biological processes using different mathematical approaches necessary to reveal characteristic features and properties of simulated systems. With the emergence of powerful mathematics software packages such as MAPLE, Mathematica, Mathcad, and MatLab, these methodologies are now accessible to a wide audience. Provides succinct but authoritative coverage of a broad array of biophysical topics and models Wr...

  14. Mathematical writing

    CERN Document Server

    Vivaldi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    This book teaches the art of writing mathematics, an essential -and difficult- skill for any mathematics student.   The book begins with an informal introduction on basic writing principles and a review of the essential dictionary for mathematics. Writing techniques are developed gradually, from the small to the large: words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs, to end with short compositions. These may represent the introduction of a concept, the abstract of a presentation or the proof of a theorem. Along the way the student will learn how to establish a coherent notation, mix words and symbols effectively, write neat formulae, and structure a definition.   Some elements of logic and all common methods of proofs are featured, including various versions of induction and existence proofs. The book concludes with advice on specific aspects of thesis writing (choosing of a title, composing an abstract, compiling a bibliography) illustrated by large number of real-life examples. Many exercises are included; over 150...

  15. Mathematical tapas

    CERN Document Server

    Hiriart-Urruty, Jean-Baptiste

    This book contains a collection of exercises (called “tapas”) at undergraduate level, mainly from the fields of real analysis, calculus, matrices, convexity, and optimization. Most of the problems presented here are non-standard and some require broad knowledge of different mathematical subjects in order to be solved. The author provides some hints and (partial) answers and also puts these carefully chosen exercises into context, presents information on their origins, and comments on possible extensions. With stars marking the levels of difficulty, these tapas show or prove something interesting, challenge the reader to solve and learn, and may have surprising results. This first volume of Mathematical Tapas will appeal to mathematicians, motivated undergraduate students from science-based areas, and those generally interested in mathematics.

  16. Physical mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Unique in its clarity, examples and range, Physical Mathematics explains as simply as possible the mathematics that graduate students and professional physicists need in their courses and research. The author illustrates the mathematics with numerous physical examples drawn from contemporary research. In addition to basic subjects such as linear algebra, Fourier analysis, complex variables, differential equations and Bessel functions, this textbook covers topics such as the singular-value decomposition, Lie algebras, the tensors and forms of general relativity, the central limit theorem and Kolmogorov test of statistics, the Monte Carlo methods of experimental and theoretical physics, the renormalization group of condensed-matter physics and the functional derivatives and Feynman path integrals of quantum field theory.

  17. Different in vitro cellular responses to tamoxifen treatment in polydimethylsiloxane-based devices compared to normal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyu; Yu, Linfen; Grist, Samantha; Cheung, Karen C; Chen, David D Y

    2017-11-15

    Cell culture systems based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices offer great flexibility because of their simple fabrication and adaptability. PDMS devices also make it straightforward to set up parallel experiments and can facilitate process automation, potentially speeding up the drug discovery process. However, cells grown in PDMS-based systems can develop in different ways to those grown with conventional culturing systems because of the differences in the containers' surfaces. Despite the growing number of studies on microfluidic cell culture devices, the differences in cellular behavior in PDMS-based devices and normal cell culture systems are poorly characterized. In this work, we investigated the proliferation and autophagy of MCF7 cells cultured in uncoated and Parylene-C coated PDMS wells. Using a quantitative method combining solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry we developed, we showed that Tamoxifen uptake into the surfaces of uncoated PDMS wells can change the drug's effective concentration in the culture medium, affecting the results of Tamoxifen-induced autophagy and cytotoxicity assays. Such changes must be carefully analyzed before transferring in vitro experiments from a traditional culture environment to a PDMS-based microfluidic system. We also found that cells cultured in Parylene-C coated PDMS wells showed similar proliferation and drug response characteristics to cells cultured in standard polystyrene (PS) plates, indicating that Parylene-C deposition offers an easy way of limiting the uptake of small molecules into porous PDMS materials and significantly improves the performance of PDMS-based device for cell related research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of platelet rich plasma and chondrocyte co-culture on MSC chondrogenesis, hypertrophy and pathological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezanifard, Rouhallah; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Hanaee Ahvaz, Hana

    2017-01-01

    Regarding the inadequate healing capability of cartilage tissue, cell-based therapy is making the future of cartilage repair and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have shown great promise in cartilage regeneration. However, a yet-unresolved issue is the emergence of hypertrophic and pathologic markers during in vitro MSC chondrogenesis. Articular chondrocytes (AC) can suppress the undesired hypertrophy when co-cultured with MSC. On the other hand, platelet rich plasma (PRP), is considered potentially effective for cartilage repair and in-vitro chondrogenesis. We thus aimed to harness chondro-promotive effects of PRP and hypertrophic-suppressive effects of AC:MSC co-culture to achieve a more functional cartilage neo-tissue. We used PRP or conventional-differentiation chondrogenic media (ConvDiff) in MSC mono-cultures and AC:MSC co-cultures. We assessed gene expression of chondrogenic and hypertrophic markers using real-time RT-PCR and immunostaining. Alkaline-phosphatase activity (ALP) and calcium content of the pellets were quantified. We also measured VEGF and TNF-α secretion via ELISA. We showed PRP had higher chondrogenic potential (in mRNA and protein level) and hypertrophic-suppressive effects than Conv-Diff (mRNA level). Co-culturing reduced ALP while PRP increased calcium deposition. In all four groups, TNF-α was down-regulated compared to MSC controls, with co-cultures receiving ConvDiff media secreting the least. Meanwhile, the only group with increased VEGF secretion was PRP-mono-cultures. We observed synergistic effects for PRP and AC:MSC co-culture in enhancing chondrogenesis. Inclusion of AC reduced hypertrophic markers and angiogenic potential in PRP groups. We thus propose that combination of PRP and co-culture would favor chondrogenesis while alleviate but not totally eradicate undesired hypertrophic and pathologic responses.

  19. Characterization and response of newly developed high-grade glioma cultures to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Paula

    2012-03-10

    High-grade gliomas (HGG), are the most common aggressive brain tumours in adults. Inhibitors targeting growth factor signalling pathways in glioma have shown a low clinical response rate. To accurately evaluate response to targeted therapies further in vitro studies are necessary. Growth factor pathway expression using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant EGFR (EGFRvIII), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), C-Kit and C-Abl together with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression and downstream activation of AKT and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P70S6K) was analysed in 26 primary glioma cultures treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib. Response to TKIs was assessed using 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)). Response for each culture was compared with the EGFR\\/PDGFR immunocytochemical pathway profile using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Erlotinib response was not strongly associated with high expression of the growth factor pathway components. PTEN expression did not correlate with response to any of the three TKIs. Increased EGFR expression was associated with gefitinib response; increased PDGFR-α expression was associated with imatinib response. The results of this in vitro study suggest gefitinib and imatinib may have therapeutic potential in HGG tumours with a corresponding growth factor receptor expression profile.

  20. Mathematical morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Najman, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical Morphology allows for the analysis and processing of geometrical structures using techniques based on the fields of set theory, lattice theory, topology, and random functions. It is the basis of morphological image processing, and finds applications in fields including digital image processing (DSP), as well as areas for graphs, surface meshes, solids, and other spatial structures. This book presents an up-to-date treatment of mathematical morphology, based on the three pillars that made it an important field of theoretical work and practical application: a solid theoretical foun

  1. Mathematical papers

    CERN Document Server

    Green, George

    2005-01-01

    An almost entirely self-taught mathematical genius, George Green (1793 -1841) is best known for Green's theorem, which is used in almost all computer codes that solve partial differential equations. He also published influential essays, or papers, in the fields of hydrodynamics, electricity, and magnetism. This collection comprises his most significant works.The first paper, ""An Essay on the Application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of Electricity and Magnetism,"" which is also the longest and perhaps the most Important, appeared In 1828. It introduced the term potential as desig

  2. Promoting Immigrant Parents’ Engagement in Early Intervention Through Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Service Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Wieber, Wendy B; Sumner, Lucia Quinonez

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of culture-based play, songs, and games in the early education of newcomers to the United States. Current studies examine culturally inclusive practices in PreK-12 schools in America, Canada, and Australia and suggest that parents participate more enthusiastically when their cultural orientation is honored. Although there is scant research regarding in-home early intervention for infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing for recent immigrants to the ...

  3. Long-term, hormone-responsive organoid cultures of human endometrium in a chemically defined medium

    OpenAIRE

    Turco, Margherita Yayoi; Gardner, L.; Hughes, J.; Cindrova-Davies, Tereza; Gomez, MJ; Farrell, L; Hollinshead, M; Marsh, SGE; Brosens, JJ; Critchley, HO; Simons, Benjamin David; Hemberger, M; Koo, Bonkyoung; Moffett, Ashley; Burton, Graham James

    2017-01-01

    In humans, the endometrium, the uterine mucosal lining, undergoes dynamic changes throughout the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. Despite the importance of the endometrium as the site of implantation and nutritional support for the conceptus, there are no long-term culture systems that recapitulate endometrial function in vitro. We adapted conditions used to establish human adult stem-cell-derived organoid cultures to generate three-dimensional cultures of normal and decidualized human endometr...

  4. Culture and math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheang, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Cultural differences have been shown across a number of different cognitive domains from vision, language, and music. Mathematical cognition is another domain that is an integral part of modern society and because there are a fixed number of ways in which many math operations can be performed, it is also an apposite tool for cultural comparisons. This discussion examines the literature on mathematical processing in accordance with culture, summarizing the brain regions involved across various mathematical tasks. In doing so, we provide a clear picture of the anatomical similarities and differences between cultures when performing different math tasks. This information is useful to explore the possibility of enhancement of mathematical skills, where different strategies may be applicable in accordance with culture. It also contributes to the evolutionary development of different math skills and the growing theory that anatomical and behavioral studies must account for the cultural identity of their sample.

  5. La mujer responsable de la salud de la familia: Constatando la universalidad cultural del cuidado Women in charge of family health-verifying cultural universality of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Concepción Pezo Silva

    2004-11-01

    a family member, the woman takes responsibility for their treatment adopting domestic, mystic practices and/or searches for prompt and effective medical service. The researches also showed that it is the woman who notices alterations in their health pattern. Conclusion: The different cultural contexts have similarities that approximate them and both indicate the need for health care providers' attention towards a kind of care focused on the women considering their culture.

  6. Making sense of climate change risks and responses at the community level: A cultural-political lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainka A. Granderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to better assess, communicate and respond to risks from climate change at the community level have emerged as key questions within climate risk management. Recent research to address these questions centres largely on psychological factors, exploring how cognition and emotion lead to biases in risk assessment. Yet, making sense of climate change and its responses at the community level demands attention to the cultural and political processes that shape how risk is conceived, prioritized and managed. I review the emergent literature on risk perceptions and responses to climate change using a cultural-political lens. This lens highlights how knowledge, meaning and power are produced and negotiated across multiple stakeholders at the community level. It draws attention to the different ways of constructing climate change risks and suggests an array of responses at the community level. It further illustrates how different constructions of risk intersect with agency and power to shape the capacity for response and collective action. What matters are whose constructions of risk, and whose responses, count in decision-making. I argue for greater engagement with the interpretive social sciences in research, practice and policy. The interpretive social sciences offer theories and tools for capturing and problematising the ways of knowing, sense-making and mobilising around risks from climate change. I also highlight the importance of participatory approaches in incorporating the multiplicity of interests at the community level into climate risk management in fair, transparent and culturally appropriate ways.

  7. Initiation of an inflammatory response in resident intestinal lamina propria cells -use of a human organ culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta Schröder-Braunstein

    Full Text Available Resident human lamina propria immune cells serve as powerful effectors in host defense. Molecular events associated with the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells are largely unknown. Here, we aimed to characterize phenotypic and functional changes induced in these cells at the onset of intestinal inflammation using a human intestinal organ culture model. In this model, healthy human colonic mucosa was depleted of epithelial cells by EDTA treatment. Following loss of the epithelial layer, expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL23A, TNFA, CXCL2, and the surface receptors CD14, TLR2, CD86, CD54 was rapidly induced in resident lamina propria cells in situ as determined by qRT-PCR and immunohistology. Gene microarray analysis of lamina propria cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection provided an overview of global changes in gene expression occurring during the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells. Bioinformatic analysis gave insight into signalling pathways mediating this inflammatory response. Furthermore, comparison with published microarray datasets of inflamed mucosa in vivo (ulcerative colitis revealed a significant overlap of differentially regulated genes underlining the in vivo relevance of the organ culture model. Furthermore, genes never been previously associated with intestinal inflammation were identified using this model. The organ culture model characterized may be useful to study molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in normal mucosa as well as potential alterations of this response in inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Maintenance of high quality rat precision cut liver slices during culture to study hepatotoxic responses: Acetaminophen as a model compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitzny, Anne; Knebel, Jan; Schaudien, Dirk; Braun, Armin; Steinberg, Pablo; Dasenbrock, Clemens; Hansen, Tanja

    2017-08-01

    Precision cut liver slices (PCLiS) represent a promising tool in reflecting hepatotoxic responses. However, the culture of PCLiS varies considerably between laboratories, which can affect the performance of the liver slices and thus the experimental outcome. In this study, we describe an easily accessible culture method, which ensures optimal slice viability and functionality, in order to set the basis for reproducible and comparable PCLiS studies. The quality of the incubated rat PCLiS was assessed during a 24h culture period using ten readouts, which covered viability (lactate dehydrogenase-, aspartate transaminase- and glutamate dehydrogenase-leakage, ATP content) and functionality parameters (urea, albumin production) as well as histomorphology and other descriptive characteristics (protein content, wet weight, slice thickness). The present culture method resulted in high quality liver slices for 24h. Finally, PCLiS were exposed to increasing concentrations of acetaminophen to assess the suitability of the model for the detection of hepatotoxic responses. Six out of ten readouts revealed a toxic effect and showed an excellent mutual correlation. ATP, albumin and histomorphology measurements were identified as the most sensitive readouts. In conclusion, our results indicate that rat PCLiS are a valuable liver model for hepatotoxicity studies, particularly if they are cultured under optimal standardized conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. The story of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Mankiewicz, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Questioning how mathematics has evolved over the centuries and for what reasons; how human endeavour and changes in the way we live have been dependent on mathematics, this book tells the story of the impact this intellectual activity has had across cultures and civilizations. It shows how, far from being just the obsession of an elite group of philosophers, priests and scientists, mathematics has in some shape or other entered every area of human activity. The mysterious tally sticks of prehistoric peoples and the terrestial maps used for trade, exploration and warfare; the perennial fascination with the motions of heavenly bodies and changing perspectives on the art and science of vision; all are testament to a mathematics at the heart of history. The path of this changing discipline is marked by a wealth of images, from medieval manuscripts to the unsettling art of Dali or Duchamp, from the austere beauty of Babylonian clay tablets to the delicate complexity of computer-generated images. The text encompass...

  10. How cultural capital, habitus and class influence the responses of older adults to the field of contemporary visual art☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Andrew; Goulding, Anna; Whitehead, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the responses of 38 older people to contemporary visual art through the results of a 28-month study entitled, Contemporary Visual Art and Identity Construction: Wellbeing amongst Older People. A framework for the analysis is provided by previous work on the consumption of art and by Bourdieu's constructs of cultural capital, habitus and field. Five groups of older people, with a range of different backgrounds, were taken to galleries and their responses were recorded, transcribed and analysed. It is concluded that participants’ responses are influenced by their cultural capital, habitus and class—which, in turn, are affected by their life course experiences. Those who could not recognise the field (e.g., did not view contemporary art as “art”) created their own meanings that they associated with the artworks. Evidence indicates that group dynamics and class mobility are likewise important. Participants also used the experience to respond to real or anticipated age-associated deficits. PMID:24748712

  11. How cultural capital, habitus and class influence the responses of older adults to the field of contemporary visual art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Andrew; Goulding, Anna; Whitehead, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    This article explores the responses of 38 older people to contemporary visual art through the results of a 28-month study entitled, Contemporary Visual Art and Identity Construction: Wellbeing amongst Older People. A framework for the analysis is provided by previous work on the consumption of art and by Bourdieu's constructs of cultural capital, habitus and field. Five groups of older people, with a range of different backgrounds, were taken to galleries and their responses were recorded, transcribed and analysed. It is concluded that participants' responses are influenced by their cultural capital, habitus and class-which, in turn, are affected by their life course experiences. Those who could not recognise the field (e.g., did not view contemporary art as "art") created their own meanings that they associated with the artworks. Evidence indicates that group dynamics and class mobility are likewise important. Participants also used the experience to respond to real or anticipated age-associated deficits.

  12. ELEMENTS OF COMPUTER MATHEMATICS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATHEMATICS , COMPUTERS), (*COMPUTERS, MATHEMATICS ), (*NUMERICAL ANALYSIS, COMPUTERS), TABLES(DATA), FUNCTIONS( MATHEMATICS ), EQUATIONS, INTEGRALS, DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS, POLYNOMIALS, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, HARMONIC ANALYSIS, USSR

  13. Organotypic three-dimensional cancer cell cultures mirror drug responses in vivo: lessons learned from the inhibition of EGFR signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Nico; Seeboeck, Rita; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Schweiger, Helmut; Smolinska, Veronika; Mohr, Thomas; Boyer, Alexandra; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Lechner, Peter; Pichler-Huebschmann, Corina; Önder, Kamil; Hundsberger, Harald; Wiesner, Christoph; Eger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models that recapitulate human tumor biology are essential to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and to aid in the discovery of novel anti-cancer therapies. 3D organotypic cultures exhibit intercellular communication, nutrient and oxygen gradients, and cell polarity that is lacking in two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. In the present study, we demonstrate that 2D and 3D cancer models exhibit different drug sensitivities towards both targeted inhibitors of EGFR signaling and broad acting cytotoxic agents. Changes in the kinase activities of ErbB family members and differential expression of apoptosis- and survival-associated genes before and after drug treatment may account for the differential drug sensitivities. Importantly, EGFR oncoprotein addiction was evident only in the 3D cultures mirroring the effect of EGFR inhibition in the clinic. Furthermore, targeted drug efficacy was strongly increased when incorporating cancer-associated fibroblasts into the 3D cultures. Taken together, we provide conclusive evidence that complex 3D cultures are more predictive of the clinical outcome than their 2D counterparts. In the future, 3D cultures will be instrumental for understanding the mode of action of drugs, identifying genotype-drug response relationships and developing patient-specific and personalized cancer treatments. PMID:29296175

  14. Seeing risk and allocating responsibility: talk of culture and its consequences on the work of patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Julia E

    2014-11-01

    To improve patient safety, hospitals have implemented interventions to change their culture. Although there is great enthusiasm for these interventions at policy and management levels, we know little about how clinicians talk about "culture" as they do the work of quality and safety improvement. This article investigates the way talk of culture arises in situ, showing how it is a trope that can frustrate, obscure, and prevent the collective social action necessary to change practice. The findings are based on a two-year ethnographic case study of a large hospital in the United States that undertook an organization-wide safety improvement initiative. They show that culture is frequently talked about as a behavioral trait of individuals, which makes the identification of social barriers and facilitators difficult. Culture talk can also obscure uncomfortable, yet crucial social phenomena, including history, politics and inequalities in power that may contribute to unsafe care delivery. The consequences of this obscurity are (1) practices that might make care safer are not considered, and (2) responsibility for enacting safe practice is allocated to those with the least authority and capacity to mitigate risk. The article closes by discussing how talk of culture obscures the role of social context and its contribution to risk in patient safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Learning Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Archie E.; And Others

    In 1990-91, 20 countries (Brazil, Canada, China, England, France, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Korea, Mozambique, Portugal, Scotland, Slovenia, Soviet Union, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, and the United States) surveyed the mathematics and science performance of 13-year-old students (and 14 countries also assessed 9-year-olds in the same…

  16. Mathematical stereochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Shinsaku

    2015-01-01

    Chirality and stereogenicity are closely related concepts and their differentiation and description is still a challenge in chemoinformatics. A new stereoisogram approach, developed by the author, is introduced in this book, providing a theoretical framework for mathematical aspects of modern stereochemistry. The discussion covers point-groups and permutation symmetry and exemplifies the concepts using organic molecules and inorganic complexes.

  17. Revisiting Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Laura Coffin

    1992-01-01

    Outlines a constructivist model for teaching basic mathematical concepts and processes to underprepared college students. Explores five types of classroom interaction incorporated into the model, including peer teaching, interactive teaching, and independent learning. Reports on an assessment of the constructivist approach at the University of…

  18. Creating Culturally Responsive and Evidence-Based Lessons for Diverse Learners with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ambra L.; Stormont, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Students with disabilities or who are at risk for disabilities, and from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds typically receive disproportionately more negative consequences in schools, including office disciplinary referrals and referrals for special education evaluation. In an effort to decrease the overrepresentation of culturally,…

  19. Consortia modulation of the stress response: proteomic analysis of single strain versus mixed culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazzini, R.A.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The high complexity of naturally occurring microbial communities is the major drawback limiting the study of these important biological systems. In this study, a comparison between pure cultures of Pseudomonas reinekei sp. strain MT1 and stable community cultures composed of MT1 plus the addition of

  20. Culturally Responsive School Psychology Practice: A Study of Practitioners' Self-Reported Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Ronda S.; Keller-Margulis, Milena A.; Burridge, Andrea Backscheider

    2017-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) recognizes cultural competence as a defining feature of psychological practice, education, training, and research (Sue et al. "American Psychologist," 49, 792-796, 1999). The purpose of this study was to investigate the self-appraised cultural competence of school psychology practitioners…