WorldWideScience

Sample records for culturally responsive education

  1. Culturally Responsive Education in Music Education: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Vanessa L.

    2017-01-01

    Demographic shifts in public school enrollment within the United States necessitate preparing preservice teachers to teach students with backgrounds that differ from their own ethnically, linguistically, racially, and economically. Culturally responsive education (CRE) is a pedagogy used to validate students' varied experiences, and to teach to…

  2. Designing for culturally responsive science education through professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie C.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2016-02-01

    Educational stakeholders across the globe are demanding science education reform that attends simultaneously to culturally diverse students' needs and promotes academic excellence. Although professional development programs can foster science teachers' growth as culturally responsive educators, effective supports to this end are not well identified. This study examined associations between specific Science Teachers are Responsive to Students (STARTS) program activities and United States high school life science teachers' understanding and enactment of culturally responsive science teaching. Findings suggest: (a) critically examining their practices while learning of students' needs and experiences enabled teachers to identify responsive instructional strategies and relevant science topics for culturally responsive teaching; (b) evaluating culturally responsive exemplars while identifying classroom-based needs allowed teachers to identify contextually appropriate instruction, thereby yielding a robust understanding of the purpose and feasibility of culturally responsive science teaching; and (c) by justifying the use of responsive and reform-based instructional strategies for their classrooms, teachers made purposeful connections between students' experiences and science instruction. We propose a set of empirically based design conjectures and theoretical conjectures to generate adaptable knowledge about preparing culturally responsive science teachers through professional development.

  3. Culturally Responsive Collegiate Mathematics Education: Implications for African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author utilizes the culturally congruent work of Gay (2010) and Ladson-Billings (2009) to highlight culturally responsive teaching as a viable option for African American students in higher education mathematics spaces. He offers translations of Gay and Ladson-Billings' work to Africana mathematics and argues that these…

  4. Culturally Responsive L2 Education: An Awareness-Raising Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Melina

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of multilingual, multiethnic, and multicultural classrooms in varied educational contexts worldwide points to the importance of cultural factors in language education and education in general. In the EFL/ESL classroom of this century, ELT is seen as including much more than purely linguistic aspects as it focuses also on…

  5. Empowerment and responsibility of the culture of peace through education

    OpenAIRE

    Mariela Inés Sánchez Cardona

    2012-01-01

    This article seeks to highlight the possibilities of empowering the culture of peace in the society in general, so it is necessary a joint work of different actors and social institutions. In this perspective each individual must transcend commitment to the peace of the personal to the social, also the State specifically in the case of Colombia must be monitored for compliance with the legislation in story to the compulsory education for educational institutions peace through public policies....

  6. Empowerment and responsibility of the culture of peace through education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Inés Sánchez Cardona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to highlight the possibilities of empowering the culture of peace in the society in general, so it is necessary a joint work of different actors and social institutions. In this perspective each individual must transcend commitment to the peace of the personal to the social, also the State specifically in the case of Colombia must be monitored for compliance with the legislation in story to the compulsory education for educational institutions peace through public policies. Similarly, we emphasize that when they achieve consistently develop the principles and methodologies of education for peace, in institutions both family, school and University, this facilitates the strengthening of the culture for peace in the country.

  7. A Blueprint for Developing Culturally Proficient/Responsive School Administrators in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Jeffrey P.; Smith, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the important topic of culturally proficient/responsive school administrators for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students with learning disabilities (LD). Culturally proficient/responsive school administrators with knowledge and strong leadership skills in multicultural education are essential to impact school…

  8. Preparing Special Educators for Culturally Responsive School-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Bridgie A.

    2004-01-01

    Today's increasingly multicultural student population requires that school-community partnerships operate from culturally responsive frameworks. Incorporating significant resources from multicultural communities is an essential component within school-community partnership. Although such a partnership is an essential strategy, it has not been…

  9. Faculty Perspectives on Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices in Developmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the perspectives of developmental math faculty at a two-year technical college regarding culturally responsive beliefs and instructional practices. Thirteen faculty who taught the developmental class Elementary Algebra with Applications were surveyed. Nine of the 13 faculty responded. One section of Wisconsin's…

  10. Devising and Investigating Benefits of Interconnected Interventions to Promote Education Majors' Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Janet C.

    2011-01-01

    For five years I have supervised a summer literacy camp that connects graduate education majors with students from diverse ethnicities. Each summer I noted I inadequately challenged the education majors to extend their knowledge, examine their attitudes, and expand their abilities to offer culturally responsive literacy instruction to students in…

  11. Cultural Perspectives on Social Responsibility in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yob, Iris M.

    2016-01-01

    The writers of the UNESCO document, "Rethinking education: Towards a global common good?" challenge educators to address their efforts to meet the current threats to sustainable life for all who share this planet. One way that higher education has been attempting to do this is through campus-community partnerships working to solve social…

  12. Culturally Responsive Professional Development for Inclusive Education in Rural Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world (World Bank, 2014). Yet, our experiences working with rural schools suggest that the Malawi education system may be far ahead of many developed nations, including the United States, in terms of their practical and philosophical commitment to inclusive education for all children, including…

  13. Culturally Responsive Education: Developing Lesson Plans for Vietnamese Students in the American Diaspora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the application of the philosophical principles of John Dewey and Culturally Responsive Education in the creation of lesson plans for Vietnamese students in the American Diaspora. Through a Fulbright-Hayes Program a group of teachers from the New York City Public School System and Long Island spent six weeks in Vietnam…

  14. Educating Culturally Responsive Teachers: A Coherent Approach. SUNY Series, Teacher Preparation and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Ana Maria; Lucas, Tamara

    This book examines what is needed to accomplish the task of staffing U.S. schools with culturally responsive teachers, discussing the specific elements of teacher education programs needed for the country's diverse public schools. The book focuses on the importance of recruiting and preparing a diverse teaching force, proposing a vision for…

  15. Immigrant Children Promoting Environmental Care: Enhancing Learning, Agency and Integration through Culturally-Responsive Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet-Cohen, Natasha; Reilly, Rosemary C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the potential of culturally-responsive environmental education to engage immigrant early adolescents. Our study suggests that environmental involvement can become a means and an end for children to bridge their school and home in agential ways. Drawing from a multi-phase study involving focus groups with children, parents, and…

  16. Pre-Service Teacher Disposition Development: Cultural Reciprocity and Responsivity in Early Childhood Special Education Practica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenberg, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative Case Study explored the integrative process of pre-service teachers' disposition development for cultural reciprocity and responsiveness. Over the course of ten months, pre-service teachers completed two Early Childhood Special Education practica in diverse urban communities. The pre-service teachers were placed in public…

  17. Counter-storying the grand narrative of science (teacher) education: towards culturally responsive teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter Charles

    2011-12-01

    John Settlage's article— Counterstories from White Mainstream Preservice Teachers: Resisting the Master Narrative of Deficit by Default—outlines his endeavour to enable pre-service teachers to develop culturally responsive science teaching identities for resisting the master narrative of deficit thinking when confronted by the culturally different `other.' Case study results are presented of the role of counterstories in enabling five pre-service teachers to overcome deficit thinking. In this forum, Philip Moore, a cultural anthropologist and university professor, deepens our understanding of the power and significance of counterstories as an educational tool for enabling students to deconstruct oppressive master narratives. Jill Slay, dean of a science faculty, examines her own master narrative about the compatibility of culturally similar academics and graduate students, and finds it lacking. But first, I introduce this scholarship with background notes on the critical paradigm and its adversary, the grand narrative of science education, following which I give an appreciative understanding of John's pedagogical use of counterstories as a transformative strategy for multi-worldview science teacher education.

  18. Sharpening the Lens of Culturally Responsive Science Teaching: A Call for Liberatory Education for Oppressed Student Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codrington, Jamila

    2014-01-01

    Wallace and Brand's framing of culturally responsive science teaching through the lens of critical race theory honors the role of social justice in science education. In this article, I extend the discussion through reflections on the particular learning needs of students from oppressed cultural groups, specifically African Americans.…

  19. Sharpening the lens of culturally responsive science teaching: a call for liberatory education for oppressed student groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codrington, Jamila

    2014-12-01

    Wallace and Brand's framing of culturally responsive science teaching through the lens of critical race theory honors the role of social justice in science education. In this article, I extend the discussion through reflections on the particular learning needs of students from oppressed cultural groups, specifically African Americans. Understanding the political nature of education, I explore the importance of transforming science education so that it has the capacity to provide African American students with tools for their own liberation. I discuss Wallace and Brand's research findings in relation to the goal of liberatory education, and offer ideas for how science educators might push forward this agenda as they strive for culturally responsive teaching with oppressed student groups.

  20. Beginning to Think Critically about Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Practice: An Elementary Education Book Study in Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Charles J.; McCormick, Theresa M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study student teachers in an elementary education program took part in a book study, "From Rage to Hope", on culturally responsive teaching. Interns critically reflected on their practice and began making changes based on practical strategies from the book. Four themes of learning and change emerged in intern written reflections: Project…

  1. Effects of Culture and Education on Ethical Responses on Our Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comiskey, Christina Pryor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two trends that affect communications are prevalent today: a focus on ethics in the U.S. business operations and an increasingly global society and marketplace. This research project brings together these trends to gain a more in-depth understanding of the impact of culture on ethical education. By surveying students in six countries around the globe, this study was able to get at the divergent cultural frameworks utilized in ethical decision making. The results offer a significant contribution to our understanding of the cross-cultural implications on ethical values in the business context. This understanding provides unique insights into ethics education and the need for a contextual understanding of applied ethics.

  2. Counteracting Educational Injustice with Applied Critical Leadership: Culturally Responsive Practices Promoting Sustainable Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Lorri J.; Santamaría, Andrés P.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution considers educational leadership practice to promote and sustain diversity. Comparative case studies are presented featuring educational leaders in the United States and New Zealand who counter injustice in their practice. The leaders' leadership practices responsive to the diversity presented in their schools offer…

  3. An Investigation of a Culturally Responsive Approach to Science Education in a Summer Program for Marginalized Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Brittany A.

    There have been numerous calls and efforts made to provide states, school districts, and communities needed financial support to increase and enhance access to and opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) related disciplines for marginalized populations (Tyson, Lee, & Hanson, 2007; Caldwell & Siwatu, 2003). As the challenge to better educate students of color and poor students intensifies, the need to provide equitable science learning experiences for all students aimed at scientific literacy and STEM also becomes critical. Thus the need to provide summer science enrichment programs where students engage in scientific experimentation, investigation, and critical thinking are vital to helping students who have been traditionally marginalized achieve success in school science and enter the science career pipeline. This mixed methods study examined the impact of a culturally responsive approach on student attitudes, interests in science education and STEM careers, and basic science content knowledge before and after participation in an upward bound summer program. Quantitative results indicated using a culturally responsive approach to teach science in an informal learning space significantly increases student achievement. Students receiving culturally responsive science instruction exhibited statistically significant increases in their posttest science scores compared to pretest science scores, M = 0.376, 95% CI [0.266, 0.487], t (10) = 7.610, p learn science utilizing a culturally responsive approach was much more beneficial to their overall science knowledge, as it allowed students to experience, understand, and connect to and through their science learning. Likewise, culturally responsive science instruction helped students to foster a more positive interest in science and STEM careers as it provided students the opportunity to do science in a meaningful and relevant way. Moreover, results revealed students receiving culturally responsive

  4. Toward a More Culturally Responsive General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to characterize culturally responsive teaching; consider how it differs from other pedagogical approaches in music education informed by culture, such as multicultural music education; and offer ideas for making the general music classroom more culturally responsive.

  5. Toward a More Culturally Responsive General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to characterize culturally responsive teaching; consider how it differs from other pedagogical approaches in music education informed by culture, such as multicultural music education; and offer ideas for making the general music classroom more culturally responsive.

  6. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Understanding Disability Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2013-01-01

    To be culturally responsive teachers, we must first have an understanding of other cultures and how students from these cultures differ from one another. As we consider the many cultures represented in our classrooms, we might also consider students with disabilities as a cultural group. Within any main culture are subgroups differentiated by…

  7. Cultural competence in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Janne; Jervelund, Signe Smith; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2017-01-01

    the survey, and 199 responded. The response rate is 14%. Data were analysed through descriptive calculations, and answers to open-ended questions were coded using content analysis. Results: Results showed that 82.4% of the informants agreed or strongly agreed that the medical education programme should...... in receiving training on cultural competence. Conclusions: Generally, there is interest in and acknowledgement of the importance of cultural competence in Danish medical education among teachers at the University of Copenhagen. This creates an opportunity to implement cultural competence in the medical...

  8. Culture in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Ulrik; Christensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    As engineers today often work in intercultural projects and contexts, intercultural competences must be part of the learning objectives in engineering educations. Cultural aspects of engineering education should not just be treated as a question of appropriate communication and teaching: cultural...... to cultural aspects in engineering education. Hence the key-question of this paper is how CDIO support the development of intercultural competences in engineering education. The paper explores the implementation of CDIO in an intercultural arctic engineering programme in Greenland that since 2001 has been...... enrolling students with special focus on developing intercultural competences. The discussion draws on the socio-technical approaches to technology and professional engineering practises [5,6]. We conclude that intercultural teaching is not just a matter of teaching in spite of cultural differences...

  9. Culturally Responsive Active Citizenship Education for Newcomer Students: A Cross-State Case Study of Two Teachers in Arizona and New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo; Jaffee, Ashley Taylor

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how two social studies teachers in New York and Arizona engage newcomer youth in active citizenship education. Using a framework of culturally responsive active citizenship education, this article sheds light on how two teachers, in two different social, political, and educational contexts, enact critical citizenship practices…

  10. Cultural Anthropology and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Carmel

    After the Second World War, the field of cultural anthropology underwent an explosive development. Sociologists, psychologists, educators, and economists all added to the increasing interest in a discipline which began by assuming that culture is the foundation of social structures and that every institution manifests itself as a system of…

  11. Educating Tomorrow's Culture Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Stephen Mark

    1979-01-01

    In light of the fact that young Americans spend hundreds of dollars each year on the arts yet have little training in developing critical skills, this writer outlines what must be done in school arts programs to educate culture consumers. (Author/JM)

  12. Rethinking Culture and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambach, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews three books that provide complementary and thought-provoking insights. The three books under review are: (1) "Reproducing class: education, neoliberalism, and the rise of the new middle class in Istanbul," by Henry J. Rutz and Erol M. Balkan; (2) "Technology, culture, family: influences on home life," by…

  13. Culturally and linguistically responsive teaching: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Diane M

    2015-02-01

    As increasing numbers of culturally and linguistically diverse learners are enrolled in nursing programs and employed in nursing service agencies, nurse educators must be aware of their own culture and how it influences their teaching and understand the learning needs of a diverse group of learners. This article offers strategies for nurse educators for being culturally and linguistically responsive while also establishing an inclusive learning environment.

  14. Popular Culture in Mainland Chinese Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wai-Chung

    2006-01-01

    The policy and practice of school education in mainland China have changed in response to the political and economic reformations and opening-up of the late 1970s. This paper argues that, despite the introduction and emphasis on popular culture in some areas of school education, traditional Chinese culture and values continue to consolidate the…

  15. Culturally Responsive Teaching for 21st-Century Art Education: Examining Race in a Studio Art Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, NaJuana

    2012-01-01

    In the art classroom--where art, identity, and culture are inextricably linked--racially and culturally responsive teaching play a critical role in how teachers interact with students and ultimately how students themselves come to understand cultural diversity, social inclusion, and antiracist behaviors. It is important that teachers understand…

  16. Going against the Grain in an Urban Arizona High School: Secondary Preservice Teachers Emerging as Culturally Responsive Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Boozer, April; Clark, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This one year study examines the journey of two preservice urban high-school teachers in Arizona as they enact Culturally Responsive Teaching in a year-long student teaching residency. Factors that influenced their Culturally Responsive Teaching practices are discussed along themes that emerged from interviews and classroom observations.…

  17. Celebrating Musical Diversity: Training Culturally Responsive Music Educators in Multiracial Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article explores outcomes of research into the role and place of cultural diversity in primary music classes at five government schools in Singapore. The study highlights the ways in which a variety of factors such as specialist music training, government policy, curriculum documents, and professional development influence teacher practice.…

  18. Celebrating Musical Diversity: Training Culturally Responsive Music Educators in Multiracial Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article explores outcomes of research into the role and place of cultural diversity in primary music classes at five government schools in Singapore. The study highlights the ways in which a variety of factors such as specialist music training, government policy, curriculum documents, and professional development influence teacher practice.…

  19. Reason, Culture, and Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Steen

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of first a critique of Bakhurst view on (respectively) the notion of “ the space of reasons”, “second nature” and “formation”, and second, Wittgenstein´s view on culture and education, I go into details about how one might apply Wittgensteinian thought within a new assessment...... of education, seen as a matter of “taking steps” within a toolbox or platform generated by forms of teaching. Invoking Kierkegaard, I conclude that the educated person does not incarnate “an absolute difference” in relation to non-educated beings. The educated person is instead the embodiment of “a difference......” ,that is, of an individuality. Education is not taking the individual from A (barbarian state) to B (better having than not having); it is providing the platform for the possibility of the actuality of somebody´s “being at B”. The argument is: Teaching gives different individuals the same such platform...

  20. Culture and Crisis Response in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Dean, Shelley; Henry, Geoff; McGhie, Desiree; Phillipson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    New Zealand is a bicultural nation, founded on the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi by the native Maori and the British Crown. It is also home to people from many countries, cultures and ethnicities. Therefore, culturally-relevant response to crisis events has become a significant aspect of the Ministry of Education's interdisciplinary Traumatic…

  1. Law and Society in Seattle: Law-Related Education as Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderStaay, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I provide a portrait (Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot and Jessica Hoffman Davis 1997) of a renowned law-related education (LRE) program, its teacher, and four of its student-participants. Following the portrait, I discuss theoretical explanations for the success of ethnic-minority students in this and other LRE programs. These…

  2. Critical Theory, Cultural Analysis, and the Ethics of Educational Technology as Social Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Provides an overview of this special issue that addresses the ethical position of educational technology in a society. Topics discussed include critical theory; an invisible college, i.e., a scholarly communication network; the humanistic approach to developing an ethical conscience; feminist theory; and postmodern and poststructural theory.…

  3. Subjectivity and Cultural Adjustment in Mathematics Education: A Response to Wolff-Michael Roth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In this volume, Wolff-Michael Roth provides a critical but partial reading of Tony Brown's book "Mathematics Education and Subjectivity". The reading contrasts Brown's approach with Roth's own conception of subjectivity as derived from the work of Vygotsky, in which Roth aims to "reunite" psychology and sociology. Brown's book, however, focuses on…

  4. Law and Society in Seattle: Law-Related Education as Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderStaay, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I provide a portrait (Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot and Jessica Hoffman Davis 1997) of a renowned law-related education (LRE) program, its teacher, and four of its student-participants. Following the portrait, I discuss theoretical explanations for the success of ethnic-minority students in this and other LRE programs. These…

  5. Cultural Diversity and Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Geneva

    2013-01-01

    This discussion examines some of the major issues and attributes of culturally responsive teaching. It begins with explaining my views of culturally responsive teaching and how I incorporate cultural responsiveness in my writing to teach readers what it means. These general conceptual frameworks are followed by a discussion of some specific…

  6. Cultural Diversity and Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Geneva

    2013-01-01

    This discussion examines some of the major issues and attributes of culturally responsive teaching. It begins with explaining my views of culturally responsive teaching and how I incorporate cultural responsiveness in my writing to teach readers what it means. These general conceptual frameworks are followed by a discussion of some specific…

  7. Inclusive Education under Collectivistic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaba, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how inclusive education under collective culture is possible. Inclusive education, which more-or-less involves changing the current schools, has been denied, doubted or distorted by both policy-makers and practitioners of general and special education in Japan. Main reason for the setback in inclusive education can be…

  8. Culturally responsive engineering education: A case study of a pre-college introductory engineering course at Tibetan Children's Village School of Selakui

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Marisol Mercado

    Culturally responsive teaching has been argued to be effective in the education of Indigenous youth. This approach emphasizes the legitimacy of a group's cultural heritage, helps to associate abstract academic knowledge with the group's sociocultural context, seeks to incorporate a variety of strategies to engage students who have different learning styles, and strives to integrate multicultural information in the educational contents, among other considerations. In this work, I explore the outcomes of a culturally responsive introductory engineering short course that I developed and taught to Tibetan students at Tibetan Children's Village of Selakui (in Uttarakhand, India). Based on my ethnographic research in Tibetan communities in northern India, I examine two research questions: (a) What are the processes to develop and implement a pre-college culturally responsive introductory engineering course? and (b) How do Tibetan culture and Buddhism influence the engineering design and teamwork of the pre-college Tibetan students who took the course? I designed then taught the course that featured elementary lectures on sustainability, introductory engineering design, energy alternatives, and manufacturing engineering. The course also included a pre-college engineering design project through which Tibetan high school students investigated a problem at the school and designed a possible solution to it. Drawing from postcolonial studies, engineering studies, engineering and social justice, Buddhist studies, and Tibetan studies, I provide an analysis of my findings. Based on my findings, I conclude that my culturally responsive approach of teaching was an effective method to help students feel that their cultural background was respected and included in a pre-college engineering course; however, some students felt resistance toward the teaching approach. In addition, the culturally relevant content that connected with their ways of living in their school, Tibetan

  9. Design culture and design education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Bang, Anne Louise

    2014-01-01

    to change the education of future designers. This is an emerging field at a number of design schools across the world, among these Design School Kolding in Denmark. In this paper we understand and discuss design education as part of a cultural phenomenon. The aim of our research is to develop new dialogue....... In this paper we discuss ways in which design education might contribute in changing the current professional culture in order to meet the need for more sustainable futures....

  10. Dealing with Difference: Building Culturally Responsive Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Burridge

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia continues to develop as a multicultural society with levels of immigration increasing significantly over recent years as a result of government policies. More recently, the new period of financial turmoil, continuing threats from terrorism and environmental concerns, have all exacerbated the challenges of dealing with difference in our society. In response, schools continue to face the challenges of the impact of a range of different cultures, languages and religions among their student and school communities. How effectively schools deal with difference and how well they are supported in their endeavours to build culturally response classrooms is a perennial issue for both teachers and educators. A major challenge for teachers is to at a minimum, understand cultural differences as they manifest in their particular school settings and to draw on approaches that support student learning in culturally appropriate ways so to assist them to better realise their full potential. In this paper we will consider cultural diversity in the context of recent school policies, highlight a number of frameworks for addressing cultural diversity in the classroom, in particular the approaches by Kalantzis and Cope’s (1999 and Hickling-Hudson (2003. We also draw on the findings from a recent qualitative study of representations of cultural diversity in a number of Sydney metropolitan schools to discuss the need for more greater resource and policy support for progressive teaching approaches that support the development of a more tolerant and inclusive multicultural society. Key words: cultural diversity, schools, teacher education, classroom practice, social inclusion

  11. Developing Culturally Responsive Leaders through Online Learning and Teaching Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Alisa

    2011-01-01

    The article will discuss culturally responsive leadership theory as a means to developing pre-service Master of School Administration (MSA) students as culturally responsive leaders who understand and are able to bridge differences that arise in diverse educational settings. The issues explored include those related to the cultural heritages and…

  12. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  13. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  14. Contemporary Culture and Aesthetic Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    century, a focus we on aesthetic education and communication. Important were arts and letters which still are important but very much on the defensive in our contemporary culture also because aesthetics often is a debate about criticism rather than about the sensorial and bodily aspect of cultural...

  15. Culturally responsive instruction for english language learners with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Michael John; O'Connor, Rollanda

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes the culturally responsive instruction of one special education teacher with Latino English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities in an urban elementary school setting. This study was situated in a social constructivist research based framework. In investigating this instruction with ELLs, this study focused on how one teacher's knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy affected her special education instruction. Findings resulted in three major themes that were aligned with the current literature in this area: Cultural Aspects of Teaching Reading, Culturally Relevant Skills-Based Instruction, and Collaborative Agency Time. The results indicated that the success of special education with ELLs at the elementary education level might be dependent on how well the special education teacher integrates culturally responsive instruction with ELLs' cultural and linguistic needs. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  16. A CULTure of entrepreneurship education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farny, Steffen; Frederiksen, Signe Hedeboe; Hannibal, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    High hopes are invested in a rapid institutionalization of an enterprise culture in Higher Education (HE). This has heightened the importance of entrepreneurship education (EE) in most Western societies; however, how values and beliefs about entrepreneurship are institutionalized in EE remains...

  17. Constructivism in cultural competence education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jennifer L; Krantz, Steven

    2010-04-01

    A graduate course on cultural diversity, based in constructivist theory and structured on the Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services model, was developed and taught through classroom and online methods. The following research questions were explored: 1) Can an educational experience, built on constructivist learning theory tenets, change students' perceptions, attitudes, knowledge, and skills in the area of cultural competence? 2) Does the delivery method, online or traditional classroom, influence the degree of change? The study used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest control group design using the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among healthcare Professionals Revised. Findings showed significant changes (p<0.001) in cultural competence scores and subscores for all learners with both teaching modalities based on interval scale and in categories of cultural knowledge, skills, desire, and overall competence based on a nominal scale. The untaught construct of cultural desire showed the most significant improvement.

  18. Culture, Education, Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenne, Herve

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that the anthropology of education must focus on what people do to educate themselves outside the constraints constituting the problematics of schooling. Anthropologists must do this precisely to fulfill their public role as legitimate participants in the conversations about understanding and transforming schooling. When…

  19. Culture, Education, Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenne, Herve

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that the anthropology of education must focus on what people do to educate themselves outside the constraints constituting the problematics of schooling. Anthropologists must do this precisely to fulfill their public role as legitimate participants in the conversations about understanding and transforming schooling. When…

  20. A sociocultural analysis of Latino high school students' funds of knowledge and implications for culturally responsive engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Joel Alejandro

    Previous studies have suggested that, when funds of knowledge are incorporated into science and mathematics curricula, students are more engaged and often develop richer understandings of scientific concepts. While there has been a growing body of research addressing how teachers may integrate students' linguistic, social, and cultural practices with science and mathematics instruction, very little research has been conducted on how the same can be accomplished with Latino and Latina students in engineering. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature by investigating how fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents used their funds of knowledge to address engineering design challenges. This project was intended to enhance the educational experience of underrepresented minorities whose social and cultural practices have been traditionally undervalued in schools. This ethnographic study investigated the funds of knowledge of fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents and how they used these funds of knowledge in engineering design. Participant observation, bi-monthly group discussion, retrospective and concurrent protocols, and monthly one-on-one interviews were conducted during the study. A constant comparative analysis suggested that Latino and Latina adolescents, although profoundly underrepresented in engineering, bring a wealth of knowledge and experiences that are relevant to engineering design thinking and practice.

  1. Culturally Responsive Social Skill Instruction for Latino Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Correa, Vivian I.; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural friendships and peer interactions are important skills for Latino students to become socially adjusted in U.S. schools. Culturally responsive social skill instruction allows educators to teach essential social skills while attending to the native culture and personal experiences of the students. The present study examined the…

  2. The Need for Culturally Relevant Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy-Brown, Nyama

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for culturally relevant teaching in dance education. Many dance teachers have heard the buzz words "culturally relevant teaching methods." Yet these dance educators acknowledge that the "dance culture" is not always synonymous with "culturally relevant." This paper examines the issue of culturally relevant teaching methods in dance…

  3. The CULTure of Entrepreneurship Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Signe Hedeboe; Hannibal, Martin; Farny, Steffen;

    2016-01-01

    High hopes are invested in a rapid institutionalisation of an enterprise culture in Higher Education. This has heightened the importance of entrepreneurship education (EE) in most Western societies; however, how values and beliefs about entrepreneurship are institutionalised in EE remains...... prevalent in EE. We argue for greater appreciation of reflexive practices to challenge normative promotions of beliefs and values that compare with forms of evangelising, detrimental to objectives of Higher Education. Consequently, we call for a more critical pedagogy to counteract a ‘cultification...

  4. Cultural Education in English Language teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易虹

    2008-01-01

    The cultural education has various influences for the English language teaching, Therefore, the teachers should pay much attention to the dissemination of cultural knowledge to the students. This thesis starts with the definition of culture. And then it analyzes the cause from the cultural education. We can have a thorough understanding of the cultural education from different angles to interpret the cultural education. The conclusion part of the paper, it illustrates explicitly the relationship between English. It starts with the function of English on the science technology, at last, the paper has a general conclusion of the content, focusing on the cultural education in English language teaching.

  5. Latino culture and sex education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, C

    1987-01-01

    This article points out important facets of Latino culture to which family life educators must be sensitive. If a family life education program is to prove successful for any Latino community, it must be bilingual. Approximately 85% of all Latinos are Catholic. Latinos are not accustomed to extensive support from the world outside the family; the cultural pattern is to rely on support from the extended family. Latino parents are especially concerned that differing sexual mores, values, and customs will corrupt their children; they place high value on the ideal of cultural preservation. The macho concept of the exaggerated importance of being male is inculcated in a male child from a very early age. Girls are constantly reminded of their inferiority and weakness and usually praised for their docility, submissiveness, and attractiveness. Marianismo, the submissive and obedient female character, pervades the traditional role of wife bestowed upon the Latina. Male and female homosexuality is not looked on favorably in the Latino community. Latinos generally employ a certain degree of formality when dealing with outsiders, professionals, and community leaders. Fatalismo, or fatalism, is particularly to blame for Latinos' apparent deference to others and yielding to authorities. Once these basic cultural characteristics are understood, health care providers can pick up on the forces operating to modify this traditional outline, such as social class, education, socioeconomic status, country of orgin, religiosity, the changing role of women, and the impact of the media, as well as the potential benefical impact of family life education programs.

  6. Culture and Education in Micronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Nancy Faires

    By focusing on social and cultural backgrounds of the five U.S.-affiliated Micronesian states, this document highlight issues that pertain to education in this region. The first sections deal with the political history of the region, emphasizing the period of U.S. administration from the 1940's to the 1970's. The history of instititonalized…

  7. Cultural Narcissism and Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajak, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Scholars have described American culture in recent decades as narcissistic, manifested by displays of self-absorption tantamount to a pathological syndrome that has reached epidemic proportions. An education reform movement that is highly critical of public schools, teachers, and students has simultaneously emerged, espousing a…

  8. Cultural Narcissism and Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajak, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Scholars have described American culture in recent decades as narcissistic, manifested by displays of self-absorption tantamount to a pathological syndrome that has reached epidemic proportions. An education reform movement that is highly critical of public schools, teachers, and students has simultaneously emerged, espousing a…

  9. Race, Culture and Moral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummett, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that the great need in moral education is to consider general moral standards and arguments first and apply these to behavior affecting racial inequality, rather than to start from a concentration on racism, working back towards morality. Considers the consequences of confusing race with culture or viewing religion only as a…

  10. Becoming Culturally Responsive: A Framework for Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagle, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for the development of culturally responsive practices in beginning teachers to meet the needs of diverse students in multicultural classrooms. The framework describes the trajectory beginning teachers undergo toward becoming culturally responsive and discusses how teacher educators in liberal arts colleges can…

  11. Culturally Relevant Management Education: Insights from Experience in Nunavut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wihak, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The author's experience with a Nunavut business management education program illustrates how to develop culturally relevant organizational behavior curriculum. The process initially involved interviews with Inuit Elders about culturally appropriate responses to scenarios of cultural conflicts in the workplace identified by Inuit managers. The…

  12. Student Culture and Identity in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriar, Ambreen, Ed.; Syed, Ghazal Kazim, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    The pursuit of higher education has become increasingly popular among students of many different backgrounds and cultures. As these students embark on higher learning, it is imperative for educators and universities to be culturally sensitive to their differing individualities. "Student Culture and Identity in Higher Education" is an…

  13. Contemporary Culture and Aesthetic Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    My focus is on the importance of an education of our senses and body through sensorial elements in order to improve our sense of situations and faculty of judgement. This was the key focus of aesthetics in its classical form from antiquity until it declines from the aesthetic agenda during the 19th...... century, a focus we on aesthetic education and communication. Important were arts and letters which still are important but very much on the defensive in our contemporary culture also because aesthetics often is a debate about criticism rather than about the sensorial and bodily aspect of cultural...... products. We can learn from the early generations within aesthetics not least from Kant when we keep in mind that his investigation of the aesthetic judgement is for the sake of judgement as such, thus for our ability to chose the right conduct of behaviour. The aesthetic judgement is a judgement about our...

  14. The CULTure of Entrepreneurship Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farny, Steffen; Frederiksen, Signe Hedeboe; Hannibal, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    High hopes are invested in a rapid institutionalisation of an enterprise culture in Higher Education. This has heightened the importance of entrepreneurship education (EE) in most Western societies; however, how values and beliefs about entrepreneurship are institutionalised in EE remains...... prevalent in EE. We argue for greater appreciation of reflexive practices to challenge normative promotions of beliefs and values that compare with forms of evangelising, detrimental to objectives of Higher Education. Consequently, we call for a more critical pedagogy to counteract a ‘cultification...... relatively unchallenged. This study applies the lens of the cult, in particular three elements Rituals, Deities and the Promise of Salvation, to reflect on the production and reproduction of entrepreneurship in EE. In doing so, the paper addresses uncontested values and beliefs that form a hidden curriculum...

  15. The culture of peace and peace education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Năstase, Adrian

    1983-09-01

    In the present world situation, there is an urgent need for new strategies of peace based on the common fundamental interest of mankind, rejecting the use of force, and aimed at creating a new world order. Recognising the close interrelationship between culture and peace, and the extension of international interdependencies in reducing economic disparities, emphasis must be given to developing positive attitudes to peace in the minds of all men: a qualitative change in thinking has to occur before international security can be ensured without resort to military alliances and nuclear deterrence. The dangers inherent in the arms race require that education for disarmament be an integral part of peace education. Likewise, the connections between peace and other international objectives such as development and human rights, need to be stressed. Peace education should lead not only to a greater awareness of problems but also to a sense of responsibility and an active involvement in efforts towards promoting equal rights, economic and social development, and mutual respect and understanding among nations. The power of informed public opinion, internationally, in influencing governments towards peace and disarmament should not be underestimated; therefore, greater attention in peace education needs to be given to identifying and overcoming the structural, conceptual and cultural obstacles to peace. What is being undertaken in Romania, especially amongst young people, by way of education and action for peace, reflects a coherent policy, comprises a powerful and effective educational whole, and is contributing towards the building up of an international `constituency' of peace and disarmament.

  16. Forming health culture as part of general education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreeva Irina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines methods of forming health culture in the content of education as a theoretical-methodological area aimed at fostering a positive attitude, sustained motivation for health and personal responsibility for its preservation.

  17. Culturally Responsive Dance Pedagogy in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dance has an important place in multicultural education and the development of culturally responsive pedagogy. Through dance, children can explore and express their own and others' cultures and share their stories in ways other than the spoken and written word. This paper presents a case study concerning a professional development programme in…

  18. Cultural competence education in university rehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteliano, Mary A; Stone, John H

    2014-01-01

    The Center of International Rehabilitation Research, Information, and Exchange (CIRRIE) has prepared curriculum guides for rehabilitation professionals in occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech language pathology, and rehabilitation counseling. The objective is to provide a resource to faculty who wish to include or strengthen cultural competency education in their program and courses. CIRRIE assessed students'cultural needs, and solicited assistance from experts in the field to assist with the development of the guides. After the guides were published CIRRIE conducted surveys to assess their usefulness. Survey responses were highest among occupational therapy faculty. Among faculty who responded, most intended to use the cultural competence activities, case studies, and resources that the guides offer throughout their curriculum.

  19. Popular Culture, Cultural Resistance, and Anticonsumption Activism: An Exploration of Culture Jamming as Critical Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter examines popular culture as a site of cultural resistance. Specifically, it explores how "culture jamming," a cultural-resistance activity, can be a form of adult education. It examines adult education and learning as it intersects with both consumerism and popular culture. Focus is placed on a growing social movement of individuals…

  20. Popular Culture, Cultural Resistance, and Anticonsumption Activism: An Exploration of Culture Jamming as Critical Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter examines popular culture as a site of cultural resistance. Specifically, it explores how "culture jamming," a cultural-resistance activity, can be a form of adult education. It examines adult education and learning as it intersects with both consumerism and popular culture. Focus is placed on a growing social movement of individuals…

  1. White Teachers, Latino Students: A Case Study of the Extent of Cultural Responsiveness Learned in a Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducey, Edward Michael, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to address how white preservice teachers understand themselves in relation to other cultures and their perceptions of preparedness to teach Latino students. In this study, the researcher used collective case study methodology to attempt to address whether there is a hidden curriculum of the dominant…

  2. Cultural Perspectives on Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhoro, Peter; Cochran, Geraldine; Gonzalez, Victor; Rockward, Willie; Sunda-Meya, Anderson; Incera, Vivian

    2012-02-01

    Populations that are underrepresented in physics generally are even more severely underrepresented among US physics teachers. Based on national data from the American Institute of Physics (AIP), 95% of physics teachers are White/non-Hispanic, about 1.5% are Hispanic, and approximately another 1.5% African-American. While 25% of our nation's African-American and Hispanic students now take physics in high school, they are very unlikely to have a role model, of similar race and ethnicity, teaching their physics classes. PhysTEC is making an effort to find and disseminate successful models for attracting more underrepresented minority students to high school physics teaching. This panel discussion, focusing on cultural perspectives on teacher education, will feature faculty from Minority Serving Institutions, which educate almost 60% of underrepresented minorities who get college degrees in the US, and individuals who have taught high school physics in areas with a dense minority population.

  3. Cultural Diversity and the Changing Culture of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nderu-Boddington, Eulalee

    2008-01-01

    The paper will examine the change in schools brought about by cultural diversity and examines the theories that surround the topic. I will evaluate and examine ways in which schools can accommodate cultural diversity. References will be made to cultural and social changes in our schools and how education is affected by such changes. The issue of…

  4. Overweight – Cultural and Educational Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana POP

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Today the natural produced food in which nutrients and calories are well balanced is more expensive than industrial produced food. Besides the financial means, understanding the benefits of healthy nurturing and making the correct choices is a cultural issue. Also the education level is correlated with health; educated individuals report higher sense of control which is associated with better health. Before and in parallel with formal education, children acquire life habits in family. Therefore parents have an important responsibility in promoting a healthy life style in family and thereby giving a good example to their children. A sedentary life has a proven influence over the children’s body weight. The purpose of this study is to promote the idea of education for a healthy life in Romania. In support of this I surveyed a number of studies about overweight in relation with education, self image, regional culture or the influence of media over body perceptions. Landmarks that society promotes are really severe especially for girls and it puts them in a position of inferiority, repercussions on self esteem and confidence. I add my own study results about some subjective parameters of well being. The results underline a dreadful but definite conclusion: people of western culture are digging their own grave with the teeth. Is a fact that poor nutrition is leading to a range of physical health problems and some psychological effects as well. Recommendations. Physical activity doubled with a healthy life style education since the early years could stop the aggressive spread of overweight and obesity. Because our soul and intelligence must express themselves through a physical body we must prepare the new generation to preserve it for at least 75 years of active life.

  5. Developing Quality Culture in Higher Education Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Tamutienė, Lina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to conceptualise quality culture development as a strategic communication process in a higher education institution. Literature review integrates material from recent quality culture development and quality management studies and provides a conceptual framework for the study of quality culture development. The theoretical areas of the concept of quality and quality culture dimensions were proposed.

  6. Decoupling Responsible Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Gilbert, Dirk Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    to responsible management education with their limited internal capacity for change. Our analysis proposes that decoupling is likely if schools (a) are exposed to resource stringency, (b) face overt or covert resistance against change processes, (c) are confronted with competing institutional pressures, and (d...

  7. A Mirror of Voices: A Collaborative Learning Community of Culturally Responsive Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kim Diann

    2013-01-01

    This action research study acknowledged the possibilities of culturally responsive pedagogy by examining digital storytelling via online workshops that were facilitated for a group of educators and educational leaders. The presence of cultural biases and cultural discontinuities in Pre-K-12 education has the propensity to contribute to the…

  8. Evaluation and Analyses of Cultural Diversity Training with Environmental Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Alma R.; LaRocque, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    The Environmental Education and Training Partnership Cultural Diversity Workshops were based on theoretical models and designed to increase individuals' awareness, knowledge, and intentions toward increasing culturally sensitivity. This study reports on the evaluation results from 191 participants. Their responses indicate significant changes in…

  9. Managing Transnational Education: Does National Culture Really Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Kaye; Cranston, Neil

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study that examined the effect of national culture upon the management of Australia's provision of transnational higher education in Thailand. In particular, using Hofstede's national cultural value dimensions as an analytical tool, interviews with managers responsible for Australia's provision of…

  10. Evaluation and Analyses of Cultural Diversity Training with Environmental Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Alma R.; LaRocque, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    The Environmental Education and Training Partnership Cultural Diversity Workshops were based on theoretical models and designed to increase individuals' awareness, knowledge, and intentions toward increasing culturally sensitivity. This study reports on the evaluation results from 191 participants. Their responses indicate significant changes in…

  11. Preparing Culturally Diverse Special Education Faculty: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Patricia; Showalter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes why more bilingual culturally responsive special education faculty are needed to meet the needs of the increasing number of culturally and linguistically diverse students with disabilities in the United States. In addition, the paper presents the successes and challenges in the journey to prepare university faculty leaders in…

  12. Disability in Cultural Competency Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Justin J.; Okoro, Olihe; Kimberlin, Carole; Odedina, Folakemi T.

    2011-01-01

    Improving health care providers' knowledge and ability to provide culturally competent care can limit the health disparities experienced by disadvantaged populations. As racial and ethnic cultures dominate cultural competency topics in education, alternative cultures such as disability have consistently been underrepresented. This article will make the case that persons with disabilities have a unique cultural identity, and should be addressed as an important component of cultural competency education in pharmacy schools. Examples of efforts in pharmacy education to incorporate cultural competency components are highlighted, many of which contain little or no mention of disability issues. Based on initiatives from other health professions, suggestions and considerations for the development of disability education within pharmacy curricula also are proposed. PMID:21519416

  13. Factors affecting patient education from cultural perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD REZA HEIDARI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient education is influenced by cultural factors. This study aims to find out the role of culture in patient education. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted on 23 Iranian nurses. Inclusion criteria were minimum 5 years of working experience in clinical nursing. Semistructured face to face interviews were used to collect the data. Interviews were taped, transcribed and analyzed using content analysis method. Results: The main theme of ‘cultural sensitivity’ was extracted from the interviews. Sub-themes were cultural divergence, cultural connection literacybased instruction. Conclusion: A dynamic process of patient education is influenced by various cultural factors. Nurses must be aware of the cultural norms in patient education to meet their expectations in a respectful manner.

  14. Educating for Cultural Citizenship: Reframing the Goals of Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttner, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Arts education does more than transfer the skills and knowledge needed to create artistic works. It also helps to shape young people's orientations towards participation in the cultural life of their communities. In this article, Paul Kuttner argues for reframing arts education as a process of developing cultural citizenship. Cultural citizenship,…

  15. Organisational Culture and Technology-Enhanced Innovation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions are evolving and technology often plays a central role in their transformations. Educational changes benefit from a supportive environment. The study examines the relationship between organisational culture and teachers' perceptions of and responses to technology-enhanced innovation among Chinese universities. A…

  16. Organisational Culture and Technology-Enhanced Innovation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions are evolving and technology often plays a central role in their transformations. Educational changes benefit from a supportive environment. The study examines the relationship between organisational culture and teachers' perceptions of and responses to technology-enhanced innovation among Chinese universities. A…

  17. Internationalization and Culture in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumby, Jacky; Foskett, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Internationalization has attained great significance in Higher Education, driven by both educational philosophy and commercial imperatives. Cultural change is implied as both a related process and as a goal. The article considers the multifaceted ways in which culture might be conceived and linked to different orientations to internationalization.…

  18. Arts and Cultural Education at School in Europe. Malta 2007/08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Sina Farrugia

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on Malta's arts and cultural education. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Youth and Sport is responsible for setting the aims for cultural and creative dimensions of education. It is the duty of the state to ensure the existence of a system of schools and institutions accessible to all Maltese citizens catering for the full…

  19. Arts and Cultural Education at School in Europe. Sweden 2007/08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurydice, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Ministry of Education and Research in cooperation with the Ministry of Culture are responsible for setting the aims for the cultural and creative dimensions of education. Decisions about the creation of the curriculum related to culture and creativity within education are made on central level as well as the creation of the arts curriculum.…

  20. Cultural Connections in Leadership Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donmoyer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    "Culture Currents" presents the books, essays, poetry, performances, music, websites and other cultural media influencing educational leaders. "Culture Currents" is a snapshot, a peek behind the scenes. It reveals what people are reading or seeing that may not be normally mentioned or cited in their academic work. In this issue's contribution, two…

  1. Culture and moral leadership in education

    OpenAIRE

    WONG, KC

    1998-01-01

    I begin by arguing that East Asia is different from the West in many aspects and that the main contributing factor is societal culture. Only recently have scholars in the field of educational administration begun to pay attention to societal culture as a theoretical construct for the analysis of educational theories. The emerging theme of moral leadership that Sergiovanni, Green-field, and others in the West discuss is consonant with a long intellectual tradition in CHinese culture. The Chine...

  2. Cultural mismatch and the education of Aboriginal youths: the interplay of cultural identities and teacher ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryberg, Stephanie A; Troop-Gordon, Wendy; D'Arrisso, Alexandra; Flores, Heidi; Ponizovskiy, Vladimir; Ranney, John D; Mandour, Tarek; Tootoosis, Curtis; Robinson, Sandy; Russo, Natalie; Burack, Jacob A

    2013-01-01

    In response to the enduring "deficit" approach to the educational attainment of Aboriginal students in North America, we hypothesized that academic underperformance is related to a cultural mismatch between Aboriginal students' cultural background, which emphasizes connectedness and interdependence, and the mainstream White model of education, which focuses on independence and assertiveness. The participants included virtually all the secondary students (N = 115) in the Naskapi community of Kawawachikamach, Quebec, Canada. We obtained self-reports of identification with Aboriginal and White culture, teacher reports of assertiveness, and official grades. We found that high identification with either Aboriginal or White culture was related to higher grades, regardless of whether the students were perceived as assertive by their teacher. Conversely, at low levels of cultural identification toward Aboriginal or White culture, being perceived as low in assertiveness by one's teacher predicted lower grades. This suggests that both high cultural identification and assertiveness can contribute to enhancing the educational outcomes of Aboriginal students, but that Aboriginal students with low levels of both cultural identification and assertiveness are at particular risk as they are mismatched with the culture of mainstream schools and do not benefit from the protective effects of identity. The relationships among identity, cultural values, and academic performance point to the need to reject the notion of an inherent deficit in education among Aboriginal youths in favor of a different framework in which success can be attained when alternative ways of being are fostered and nurtured in schools.

  3. Personalizing Culture Through Anthropological and Educational Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    This report is written primarily for teachers and teacher educators who, in their teaching, curricula, and relationships with students, are struggling with fundamental cultural questions: Who are my students? What kinds of cultural influences shape their lives? How do they — and I, as their teacher — shape and construct this culture on an ongoing basis? What are my own cultural assumptions and how do they influence my teaching? Much has been written about how schools should respond t...

  4. Olympic Education and Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Hai

    2009-01-01

    @@ In recent years, Olympic education has received increasingly greater attention. It is not just Olympic host cities that have established specialized Olympic education prograrnmes across the board, but also non-host cities are developing Olympic education activities to different degrees. Olympic education has also become an important project in the Olympic preparatory work, and has been an important project in the preparations for the Beijing Olympics. How to understand Olympic education? There are many different ways of looking at it. This essay attempts to take the unique characteristics of Olympic education as a starting point to explore the important role played by issues of cross-cultural communication in Olympic education.

  5. Cultural capital, teacher bias, and educational success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier; Møllegaard, Stine

    2017-01-01

    . Second, cultural capital leads teachers to form upwardly biased perceptions of children's academic ability, but only when their exposure to children's cultural capital is brief (as in oral and written exams) rather than long (as in grades awarded at the end of the school year). Third, we find......In this paper we use new data on Danish monozygotic (MZ) twins to analyze the effect of cultural capital on educational success. We report three main findings. First, cultural capital has a positive direct effect on the likelihood of completing the college-bound track in Danish secondary education...

  6. Culturally Responsive Differentiated Instruction: Narrowing Gaps between Best Pedagogical Practices Benefiting All Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Lorri J.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Because of its special education association, differentiated instruction (DI) is a topic of concern for many educators working with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners, whereby bilingual, multicultural, and culturally responsive teaching (CRT) is considered more appropriate for responding to cultural and…

  7. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  8. Culturally Responsive Online Design: Learning at Intercultural Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morong, Gail; DesBiens, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents evidence-based guidelines to inform culturally responsive online learning design in higher education. Intercultural understanding is now a recognised core learning outcome in a large majority of Canadian public universities; however, supporting design methodology is underdeveloped, especially in online contexts. Our search…

  9. Cultural competencies for graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lauren; Calvillo, Evelyn; Dela Cruz, Felicitas; Fongwa, Marie; Kools, Susan; Lowe, John; Mastel-Smith, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Nursing is challenged to meet the health needs of ethnic and socioculturally diverse populations. To this end, American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) charged an expert nursing faculty advisory group to formulate competencies for graduate nursing education, expanding them to integrate leadership and scholarship. The Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education served as the springboard for the initiative. In formulating the graduate cultural competencies and the toolkit, the advisory group reviewed all AACN Essentials documents and the cultural competency literature, drew upon their collective experiences with cultural diversity, and used cultural humility as the supporting framework. Six core competencies were formulated and endorsed by the AACN board of directors and key professional nursing organizations. A companion toolkit was compiled to provide resources for the implementation of the competencies. A 1-day conference was held in California to launch the cultural competencies and toolkit. Dissemination to graduate nursing programs is in process, with emphasis on faculty readiness to undertake this graduate educational transformation. The AACN Cultural Competencies for Graduate Nursing Education set national standards to prepare culturally competent nurses at the graduate level who will contribute to the elimination of health disparities through education, clinical practice, research, scholarship, and policy.

  10. Assisting Preservice Teachers toward Becoming Culturally Responsive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starker, Tehia V.; Fitchett, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, researchers inquired about preservice teachers' (PST) experience in becoming culturally responsive in a graduate teacher-licensure social studies methods class (N = 20). Researchers examined PST lesson plans and reflections, and rated them based on Geneva Gay's (2002) framework for preparing culturally responsive…

  11. Towards a Culturally Situated Reader Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wanda; Browne, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a theory of how culture enables literary interpretations of texts. We begin with a brief overview of the reader response field. From there, we introduce the theory and provide illustrative participant data examples. These data examples illustrate the four cultural positions middle grade students in our research assumed when…

  12. Leveraging cultural differences to promote educational equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Laura M; Germano, Adriana L; Fryberg, Stephanie A

    2017-08-10

    This paper theorizes that academic interventions will be maximally effective when they are culturally grounded. Culturally grounded interventions acknowledge cultural differences and validate multiple cultural models in a given context. This review highlights the importance of considering culture in academic interventions and draws upon the culture cycle framework to provide a blueprint for those interested in building more efficacious interventions. Specifically, the paper reviews literature in education and psychology to argue: first, when working-class and racial minority students' cultural models are not valued in mainstream academic domains, these students underperform; and second, many current academic interventions intended to improve working-class and racial minority students' academic outcomes could be further enhanced by cultural grounding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Culturally relevant physical education in urban schools: reflecting cultural knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, Sara B; McCaughtry, Nate

    2011-03-01

    Using a three-part theoretical framework, the cultural relevance cycle-which consists of (a) knowing community dynamics, (b) knowing how community dynamics influence educational processes, and (c) implementing strategies that reflect cultural knowledge of the community--we examined teachers' and students' perspectives on culturally relevant physical education in urban settings. We observed and interviewed 53 physical education teachers and 183 students in urban districts over 4 years. We identified themes of care, respect, language and communication, and curricular content that explained how these teachers enacted the cultural relevance cycle. Within these themes, teachers and students specified global and discipline-specific components of care, the rflattening of social hierarchies among students and between students and teachers, accommodation of English as a second language and urban communication, and relevant curricular content as necessary for achieving cultural relevance. Enacting the cycle of cultural relevance resulted in respectful learning environments in which students were highly engaged; however very few teachers enacted all three steps of the cycle.

  14. Educational responses to unethical healthcare practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Catherine; Leng, Jane; Gallagher, Ann

    The aim of this article is to explore explanations for unethical healthcare practice and identify educational responses. The meaning of unethical practice is outlined and causes of it are suggested, primarily relating to individual perpetrators and organisational culture or climate. Empirical and theoretical literature is reviewed and research findings are discussed. Individual resilience and the ethical climate of healthcare organisations are considered as responses to unethical practice. Role modelling is explored, acknowledging the role of effective leadership.

  15. Cultural competence education for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Lidia; Horey, Dell; Romios, Panayiota; Kis-Rigo, John

    2014-05-05

    Cultural competence education for health professionals aims to ensure all people receive equitable, effective health care, particularly those from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. It has emerged as a strategy in high-income English-speaking countries in response to evidence of health disparities, structural inequalities, and poorer quality health care and outcomes among people from minority CALD backgrounds. However there is a paucity of evidence to link cultural competence education with patient, professional and organisational outcomes. To assess efficacy, for this review we developed a four-dimensional conceptual framework comprising educational content, pedagogical approach, structure of the intervention, and participant characteristics to provide consistency in describing and assessing interventions. We use the term 'CALD participants' when referring to minority CALD populations as a whole. When referring to participants in included studies we describe them in terms used by study authors. To assess the effects of cultural competence education interventions for health professionals on patient-related outcomes, health professional outcomes, and healthcare organisation outcomes. We searched: MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1946 to June 2012); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library) (June 2012); EMBASE (OvidSP) (1988 to June 2012); CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (1981 to June 2012); PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1806 to June 2012); Proquest Dissertations and Theses database (1861 to October 2011); ERIC (CSA) (1966 to October 2011); LILACS (1982 to March 2012); and Current Contents (OvidSP) (1993 Week 27 to June 2012).Searches in MEDLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Proquest Dissertations and Theses, ERIC and Current Contents were updated in February 2014. Searches in CINAHL were updated in March 2014.There were no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs, and controlled clinical trials of

  16. Culture and Career: Community for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovee, Charles C.; Binau, David K.

    During the past 8 to 10 years education at Sheldon Jackson College (SJC) has shifted to a theme of culture and careers. This paper describes current SJC programs, as well as some that are being considered. The Culture and Native Study Programs, funded in 1968, began with the teaching of the Tlingit Language. As a result, the First Tlingit Language…

  17. EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF CONTACT BETWEEN CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Verde Peleato

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article responds to the interest that continues to raise the meeting of cultures present in school and all that involves in the teaching task. In particular, from an investigation conducted on bilingual education in California, raised some thoughts that should be taken into account when working in school settings of cultural and linguistic diversity.

  18. Contemporary cultural industry and its educational determinations

    OpenAIRE

    Ion CIOBANU

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary media, the speed and extent of communication processes, production and dissemination of cultural property, easy access to such products through globalization due to the internet have created the idea that this “democratization of culture” is beneficial to educational processes. However, there are many thinkers who point out that this veritable “cultural industry” is oriented towards aspects that distort the authentic culture, deform it, change its contents and converts it exclusi...

  19. Cultural responsiveness in EFL teaching: reflections from native instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinarbas H. Ibrahim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many international students from different parts of the world have been studying at Turkish universities, which creates a multicultural educational setting. Due to the multicultural educational setting, English has become the most widely used language for exchanging and sharing knowledge, therefore many international universities in Turkey put a great emphasis on English language education and offer English preparatory courses to students. In order to succeed at better language education, universities employ native English instructors to provide a richer language experience with cultural components embedded in language content. In this qualitative case study, cultural reflections of native English instructors at a Turkish university were investigated. Individual and focus group interviews were data sources for the study. Findings indicated that cultural responsiveness was considered to be constructed through time, and a necessity of orientation process was emphasized. However, the native instructors’ presumptions cause intolerance and underestimation of the host culture. In addition, educational issues and students’ misbehaviors, such as cheating and calling their instructors by their first name, were attributed to cultural background of the students.

  20. DIAGNOSING THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žana Prutina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary business environment places demands on companies to go beyond economic survival and self-interest and satisfy the needs of various stakeholders. Organizations embark on the path of responsibility and sustainability, but many argue that CSR becomes embedded in an organization when it permeates all aspects of organization, including the organizational culture. Existing organizational culture typologies only provide the framework for analysis within the traditional business paradigm, but they are of limited use in the context of corporate social responsibility. After the analysis of major scholarship in the field, this paper defines CSR culture and identifies four types of organizational cultures based on companies’ CSR orientations, namely CSR-related values and strategy. In order to fully embed CSR culture, CSR has to be both strategic and value driven. This paper explores different CSR orientations and makes recommendations needed in order to achieve the desired state. Furthermore, through exploratory factor analysis, it identifies two cultural elements, CSR values and employee engagement in CSR, which indicate the existence of CSR culture. Identification of these cultural elements is intended to help in analyzing the direct and indirect effect of CSR culture on organizational outcomes, especially employee attitudinal and behavioral outcomes.

  1. Education is Everybody's Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Wild, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Statistics education should be a vital concern of anyone who cares about the future of statistics or statisticians, or who employs statisticians. Who should be educated and for what purposes? There is statistics education for those who will become professional statisticians, for those in other areas or professions who will use statistics fairly seriously, and statistics education to provide general life skills and enable an educated citizenry to participate in societal debates which ...

  2. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  3. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  4. Cultural Protestantism and Nordic Religious Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Is there a Nordic model for Religious Education? The article explores how Cultural Protestantism and Liberal Theology influenced the ways in which Religious Education developed in Sweden, Denmark and Norway from the late 19th century until the mid-20th century as part of the transformation...... in the question of education, namely Nathan Söderblom (1866-1931), Edvard Lehmann (1862-1930) and Eivind Berggrav (1884-1959), who serve as prisms for the transnational historical analysis of what takes place between states and social fields. The article suggests that Nordic Cultural Protestantism contributed...

  5. Outsiders in nursing education: cultural sensitivity in clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrew, Jacqueline Kayler; Lewallen, Lynne Porter; Chun, Edna

    2014-01-01

    Cultural competence is a stated value of nursing and nursing education. However, some institutional and traditional practices in nursing education can unintentionally impede nurses from achieving cultural competence. Both the literature and interviews with nurse educators show that despite educators' intentions to treat all students the same, nontraditional students may feel singled out and may in fact be singled out for closer scrutiny because of their difference from the demographic norms of nursing students. To ensure that the nursing profession reflects the composition of the patient population it serves, nurse educators must first acknowledge the Eurocentric culture of nursing education and, then, work to change the environment in which students are recruited, learn, and take on the role of beginning practicing nurses.

  6. Cultural Protestantism and Nordic Religious Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Is there a Nordic model for Religious Education? The article explores how Cultural Protestantism and Liberal Theology influenced the ways in which Religious Education developed in Sweden, Denmark and Norway from the late 19th century until the mid-20th century as part of the transformation...... in the question of education, namely Nathan Söderblom (1866-1931), Edvard Lehmann (1862-1930) and Eivind Berggrav (1884-1959), who serve as prisms for the transnational historical analysis of what takes place between states and social fields. The article suggests that Nordic Cultural Protestantism contributed...... to a model of religious education which in complex ways combines secularization in the meaning of division of the church-state relation with sacralization of the state and its so-called culture....

  7. Logarithmic Time: Its Role in Current Culture and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The timescales relevant for human culture cover a very wide range. A better appreciation of these timescales would facilitate an adequate response to humanity's ecological "slow reckoning". This article discusses the use and presentation of simple logarithmic timescales and advocates their widespread use in education. (Contains 5 notes.)

  8. Education for a Culture of Peace and Co-Existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Guetta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Education is a key and fundamental tool required to achieve social change, especially regarding social cohesion and co-existence. Education affects the most critical issues facing humanity, including the proliferation of various forms of violence, environmental degradation, and annihilation of cultures. I argue that the impact of education is equal to that of economics, politics, and technological advances. Therefore, if we wish to see change, educational reform has to be designed to operate in a global-human context, empowering and allowing people to achieve their potential. It should instil in individuals and groups respect for others with whom they interact, in a global as well as local sense. The article draws on the theories of Edgar Morin, Reuven Feuerstein, and Jerome Bruner, and their contributions to the development of educational approaches that encourage a culture of responsible, participatory, and creative coexistence. .

  9. Cultural Awareness Education in Early Childhood Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anicich, Maggie; Kirk, Rea

    A cultural awareness curriculum was implemented in one multicultural kindergarten class in a Los Angeles suburb school. The project, intended to foster ethnic pride and reduce ethnic prejudice, began the first week of school and extended for 2 months. Four behavior patterns were addressed: (1) positive sense of self; (2) positive self-other…

  10. Culture moderates children's responses to ostracism situations

    OpenAIRE

    Over, Harriet; Uskul, Ayse K.

    2016-01-01

    Across a series of studies, we investigate cultural differences in children’s responses to ostracism situations. Working with the children of farmers and herders, we focus on how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 1a showed that that 3- to 8-year-old children from a socially interdependent farming community estimated ostracism to be less painful than did children from an independent herding community. Study 1b showed that this cultural difference was specific to social pain and ...

  11. Ceilidh Culture and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Mark; Byrne, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Ceilidh is an important part of both Scottish and Irish cultures, and its role within the traditions is central to the onward transmission of music, poetry and lore. There has been a renaissance in Scottish traditional music in recent years, and this article examines the learning processes and means of transmission in traditional music that have…

  12. Culture Matters in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Valerie Ooka; Lafferty, Karen Elizabeth; Pang, Jennifer M.; Griswold, Joan; Oser, Rick

    2014-01-01

    On the Saturday before Halloween, hundreds of students and their parents went from booth to booth participating in science activities at an annual Fall Festival and Learning Fair. The Fall Festival and Learning Fair is a valuable annual partnership where culturally relevant teaching engages each child in hands-on, standards-based science lessons.…

  13. Culture moderates children's responses to ostracism situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Harriet; Uskul, Ayse K

    2016-05-01

    Across a series of studies, we investigated cultural differences in children's responses to ostracism situations. Working with the children of farmers and herders, we focused on how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 1a showed that 4- to 8-year-old children from a socially interdependent farming community estimated ostracism to be less painful than did children from an independent herding community. Study 1b showed that this cultural difference was specific to social pain and did not apply to physical pain. Study 2 replicated the results of Study 1a and showed that individual differences in parents' level of social interdependence mediated the relationship between cultural group and how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 3 replicated this effect again and showed that children's tendency to recommend seeking social support following ostracism mediated the relationship between cultural group and the perceived pain of being excluded. Finally, Study 4 investigated cultural differences in moral responses to ostracism and showed that children from the farming community punished an individual who ostracized someone else less harshly than did children from the independent herding community. Thus different economic cultures are associated with striking differences in social interdependence and responses to ostracism from early in development. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. CULTURE AS A CREATIVE BASE OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. Goncharov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper denotes the vital need for the human-centered pro jects of education updates and develops the idea of the culture adequacy raised by Y. V. Larin in «Education in search of the adequacy principle». The author regards culture as a creative basis for upbringing the young generation, and provides the detailed analysis of its semantic content; in his opinion, culture contains neither value neutral nor destructive connotations. The world of culture incorporates the model samples of human subjectivity, based on the main criterion of perfection. By revealing the model samples of cultural heritage to students, a teacher develops their general cultural competences and the related individual, professional and civic qualities. Consequently, the author argues that socio-economic and political problems, including the renovation of social institutions and industrial spheres, can be solved by cultivating and developing the universality and integrity of productive and creative human forces. Additionally, the paper proves the impossibility of separate development of the general cultural and professional competences in educational process. 

  15. Cultural Studies of Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    El-Hani, Charbel Niño; Muñoz, Yupanqui J.

    2012-01-01

    Texto completo: acesso restrito. p. 909-943 Video games, as technological and cultural artifacts of considerable influence in the contemporary society, play an important role in the construction of identities, just as other artifacts (e.g., books, newspapers, television) played for a long time. In this paper, we discuss this role by considering video games under two concepts, othering and technopoly, and focus on how these concepts demand that we deepen our understanding of the ethics of v...

  16. Educational Policy vs. Culturally Sensitive Programs in Turkish Educational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the perceptions of elementary school teachers about the sensitiveness of principals, teachers, and curriculum on multicultural education. Education provides the transmission and the advancement of its culture while it is developing and enhancing the common values, the integrity and the progress of…

  17. Culturally Responsive Physics Teaching: Content or Conveyance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Taquan Seth

    2011-12-01

    This study, in response to the achievement gap in science and the lack of significant numbers of ethnic minorities in science fields, examined the effects of a Cultural Responsiveness Workshop and intervention on teacher practice, teacher discourse, and student perceptions and connectedness to physics. The sample was comprised of three high school physics teachers---2 teaching five 12th grade sections and one teaching five 9th grade sections of physics---in two separate urban schools in the same section of South Los Angeles. My research design was qualitative and examined eight culturally responsive indicators that, when applied, may increase student engagement and level of connectedness in urban high school physics classrooms: (1) proximity to students, (2) the ways in which they encouraged students, (3) positive reinforcement techniques, (4) modifications for individual learning types, (5) use of children's strengths, (6) scaffolding, (7) displaying an understanding of diverse cultures, and (8) displaying a personal regard for students of diverse cultures. When the study was completed and data was collected, I identified trends in the change in teacher discourse, behaviors, instructional practice, and perceptions of student engagement. My findings, discovered through classroom observations and focus groups, indicated a positive shift in each. Accompanying these shifts were positive shifts in level of student engagement and level of connectedness. There were also the unexpected findings of the need for teachers to receive feedback in a safe collaborative space and the use of culturally responsive teaching as a tool for behavioral management. My study found that there is a definite relationship between the use of the culturally responsive indicators observed, student engagement and student level of connectedness to physics when implemented in urban high school science classrooms.

  18. 校园文化培育大学生社会责任感的“四维模式”%The Four-dimension Model of Cultivating the Social Responsibility in the Culture of Higher Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔佩科

    2014-01-01

    校园文化有助于大学生社会责任感的培育,校园文化所包含的精神文化、制度文化、显性文化、隐性文化成为培育大学生社会责任感的“四维模式”,其中,校风、教风、学风等精神文化表现载体成为培养大学生社会责任感的重要因子,制度文化通过对学风、道德、意识等方面发挥作用来为大学生社会责任感培养提供必要的保证,物质、景观等硬实力方面的显性文化与社团活动、“书香校园”工程等软实力方面的隐性文化也用各自的模式影响着大学生社会责任感的培育。%The culture of higher education can be beneficial to the cultivation of social responsibility among college students. The culture of spirit,culture of system,the internal and external culture included in the campus culture has become the four-dimension model of cultivating the social responsibility for college students. The carrier of school spirit,teaching spirit,and learning spirit has become an important factor of cultivating the social responsibility for college students. Our discipline and culture will function as a crucial guarantee to the aspects of learning spirit,morel value and consciousness. The external culture with material and sceneries,together with the internal culture of club activities and the project of “culture campus” respectively also has an impact on the development social responsibility of college students.

  19. Cultural Protestantism and Nordic Religious Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2015-01-01

    of the relations between church and state. Situated between history of education and curriculum, church history and transnational welfare state history, the article focuses on three transnationally acting theologians, early historians and psychologists of religion and public debaters who involved themselves...... in the question of education, namely Nathan Söderblom (1866-1931), Edvard Lehmann (1862-1930) and Eivind Berggrav (1884-1959), who serve as prisms for the transnational historical analysis of what takes place between states and social fields. The article suggests that Nordic Cultural Protestantism contributed......Is there a Nordic model for Religious Education? The article explores how Cultural Protestantism and Liberal Theology influenced the ways in which Religious Education developed in Sweden, Denmark and Norway from the late 19th century until the mid-20th century as part of the transformation...

  20. THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE SPECIFIC TO THE STUDENT-CENTRED EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remus Dorel Rosca

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present socio-economic realities demand the necessity of a paradigm change in the Romanian academic education, in order to promote the student centred education at strategic and operational level. This could not be accomplished without promoting a specific organizational culture. This would change the role of the universities from the diploma providers to value competence and providers for the employee and/or entrepreneur status of the students and also for their status as responsible citizens. The conclusions of the paper will help the decision factors of the upper educational system in Romania to be aware of the importance of promoting the organizational culture specific to the student-centred education as a condition of increasing the satisfaction of all the stakeholders involved (employer, teacher, student with considerable benefits for the universities and the Romanian economy's competitiveness.

  1. Schools and Marketization: Cultural Challenges and Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foskett, Nicholas H.

    1998-01-01

    Develops an analytical methodology for service organizations by examining four key cultural and managerial developments: understandings of markets and marketing held within the school; organizational responses to the market; use of analytical tools; and development of appropriate marketing strategies. Shows variations in schools' development of a…

  2. Culturally Responsive Computing: A Theory Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kimberly A.; Sheridan, Kimberly M.; Clark, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Despite multiple efforts and considerable funding, historically marginalized groups (e.g., racial minorities and women) continue not to enter or persist in the most lucrative of fields--technology. Understanding the potency of culturally responsive teaching (CRT), some technology-enrichment programs modified CRP principles to establish a…

  3. Cultural Reproduction, Cultural Mobility, Cultural Resources, or Trivial Effect? A Comparative Approach to Cultural Capital and Educational Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Hampden-Thompson, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    We assess explanations for the associations between cultural capital (especially cultural activities and cultural possessions) and educational performance of schooled adolescents in 22 Western industrialized countries based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). We further ascertain variations in the effect of…

  4. Three Curriculum and Organisational Responses to Cultural Pluralism in New Zealand Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, David

    1990-01-01

    Examines three educational responses to cultural diversity operating in New Zealand schools: incorporation of Maori culture programs in mainstream curriculums, organizational modification to accommodate Maori students, and the development of Maori culture and language immersion programs in primary schools. Application of similar programs to…

  5. Challenges in Cross-Cultural Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Alli; Ruggieri, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important and lasting legacies of the 20th century is globalization and the increased integration among countries and economies leading to more interactions among the peoples of different cultures. This effect has also percolated into the business environment and into the realm of business education. We have seen the…

  6. Reflecting Indigenous Culture in Educational Software Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Marilyn

    1989-01-01

    Discusses research on Australian Aboriginal cognition which relates to the development of appropriate educational software. Describes "Tinja," a software program using familiar content and experiences, Aboriginal characters and cultural values, extensive graphics and animation, peer and group work, and open-ended design to help young…

  7. Youth Digital Cultural Consumption and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Pini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Media and technological devices function as socializing agents during children’s leisure and entertainment time. Drawing from the theory of cultural consumption, a socio educational approach to students’ digital practices, and media literacy, this qualitative study seeks to explore and describe students’ cultural consumption profile. The authors explore the representations and meanings of digital practices of public school students of a predominately working class neighborhood situated in the periphery of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Findings highlight different aspects of youth cultural consumption profile. Two themes were identified: a children use computers for a multiplicity of different activities enacting multitasking practices; and b children develop new forms of digital practices for social digital interaction that are expressed in the “need” to be connected, the production and use of shared codes and the establishment of ambivalent relations with social media platforms. Implications for education are explored.''

  8. Hermeneutic notions augment cultural safety education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Deb G

    2005-09-01

    Nurses are beginning to demand educational approaches that confront racism, rather than teach cultural diversity. One example of the latter approach is the introduction of kawa whakaruruhau, or cultural safety, in nursing and midwifery education in New Zealand. In the nursing and midwifery context of kawa whakaruruhau, nurses and midwives recognize, respect, and nurture the unique cultural identity of New Zealand's indigenous people, the tangata whenua, and safely meets their needs, expectations, and rights. In this article, I integrate literature pertaining to the implementation of cultural safety with the findings of a hermeneutic project that described the experience of nursing people from cultures other than one's own, and argue that the Gadamerian notions of "horizon," "prejudice," and "play" can be used to facilitate understanding of the tensions and contradictions inherent in cross-cultural practice. In addition, I recommend strategies that enable students to explore the prejudices, paradoxes, and possibilities experienced personally and professionally. As Gadamer noted, the art is in seeing what is questionable. There is also art in knowing how to question in a manner that makes new understanding possible.

  9. Peculiarities Of Cultural Interaction In Education: The US Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baybakova Olga

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Article deals with the problem of multicultural education. Ukraine, being a multicultural society, requires a new conception of the world, aimed at integrating cultures and nations, their further convergence as well as cultural enrichment. In this context the experience of many foreign countries, especially the USA, is very interesting. This country differs from average multicultural nations in a range of peculiarities, one of which is the fact that cultural interaction was not within an individual ethnos, but within immigrants–descendants of different countries, representatives of various cultures. It is underlined that the USA is the country that underwent durable trials in search for the most optimum ways to provide cultural interaction. The most modern response to the cultural diversity at the end of the 20th century in the USA became the policy of multiculturalism. Multiculturalism is considered to be a democratic policy of solving the problem of cultural and social diversity in the society, which includes educational, linguistic, economic and social components and has specific mechanisms of embodiment.

  10. Enhancing cultural competence in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Janne; Norredam, Marie; Dogra, Nisha

    2017-01-01

    A health system serving diverse populations requires health professionals who are competent in caring for patients and population groups who differ in e.g. age, gender, socio-economic status, migrant status, and ethnicity. Cultural competence (CC) among health professionals is viewed as one...... the project Culturally Competent in Medical Education involving 13 partners from 11 countries.4 The project aimed to support the implementation of CC in medical curricula. First, a Delphi Study involving 34 experts was conducted to develop a framework of core cultural competencies for medical school teachers...... The proposed guidelines were presented in September 2015 in Amsterdam at a workshop entitled: “How to integrate cultural competence in medical education”. A range of participants attended the workshop, including the project partners, deans and faculty members of Dutch medical schools, physicians, and students...

  11. The educational attributes and responsibilities of effective medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, Charles J; Searle, Nancy S; Gunderman, Richard; Krane, N Kevin; Perkowski, Linda; Schutze, Gordon E; Steinert, Yvonne

    2011-04-01

    Of the many roles that the academic-educator may fulfill, that of teacher is particularly challenging. Building on prior recommendations from the literature, this article identifies the skill set of teachers across the medical education continuum-characteristics of attitude and attributes, knowledge, and pedagogic skills that permit effective teaching to be linked with effective learning and understanding. This examination which characterizes teachers' attitudes, knowledge, and skills serves to reemphasize the centrality of teaching within medical education, provides direction for faculty and institutions alike in the discharge of academic responsibilities, and makes educational accountability clear. This listing of teacher attitudes and responsibilities was vetted in 2009 by medical education leaders from across North America during a national conference on faculty development.A set of recommendations concerning faculty development issues for medical teachers is offered. The recommendations are intended to establish an academic culture in medical education that values and rewards-academically and fiscally-those centrally committed to the role of teacher. The challenges of defining skills, developing and funding programs, and ongoing evaluation must be faced to achieve success in teaching throughout medical education, now and in the future. Faculty members, fellow learners, and patients deserve no less.

  12. The Importance of Ethnic Cultural Competency in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cultural competency in physical education is unmistakable. The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) has identified elements of cultural competency within both the National Standards for Physical Education and the National Standards and Guidelines for Physical Education Teacher Education. Although there…

  13. Culture-Based Arts Education That Teaches against the Grain: A Model for Place-Specific Material Culture Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bequette, James W.

    2014-01-01

    When 50 Midwest teachers in two public schools and one Reservation school worked in respectful, knowledgeable, and power-sharing ways with local Indigenous elders, artists, and academics, the outcome was often culture-based arts education that teaches against the grain. This collaboration and the culturally responsive pedagogy it inspired led to…

  14. EDUCATION AS A SOCIO-CULTURAL PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A. SHTURBA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article author analyze the socio-cultural phenomenon of education through the prism of its values and target components. Understanding of the role and place of education in society is not possible out of the human essence context. In living nature man appears as a phenomenon - this thesis is recognized the absolute majoriy of scientific and philosophical theories, concepts and doctrines, including non-humanistic oriented. It is known that man is a social being - society is environment for its full life. As Aristotle said, only the gods and the animals can live outside society. However, human nature does not imply a simple social existence in the form of an intensive exchange of information with similar entities and, based on this, building complex collective actions. The man has a mind that is capable of abstract thought, speech, language, complex psyche, important component of which is imagination. These features formed the basis of theoretical and methodological basis of the analysis of education as a phenomenon. The author indicated value and target measurement of socio-cultural phenomenon of education, which led to the conclusion about the need to rely on a properly organized philosophical and pedagogical knowledge, the importance of implementation in the educational process of program-target approach and the relevance of the audit of modern educational models for nonborrowed trainings, upbringing and socialization. doi: 10.17748/2075-9908-2016-8-2/1-124-126. [en

  15. Enhancing cultural awareness education for undergraduate medical students: Initial findings from a unique cultural immersion activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Sargeant

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Cultural awareness education is mandatory for medical programs, with particular emphasis on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. However, there is limited evidence to measure the impact of such education has on medical students. Aims This paper presents the development and delivery of a cultural immersion activity for first year undergraduate medical students. Additionally we explore how this type of activity may improve attitudes, comprehension and perceived competence relating to working with and understanding people of different cultures. Methods A pre- and post-survey design was utilised in connection with a cultural immersion activity. First year medical students (N=284, responses 196, 69 per cent from three cohorts (2012–2014 inclusive voluntarily completed a cultural awareness questionnaire, which contained items that related to perceptions, personal characteristics and educational competence. The main outcome measures were changes in perceived cultural knowledge, awareness, beliefs and attitudes. Data were analysed using principal component analysis and obtained means comparison. Results Principal component analysis revealed five dimensions for pre-post comparison: Knowledge Acquisition, Perceptions of Role Modelling, Internal Beliefs and Reflections, Personality Variables and Institutional Influences. Non-parametric means comparison showed increased ratings for knowledge acquisition and institutional influences (p<0.001, whilst a decline was noted for the personality variables (p<0.05. Conclusion Cultural immersion has great potential to elicit positive shifts in attitudinal and knowledge related aspects of cultural awareness at early stages in medical curricula. Negative directions also suggest that students question their beliefs and behaviours relating to cultural knowledge.

  16. Cultural Competency Education in Academic Dental Institutions in Australia and New Zealand: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Sheree L; Hayes, Melanie J; Taylor, Jane A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the status of cultural competency education in Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy programs. The study sought to explore the extent to which cultural competence is included in these programs' curricula, building on similar studies conducted in the United States and thus contributing to the international body of knowledge on this topic. A 12-item instrument was designed with questions in four areas (demographics, content of cultural competency education, organization of overall program curriculum, and educational methods used to teach cultural competence) and was sent to all Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy educational programs. Of the total 24 programs, 15 responded for a response rate of 62.5%. The results showed that lectures were the most frequent teaching method used in cultural competency education; however, the variation in responses indicated inconsistencies across study participants, as discussions and self-directed learning also featured prominently in the responses. The majority of respondents reported that cultural competence was not taught as a specific course but rather integrated into their programs' existing curricula. The variations in methods may indicate the need for a standardized framework for cultural competency education in these countries. In addition, the notion of cultural competency education in academic dental institutions demands additional evaluation, and further research is required to develop a solid evidence base on which to develop cultural competency education, specifically regarding content, most effective pedagogies, and assessment of student preparedness.

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and c...

  18. Responsibility and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, J L

    1999-09-01

    Ethical assumptions of psychiatry training and practice in a postmodern society, and of values and their linked beliefs have become important to search for and to acquire if a psychiatrist is to work in an informed, safe and helpful manner. These educational themes have particularly impacted on mental health services in the past 12 months and are reflected in the publications, including several editorials, reviewed. It is unsurprising that this literature is not evidence based in a restricted sense; but instead the area reviewed is within the field of opinion, purpose of regulatory bodies, and the influence of the public through user groups and the ballot box.

  19. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE INTERFERENCE IN PLURILINGUAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackett-Jones, A.V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with interlingual phenomena that occur in the process of multiple language acquisition in a learning environment. The notions of language interference and transfer put forward by the theories of bilingualism, give useful insights when applied to the modern day educational trends. Language and culture interference is an important aspect to be considered with regard to teaching of plurilingual learners, whose communicative competence is formed on the basis of several linguistic and cultural systems that interact with each other and exert mutual influence.

  20. Secondary English Learners: Strengthening Their Literacy Skills through Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    In high school English classrooms where English language learners may be at risk of academic failure, Culturally Responsive Teaching can help educators build an inclusive community in which all students can improve their literacy skills.

  1. Secondary English Learners: Strengthening Their Literacy Skills through Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    In high school English classrooms where English language learners may be at risk of academic failure, Culturally Responsive Teaching can help educators build an inclusive community in which all students can improve their literacy skills.

  2. Decoupling Responsible Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Gilbert, Dirk Ulrich

    stringency, (2) face overt or covert resistance against change processes, (3) are confronted with competing institutional pressures, and (4) perceive institutional demands as ambiguous. The discussion points to two implications. While decoupling may give rise to the illusion that responsible management...

  3. Educating Gerontologists for Cultural Proficiency in End-of-Life Care Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Gary L.; Sherman, Patricia A.; Bullock, Karen

    2009-01-01

    An educational program was developed to train practitioners to provide care for patients and families that are responsive to cultural concerns. The aim was to increase knowledge and improve attitudes toward providing culturally proficient and culturally sensitive care for patients and families facing life-threatening illnesses. The program…

  4. Do Cultural Differences Matter In Development Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bebenova - Nikolova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the impact of cultural differences on the implementation of Development Education (DE. Firstly, it presents dimensions of cultural differences and gives reasons on the selection of Hofstede’s five dimensions model to be used for comparison between national cultures. Then the article presents some findings on cultural differences based on surveyed school practitioners’ perceptions on the main issues of DE (economic, political, environmental and social. The evaluation survey, implemented in four EU countries (UK, PL, BG and Cyprus, is part of the project ‘The world from our doorstep’, funded by EuropeAid . It was based on a selfassessment questionnaire as well as on focus groups discussions, including multiple-choice activities. Using Hofstede’s model, the paper draws certain suppositions and then compares them with the survey results. Another applied approach is field observation on how DE was being implemented in the project countries. The conclusions derived from the comparison between Hofstede’s cultural dimensions and the project findings indicate some ideas on defining the content of the DE to become more culturally open and thus more effective. Building teachers’ intercultural competence and awareness of interconnectedness is timely and necessity-driven, especially under the framework of DE goals.

  5. International Education and Cultural Heritage: Alliance or Antagonism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandiraki, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Although international education is difficult to define, its promotion of cultural diversity is widely accepted. Cultural heritage is the backbone and the product of cultural histories; it is, therefore, essential to national identity construction. As international education is very diverse, its relationship with cultural heritage ranges from…

  6. Culturally Relevant Education: Extending the Conversation to Religious Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Brittany; Amatullah, Tasneem; Laughter, Judson

    2016-01-01

    Culturally relevant education represents a wide collection of pedagogies of opposition to social injustice and holds a commitment to collective empowerment and social justice. By using culturally relevant education as a framework, we make the case to include religious diversity as a part of culturally relevant education intentionally. We believe…

  7. Promoting collaboration and cultural competence for physician assistant and physical therapist students: a cross-cultural decentralized interprofessional education model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen De Oliveira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As the United States health care model progresses towards medical teams and the country’s population continues to diversify, the need for health professional education programs to develop and implement culturally specific interprofessional education (IPE becomes increasingly imperative. A wide range of models exists for delivering and implementing IPE in health education, but none have included the cultural components that are vital in educating the health professional. Methods: A cross-cultural decentralized IPE model for physician assistant (PA and physical therapy (PT students was developed. This three-part IPE series was created using an established cultural curricular model and began with the exploration of self, continued with the examination of various dimensions of culture, and concluded with the exploration of the intersection between health and culture. We assessed student satisfaction of the IPE experiences and students’ engagement and attitudes towards IPE using a three-item open-ended questionnaire administered after each cross-cultural activity and the Interprofessional Education Series Survey (IESS upon the completion of the series. Results: IESS responses showed that PA and PT students reported benefits in interprofessional collaboration and cultural awareness and expressed overall satisfaction with the series. Qualitative analysis revealed growth in student response depth consistent with the scaffolded focus of each IPE module in the series. Conclusion: The trends in this three-part series suggest that institutions looking to develop culturally inclusive IPE educational initiatives may have success through a decentralized model mirroring the effective cultural progression focused on addressing exploration of self, examination of various dimensions of culture, and exploration of the intersection between health and culture.

  8. Cultur(ally) Jammed: Culture Jams as a Form of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ulyssa

    2012-01-01

    Does the person become the name or does the name become the person? This question was asked by a participant of my culture jam entitled, "What's my name?" In this culture jam, I asked people to discern the name of a person based solely on their appearance and a list of possible names below their picture. This article aims to show how culture jams…

  9. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  10. Cultural Differences in School Education between China and Western Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张梦娟

    2013-01-01

    Intercultural communication has become a necessary phenomenon,we should introduce some cultural background knowledge in English teaching. This essay is aimed at discussing the cultural differences in school education between China and Western countries in three aspects-the different forms of school education,the different roles of teachers in school education,the different goals of school education.

  11. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  12. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  13. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  14. Critical Culture: Environmental Adult Education in Public Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lorraine; Clover, Darlene E.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explores how museums, as educational and cultural institutions, can become agents of socioecological transformation. The ideas of critical museum studies and environmental adult education are reviewed, and three examples of environmental adult education in museums are discussed.

  15. The Dilemma of Cultural Responsiveness and Professionalization: Listening Closer to Immigrant Teachers Who Teach Children of Recent Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Jennifer Keys; Tobin, Joseph; Arzubiaga, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Many scholars in the fields of teacher education, multicultural education, and bilingual education have argued that children of recent immigrants are best served in classrooms that have teachers who understand the cultural background and the home language of their students. Culturally knowledgeable and responsive teachers are…

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and corporate ethics programs for CSR.

  17. Promoting a Culture of Scholarship among Educational Developers: Exploring Institutional Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Fay

    2014-01-01

    Educational developers tend to be located in centres and units of teaching and learning outside the academic mainstream. They have little opportunity to engage in scholarship. Through an overview of the literature on educational development and educational professional roles and responsibilities, the author suggests that promoting a culture of…

  18. Education for Responsible Citizenship: Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghid, Yusef

    2009-01-01

    There is an abundance of literature on citizenship education. This essay is an attempt to show how deliberation is used in university classroom pedagogy, to engender in students a commitment to becoming responsible citizens of a post-apartheid South Africa. Firstly, I show that controversy can be attended to through deliberation, with specific…

  19. Child Abuse: The Educator's Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Office of the Attorney General, Sacramento. School Safety Center.

    Addressing educators and citing the California Penal Code, this booklet discusses the legal responsibilities of persons in child care situations regarding incidents of suspected child abuse. Included are: (1) a definition of child abuse and neglect; (2) reporting procedures including liability of failure to report and immunity of the reporting…

  20. Converging Recommendations for Culturally Responsive Literacy Practices: Students with Learning Disabilities, English Language Learners, and Socioculturally Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Susan V.; Rao, Shaila; Protacio, Maria Selena

    2015-01-01

    This study examines culturally responsive pedagogy across the fields of special education, multicultural literacy education, and teaching English language learners. A systematic review of recommendations identified culturally responsive practices in five key areas: dialogue, collaboration, visual representation, explicit instruction, and inquiry.…

  1. Organizational culture during the accident response process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of an organization to effectively move from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy may well depend on the organization having the ability to balance these two apparently dichotomous cultural styles. The organization which is most capable of making the necessary transition in an optimal manner may well exhibit some aspects of both cultural styles during normal operations. Data collected at one NPP does exhibit this pattern of results, with the organization exhibiting a clear hierarchical chain of command and perceived conventional behavioral expectations as well as exhibiting a more decentralized and collegial approach to decisionmaking, a team work orientation, and informal communications. Thus, it is expected that this organization possesses the capabilities to make a successful transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. Data collected at a second NPP more strongly exhibits the traditional style suggested as being important during the anticipatory strategy, with more formal communications and bureaucratically controlled decision-making. This organization may experience difficulty if faced with the need to make a transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. These conclusions are further validated based on observation of Emergency Preparedness Exercise Inspections, which suggest that the more anticipatory types of behaviors actually inhibit successful performance during an ad hoc response. The final validation of these hypotheses needs to be demonstrated with cultural data collected during emergency simulations. The mechanism to obtain such data during these types of situations is an area for future research.

  2. Organizational culture during the accident response process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1992-08-01

    The ability of an organization to effectively move from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy may well depend on the organization having the ability to balance these two apparently dichotomous cultural styles. The organization which is most capable of making the necessary transition in an optimal manner may well exhibit some aspects of both cultural styles during normal operations. Data collected at one NPP does exhibit this pattern of results, with the organization exhibiting a clear hierarchical chain of command and perceived conventional behavioral expectations as well as exhibiting a more decentralized and collegial approach to decisionmaking, a team work orientation, and informal communications. Thus, it is expected that this organization possesses the capabilities to make a successful transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. Data collected at a second NPP more strongly exhibits the traditional style suggested as being important during the anticipatory strategy, with more formal communications and bureaucratically controlled decision-making. This organization may experience difficulty if faced with the need to make a transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. These conclusions are further validated based on observation of Emergency Preparedness Exercise Inspections, which suggest that the more anticipatory types of behaviors actually inhibit successful performance during an ad hoc response. The final validation of these hypotheses needs to be demonstrated with cultural data collected during emergency simulations. The mechanism to obtain such data during these types of situations is an area for future research.

  3. Organisational Culture of Further Education Colleges Delivering Higher Education Business Programmes: Developing a Culture of "HEness"--What Next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feather, Denis

    2016-01-01

    This paper draws on the views of lecturers working in and delivering college-based higher education (CBHE) in the UK. There have been numerous works on the culture of higher education in further education (HE in FE). However, as noted by some literati, the culture of further education (FE) is not easy to define, and does not readily lend itself to…

  4. Conceptualizations of culture and cultural care among undergraduate nursing students: an exploration and critique of cultural education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Helen; Kalischuk, Ruth Grant

    2014-01-01

    Culture and cultural care have become important concepts in nursing education. However, little is known about what nursing students learn about these complex concepts. The purpose of this study was to explore and critique what nursing students learn about culture and cultural care. First and fourth year students were invited to participate in a focused ethnography to explore how nursing education might shape student knowledge of culture over time. Findings revealed that both groups of students supported the essentialist view of culture. Although students supported the ideals of cultural care, students remained unaware of critical views of culture.

  5. PHYSICAL EDUCATION - PHYSICAL CULTURE. TWO MODELS, TWO DIDACTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Vizuete Carrizosa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical Education is currently facing a number of problems that are rooted in the identity crisis prompted by the spread of the professional group, the confrontation of ideas from the scientific community and the competing interests of different political and social areas, compared to which physical education has failed, or unable, to react in time. The political and ideological confrontation that characterized the twentieth century gave us two forms, each with a consistent ideological position, in which the body as a subject of education was understood from two different positions: one set from the left and communism and another, from Western democratic societies.The survival of these conflicting positions and their interests and different views on education, in a lengthy space of time, as a consequence threw two teaching approaches and two different educational models, in which the objectives and content of education differ , and with them the forms and methods of teaching. The need to define the cultural and educational approach, in every time and place, is now a pressing need and challenge the processes of teacher training, as responsible for shaping an advanced physical education, adjusted to the time and place, the interests and needs of citizens and the democratic values of modern society.

  6. Culture, language, pedagogy : the place of culture in language teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The principles of many international language teacher education programmes are grounded in a relatively homogenous set of ‘Western’ cultural values, even though their participants come from a wide range of different cultural backgrounds. This paper addresses some of the issues surrounding the role of culture in language teacher education and discusses the ways in which cultural phenomena are defined and recognised on such programmes. It argues that language teacher education should acknowledg...

  7. The Cultural Responsiveness of Teacher Candidates Towards Roma Pupils in Serbia and Slovenia--Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecek, Mojca; Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Vujisic-Živkovic, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, there is a growing need for teacher awareness and sensitivity to cultural differences, what is often called culturally responsive teaching. This is why teacher education institutions are making significant efforts to require student teachers to enrol in courses that focus on understanding, tolerance and acceptance of differences…

  8. The Cultural Responsiveness of Teacher Candidates Towards Roma Pupils in Serbia and Slovenia--Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecek, Mojca; Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Vujisic-Živkovic, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, there is a growing need for teacher awareness and sensitivity to cultural differences, what is often called culturally responsive teaching. This is why teacher education institutions are making significant efforts to require student teachers to enrol in courses that focus on understanding, tolerance and acceptance of differences…

  9. Developing cultural competence and social responsibility in preclinical dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W

    2004-04-01

    Dental student development of cultural competence and social responsibility is recognized by educators as an important element in the overall shaping of minds and attitudes of modem dental practitioners. Yet training modalities to achieve these competencies are not clearly defined, and outcome measurements are elusive. This article shows an effective method to meet these desired outcomes. Sixty-one freshmen (class of 2005) participated in forty hours of nondental community service, and reflective journals were completed by the end of second year. Competency outcomes were measured by selecting key words and phrases found in the individual journals. Key phrases were related to compassion, righteousness, propriety, and wisdom. Also, phrases had to be accompanied by written indications of direct program causation. The combination of active-learning (based upon service learning models) in public health settings outside of the dental realm, accompanied by reflective journaling, enhanced cultural understanding and community spirit in the majority of students.

  10. Beyond cultural competence: critical consciousness, social justice, and multicultural education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K; Lypson, Monica L

    2009-06-01

    In response to the Liaison Committee on Medical Education mandate that medical education must address both the needs of an increasingly diverse society and disparities in health care, medical schools have implemented a wide variety of programs in cultural competency. The authors critically analyze the concept of cultural competency and propose that multicultural education must go beyond the traditional notions of "competency" (i.e., knowledge, skills, and attitudes). It must involve the fostering of a critical awareness--a critical consciousness--of the self, others, and the world and a commitment to addressing issues of societal relevance in health care. They describe critical consciousness and posit that it is different from, albeit complementary to, critical thinking, and suggest that both are essential in the training of physicians. The authors also propose that the object of knowledge involved in critical consciousness and in learning about areas of medicine with social relevance--multicultural education, professionalism, medical ethics, etc.--is fundamentally different from that acquired in the biomedical sciences. They discuss how aspects of multicultural education are addressed at the University of Michigan Medical School. Central to the fostering of critical consciousness are engaging dialogue in a safe environment, a change in the traditional relationship between teachers and students, faculty development, and critical assessment of individual development and programmatic goals. Such an orientation will lead to the training of physicians equally skilled in the biomedical aspects of medicine and in the role medicine plays in ensuring social justice and meeting human needs.

  11. Unravelling Quality Culture in Higher Education: A Realist Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendermacher, G. W. G.; oude Egbrink, M. G. A.; Wolfhagen, I. H. A. P.; Dolmans, D. H. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing belief that higher education institutions should nurture a "quality culture" in which structural/managerial and cultural/psychological elements act in synergy to continuously improve education. Notwithstanding the positive connotation of the "quality culture" concept, its exact configuration remains subject…

  12. Situating Educational Leaders as Prophetic Critics in Black Popular Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prier, Darius D.

    2017-01-01

    This article situates educational leaders as prophetic critics in Black popular culture. These leaders merge cultural criticism with moral and political judgment, analyzing urban youths' lived experiences and representational practices as well as analyzing counter-narrative texts in Black popular culture that have implications for urban education.…

  13. Unravelling Quality Culture in Higher Education: A Realist Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendermacher, G. W. G.; oude Egbrink, M. G. A.; Wolfhagen, I. H. A. P.; Dolmans, D. H. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing belief that higher education institutions should nurture a "quality culture" in which structural/managerial and cultural/psychological elements act in synergy to continuously improve education. Notwithstanding the positive connotation of the "quality culture" concept, its exact configuration remains subject…

  14. Festival of Pacific Arts: Education in Multi-Cultural Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Hauteserre, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Can acts of support and/or revival of Pacific cultures serve to educate international tourists about Indigenous cultures? This paper examines, from a postcolonial perspective and using a qualitative methodology, whether the Festivals of Pacific Arts, to which all nations send delegations, can educate visitors about Indigenous cultures of the…

  15. Culture, Language, Pedagogy: The Place of Culture in Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Richard; MacDonald, Malcolm N.

    2007-01-01

    The principles of many international language teacher education programmes are grounded in a relatively homogenous set of "Western" cultural values, even though their participants come from a wide range of different cultural backgrounds. This paper addresses some of the issues surrounding the role of culture in language teacher education and…

  16. Did cultural and artistic education in the Netherlands increase student participation in high cultural events?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, M.-L.; van Klaveren, C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether Cultural and Artistic Education that was implemented by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science in 1999 caused students to participate more in high cultural events. A unique feature of the intervention was that students were free to choose the type of cultura

  17. The Culture of the Kitchen: Recipes for Transformative Education within the African American Cultural Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Toby S.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout many ethnic communities, culture, place, and education have always been important to each other. There are countless creative strategies and approaches to education, inclusion, and personal development that can be derived from studying cultural spaces within any culture. In this article, the author looks specifically at the African…

  18. Online cultural competency education for millennial dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lorraine; Hanes, Philip J

    2014-06-01

    Teaching cultural competence is now an educational requirement for U.S. dental curricula to meet 2013 accreditation standards. The question now is, given time restrictions, limited resources, and budget constraints faced by the majority of dental schools, how can they provide effective cultural competency education to prepare future dental professionals? An additional concern regarding instruction is the recent focus on techniques to engage Millennial learners since this generation is characterized as technologically savvy with a preference for multimedia and general dislike of traditional lectures. With these issues in mind, Georgia Regents University developed Healthy Perspectives, an online, interactive course in cultural competence designed to engage Millennial students. Both before and after the course, the students were asked to complete a modified version of the Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire. Of the eighty-eight students in the course (eighty-one first-year dental students and seven entering radiology students), seventy-one completed the questionnaire both before and after the course, for an 81 percent response rate. Seventy-five students also completed the course evaluation. The pre and post questionnaires showed statistically significant gains for students across the four primary areas of self-awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Student evaluations of the course were generally positive, particularly regarding content, but somewhat surprisingly their assessment of the interactive components (which were designed to meet generational expectations) was ambivalent.

  19. Towards the "Informed Use" of Information and Communication Technology in Education: A Response to Adams' "Powerpoint, Habits of Mind, and Classroom Culture"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Michael; Towndrow, Phillip A.

    2007-01-01

    PowerPoint, the widely-used slide-show software package, is finding increasing currency in lecture halls and classrooms as the preferred method of communicating and presenting information. But, as Adams [Adams, C. (2006) "PowerPoint, habits of mind, and classroom culture." "Journal of Curriculum Studies," 38(4), 389-411] attempts to show, users…

  20. The human nature of culture and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevarthen, Colwyn; Gratier, Maya; Osborne, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Human cultures educate children with different strategies. Ancient hunter-gatherers 200,000 years ago, with bodies and brains like our own, in bands of a hundred well-known individuals or less, depended on spontaneous cooperative practice of knowledge and skills in a natural world. Before creating language, they appreciated beautiful objects and music. Anthropologists observe that similar living cultures accept that children learn in playful 'intent participation'. Large modern industrial states with millions of citizens competing in a global economy aim to instruct young people in scientific concepts and the rules of literacy and numeracy deemed important for employment with elaborate machines. Our psychobiological theories commonly assume that an infant starts with a body needing care and emotional regulation and a mind that assimilates concepts of objects by sensorimotor action and requires school instruction in rational principles after several years of cognitive development. Evidence from archeology and evolutionary anthropology indicates that Homo sapiens are born with an imaginative and convivial brain ready for the pleasure of shared invention and with a natural sense of beauty in handmade objects and music. In short, there are innate predispositions for culture for practicing meaningful habits and artful performances that are playfully inventive and seductive for companionship in traditions, and soon capable of grasping the clever purpose of shared tasks and tools. This knowledge of inventive human nature with esthetic and moral sensibilities has important implications for educational policy in our schools. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:173-192. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1276 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  1. Educational stratification in cultural participation: Cognitive competence or status motivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.; Bol, Th.; Werfhorst, van de H.G.; Ganzeboom, H.B.G.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines educational stratification in highbrow cultural participation. Thereare two contrasting explanations of why cultural participation is stratified. The statushypothesis predicts that people come to appreciate particular forms of art because itexpresses their belonging to a certai

  2. Interagency Reform: Changing Organizational Culture through Education and Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    to focus on the people operating inside the interagency community. That takes changing basic organizational culture using an in-stride method that...capitalizes on two momentous influencers of organizational culture - education and interagency assignments.

  3. Leadership and culture of data governance for the achievement of higher education goals (Case study: Indonesia University of Education)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putro, Budi Laksono; Surendro, Kridanto; Herbert

    2016-02-01

    Data is a vital asset in a business enterprise in achieving organizational goals. Data and information affect the decision-making process on the various activities of an organization. Data problems include validity, quality, duplication, control over data, and the difficulty of data availability. Data Governance is the way the company / institution manages its data assets. Data Governance covers the rules, policies, procedures, roles and responsibilities, and performance indicators that direct the overall management of data assets. Studies on governance data or information aplenty recommend the importance of cultural factors in the governance of research data. Among the organization's leadership culture has a very close relationship, and there are two concepts turn, namely: Culture created by leaders, leaders created by culture. Based on the above, this study exposure to the theme "Leadership and Culture Of Data Governance For The Achievement Of Higher Education Goals (Case Study: Indonesia University Of Education)". Culture and Leadership Model Development of on Higher Education in Indonesia would be made by comparing several models of data governance, organizational culture, and organizational leadership on previous studies based on the advantages and disadvantages of each model to the existing organizational business. Results of data governance model development is shown in the organizational culture FPMIPA Indonesia University Of Education today is the cultural market and desired culture is a culture of clan. Organizational leadership today is Individualism Index (IDV) (83.72%), and situational leadership on selling position.

  4. Education for a Culture of Peace: The Culture of Peace News Network as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David

    2013-01-01

    The Culture of Peace News Network, an internet news service, is analyzed in the framework of a general approach to education for a culture of peace. Its format reflects the eight program areas for a culture of peace as adopted by the UN General Assembly. Among its other operating principles are universality of news with all cultures and regions of…

  5. Consumption Culture and Art Education: Cultural Compounds of Traditional Resistances and Futuristic Strategies in Postmodern(ist Art Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin EKER

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Consumption Culture and Art Education: Cultural Compounds of Traditional Resistances and Futuristic Strategies In Postmodern(ist Art Education New cultural fields and definitions have begun to develop through the globalization of cultural policies. It is inevitable that pedagogical debates in reference to the culture contact with art education in a great level. While a cultural study is to have a connection with other fields, art education is thought to be fed by a dynamic forming a common ground between conditions of cultural fields and those of itself. It is likely to express plenty of contents to be referred to art education by regarding culture of consumption of culture and art as an axis. These contents consist of the following titles such as traditional, actual and futuristic assessments of culture, experience of consumption, aesthetic of consumption, contents of visual and social consumption, concepts of consumption in art and consumption motivations of postmodern individual. Therefore, it is required to consider that connection between consumption culture and art education is a content belonging to postmodern art education and will become a notable scope in prospective art education in view of strategic facts

  6. Cross-cultural School Based Encounters as Health Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruselius-Jensen, Maria; Renwick, Kerry; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    : Qualitative analysis of 18 focus group discussions with 72 Danish and 36 Kenyan students. Results: Cross-cultural dialogues promoted students’ engagement and reflections on their own and peers’ health condition, access to education, food cultures, gender and family structures. Conclusion: Findings indicate......Objective: Drawing on the concepts of the cosmopolitan person and democratic health education, this article explores the merits of primary school–based, cross-cultural dialogues for global health education. Design: A qualitative study of the learning outcomes of the Move|Eat|Learn (MEL) project...... the merits of cross-cultural dialogues as a means of educating students to become global health agents with a cosmopolitan outlook....

  7. Defining culturally responsive teaching: The case of mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni L. Harding-DeKam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Elementary classroom teachers in eight school districts across Colorado, United States, share the knowledge of their students’ home and community life, define culturally responsive mathematics based on the children they instruct, and give examples of how students learn math through culture in their classrooms. Findings from two interviews, classroom observations, and student artifacts reveal that teachers have an intimate cultural knowledge of the students in their classrooms, define culturally responsive mathematical practices consistent with research, use culturally responsive mathematics teaching for authentic learning, and express a need for additional professional development and curriculum support for culturally responsive mathematics instruction. Culturally responsive mathematics is important in elementary classrooms because it allows students to make personal connections to mathematics content.

  8. 75 FR 2181 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Request for Grant Proposals: Global...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Request for Grant Proposals: Global Undergraduate Exchange... and Cultural Affairs announces an open competition to administer the FY2010 Global Undergraduate.... The recipient organization will be responsible for the following aspects of the program: Placement...

  9. Cultural Competence and Social Work Education: Moving toward Assessment of Practice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Jayshree S.; Osteen, Philip; Shipe, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Social work educators are responsible for ensuring that future practitioners are culturally competent and have the ability to work effectively with people from different backgrounds. The purpose of this article is to address the current limitations in measuring cultural competence and to report the results of a qualitative study examining…

  10. Culturally Responsive Dispositions in Prospective Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Desha L.; Edwards, Belinda; Kuhel, Karen A.; Lim, Woong

    2016-01-01

    Sustaining teachers in culturally and linguistically diverse schools has been a prominent issue for years. This qualitative study focused on the impact of an enhanced preparation program on the cultural dispositions of five pre-service mathematics teachers. It is postulated that if positive cultural dispositions are developed in teacher…

  11. INVESTIGATION OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN RURAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Augustyniak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the investigation of organisational culture in rural schools. The pool was organized in fall 2004 among 1000 teachers working at primary schools in rural areas of south-eastern Poland and yielded 922 (92,2% correct answers. The questionnaire contained 13 items of various focus concerning the strenght of the organizational culture-related issues, however only 4 of them are analysed in this paper. The stastical analysis of the answers reveals high importance of organizational liaisons for the teaching staff that is expressed by the peode of the school achievement, orginality of educational approaches (75% and also by the knowledge of the history and fame of the institution (87%. Suprisingly, only 65% of responses indicated children as the most important in the school. The paper contains also details on gender, age and habitation of rural teachers.

  12. Can Discipline Education be Culturally Sensitive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ashley E; Hudnut-Beumler, Julia; Scholer, Seth J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Inappropriate discipline such as harsh physical punishment is a social determinant of health. The objective was to determine if a brief parent training intervention that teaches discipline strategies is culturally sensitive. Methods English or Spanish-speaking parents of 1-5 year old children viewed a multimedia program that teaches appropriate discipline strategies. The intervention, Play Nicely, was viewed in the exam room before the physician's visit. Parents viewed 4 of 20 discipline strategies of their choosing; the average viewing time was 7 min. Results Of 204 parents eligible to participate, 197 (96 %) completed the study; 41 % were Black, 31 % were White, and 21 % were Hispanic. At least 80 % of parents from each racial/ethnic group reported that the program built their confidence to care for their child, addressed their family needs, explained things in a way they could understand, respected their family values, and was sensitive to their personal beliefs. Overall, 80 % of parents reported that the program answered individual questions. One parent (0.5 %) reported that the program did not respect her family values. Conclusions for Practice Discipline education can be integrated into the pediatric primary care clinic in a way that is family-centered and culturally sensitive for the majority of parents. The results have implications for the development and implementation of population-based parenting programs and the primary prevention of child abuse and violence.

  13. Responsibility, Complexity Science and Education: Dilemmas and Uncertain Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Tara

    2009-01-01

    While complexity science is gaining interest among educational theorists, its constructs do not speak to educational responsibility or related core issues in education of power and ethics. Yet certain themes of complexity, as taken up in educational theory, can help unsettle the more controlling and problematic discourses of educational…

  14. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter…

  15. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter…

  16. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter alia"…

  17. Cultures Around the World: A Unique Approach to Youth Cultural Diversity Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justen O. Smith

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly diverse cultural trends have significant implications for the educational needs of American youth. Learning about and valuing diverse cultures will help prepare youth to become better citizens in an ever-changing society. Cultures Around the World was developed to meet the educational needs of youth in the area of cultural diversity. The Cultures Around the World program brings to life exciting cultures and customs from countries all over the world. Countries are presented in a unique format by teaching youth (ages 10 to 18 a specific country’s history, culture, food, music, dance, language, religion, and current issues. The Cultures Around the World program can be used by any youth educator. The program comes in a ready to use CD containing presentations, handicraft instructions, language guides, and resource guides for nine different countries (Armenia, Australia, Ecuador, Egypt, England, France, Ghana, Slovakia and Mexico.

  18. Multiliteracies practices at school: for a responsive education to contemporaneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadete Fernandes de Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sharing with Rojo the assumption that Bakhtin's Circle philosophy of language owns the necessary lightness of thought and plasticity for the comprehension and analysis of contemporary multiliteracies practices, this paper aims, from a Bakhtinian perspective, at reflecting about the meanings of educating as a responsible act. Parting from the idea that a responsible education should not only be responsive for the multiple uses of languages that (redesign performances in our contemporary world, but also lead to the critical positioning about these uses, we relate some of the Circle's constructs such as ideology, dialogism, genre, hybridism, responsiveness, responsible act, etc. with the notion of teacher's knowledge, views of language constructed in the dialogues between Applied Linguistics and Cultural Studies and the pedagogy of multiliteracies proposed by the New London Group so as to think of educational processes that are responsive to contemporaneity.

  19. Enhancing Self-Awareness: A Practical Strategy to Train Culturally Responsive Social Work Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini J. Negi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A primary goal of social justice educators is to engage students in a process of self-discovery, with the goal of helping them recognize their own biases, develop empathy, and become better prepared for culturally responsive practice. While social work educators are mandated with the important task of training future social workers in culturally responsive practice with diverse populations, practical strategies on how to do so are scant. This article introduces a teaching exercise, the Ethnic Roots Assignment, which has been shown qualitatively to aid students in developing self-awareness, a key component of culturally competent social work practice. Practical suggestions for classroom utilization, common challenges, and past student responses to participating in the exercise are provided. The dissemination of such a teaching exercise can increase the field’s resources for addressing the important goal of cultural competence training.

  20. Organization a Culture of Self-Education of Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyganova, Elena Aleksandrovna; Yavgildina, Ziliya Mukhtarovna

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the culture of self-education of music teacher as a professionally necessary quality of a modern specialist in the field of music education. The author proposes finalized definitions of basic concepts; consistently reveals the essence, structure, criteria and indicators of self-culture of music teacher; reveals the potential…

  1. Exploring Culture-Specific Learning Styles in Accounting Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Seth E.; Sauerwein, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review whether culture affects accounting students' learning processes to identify practical guidance for accounting educators facing a culturally diverse classroom. In spite of a significant literature thread in accounting education on student learning, relatively, little emphasis has been placed on…

  2. Professional Piano Education in Chinese Piano Music Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changkui

    2010-01-01

    The development of Chinese piano music culture including professional piano education is based on the traditional culture of "neutralization", and in the researches about the professional piano education in the 21st century, the research of the piano teaching in normal colleges is the most active one, and it is mainly centralized in the…

  3. Exploring Culture-Specific Learning Styles in Accounting Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Seth E.; Sauerwein, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review whether culture affects accounting students' learning processes to identify practical guidance for accounting educators facing a culturally diverse classroom. In spite of a significant literature thread in accounting education on student learning, relatively, little emphasis has been placed on…

  4. Irish International Cultural and Educational Exchange: Two Models for Inspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøss, Michael

    2006-01-01

    An account of the cultural and educational foreign policies of Denmark and Canada and a discussion of their relevance for the future of Irish foreign policy.......An account of the cultural and educational foreign policies of Denmark and Canada and a discussion of their relevance for the future of Irish foreign policy....

  5. Cross-cultural investigations of preschool education in foreign countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazranova L.Zh.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the theoretical review and analysis of cross-cultural investigations carried out in the sphere of preschool education in foreign countries in recent decades. The article introduces the results of the studies aimed at estimation ofpreschool children’s understanding of racial cues, disclosure of ethno-cultural and socio-cultural conditions affecting children’s school readiness; criteria which parents from different ethno-cultures use to estimate the efficiency of preschool education; specificity of child-educator and mother-child relationships; problems and resources of children-migrants adaptation in terms of multi-cultural settlements. Stated problems, their analysis and solutions make it possibleto increase the efficiency of educational process in modern socio-cultural environment.

  6. Fertile Zones of Cultural Encounter in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolikant, Yifat Ben-David; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2008-01-01

    We explain certain learning difficulties in computer science education as resulting from a clash between the students' culture as computer users and the professional computing culture. We propose the concept of fertile zones of cultural encounter as a way of overcoming these learning difficulties. This pedagogical approach aims to bridge the gap…

  7. Fertile Zones of Cultural Encounter in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolikant, Yifat Ben-David; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2008-01-01

    We explain certain learning difficulties in computer science education as resulting from a clash between the students' culture as computer users and the professional computing culture. We propose the concept of fertile zones of cultural encounter as a way of overcoming these learning difficulties. This pedagogical approach aims to bridge the gap…

  8. Higher Education Sub-Cultures and Open Source Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Shahron Williams

    2011-01-01

    Successful adoption of new teaching and learning technologies in higher education requires the consensus of two sub-cultures, namely the technologist sub-culture and the academic sub-culture. This paper examines trends in adoption of open source software (OSS) for teaching and learning by comparing the results of a 2009 survey of 285 Chief…

  9. Higher Education Sub-Cultures and Open Source Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Shahron Williams

    2011-01-01

    Successful adoption of new teaching and learning technologies in higher education requires the consensus of two sub-cultures, namely the technologist sub-culture and the academic sub-culture. This paper examines trends in adoption of open source software (OSS) for teaching and learning by comparing the results of a 2009 survey of 285 Chief…

  10. A Letter of Apology Nearly 50 Years in the Making: How We've Failed to Solve the Cultural Bind of the American Male. Response to "The Cultural Bind of the American Male"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandless, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's letter of apology as a response to "The Cultural Bind of the American Male". In the letter, the author offers his apologies because educators have failed to solve the cultural bind of the American male.

  11. Cultural diversity in nursing education: perils, pitfalls, and pearls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Hedi; Schim, Stephanie; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2010-05-01

    Increasing diversity in the classroom challenges nursing educators to identify issues that complicate teaching (perils), analyze barriers for themselves and their students (pitfalls), and select new strategies for working with nontraditional students (pearls). This article identifies concerns arising from attitudes and values within nursing and common approaches to diversity education, and then discusses key issues in nursing education that relate to human nature, culture, faculty workload, and student demographics. Finally, some strategies are proposed for increasing the effectiveness of professional preparation with diverse students through a focus on culturally congruent education and development of faculty cultural competence.

  12. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  13. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  14. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  15. The Culturally Responsive Teacher Preparedness Scale: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the competencies of culturally responsive teaching and construct a Culturally Responsive Teacher Preparedness Scale (CRTPS) for the use of teacher preparation programs and preservice teachers. Competencies listed in the scale were identified through literature reviews and input from experts. The…

  16. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  17. Cultural Emergence: Theorizing Culture in and from the Margins of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Nathan Brent; Erichsen, Elizabeth Anne; Anicha, Cali L.

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching seeks to explore conceptualizations of culture that address contemporary challenges in science education. Toward this end, we unite two theoretical perspectives to advance a conceptualization of culture as a complex system, emerging from iterative processes of cultural bricolage,…

  18. Conceptualization of responsiveness of nursing education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to explore the concept of responsive nursing education ... A qualitative approach and ethnography design, using purposive sampling ... of teaching strategies, assessment methods, and the nature of the educators, ...

  19. Evaluating Young Children from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds for Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rashida; Guiberson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing diversity in the United States, there has been a call for early intervention/early childhood special education (EI/ECSE) services to be responsive and sensitive to the diversity of children and families represented in communities. Culturally responsive practice is particularly important for EI/ECSE professionals because of the…

  20. Cultural Competence and the Mississippi Educator: An Investigative Study into the Cultural Competence Levels of Mississippi Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson Stewart, Felicia L.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests a linkage between the academic success of culturally and linguistically diverse students and the cultural competence practice and behaviors of educators. Attention in the available research is given to urban school districts with a large population of culturally and linguistically diverse students and the relationships between…

  1. Educational Spaces of Cultural Capitalism: The Concept of Consumer Culture as a New Framework for Contemporary Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Phillip D. Th.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a specific concept of consumer culture into the international and European discussion about new concepts and categories in comparative education. Basic meanings of consumer culture are presented in reference to consumer research, consumer culture theory, and a revisited concept of world polity. In addition to general…

  2. Educational Spaces of Cultural Capitalism: The Concept of Consumer Culture as a New Framework for Contemporary Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Phillip D. Th.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a specific concept of consumer culture into the international and European discussion about new concepts and categories in comparative education. Basic meanings of consumer culture are presented in reference to consumer research, consumer culture theory, and a revisited concept of world polity. In addition to general…

  3. The relationship between cultural competence education and increasing diversity in nursing schools and practice settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacquiao, Dula

    2007-01-01

    This article attempted to examine the relationship between cultural competence education and increasing diversity in nursing schools and practice settings. In addition to the review of the literature, a panel of experts was interviewed regarding institutional practices in response to the challenge of increasing diversity and cultural competence education. Evidence of positive outcomes of cultural competent care and impact of race and ethnic concordance between patients and providers are presented. The challenge of increasing underrepresented minorities in health care professions remains elusive. An ecological analysis is recommended to address the social and cultural barriers that transcend the micro system of the school and the macro system of the society. The challenge of increasing diversity and realizing outcomes of cultural competence education requires social and comprehensive remedies to level life inequities that perpetuate a history of disadvantages in some groups.

  4. Social Reconstructionism: Reciprocal Influences of Culture and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kostyło

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The fact that culture has an impact, both in conceptual and practical sense, on education is undoubtable. But when we state that interaction between the two areas is mutual, namely, that also education has an influence on culture, then we express an original and controversial idea. Therefore, we acknowledge that education is a power which can change society. That idea was pushed forward for many years by Theodore Brameld, the founder of reconstructionst philosophy of education. In his view each educational theory and practice effectively affects culture, changes and reconstructs it. In this text I present the assumptions of Theodore Brameld’s social reconstructionism. The starting point for my considerations are three other philosophies of education indicated by by Brameld: perenialism, essentialism, and progressivism. In the conclusion I point out how each of the philosophies of education relates to social change. The terms “society” and “culture” are used interchangeably in this text.

  5. The Impact of Educational Interventions on Organizational Culture at an Urban Federal Agency. Ph.D. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Janet Myrick

    1994-01-01

    This study on the impact of educational interventions on organizational culture is an evaluation of a major educational initiative undertaken by an urban federal agency, namely the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC). The design of this educational evaluation captures the essence of NASA-LaRC's efforts to continue its distinguished and international stature in the aeronautical research community following the Challenger tragedy. More specifically, this study is an evaluation of the educational initiative designed to ameliorate organizational culture via educational interventions, with emphasis on communications, rewards and recognition, and career development. After completing a review of the related literature, chronicling the educational initiative, interviewing senior managers and employees, and critically examining thousands of free responses on employee perceptions of organizational culture, it is found that previous definitions of organizational culture are more accurately classified as manifestations of organizational culture. This research has endeared to redefine 'organizational culture' by offering a more accurate and diagnostic perspective.

  6. Key Factors for Developing a Cross-Cultural Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Keeyung; Chung, Sock H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: As universities and colleges face an increasingly global environment, internationalization is viewed as a critical aspect of education, a fact that has significant academic and economic implications for higher educational institutions worldwide which need to be current with cultural education to adapt to change. Learning from other…

  7. Response Essay: Special Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Paid

    2000-01-01

    This commentary reflects on findings from previous articles that reviewed trends in special education research in the United States, Norway, Botswana, Ecuador, Australia, and Turkey. It discusses the function, funding, and subject matter of special education research, on research on the education of special education teachers, and on research…

  8. Visual culture as a strategy of reflection in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2004-01-01

    Visual culture is an issue in the current research field of visual arts education. this article investigates how the emergence of the concept of visual culture comes about and how it is usable in an educational contekxt. From at system theory approach, the author investigates how the concept...... of visual culture articulates af phase of art and visual arts education. This phase makes it possible to reconsider the concept of aesthetics as a mode of cognition. Likewise, the phase reflexivly constitutes a viewing on visual phenomena. This viewing requires a reconsidering of the notions of what art...... education means and how visual culture can be performed as a special approach to all areas of education....

  9. Improving cultural diversity awareness of physical therapy educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaro, Rolando T; Umphred, Darcy A

    2007-01-01

    In a climate of increasing diversity in the population of patients requiring physical therapy (PT) services, PT educators must prepare students and future clinicians to work competently in culturally diverse environments. To be able to achieve this goal, PT educators must be culturally competent as well. The purposes of the study were to develop a valid and reliable instrument to assess cultural diversity awareness and to develop an educational workshop to improve cultural diversity awareness of PT academic and clinical educators. Phase 1 of the study involved the development of an instrument to assess cultural diversity awareness. The Cultural Diversity Awareness Questionnaire (CDAQ) was developed, validated for content, analyzed for reliability, and field and pilot tested. Results indicated that the CDAQ has favorable psychometric properties. Phase 2 of the study involved the development and implementation of the Cultural Diversity Workshop (CDW). The seminar contents and class materials were developed, validated, and implemented as a one-day cultural diversity awareness seminar. A one-group, pretest-posttest experimental design was used, with participants who completed the CDAQ before and after the workshop. Results indicated that the workshop was effective in improving cultural diversity awareness of the participants. Results of the workshop evaluation affirmed the achievement of objectives and effectiveness of the facilitator. This study provided a solid initial foundation upon which a comprehensive cultural competence program can be developed.

  10. An Experiential Approach to Cultural Intelligence Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNab, Brent R.

    2012-01-01

    Cultural intelligence (CQ) represents a promising advancement in the area of cross-cultural training and management. Experiential approaches for CQ development have been proposed as highly effective; however, there is a lack of CQ-specific approaches in the management literature. This work overviews the concept of cultural intelligence and its…

  11. Psychiatry Resident Training in Cultural Competence: An Educator's Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Irma; Johnson, Toni L; Shelton, Pheston G; Glass, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Resident physicians training in psychiatry in the U.S. are required to master a body of knowledge related to cultural psychiatry; are expected to adopt attitudes that endorse the principles of cultural competence; and finally are expected to acquire specific cultural competence skills that facilitate working effectively with diverse patients. This article first provides an overview of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies related to cultural competence, as well as the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's (AACAP) recommendations for the cultural competence training of child/adolescent fellows. Next, numerous print and electronic resources that can be used in cultural competence education in psychiatry are reviewed and discussed. Finally, we conclude by providing recommendations for psychiatry residency programs that we culled from model cultural competence curricula.

  12. Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: A Critical Perspective. Critical Perspectives on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Harry, Ed.; Lauder, Hugh, Ed.; Porter, Jill, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning" focuses on how education is understood in different cultures, the theories and related assumptions we make about learners and students and how we think about them, and how we can understand the principle actors in education--learners and teachers. Within this volume, internationally renowned…

  13. Free knowledge: An educational responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Rascón Gómez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal.dotm 0 0 1 181 1032 Universidad de Salamanca 8 2 1267 12.0 0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Knowledge has been one of the philosophical issues par excellence, having even a branch specifically devoted to its study and understanding, the epistemology. It has often been seen as something static and limited to the mere description of objects. However, in the educational sphere we understand that knowledge must go beyond the mere description, providing explanations of the facts through experience; this is the only way for it to become actual learning and to affect our lives. In addition, knowledge needs updating, growth, multiplication, and those are made possible by sharing it and preventing its atrophy. If knowledge is dynamic, it is our responsibility to release it from its potential enclosures and to enrich it. From this perspective, we are developing an educative innovation project at the University of Malaga that aims at building free knowledge in a cooperative manner. To this end we formed a group of students who employ free software tools to develop their own teaching materials through the Spanish translation of Chris Kelty's Two Bits, a reference work related with their subjects. Thus, we are not only contributing to the production of knowledge but also making it in a cooperative, distributed and responsible

  14. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLESIA O. GRYGORIEVA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Grygorieva OO, Berezovsjka MA, Dacenko OI. 2015. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 38-42. Two cultures of Chlamydomonas actinochloris Deason et Bold in the lag-phase were exposed to the microwave irradiation. One of them (culture 1 was not treated beforehand, whereas the other (culture 2 was irradiated by microwaves 2 years earlier. The measurement of cell quantity as well as measurement of change of intensities and spectra of cultures photoluminescence (PL in the range of chlorophyll a emission was regularly conducted during the cell cultures development. Cell concentration of culture 1 exposed to the microwave irradiation for the first time has quickly restored while cell concentration of culture 2 which was irradiated repeatedly has fallen significantly. The following increasing of cell concentration of culture 2 is negligible. Cell concentration reaches the steady-state level that is about a half of the cell concentration of control culture. Initially the PL efficiency of cells of both cultures decreases noticeable as a result of irradiation. Then there is the monotonic increase to the values which are significantly higher than the corresponding values in the control cultures. The ratio of the intensities at the maxima of the main emission bands of chlorophyll for control samples of both cultures remained approximately at the same level. At the same time effect of irradiation on the cell PL spectrum appears as a temporary reduction of this magnitude.

  15. Cultural minority students' experiences with intercultural competency in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyerzapf, Hannah; Abma, Tineke

    2017-05-01

    Medical schools increasingly value and focus on teaching students intercultural competency within present-day multicultural society. Little is known about the experiences of cultural minority students in intercultural competence activities. This article discusses the intercultural competence activities of medical education in a Dutch university from the perspective of cultural minority students. We will formulate recommendations for how to stimulate intercultural competency in, as well as inclusiveness of, medical education. A qualitative evaluation was performed within a medical school in the Netherlands. Data were collected through interviews (n = 23), a focus group (six participants) and participant observations (20 hours). Thematic analysis was performed. Cultural minority students experienced a lack of respect and understanding by cultural majority students and teachers. Education activities intended to transfer intercultural knowledge, address personal prejudice and stimulate intercultural sensitivity were perceived as stigmatising and as creating an unsafe climate for cultural minority students. Cultural minority and majority students on campus seemed segregated and the intercultural awareness of minority students was not integrated in intercultural competence activities. As cultural minority students were confronted with microaggressions, the medical school did not succeed in creating a safe education environment for all students. Contrary to their aims and intentions, intercultural competence activities had limited effect and seemed to support the polarisation of cultural minority and majority students and teachers. This can be seen as pointing towards a hidden curriculum privileging majority over minority students. For structural integration of intercultural competency in medical education, the focus must penetrate beyond curricular activities towards the critical addressing of the culture and structure of medical school. Collective commitment to

  16. Cultural complexity, post-colonialism and educational change: Challenges for comparative educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling-Hudson, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This study explores various elements in the struggle for a post-colonial refashioning of cultural identity through education. Drawing on experiences in Australia and the Caribbean, the author illustrates how educational systems undergoing decolonisation reflect socio-cultural tensions of race and power. The author discusses the complexities for comparative educators in engaging with suppressed knowledge, recognising the yearnings of the marginalised, challenging the conditions that lead to poverty, and refashioning education for social justice in an era when the achievement of justice seems increasingly difficult. She argues that comparative educators can benefit from using post-colonial thinking to understand cultural complexity and promote lifeaffirming practices in educational change.

  17. A snapshot of cultural competency education in US dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael L; Bean, Canise Y; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2006-09-01

    During the last decade, cultural competency has received a great deal of attention in health care and the literature of many fields, including education, social services, law, and health care. The dental education literature provides little information regarding status, strategies, or guiding principles of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. This study was an attempt to describe the status of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. A web-based thirty-question survey regarding cultural competency education coursework, teaching, course materials, and content was sent in 2005 to the assistant/associate deans for academic affairs at fifty-six U.S. dental schools, followed up by subsequent email messages. Thirty-four (61 percent) dental school officials responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (twenty-eight; 82 percent) did not have a specific stand-alone cultural competency course, but indicated it was integrated into the curriculum. Recognition of local and national community diversity needs prompted course creation in most schools. Respondents at almost two-thirds of schools indicated that their impression of students' acceptance was positive. Teachers of cultural competency were primarily white female dentists. Few schools required faculty to have similar cultural competency or diversity training. Thirty-three of the thirty-four U.S. dental schools responding to this survey offer some form of coursework in cultural competency with little standardization and a variety of methods and strategies to teach dental students.

  18. Maria Montessori and Howard Gardner : Educational development in different cultures

    OpenAIRE

    甲斐, 仁子; KIMIKO, KAI; Fuji Women's University Faculty of Human Life Science, Department of Early Childhood Care and Education

    2007-01-01

    Maria Montessori (1870-1952) proposed her own type of educational program, which she called "scientific pedagogy" because of its distinctive features. Since her first experiment at the "Children's House" in 1907 in Italy, Montessori education has been practiced for almost a century in a variety of cultures. This paper will examine the characteristics of Montessori education in the light of current research. In addition to describing the academic basis of Montessori education, the paper also c...

  19. Visual culture as a strategy of reflection in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2004-01-01

    Visual culture is an issue in the current research field of visual arts education. this article investigates how the emergence of the concept of visual culture comes about and how it is usable in an educational contekxt. From at system theory approach, the author investigates how the concept of v...... education means and how visual culture can be performed as a special approach to all areas of education.......Visual culture is an issue in the current research field of visual arts education. this article investigates how the emergence of the concept of visual culture comes about and how it is usable in an educational contekxt. From at system theory approach, the author investigates how the concept...... of visual culture articulates af phase of art and visual arts education. This phase makes it possible to reconsider the concept of aesthetics as a mode of cognition. Likewise, the phase reflexivly constitutes a viewing on visual phenomena. This viewing requires a reconsidering of the notions of what art...

  20. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on culture as a dynamic process situated in a social context, and has been valued in diverse fields for yielding rich understandings of complex issues and key factors involved. This paper explains how activity theory can be used in (cross-)cultural medical education research. We discuss activity theory's theoretical background and principles, and we show how these can be applied to the cultural research practice by discussing the steps involved in a cross-cultural study that we conducted, from formulating research questions to drawing conclusions. We describe how the activity system, the unit of analysis in activity theory, can serve as an organizing principle to grasp cultural complexity. We end with reflections on the theoretical and practical use of activity theory for cultural research and note that it is not a shortcut to capture cultural complexity: it is a challenge for researchers to determine the boundaries of their study and to analyze and interpret the dynamics of the activity system.

  1. State Education Agency Civil Rights Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Peter

    This memorandum addresses the responsibility of State Education Agencies (SEAs) for insuring that local educational agencies do not violate students' civil rights. The SEA's duty is said to arise from two sources. First, in most if not all States, State law mandates that State education officials supervise and regulate the conduct of local school…

  2. The Education of Developing Responsibility Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Semra Kiranli; Güzel, Deniz Bostan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to improve different responsibility value education activities in pre-school value education. In Turkey, there is a yearly programme in which value should be gained in pre-school value education, but it is lack of activities and how. This research was performed with the studies in a total of 26 students aged five and…

  3. A Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices of Adult ESOL and EAP Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how frequently adult education English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers in Florida used specific culturally responsive teaching practices and how important they believed those practices were to their teaching. Using Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's…

  4. The Coconut Wireless Project: Sharing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy through the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Barber, Sharon; Trumbull, Elise; Wenn, Richard

    Beginning in the 1997-98 school year, WestEd staff, with the support of the Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL), worked intensively with a group of five Chamorro teachers from Rota Elementary School (Hawaii) to develop culturally responsive, standards-based science units. The larger goal was to develop Web-based case examples of…

  5. Urban Teachers' Professed Classroom Management Strategies: Reflections of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dave F.

    2004-01-01

    Thirteen urban educators teaching from 1st through 12th grade selected from 7 cities across the United States were interviewed in this qualitative research study to determine if the classroom management strategies they use reflect the research on culturally responsive teaching. Participants revealed using several management strategies that reflect…

  6. Culturally Responsive Pyramid Model Practices: Program-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rosemarie; Steed, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual article reviews current research on racial disparities in disciplinary practices in early childhood education and work to address these issues within a positive behavior support (PBS) framework. Building largely on the Pyramid Model, recommendations and a culturally responsive approach are suggested for use within a program-wide…

  7. A Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices of Adult ESOL and EAP Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how frequently adult education English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers in Florida used specific culturally responsive teaching practices and how important they believed those practices were to their teaching. Using Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's…

  8. Culturally Responsive Instructional Leadership: A Conceptual Exploration with Principals of Three New Zealand Mainstream Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisha, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Principals of many New Zealand (NZ) mainstream schools navigate a complex intercultural educational policy environment to address the academic challenges of Maori and Pasifika students. This inquiry sought to explore the concept of "culturally responsive instructional leadership" by studying the knowledge, actions, motives, perceptions,…

  9. "Katherine With-a-K and Little Nato": A Case Study of Culturally Responsible Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parscal, Jeannie N.

    This case study, one of four, is part of a larger study, "Ethnographic Case Studies of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (CRP) of At-Risk Students in Middle School Classrooms." The study provides relevant case literature regarding CRP for the enhancement of preservice teacher education and describes the characteristics of a multicultural…

  10. An Empirical Perspective on the Culture - Corporate Social Responsibility Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru ZAIȚ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Business competition and pressure of European directives put Romanian company in a position to find answers to issues related to long-term survival and development. In this context we believe it is necessary to analyze some of the most important components that should be taken into consideration at the strategic level: national and organizational culture. The results indicate that corporate social responsibility is supported by learning and change-oriented organizational culture, but also by a favorable cultural and national economic framework. Based on these theoretical considerations we intent to emphasize the relationships between national culture / corporate culture and corporate social responsibility (CSR, elaborating an empirical argument by analyzing the results provided by Global 100, an annual project initiated by Corporate Knights Inc. (Davos. Starting with 2005, it has the largest database in the world and an appropriate evaluation methodology that provides a ranking of the top 100 most responsible companies in the world.

  11. Climate Change, Individual Responsibilities and Cultural Frameworks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Heyd

    2010-01-01

    .... On the assumption that, in the light of accelerating climate change, individuals have both ethical and prudential responsibilities, the limited advances in mitigation and adaptation of international...

  12. Outdoor education in New Zealand: a comparative and cultural perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2009-01-01

      This presentation takes general view of understanding outdoor education in New Zealand.  This is seen from an outsider's perspective and is compared with "friluftsliv" in Denmark and the Nordic countries. Analysing and understanding one's culture is never easy, and the main challenge is to focus...... on and question everyday phenomena which seem natural and that reproduce one's own perspective. Cultural analysis and the analysis of social configurations together with a comparative cultural perspective form the research approach.  . The presentation is based on a comparative and qualitative case study (Ragin......, 1992) of friluftsliv in Denmark and outdoor education in New Zealand. Friluftsliv and outdoor education are understood as socio-cultural constructs which develop and differ in time and space. The theoretical framework is based on ethnological cultural analysis (Ehn & Lofgren, 1982, 2008) combined...

  13. The Culture of the Schools and Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    The socializing effects of the institutional culture of public schools may be the most powerful single influence in the development of teachers, yet the teacher education profession has largely ignored what happens to its students after they leave college. (DS)

  14. Field Theory in Cultural Capital Studies of Educational Attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Krarup, Troels Magelund

    2012-01-01

    hypothesis about certain individual resources, disregarding the structural vision and important related concepts such as field, habitus, and strategy in Bourdieu’s sociology. This article reintroduces field theory into cultural capital research in education, taking into consideration current concerns...

  15. The culture of criticism and argument in health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Barbara; Westwood, Geoffrey

    2002-03-01

    A programme to introduce skills in critical analytical reading and writing in postgraduate tertiary students in Public Health Management is described. The students had considerable professional experience, but their previous academic learning did not require a critical-analytical approach. The ability to review and analyse past theory and practice and to critically analyse and evaluate public health programmes is an essential element of the skills required by graduates. The paper describes and discusses the teaching and learning strategies used in critical analysis sessions. The personal and systemic barriers to achieving substantial change in cultures of learning are reviewed. As a limited response to a perceived problem, significant changes in the ability of students to critically analyse published material and write appropriate essays were achieved. The value of critical analysis in public health is described and the implication for medical education at all levels is considered.

  16. Crisis and Man: Literary Responses Across Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnaswami, Mallika

    2012-01-01

    Myth of Sisyphus exemplifies the situation man finds himself in irrespective of his ethnic and geographical background. Art and cultural forms gave expression to this situation and the intensity of the expression depended upon the political and social dimensions. War or peace, man is always condemned to struggle with his problems, moral or otherwise. Post war English writers focused on the social problems the British society found itself in and its helplessness in dealing with them. It was th...

  17. Education Leadership in a Culture of Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Fred J.

    2010-01-01

    Leadership in education is much like leadership in business and government. Three problems in particular make education seem different, including the almost constant pressure, the politics of the job, and state and federal regulations. But these are similar to problems faced by leaders in other organizations. However, education leaders must take…

  18. Contextual Responsiveness: An Enduring Challenge for Educational Assessment in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Serpell

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies in Africa have found that indigenous conceptualization of intelligence includes dimensions of social responsibility and reflective deliberation, in addition to the dimension of cognitive alacrity emphasized in most intelligence tests standardized in Western societies. In contemporary societies undergoing rapid socio-cultural and politico-economic change, the technology of intelligence testing has been widely applied to the process of educational selection. Current applications in Zambia rely exclusively on Western style tests and fail to respond to some enduring cultural preoccupations of many parents, educators and policymakers. We discuss how recent and ongoing research addresses the challenges of eco-culturally responsive assessment with respect to assessment of intellectual functions in early childhood, monitoring initial literacy acquisition in middle childhood, and selection for admission to secondary and tertiary education. We argue that the inherent bias of normative tests can only be justified politically if a compelling theoretical account is available of how the construct of intelligence relates to learning and how opportunities for learning are distributed through educational policy. While rapid social change gives rise to demands for new knowledge and skills, assessment of intellectual functions will be more adaptive in contemporary Zambian society if it includes the dimensions of reflection and social responsibility.

  19. A Validation Study of the Culturally Responsive Teaching Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2017-01-01

    Amidst the ethnic and linguistic diversity in adult English language classes, there is heightened importance to using culturally responsive teaching practices. However, there are limited quantitative examinations of this approach in adult learning environments. The purpose of this investigation was to describe patterns of culturally responsive…

  20. Identity Affirmed, Agency Engaged: Culturally Responsive Performance-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Performance-based assessment is unquestionably superior to the instrumental rationality of high-stakes standardized testing and the audit culture that testing regimes inspire. It is more likely to engender opportunities to witness the un-measureable: vision, imagination, and compassion. Performance assessments must be culturally responsive in…

  1. Celebrating Difference: Best Practices in Culturally Responsive Teaching Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Xeturah; Hernandez, Cecilia; Parra, Julia; Negash, Beyan

    2017-01-01

    Culturally responsive teaching and design practices flip the online classroom by creating an environment that acknowledges, celebrates, and builds upon the cultural capital that learners and teachers bring to the online classroom. Challenges exist in all phases of online course design, including the ability to create online courses that reflect…

  2. Strategies to Promote Cultural Competence in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Megan; Kaspar, Rita W; Teall, Alice M

    2015-09-01

    Cultural competence is a mainstay in health care and nursing education. With the expansion in the number of distance-based nursing programs across the country, innovative teaching methods for distance learning faculty are required to instill cultural competence in students. Faculty must be deliberate when planning distance-based learning activities that incorporate cultural experiences. This article describes several such strategies including the creative use of blogging, recorded lectures, the online synchronous classroom, social media, and cultural immersion projects. These methods capitalize on existing information technologies and offer distance-based students the opportunity to connect with one another, as well as develop the awareness, sensitivity, and respect that is required when providing culturally competent care. These teaching methods are modifiable to meet the teaching and learning needs of the faculty and the students, thereby allowing educators to support the integration of cultural competence into patient care for distance students.

  3. Community-Based Financial Literacy Education in a Cultural Context: A Study of Teacher Beliefs and Pedagogical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Taylor, Edward W.; Forte, Karin Sprow

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the findings related to teaching beliefs and pedagogical practices of a study that examined how financial literacy educators educate adults from underserved population groups in community-based settings. The study is theoretically framed in the teaching beliefs and culturally responsive education literature. Findings reveal a…

  4. Raising Pasifika Achievement: Teacher Cultural-Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter-Samuels, Tute

    2013-01-01

    Pasifika learners, along with Maori, continue to experience high disparities in New Zealand's education system. Furthermore, it is predicted that over the next few decades, the majority of students in New Zealand primary schools will be Maori and Pasifika. The implications for classroom teachers are enormous. In reviewing a range of literature,…

  5. Should we learn culture in chemistry classroom? Integration ethnochemistry in culturally responsive teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, Yuli; Ridwan, Achmad; Nurbaity

    2017-08-01

    The papers report the first year of two-year longitudinal study of ethnochemistry integration in culturally responsive teaching in chemistry classrooms. The teaching approach is focusing on exploring the culture and indigenous knowledge in Indonesia from chemistry perspectives. Ethnochemistry looks at the culture from chemistry perspectives integrated into culturally responsive teaching has developed students' cultural identity and students' engagement in chemistry learning. There are limited research and data in exploring Indonesia culture, which has around 300 ethics, from chemistry perspectives. Students come to the chemistry classrooms from a different background; however, their chemistry learning disconnected with their background which leads to students' disengagement in chemistry learning. Therefore this approach focused on students' engagement within their differences. This research was conducted with year 10 and 11 from four classrooms in two secondary schools through qualitative methodology with observation, interviews, and reflective journals as data collection. The results showed that the integration of ethnochemistry in culturally responsive teaching approach can be implemented by involving 5 principles which are content integration, facilitating knowledge construction, prejudice reduction, social justice, and academic development. The culturally responsive teaching has engaged students in their chemistry learning and developed their cultural identity and soft skills. Students found that the learning experiences has helped to develop their chemistry knowledge and understand the culture from chemistry perspectives. The students developed the ability to work together, responsibility, curiosity, social awareness, creativity, empathy communication, and self-confidence which categorized into collaboration skills, student engagement, social and cultural awareness, and high order thinking skills. The ethnochemistry has helped them to develop the critical self

  6. Cultured articular chondrocytes sheets for partial thickness cartilage defects utilizing temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kaneshiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of articular cartilage has several functions that are unique to joints. Although a technique for transplanting cultured chondrocytes has already been introduced, it is difficult to collect intact ECM when using enzymes to harvest samples. Temperature-responsive culture dishes have already been clinically applied in the fields of myocardial and corneal transplantation. Earlier studies have shown that a sheet of cultured cells with intact ECM and adhesive factors can be harvested using such culture dishes, which allow the surface properties of the dish to be reversibly altered by changing the temperature. Human chondrocytes were subjected to enzymatic digestion and then were seeded in temperature-responsive culture dishes. A sheet of chondrocytes was harvested by only reducing the temperature after the cultured cells reached confluency. A real-time PCR analysis of the chondrocyte sheets confirmed that type II collagen, aggrecan, and fibronectin were present. These results suggested that, although chondrocytes undergo dedifferentiation in a monolayer culture, multilayer chondrocyte sheets grown in a similar environment to that of three-dimensional culture may be able to maintain a normal phenotype. A histological examination suggested that multilayer chondrocyte sheets could thus prevent the loss of proteoglycans because the area covered by the sheets was well stained by safranin-O. The present experiments suggested that temperature-responsive culture dishes are useful for obtaining cultured chondrocytes, which may then be clinically employed as a substitute for periosteal patches because such sheets can be applied without a scaffold.

  7. Improving Cultural Education of Special Operations Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    knowledge of local culture and customs is nearly useless if SOF operators demonstrate rude , obnoxious or arrogant behavior when dealing with...nature and geared more towards a tourist than a SOF operator. The cultural component of this regional specific training could be greatly improved by

  8. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  9. Educational stratification in cultural participation: Cognitive competence or status motivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.; Bol, Th.; Werfhorst, van de H.G.; Ganzeboom, H.B.G.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines educational stratification in highbrow cultural participation. There are two contrasting explanations of why cultural participation is stratified. The status hypothesis predicts that people come to appreciate particular forms of art because it expresses their belonging to a cer

  10. Educational stratification in cultural participation: cognitive competence or status motivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Notten; B. Lancee; H.G. van de Werfhorst; H.B.G. Ganzeboom

    2014-01-01

    This article examines educational stratification in highbrow cultural participation. There are two contrasting explanations of why cultural participation is stratified. The status hypothesis predicts that people come to appreciate particular forms of art because it expresses their belonging to a cer

  11. Child-Centered Education for Pacific-Rim Cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Peter W.

    1998-01-01

    Argues for a cautious approach to transplanting theory from one culture to another, particularly considering the case for applying Friedrich Froebel's child-centered theory to early childhood education in Pacific Rim cultures. Uses a historical approach to distinguish three distinct versions of the theory, the Christian, the Progressive, and the…

  12. The Information Culture of Higher Education Institutions: The Estonian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Liia; Heidmets, Mati; Virkus, Sirje

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper focuses on the information culture of higher education institutions in Estonia. The aim of the study is to explore the relationship between information culture, information management and job satisfaction, leadership style, and self-reported individual performance. Method: A total of 160 faculty members from twelve…

  13. Cultural Issues in the Communication of Research on Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini Bussi, Maria G.; Martignone, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    It might be trite to observe that every research study is framed within a cultural background. In this paper we argue that the description of the cultural background is important for discussing, evaluating and exploiting internationally the findings of local educational studies. This issue is fundamental in every study in mathematics education…

  14. Education Policy Borrowing and Cultural Scripts for Teaching in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    China's recent education reforms are a result of selective policy borrowing from "the West". Although comparativists have highlighted the importance of cultural context in policy borrowing in China, what remains relatively under-explored is the epistemological basis for cultural views that mediate policy transfer. This article argues…

  15. A Critique of the Role of Culture in Maori Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourie, Megan; Rata, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Educational under-achievement by a section of the Maori population is a persistent problem for New Zealand. This article is a theoretical examination of the practice and consequences of a culture-based curriculum that is promoted as the solution. We develop the argument that not only is the "cultural solution" at odds with the complex…

  16. Peculiarities of Cultural Interaction in Education: The US Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baybakova, Olga; Sidun, Larysa

    2015-01-01

    Article deals with the problem of multicultural education. Ukraine, being a multicultural society, requires a new conception of the world, aimed at integrating cultures and nations, their further convergence as well as cultural enrichment. In this context the experience of many foreign countries, especially the USA, is very interesting. This…

  17. Educating for Cultural Competence in the Generalist Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers-Hoag, Karen M.; Sandau-Beckler, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    A skills-oriented model for educating culturally competent social workers focuses on integrating cultural content in courses covering human behavior in the social environment, methods for social work practice, social welfare policy, social work research, and field work. Includes objectives, discussion questions, and activities for each area. Case…

  18. Cultural Strengths to Persevere: Native American Women in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Stephanie J.; Lindley, Lorinda S.

    2013-01-01

    Beginning with an overview of historical perspectives of Native American women, this article includes some discussion of values and practices of contemporary Native American women, data pertaining to Native American women's participation in higher education, and an introduction of familial cultural capital, community cultural wealth, Native…

  19. Educational activities for the diffusion of scientific culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlet, Roger

    2015-08-01

    Considering there is a divorce between science and culture, we suggest activities such as trails of mathematical/astronomical knowledge and vision of scientific teaching and education, that are aiming ata global, citizen dialogue, at reviving a truly human culture integrating science, and at answering all kinds of obscurantism/fundamentalism.

  20. Investigation of Malaysian Higher Education Quality Culture and Workforce Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hairuddin Mohd; Musah, Mohammed Borhandden

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the quality culture and workforce performance in the Malaysian higher education sector. The study also aims to test and validate the psychometric properties of the quality culture and workforce performance instruments used in the study. Design/methodology/approach: A total…

  1. Cultivating Aboriginal Cultures and Educating Aboriginal Children in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Karen; Kuo, Li Tsung Wen

    2007-01-01

    Many Americans believe that diversity issues are limited to the United States. The truth is, however, that many cultures struggle to recognize and foster cultural diversity. In this article, the authors have two aims: (1) to recognize various ethnic groups in Taiwan, in particular aboriginal groups; and (2) to inform educators about what they can…

  2. In Light of the 2012 NASPE Symposium, to What Extent Should Physical Educators Incorporate Pop Culture in Their Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this "Issues" column, "The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance" provides responses to the question: "In Light of the 2012 NASPE Symposium, to What Extent Should Physical Educators Incorporate Pop Culture in Their Classes?" Responses this month come from an assistant professor who says that:…

  3. In Light of the 2012 NASPE Symposium, to What Extent Should Physical Educators Incorporate Pop Culture in Their Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this "Issues" column, "The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance" provides responses to the question: "In Light of the 2012 NASPE Symposium, to What Extent Should Physical Educators Incorporate Pop Culture in Their Classes?" Responses this month come from an assistant professor who says that:…

  4. Cross-cultural communication in medicine: questions for educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, J R; Kai, J; Loudon, R F

    2001-03-01

    Most research into medical communication has had a western setting. It has been undertaken by western researchers and been influential in shaping communication skills curricula. However we know much less about what communication is effective under other circumstances. This article highlights gaps in our knowledge from research in this field, and poses attendant questions for debate by medical educators. We consider the following key aspects of debate on cross-cultural work. (i) To what extent can our understanding of general principles in other cultures be summarized and presented for teaching in a way which does not descend into caricature? Alternatively, can features of other cultures be presented in ways which do not descend into particularity? (ii) Can such paradigms as "patient-centredness" be transferred from culture to culture? Should they be presented across cultures as features of "good" consultations? (iii) What use can be made of the role of interpreters for teaching purposes? What importance does it have to the educator that a doctor may not be a native speaker of the majority language of the culture in which s/he is operating? (iv) Although the language of illness, and particularly metaphors associated with illness, are studied in other cultures, the way in which illness is metaphorized in British English is seldom discussed. What can educators learn and teach from a study of such matters? (v) What are the implications for communication skills teachers of the need to present materials within a culturally diverse environment?

  5. Forming Future Teachers’ Aesthetic Culture in Foreign Educational Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotska Galyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a theoretical analysis of foreign educational experience in solving scientific problems of forming future teachers’ aesthetic culture. Given the current socio-cultural situation, it has been noted that a teacher who developed his/her aesthetic culture can make a direct contribution to the social and cultural challenges of a changing world. Based on the study of scientific and pedagogical literature, normative and legal support and the content of practical courses, the author has revealed the peculiarities of forming future specialists’ aesthetic culture in foreign countries (Japan, Germany, Canada, the United States, England. Special attention has been paid to the aesthetic potential of fine arts in forming future teachers’ aesthetic culture, which ensures the harmony of intellectual and aesthetic development of personality, enriches the emotional and sensual sphere, develops cognitive and creative activities, aesthetic needs and tastes, stipulates for future teachers’ involving in the process of artistic and aesthetic culture of the nation. The performed analysis proves that the forming of future teachers’ aesthetic culture should be based on the intercultural approach; the ideas of interrelation between aesthetic and ecological in aesthetic education; integration relations between powerful potential of fine (visual arts, environmental science and aesthetic creativity. The experience of foreign educational practice may be adopted by domestic universities to form individual aesthetic culture of future teachers.

  6. Social responsibility through art-education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Oliveira, Celso A.; Teixeira, Sandra R.C.; Teixeira, Karla B. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Curiosity about the job site of a pipeline is a strong characteristic among the residents in the area of influence of the PETROBRAS Engineering works, especially because of their proximity and direct interference in people's daily lives. In this context, children demand special attention concerning aspects such as Health, Safety and Environment (HSE). The opening of trenches and the movements of pipes, machines, and heavy equipment creates a fantastic, toy filled world in a child's imagination, which demands the disclosure of possible hazards caused by the job. To mitigate such risks and to extol the positive impacts brought to these communities, PETROBRAS created the Program 'Smart Kids Play Safe' aimed at the public in the 5-12-year-old range in order to encourage safe behavior and the development of a sense of citizenship and respect for the environment by means of playful educational activities including tricks, games, theaters, and workshops, and so on. The program seeks to link the content worked and the terms used to the reality of the target audience in order to maximize the assimilation of the concepts. These events could take place out in the open as well as inside a school. If in school, the role of the teacher becomes fundamental to the suitability of the contents, in addition to his or her experience and active participation during the events. During the construction of the GNL Pipeline main in 2008, in the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, PETROBRAS felt the necessity of creating a program that could attract and at the same time sensitize children to the hazards of playing near a pipeline construction site. And to that end, the company decided to involve educators in this process and created the Social Responsibility through Art-Education Program. A culture of environmental protection, and the concepts of socialization, safety, health and citizenship must all be self-sustaining. This contributes to the improvement of Basic

  7. The Art of Culture War: (Un)Popular Culture, Freedom of Expression, and Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darts, David

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the culture wars in the United States and considers their impact on the field of art education. Stretching across virtually ever facet of contemporary culture, these ideologically charged battles over opposing moral values and fundamental belief systems are an intrinsic part of the ongoing struggle to define and control U.S.…

  8. Aboriginal Education as Cultural Brokerage: New Aboriginal Teachers Reflect on Language and Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Julian; Cherubini, Lorenzo; Trudeau, Lyn; Hodson, Janie M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a Talking Circle of six beginning Aboriginal teachers who discussed their roles as teachers. Participants criticized teacher education programs for not preparing them to teach in ways that are respectful of Aboriginal languages and culture. They discussed the importance of coming to know themselves and their culture. The…

  9. Education Abroad and Domestic Cultural Immersion: A Comparative Study of Cultural Competence among Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare Landa, Melissa; Odòna-Holm, Jocelyn; Shi, Lijuan

    2017-01-01

    As the demographics of the United States continue to shift, American classrooms reflect the richness of cultural diversity and the vibrancy of immigrant populations. Education abroad programs provide opportunities for preservice teachers to develop their cultural competence, required for effectively teaching children from a range of cultural…

  10. Development of Quality Assurance System in Culture and Nation Character Education in Primary Education in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilana, Rudi; Asra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of national education is to develop skills and build dignified national character and civilization in educating nation life (Act No. 20, 2003). The paper describes a system of quality assurance in culture and character education in primary education. This study employs the six sigma model which consists of the formula DMAIC (Define,…

  11. Field Theory in Cultural Capital Studies of Educational Attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Troels; Munk, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    certain isolated individual resources, disregarding the structural vision and important related concepts such as field in Bourdieu’s sociology. We (re)emphasize the role of field theory in cultural capital research in education, taking into consideration current concerns in international quantitative......This article argues that there is a double problem in international research in cultural capital and educational attainment: an empirical problem, since few new insights have been gained within recent years, and a theoretical problem, since cultural capital is seen as a simple hypothesis about...

  12. Field Theory in Cultural Capital Studies of Educational Attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Krarup, Troels Magelund

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that there is a double recession in international mainstream research in cultural capital and educational attainment: an empirical recession, since few new insights have been gained within recent years, and a theoretical recession, since cultural capital is now seen as a simple...... hypothesis about certain individual resources, disregarding the structural vision and important related concepts such as field, habitus, and strategy in Bourdieu’s sociology. This article reintroduces field theory into cultural capital research in education, taking into consideration current concerns...

  13. Queer Breeding: Historicising Popular Culture, Homosexuality and Informal Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Through an analysis of gay protest music (1975) and an educational kit for students (1978), both sponsored by the Campaign for Homosexual Equality in the UK, this paper brings into focus a history of gay rights activists' efforts to marshal popular culture in the development of informal sex education for young people in the second half of the…

  14. Collaborative learning in a culturally diverse secondary vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drs. Kennedy Aquilino Tielman; Prof. dr. Perry den Brok; Dr. Rutger van de Sande; Dr. S. Bolhuis

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative learning in a culturally diverse secondary vocational education. By K. Tielman (Fontys), P. den Brok (ESoE), S. Bolhuis (Fontys) and R. van de Sande (Fontys) This contribution discusses a descriptive study on the experiences of students and teachers in secondary vocational education

  15. Queer Breeding: Historicising Popular Culture, Homosexuality and Informal Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Through an analysis of gay protest music (1975) and an educational kit for students (1978), both sponsored by the Campaign for Homosexual Equality in the UK, this paper brings into focus a history of gay rights activists' efforts to marshal popular culture in the development of informal sex education for young people in the second half of the…

  16. Appropriate Management in an African Culture: Implications for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duze, Chinelo O.

    2012-01-01

    Following continued search for reasons on the inability of African nations to realize appreciable economic development through education, the researcher investigated the influence of cultural environment on management in industry. Because input/output measures of productivity are not easily measured in education, the industry was used, hoping that…

  17. Perceptions of State Political Culture by Education Policy Elites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirt, Frederick; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The confirmed existence of political culture in the attitudes of education policymakers in six states (Arizona, California, Illinois, Pennsylvania, West Virginai, and Wisconsin) indicates that how education leaders decide about policy may depend less on what resources the states have than how leaders expect the political system to operate. (CB)

  18. Developing Quality Assurance Culture for Sustainable University Education in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibara, Emmanuel Chisa

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of any university education depends on quality parameters that should be specified, adhered to and sustained. The development of quality assurance culture in Nigerian university education is imperative, considering the fact that globalization, mobility of labour, competition and the quest for best practices have subjected…

  19. Queer Breeding: Historicising Popular Culture, Homosexuality and Informal Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Through an analysis of gay protest music (1975) and an educational kit for students (1978), both sponsored by the Campaign for Homosexual Equality in the UK, this paper brings into focus a history of gay rights activists' efforts to marshal popular culture in the development of informal sex education for young people in the second half of the…

  20. Education for Librarianship in China after the Cultural Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sharon Chien

    1983-01-01

    Description of present status of library education in China emphasizes Chinese government mobilization of limited resources to cope with severe shortage of library personnel caused by destructiveness of cultural revolution. New trends in library modernization, expansion of library science education, and possible future developments are discussed.…

  1. Between Faith and Science: World Culture Theory and Comparative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Stephen; Rappleye, Jeremy; Silova, Iveta

    2012-01-01

    World culture theory seeks to explain an apparent convergence of education through a neoinstitutionalist lens, seeing global rationalization in education as driven by the logic of science and the myth of progress. While critics have challenged these assumptions by focusing on local manifestations of world-level tendencies, such critique is…

  2. "Taking Culture Seriously": Implications for Intercultural Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogay, Tania; Edelmann, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Albeit indispensable to understanding human action, the concept of culture has suffered from excessive enthusiasm in the fields of intercultural education as well as in intercultural teacher training, leading too often to culturalist stances. These excesses of intercultural education and training as well as their contradictory message (between…

  3. Physical Education Cultures in Sweden: Fitness, Sports, Dancing … Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Håkan; Karlefors, Inger

    2015-01-01

    In a significant article from 1993, Crum describes the purpose of physical education (PE) as a "planned introduction into movement culture". In broad terms, this purpose is tantamount to the stated purpose of Swedish PE in national steering documents. Crum contends, however, that physical educators do not prioritise learning, which is…

  4. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  5. Educations of Vision - relational strategies in visual culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Helene

    2004-01-01

    The article is divided into three parts. Through examples from twentieth century Scandinavian visual arts education the first part ?Epistemological inquiries? discusses how the historical and social construction of dominant modern strategies of vision has occurred. The second part ?Experimentalist...... redescriptions? employs poststructuralist and feminist thinking about visual culture in an attempt to explore alternative understandings of visual education. In the final part ?Educations of vision in late modernity? socialization and self creation are proposed as two different, but supplementary, educational...... functions which contemporary visual education inspired by epistemological and experimentalist approaches should aim to fulfill....

  6. Educations of Vision - relational strategies in visual culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Helene

    2004-01-01

    The article is divided into three parts. Through examples from twentieth century Scandinavian visual arts education the first part ?Epistemological inquiries? discusses how the historical and social construction of dominant modern strategies of vision has occurred. The second part ?Experimentalist...... redescriptions? employs poststructuralist and feminist thinking about visual culture in an attempt to explore alternative understandings of visual education. In the final part ?Educations of vision in late modernity? socialization and self creation are proposed as two different, but supplementary, educational...... functions which contemporary visual education inspired by epistemological and experimentalist approaches should aim to fulfill....

  7. Evaluating human, social and cultural capital in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Jan

    2012-07-01

    Using the concepts of human, social and cultural capital this paper will review the literature on these theories and evaluate their application to nurse education in the United Kingdom (UK). Each concept will be explored before considering the impact and application within nurse education. Issues of sponsorship via mentoring and increased skills and contribution to the knowledge economy alongside the delivery of quality care by nursing students will be discussed with reference to theory and current policy drivers. As nursing education moves to a graduate profession in the UK this paper evaluates the drivers of human, social and cultural capital that affect this development.

  8. FORMATION OF ECOLOGICAL CULTURE AND EDUCATION OF Schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustamova Fakhrida Nazim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the formation of ecological culture and education of schoolchildren. The main goal of environmental education in schools - to bring conservationists, environmental knowledge to teach children to be compassionate, to love and protect nature, carefully dispose of its wealth. It is desirable that when teaching ecology students and pupils used a variety of games. This will have a positive impact on their environmental education.

  9. Cross Cultural Considerations for Education and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpson, William M.

    Sociopolitical influences on education and research in the United States, China, and the Soviet Union are contrasted. Discussions with American scholars who have knowledge of educational practice in socialist nations are presented. The major philosophical difference stressed by these scholars is the pervasive influence of dialectical materialism…

  10. Educational innovation, learning technologies and Virtual culture potential'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Riley

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning technologies are regularly associated with innovative teaching but will they contribute to profound innovations in education itself? This paper addresses the question by building upon Merlin.Donald's co-evolutionary theory of mind, cognition and culture. He claimed that the invention of technologies for storing and sharing external symbol systems, such as writing, gave rise to a 'theoretic culture' with rich symbolic representations and a resultant need for formal education. More recently, Shaffer and Kaput have claimed that the development of external and shared symbol-processing technologies is giving rise to an emerging 'virtual culture'. They argue that mathematics curricula are grounded in theoretic culture and should change to meet the novel demands of 'virtual culture' for symbol-processing and representational fluency. The generic character of their cultural claim is noted in this paper and it is suggested that equivalent pedagogic arguments are applicable across the educational spectrum. Hence, four general characteristics of virtual culture are proposed, against which applications of learning technologies can be evaluated for their innovative potential. Two illustrative uses of learning technologies are evaluated in terms of their 'virtual culture potential' and some anticipated questions about this approach are discussed towards the end of the paper.

  11. Cross-Cultural Selling: Examining the Importance of Cultural Intelligence in Sales Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpechitre, Duleep; Baker, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Cross-cultural selling has become an important factor in sales education. In the current competitive business graduate market, students who enter the workforce in frontline customer service positions are expected to perform sales at a higher level. Students that have acquired an education in sales during their undergraduate program have been found…

  12. Cultural Capital and Educational Strategies. Shaping Boundaries between Groups of Students with Homologous Cultural Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzalis, Marco; Porcu, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    Rather than assessing its causal effect on educational attainment, the authors of this article aim to use the concept of cultural capital to define a huge, complex and interconnected collection of educational and school strategies adopted by students and families and to examine the way that these strategies are related to school inequalities. Data…

  13. Educational Organisations as "Cultures of Consumption": Cultural Contexts of Consumer Learning in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    High levels of consumption in the industrialised parts of the world such as Europe mark a central threat to global sustainable development. In recent years, growing attention has been paid to the contributions of education and educational organisations to the socialisation of youths and young adults into consumer culture. It is the contention of…

  14. Development of culturally sensitive dialog tools in diabetes education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Folmann Hempler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Person-centeredness is a goal in diabetes education, and cultural influences are important to consider in this regard. This report describes the use of a design-based research approach to develop culturally sensitive dialog tools to support person-centered dietary education targeting Pakistani immigrants in Denmark with type 2 diabetes. The approach appears to be a promising method to develop dialog tools for patient education that are culturally sensitive, thereby increasing their acceptability among ethnic minority groups. The process also emphasizes the importance of adequate training and competencies in the application of dialog tools and of alignment between researchers and health care professionals with regards to the educational philosophy underlying their use.

  15. Cultural pedagogies and school knowledge: questions to contemporary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odailso Sinvaldo Berté

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuss the ways in which cultural pedagogies are related to school knowledge. In line with different research of the visual culture education field, the text articulates theoretical arguments that approach the pedagogies of pleasure, question, and conflict. It grounds pedagogical proposals that advance from a critical assessment of culture to considerations about the body, experiences, affections, practices of image’s uses and cultural artifacts in order to articulate creative and emancipatory forms of the teaching-learning processes.

  16. Teacher Education for TESOL in Malaysia: The Pursuance of Conformity in the Context of Cultural Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallia, Mildred; Thiyagarajah, Rosy

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the development of preservice education for Malaysian Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) within the sociopolitical and sociocultural context, highlighting the pursuance of conformity within the context of cultural diversity and showing how institutional forms and processes frame the teaching profession's response to…

  17. Speaking "Out of Place": YouTube Documentaries and Viewers' Comment Culture as Political Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Marcelina

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the comment culture that accompanies documentary films on YouTube as a site of (geo) political education. It considers how viewers try to teach each other about the proper "place" of critique in response to the global, national, and local rhetoric featured in one environmental documentary film. YouTube viewers use…

  18. Modern education of future teacher of physical culture in the conditions of informatization of educational space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragnev Y.V.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The informatization of the educational space is determined by the organizational, scientific-technical, educational processes, which update the creation of the unified information and educational space for the comprehensive use of information technologies in educational process of a future teacher of physical culture at the higher school. Stated that the integration and expansion of the educational space of the orients the higher school not only in the preparation of the literate student on the issues of information culture, but also to help the younger generation in the mastery of basic social abilities and skills in conditions of informatization of the educational space.

  19. Culturally Responsive Pain Management for Black Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Lane, Sheria G; Booker, Staja Q

    2017-03-02

    pain for Black older adults has received inadequate attention by health care professionals despite evidence of greater pain intensity, depressive symptoms, and functional disability compared with White American older adults. Pain management for this population may be significantly improved with more careful attention to the provision of culturally responsive care. As professionals concerned with the optimization of health and reduction of suffering throughout the lifespan, nurses have an ethical, moral, and professional responsibility to provide culturally responsive care to the populations they serve-particularly when clear disparities in health exist. By considering how culture affects important health beliefs, values, preferences, and customs, and integrating this understanding into practice, quality of life is likely to be improved. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Giving Power Its Due: The Powerful Possibilities and the Problems of Power with Deliberative Democracy and English Language Learners. A Response to "Deliberative Democracy in English-Language Education: Cultural and Linguistic Inclusion in the School Community"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jarrod S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of deliberation with English Language Learners presents possibilities to both improve language learning, but also expand the potential for civics education for all students. In particular, this response examines the issue of power to extend Liggett's (2014) arguments for using deliberative democracy with English Language Learners and…

  1. Giving Power Its Due: The Powerful Possibilities and the Problems of Power with Deliberative Democracy and English Language Learners. A Response to "Deliberative Democracy in English-Language Education: Cultural and Linguistic Inclusion in the School Community"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jarrod S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of deliberation with English Language Learners presents possibilities to both improve language learning, but also expand the potential for civics education for all students. In particular, this response examines the issue of power to extend Liggett's (2014) arguments for using deliberative democracy with English Language Learners and…

  2. Cultural differences in responses to a Likert scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jerry W; Jones, Patricia S; Mineyama, Yoshimitsu; Zhang, Xinwei Esther

    2002-08-01

    Cultural differences in responses to a Likert scale were examined. Self-identified Chinese, Japanese, and Americans (N=136, 323, and 160, respectively) recruited at ethnic or general supermarkets in Southern California completed a 13-question Sense of Coherence scale with a choice of either four, five, or seven responses in either Chinese, Japanese, or English. The Japanese respondents more frequently reported difficulty with the scale, the Chinese more frequently skipped questions, and both these groups selected the midpoint more frequently on items that involved admitting to a positive emotion than did the Americans, who were more likely to indicate a positive emotion. Construct validity of the scale tended to be better for the Chinese and the Americans when there were four response choices and for the Japanese when there were seven. Although culture affected response patterns, the association of sense of coherence and health was positive in all three cultural groups. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Development of a Culturally Responsive Nutrition Promotion Course for Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Gail C.; Beaudoin, Jessica; Rascon, Mayra; Garcia-Vega, Melawhy; Rios-Ellis, Britt

    2013-01-01

    The health of Hispanics is greatly influenced by level of education, socioeconomic status, and access to healthcare (United States Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2011). To address this issue and to reduce health disparities among all ethnic groups, community based interventions with culturally appropriate and linguistically…

  4. Development of a Culturally Responsive Nutrition Promotion Course for Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Gail C.; Beaudoin, Jessica; Rascon, Mayra; Garcia-Vega, Melawhy; Rios-Ellis, Britt

    2013-01-01

    The health of Hispanics is greatly influenced by level of education, socioeconomic status, and access to healthcare (United States Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2011). To address this issue and to reduce health disparities among all ethnic groups, community based interventions with culturally appropriate and linguistically…

  5. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  6. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  7. Interdisciplinary: Cultural competency and culturally congruent education for millennials in health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawala-Druy, Souzan; Hill, Mary H

    2012-10-01

    The increasingly diverse multicultural and multigenerational student population in the United States requires that educators at all levels develop cultural knowledge, awareness, and sensitivity to help diverse learners fulfill their potential and to avoid cultural misunderstandings that can become obstacles or barriers to learning. The purpose of this study was to design and implement eclectic, creative, evidence-based interdisciplinary educational activities, along with culturally congruent teaching strategies, within a semester-long university course that promoted positive and culturally competent learning outcomes for culturally diverse, largely millennial students. The interdisciplinary course would prepare health professional students with the requisite knowledge and skills, through transformative learning that produces change agents, to provide culturally congruent and quality team-based care to diverse populations. This was a qualitative and quantitative study, which measured students' level of cultural awareness, competence, and proficiency pre and post the educational intervention. Instruments used for data collection included the Inventory for Assessing The Process of Cultural Competence-Student Version (IAPCC-SV) by Campinha-Bacote, course evaluations, students' feedback, and portfolio reflections. The study was conducted at a private academic institution located in the Mid-Atlantic region and the sample population included inter-professional students (N=106) from various health professions including nursing, pharmacy, and allied health sciences. Results from the pre- and post-test IAPCC-SV survey revealed that mean scores increased significantly from pre-test (60.8) to post-test (70.6). Thus, students' levels of cultural competency (awareness, knowledge, skills, desire, encounter) improved post-educational intervention, indicating that the teaching methods used in the course might be applied on a larger scale across the university system to cater to the

  8. Beyond the Melting Pot and Salad Bowl Views of Cultural Diversity: Advancing Cultural Diversity Education of Nutrition Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiloane, Kelebogile Tsametse

    2016-10-01

    This article outlines how the melting pot and salad bowl views of cultural diversity have influenced the cultural training of nutrition educators and other health professionals. It explores how these views are changing in reaction to the changing demographics and health disparities seen in the US today and how the cultural training of nutrition educators has not kept up with these changing views. Suggestions for how this cultural education could be modified include placing a greater emphasis on both the cultural self-awareness of nutrition educators and the sociopolitical historical factors that influence the cultural orientation of nutrition educators and their clients.

  9. How to challenge a culturalization of human existence? Promoting interculturalism and ethical thinking in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Brossard Børhaug

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available What if culture appears to be a universal solution – and problem – to all human encounters in the multicultural school? When teachers explain the problems encountered by minority pupils simply by reference to their cultural (religious backgrounds, one faces the danger of culturalization where the other’s difference is explained only by his/her ethnicity. Culturalization is highly problematic because it emphasizes stereotyped inter-group differences and by doing so erases intra-group and inter-individual differences. The article argues that culture is fundamental in human existence, but it should not be an ambiguous dimension if the school seeks to help the learner get a stronger capacity of voice and aspiration. In order to challenge culturalization of human existence, it is crucial for education to promote the paradigm of interculturalism. Such a paradigm requires educators to acknowledge multiple forms of identity belongings for the individual and to resist the interpretation of culture as common sense. Education becomes intercultural and provides liberating categorizations for the individual when it acknowledges the true value of chosen cultural affiliations and individual aspirations. Nonetheless, promoting interculturalism might not be sufficient. Facing the potential danger of culturalization, we also need to foster ethics in education, in order to deconstruct the categories of cultural identity and belonging. Drawing on the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas (1905-1995 the article argues that loving the other implies the act of loving the other person as a brother and as a stranger. Responsibility understood as an ethical responsibility opens up the community’s traditional structures and promotes a politics of ethical difference. Justice, thus, is not only about how well rights and duties are enforced, but also a matter of the other’s right to be other. Difference as a category is in other words not cultural but refers to the

  10. Cultural Identity and Education: A Critical Race Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Theodorea Regina; Candis, Matthew Reese

    2013-01-01

    The authors begin this article looking at the start of the journey through this new 21st century and how educators at every level are endeavoring to meet the challenge to be responsive to the educational needs of their students, current and future. This is especially true in relationship to the education of students of diverse backgrounds…

  11. Quality Assurance of University Education: Whose Responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibijola, Elizabeth Yinka

    2015-01-01

    This study sought the opinion of stakeholders in university education, to know who should be responsible for quality assurance of university education in Nigeria. Descriptive research of survey design was employed in the study. The population consisted of all public university staff members, students and the employers of Nigerian university…

  12. Felix Adler and Education for Ethical Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallones, Jared R.

    2015-01-01

    This article delves into the various religious influences on Dr. Felix Adler's spiritual development and the resulting theological and philosophical foundations for the Ethical Culture Society that he created in addition to the Society's schools. The discussion focuses on Dr. Adler's personal struggles with traditional Judaism in the face of…

  13. Culture and Moral Leadership in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kam-cheung

    1998-01-01

    East Asia differs significantly from the West, with the main contributing factor being culture. The article traces the differences from their beginnings and offers reasons for the differences, presents Western conceptualizations of moral leadership, discusses leadership in light of Chinese intellectual traditions, and argues that the construct of…

  14. Liberal Feminism, Cultural Diversity and Comparative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enslin, Penny; Tjiattas, Mary

    2004-01-01

    For multiculturalists who favour a relativist approach, globalization and the increasing interconnectedness of societies pose a threat to cultural diversity. In this paper we show, through an exploration of the work of Martha Nussbaum, that a viable universalist feminism can accommodate a thin and so defensible version of multiculturalism.…

  15. Educating for professional responsibility - a normative dimension of higher education

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    Tone Dyrdal Solbrekke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has the politically defined mandate of higher education as its starting point to highlight and discuss contemporary challenges in relation to its normative dimension that are illustrated by examples from Norwegian higher education. A central question in the first part of the paper is whether there has been a change in the public understanding of the normative responsibility of higher education. Is there a move towards an understanding of the main responsibility of higher education as that of providing society with technical expertise and professionals who give precedence to financial interests, entrepreneurial and innovative ideas − at the expense of moral and civic values? In the second part of the paper, it is argued that greater awareness of the normative dimension of higher education is called for – here illustrated with the case of educating for professional responsibility. It is suggested that a teaching approach based on the model of deliberative communication provides an appropriate means of increasing moral consciousness of professional responsibility. Students may gain greater ability tosee and critically examine the moral and societal implications of their future professional responsibility if issues of professional responsibility are linked to the societal frameworks in which professionals are to operate.

  16. Technological aspects of teacher training in culture of information products criation in further education system

    OpenAIRE

    Кондратьева, И. П.

    2013-01-01

    Submission is devoted to urgent educational problem of teacher training in culture of information products criation. Theses include the concept of the culture, describe the educational technology stages of teacher training in further education system.

  17. Cultural competence in medical education: A questionnaire study of Danish medical teachers' perceptions of and preparedness to teach cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Janne; Jervelund, Signe Smith; Norredam, Marie; Kristiansen, Maria; Krasnik, Allan

    2017-03-01

    The cultural competence training of healthcare professionals is a key element in ensuring the quality of both the access and delivery of healthcare to increasingly ethnically diverse populations. The aim of this study is to investigate Danish medical teachers' opinions about cultural competence, their willingness to receive training and preparedness to teach cultural competence topics. The survey was sent to medical teachers, clinical teachers and external lecturers who teach in the medical programme at the University of Copenhagen. A total of 1400 medical teachers received the survey, and 199 responded. The response rate is 14%. Data were analysed through descriptive calculations, and answers to open-ended questions were coded using content analysis. Results showed that 82.4% of the informants agreed or strongly agreed that the medical education programme should include training on cultural issues, and 60.3% agreed or strongly agreed that students should be assessed on their cultural competence skills. Regarding preparedness to teach a diverse classroom, 88.4% felt somewhat or very prepared to engage and motivate all students. About 70% were interested in receiving training on cultural competence. Generally, there is interest in and acknowledgement of the importance of cultural competence in Danish medical education among teachers at the University of Copenhagen. This creates an opportunity to implement cultural competence in the medical curriculum, training of teachers and strengthening the diversity sensitivity of the organisation. However, support for this programme by management and the allocation of an appropriate level of resources is a prerequisite to the success of the programme.

  18. Educating for diversity, social responsibility and action: preservice teachers engage in immersion experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Winston

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines how a short cultural immersion experience strongly impacted and had long lasting personal and educational effects on preservice teachers who were enrolled in a cultural diversity class. Reports from their reflections and oral responses indicated that this experience helped them to be more culturally aware and to seriously reflect on their prejudices, misconceptions and stereotypes about minority groups. Through personal convictions they realized that positive changes toward cultural diversity had to be made if they were going to be culturally responsive in their daily lives, and as teachers in the classrooms.

  19. INCLUSIVEEDUCATION CULTURE: ESPECIAL EDUCATION AND THE FORMATIVE PROCESSES OF TEACHERS

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    Guacira de Azambuja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The articlepresents a bibliography research. Its objective is to discuss the formativeprocesses particularities of especial educational teacher by an inclusiveeducational culture. It was found thatexist specifities that mark the formation of special educational teacher. Thesespecificities are origin of historical educational context mark by NacionalPolicy on Inclusive Perspective. This perspective suggest the existence ofother factor that influenced and do influence the special education and theteachers in this area. Among the factors associated to this process are: socioculturalvariants, initial formation and the continuous formation. It’s concluded that notjust a challenging proposal in the formation of special educational teacher is enoughto effectively attend the student’s educational needs, it’s necessary to focusin the special educational ‘s laws and the development of public policies ofgeneral formation.

  20. Cultural Memory Banking in Preservice Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Vicente C.; Tippins, Deborah J.

    2012-12-01

    This study focused on the exemplification of cultural memory banking as an ethnographic tool to understand cultural practices relevant to science teaching and learning in a rural coastal village in a central island of the Philippine archipelago. Using the collaborative action ethnography as a research methodology, 10 prospective science teachers and a science teacher educator/doctoral candidate formed a research team and documented community funds of knowledge relevant to science teaching and learning through their participation in a Community Immersion course. The study employed the use of the cultural memory banking as a meditational tool to analyze, make sense of, and represent interview, focus-group discussion, and observation data, among others, for the development of culturally relevant science lessons. Originally used as an anthropological tool to preserve cultural knowledge associated with the cultivation of indigenous plant varieties, the cultural memory banking, as adapted in science education, was used, both as a data collection and analytic tool, to locate relevant science at the intersection of community life. The research team developed a cultural memory bank exemplar, "Ginamos: The Stinky Smell that Sells," to highlight the learning experiences and meaning-making process of those involved in its development. Dilemmas and insights on the development and use of cultural memory banking were discussed with respect to issues of knowledge mining and mainstreaming of indigenous/local funds of knowledge, troubling the privileged position of Western-inspired nature of science.

  1. New literacies and future educational culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Pincas

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The argument in this paper is based on the view that, even though traditional classroom teaching and lecturing are likely to remain the norm, there is a recognized and growing place for the use of technology in educational provision in schools and universities. Online course design is still very much open to discussion, since traditions of delivery have yet to develop. But new software developments are arriving so quickly, that educators have barely time to experiment with one mode of delivery before they are overtaken by another.

  2. EDUCATION AND CULTURE (CONCERNING THE PROBLEM IN SEARCH THE PRINCIPLE OF EDUCATION ADEQUACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena N. Yarkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article develops a theme raised in the study «Education in Search of the Adequacy principle» by Yu. V. Larin, whereas the topical principle of modern education is the principle of cultural adequacy.The aim of the study is the analysis of value-semantic content of the principle of cultural adequacy of education. Methods of the study are formed by appeal to cultural approach connecting methods of ideal typing and value-semantic reconstruction.Results. In general, there are three types of culture based on the explication of the three modality human relations to the world: «the world is a condition», «the world is a tool», «the world is a purpose»; and, accordingly, three types of pedagogical culture: traditional, utilitarian, creative.Traditional pedagogical culture focuses on education homo traditional – traditional man, the individual, the obedient executor of the culture value semantic, regulatory policies and regulations, subordinating its activity transmitted from generation to generation tradition. The semantic space of traditional pedagogical culture principle of cultural adequacy education is defined as the principle of consistency with established tradition.Pedagogical culture of utilitarian type directs a homo utilitarian – utilitarian man, individuality, interpreting the culture value semantic, legal and regulatory requirements and on the basis of situational use, fully to the publication of his life publicly or individually beneficial activities. The utilitarian type principle of cultural adequacy of education is defined as the principle of consistency with the social and/or individual use in the semantic space of pedagogical culture.Pedagogical culture of creative types is aimed at nurturing homo creator – creative person whose existence is self-organization in the space between tradition and innovation, absolute and relative, universal and particular meanings of human existence, between social and individual

  3. Formation of self-regulation culture of physical education faculty

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    Kudin S.F.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to experimentally substantiate effectiveness of pedagogic conditions of self-regulation culture formation of future physical culture teachers. Material: in the research 110 3rd year students of physical education faculty participated. The students were questioned. The level of students’ anxiety was assessed. Results: Implementation of the author’s course in educational process facilitated formation of students’ self-regulation skills and abilities; raises confidence and self estimation; influences positively on functional state. It was found that students acquire ability to consciously observe their own verbal constructs of negative thinking and create positive alternatives. Conclusions: preparing of future physical culture teachers stipulates his (her ability to effectively fulfill professional functioning in the aspect of health preservation. The necessary conditions of self-regulation culture formation are formation of students’ holistic value-meaningful attitude to individual health and health of surrounding people.

  4. Mismatch of Cultural Dimensions in an Urban Medical Educational Environment

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    Bethany Malone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify cultural dimensions and their potential mismatches between attending physicians and their residents and medical students. Methods. We surveyed faculty and students, both undergraduates and postgraduate resident physicians, at the SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, using Hofstede’s VSM-08 questionnaire, and calculated cultural dimensions, including the Power-Distance Index (PDI, Individualism (IDV, Masculinity (MAS, Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI, and Long-term Outlook (LTO. Correlations between faculty and student demographic data and cultural dimensions were calculated (SPSS. Results. There were 237 student and resident respondents and 96 faculty respondents. Comparing all faculty and student respondents, significant differences were found in four of five cultural dimensions, with faculty scoring higher in MAS, and lower in PDI, IDV, UAI, and LTO. Conclusions. These differences may be important in the design and implementation of a medical educational curriculum, and, particularly, in the measurement and evaluation of educational outcomes.

  5. Cross-cultural Education at the International Space University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J. D.; Peeters, W.; Hill, H.

    2006-12-01

    A typical nine-week summer session of the International Space University includes 100 graduate students and young professionals from as many as thirty countries. In addition to lectures and team projects covering a variety of space-related disciplines, the curriculum contains several modes of cross-cultural education. In role- playing workshops, students (asked to behave in accord with known cultural norms of various countries) engage in negotiations on problems such as the rescue and return of astronauts as mandated in international agreements and treaties. Culture shock that could derail such negotiations in actual practice is observed, and the participants come away with heightened sensitivity to cultural differences. This technique could be extended to other educational settings, such as the activities of the UN's Regional Centres in developing countries and the outreach efforts associated with the International Heliophysical Year.

  6. Culture of Peace: Challenges for the teachers’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathia Alvarado

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available People’s economic and social advance can only be carried out if they are accompanied by a Culture of Peace: Education has a dual role as a human right to teach human rights and a specific call in building this Culture among the younger generations. The central argument of this paper is how the Culture of Peace in schools is an everyday experience in the classroom. This poses challenges such as training teachers who must prepare to educate new generations to confront the conflict without violence and to develop an alternate way of looking at the differences between people and societies. It is concluded that it is essential that educators must have a lifelong learning processes. This training should contemplate personal knowledge to manage the emotions that arise in every interaction, which will result in the well-being of students in the school.

  7. Creating participatory writing cultures in UK higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Clughen, L; Hardy, C.

    2011-01-01

    One particularly difficult area for higher education students is writing appropriately for their respective disciplines. As writing is a social, cultural and dialogic act, writing support should create learning events that will allow for useful social exchange of ideas within the appropriate disciplinary cultures. Indeed, many claims are made in favour of disciplinary-based writing support: students will become more engaged with their subjects, will develop as critical thinkers and, through d...

  8. Teams and Collegiality in Educational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovbjerg, Kirsten Marie

    2006-01-01

    In recent decades modern educational organisations have become heavily influenced by new management theories and their new ways of organising staff in teams. This trend started in private organisations with a new organisational agenda but has migrated to public organisations with the introduction of new public management (NPM) in state and…

  9. Cultural Diversity in Mathematics (Education): CIEAEM 51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Afzal; Williams, Honor; Kraemer, Jean Marie

    The 51st meeting of the Commission Internationale pour L'Etude et L'Amelioration de L'Ensignment des Mathematiques (CIEAEM) was held July, 1999 at Chichester, UK and facilitated the collaboration of delegates from over 30 countries providing a variety of perspectives on the theme OCultural Diversity in Mathematics Education'. The papers in this…

  10. The Match between Apache Indians' Culture and Educational Practices Used in Our Schools: From Problems to Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, Lawrence; Hammond, Helen

    2007-01-01

    This study examined cultural values and practices of Apache Indian families in regards to child rearing and how culturally responsive our schools' educational practices are with this population of individuals. Findings from this study revealed a potentially negative impact on these students' development and academic achievement. Solutions to…

  11. NAFTA and Higher Education: The Cultural and Educational Dimensions of Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altbach, Philip G.

    1994-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which promises closer economic relations between Canada, the United States, and Mexico, has implications for higher education. These include the need for better understanding of the different educational systems, more educational and cultural exchange, and expanded area studies and language…

  12. NAFTA and Higher Education: The Cultural and Educational Dimensions of Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altbach, Philip G.

    1994-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which promises closer economic relations between Canada, the United States, and Mexico, has implications for higher education. These include the need for better understanding of the different educational systems, more educational and cultural exchange, and expanded area studies and language…

  13. Visual Culture, Art Education and the everyday: hybridisms and paradoxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Ribeiro Meira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Art education in school faces instigating and provocative challenges, for instance, the teacher confronts: how to work with everyday issues and images. In the art field, Visual Culture can point to approximations between life, its paradoxes, the everyday, its hybridism and school, with its challenges. In considering the possibilities of teaching art, we discuss the contributions of authors such as: Merleau-Ponty, Nicolas Bourriaud, Michel Maffesoli, and also, Edgar Morin, who calls for the necessity for complex thinking when thinking about a complex reality of crossed borders, hybridisms, uncertainty and contradictions that, for this very reason, permit rich dialogues between art, education and culture.

  14. AXIOLOGY PROBLEMS OF THE CULTURE AND EDUCATION OF YOUTH NOWADAYS

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    Valentina I. Revyakina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to justify the priorities of culture and education as a guarantor of moral improvement of the Russian society at the beginning of the XXI century.Methods. Despite the socio-cultural lack of stability of the Russian social medium, quite mature qualities of the youth’s civic consciousness, activity and volunteering for the good of society have been revealed on the basis of the methods of analyzing scientific and publicistic researches, surveys and questionnaire.Results and scientific novelty. The article deals with the problems that generated low level of culture and education amongst teenagers and youth under conditions of modern political regime and lack of former ideological guidelines. Destabilizing factors of the teenagers and students’ motivation decrease towards perception and acquiring cultural-educational ideals are noted. The destructive role of the mass media including television and radio encouraging moral deformation of the coming generation and its intellectual immiseration is shown.It’s underlined that undergraduates and students’ subjective position as a basic index of cultural-educational competence development is expressed in the volunteering movement. The motives of volunteering movement are as follows initiation, independence of goal-setting and planning, self-realization aspiration, ability to put ideas into practice without external pressure. The meaning of education is characterized as reproduction and enriching of people’s life values and ideals providing times connection and continuity of generations. The author’s own thoughts about the role of education in the life of a modern person are accompanied by the analysis of students’ attitudes and judgments on the matter.Practical significance. The research findings appeal to specialist audiences involved in the sphere of education.

  15. Civil responsibility of Physical Education professionals

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the civil responsibility of Physical Education professionals which consists of an obligation to repair eventual damages in their professional practice. Firstly, this study presents a historical rescue, the conceptualization of civil responsibility , the differentiation of that criminal responsibility, and also of the assumed ones. Secondly, the conditions for the imputation of a damage and the differentiation between obligation of means and obligation of ...

  16. Race, Class, and Cultural Reproduction: Critical Theories in Urban Education

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    Elaine M. Walker

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available In spite of decades of reform attempts urban education remains an intractable policy issue for educators. National and state level data continue to show disparities in educational achievement and attainment between students from affluent and poor urban communities. If past policies have not proven to be effective in substantially improving urban educational systems the question is why? In this paper the argument is raised that urban educational policies lack sound epistemological grounding. Policies are divorced from an understanding of the “urban problematic”. Functionalist in orientation these policies have for the most part sought to “fix” urban schools by focusing on micro-ecological issues. In this paper three theoretical perspectives are explored for their potential contribution to inform research and policy on urban educational issues. The three perspectives are: 1 class theories 2 critical race theory and 3 cultural reproduction theories.

  17. Democratization of Education as Prerequisite for Social Economic and Cultural Progress in a Multi-Cultural Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madumere, S. C.; Olisaemeka, B. U.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on democratization of education as a prerequisite for social, economic and cultural progress in a multi-cultural society, such as Nigeria. Attempt was made to define and explain the major concepts in the paper. Education was explained as an instrument of democracy and as function of socialization, culture and economic…

  18. The Use and Abuse of Education for Culture; Lesson from Nietzsche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maratos, John

    2000-01-01

    States that Friedrich Nietzsche identifies three ways the past is used. Using examples from ethnic, cultural, and political projects, considers the three abuses of education for culture: (1) the need for monumental history; (2) antiquarian uses of education for culture; and (3) critical uses of education for culture. (CMK)

  19. The Use and Abuse of Education for Culture; Lesson from Nietzsche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maratos, John

    2000-01-01

    States that Friedrich Nietzsche identifies three ways the past is used. Using examples from ethnic, cultural, and political projects, considers the three abuses of education for culture: (1) the need for monumental history; (2) antiquarian uses of education for culture; and (3) critical uses of education for culture. (CMK)

  20. Cultural variations in motivational responses to felt misunderstanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Janetta; Oishi, Shigehiro; Coan, James A; Akimoto, Sharon; Miao, Felicity F

    2010-07-01

    Three studies examined cultural variations in the motivational consequences of being misunderstood by others. Study 1 found that European American students who felt misunderstood by others performed progressively better academically, whereas Asian and Asian American students who felt misunderstood by others performed progressively worse. In Studies 2 and 3, felt misunderstanding was experimentally manipulated, and motivational responses were measured with a handgrip task (Study 2) and prefrontal electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry (Study 3). Across the two studies, Asians and Asian Americans showed more withdrawal-related responses but European Americans showed either no difference (Study 2) or more motivated responses (Study 3) after being misunderstood versus being understood. Together, these studies demonstrate systematic cultural variations in motivational responses to felt misunderstanding.

  1. Culture of Peace and Musical Education in contexts of Cultural Diversity

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    Sebastián Sánchez Fernández

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The cultural diversity of the world needs to education for the peace, working the values related to the Culture of Peace, like the respect, the justice, the equality, the tolerance and the interculturality. The fundamental aim of our research is to know and to value how the educational centers turn into the most suitable scenes to develop the education. For it we have realized a study in a center of Infantile and Primary Education of the Autonomous City of Melilla, the College Velázquez, with which we try to know the reality that is lived in the school centers of the city in the relative to the promotion of the Interculturality and the Culture of Peace between the pupils of different groups. We have used a qualitative methodology, which has allowed us to form a group of discussion with several teachers of different professional profiles. As more relevant result stands out than the music, in spite of the hourly restrictions that the legislation has established for this matter, it is one of the best resources to educate in values and to promote the Interculturality and the Culture of Peace.

  2. A Culturally Responsive Counter-Narrative of Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gist, Conra D.

    2014-01-01

    How do you recognize an effective teacher's sociocultural consciousness? Tamara Wallace's and Brenda Brand's argument that sociocultural consciousness is the "brain" of effective culturally responsive instruction for students of color comes at a time when the system of teacher evaluation is being overhauled nationwide.…

  3. Examining Preservice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Teaching Self-Efficacy Doubts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwatu, Kamau Oginga; Chesnut, Steven Randall; Alejandro, Angela Ybarra; Young, Haeni Alecia

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to add to the research on teachers' self-efficacy beliefs by examining preservice teachers' culturally responsive teaching self-efficacy doubts. We examined the tasks that preservice teachers felt least efficacious to successfully execute and explored the reasoning behind these self-efficacy doubts. Consequently, we were…

  4. German financial media's responsiveness to Deutsche Bank's cultural change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strauß, N.

    2015-01-01

    Based on first-order and second-order agenda building theory, this study analyzes the responsiveness of German financial media to frames of the "cultural change" proclaimed in the banking industry, exemplified by Deutsche Bank. Findings suggest a difference between the two major German financial med

  5. Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

  6. Fostering Culturally and Developmentally Responsive Teaching through Improvisational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Elizabeth; Whyte, Kristin; Delaney, Kate Kresin

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore an effort to rethink curricular decision-making with a group of public pre-K teachers working in a context of curriculum escalation and commitment to play-based pedagogy. Through a professional development program designed to support developmentally and culturally responsive early mathematics, we examine how teachers…

  7. Culturally Responsive Evaluation Meets Systems-Oriented Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Veronica G.; Parsons, Beverly A.

    2017-01-01

    The authors of this article each bring a different theoretical background to their evaluation practice. The first author has a background of attention to culturally responsive evaluation (CRE), while the second author has a background of attention to systems theories and their application to evaluation. Both have had their own evolution of…

  8. An Analysis of the Impact of Traditional Chinese Culture on Chinese Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyuan, Gu

    2006-01-01

    The educational tradition of China has developed from traditional Chinese culture. Without an understanding of the cultural impact on traditional education, it is impossible to comprehend the educational tradition of China and to change its traditional educational ideas. There are fine traditions and feudal remains in Chinese culture which ought…

  9. "Because They Want to Teach You about Their Culture": Analyzing Effective Mentoring Conversations between Culturally Responsible Mentors and Secondary Science Teachers of Indigenous Students in Mainstream Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Te Kotahitanga is an educational reform project in Aotearoa/New Zealand demonstrated to have significantly impacted the participation, achievement, and retention of indigenous Maori students in secondary schools. In this paper, I share results from a study of culturally responsible mentoring at 4 different schools participating in the Te…

  10. Integrating social factors into cross-cultural medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alexander R; Betancourt, Joseph R; Carrillo, J Emilio

    2002-03-01

    The field of cross-cultural medical education has blossomed in an environment of increasing diversity and increasing awareness of the effect of race and ethnicity on health outcomes. However, there is still no standardized approach to teaching doctors in training how best to care for diverse patient populations. As standards are developed, it is crucial to realize that medical educators cannot teach about culture in a vacuum. Caring for patients of diverse cultural backgrounds is inextricably linked to caring for patients of diverse social backgrounds. In this article, the authors discuss the importance of social issues in caring for patients of all cultures, and propose a practical, patient-based approach to social analysis covering four major domains--(1) social stress and support networks, (2) change in environment, (3) life control, and (4) literacy. By emphasizing and expanding the role of the social history in cross-cultural medical education, faculty can better train medical students, residents, and other health care providers to care for socioculturally diverse patient populations.

  11. An Essay in Culture, Society, Education and Vocational Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, John H.

    2007-01-01

    In many developing countries it is apparent that there are multifarious impediments associated with, and acting upon, educational development and the complexity of diverse socio-cultural landscapes. Indeed, numerous perspectives tend to be overlooked or possibly not even taken under consideration when it comes to the transmission of salient…

  12. Multi-Cultural Graduate Library Education. Historical Paper 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jane Robbins

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines factors influencing the number of minority students enrolling in library schools during the 10 years prior to 1978. Robbins notes that there are four categories of barriers likely obstructing recruitment of students of color into LIS programs: financial, educational, psychosocial, and cultural. [For the commentary on this…

  13. Field Theory in Cultural Capital Studies of Educational Attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Troels; Munk, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    certain isolated individual resources, disregarding the structural vision and important related concepts such as field in Bourdieu’s sociology. We (re)emphasize the role of field theory in cultural capital research in education, taking into consideration current concerns in international quantitative...

  14. Reconciling Organisational Culture and External Quality Assurance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Dhaya

    2013-01-01

    Organisational culture and external quality assurance have both been presented as significant drivers of effectiveness, efficiency and excellence in higher education institutions. However, these assumptions have not been critically examined given the philosophical, conceptual and methodological contestations surrounding both constructs. A…

  15. Intercultural Interpretations: Making Public Relations Education Culturally Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Joy

    2009-01-01

    Public relations educators delivering courses to international students find that each cohort of students interprets and understands public relations theory and its application to practice according to their respective cultures. The premise of this paper is to reflect on some of the interpretations and expectations of public relations students…

  16. Cultural Bias in Children's Storybooks: Implications for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Joan S.

    This study addresses concern about bias in educational materials for elementary school pupils. Children's storybooks were examined for the appearance of biases across the cultural categories of race, ethnicity, gender, age, socioeconomic level, religion, and environmental background. These biases included stereotyping, invisibility (omission of…

  17. Meanings and Implications of Culture in Sustainability Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vince; Datta, Ranjan; Dyck, Shannon; Kayira, Jean; McVittie, Janet

    2016-01-01

    As scholars working both individually and collectively, we are interested in exploring what may be achieved through taking up the complex notion of culture in sustainability education research. In this article, we present a bricolage of research, drawing on empirical and theoretical sources that collectively establish the kind of capacity we see…

  18. US and Russian Traditions in Rhetoric, Education and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappen, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional rhetoric attempts to find the available means of persuasion in public assemblies, law courts and ceremonials and is grounded in cultural values and beliefs. Traditional rhetoric supports the development of social communities and posits education as a primary means of maintaining these communities. In contrast, contemporary alternatives…

  19. Multi-Cultural Graduate Library Education. Historical Paper 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jane Robbins

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines factors influencing the number of minority students enrolling in library schools during the 10 years prior to 1978. Robbins notes that there are four categories of barriers likely obstructing recruitment of students of color into LIS programs: financial, educational, psychosocial, and cultural. [For the commentary on this…

  20. Culture: A Filtration Process during Communication in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Rudi

    This paper focuses on the filtration process of culture during communication in education with reference to visual elements. An introduction provides a review of some communication models--graphic representations of theories that attempt to predict and explain the process of communication. These simple models are discussed: Aristotle's model of…

  1. Popular Culture, De-Centering Educators and Critical Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I trace three traditions and bodies of work: The Chicago School of Sociology, the Birmingham School of Cultural Studies and the New Sociology of Education. Each of these traditions evolved in distinct though overlapping ways. Taken together, they offer a productive set of resources for thinking through the complexities of popular…

  2. PRODUCTIVE EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING FOREGN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vladimirovna Sannikova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to looking for productive educational technologies in learning a foreign language and culture with the use of ICT-based on the student-centered strategy that implements the method of projects.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-47

  3. Are International Students’ Preferred Pedagogy Influenced by Their Educational Culture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Winch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of international students is studying at British universities. This study investigates multicultural students’ preferences on teaching and learning which was conducted at a university in the South of England during 2009/2010 academic year. In the literature review, the framework used in this study is explained. The study sample was 34 students who were studying Japanese as a non-credit module. Quantitative and qualitative data was collected using questionnaires. The results showed that some students’ preferred pedagogy appeared to be altered and influenced by British educational culture regardless of students’ previous educational culture. In addition, the sample participants’ preferred pedagogy are identified into given categories based on the framework of the study. Those who are in the teaching profession are encouraged to take into consideration of the educational cultures and teaching and learning practices from non-Anglophone countries. Keywords: culture, globalisation, higher education, Japanese language teaching, multicultural, power distance index (PDI, uncertainty avoidance index (UAI

  4. Towards a Culture of Quality. Perspectives on Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Badri N., Ed.; Kanwar, Asha, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This third publication on the theme of quality in the Commonwealth of Learning Perspectives on Distance Education series widens the discussion beyond external quality assurance processes to a more generic focus on a "culture of quality." It is an extension of the earlier two publications, which came out in 1994 and 1997 and drew…

  5. Reconciling Organisational Culture and External Quality Assurance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Dhaya

    2013-01-01

    Organisational culture and external quality assurance have both been presented as significant drivers of effectiveness, efficiency and excellence in higher education institutions. However, these assumptions have not been critically examined given the philosophical, conceptual and methodological contestations surrounding both constructs. A…

  6. Does Culture Influence Learning Styles in Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikutty, Sankaran; Anuradha, N. S.; Hansen, Katrin

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops a framework for understanding the relationships between approaches to learning adopted by students in the context of higher education and the culture of the country they were brought up in. The paper, after examining the more widely used Kolb's learning styles, opts for another categorisation, namely the so called learning…

  7. Designing a Robot for Cultural Brokering in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yanghee

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of English language learning children in U.S. classrooms and the need for effective programs that support these children present a great challenge to the current educational paradigm. The challenge may be met, at least in part, by an innovative humanoid robot serving as a cultural broker that mediates collaborative…

  8. Critical Culturally Sustaining/Revitalizing Pedagogy and Indigenous Education Sovereignty

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Teresa L.; Lee, Tiffany S.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Teresa L. McCarty and Tiffany S. Lee present critical culturally sustaining/revitalizing pedagogy as a necessary concept to understand and guide educational practices for Native American learners. Premising their discussion on the fundamental role of tribal sovereignty in Native American schooling, the authors underscore and…

  9. The Possibilities of Education in the Culture of Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suoranta, Juha

    1996-01-01

    Reviews Freud, Foucault, Eco, and critical theorists to examine features of postmodern society: a culture of violence, pervasive hidden forms of social control, voyeurism toward life, the sovereignty of instrumental rationality, and threats of fascism. Suggests the need for critical practice in education that values rational self-clarity,…

  10. Popular Culture, De-Centering Educators and Critical Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I trace three traditions and bodies of work: The Chicago School of Sociology, the Birmingham School of Cultural Studies and the New Sociology of Education. Each of these traditions evolved in distinct though overlapping ways. Taken together, they offer a productive set of resources for thinking through the complexities of popular…

  11. Marxism in Vygotskian Approaches to Cultural Studies of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo, Jr.; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research,…

  12. Education for Peace: Transforming the Culture of Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita Sharma

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper narrates the conceptual framework of ‘Education for Peace’ and its need especially in regions, which have seen ethnic conflicts. In Education for Peace, the educator and the educand are seen as transformative agents and not mere passive recipients. Their role is not restricted to the close precincts of the classroom and the ‘schooled’ world but to the larger community and the lived experiences of the educand and the educator. Its importance in the curriculum of school education is widely felt as well. In conflict prone or post conflict regions where collective memories of the past conflict and collective hopes of the future are contested, understanding the views and collective hopes of the ‘other’ becomes imperative. In this context, I would like to explain the concept of ‘Education for Peace’, its approaches and prerequisites and locate the contesting spaces, structure, content, images, processes in school education by reviewing empirical and theoretical studies on ‘Education for Peace’. It further delves into ethnicity and ethnic conflicts and probes how it makes different meaning in different contexts. The paper leaves scope for exploring educator-educand relationship, identity construction rather reinforcement though school education for transforming violence of culture in regions which is facing identity crisis and conflict.

  13. The difference in cultural curriculum: for a lesser (Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo César Bueno Nunes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The current time is contingent, plural, decentralized, free of old identities and permeated by the noise of voices that have never been heard. Inserted in such context, the school tries to overcome traces of the past and face the struggles of the present. Regarding physical education, the cultural curriculum seems to contribute with the new era mentality by questioning the hegemony of body practices and meanings of the privileged groups to promote the pedagogy of difference. This study analyzed the most important works on this proposal, identifying teaching principles and procedures that characterize it and submitted them to the confrontation with the notion of pure difference by Gilles Deleuze. The results indicate that the cultural curriculum takes the features of a lesser (physical education when it listens what the „different ones‟ have to say and pays attention to the cultural body repertoire that students can access

  14. ELT for Peace Education: Negotiating Ethnic and Cultural Plurality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piku Chowdhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiculturalism and multi-ethnicity have assumed the status of the most charged signs characterizing social contingencies and resultant violence in the increasingly glocalized world today. Minoritization continually interrupts and interrogates the homogeneous, horizontal claim of the projected democratic liberal society. Solidarity turns out to be situational and strategic while the concept of commonality is negotiated through contingencies of social interest and political claims. As Homi K. Bhabha points out in “Cultures in Between”- “How did we allow ourselves to forget that the nationalist violence between Hindus and Muslims lie just under the skin of India’s secular modernity? ...We have entered an anxious age of identity”(p.59. Experimenting with UNESCO’s vision of promoting a “culture of peace” through education, 70 trainee teachers from varied socio-cultural and religious backgrounds were exposed to ELT exercises that opened up new avenues of peace education.

  15. Response to Cultures Continuum and the Development of Intercultural Responsiveness (IR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn; Mixon, Jason R.; Henry, Lula; Butcher, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study investigated the perceptions of pre-service teachers' intercultural responsiveness. Findings from this study affirmed that pre-service teachers believed that positive dispositions, being culturally aware, and responding by incorporating cultural differences is a key to achieving Intercultural…

  16. Parental cultural socialization and educational attainment: Trend effects of traditional cultural capital and media involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaykamp, G.L.M.; Notten, N.J.W.R.

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes long-term developments in parental cultural socialization effects for children's educational attainment. Retrospective information of 3.106 respondents from the Family Survey of the Dutch population are used to address questions on trends in the impact of traditional measures o

  17. The Impact of Cultural Diversification on Education in a Closed Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Paula Marie

    During the past 20 years, several of Utah's more populous areas have developed large, immigrant, non-Mormon populations. A study examined the effects over these years of the challenges caused by such cultural diversification on Utah's previously closed educational environment. Challenges were identified specifically by examining changes in…

  18. Child Development in Cultural Contexts: Implications of Cultural Psychology for Early Childhood Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghwa; Johnson, Amy S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we argue that early childhood educators, under the influence of last century's grand universal theories of child development, have not been attentive enough to the centrality of culture in children's development. We discuss how the exploration of contemporary developmental perspectives is critical to the field and illustrate…

  19. Incorporating cultural issues in education for ethical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Susan; Klotz, Linda

    2007-07-01

    The population of most non-dominant ethnic groups in the USA is growing dramatically. Faculty members are challenged to develop curricula that adequately prepare our future nurses. An increased focus on clinical ethics has resulted from the use of sophisticated technology, changes in health care financing, an increasing elderly population and the shift of care from inpatient to outpatient settings. Nurses frequently face situations demanding resolution of ethical dilemmas involving cultural differences. Nursing curricula must include content on both ethics and cultural sensitivity. Active student participation is an important element providing a foundation for ethical practice. A proposed educational format was introduced with graduating baccalaureate students. In a pilot study, curricular content on cultural sensitivity and ethical practice was taught in separate modules. Students were then asked to identify and problem solve an ethical dilemma involving patients and professional caregivers from vastly different cultures. Course faculty members provided discussion questions to guide the students' thinking.

  20. A Prescription for Cultural Competence in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kripalani, Sunil; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Katz, Marra G; Genao, Inginia

    2006-01-01

    Cultural competence programs have proliferated in U.S. medical schools in response to increasing national diversity, as well as mandates from accrediting bodies. Although such training programs share common goals of improving physician-patient communication and reducing health disparities, they often differ in their content, emphasis, setting, and duration. Moreover, training in cross-cultural medicine may be absent from students' clinical rotations, when it might be most relevant and memorab...

  1. On Becoming an Educated Person: Salvadoran Adult Learners' Cultural Model of Educacion/Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: In contrast to cultural constructs that equate education with cognitive development and formal schooling, the Latin American cultural model of educacion encompasses academic knowledge and social competence. Prior scholarship has mainly investigated parental notions of educacion vis-a-vis childrearing and schooling, primarily…

  2. On Becoming an Educated Person: Salvadoran Adult Learners' Cultural Model of Educacion/Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: In contrast to cultural constructs that equate education with cognitive development and formal schooling, the Latin American cultural model of educacion encompasses academic knowledge and social competence. Prior scholarship has mainly investigated parental notions of educacion vis-a-vis childrearing and schooling, primarily…

  3. The Role of Research Education Coordinators in Building Research Cultures in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Angela; Boud, David; Malfroy, Janne

    2017-01-01

    The development of cultures of support has become important in programmes for the preparation of research students. The paper draws on in-depth interviews with 21 research education coordinators from Australian and United Kingdom institutions to identify the strategies that they use to build research cultures and integrate research students into…

  4. Exploring the influence of cultural familiarity and expertise on neurological responses to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Steven M; Morrison, Steven J

    2003-11-01

    Contemporary music education in many countries has begun to incorporate not only the dominant music of the culture, but also a variety of music from around the world. Although the desirability of such a broadened curriculum is virtually unquestioned, the specific function of these musical encounters and their potential role in children's cognitive development remain unclear. We do not know if studying a variety of world music traditions involves the acquisition of new skills or an extension and refinement of traditional skills long addressed by music teachers. Is a student's familiarity with a variety of musical traditions a manifestation of a single overarching "musicianship" or is knowledge of these various musical styles more similar to a collection of discrete skills much like learning a second language? Research on the comprehension of spoken language has disclosed a neurologically distinct response among subjects listening to their native language rather than an unfamiliar language. In a recent study comparing Western subjects' responses to music of their native culture and music of an unfamiliar culture, we found that subjects' activation did not differ on the basis of the cultural familiarity of the music, but on the basis of musical expertise. We discuss possible interpretations of these findings in relation to the concept of musical universals, cross-cultural stimulus characteristics, cross-cultural judgment tasks, and the influence of musical expertise. We conclude with suggestions for future research.

  5. Necessity of “Historic Cultural Heritage and Conservation” Course in Interior Architecture Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atalan, Özlem; Sevinç, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    .... Architectural education is considered to be a complex process. Teaching the historical cultural heritage and conservation of historic structures constitutes an important part of architectural education...

  6. Exploring dental students' perceptions of cultural competence and social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W; Rustveld, Luis O; Weyant, Robert J; Close, John M

    2008-10-01

    The improvement of basic cultural competency skills and the creation of a greater community-minded spirit among dental students are important parts of dental education. The purpose of our study was to assess changes in dental students' attitudes and beliefs about community service and changes in cultural competencies after participation in a two-year program of non-dental community service (Student Community Outreach Program and Education, SCOPE). During 2003-07, two identical twenty-eight-item surveys were administered to SCOPE participants/completers. In the first, students reported on their attitudes after program completion. In the second, students reported retrospectively on their attitudes prior to starting the program. One hundred twenty-six post- and pre-intervention surveys were matched and assessed for changes in student attitudes after program participation. Based on factor analysis, four distinct scales were identified: 1) community service, 2) cultural competence, 3) communication, and 4) treatment perspective. Over time, statistically significant changes (pstudent attitudes and beliefs were found for scales 1 (p=.017), 2 (p=.001), and 3 (borderline significance, p=.057). Scale 4 showed no significant difference (p=.108). These scales indicate main focus areas to help guide future dentists in acquiring relevant sociocultural competencies and enabling community-minded attitudes. Overall, this study provides support for the addition of a non-dental community service-learning program into the preclinical curriculum.

  7. Political and Cultural Nationalism in Education. The Ideas of Rousseau and Herder Concerning National Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiborg, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    Jean Jacques Rousseau in France and Johann Gottfied Herder in Germany both emphasized the role of education in building the nation-state. However, Rousseau focused on shaping the national character through citizenship education and political socialization in public schools, while Herder saw a national identity evolving from a common culture and…

  8. Games That Art Educators Play: Games in the Historical and Cultural Context of Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    Games have played an important role in modern educational methodologies. Beginning with the work of luminaries like Froebel, Montessori, and Dewey and continuing through the Cold War, the counter-culture movement of the 1960s and '70s, and into the present day, shifts in educational practice can be traced historically using the lens of games,…

  9. Political and Cultural Nationalism in Education. The Ideas of Rousseau and Herder Concerning National Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiborg, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    Jean Jacques Rousseau in France and Johann Gottfied Herder in Germany both emphasized the role of education in building the nation-state. However, Rousseau focused on shaping the national character through citizenship education and political socialization in public schools, while Herder saw a national identity evolving from a common culture and…

  10. Games That Art Educators Play: Games in the Historical and Cultural Context of Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    Games have played an important role in modern educational methodologies. Beginning with the work of luminaries like Froebel, Montessori, and Dewey and continuing through the Cold War, the counter-culture movement of the 1960s and '70s, and into the present day, shifts in educational practice can be traced historically using the lens of games,…

  11. Popular Culture and Critical Media Literacy in Adult Education: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter introduces the volume, provides an overview of the theory and literature on popular culture and critical media literacy in education, and discusses ways to use popular culture in adult education.

  12. Geoethics and geological culture: awareness, responsibility and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Peppoloni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The international debate in the field of geoethics focuses on some of the most important environmental emergencies, while highlighting the great responsibilities of geoscientists, whatever field they work in, and the important social, cultural and economic repercussions that their choices can have on society. The GeoItalia 2009 and 2011 conferences that were held in Rimini and Turin, respectively, and were organized by the Italian Federation of Earth Science, were two important moments for the promotion of geoethics in Italy. They were devoted to the highlighting of how, and with what tools and contents, can the geosciences contribute to the cultural renewal of society. They also covered the active roles of geoscientists in the dissemination of scientific information, contributing in this way to the correct construction of social knowledge. Geology is culture, and as such it can help to dispel misconceptions and cultural stereotypes that concern natural phenomena, disasters, resources, and land management. Geological culture consists of methods, goals, values, history, ways of thinking about nature, and specific sensitivity for approaching problems and their solutions. So geology has to fix referenced values, as indispensable prerequisites for geoethics. Together, geological culture and geoethics can strengthen the bond that joins people to their territory, and can help to find solutions and answers to some important challenges in the coming years regarding natural risks, resources, and climate change. Starting from these considerations, we stress the importance of establishing an ethical criterion for Earth scientists, to focus attention on the issue of the responsibility of geoscientists, and the need to more clearly define their scientific identity and the value of their specificities.

  13. Structure of lessons of physical culture in general educational establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaskov Y.V.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the didactic problems of organization of lessons of physical culture the problem of choice of optimum structure of lesson is selected in general educational establishments. The theoretical questions of concept «Structure of lesson» are examined in the article, the questions of plugging in the structure of lesson of the proper stages are probed, components and elements, author determinations over of these concepts are brought. It is well-proven that at choice structure of lesson of physical culture kinds and types of lessons have influence, and types of lessons, and also age of student and teaching stage.

  14. AXIOLOGY PROBLEMS OF THE CULTURE AND EDUCATION OF YOUTH NOWADAYS

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina I. Revyakina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to justify the priorities of culture and education as a guarantor of moral improvement of the Russian society at the beginning of the XXI century.Methods. Despite the socio-cultural lack of stability of the Russian social medium, quite mature qualities of the youth’s civic consciousness, activity and volunteering for the good of society have been revealed on the basis of the methods of analyzing scientific and publicistic researches, surveys and questionnaire.R...

  15. Performance-based competencies for culturally responsive interprofessional collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Valerie; Lackie, Kelly

    2009-11-01

    This paper will highlight how a literature review and stakeholder-expert feedback guided the creation of an interprofessional facilitator-collaborator competency tool, which was then used to design an interprofessional facilitator development program for the Partners for Interprofessional Cancer Education (PICE) Project. Cancer Care Nova Scotia (CCNS), one of the PICE Project partners, uses an Interprofessional Core Curriculum (ICC) to provide continuing education workshops to community-based practitioners, who as a portion of their practice, care for patients experiencing cancer. In order to deliver this curriculum, health professionals from a variety of disciplines required education that would enable them to become culturally sensitive interprofessional educators in promoting collaborative patient-centred practice. The Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre (RN-PDC), another PICE Project partner, has expertise in performance-based certification program design and utilizes a competency-based methodology in its education framework. This framework and methodology was used to develop the necessary interprofessional facilitator competencies that incorporate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for performance. Three main competency areas evolved, each with its own set of competencies, performance criteria and behavioural indicators.

  16. "It's worth our time": a model of culturally and linguistically supportive professional development for K-12 STEM educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charity Hudley, Anne H.; Mallinson, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Professional development on issues of language and culture is often separate from professional development on issues related to STEM education, resulting in linguistic and cultural gaps in K-12 STEM pedagogy and practice. To address this issue, we have designed a model of professional development in which we work with educators to build cultural and linguistic competence and to disseminate information about how educators view the relevance of language, communication, and culture to STEM teaching and learning. We describe the design and facilitation of our model of culturally and linguistically responsive professional development, grounded in theories of multicultural education and culturally supportive teaching, through professional development workshops to 60 K-12 STEM educators from schools in Maryland and Virginia that serve African American students. Participants noted that culturally and linguistically responsive approaches had yet to permeate their K-12 STEM settings, which they identified as a critical challenge to effectively teaching and engaging African-American students. Based on pre-surveys, workshops were tailored to participants' stated needs for information on literacy (e.g., disciplinary literacies and discipline-specific jargon), cultural conflict and mismatch (e.g., student-teacher miscommunication), and linguistic bias in student assessment (e.g., test design). Educators shared feedback via post-workshop surveys, and a subset of 28 participants completed in-depth interviews and a focus group. Results indicate the need for further implementation of professional development such as ours that address linguistic and cultural issues, tailored for K-12 STEM educators. Although participants in this study enumerated several challenges to meeting this need, they also identified opportunities for collaborative solutions that draw upon teacher expertise and are integrated with curricula across content areas.

  17. "It's worth our time": a model of culturally and linguistically supportive professional development for K-12 STEM educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charity Hudley, Anne H.; Mallinson, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Professional development on issues of language and culture is often separate from professional development on issues related to STEM education, resulting in linguistic and cultural gaps in K-12 STEM pedagogy and practice. To address this issue, we have designed a model of professional development in which we work with educators to build cultural and linguistic competence and to disseminate information about how educators view the relevance of language, communication, and culture to STEM teaching and learning. We describe the design and facilitation of our model of culturally and linguistically responsive professional development, grounded in theories of multicultural education and culturally supportive teaching, through professional development workshops to 60 K-12 STEM educators from schools in Maryland and Virginia that serve African American students. Participants noted that culturally and linguistically responsive approaches had yet to permeate their K-12 STEM settings, which they identified as a critical challenge to effectively teaching and engaging African-American students. Based on pre-surveys, workshops were tailored to participants' stated needs for information on literacy (e.g., disciplinary literacies and discipline-specific jargon), cultural conflict and mismatch (e.g., student-teacher miscommunication), and linguistic bias in student assessment (e.g., test design). Educators shared feedback via post-workshop surveys, and a subset of 28 participants completed in-depth interviews and a focus group. Results indicate the need for further implementation of professional development such as ours that address linguistic and cultural issues, tailored for K-12 STEM educators. Although participants in this study enumerated several challenges to meeting this need, they also identified opportunities for collaborative solutions that draw upon teacher expertise and are integrated with curricula across content areas.

  18. Data on multicultural education and diagnostic information profiling: Culture, learning styles and creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andino Maseleno

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data related to multicultural education and diagnostic information profiling preliminary findings. It includes the responses of 253 students. The data consists of six sections, i culture: race, ethnicity, language and identity; ii learning preferences: physiological and perceptual; iii cognitive learning styles: physical, emotional and mental; iv creativity skills and problem solving skills; v motivation; and vi students’ background knowledge. The data may be used as part of data analytics for specific personalized e-learning platform.

  19. Data on multicultural education and diagnostic information profiling: Culture, learning styles and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseleno, Andino; Hardaker, Glenn; Sabani, Noraisikin; Suhaili, Nabilah

    2016-12-01

    This article contains data related to multicultural education and diagnostic information profiling preliminary findings. It includes the responses of 253 students. The data consists of six sections, i) culture: race, ethnicity, language and identity; ii) learning preferences: physiological and perceptual; iii) cognitive learning styles: physical, emotional and mental; iv) creativity skills and problem solving skills; v) motivation; and vi) students' background knowledge. The data may be used as part of data analytics for specific personalized e-learning platform.

  20. A low-fidelity serious game for medical-based cultural competence education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zain; Kapralos, Bill

    2017-07-01

    Research has shown that the quality of care is compromised when healthcare providers respond inappropriately to patient language and cultural factors. However, research indicates that medical education is not keeping pace with the changing composition of the patient population in culturally diverse societies such as Canada and the United States, and many healthcare providers do not possess the attitudes or skills required to be effective within a culturally diverse healthcare setting. Here, we present Fydlyty, a web-based, low-fidelity serious game for medical-based cultural competence education. Fydlyty includes both a scenario and dialogue editor providing the ability to develop conversations, interpret responses, and respond to questions/answers from the game player. These responses are based on predefined cultural characteristics of the virtual patient and on different moods that the virtual patient may express depending on the situation. The results of a usability experiment conducted with medical professionals and trainees revealed that the game is easy to use, intuitive, and engaging.

  1. Humanism model of education on a physical culture in the institute of higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strel'tsov V.A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Humanistic approach to the modeling of educational process in physical training at the institute of higher education is exposed in the article. The article defines new contents of key categories aimed at transformation of pedagogical consciousness and practice. The article positions the integrity of the student's physical culture formation as the basis of the humanistic-oriented model of education. The realization of the given model shows improved results of students' personality development in comparison with the traditional technocratic approach.

  2. Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Császi, Lajos

    2008-01-01

    In his paper "Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence" Lajos Császi argues that media violence is not a reification of social violence; rather, a popular ritual allowing contemporary societies to sublimate, to substitute, and to discuss aggression in the public sphere. Császi reviews the central questions of contemporary debates about television violence including Stuart Hall's thought on this topic and introduces the ideas of Elias, Geertz, Turner, Bettelhei...

  3. The Role of Confucian Cultural Values and Politics in Planning Educational Programs for Adults in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kiung; Cervero, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Program planning activities are not culturally neutral but are replete with various cultural values and affected by them. This qualitative study was conducted in Korea and examines how cultural values influence educational planning in Korea. Specifically, the study was to examine how Confucian cultural values play out in educational planning in…

  4. The Nature of Teaching and Learning in Cross-Cultural Experiential Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Adam

    2000-01-01

    Examines the three stages in cross-cultural education: (1) planning; (2) the experience itself; and (3) reflection. Reconsiders the nature of teaching and learning in cross-cultural education as a process that allows students to maintain their own cultural selves within the unnatural conditions of crossing cultures. (Author/CCM)

  5. 76 FR 16031 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy... of Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and... Policy and Evaluation, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Department of State. BILLING CODE 4710...

  6. 76 FR 16033 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

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    2011-03-22

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy... Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and Evaluation... Collection. Originating Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and Evaluation...

  7. 76 FR 16032 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

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    2011-03-22

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy... Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and Evaluation... Collection. Originating Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and Evaluation...

  8. 75 FR 60490 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

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    2010-09-30

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy...: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and Evaluation, Evaluation Division Survey.... Originating Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and Evaluation, Evaluation...

  9. 76 FR 16029 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy... of Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and... Request: New Collection Originating Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy...

  10. Cultural education through the high school level English textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ookawa Kouki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It cannot be denied that intercultural understanding is crucial in the process of learning English at elementary school, junior high school, high school, and beyond. This paper analyzes the high school English textbooks approved by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan from the perspective of intercultural understanding. First, it elucidates the types of articles, the countries materials deal with, and the purposes of the materials used in the books. Then it considers important elements of intercultural education. The result of the research shows that the materials contain various kinds of categories, and many concern English-speaking countries. Furthermore, an important fact is that many materials concerning Japan, aimed at understanding its own culture, are shown in the textbooks as well. Finally, the paper suggests future direction for the use of materials in the textbooks in order to facilitate intercultural understanding.

  11. Images in Children's Education: An approach from the Visual Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rangel Vieira da Cunha

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article I understand how it is and establishing the context of early childhood education the idea that the images take on teaching roles. Examine how is constructed in broader contexts, the design of a visual education and how this concept is being renewed in the specific context of teaching young children. I assume that the pedagogy of the visual - the ways in which children and adults build their processes to see the world - are made in various ways and in different instances. So there are no boundaries so marked between the ways that schools and cultural pedagogies deal with the universe imagery, while acknowledging that the school universe has its specific ways of dealing with the various forms and cultural traditions of the images.

  12. Educating About Global Climate Change With A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, C.; Fessenden, J.; Kanjorski, N.; Hall, M. K.

    2004-12-01

    Predominantly minority populated schools in Northern New Mexico are plagued by low standardized test scores and high drop-out rates. The school system is currently failing students, and success in science is reliant on self-motivation among students. In order for students to gain momentum in a system where exposure to science is not prevalent, it is important for them to get outside support that catalyzes their interest. Collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Science Education Solutions (SES), and local schools has been established to identify student needs and provide them with the opportunity to engage in science through hands-on experience with world-class scientists. Students are being introduced to the prospects of a scientific career while getting the unique chance to explore different aspects of several LANL scientists' research. This initiative also incorporates cultural awareness efforts to promote parent and community involvement. In the past year, two pilot projects were carried out to test the concepts, goals, and methods of the collaboration. One pilot project used plant growth studies in predominantly Hispanic fifth-grade classrooms to stimulate student interest. Students explored tree ring cores and tested water-use efficiency with sponges. The other pilot project included a two-day workshop for Native American students from Jemez Pueblo focusing on global climate change. This project combined a class component and hands-on field research. Samples were taken from LANL research sites with in-field lessons from scientists who monitor the sites. In addition, Jemez Pueblo officials were able to tie the sites to the student's lives with a historical and cultural overview. The most successful elements from these pilot projects are being used to develop a long-term project that will pique student interest in the science disciplines. Field activities garnered the most enthusiastic response from students, while in-class lessons were less

  13. An analysis of the Impact of traditional Chinese culture on Chinese education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Mingyuan

    2006-01-01

    The educational tradition of China has developed from traditional Chinese culture.Without an understanding of the cultural impact on traditional education,it is impossible to comprehend the educational tradition of China and to change its traditional educational ideas.There are fine traditions and feudal remains in Chinese culture which ought to be examined from the historical materialism perspective in order to tell the essence from the dross and to facilitate educational modernization in today's China.

  14. Culture and Cultural Competence in Nursing Education and Practice: The State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkess, Linda; Kaddoura, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    The concept of cultural competency has developed a substantial presence in nursing education and practice since first attracting widespread attention in the 1990s. While several theories and corresponding measures of cultural competency have been advanced and tried, much work remains, as many nursing professionals continue to call for greater evidence-based research and attention to patient perspectives and outcomes. Using a method provided by Hawker et al. to appraise articles, this paper compares nine recent (2008-2013) studies (including two composite studies) related to cultural competency, undergraduate curricula, and teaching strategies in nursing to assess the state of the art in this important area of care. The studies applied phenomenological, study abroad, online, and service learning strategies, four of which relied on some version of Campinha-Bacote's IAPCC© model. These studies reported a general improvement in competency among students, though generally only to a level of cultural awareness, and admitted being constrained by several common limitations. Improved results and more realistic expectations in this area may require a closer understanding of the nature of the "culture" that underlies cultural competence. Harkess Kaddoura. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Identity text: an educational intervention to foster cultural interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareen Zaidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sociocultural theories state that learning results from people participating in contexts where social interaction is facilitated. There is a need to create such facilitated pedagogical spaces where participants can share their ways of knowing and doing. The aim of this exploratory study was to introduce pedagogical space for sociocultural interaction using ‘Identity Text’. Methods: Identity Texts are sociocultural artifacts produced by participants, which can be written, spoken, visual, musical, or multimodal. In 2013, participants of an international medical education fellowship program were asked to create their own Identity Texts to promote discussion about participants’ cultural backgrounds. Thematic analysis was used to make the analysis relevant to studying the pedagogical utility of the intervention. Result: The Identity Text intervention created two spaces: a ‘reflective space’, which helped participants reflect on sensitive topics such as institutional environments, roles in interdisciplinary teams, and gender discrimination, and a ‘narrative space’, which allowed participants to tell powerful stories that provided cultural insights and challenged cultural hegemony; they described the conscious and subconscious transformation in identity that evolved secondary to struggles with local power dynamics and social demands involving the impact of family, peers, and country of origin. Conclusion: While the impact of providing pedagogical space using Identity Text on cognitive engagement and enhanced learning requires further research, the findings of this study suggest that it is a useful pedagogical strategy to support cross-cultural education.

  16. Identity text: an educational intervention to foster cultural interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Zareen; Verstegen, Daniëlle; Naqvi, Rahat; Dornan, Tim; Morahan, Page

    2016-01-01

    Sociocultural theories state that learning results from people participating in contexts where social interaction is facilitated. There is a need to create such facilitated pedagogical spaces where participants can share their ways of knowing and doing. The aim of this exploratory study was to introduce pedagogical space for sociocultural interaction using 'Identity Text'. Identity Texts are sociocultural artifacts produced by participants, which can be written, spoken, visual, musical, or multimodal. In 2013, participants of an international medical education fellowship program were asked to create their own Identity Texts to promote discussion about participants' cultural backgrounds. Thematic analysis was used to make the analysis relevant to studying the pedagogical utility of the intervention. The Identity Text intervention created two spaces: a 'reflective space', which helped participants reflect on sensitive topics such as institutional environments, roles in interdisciplinary teams, and gender discrimination, and a 'narrative space', which allowed participants to tell powerful stories that provided cultural insights and challenged cultural hegemony; they described the conscious and subconscious transformation in identity that evolved secondary to struggles with local power dynamics and social demands involving the impact of family, peers, and country of origin. While the impact of providing pedagogical space using Identity Text on cognitive engagement and enhanced learning requires further research, the findings of this study suggest that it is a useful pedagogical strategy to support cross-cultural education.

  17. Cultural and Intercultural Experiences in European Adult Education. Essays on Popular and Higher Education since 1890. Leeds Studies in Continuing Education. Cross-Cultural Studies in the Education of Adults, Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Stuart, Ed.; Hake, Barry J., Ed.

    This book contains the following papers from a European research seminar examining the history and theory of cross-cultural communication in adult education: "Introduction" (Stuart Marriott, Barry J. Hake); "Formative Periods in the History of Adult Education: The Role of Social and Cultural Movements in Cross-Cultural Communication" (Barry J.…

  18. Conserving (not preserving culture: Avoiding the damage to culture of veiled moralism in HIV education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Price

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Language mechanisms in much HIV discourse insist that a Western-based moralism dominates. These mechanisms include: the use of strategic absences of information about the moral grounding of texts; and slippages of meaning, where one word is used to refer to many meanings. A common slippage of meaning is the use of the word ‘polygamy’ to refer to a range of behaviours, thus hiding low HIV risk sexual practices (polyfidelity under the same umbrella as high risk practices (promiscuity and advocating their general removal. Another dubious method of achieving a moral position is to take a true premise and use it to advance a false conclusion. For example, the true premise that wife inheritance in its historical form is an HIV risk does not automatically lead to the conclusion that wife inheritance ‘must’ be eradicated. This is only one possible conclusion. Another, more culturally sensitive, conclusion could be that wife inheritance should be embarked upon, as should all sexual relationships, in a context of HIV tests, and safer sexual practice. I argue that moralism (such as ‘wife inheritance is morally wrong’ cloaked as science (the claim that science ‘proves’ the moral position that wife inheritance is wrong is a threat to traditional culture and discriminates against up-holders of traditional lifestyles. Drawing primarily from my experience of HIV education in a development setting in Southern Africa, I offer a weak (realist moral relativism as an alternative to, on the one hand, the positivist-based, absolutist morality which threatens to destroy traditional cultures in the name of HIV education and, on the other hand, extreme cultural relativism in which ‘anything goes’. Possibly, HIV educators have not done enough to include some traditional safer sex practices in their professional inventory of acceptable behaviours, such as hlobonga (thigh sex and polygamy interpreted as polyfidelity. My hope is that by being more

  19. Using critical race theory to analyze science teachers culturally responsive practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tamara; Brand, Brenda R.

    2012-06-01

    Culturally responsive science teaching is using knowledge about the culture and life experiences of students to structure learning that is conducive to their needs. Understanding what teachers need to prepare them to be culturally responsive is a matter of continuous debate. As the focus of multicultural education ventures farther away from its roots, advocating the civil rights of historically oppressed groups, concerns about the gravity of racial inequity on schooling continues. How will this shift in focus influence teachers' capacity to accommodate students' needs resulting from racial inequities in this society, particularly African American students? What knowledge is essential to their effectiveness? This qualitative study examined the instructional practices of two effective middle school science teachers deemed culturally responsive by their administrator on the basis of classroom observations, students' responses and standardized assessment results. Both teachers' classrooms consisted primarily of African American students. Grounded theory was used to analyze the teachers' beliefs and practices in order to identify existing commonalties. Critical race theory was used to identify whether there was any influence of the students' racial identities on the teachers' beliefs and practices. The analysis reveals that the teachers' beliefs and practices were informed by their critical awareness of social constraints imposed upon their African American students' identities. These findings communicate the significance of sociocultural awareness to informing the teachers' instruction, as well as their strategies for managing the varying dynamics occurring in their classrooms. It can be deduced from the findings that an understanding of racial inequities is crucial to the development of sociocultural awareness, and is the foundation for the culturally responsive dispositions and practices of these middle school science teachers.

  20. Educação e diversidade cultural = Education and cultural diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Nascimento de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este texto procura analisar questões referentes às principais tensões a serem resolvidas pela educação, objetivando dar clareza à temática da diversidade cultural. Discutimos neste espaço o contexto do surgimento de conceitos como o de diversidade cultural, pluralismo, multiculturalismo, interculturalidade, identidade, entre outros. Baseamos este estudo em pesquisas realizadas por professores da Área de Políticas Públicas da Universidade Estadual de Maringá, que analisam aspectos importantes a respeito da história da educação brasileira, em especial documentos de organismos internacionais como a Unesco.This paper seeks to analyze the main issues concerning the main tensions to be resolved by the education, aiming to clear the theme of cultural diversity. Here in it is argued in the context of the emergence of concepts, such as cultural diversity, pluralism, multiculturalism, interculturality, identity, among others. This study is based on a research conducted by teachers of the area of public policy of the State University of Maringá, which examine important aspects of the history of Brazilian education, in particular documents of international organizations like UNESCO.

  1. Effects of cultural background and education on handedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, A; Ardila, O; Bryden, M P; Ostrosky, F; Rosselli, M; Steenhuis, R

    1989-01-01

    A 5-item handedness questionnaire was given to 317 subjects in four different groups: (1) 51 Tucano (Amazonian jungle) adolescents (36 male, 15 female); (2) 66 Spanish-speaking adolescents (43 male, 23 female) with similar age and educational background to the Tucano group; (3) 100 urban subjects (50 male, 50 female) with a low educational level; and (4) 100 urban subjects (50 male, 50 female) with a high level of education. Hand preference scores were not affected by sex or educational level. The incidence of left-handedness was lower in the Tucano group than in the other groups, despite the fact that the Tucano culture is a highly permissive one. The two rural groups showed less extreme hand preferences than the urban groups, and the Tucano in particular were less likely to indicate extreme hand preferences on any of the items. These results indicate significant effects of culture and environment on declared hand preference, and may be pertinent to recent discussions of cerebral organization in illiterates.

  2. Marxism in Vygotskian approaches to cultural studies of science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Junior, Paulo; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research, sustained by Vygotsky's original and successor theories, has been appropriating meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism. Once we identified Cultural Studies of Science Education as a journal that would probably concentrate papers that follow these perspectives, we decided to take it as the context of this study. In the process of selecting the corpus to be reviewed from the editions published from 2006 to 2011, we have found that 16 % of the articles that matched keywords denoting frameworks related to the Vygotskian tradition developed and appropriated the categories of dialectical materialism. The quality and originality of contemporary development of CHAT denote that this framework has been playing a very important role in recent expansion of Vygotskian approaches to research in science education. Among the papers that we considered to develop and appropriate Vygotskian frameworks, incompletion in the appropriation of meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism and the misusage of dialectics intertwined with dialogism were highlighted. Our findings suggest that overcoming these limitations can enhance political analysis of sociocultural phenomena in the context of science education. It also represents a strengthening of the role of dialectical materialism in expanding sociocultural perspectives toward a better articulation between individual and institutional-centered analyses.

  3. Overcoming the Discontinuity of Patriotic Education and Moral Development by Means of Regional Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonova, Anna U.

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyzes studies on continuing education, explains the concept of "continuity of patriotic education and moral development by means of regional culture", determines the uniqueness of regional culture as the core of patriotic education and moral development, and characterizes the model of continuity of patriotic education and…

  4. What images are teens producing? - Visual culture, education and adolescences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Ferrari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is the result of a survey of Undergraduate Research held at four schools in the city of Juiz de Fora with male and female students of the second segment of Elementary Education, with the aim of investigating and questioning the relationships that are established between young people and schools in their links to the pictures and learn. Rather than focus on the relationship between Visual Culture, Education and subjectivities, the text invests in new goals and work proposals that dialogue with my performances in the research groups and the study of gender and sexuality UFJF. In this sense, I am also interested in the relationships of these adolescents with gender relations, sexualities and images. As the pictures looks to educate our genders and sexualities?

  5. Framework for transforming departmental culture to support educational innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C. Corbo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] This paper provides a research-based framework for promoting institutional change in higher education. To date, most educational change efforts have focused on relatively narrow subsets of the university system (e.g., faculty teaching practices or administrative policies and have been largely driven by implicit change logics; both of these features have limited the success of such efforts at achieving sustained, systemic change. Drawing from the literature on organizational and cultural change, our framework encourages change agents to coordinate their activities across three key levels of the university and to ground their activities in the various change perspectives that emerge from that literature. We use examples from a change project that we have been carrying out at a large research university to illustrate how our framework can be used as a basis for planning and implementing holistic change.

  6. Framework for transforming departmental culture to support educational innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Joel C.; Reinholz, Daniel L.; Dancy, Melissa H.; Deetz, Stanley; Finkelstein, Noah

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] This paper provides a research-based framework for promoting institutional change in higher education. To date, most educational change efforts have focused on relatively narrow subsets of the university system (e.g., faculty teaching practices or administrative policies) and have been largely driven by implicit change logics; both of these features have limited the success of such efforts at achieving sustained, systemic change. Drawing from the literature on organizational and cultural change, our framework encourages change agents to coordinate their activities across three key levels of the university and to ground their activities in the various change perspectives that emerge from that literature. We use examples from a change project that we have been carrying out at a large research university to illustrate how our framework can be used as a basis for planning and implementing holistic change.

  7. The Development of a Cultural-Based Educational Program to Enhance Breast Self-Examination (BSE Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita Juanita

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop the educational program which is appropriate with Islamic culture in order to enhance BSE self-efficacy of nursing students and thus promote BSE practice. Method: This study is a development research study which is consisting of three phases including: 1 reviewing several existing BSE educational programs; 2 program design based on SCT and Islamic culture; and 3 program validation by three experts. Result: Based on previous studies, the most appropriate theory to enhance self-efficacy was Social Cognitive Theory (SCT because this theory provides several strategies to increase the self-efficacy. Further, the program that used Islamic culture was more appropriate to increase BSE practice among Muslim women. As a result, the newly developed program was developed used SCT and Islamic culture. This program was comprised of four sessions including: 1 exploring Islamic mandate on prevention and individual responsibility in health promotion, and culture-related beliefs toward BSE, 2 health education by conducting lecturing session and watching a video about BSE procedures, 3 BSE training activities including BSE demonstration and return demonstration, 4 follow-up by conducting a meeting. Conclusion: The cultural-based educational program for enhancing BSE self-efficacy and promoting BSE is a program using multifaceted methods. It designed based on a review of the literature from previous studies and were supported by research findings on experimental studies in other population. Keywords: Cultural, Educational program development, Breast self-examination, Self-efficacy.

  8. Pre-Service Teachers: Does Cultural Responsiveness Affect Anticipated Self-Determination to Teach in Specific Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation to teach is essential to educating all children in the public schools. This study examined the anticipated self-determination of pre-service teachers to teach in classroom settings that varied in the ethnic and racial composition of the students in the classes. Additionally the cultural responsiveness of participants was measured to…

  9. Implementation and Acceptability of an Adapted Classroom Check-Up Coaching Model to Promote Culturally Responsive Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Elise T.; Larson, Kristine E.; Reinke, Wendy M.; Herman, Keith C.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Literature suggests that improving teacher use of culturally responsive classroom management strategies may reduce the disproportionate number of racial and ethnic minority students who receive exclusionary discipline actions and are identified as needing special education, particularly for emotional and behavioral disorders. Coaching teachers is…

  10. My Name Is Not Michael: Strategies for Promoting Cultural Responsiveness in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Lisa L.; Hurt, Kara; Lindo, Natalya

    2014-01-01

    With the changing cultural demographics in U.S. classrooms, school counselors must develop innovative approaches to promote culturally responsive school climates and organizational change. A vision is offered of systemic cultural responsiveness and culturally relevant teaching practices that nurture and engage all learners. The role of the school…

  11. Perceived Cultural Responsiveness and Effectiveness of a Speech and Language Program for Indigenous Preschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Kent; Craft, Calli B.; MacKay, Leslie D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an increasing need for culturally relevant curricula, what is considered culturally responsive and how it is assessed is under-researched. The present study examined the perceived cultural responsiveness and effectiveness of an early intervention program designed to teach early language skills and expose students to Indigenous culture, the…

  12. Citizenship Education to Nanotechnologies: Teaching Knowledge About Nanotechnologies and Educating for Responsible Citizenship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Panissal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a research based on a project for citizenship education tonanotechnologies in a French high school which aims at teaching the specific characteristics of nanotechnologies, of their fields of application and of the controversies which are linked to them. At the junction of Socially Acute Questions didactics and of the cultural-historical Vygotskian theory, we analyze the knowledge at work in a debate on the promises and risks connected with nanotechnologies. The knowledge mobilized by the students (17- to 18 yearsold in their dialogical interactions can refer back to the archetypal narrativeswhose origin lies in men’s social and cultural history. Through the joint effect of cumulative talk and exploratory talk, the students co-construct the concepts linked to the Social Ethical Issues: risks and human enhancement. We show that the debate at school leads students to be able to construct reasoned opinion and to position themselves in their environment in a responsible way. This educational innovation appears to be relevant for combining the learning of academic and cultural contents with social competencies necessary for committed citizenship education in the field of nanotechnologies.

  13. Insurgent multiculturalism: rethinking how and why we teach culture in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Delese

    2003-06-01

    The author proposes a theoretical orientation for cultural competency that reorganizes common curricular responses to the study of culture in medical education. What has come to be known in medical education as cultural competency is theoretically truncated and may actually work against what educators hope to achieve. Using Giroux's concept of insurgent multiculturalism, she suggests that the critical study of culture might be a bridge to certain aspects of professional development. Insurgent multiculturalism moves inquiry away from a focus on nondominant groups to a study of how unequal distributions of power allow some groups but not others to acquire and keep resources, including the rituals, policies, attitudes, and protocols of medical institutions. This approach includes not only the doctor-patient relationship but also the social causes of inequalities and dominance. Linked to professional development efforts, insurgent multiculturalism can provide students with more opportunities to look at their biases, challenge their assumptions, know people beyond labels, confront the effects of power and privilege, and develop a far greater capacity for compassion and respect.

  14. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS: CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Smentyna, Nataly; Khusainov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    The article is devoted to questions of social responsibility and social activities of higher educational institutions (universities). It is analyzed the theoretical concept of social responsibility of higher educational institutions. It is outlined the role of stakeholders in the acting of university. It is given the author's definition of “social responsibility of higher education institution”. It is determined the development priority areas of social responsibility of higher educational ins...

  15. The impact of religion and cultural values on AIDS education programs in Malaysia and the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteria, T; Sullivan, G

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of cultural values and government policies on the content of AIDS educational literature prepared by public health agencies in Malaysia and the Philippines. The literature from these countries, which has been distributed to the public and is intended to inform them of the danger of AIDS, how the HIV is and is not transmitted, and how to avoid infection, is analyzed and evaluated for effectiveness and congruence with the dominant religious tenets and cultural practices in each country, and attitudes to sexual behavior. The paper also describes the response of these countries to the AIDS pandemic, and concludes with suggestions about how this form of AIDS education can be improved.

  16. Crow Education Partnership: Science in a Cultural Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S. B.; NASA Astrobiology Institute Icy Worlds Science Team; Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (Wissard) Science Team

    2011-12-01

    Join us to learn more about a developing science education partnership on the Crow Indian Reservation, in South Central Montana. Through this partnership we are designing culturally-relevant STEM science enrichment activites that focus on extreme environments for the Upper Elementary grades in the Hardin School District. The district encompasses three intermediate schools in a rural setting, with a largely Native American student body. Intermediate School teachers from Hardin, scientists and graduate students at Montana State University, and Crow tribal members are working together to develop inquiry-based science activities for students and teachers. Through the use of hands-on interactions, online technologies and field experiences, we are providing monthly science interaction for the classroom, and modeling inquiry-based activities for the teachers and community members. In addition to developing activities, we are working with Crow tribal members and teachers to tie science activities to the national standards and school district curriculum, while at the same time connecting science activities to Crow history and culture. Our blended education model which utilizes face to face interactions and video-conferencing, engages MSU graduate students in the teaching process. Graduate students are developing science communication skills and learning the importance of cross-cultural communication, while the teachers and intermediate students are gaining science content knowledge and direct interactions with authentic science experiences. We are developing a true partnership and community of learning through our efforts.

  17. The Nuer Nutrition Education Program: breaking down cultural barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverentz, M L; Cox, C C; Jordan, M

    1999-01-01

    Very little is known about the Nuer culture, partly because of its widely misunderstood language and because of the mixture of its people with the other tribes in Africa, according to Evans-Pritchard). However, it is known that the Nuer women's roles in the family seem to be centered around cooking duties. In the Nuer culture, no work is considered degrading, and the women know and accept their domestic duties. During the summer of 1996, a pilot project was conducted as an attempt to help Nuer refugee women of Des Moines, Iowa, incorporate nutritional concepts and American food preparation techniques into their existing methods of food preparation. The barriers faced involved the Nuer women's unfamiliarity with American foods and household items and their inability to read and understand English. Cultural issues and barriers were overcome when the health educator was willing to take the time to gain the trust and respect of the Nuer people. Structured interviews indicated an increase in knowledge of American foods and cooking skills. This education program in no way meant to replace traditional Nuer cooking methods; rather, it acted as a way to adjust to life in the United States.

  18. Response to Marie Paz Morales' ``Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-12-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript.

  19. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  20. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  1. Cultural Competency Training Requirements in Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Adrian Jacques H.; Lin, Susan Y.; Chun, Maria B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competency is an important skill that prepares physicians to care for patients from diverse backgrounds. Objective We reviewed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) program requirements and relevant documents from the ACGME website to evaluate competency requirements across specialties. Methods The program requirements for each specialty and its subspecialties were reviewed from December 2011 through February 2012. The review focused on the 3 competency domains relevant to culturally competent care: professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, and patient care. Specialty and subspecialty requirements were assigned a score between 0 and 3 (from least specific to most specific). Given the lack of a standardized cultural competence rating system, the scoring was based on explicit mention of specific keywords. Results A majority of program requirements fell into the low- or no-specificity score (1 or 0). This included 21 core specialties (leading to primary board certification) program requirements (78%) and 101 subspecialty program requirements (79%). For all specialties, cultural competency elements did not gravitate toward any particular competency domain. Four of 5 primary care program requirements (pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, family medicine, and psychiatry) acquired the high-specificity score of 3, in comparison to only 1 of 22 specialty care program requirements (physical medicine and rehabilitation). Conclusions The degree of specificity, as judged by use of keywords in 3 competency domains, in ACGME requirements regarding cultural competency is highly variable across specialties and subspecialties. Greater specificity in requirements is expected to benefit the acquisition of cultural competency in residents, but this has not been empirically tested. PMID:24404264

  2. Monitoring Educational Organizations' Culture of Sustainable Consumption: Initiating and Evaluating Cultural Change in Schools and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Patterns of consumption are considered as a main driver of unsustainable development. In the debate, education and educational organizations are unisonous considered as a key player to contribute to a more sustainable socialization of young consumers. Both schools and universities are challenged to become places and life-worlds in which sustainable consumption can be learned and experienced. The objective of this paper was to explore how educational organizations can effectively engage their members in bringing about the aspired transformations and monitoring their effects. Approach: The study used a conceptual approach that included three steps. Firstly, the concept of an educational organization’s Culture Of Consumption (COC was adopted as an analytical frame of reference. In a second step, methodological propositions for changing the organizational COC were discussed drawing on the concepts of mode-2 knowledge production and participatory change management. In a third step, existing tools and approaches to sustainability auditing in the educational context were screened and critically discussed against the background of recent innovations in mode-2 approaches to sustainability evaluation. Results: The findings revealed that while existing sets of indicators did adequately account for key consumption-related organizational operations and to some extent for educational goals and aspirations, they failed to tap the realm of underlying and tacit basic assumptions that substantiate the essence of an organizational COC. To remedy this shortcoming, additional indicators and modifications were proposed. As a synthesis, a synoptic framework of a monitoring system for an educational organization’s COC was presented. Conclusion: The study’s results highlighted the need to develop monitoring frameworks that go beyond assessing operative performances and pay greater attention to reflective, interpretative and deliberative

  3. Cross Cultural Educational Exchanges between Indonesia and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Rohayati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, Japan has become a country which has a big influence especially in South East Asia. They actively build bilateral and multilateral cooperation with other countries like establishing the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA in August 1974. The cooperation has involved many sectors such as technology, politics, economy, social affairs and culture.On the ASEAN stage, Japan is actively promoting its culture to ASEAN countries, including Indonesia. One major program is “Pesantren Leaders’ Visit to Japan”. The program is a cooperation between the Japanese Embassy and the Center for the Study of Islam and Society (PPIM, UIN Syarif Hidayatullah Jakarta, which has run from 2004 until now.In the program, the Japanese Government every year invites several religious education leaders in Indonesia to observe the social and culture dynamics of the Japanese. Not only that, they are also invited to visit some schools, government offices, small and medium enterprises in Japan to see the latest productivity developments, including the problems and challanges they have in many sectors. As a result of its ongoing work, this bilateral program has produced a cross-cultural network and inter-faith dialogue among Islamic schools in Indonesia and Japan. 

  4. Reconceiving corporate social responsibility for business and educational outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Anthony Camilleri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are win win opportunities for big businesses and policy-makers as they nurture human capital with the right knowledge, skills and competences. A thorough literature review suggests that there is a rationale for corporations to collaborate with national governments and other stakeholders in the provision of education and training. In addition, this paper presents qualitative case studies of numerous exemplary firms that have distinguished themselves for their responsible behaviours, particularly towards their human resources and prospective employees. The findings indicate that there is scope for businesses to engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR initiatives through the provision of educational programmes and continuous professional training and development of workers. Very often, these businesses’ underlying objective is to improve their employees’ competences, whilst minimising the skill gaps and mismatches in the labour market. In conclusion, this inquiry posits that CSR and stakeholder engagement could boost the employees’ morale and job satisfaction, which may in turn lead to lower staff turnover rates and greater productivity levels in workplace environments. It implies that there is potential for the organisational cultures and their business ethos to become more attuned with the governments’ educational policies; in order to better respond to the diverse needs of today’s learners and tomorrow’s human resources.

  5. Social uses of prescribed school culture in the secondary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Dallabrida

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to understand the social uses of prescribed school culture nationally in three secondary schools of Florianopolis in the 1950s. Focused on Colégio Catarinense, administered by the Jesuits and dedicated exclusively to men; the Colégio Coração de Jesus, run by the Sisters of Divine Providence and with female customers; and the State College Dias Velho, public, free and for boys and girls. According to Roger Chartier, educational institutions are considered to appropriate themselves of cultural goods in different and creative ways. This socio-historical analysis is based on written documents and testimonials of teachers and students who worked at or attended these schools.

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility through Education and Sport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Eugenia Iamandi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the need to tackle in a sustainable way the new economic and social requirements particularly induced by the recent financial crisis, corporate social responsibility (CSR is one envisaged solution at community and organizational level, because of its win-win strategic potential. More than that, acknowledging the economic impact of strongly supporting social domains like education and sport, the European Union (EU has designed new measures for developing the human potential during 2014-2020 period. Following these two rationales, the main research objective is to emphasize the relationship between CSR and corporate support for educational and sport projects of top performing companies in Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia in the post-crisis period. Four main issues are investigated in detail regarding the corporate support for education and sport areas through CSR initiatives, namely existence of corporate involvement, forms of commitment, reasons for engagement, and main beneficiaries of implication. The research methodology focuses on empirical and analytical perspectives, while the results show new facets and implications of CSR initiatives in education and sport domains, but also a set of similarities and differences between the analysed EU countries. Economic and social impacts are also examined, as well as future research directions.

  7. Bearing response-ability: theater, ethics and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Kate

    2012-03-01

    This paper addresses a growing concern within the medical humanities community regarding the perceived need for a more empathically-focused medical curricula, and advocates for the use of creative pedagogical forms as a means to attend to issues of suffering and relationality. Drawing from the ethical philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, I critique the notion of empathy on the basis that it erases difference and disregards otherness. Rather, I propose that the concept of empathy may be usefully replaced with that of ethical responsibility, which suggests a shared sense of humanity outside the boundaries of presumed knowledge of the other. To illustrate this argument, I theorize the importance of theater within medical education. Theater, I argue, may engender ethical responsibility in the Levinasian sense, and thus may allow learners to differently engage with the experience of the suffering other. As such, I examine Margaret Edson's widely used play Wit as a platform for such an ethical encounter to occur. Thus, rather than working to understand the value of theater in medical education in terms of knowledge and skill acquisition, I theorize that its primacy within medical curricula arises from its ethical/relational potential, or potential to engender new forms of inter-human relationality.

  8. 76 FR 16030 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy... Cultural Affairs, Office of Policy and Evaluation, Evaluation Division (ECA/P/ V). Form Number: Survey... of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of...

  9. 19 CFR 10.121 - Visual or auditory materials of an educational, scientific, or cultural character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... educational, scientific, or cultural character. (a) Where photographic film and other articles described in... the articles are visual or auditory materials of an educational, scientific, or cultural character..., scientific, or cultural character. 10.121 Section 10.121 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER...

  10. Culture Clash: Mentoring Student Literacy Educators in a Marketised and Instrumentalist Further Education Policyscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Georgina; Orrock, Deborah; Smith, Rob

    2013-01-01

    At the centre of the study on which this article is based, there is a sense of cultural collision. While from a global perspective, Literacy education has an exciting and radical pedigree, the teaching of Literacy in England has been harnessed to an explicitly instrumentalist policy agenda since the introduction of the Adult Literacy Core…

  11. Rethinking the Adventure Education Experience: An Inquiry of Meanings, Culture and Educational Virtue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingman, Benjamin Charles

    2013-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the adventure education (AE) experience with particular attention to what happens during the AE experience, the meanings participants ascribe to the experience, how personal backgrounds and institutional cultures coalesce in AE, and the significance of the AE experience for schooling. These topics are explored…

  12. Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory to Design and Evaluate an Educational Game in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarou, D.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a methodology for using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) at the initial stages of the design process of an educational game, by exploring how the theory can be used as a framework for producing not only usable but also useful computer tools. The research also aimed to investigate how the theory could…

  13. Transforming America: Cultural Cohesion, Educational Achievement, and Global Competitiveness. Educational Psychology. Volume 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVillar, Robert A.; Jiang, Binbin

    2011-01-01

    Creatively and rigorously blending historical research and contemporary data from various disciplines, this book cogently and comprehensively illustrates the problems and opportunities the American nation faces in education, economics, and the global arena. The authors propose a framework of transformation that would render American culture no…

  14. Education, Culture and Indigenous Rights: The Case of Educational Reform in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comboni Salinas, Sonia; Juarez Nunez, Jose Manuel

    2000-01-01

    Examines the implementation of intercultural bilingual education throughout Bolivia and its relationship to the linguistic and cultural rights of the majority indigenous population. Discusses institutional and curriculum reforms, particularly in rural schools; a new emphasis on students' learning needs; relationship to indigenous…

  15. Individual and culture-level components of survey response styles: A multi-level analysis using cultural models of selfhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter B; Vignoles, Vivian L; Becker, Maja; Owe, Ellinor; Easterbrook, Matthew J; Brown, Rupert; Bourguignon, David; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B; Kreuzbauer, Robert; Cendales Ayala, Boris; Yuki, Masaki; Zhang, Jianxin; Lv, Shaobo; Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit; Jaafar, Jas Laile; Fischer, Ronald; Milfont, Taciano L; Gavreliuc, Alin; Baguma, Peter; Bond, Michael Harris; Martin, Mariana; Gausel, Nicolay; Schwartz, Seth J; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Tatarko, Alexander; González, Roberto; Didier, Nicolas; Carrasco, Diego; Lay, Siugmin; Nizharadze, George; Torres, Ana; Camino, Leoncio; Abuhamdeh, Sami; Macapagal, Ma Elizabeth J; Koller, Silvia H; Herman, Ginette; Courtois, Marie; Fritsche, Immo; Espinosa, Agustín; Villamar, Juan A; Regalia, Camillo; Manzi, Claudia; Brambilla, Maria; Zinkeng, Martina; Jalal, Baland; Kusdil, Ersin; Amponsah, Benjamin; Çağlar, Selinay; Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu; Möller, Bettina; Zhang, Xiao; Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Prieto Gil, Paula; Lorente Clemares, Raquel; Campara, Gabriella; Aldhafri, Said; Fülöp, Márta; Pyszczynski, Tom; Kesebir, Pelin; Harb, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Variations in acquiescence and extremity pose substantial threats to the validity of cross-cultural research that relies on survey methods. Individual and cultural correlates of response styles when using 2 contrasting types of response mode were investigated, drawing on data from 55 cultural groups across 33 nations. Using 7 dimensions of self-other relatedness that have often been confounded within the broader distinction between independence and interdependence, our analysis yields more specific understandings of both individual- and culture-level variations in response style. When using a Likert-scale response format, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as similar to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour harmony, similarity with others and receptiveness to influence. However, when using Schwartz's (2007) portrait-comparison response procedure, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant but also connected to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour self-reliance and self-consistency. Extreme responding varies less between the two types of response modes, and is most prevalent among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant, and in cultures favouring self-reliance. As both types of response mode elicit distinctive styles of response, it remains important to estimate and control for style effects to ensure valid comparisons. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  16. ACTUALIZATION OF THE PERSON OF STUDENTS AS BEARERS OF INNOVATION CULTURE IN HIGHER EDUCATION: EMPIRICAL STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana B. Zagorulya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to consider the problem of empirical research aimed at identifying the personality traits of students as bearers of innovation culture: innovative susceptibility, assertiveness, autonomy in decision-making, initiative and responsibility.Methods. In accordance with the object and purpose of the empirical research, empirical methods are used: instructional design model, observation, notes and forming experiments, testing, questionnaire, interview, qualitative analysis of empirical data; block of complementary techniques: «Research of features of response to conflict» (by K. Thomas, «Assertiveness», «Leader. Qualities of a Leader», «Leading representative system».Scientific novelty and results. Scientific novelty consists in the justification of psycho-pedagogical tools for diagnosing the level of development of the innovation culture of students of high school. It is found that students who successfully realizing the potential strength and ability to organize their own life, educational activities and communication on the basis of aggregate conscious goals, values in assertiveness, are outer-directed to innovation taking place in society and in the world. The use of innovative technologies in the educational process, especially creative projects, the decision of cases, holding debates, simulations and role-playing games creates conditions for the development of assertive behavior required in the process of successful adaptation and integration of students in the educational environment of the university, the acquisition of competitiveness in the society. It is concluded that the presence of the students’ considerable potential for the development of an innovation culture, in particular the leading representative of different systems, allowing to develop communication skills and engage in constructive dialogue.Practical significance. Appropriate methods and appropriate tools for diagnosing the level

  17. Cultural Implication of Citizen Education%公民教育的文化意蕴

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙峰

    2015-01-01

    公民社会就是“公民”作为社会主体的社会,公民社会在成长和发展中应具有相应的价值观念和精神文化体系。公民社会与公民文化是融为一体的。公民社会的本质不仅可以从制度层面体现出来,而且有着深刻的文化价值蕴涵。公民社会的文化价值状态反映着公民文化的内涵。公民文化是社会民主制度建构的基础。公民文化的培育既是公民个体的自觉实践,也是一项根本的社会使命。公民文化的培育能够促进公民社会的发育和完善。公民社会与公民文化是公民教育产生和发展的基础。公民文化与公民教育是相互促进、共同发展的。公民教育主要包括公民意识教育、公民伦理教育和公民责权教育。公民教育作为一种文化现象,是文化传统的反映和文化合理性的表达。理性精神、伦理精神和公共精神是公民教育的文化诉求。%Civic society is a one that regards the citizen as its subject .As a new social state ,it can’t go without relevant value view and spiritual culture system .Civic society is integrated with citizen culture . The essence of civic society isn’t only embodied by institutional level ,but also possesses profound cultural implication .T he cultural value condition of civic society reflects citizen culture’s meaning .Citizen culture is the basis of democratic society and democratic construction .The fostering of citizen culture is both indi‐vidual citizen’s conscious practice and a fundamental social mission .Citizen culture and citizen education goes hand in hand .The base of citizen education’s birth and development is civic society and citizen cul‐ture .T he w hole citizen education includes citizen idea education ,citizen ethic education and citizen’s right and responsibility education .As a cultural phenomenon ,citizen education is an expression of cultural tra‐dition and cultural rationality .T he sprit

  18. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  19. Confucian Thought Affecting Leadership and Organizational Culture of Korean Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Kyu

    2001-01-01

    This article examines Confucian thought affecting leadership and organizational culture of Korean higher education in order to understand leadership behavior and ethical values in Korean higher education from a viewpoint of educational administration. The writer evaluates that most of educational administrators in Korean higher education prefer…

  20. Quiet or Questioning? Students' Discussion Behaviors in Student-Centered Education across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M.; Driessen, Erik W.; Beh, Philip; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2014-01-01

    A tool used in student-centered education is discussion among students in small learning groups. The Western origin of student-centered education, coupled with cross-cultural differences in communication styles, may detract from its cross-cultural applicability. This study investigates how in student-centered education, students' cultural…